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Sample records for arthroplasty replacement finger

  1. Failures of the RM finger prosthesis joint replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A; Lakshmipathy, R; Irwin, L R

    2011-09-01

    In our unit a high failure rate of the RM finger prosthesis joint replacement system was noted, prompting a review of cases. A series of patients underwent implantation under the care of one surgeon and the results were monitored. Twenty-one devices were implanted of which 16 were inserted for rheumatoid disease. Patients were reviewed regularly and the implant performance was assessed critically along with survival of the implant to revision, infection or death of the patient. The mean follow-up was 32 months. Unacceptable failure rates at early and medium term stages were identified, with 15 of the implants revised by 2 years. Loosening was the commonest mode of failure. The authors do not recommend the use of this implant, especially in cases of rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints.

  3. femoral neck fracture during physical therapy following surface replacement arthroplasty: a preventable complication? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayton Michael R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This case report describes two cases of peri-prosthetic fracture during physical therapy in patients who underwent a hip resurfacing, or surface replacement arthroplasty. The fractures occurred with forceful passive combined flexion and external rotation. Functional results were ultimately obtained in both cases, requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Recognizing patient risk factors and cautioning therapists about the possibility of fracture may have prevented these complications.

  4. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    Prefontaine Paul; Ganley Kathleen J; Warren Meghan; Cook Jon R; Wylie Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP) – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered...

  5. Patient-reported outcome of hip resurfacing arthroplasty and standard total hip replacement after short-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Tina Koerner; Douw, Karla; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate patientreported outcome in terms of satisfaction in two study groups that had undergone hip resurfacing arthro-plasty (HRA) or total hip replacement (THR). The procedure consists of placing a hollow, mushroom-shaped metal cap over the femoral head while...

  6. Total ankle replacement: a population-based study of 515 cases from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivu, Helka; Eskelinen, Antti; Ikävalko, Mikko; Paavolainen, Pekka; Remes, Ville

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Although total ankle replacement (TAR) is a recognized procedure for treatment of the painful arthritic ankle, the best choice of implant and the long-term results are still unknown. We evaluated the survival of two TAR designs and factors associated with survival using data from the nationwide arthroplasty registry in Finland. Methods 573 primary TARs were performed during the period 1982–2006 because of rheumatic, arthritic, or posttraumatic ankle degeneration. We selected contemporary TAR designs that were each used in more than 40 operations, including the S.T.A.R. (n = 217) and AES (n = 298), to assess their respective survival rates. The mean age of the patients was 55 (17–86) years and 63% of operations were performed in women. Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Cox regression model were used for survival analysis. The effects of age, sex, diagnosis, and hospital volume were also studied. Results The annual incidence of TAR was 1.5 per 105 inhabitants. The 5-year overall survivorship for the whole TAR cohort was 83% (95% CI: 81–86), which agrees with earlier reports. The most frequent reasons for revision were aseptic loosening of one or both of the prosthesis components (39%) and instability (39%). We found no difference in survival rate between the S.T.A.R. and AES designs. Furthermore, age, sex, diagnosis, and hospital volume ( 100 replacements in each of 17 hospitals) did not affect the TAR survival. Interpretation Based on our findings, we cannot conclude that any prosthesis was superior to any other. A high number of technical errors in primary TARs suggests that this low-volume field of implant arthroplasty should be centralized to fewer units. PMID:20180720

  7. Anatomic Total Talar Prosthesis Replacement Surgery and Ankle Arthroplasty: An Early Case Series in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about specific outcomes and early experiences of total talar prosthesis replacement surgery in the current literature, and ankle arthroplasty in Southeast Asia. This study reported on four patients with talar loss or ankle arthritis. Patients were treated with a custom total talar prosthesis (anatomic-metallic version) replacement (TPR, n=1) or with total ankle replacement (TAR, n=3). Baseline data, including Visual-Analog-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA) and Quality of Life scores via Short-Form-36 (SF-36), were collected for all patients. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 months. From preoperative to postoperative, VAS-FA score increased from 6.0 to 57.5, and SF-36 score increased from 19.3 to 73.7 in a patient with TPR. Mean VAS-FA scores increased from 51.5±15.6 to 85.7±4.7 (P=0.032), and mean SF-36 scores tended to increase from 65.2±13.3 to 99.3±1.2 (P=0.055) in TAR group. This study is the first report of anatomic-metallic TPR which appears to provide satisfactory outcomes for treatment of talar loss at a short-term follow-up. TAR also provides acceptable results for treatment of ankle arthritis at this point. PMID:25317313

  8. Anatomic total talar prosthesis replacement surgery and ankle arthroplasty: an early case series in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayanin Angthong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about specific outcomes and early experiences of total talar prosthesis replacement surgery in the current literature, and ankle arthroplasty in Southeast Asia. This study reported on four patients with talar loss or ankle arthritis. Patients were treated with a custom total talar prosthesis (anatomic-metallic version replacement (TPR, n=1 or with total ankle replacement (TAR, n=3. Baseline data, including Visual-Analog-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA and Quality of Life scores via Short-Form-36 (SF-36, were collected for all patients. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 months. From preoperative to postoperative, VAS-FA score increased from 6.0 to 57.5, and SF-36 score increased from 19.3 to 73.7 in a patient with TPR. Mean VAS-FA scores increased from 51.5±15.6 to 85.7±4.7 (P=0.032, and mean SF-36 scores tended to increase from 65.2±13.3 to 99.3±1.2 (P=0.055 in TAR group. This study is the first report of anatomic-metallic TPR which appears to provide satisfactory outcomes for treatment of talar loss at a short-term follow-up. TAR also provides acceptable results for treatment of ankle arthritis at this point.

  9. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

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    Tatiana Flisikowska

    Full Text Available Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+ and IgG(+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  10. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  11. Oxford Partial Knee Replacement as a Gateway to Outpatient Arthroplasty “Lessons Learned along the Journey”

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    Michael E Berend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Partial Knee Replacement was approved for implantation in the US in 2004 after the surgeon completed an educational training requirement.  Since then my knee practiced has expanded to over 50% partial knee.  This experience coupled with refinement of surgical techniques, anesthesia protocols, and patient selection has facilitated the transformation to same day discharge for partial knee cases and has quickly transitioned to total hip, total knee, and selected revision surgeries.  Patient selection has also expanded for outpatient joints and is now based on medical screening criteria and insurance access.  Over a two-year period we have performed over 1,000 outpatient arthroplasty procedures with no readmissions for pain control.   Overall readmission rate for all reasons was 2%.  Patient satisfaction scores were 98% Great-Good for 2014-15.  The combination of a partial knee replacement practice and an outpatient joint program brings the best VALUE to the patients, surgeons, and the arthroplasty system and represents the future of arthroplasty care.

  12. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

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    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  13. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

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    Prefontaine Paul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT, and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM, and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°, but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°. The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients ( Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe protocol for providing care after a TKA.

  14. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in the diagnosis of infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty

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    Park, Dong Rib [College of Medicine, Kunkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Bin, Seong Il; Cho, Woo Shin; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy for diagnosing prosthetic infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty without the aid of following bone marrow scintigraphy. The study subjects were 25 prostheses of 17 patients (one man and 16 women, mean age: 65 years) who had total knee replacement arthroplasty. After injection of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte, the whole body planar and knee SPECT images were obtained in all patients. The subjects were classified into three groups according to clinical suspicion of prosthetic infection: Group A (n=11) with high suspicion of infection; Group B (n=6) with equivocal suspicion of infection, and Group C (n=8) with asymptomatic contralateral prostheses. Final diagnosis of infection was based on surgical, histological and bacteriological data and clinical follow-up. Infection was confirmed in 13 prostheses (11 in Group A and 2 in Group B). All prostheses in Group A were true positive. There were two true positive, one false positive and three true negative in Group B, and six true negatives and two false positive in Group C. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of the infected knee prosthesis were 100%, 75% and 88%, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy is a sensitive method for the diagnosis of infected knee prosthesis. However, false positive uptakes even in asymptomatic prosthesis suggest that bone marrow scintigraphy may be needed to achieve improved specificity.

  15. Medium-term evaluation of total knee arthroplasty without patellar replacement

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    José Wanderley Vasconcelos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mid-term evaluate patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. METHODS: It was realized a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. In all patients clinical examination was done based on the protocol of the Knee Society Scoring System, which assessed pain, range of motion, stability, contraction, knee alignment and function, and radiological evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients were evaluated. Of these, 07 were operated only on left knee, 12 only on right knee and 17 were operated bilaterally, totaling 53 knees. Ages ranged from 26 to 84 years. Of the 53 knees evaluated, 33 (62.26% had no pain. The maximum flexion range of motion averaged 104.7°. No knee had difficulty in active extension. As to the alignment for anatomical axis twelve knees (22.64% showed deviation between 0° and 4° varus. Thirty-nine (75.49% knees showed pace without restriction and the femorotibial angle ranged between 3° varus and 13° valgus with an average of 5° valgus. The patellar index ranged from 0.2 to 1.1. CONCLUSION: Total knee arthroplasty whitout patellar resurfacing provides good results in mid-term evaluation.

  16. Countrywise results of total hip replacement. An analysis of 438,733 hips based on the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Keijo T; Matilainen, Markus; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose An earlier Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) report on 280,201 total hip replacements (THRs) based on data from 1995-2006, from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, was published in 2009. The present study assessed THR survival according to country, based on the NARA .......36-0.98) year of follow-up. Interpretation The differences in THR survival rates were considerable, with inferior results in Finland. Brand-level comparison of THRs in Nordic countries will be required....

  17. The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry: clinical outcome and short-term survival of 2,137 primary shoulder replacements

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppe V Rasmussen; Jakobsen,John; Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo S

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) was established in 2004. Data are reported electronically by the surgeons. Patient-reported outcome is collected 10–14 months postoperatively using the Western Ontario osteoarthritis of the shoulder index (WOOS). 2,137 primary shoulder arthroplasties (70% women) were reported to the registry between January 2006 and December 2008. Mean age at surgery was 69 years (SD 12). The most common indications were a displaced proximal humeral fracture (54...

  18. Wear of cross-linked polyethylene against itself: a material suitable for surface replacement of the finger joint.

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    Sibly, T F; Unsworth, A

    1991-05-01

    Cross-linking of polyethylene (XLPE) has dramatically improved its properties in industrial applications, and it may also have some application in the field of human joint replacement. Additionally it has the advantage of permitting a lower molecular weight base material to be used, so that components may be injection moulded rather than machined. This study therefore investigates the wear resistance of medical grade cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), cross-linked by a silane-grafting process, with a molecular weight between cross links of 5430 g mol(-1). This first report investigates the wear resistance of XLPE against itself, because for certain joints, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, the material may have a high enough wear resistance to allow both bearing surfaces to be made from it. Tests were carried out both on a reciprocating pin and plate machine with pins loaded at 10 and 40 N and also on a new finger joint simulator, which simulates the loads applied to and the movements of, the metacarpo-phalangeal joint. An average wear rate of 1.8 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1 was found (range 0.9-2.75 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1). This is about six times greater than the wear rate of non-cross-linked ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against stainless steel, but for applications with low loading, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, this material is shown to have adequate wear resistance. The coefficient of friction was 0.1, which is similar to that of UHMWPE on stainless steel.

  19. Limb salvage after infected knee arthroplasty with bone loss and extensor mechanism deficiency using a modular segmental replacement system.

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    Namdari, Surena; Milby, Andrew H; Garino, Jonathan P

    2011-09-01

    Multiple total knee arthroplasty revisions pose significant surgical challenges, such as bone loss and soft tissue compromise. For patients with bone loss and extensor mechanism insufficiency after total knee arthroplasty, arthrodesis is a treatment option for the avoidance of amputation. However, arthrodesis is both difficult to achieve in situations with massive bone loss and potentially undesirable due to the dramatic shortening that follows. Although intramedullary nailing for knee arthrodesis has been widely reported, this technique has traditionally relied on the achievement of bony union. We report a case of a patient with massive segmental bone loss in which a modular intercalary prosthesis was used for arthrodesis to preserve limb length without bony union.

  20. Zinc to cadmium replacement in the A. thaliana SUPERMAN Cys₂ His₂ zinc finger induces structural rearrangements of typical DNA base determinant positions.

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    Malgieri, Gaetano; Zaccaro, Laura; Leone, Marilisa; Bucci, Enrico; Esposito, Sabrina; Baglivo, Ilaria; Del Gatto, Annarita; Russo, Luigi; Scandurra, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla

    2011-11-01

    Among heavy metals, whose toxicity cause a steadily increasing of environmental pollution, cadmium is of special concern due to its relatively high mobility in soils and potential toxicity at low concentrations. Given their ubiquitous role, zinc fingers domains have been proposed as mediators for the toxic and carcinogenic effects exerted by xenobiotic metals. To verify the structural effects of zinc replacement by cadmium in zinc fingers, we have determined the high resolution structure of the single Cys₂ His₂ zinc finger of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein (SUP37) complexed to the cadmium ion by means of UV-vis and NMR techniques. SUP37 is able to bind Cd(II), though with a dissociation constant higher than that measured for Zn(II). Cd-SUP37 retains the ββα fold but experiences a global structural rearrangement affecting both the relative orientation of the secondary structure elements and the position of side chains involved in DNA recognition: among them Ser17 side chain, which we show to be essential for DNA binding, experiences the largest displacement.

  1. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

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    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  2. Reliability of patient-reported functional outcome in a joint replacement registry. A comparison of primary responders and non-responders in the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Brorson, Stig;

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used by some arthroplasty registries to evaluate results after surgery, but non-response may bias the results. The aim was to identify a potential bias in the outcome scores of subgroups in a cohort of patients from the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty...... Registry (DSR) and to characterize non-responders....

  3. The efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) imaging in suspected prosthetic infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (pilot study)

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    Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Nam Bum [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to increase the labelling efficiency of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) and 2) to determine the value of infecton imaging in demonstrating infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA). Five patients (4 female, 1 male: mean age 52.8{+-}13.5 years, both TKRA in 3 pt) with suspected prosthetic infective conditions were included. In order to increase labelling efficiency, infection was labelled with stannous tartrate instead of previousely used formamidine sulfinic acid (FSA). Immediate perfusion, 5min blood pool, 1hr, 4hr and 24hr delayed images were perfomed. All images were blindly interpreted by two independent observers with visual findings being classified according to a four-grade scale(0.1.2.3). Images graded 0 and 1, and also those regions which showed faintly increase or unchanged uptake grade on late images as compared with early images, were classified as negative; grades 2 and 3 were classified as positive. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative microbiological / histological findings or by the presence of gross purulence. Labelling efficiency increased up to over 98% with formation of radiocolloid less than 1%. All of four pt with prosthetic infection showed positive infecton images but one pt with sterile loosening of prosthesis showed negative infection images. The easy availability as well as new labelling technique make infecton imaging the better option for the detection of prosthetic orthopedic infection.

  4. Replacement

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    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  5. Experimental and failure analysis of the prosthetic finger joint implants

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    Naidu, Sanjiv H.

    Small joint replacement arthroplasty of the hand is a well accepted surgical procedure to restore function and cosmesis in an individual with a crippled hand. Silicone elastomers have been used as prosthetic material in various small hand joints for well over three decades. Although the clinical science aspects of silicone elastomer failure are well known, the physical science aspects of prosthetic failure are scant and vague. In the following thesis, using both an animal model, and actual retrieved specimens which have failed in human service, experimental and failure analysis of silicone finger joints are presented. Fractured surfaces of retrieved silicone trapezial implants, and silicone finger joint implants were studied with both FESEM and SEM; the mode of failure for silicone trapezium is by wear polishing, whereas the finger joint implants failed either by fatigue fracture or tearing of the elastomer, or a combination of both. Thermal analysis revealed that the retrieved elastomer implants maintained its viscoelastic properties throughout the service period. In order to provide for a more functional and physiologic arthroplasty a novel finger joint (Rolamite prosthesis) is proposed using more recently developed thermoplastic polymers. The following thesis also addresses the outcome of the experimental studies of the Rolamite prosthesis in a rabbit animal model, in addition to the failure analysis of the thermoplastic polymers while in service in an in vivo synovial environment. Results of retrieved Rolamite specimens suggest that the use for thermoplastic elastomers such as block copolymer based elastomers in a synovial environment such as a mammalian joint may very well be limited.

  6. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

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    Nikolai M Kliushin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection.

  7. Survival rates and causes of revision in cemented primary total knee replacement: a report from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register 1994-2009.

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    Gøthesen, O; Espehaug, B; Havelin, L; Petursson, G; Lygre, S; Ellison, P; Hallan, G; Furnes, O

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated the rates of survival and cause of revision of seven different brands of cemented primary total knee replacement (TKR) in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the years 1994 to 2009. Revision for any cause, including resurfacing of the patella, was the primary endpoint. Specific causes of revision were secondary outcomes. Three posterior cruciate-retaining (PCR) fixed modular-bearing TKRs, two fixed non-modular bearing PCR TKRs and two mobile-bearing posterior cruciate-sacrificing TKRs were investigated in a total of 17 782 primary TKRs. The median follow-up for the implants ranged from 1.8 to 6.9 years. Kaplan-Meier 10-year survival ranged from 89.5% to 95.3%. Cox's relative risk (RR) was calculated relative to the fixed modular-bearing Profix knee (the most frequently used TKR in Norway), and ranged from 1.1 to 2.6. The risk of revision for aseptic tibial loosening was higher in the mobile-bearing LCS Classic (RR 6.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8 to 12.1)), the LCS Complete (RR 7.7 (95% CI 4.1 to 14.4)), the fixed modular-bearing Duracon (RR 4.5 (95% CI 1.8 to 11.1)) and the fixed non-modular bearing AGC Universal TKR (RR 2.5 (95% CI 1.3 to 5.1)), compared with the Profix. These implants (except AGC Universal) also had an increased risk of revision for femoral loosening (RR 2.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.8), RR 3.7 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.9), and RR 3.4 (95% CI 1.1 to 11.0), respectively). These results suggest that aseptic loosening is related to design in TKR.

  8. Arthroplasty register for Germany

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    Hagen, Anja

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: The annual number of joint replacement operations in Germany is high. The introduction of an arthroplasty register promises an important contribution to the improvement of the quality of patient’s care. Research questions: The presented report addresses the questions on organization and functioning, benefits and cost-benefits as well as on legal, ethical and social aspects of the arthroplasty registers. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in September 2008 in the medical databases MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. and was complemented with a hand search. Documents describing arthroplasty registers and/or their relevance as well as papers on legal, ethical and social aspects of such registers were included in the evaluation. The most important information was extracted and analysed. Results: Data concerning 30 arthroplasty registers in 19 countries as well as one international arthroplasty register were identified. Most of the arthroplasty registers are maintained by national orthopedic societies, others by health authorities or by their cooperation. Mostly, registries are financially supported by governments and rarely by other sources.The participation of the orthopedists in the data collection process of the arthroplasty registry is voluntary in most countries. The consent of the patients is usually required. The unique patient identification is ensured in nearly all registers.Each data set consists of patient and clinic identification numbers, data on diagnosis, the performed intervention, the operation date and implanted prostheses. The use of clinical scores, patient-reported questionnaires and radiological documentation is rare. Methods for data documentation and transfer are paper form, electronic entry as well as scanning of the data using bar codes. The data are mostly being checked for their completeness and validity. Most registers offer results of the data evaluation to the treating orthopedists and

  9. Early failures among 7,174 primary total knee replacements: a follow-up study from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register 1994-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Ove; Espehaug, Birgitte; Lie, Stein Atle; Vollset, Stein Emil; Engesaeter, Lars Birger; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2002-04-01

    We studied primary total knee replacements (TKRs), reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, operated on between 1994 and 2000. A Cox multiple regression model was used to evaluate differences in survival among the prosthesis brands, their types of fixation, and whether or not the patella was resurfaced. In Norway in 1999, the incidence of knee prosthesis operations was 35 per 100,000 inhabitants. Cement was used as fixation in 87% of the knees, 10% were hybrid and 2% uncemented implants. Bicompartmental (not resurfaced patella) prostheses were used in 65% of the knees. With all revisions as endpoint, no statistically significant differences in the 5-year survival were found among the cemented tricompartmental prostheses brands: AGC 97% (n 279), Duracon 99% (n 101), Genesis I 95% (n 654), Kinemax 98% (n 213) and Tricon 96% (n 454). The bicompartmental LCS prostheses had a 5-year survival of 97% (n 476). The type of meniscal bearing in LCS knees had no effect on survival. Survival with revision for all causes as endpoint showed no differences among types of fixation, or bi- or tricompartmental prostheses. Pain alone was the commonest reason for revision of cemented bicompartmental prostheses. The risk of revision because of pain was 5.7 times higher (p < 0.001) in cemented bicompartmental prostheses than cemented tricompartmental ones, but the revisions mainly involved insertion of a patellar component. In tricompartmental prostheses the risk of revision because of infection was 2.5 times higher than in bicompartmental ones (p = 0.03). Young age (< 60) and the sequelae after a fracture increased the risk of revision. The 5-year survival of the 6 most used cemented tricompartmental knee prostheses brands varied between 95% and 99%, but the differences were not statistically significant. There were more revisions because of pain in bicompartmental than in tricompartmental knees. In tricompartmental knees, however, there were more revisions because of an

  10. Total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavković Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total hip arthroplasty is most common reconstructive hip procedure in adults. In this surgery we replace some parts of the upper femur and acetabulum with biocompatible materials. The main goal of this surgery is to eliminate pain and regain full extent of joint motion, maintaining hip stability. Surgical technique, biomaterials, design of the prosthesis and fixation techniques have evolved with time adjusting to each other. After total hip arthroplasty patients’ quality of life should be improved. There are many various postoperative complications. Some of them are fatal, and some are minor, which may become manifested years after surgery. Each next surgical procedure following previous hip surgery is associated with considerably lower chances to be successful. Therefore, in primary total hip arthroplasty, preoperative evaluation and preparation of patients are essential. Every orthopaedic surgeon needs to improve already adopted surgical skills applying them with precision and without compromise, with the main goal to achieve long-term durability of the selected implant. The number of total hip arthroplasties will also increase in future, and newer and higher quality materials will be used.

  11. Distraction Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthroplasty? The major goal of this treatment is healing of damaged tissue that occurs from arthritis. Unloading the ankle, along with the use of range of motion activity, is believed to help restore some of the ...

  12. Primary total elbow arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    were replaced. Conclusion: Elbow arthroplasty remains a valuable option for deformed and ankylosed elbows especially in the demanding patients with crippling deformity of the elbow.

  13. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  14. Finger pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hands from the cold. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: Your finger pain is caused by injury ... to Expect at Your Office Visit The health ... will be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms. You may have an x- ...

  15. [Uncemented arthroplasty of the hip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schulze Pellengahr, C; Fottner, A; Utzschneider, S; Schmitt-Sody, M; Teske, W; Lichtinger, T; Esenwein, S A

    2009-05-01

    Prognosis of cemented total hip replacement seems to be excellent for elderly patients. In younger age the outcome is less favourable and early revision is more common. Thus, different concepts with better prognosis and preservation of bone stock for possible revisions were needed. After more than 30 years of application with excellent short-term and long-term results, uncemented total hip arthroplasty is nowadays generally regarded as the standard procedure for younger patients. New bone-preserving implants, such as surface replacement or short-stemmed femoral shaft prostheses, have been introduced especially for younger patients. Some of these new procedures are still under development, and the long-term results of new implant concepts have to be evaluated over the next decades. Regarding recently published scientific studies an overview about non-cemented total hip arthroplasty is given and current concepts and developments are presented.

  16. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  17. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  18. Factors influencing health-related quality of life after total hip replacement - a comparison of data from the Swedish and Danish hip arthroplasty registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Max; Paulsen, Aksel; Overgaard, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as part of routine medical practice, particularly in fields such as joint replacement surgery where pain relief and improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are primary outcomes. Between-country comparisons...... health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year after total hip replacement (THR) surgery in Sweden and in Denmark....... of PROs may present difficulties due to cultural differences and differences in the provision of health care. However, in order to understand how these differences affect PROs, common predictors for poor and good outcomes need to be investigated. This cross-sectional study investigates factors influencing...

  19. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Sporer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Scott M. Sporer, MD. and the contributors have aimed providing the reader practical and clinically relevant information, evidence-based advices, their preferences and opinions containing current concepts for difficult and controversial clinical situations in total hip replacement surgery which are often not addressed clearly in traditional references. FEATURES The book is composed of 9 sections and 49 articles each written by a different expert designed in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected. Second section is about preoperative acetabulum questions. Third section is about preoperative femur questions. Fourth section is about intraoperative questions. Intraoperative acetabulum question is subjected in the fifth section and the intraoperative femur questions in the sixth section. The seventh section is about postoperative questions. Eighth and ninth sections are about general questions about failure and failure of acetabulum in turn. AUDIENCE Mainly practicing orthopedic surgeons, fellows and residents who are interested in hip arthroplasty have been targeted but several carefully designed scenarios of controversial and difficult situations surrounding total hip replacement surgery and the current information will also be welcomed by experienced clinicians practicing in hip arthroplasty. ASSESSMENT Scott M. Sporer

  20. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Mann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and experience are necessary to achieve a successful result. We have been treating ankle arthritis with the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR ankle replacement prosthesis for over ten years. We believe that arthroplasty will surpass arthrodesis as the standard of care for severe ankle arthritis.

  1. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  2. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique

    OpenAIRE

    MEROLLA, GIOVANNI; Nastrucci, Guglielmo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid compon...

  3. SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY RECORDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. Methodology: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. Results: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. Conclusion: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation. PMID:26998463

  4. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  5. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is claimed to allow higher activity levels and to give better quality of life than total hip arthroplasty. In this literature review, we assessed the therapeutic value of hip resurfacing arthroplasty as measured by functional outcome. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Results 9 patient series, 1 case-control study, and 1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) were included. Clin...

  6. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns technical aspects of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in unicompartmental arthroplasty, particularly with the introduction of the minimally invasive technique. In the light of the excellent long-term results of the total kn

  7. Aesthetic Finger Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fab...

  8. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

  9. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorde, Pia C Ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision......, and we compare outcome after resurfacing hemi-arthroplasty (RHA) and stemmed hemi-arthroplasty (SHA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from the national Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and included patients with RA who underwent shoulder arthroplasty in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. Patient......-reported outcome was obtained 1-year postoperatively using the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS), and rates of revision were calculated by checking revisions reported until December 2011. The patient-reported outcome of RHA was compared to that of SHA using regression analysis...

  10. Physical rehabilitation after total joint arthroplasty in companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Doyle, Nancy D; Pyke, Joanna Freeman

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have total joint arthroplasty have varying needs related to rehabilitation. In the short term, rehabilitation should be used in all dogs to identify high-risk patients and to minimize the likelihood of postoperative complications. Many patients undergoing total hip replacement recover uneventfully without needing long-term physiotherapy. All patients undergoing total knee replacement and total elbow replacement need rehabilitation to restore limb use and maximize their functional recovery. This article presents rehabilitation considerations for companion animals undergoing total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and total elbow replacement; postoperative complications and how to mitigate risks; and anticipated patient outcomes.

  11. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K.; Higuera, Carlos A.; Barsoum, Wael K.; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing li...

  12. Aesthetic finger prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, N; Maheswari, M Uma; Anandkumar, V; Padmanabhan, T V; Swarup, Shailee; Jibran, Ahmed Hasan

    2011-12-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fabricate silicone rubber prosthesis for a patient who has a partial finger loss caused due to trauma.

  13. Estetske proteze po delni amputaciji prstov: Aesthetic prostheses after partial finger amputation: Aesthetic prostheses after partial finger amputation:

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Partial finger amputation affects patients from the functional as well as from the aesthetic point of view. In accordance with the number of amputated fingers, abilities and capabilities of the hand are reduced and the patient's self-image is altered. The amputated part of the finger can be replaced by an aesthetic silicone prosthesis, which is individually coloured and fitted. In anaplastology, as the field of aesthetic prosthetics is nowadays called, several different approaches to prosthes...

  14. Aesthetic finger prosthesis with silicone biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, K M; Gururaju, C R; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of finger prosthesis is as much an art as it is science. The ideally constructed prosthesis must duplicate the missing structures so precisely that patients can appear in public without fear of attracting unwanted attraction. A 65-years-old patient reported with loss of his right index finger up to the second phalanx and wanted to get it replaced. An impression of the amputated finger and donor were made. A wax pattern of the prosthesis was fabricated using the donor impression; a trial was performed and flasked. Medical grade silicone was intrinsically stained to match the skin tone, following which it was packed, processed and finished. This clinical report describes a method of attaining retention by selective scoring of the master cast of partially amputated finger to enhance the vacuum effect at par with the proportional distribution of the positive forces on the tissues exerted by the prosthesis. PMID:23975917

  15. Proximal humeral fractures treated with arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Qi-rong; WU Hai-shan; ZHOU Wei-jiang; LI Xiao-hua; WU Yu-li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore arthroplasty in treating 3- and 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus.Methods: A total of 132 patients with proximal humeral fractures were treated in our hospital from July 1997 to February 2003. According to Neer's classification, the fractures of 45 patients (14 males and 31 females, aged 31-78 years, 56.1 years±7.8 years on an average) belonged to 3- or 4-part fractures (10 patients with 4-part fracture and 35 with 3-part comminuted fracture) and they were treated with shoulder joint arthroplasty. Unipolar prosthesis replacement of the head of humerus was made in 28 cases, while bipolar prosthesis replacement in 2 cases and total shoulder joint replacement in 15 cases. Results: During the follow-up period (range: 12-72 months, mean: 37.3 months±4.1 months), among the 45 patients who suffered from fractures of the proximal humerus and underwent arthroplasty surgery, 44 patients (97.8%) had no postoperative pain and were satisfied with the active range of motion and with the whole treatment results. And radiography showed that the prostheses were at their good position. One patient had postoperative pain because he had so narrow medullary cavity that the humeral prosthesis could not be put deeply enough and the prosthesis head was a little higher over the anatomic level. He did not have good postoperative active range of motion, either. Then he received a review surgery and got satisfied results. Temporary shoulder stiffness was observed in one patient. Manual release of these adhesions improved the shoulder function. No evidence of nonunion of the fracture segments around the humeral prosthesis stem was found. Conclusions: Shoulder arthroplasty is a dependable method to restore the comfort and function of the should joints of the patients with 3- or 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus.

  16. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  17. Imaging of hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T., E-mail: millertt@hss.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E. 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The imaging evaluation of the prosthetic hip begins with radiography, but arthrography, aspiration, scintigraphy, sonography, CT and MR imaging all have roles in the evaluation of the painful prosthesis. This article will review the appearance of normal hip arthroplasty including hemiarthroplasty, total arthroplasty, and hip resurfacing, as well as the appearances of potential complications such as aseptic loosening and osteolysis, dislocation, infection, periprosthetic fracture, hardware failure, and soft tissue abnormalities.

  18. ARTHROFIBROSIS FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi B. Solanki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty is an uncommon complication defined as less than 80 degrees of knee flexion 6-8 weeks post operatively. It is characterized by abnormal scarring of the joint in which the formation of dense fibrous tissue and tissue metaplasia prevent normal range of motion. Clinical features include limited knee Range of motion with extension deficit, pain with activities of daily living and unusual amount of pain and swelling post operatively in the absence of infection, bleeding or mechanical complications. We present case of 55 years old female who undergone for total knee replacement before 3 months and presented to our department with complain of knee pain and swelling with activities of daily living. She was diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination. Her detailed evaluation was carried out and Physiotherapy treatment was started.

  19. The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe; Jakobsen, John; Brorson, Stig

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) was established in 2004. Data are reported electronically by the surgeons. Patient-reported outcome is collected 10-14 months postoperatively using the Western Ontario osteoarthritis of the shoulder index (WOOS). 2,137 primary shoulder arthroplasties......% reverse shoulder arthroplasties, and 3% total arthroplasties. Median WOOS was 59% (IQR: 37-82). 5% had been revised by the end of June 2010. The most frequent indications for revision were dislocation or glenoid attrition....

  20. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  1. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); A. Furlan (Alessandro); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee art

  2. Difference in clinical outcome between total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty used in hemiarthroplasty revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, B.P.; Alta, T.D.; Sewnath, M.E.; Willems, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The increase of shoulder replacements will lead to a higher revision rate of shoulder arthroplasties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of revision surgery performed in our hospital, distinguish the differences in clinical outcome according to revision indicatio

  3. 人工全髋关节置换术及全膝关节置换术术后隐性失血的临床比较%Clinical comparison of postoperative hidden blood loss by artificial hip replacement and total knee arthro-plasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆雷锋

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the postoperative hidden blood loss by artificial total hip replacement and to -tal knee arthroplasty .Methods Sixty patients accepted total hip arthroplasty from June 2012 to September 2014 were se-lected as the experiment group , the other 72 patients accepted total knee arthroplasty were selected as the control group , ac-cording to Gmss equation , calculated hidden blood loss combination of the patients weight , height, the red blood cell pres-sure before and after operation.Results In experiment group, the hidden blood loss[(482.1 ±42.7)ml] was significant-ly lower than in that incontrol group [(776.1 ±84.8)ml](P0.05).The hidden blood loss of obese and non obese in the group had no significant difference (P>0.05).Conclusions The hidden blood loss after total knee arthroplasty was significantly higher than that after artificial hip replacement , the application of drainage blood transfu-sion cannot meet the body circulation recovery needs , should be timely supplement blood capacity .%目的:探究人工全髋关节置换术及全膝关节置换术术后隐形失血的情况。方法选取周口市中心医院2012年6月至2014年9月收治的60例接受人工全髋关节置换术治疗的患者为实验组,另选择同期来院行人工全膝关节置换术的72例患者为对照组,依据Gmss方程,并结合患者体质量、身高、手术前后红细胞压积,行隐性失血计算。结果实验组隐性失血量为(482.1±42.7)ml,明显低于对照组的(776.1±84.8)ml(P<0.05);而未应用引流血回输者与应用引流血回输者隐性失血比较差异未见统计学意义(P>0.05),组内肥胖者与非肥胖者隐性失血量比较差异未见统计学意义( P>0.05)。结论人工全膝关节置换术后隐性失血量明显高于人工全髋关节置换术,应用引流血回输无法满足机体体循环恢复需要,应及时行血容量补充。

  4. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  5. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  6. Patellofemoral Joint Arthroplasty: Our Experience in Isolated Patellofemoral and Bicompartmental Arthritic Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, L.; Schirò, M.; Atzori, F.; Ferrero, G.; Massè, A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated patellofemoral (PF) arthritis is rare, and there is no complete agreement about the best surgical treatment. The operative treatments are total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral replacement (PFR). The incidence of many early complications of PF arthroplasty has decreased with the introduction of newer designs. Nowadays, the main cause of revision surgery is the progression of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In the past, PF arthroplasty was contraindicated in patients with evidence of osteoarthritis or pain in medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartments. The improvement in implant designs and surgical techniques has allowed the addition of a monocompartmental arthroplasty for the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. In this work, we evaluate our first experience with PF arthroplasty and its combination with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS From May 2014 to March 2016, we treated 14 patients. An isolated PF arthroplasty was performed in six knees (five patients), and a combined PF and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed in nine cases. We observed a significant improvement in the clinical and functional Knee Society Scores (KSSs) after surgery in our patients. RESULTS We obtained good results in our cases both for clinical and functional KSSs. Patellar clunk was recorded in one case. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION We are going toward a new attitude in which partial osteoarthritic changes could be treated with partial resurfacing prosthetic solutions such as unicompartmental, bi–unicompartmental or PFR alone, or unicompartmental combined, which respects the cruciates and achieves maximal bone preservation, which is vital, particularly, for young patients. PMID:27891054

  7. The Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelin, Leif I; Fenstad, Anne M; Salomonsson, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The possibility of comparing results and of pooling the data has been limited for the Nordic arthroplasty registries, because of different registration systems and questionnaires. We have established a common Nordic database, in order to compare demographics and the results...... collaboration has shown differences between the countries concerning demographics, prosthesis fixation, and survival. The large number of patients in this database significantly widens our horizons for future research....... of total hip replacement surgery between countries. In addition, we plan to study results in patient groups in which the numbers are too small to be studied in the individual countries. Material and methods Primary total hip replacements (THRs) from 1995-2006 were selected for the study. Denmark, Sweden......, and Norway contributed data. A common code set was made and Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and diagnosis was used to calculate prosthesis survival with any revision as endpoint. Results 280,201 operations were included (69,242 from Denmark, 140,821 from Sweden, and 70,138 from Norway...

  8. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 1: Prosthesis terminology and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Shoulder arthroplasty is the third most common joint replacement procedure in the UK, and there are a number of different implant options available to surgeons to treat a variety of shoulder disorders. With an increasing burden placed on clinical follow-up, more patients are remaining under the care of their general practitioners and musculoskeletal triage assessment services and are not necessarily being seen by specialists. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists are therefore often prompted by radiological reports describing evidence of implant failure. This article is the first of two reviews on shoulder arthroplasty, concentrating on implant features and the indications for their use. The second article will address the modes of failure of shoulder arthroplasty and describe the relevant associated radiological features.

  9. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  10. Cross finger flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, W H

    1979-01-01

    Proper fingertip reconstruction requires good skin and soft tissue coverage, preservation of function and as normal an appearance as possible. The cross finger flap results in negligible joint stiffness, minimal morbidity and little work-time loss. An important factor is the conservation of finger length permitted by this technique. This method of repair is underutilized. It is indicated in several types of fingertip amputations where bone shortening would be detrimental.

  11. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  12. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  13. Current trends in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eingartner, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    After 20 years of application, with excellent short-term and long-term results, uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) is now generally regarded as the standard procedure for younger patients undergoing THA. However, expectations regarding hip replacement are continuously rising, along with the increasing number of young and active patients undergoing hip arthroplasty: a complication rate, including postoperative dislocation, close to zero, faster postoperative rehabilitation, low wear even in active patients, high durability and long term survival, etc. Demographic changes in aging societies are also leading to an increased need for cost-effective THA for the low-demand trauma patient. For high-demand patients, modern THA bearings, such as ceramic-ceramic articulations and other improved PE and metal materials, provide high durability and low wear, if the components are properly aligned. Navigation technology has been introduced in THA to ensure perfect component positioning without outliers and concomitant risk of increased wear and implant failure. Minimally and less invasive approaches are becoming increasingly popular in order to facilitate rehabilitation and fast-track surgery in younger patients. Navigation provides assistance for implant positioning in procedures with limited surgical exposure and visibility. New bone-preserving implants, such as surface replacement or short-stemmed femoral shaft prostheses, have been introduced especially for younger patients. Some of these new procedures are still under development,and the long-term results of new implant concepts have to be evaluated over the next decades. Not every modern concept will likely stand the test of time, but some will be beneficial for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty in the future.

  14. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    -up period. CONCLUSIONS Artificial cervical disc replacement in patients who have previously undergone cervical fusion surgery appears to be safe, with encouraging early clinical results based on this small case series, but more data from larger numbers of patients with long-term follow-up are needed. Arthroplasty may provide an additional tool for the management of post-fusion adjacent-level cervical disc disease in carefully selected patients.

  15. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc...

  16. Cross-shear implementation in sliding-distance-coupled finite element analysis of wear in metal-on-polyethylene total joint arthroplasty: intervertebral total disc replacement as an illustrative application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Hyde, Philip J; Hall, Richard M; Fisher, John; Brown, Thomas D

    2010-06-18

    Computational simulations of wear of orthopaedic total joint replacement implants have proven to valuably complement laboratory physical simulators, for pre-clinical estimation of abrasive/adhesive wear propensity. This class of numerical formulations has primarily involved implementation of the Archard/Lancaster relationship, with local wear computed as the product of (finite element) contact stress, sliding speed, and a bearing-couple-dependent wear factor. The present study introduces an augmentation, whereby the influence of interface cross-shearing motion transverse to the prevailing molecular orientation of the polyethylene articular surface is taken into account in assigning the instantaneous local wear factor. The formulation augment is implemented within a widely utilized commercial finite element software environment (ABAQUS). Using a contemporary metal-on-polyethylene total disc replacement (ProDisc-L) as an illustrative implant, physically validated computational results are presented to document the role of cross-shearing effects in alternative laboratory consensus testing protocols. Going forward, this formulation permits systematically accounting for cross-shear effects in parametric computational wear studies of metal-on-polyethylene joint replacements, heretofore a substantial limitation of such analyses.

  17. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  18. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya;

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek wo...

  19. Finger cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are indications that subjects with a reduced finger CIVD response are more prone to get local cold injuries, but more epidemiological research is needed to establish a firm relationship. Although it was observed that an early CIVD onset was associated with initially superior manual performance

  20. The Research of Artificial Cervical Disc Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhua; Qiang Shenb

    2008-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty after anterior decompression with insertion of a prosthetic total disc replacement has been suggested as an alternate to anterior cervical fusion. It develops quickly during recent years. Currently there are several cervical arthroplasty devices. Each device varies in terms of materials, range of motion and constraint. Early studies suggest that in the short term, the complication rate and efficacy is no worse than fusion surgery. Long-term results have not yet been reported. This review examines the current prostheses as well as discussing issues regarding indications and technique. It is hoped that an improvement of cervical arthroplasty occurs in terms of materials and design as spinal surgeons enter a new dines of the management of cervical spine disease.

  1. Bilateral knee replacements for treatment of acute septic arthritis in both knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Omer; Asumu, Theophilus

    2013-11-01

    A case report of bilateral acute septic arthritis of knees is presented, which was managed with staged total knee replacements for both knees. A literature review on septic arthritis treated with knee arthroplasty is also presented.

  2. Total ankle arthroplasty in end-stage ankle arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Demetracopoulos, Constantine A.; Halloran, James P.; Maloof, Paul; Samuel B Adams; Parekh, Selene G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in ankle prosthesis design, combined with improved surgical techniques for correction of coronal plane deformity and ligamentous balancing, have led to a resurgence of interest in total ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Although ankle arthrodesis has long been considered the gold standard treatment for ankle arthritis, recent studies have shown that patients who undergo total ankle replacement have equivalent pain relief and improved functi...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3210 Section 888.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal (finger)...

  5. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  6. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    OpenAIRE

    Sporer, Scott M.; Bernard R. Bach, Jr

    2009-01-01

    DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Sc...

  7. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank;

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fin...

  8. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fi...

  9. ORO. The physical developer replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael A; James, Tim

    2009-12-01

    In the process of fingerprint development Physical Developer has been largely the method of choice on porous surfaces after coming into contact with wet environments. It is only recently that a new technique has been identified which could replace this standard technique. This study aims to build on previous research and expand knowledge regarding the technique. The study built on previous research and compared Physical Developer to Oil Red O, testing both on four paper types, while being placed in three different water types and an accelerant for various amounts of time. Marks were placed with both heavily 'loaded' sebaceous fingers and 'normal' un-washed fingers. Results show that Oil Red O consistently produced clearer more detailed marks from the 'loaded' fingers, but neither technique proved to work better on the 'normal' marks. Neither technique developed any prints from the accelerant.

  10. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty.

  11. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  12. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; Zanden, van der A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the b

  13. Long-term results with the Kudo type 3 total elbow arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thillemann, Theis Muncholm; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Johannsen, Hans Viggo;

    2012-01-01

    From 1992 to 1993, 17 elbows were replaced with the unlinked Kudo type 3 total elbow arthroplasty in 16 patients with arthritic joint destruction. Of these elbows, 8 were available for clinical examination after a mean of 9.5 years. Of the 17 elbow implants, 5 were revised: 2 because of loosening...

  14. A randomised controlled trial of total hip arthroplasty versus resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of young patients with arthritis of the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Damian R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip replacement (arthroplasty surgery is a highly successful treatment for patients with severe symptomatic arthritis of the hip joint. For older patients, several designs of Total Hip Arthroplasty have shown excellent results in terms of both function and value for money. However, in younger more active patients, there is approximately a 50% failure rate at 25 years for traditional implants. Hip resurfacing is a relatively new arthroplasty technique. In a recent review of the literature on resurfacing arthroplasty it was concluded that the short-term functional results appear promising but some potential early disadvantages were identified, including the risk of femoral neck fracture and collapse of the head of the femur.The aim of the current study is to assess whether there is a difference in functional hip scores at one year post-operation between Total Hip Arthroplasty and Resurfacing Arthroplasty. Secondary aims include assessment of complication rates for both procedures as well cost effectiveness. Methods/design All patients medically fit for surgery and deemed suitable for a resurfacing arthroplasty are eligible to take part in this study. A randomisation sequence will be produced and administered independently. After consenting, all patients will be clinically reviewed and hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed through questionnaires. The allocated surgery will then be performed with the preferred technique of the surgeon. Six weeks post-operation hip function will be assessed and complications recorded. Three, six and 12 months post-operation hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed. Additional information about patients' out-of-pocket expenses will also be collected. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN33354155 UKCLRN portfolio ID 4093

  15. Primary and revision total hip replacement without cement and with associated femoral osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, J L; Hungerford, D S

    1989-12-01

    Nine porous-coated total hip prostheses were implanted without cement in nine patients who had a major proximal femoral deformity. Six patients had revision and three, primary total hip replacement. In all nine patients, as well placed corrective osteotomy was needed to successfully perform the arthroplasty. The average time until union of the proximal femoral osteotomy was fifteen weeks for the patients who had a primary arthroplasty and twenty-seven weeks for the patients who had a revision arthroplasty. The average Harris hip-rating score was 94 points for the patients who had a primary arthroplasty and 84 points (range, 60 to 93 points) for those who had a revision arthroplasty. The length of follow-up averaged forty-seven months.

  16. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  17. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  18. Emotional Communication in Finger Braille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe analyses of the features of emotions (neutral, joy, sadness, and anger expressed by Finger Braille interpreters and subsequently examine the effectiveness of emotional expression and emotional communication between people unskilled in Finger Braille. The goal is to develop a Finger Braille system to teach emotional expression and a system to recognize emotion. The results indicate the following features of emotional expression by interpreters. The durations of the code of joy were significantly shorter than the durations of the other emotions, the durations of the code of sadness were significantly longer, and the finger loads of anger were significantly larger. The features of emotional expression by unskilled subjects were very similar to those of the interpreters, and the coincidence ratio of emotional communication was 75.1%. Therefore, it was confirmed that people unskilled in Finger Braille can express and communicate emotions using this communication medium.

  19. Transfemoral amputation after failed knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. With use of individual data linkage, 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Of these, 258...... for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed...

  20. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  1. Total Knee Arthroplasty Complicated by a Severe Heterotopic Ossification: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Spinarelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Total knee arthroplasty (TKA associated with heterotopic ossifications (HOs are rare occurrences despite the relatively frequent surgery procedure of the hip arthroplasty. Up to present, different types of treatment were described in the literature. Case Presentation We report an unusual case of TKA in a 70-year-old woman, which was early complicated by development of HO. It was successfully treated with a second surgery and a selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib with good clinical results. Conclusions This case illustrates that early operative and medical treatment can be used to optimally resolve stiffness caused by HO after total knee replacement.

  2. Covering the Dorsal Finger Defect with Reverse Cross Finger Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Gurbuz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of finger extensor zone defects with or without tendon gaps still remains a challenge for surgeons. Although surgical treatments may differ, and range from the use of local, regional, to free flaps, the outcomes for all cases are not satisfactory. In this case report, we present a case of a 3rd finger extensor side crush injury including a defect of Dd (Digit Dorsal 1, Dd2 and Dd3 defects of extensor zones with tendon gap. Tendon gap was reconstructed using m. palmaris longus tendon graft and the defect was covered with reversed cross-finger flap (random pattern with good cosmetic and excellent functional results.

  3. Distal interphalangeal joint implant arthroplasty in a musician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D A; Peimer, C A

    1998-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease commonly affects the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints, causing articular destruction and marginal bone formation. Treatment for pain relief and function is most often done through arthrodesis. The case of a 70-year-old concert violinist with left index finger DIP joint osteoarthritis is presented. Arthritis in the involved joint caused pain and deformity and interfered with the patient's ability to play music. Trial arthrodesis with K-wires proved impossible because of the patient's need for continued mobility. Swanson hinge implant arthroplasty was performed on the affected DIP joint. The patient eventually achieved an excellent result and was able to return to playing the violin professionally. Treatment and therapy guidelines are presented.

  4. Steadily translating parabolic dissolution fingers

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratiuk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution fingers (or wormholes) are formed during the dissolution of a porous rock as a result of nonlinear feedbacks between the flow, transport and chemical reactions at pore surfaces. We analyze the shapes and growth velocities of such fingers within the thin-front approximation, in which the reaction is assumed to take place instantaneously with the reactants fully consumed at the dissolution front. We concentrate on the case when the main flow is driven by the constant pressure gradient far from the finger, and the permeability contrast between the inside and the outside of the finger is finite. Using Ivantsov ansatz and conformal transformations we find the family of steadily translating fingers characterized by a parabolic shape. We derive the reactant concentration field and the pressure field inside and outside of the fingers and show that the flow within them is uniform. The advancement velocity of the finger is shown to be inversely proportional to its radius of curvature in the small P\\'{e}clet...

  5. Design of rehabilitation robot hand for fingers CPM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Chan, T. W.; Tong, K. Y.; Kwong, K. K.; Yao, Xifan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a low-cost prototype for rehabilitation robot aide patient do hands CPM (continuous passive motion) training. The design of the prototype is based on the principle of Rutgers Master II glove, but it is better in performance for more improvement made. In the design, it uses linear motors to replace pneumatic actuators to make the product more portable and mobile. It increases finger training range to 180 degree for the full range training of hand finger holding and extension. Also the prototype can not only be wearing on palm and fore arm do training for face to face with finger move together, but also be put in the opposite hand glove wear direction for hand rehabilitation training. During the research, Solidworks is used as the tool for mechanical design and movement simulation. It proved through experiment that the prototype made in the research is appropriate for hand do CPM training.

  6. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  7. Drain tip culture following total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahubali Aski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Placing a suction drain following total knee replacement is usual practice which is been followed by many surgeons. Closed suction drainage following arthroplasty is a routine with the aim of preventing wound hematoma and thereby reducing the risk of infection. Surgical site infections in orthopaedic surgeries are disastrous and often lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Usefulness of drain tip culture in predicting the wound infection is been tested but results are controversial. Methods: It is a prospective study of 546 drains (352 patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA. The drain tip was sent for culture at the time of removing. Cultures from the SSI (surgical site infection were also collected. Cases that had at least six months of follow up were included in the study. However in one patient with superficial infection, the drain tip culture was negative. Results: Drain tip culture was positive in total of 18 patients. Three patients had developed deep infection and 10 patients had superficial infection. All three patients with deep infection and 9 out of 10 patients of superficial infection were culture positive. Out of 8 culture positive superficial infections, one had different bacteria identified from the site. Drain tip culture was positive in 3.39% of drains and infection rate was positive in 1.88% of wounds. On statistical analysis we found drain tip culture sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 98.46%, positive predictive value of 52.9% and negative predictive value of 99.8%. Conclusion: Drain tip culture positivity helps in predicting the future chance of developing the infection. If drain tip culture is negative, then there is almost near nil chances of infection. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(2.000: 409-411

  8. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  9. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hofmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17 and professional clarinettists (N = 6 were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 x 2 x 2 design (register: low--high; tempo: slow--fast, dynamics: soft--loud. There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low--high of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions. The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean and peak force (Fmax were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g. guitar. Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N.For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N. Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  10. Design of lanthanide fingers: compact lanthanide-binding metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    am Ende, Christopher W; Meng, Hai Yun; Ye, Mao; Pandey, Anil K; Zondlo, Neal J

    2010-08-16

    Lanthanides have interesting chemical properties; these include luminescent, magnetic, and catalytic functions. Toward the development of proteins incorporating novel functions, we have designed a new lanthanide-binding motif, lanthanide fingers. These were designed based on the Zif268 zinc finger, which exhibits a beta beta alpha structural motif. Lanthanide fingers utilize an Asp(2)Glu(2) metal-coordination environment to bind lanthanides through a tetracarboxylate peptide ligand. The iterative design of a general lanthanide-binding peptide incorporated the following key elements: 1) residues with high alpha-helix and beta-sheet propensities in the respective secondary structures; 2) an optimized big box alpha-helix N-cap; 3) a Schellman alpha-helix C-cap motif; and 4) an optional D-Pro-Ser type II' beta-turn in the beta-hairpin. The peptides were characterized for lanthanide binding by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In all instances, stabilization of the peptide secondary structures resulted in an increase in metal affinity. The optimized protein design was a 25-residue peptide that was a general lanthanide-binding motif; this binds all lanthanides examined in a competitive aqueous environment, with a dissociation constant of 9.3 microM for binding Er(3+). CD spectra of the peptide-lanthanide complexes are similar to those of zinc fingers and other beta beta alpha proteins. Metal binding involves residues from the N-terminal beta-hairpin and the C terminal alpha-helical segments of the peptide. NMR data indicated that metal binding induced a global change in the peptide structure. The D-Pro-Ser type II' beta-turn motif could be replaced by Thr-Ile to generate genetically encodable lanthanide fingers. Replacement of the central Phe with Trp generated genetically encodable lanthanide fingers that exhibited terbium luminescence greater than that of an EF-hand peptide.

  11. Shoulder arthroplasty in complex acute and chronic proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Søjbjerg, J.O.; Sneppen, O.

    1991-01-01

    From 1983 to 1988, 42 shoulder arthroplasties were performed on comminuted acute or chronic proximal humeral fractures. Patients were categorized according to the post-fracture operative delay; there were 15 four-part fractures, with median post-fracture delay of 13 days (range: 7 to 21), and 27...... instability were seen in shoulders formerly treated with osteosynthesis (one acute and four chronic cases). Two of these cases developed an infection. Good results can be expected after prosthetic replacement in acute proximal humeral fractures. Failed primary treatment reduces the possibility of a good...

  12. Internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm in primary total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular injury is one of the rare complications of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA. We report an unusual case of lobulated pseudoaneurysm arising from one of the branches of the left internal iliac artery during acetabulum preparation in THA, which was successfully treated with coil embolization and multidisciplinary care. After 6 years follow up, patient did not have any symptoms related to the hip replacement. We recommend that surgeons should be extremely cautious while drilling medial wall of the acetabulum for depth assessment. Aggressive multidisciplinary approach, including possible support from an interventional radiologist is required for the treatment of such vascular injuries.

  13. Two Case Studies Related to Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Report on Two Case Studies related to Total Knee Arthroplasty Previously Discussed by AKS Members Methods: Case Series Case 1: A 76 year old woman requiring a right total knee replacement in the presence of marked dystrophic calcification affecting the quadriceps tendon on a background of having sustained a post operative quadriceps tendon rupture post left TKR in 2013 Case 2: Management issues related to performing a TKR in a 80 year old woman with a possible past history of TB affecting the joint Conclusion: Both procedures went smoothly and particularly as advice was given by AKS members, these are presented largely for feedback.

  14. Reliability and concurrent validity of the Dutch hip and knee replacement expectations surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Stevens, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Preoperative expectations of outcome of total hip and knee arthroplasty are important determinants of patients' satisfaction and functional outcome. Aims of the study were (1) to translate the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Replacement Expectations Survey and Knee Replacement Expectati

  15. Viscous fingering of miscible slices

    CERN Document Server

    De Wit, A; Martin, M; Wit, Anne De; Bertho, Yann; Martin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Viscous fingering of a miscible high viscosity slice of fluid displaced by a lower viscosity fluid is studied in porous media by direct numerical simulations of Darcy's law coupled to the evolution equation for the concentration of a solute controlling the viscosity of miscible solutions. In contrast with fingering between two semi-infinite regions, fingering of finite slices is a transient phenomenon due to the decrease in time of the viscosity ratio across the interface induced by fingering and dispersion processes. We show that fingering contributes transiently to the broadening of the peak in time by increasing its variance. A quantitative analysis of the asymptotic contribution of fingering to this variance is conducted as a function of the four relevant parameters of the problem i.e. the log-mobility ratio R, the length of the slice l, the Peclet number Pe and the ratio between transverse and axial dispersion coefficients $\\epsilon$. Relevance of the results is discussed in relation with transport of vi...

  16. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  17. 髌骨置换治疗严重髌股关节炎在膝关节置换术中的临床应用分析%Patellar Replacement to Treat Severe Patellofemoral Arthritis in the Knee Arthroplasty Clinical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代宏杰; 王立涛; 靳宪辉; 崔胜杰

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨髌骨置换针对严重髌股关节炎在膝关节置换术中的应用及临床疗效。方法:2004年2月-2010年11月间行膝关节表面置换的126例(149例膝关节)。术前查X线(负重侧位、45°Rosenberg相、Merchant轴位相),对髌股关节炎分级并测量髌骨厚度和髌股间隙,从而预测出髌骨假体厚度,使重建后的髌股间隙不大于原间隙。均采用统一膝关节假体(smith&nephew ),由同一组医生完成。术中行髌骨截骨后假体置换,并在置换前后测量髌骨的运动轨迹。术后随访。膝关节评分(HSS评分),髌骨评分(Feller评分),结果应用SPSS13.0软件行统计学分析。结果:术中股骨和胫骨假体试模安装完成后,行髌骨截骨安装假体,140例均髌骨轨迹良好,可以达到“no thumb test”,9例采用了外侧支持带松解等操作,后髌骨轨迹良好。术后126患者均获得随访12个月,膝关节屈伸活动度平均110.5°(90°~125°),出现19髌前疼痛口服非甾体类药物逐渐缓解,无1例出现髌骨脱位、半脱位、髌骨坏死、髌骨坏死、髌骨骨折及皮肤坏死等。结论:对于严重的髌股关节炎行髌骨置换后可以更好的重建髌股关节,改善关节屈伸功能,减少髌骨的相关并发症。%Objective :To discuss serious patellofemoral arthritis in patella replacement in the application and clinical curative effect of knee arthroplasty .Methods :In February 2004 to November 2010 ,126 cases of knee joint surface re-placement (149 cases of knee joints ) .Preoperative X-ray check (lateral load-bearing ,45°Rosenberg phase ,phase break shaft) ,classification and measurement of patellofemoral arthritis patellar thickness and patellofemoral gap ,so as to predict the thickness of the patellar prosthesis ,the reconstruction of patellofemoral clearance is not more than the origi-nal clearance .After intraoperative osteotomy patella

  18. Failure of total hip arthroplasty with Boneloc bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebuhr, P; Stentzer, K; Thomsen, F; Levi, N

    2000-12-01

    Early failure of Boneloc cemented total hip arthroplasty is well documented. However, information regarding the long term prognosis is scanty. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the long term failure rate of total hip replacement with Boneloc bone cement. Between January 1991 and March 1992, Boneloc bone cement (Polymers Recontructive A/S, Farum, Denmark) was used in 42 consecutive total hip replacements in 42 patients. The average age of the patients was 75 years. There were 25 women and 17 men. The diagnosis at operation was osteoarthritis in all cases. A cemented Muller Taperloc femoral stem was used with a cemented Muller acetabular cup (Biomet, Warsaw, USA). The follow-up time was 9 years. All patients underwent radiographic control the first postoperative year and annually after 1995. To date 21 patients have been revised for aseptic loosening at a mean of 5 years (range: one year to 8 years). Three other patients have definite radiographic evidence of loosening. The overall failure rate is therefore 24/42 = 57%. Our results confirm the previously reported poor results of Boneloc bone cement for hip arthroplasty and support the recommendation of indefinite follow-up for surviving prostheses. New prosthesis designs and new cements should have documentation, including laboratory tests and randomized clinical studies with radiostereometric evaluation. However, the ethical responsibility rests heavily on the shoulders of the clinician to make a correct analysis of the need for a new product before he begins to use it.

  19. Revision of hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wera, Glenn D; Gillespie, Robert J; Petty, Carter; Petersilge, William J; Kraay, Matthew J; Goldberg, Victor M

    2010-08-01

    Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing has become an increasingly popular treatment for young, active patients with degenerative disease of the hip, as bearing surfaces with better wear properties are now available. One proposed advantage of resurfacing is its ability to be successfully revised to total hip arthroplasty (THA). In addition, radiographic parameters that may predict failure in hip resurfacing have yet to be clearly defined. Seven MOM resurfacing arthroplasties were converted to conventional THAs because of aseptic failure. Using Harris Hip Scores (HHS) and Short Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire scores, we compared the clinical outcomes of these patients with those of patients who underwent uncomplicated MOM hip resurfacing. In addition, all revisions were radiographically evaluated. Mean follow-up periods were 51 months (revision group) and 43 months (control group). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups' HHS or SF-12 scores. There was no dislocation or aseptic loosening after conversion of any resurfacing arthroplasty. Valgus neck-shaft angle (P hip resurfacing. Conversion of aseptic failure of hip resurfacing to conventional THA leads to clinical outcomes similar to those of patients who undergo uncomplicated hip resurfacing. The orientation of the femur and the components placed play a large role in implant survival in hip resurfacing. More work needs to be done to further elucidate these radiographic parameters.

  20. An Underactuated Multi-finger Grasping Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Rossi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a mechanical model for an underactuated multi-finger grasping device is presented. The device has single-tendon, three-phalanx fingers, all moved by only one actuator. By means of the model, both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour of the finger itself can be studied. The finger is part of a more complex mechanical system that consists of a four-finger grasping device for robots or a five-finger human hand prosthesis. Some results of both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour are also presented.

  1. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  2. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  3. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  4. Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty and Perioperative Blood Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Cook

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is standard practice in many institutions to routinely perform preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin level testing in association with hip joint arthroplasty procedures. It is our observation, however, that blood transfusion after uncomplicated primary hip arthroplasty in healthy patients is uncommon and that the decision to proceed with blood transfusion is typically made on clinical grounds. We therefore question the necessity and clinical value of routine perioperative blood testing about the time of hip resurfacing arthroplasty. We present analysis of perioperative blood tests and transfusion rates in 107 patients undertaking unilateral hybrid hip resurfacing arthroplasty by the senior author at a single institution over a three-year period. We conclude that routine perioperative testing of haemoglobin levels for hip resurfacing arthroplasty procedures does not assist in clinical management. We recommend that postoperative blood testing only be considered should the patient demonstrate clinical signs of symptomatic anaemia or if particular clinical circumstances necessitate.

  5. Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    of the hospital stay (I); how to optimize analgesia by using a compression bandage in total knee arthroplasty (II); the clinical and organizational set-up facilitating or acting as barriers for early discharge (III); safety aspects following fast-track in the form of few readmissions in general (IV) and few...... thromboembolic complications in particular (V); feasibility studies showing excellent outcomes following fast-track bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty (VI) and non-septic revision knee arthroplasty (VII); how acute pain relief in total hip arthroplasty is not enhanced by the use of local infiltration......Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty aims at giving the patients the best available treatment at all times, being a dynamic entity. Fast-track combines evidence-based, clinical features with organizational optimization including a revision of traditions resulting in a streamlined pathway from...

  6. Knee Arthrodesis after failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. A total of 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed in Denmark from 1997 to 2013 were identified by linking the data using....... Differences in cumulative incidence were compared with the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 164 of the 165 arthrodeses were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of arthrodesis was 0.26% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 0.31%). The 5-year cumulative...

  7. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries Report of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Working Group of the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries Part II. Recommendations for selection, administration, and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia;

    2016-01-01

    - The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common...... of a 1-item pain question ("During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?"; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome ("How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement...

  8. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies show that patients with osteoarthritis get better pain relief from total shoulder arthroplasty than from hemiarthroplasty. Resurfacing ... first, second or third day a er surgery. Pain Management A er surgery, you will feel some pain, ...

  9. Use of scoring systems for assessing and reporting the outcome results from shoulder surgery and arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Booker, Simon; Alfahad, Nawaf; Scott, Martin; Gooding, Ben; Wallace, W. Angus

    2015-01-01

    To investigate shoulder scoring systems used in Europe and North America and how outcomes might be classified after shoulder joint replacement. All research papers published in four major journals in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed for the shoulder scoring systems used in their published papers. A method of identifying how outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty might be used to categorize patients into fair, good, very good and excellent outcomes was explored using the outcome evaluations from pati...

  10. A Simple Mathematical Standardized Measurement of Acetabulum Anteversion after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kun Liaw

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We invented a standardization method to measure the cup's anteversion after total hip arthroplasty without the influence of patient's position. We measured 68 radiographs of 10 patients after total hip replacement (THR and calculated the error of each measurement, defined as the difference with the average of the same measuring method on the same patient. We also calculated the repeatability standard deviation (RSD of each method according to the American Society for Testing and Materials, ASTM E691.

  11. Short-Stem Hip Arthroplasty as a Solution for limited Proximal Femoral Bone Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai E Gamboa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe an uncommon scenario where the femoral diaphysis was subjugated by previous long stemmed revision knee replacements limiting options for primary hip arthroplasty. A  short stemmed pressfit femoral componet was implanted bilaterally. At 11 years the implants remain stable with improved clinical function. This case emphasizes the importance of preoperative templating and  the utility of considering the use of unconventional stems in the management of unusual situations.

  12. Effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis: a systematic review of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Barker Karen L; Minns Lowe Catherine; Dewey Michael E; Sackley Catherine M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Physiotherapy has long been a routine component of patient rehabilitation following hip joint replacement. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise after discharge from hospital on function, walking, range of motion, quality of life and muscle strength, for osteoarthritic patients following elective primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods Design: Systematic review, using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for System...

  13. Bipolar hip arthroplasty as salvage treatment for loosening of the acetabular cup with significant bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Revision arthroplasty of the hip is becoming increasingly important in recent years. Early primary arthroplasty and longer life expectancy of the patients increases the number of revision surgery. Revision surgery of hip arthroplasty is major surgery for the patients, especially the elderly, with significant risks concerning the general condition of the patient. The aim of this work is to evaluate the outcome of bipolar hip arthroplasty as a salvage procedure for treatment of loosening of the acetabular cup with significant acetabular bone defects after total hip replacement (THR in multi-morbid patients.Patients and methods: During the period from January 1 2007 to December 31 2011 19 revision hip surgeries were performed in , in which the loosened acetabular cup was replaced by a bipolar head. The examined patient group consisted exclusively of female patients with an average of 75 years. The predominant diagnosis was “aseptic loosening” (84.2%. All patients in our study were multi-morbid. We decided to resort to bipolar hip arthroplasty due to the compromised general condition of patients and the major acetabular bone defects, which were confirmed intraoperatively. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 67 months (average 19.1 months. Results: Evaluation of the modified Harris Hip Score showed an overall improvement of the function of the hip joint after surgery of approximately 45%.Surgery was less time consuming and thus adequate for patients with significantly poor general health condition. We noticed different complications in a significant amount of patients (68.4%. The most common complication encountered was the proximal migration of the bipolar head.The rate of revision following the use of bipolar hip arthroplasty in revision surgery of the hip in our patients was high (21%. Despite the high number of complications reported in our study, we have noticed significant improvement of hip joint function as well

  14. Boneloc bone-cement: experience in hip arthroplasty during a 3-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kader, K F; Allcock, S; Walker, D I; Chaudhry, S B

    2001-10-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone-cement was introduced in the 1960s for fixation of total hip arthroplasty replacement components. Long-term results of cement fixation for hip and knee arthroplasty have been extremely good. Although the use of PMMA bone-cement has enabled long-term survival of joint arthroplasty implants, there has been concern about aseptic loosening. This concern led to the introduction of Boneloc bone-cement (Biomet, Warsaw, IN) in the early 1990s. It was hoped that with the improved physical and chemical characteristics of Boneloc, there would be less aseptic loosening in the long-term. A clinical trial was conducted to evaluate Boneloc bone-cement in cementing the femoral component of the Bimetric total hip arthroplasty prosthesis in 33 hips in 32 patients. On follow-up, 7 stems (24%) developed definite loosening, and 3 stems (10%) were possibly loose. Of the 7 definite loose stems, 5 (17%) were revised because of increasing pain or progressive loosening. Despite the biologic advantages of Boneloc, this study suggests that the chemicals substituted in Boneloc bone-cement led to an alteration in its mechanical properties. These properties proved to be inferior to conventional PMMA bone-cement. There is possible time-dependent deterioration of mechanical properties leading to early aseptic loosening. The conventional PMMA bone-cement has stood the test of time. Research and experimental studies should continue to improve the mechanical properties of Boneloc before further human trials.

  15. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  16. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hintermann Beat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA. In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week and hospital stay (12 days of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient.

  17. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  18. Dislocation following revision total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioe, Terence J

    2002-04-01

    Dislocation is a relatively common complication following revision total hip arthroplasty. Risk factors include surgical approach, gender, underlying diagnosis, comorbidities, surgical experience, and previous surgery; for later dislocations, risk factors include wear/deformation of polyethylene, trauma, and decreased muscle strength. Prevention and precaution are the watchwords for dislocations following revision total hip arthroplasty. For dislocations that do occur, treatment rests first on identifying the source of instability. Most dislocations can be managed by closed reduction. Constrained components may increase success rates, but only for appropriate indications. Prevention and treatment of dislocations following revision total hip arthroplasty are discussed in this article.

  19. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  20. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  1. QUALITY OF LIFE PARAMETERS IMPROVEMENT FOLLOWING TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Grierosu, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Large joint replacement regarding lower limbs include hip and knee arthroplasty surgical procedures, meant toimprove Quality Of Life (QOL) parameters, an optimal representation for patient recovery toward an independent lifestyle. The present study is a consequence of an imperative requirement from the nursing staff, which, in closecooperation with the surgeon, the physical therapist and the psychologist intend a better understanding regardingpatient perception of the so-called post-discharge...

  2. FINGER-VEIN RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Haritha Deepthi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the Person‟s/Organization‟s Private information‟s are becoming very easy to access, the demand for a Simple, Convenient, Efficient, and a highly Securable Authentication System has been increased. In considering these requirements for data Protection, Biometrics, which uses human physiological or behavioral system for personal Identification has been found as a solution for these difficulties. However most of the biometric systems have high complexity in both time and space. So we are going to use a Real time Finger-Vein recognition System for authentication purposes. In this paper we had implemented the Finger Vein Recognition concept using MATLAB R2013a. The features used are Lacunarity Distance, Blanket Dimension distance. This has more accuracy when compared to conventional methods.

  3. BIOLOGIC JOINT RECONSTRUCTION: ALTERNATIVES TO ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Cole

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive source of information in the management of cartilage lesions of major joints using nonoperative or surgical techniques other than total joint replacement. The text also includes chapters in basic sciences, imaging and rehabilitation.The editors are aiming to provide a reference about the latest concepts and techniques in the treatment of cartilage lesions including future aspects by a comprehensive approach to the alternative joint restoration procedures such as biological, pharmacological and surgical techniques of cartilage repairing and partial resurfacing etc.Orthopedic surgeons in sports medicine, orthopedic surgeons performing joint replacements, orthopedic resident and fellows will be the main audiences.The text is 349 pages, divided into 34 chapters in 7 sections. Section I is "Background-articular cartilage and allograft processing" including chapters about pathology, patient evaluation, imaging and allograft processing. Section II is "Nonoperative treatment" including chapters about neutraceuticals, pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation. Section III is "Operative treatment-knee" including chapters about arthroscopic debridment, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, mosaicplasty, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allografts, autologous chondrocyte implantation, existing cell-based technologies, minimally invasive second-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation, future development in cartilage repair, meniscus transplantation, management of OCD, patellafemoral chondral disease, proximal tibial and distal femoral osteotomies, unicompartmental arthritis current techniques, unicompartmental knee replacement. Section IV is "Operative treatment-Hip" including chapters about hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic partial resurfacing, related osteotomies. Section V is "operative treatment-shoulder" including chapters about arthroscopic debridment and release, biologic resurfacing and

  4. Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA.

  5. Complications Related to Metal-on-Metal Articulation in Trapeziometacarpal Joint Total Joint Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Frølich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adverse reactions to metal-on-metal (MoM prostheses are well known from total hip joint resurfacing arthroplasty with elevated serum chrome or cobalt, pain and pseudo tumor formation. It may, however, also be seen after total joint replacement of the trapeziometacarpal joint using MoM articulation, and we present two cases of failure of MoM prostheses due to elevated metal-serum levels in one case and pseudo tumor formation in another case. Furthermore, we suggest a diagnostic algorithm for joint pain after MoM trapeziometacarpal joint replacement based on published experiences from MoM hip prostheses and adverse reactions to metal.

  6. Complications Related to Metal-on-Metal Articulation in Trapeziometacarpal Joint Total Joint Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Christina; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions to metal-on-metal (MoM) prostheses are well known from total hip joint resurfacing arthroplasty with elevated serum chrome or cobalt, pain and pseudo tumor formation. It may, however, also be seen after total joint replacement of the trapeziometacarpal joint using MoM articulation......, and we present two cases of failure of MoM prostheses due to elevated metal-serum levels in one case and pseudo tumor formation in another case. Furthermore, we suggest a diagnostic algorithm for joint pain after MoM trapeziometacarpal joint replacement based on published experiences from MoM hip...

  7. A compression bandage improves local infiltration analgesia in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl Kri;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-volume local infiltration analgesia has been shown to be an effective pain treatment after knee replacement, but the role of bandaging to prolong analgesia has not been evaluated. METHODS: 48 patients undergoing fast-track total knee replacement with high-volume (170 mL) 0...... with compression bandage than in those with non-compression bandage and with a similar low use of oxycodone. Mean hospital stay was similar (2.8 days and 3.3 days, respectively). INTERPRETATION: A compression bandage is recommended to improve analgesia after high-volume local infiltration analgesia in total knee...... arthroplasty Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  8. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  9. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp N Streubel

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made.

  10. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Roger A.; Harrison, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and exp...

  11. Wear debris in cemented total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, M H; Salvati, E A; Buly, R L

    1991-03-01

    One of the most prevalent clinical problems in long-term follow up of total hip arthroplasty patients is loosening of prosthetic fixation. Factors contributing to mechanical failure of total hip reconstruction are complex and multiple. It has become increasingly apparent that wear debris from the prosthetic components may contribute significantly to this process. The authors summarize some of the current concepts concerning the detrimental effects of metallic debris in total hip arthroplasty.

  12. Revision total elbow arthroplasty with the linked Coonrad-Morrey total elbow arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Hans Christian; Thillemann, Theis; Belling-Sørensen, Anne Kathrine;

    2013-01-01

    In this retrospective study we evaluated the short- to medium-term results after 20 Coonrad-Morrey revision total elbow arthroplasties (TEAs).......In this retrospective study we evaluated the short- to medium-term results after 20 Coonrad-Morrey revision total elbow arthroplasties (TEAs)....

  13. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  14. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3220 Section 888.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3200 Section 888.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  16. Clinical outcome after treatment of infected primary total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive cases of infected primary total knee arthroplasties were treated at our institution from 1989 through 2000. Eleven patients had debridement and irrigation performed within 2 months of index arthroplasty or hematogenous spread; only one infection was eradicated. Twenty......-five patients had their prostheses removed; 17 had two-stage revision arthroplasty, following which infection was eradicated in 15; one had a permanent spacer, 7 had arthrodesis (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) and 2 had a femur amputation (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) at follow......-up of mean 24 months. Infections were cured equally well with revision arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Among the 15 patients who ended up with revision arthroplasty, 11 had a better range of motion compared to the index arthroplasty, but 8 had daily pain. We present our treatment protocol, which eradicated 15...

  17. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  18. The patient's experience of temporary paralysis from spinal anaesthesia, a part of total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Louise; Konradsen, Hanne; Dreyer, Pia Sander

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of being temporary paralysed from spinal anaesthesia when undergoing total knee replacement. BACKGROUND: Total knee arthroplasty is a common procedure, and regional anaesthesia is used as a method for anaesthetising the patien...

  19. Finger Motion Decoding Using EMG Signals Corresponding Various Arm Postures

    OpenAIRE

    You, Kyung-Jin; Rhee, Ki-Won; Shin, Hyun-Chool

    2010-01-01

    We provide a novel method to infer finger flexing motions using a four-channel surface electromyogram (EMG). Surface EMG signals can be recorded from the human body non-invasively and easily. Surface EMG signals in this study were obtained from four channel electrodes placed around the forearm. The motions consist of the flexion of five single fingers (thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger) and three multi.finger motions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used...

  20. INDICATIONS FOR DISTAL RADIOULNAR ARTHROPLASTY: REPORT ON THREE CLINICAL CASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cláudia; Pereira, Alexandre; Sousa, Marco; Trigeuiros, Miguel; Silva, César

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar arthroplasty is an attractive solution for treating various pathological conditions of the distal radioulnar joint because it allows restoration of stability, load transmission and function. The main indications are: radioulnar impingement after partial or complete resection of the distal ulna; and degenerative, inflammatory or post-traumatic arthritis of the distal radioulnar joint. The authors present three clinical cases of distal radioulnar pathological conditions: two patients with post-traumatic sequelae and one case of distal radioulnar impingement after a Sauvé-Kapandji operation. The three cases were treated surgically with a metallic prosthesis to replace the distal ulna (First Choice - Ascension®). The first two were treated with a resurfacing prosthesis and the last one with a modular prosthesis. All of the patients had achieved pain relief and increased movement of the distal radioulnar joint after one year of postoperative follow-up. PMID:27047827

  1. The rehabilitation management after hip arthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina BURCHICI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this paper we describe the physical therapy management of a 64-year-old female following a bilateral hip arthroplasty. Method: The patient featured in this study, after the surgical intervention had undergone specific recovery treatment consisting of: posture techniques, static (isometric contractions and dynamic kinetic techniques (passive motion, passive-actives, actives, actives with resistance, massage, respiratory gymnastics and reeducation of walking. Results: At the end of the rehabilitation program, hip muscular strength and joint range of motion were improved significantly. The Harris hip score was significantly improved, in comparison to the preoperative one. Conclusion: This case illustrates the importance of the rehabilitation management after bilateral hip replacement.

  2. Anteroposterior glide versus rotating platform low contact stress (LCS knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn-Jones Charles

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fifty thousand knee replacements are performed annually in the UK at an estimated cost of £150 million. Post-operative improvement depends on a number of factors including implant design and patient associated factors. To our knowledge there are no published study's comparing the results of AP glide and rotating platform designs of LCS knee arthroplasty. Therefore we feel that a study is required to investigate and compare the effects of two types of LCS total knee arthroplasty on joint proprioception and range of motion. Methods/Design Patients will be randomised to receive either a LCS AP glide or Rotating platform prosthesis. Clinical scores (Oxford knee score, American knee society score, EuroQol, range of motion and proprioception will be assessed prior to and at 3,6, 12 and 24 months after the operation. Proprioception will be assessed in terms of absolute error angle (mean difference between the target angle and the response angle. Knee angles will be measured in degrees using an electromagnetic tracking device, Polhemus 3Space Fastrak that detects positions of sensors placed on the test limb. Student's t-test will be used to compare the mean of two groups. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the best prosthesis to use for patients undergoing total knee replacement. This pragmatic randomised trial will test the null hypothesis that anteroposterior glide LCS knee arthroplasty does not result in better post operative knee motion and proprioception as compared to rotating platform LCS knee. Trial Registration ISRCTN52943804

  3. Ninety day mortality and its predictors after primary shoulder arthroplasty: an analysis of 4,019 patients from 1976-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Jasvinder A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examine 90-day postoperative mortality and its predictors following shoulder arthroplasty Methods We identified vital status of all adults who underwent primary shoulder arthroplasty (Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA or humeral head replacement (HHR at the Mayo Clinic from 1976-2008, using the prospectively collected information from Total Joint Registry. We used univariate logistic regression models to assess the association of gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA class, Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index, an underlying diagnosis and implant fixation with odds of 90-day mortality after TSA or HHR. Multivariable models additionally adjusted for the type of surgery (TSA versus HHR. Adjusted Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Results Twenty-eight of the 3, 480 patient operated died within 90-days of shoulder arthroplasty (0.8%. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, the following factors were associated with significantly higher odds of 90-day mortality: higher Deyo-Charlson index (OR, 1.54; 95% CI:1.39, 1.70; p Conclusions 90-day mortality following shoulder arthroplasty was low. An underlying diagnosis of tumor, higher comorbidity and higher ASA class were risk factors for higher 90-day mortality, while higher BMI was protective. Pre-operative comorbidity management may impact 90-day mortality following shoulder arthroplasty. A higher unadjusted mortality in patients undergoing TSA versus HHR may indicate the underlying differences in patients undergoing these procedures.

  4. Reconstruction of finger pulp defect with reversed fasciocutaneous island flap from same finger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yao-jun; HONG Guang-xiang; XU Nan-wei; HU Zhi-yong; SHAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical curative effect of reconstruction of finger pulp defect by anastomosis of reversed fasciocutaneous island flap with dorsal branch of the digital nerve of the same finger. Methods: The restoration of finger pulp defect with fasciocutaneous island flap from the same finger was conducted in 25 cases (30 fingers) from January 2002 to June 2003. Nine patients (11 fingers) whose flaps with dorsal branch of the digital nerve anastomosed with the digital inherent nerve around the surface of the wound were Group A and the others were Group B. The follow-up was carried out at 3 and 9 months after the operation to observe the shape of finger pulp and the sense restoration between two groups.Results: All flaps of 25 cases (30 fingers) survived. Three months after operation, the patients had fully grown finger pulps and recovered the superficial sensation and tactile sense of finger pulps. The two point discrimination on average was 5.00 mm ± 0.23 mm in Group A and 6.00 mm ± 0.30 mm in Group B. The difference between two groups was highly significant. Nine months later, their senses of finger pulps between two groups were recovered basically. Conclusions:The reversed fasciocutaneous island flap from the same finger is the first choice to reconstruct the finger pulp defect, and the anastomosis of dorsal branch of the digital nerve shall be determined according to the specific condition.

  5. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seun Ah Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect; flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect; gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect; and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  6. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seun Ah; Kim, Baek Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Na [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [Incheon Baek Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  7. Health-related quality of life in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, J.A.; Sloan, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To study the HRQOL in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) and compare them with age- and gender-matched US population and control veteran population without these procedures.

  8. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-xing Ma; Yong-Qing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement.The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis.This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis.Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems,And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA).Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it.

  9. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  10. Bilateral hip arthroplasty: is 1-week staging the optimum strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis-Owen Charles A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seventy-nine patients underwent bilateral hip arthroplasty staged either at 1 week (Group 1 or after greater intervals (as suggested by the patients, mean 44 weeks, range 16-88 weeks (Group 2, over a five year period at one Institution. Sixty-eight patients (29 bilateral hip resurfacings and 39 total hip replacements completed questionnaires regarding their post-operative recovery, complications and overall satisfaction with the staging of their surgery. There was no significant age or ASA grade difference between the patient groups. Complication rates in the two groups were similar and overall satisfaction rates were 84% in Group 1 (n = 32 and 89% in Group 2 (n = 36. Cumulative hospital lengths of stay were significantly longer in Group 1 patients (11.9 days vs 9.1 days(p The mean time to return to part-time work was 16.4 weeks for Group 1, and a cumulative 17.2 weeks (8.8 and 8.4 weeks for Group 2. The time to return to full-time work was significantly shorter for Group 1 patients (21.0 weeks, compared with a cumulative 29.7 weeks for Group 2(p Hip resurfacing patients in Group 2 had significantly shorter durations of postoperative pain and were able to return to part-time and full time work sooner than total hip arthroplasty patients. There was a general trend towards a faster recovery and resumption of normal activities following the second operation in Group 2 patients, compared with the first operation. Bilateral hip arthroplasty staged at a 1-week interval resulted in an earlier resolution of hip pain, and an earlier return to full-time work (particularly following total hip replacement surgery, with high levels of patient satisfaction and no increased risk in complications; however the hospital length of stay was significantly longer. The decision for the timing of staged bilateral surgery should be made in conjunction with the patient, making adjustments to accommodate their occupational needs and functional demands.

  11. Hip arthroplasty for treatment of advanced osteonecrosis: comprehensive review of implant options, outcomes and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waewsawangwong W

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Warit Waewsawangwong, Pirapat Ruchiwit, James I Huddleston, Stuart B Goodman Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surgical treatment for late stage (post-collapse osteonecrosis of the femoral head is controversial. In these situations, the outcome of joint preservation procedures is poor. There are several arthroplasty options for late-stage disease. The clinical outcomes of hemiarthroplasty and hemiresurfacing are unpredictable because of progressive acetabular cartilage degeneration. Total hip resurfacing may be associated with further vascular insult to the femoral head and early failure of the implant. Total hip replacement with metal-on-conventional polyethylene bearing surfaces has been the gold standard, but implant survivorship is limited in young active patients due to wear and osteolysis. Newer alternative bearing surfaces may have improved wear characteristics, but their durability must be confirmed in longer-term studies. Keywords: hip arthroplasty, advanced osteonecrosis, implant options, outcomes, complications

  12. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  13. Elbow arthroplasty: where are we today? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degreef, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Background The elbow joint is a complex compound articulation, with a linking role within the upper limb kinematics. Its hinge function allows for proper placement of our working instrument (the hand) in the space surrounding us, directed by the shoulder joint. Both reliable mobility and stability are essential elements to allow for consistent bridging of the distance we aim to achieve in common daily activities. Sufficient flexion and extension are required to ensure both the patients' independence and the dignity. Next to the hinge, a radio-ulnar rotation with precise co-operation of forearm and wrist spin enhances the linking function with accurate precision instrument manipulation. Arthritis of the elbow joint or cubarthritis, whether primary or secondary, may not be as highly prevalent as hip or knee arthritis, but its impact on daily live certainly cannot be underestimated. Methods Current treatment options for failing cubarthritis are reviewed. Results Surgical techniques to reconstruct or replace the elbow joint are currently increasingly efficient with mounting long-term outcome reports. Debridement techniques including open or arthroscopic Outerbridge-Kashiwaghi procedure often delays joint replacement. Implants for joint arthroplasty focus on the ulna-humeral joint mostly with semi-constrained linked techniques, but there is a trend towards total joint replacement including the radiocapitellar joint. Conclusion In this independent review article, elbow joint failure due to cubarthritis and an overview of its current state-of-the-art orthopaedic treatment algorithm is presented, with its indications, advantages, risks and outcome.

  14. An unusual case of persistent groin pain after total hip arthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederich Niklaus F

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Arthroplasty is a well-established routine elective surgical procedure in orthopaedics. To a great extent, diagnosis, treatment and post-operative rehabilitation in these patients is standardised. In a busy clinic, surgeons from time to time tend to focus their attention on common causes of joint pain, but it may lead them to overlook sinister but less common pathologies. Here we report a case of a patient with groin pain due to pre-operatively undetected pelvic metastases from a pyeloureteral carcinoma who underwent total hip arthroplasty. There are several case reports which deal with primary or secondary tumours which were either discovered at the time of replacement surgery or developed at the site of prosthesis years after total hip or knee replacement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in which a metastatic cancer was missed pre-operatively and intra-operatively both by the radiologist and by the orthopaedic surgeon and should be reported so that surgeons are reminded to be careful when dealing with seemingly routine cases. Case presentation A 79-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the arthroplasty clinic with groin pain. Initial radiographs showed subtle bilateral abnormalities in the pelvis. Neither the radiologist nor the orthopaedic surgeon recognized it. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the hip was established, and she underwent total hip arthroplasty. Despite initial improvement, the patient came back with worsening hip pain three months later. Further radiological examination revealed multiple metastatic lesions throughout the pelvis due to a pyeloureteral carcinoma. Conclusions This case report emphasizes the importance of meticulous, unbiased pre-operative assessment of patients and their radiographs, even in so-called routine clinical cases. Often subtle radiological changes are classed as normal, especially if they are bilateral. Further radiological imaging should be recommended

  15. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  16. Generating and analyzing synthetic finger vein images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillerström, Fieke; Kumar, Ajay; Veldhuis, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The finger-vein biometric offers higher degree of security, personal privacy and strong anti-spoofing capabilities than most other biometric modalities employed today. Emerging privacy concerns with the database acquisition and lack of availability of large scale finger-vein database have

  17. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  18. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  19. Double dislocation of finger interphalangeal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Saqib Aziz; Mestha, Prabhakar; McNally, Scarlett

    2012-10-22

    A 62-year-old, right-hand-dominant man who had dementia and lived in an Elderly Mentally Infirm (EMI) nursing home was admitted through Accident & Emergency (A&E) department following unwitnessed injury to the left little finger. His examination revealed a swollen and deformed left little finger with a laceration along the middle crease on the volar aspect and head of proximal phalanx visible through this. Distally sensations and capillary refill was normal. X-rays showed a double dislocation of both proximal and distal interphalangeal joints. The finger was reduced under ring block and the laceration was washed with saline in A&E. The patient was taken to the operation theatre next morning for wound exploration and wash-out±stabilistion of the finger under general anaesthesia. The wound was thoroughly washed out and closed with 4/0 interrupted nylon. The finger was immobilised with neighbour strapping and bandaged in flexion.

  20. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  1. Primary total hip arthroplasty for acetabular fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zi-ming; SUN Hong-zhen; WANG Ai-min; DU Quan-yin; WU Siyu; ZHAO Yu-feng; TANG Ying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the operative indications and operative methods of primary total hip arthroplasty for acetabular fracture and to observe the clinical curative effect.Methods: We retrospectively summarized and analyzed the traumatic conditions, fracture types, complications,operative time, operative techniques, and short-term curative effect of 11 patients( 10 males and 1 female, with a mean age of 42. 4 years ) with acetabular fracture who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty.Results: The patients were followed up for 6-45 months ( mean = 28 months). Their average Harris score of postoperative hip joint was 78.Conclusion: Under strict mastery of indications,patients with acetabular fracture may undergo primary total hip arthroplasty, but stable acetabular components should be made.

  2. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  3. The Incidence of Adjacent Segment Degeneration after Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA): A Meta Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Baohui Yang; Haopeng Li; Ting Zhang; Xijing He; Siyue Xu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cervical disc arthroplasty is being used as an alternative degenerative disc disease treatment with fusion of the cervical spine in order to preserve motion. However, whether replacement arthoplasty in the spine achieves its primary patient centered objective of lowering the frequency of adjacent segment degeneration is not verified yet. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a meta-analysis according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration using databases including PubMed, Cochrane Ce...

  4. Current concepts in total femoral replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo Bp; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-12-18

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20(th) century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure.

  5. Use of Cement Gun for Fixation of Tibia Component in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Yoga

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficacy of a cement gun to improve the depth of cement penetration in total knee arthroplasty. Ninety-one consecutive patients from two hospitals were recruited for this study. For Group I cement was applied to the tibial baseplate and the proximal tibia with fingers. Group 2 had similar application of cement to the tibial baseplate but cement was pressurized into the proximal tibia using a cement gun.. The knee was kept extended until the cement hardened. Standard post-operative x-rays were reviewed to assess cement penetration into the proximal tibia. The mean cement penetration was 2.1 mm in Group 1 and 3.1 mm in Group 2 and the difference was statistically significant. The use of the cement gun improves cement penetration into the proximal tibia and facilitates early stability of the implant fixation to the bone.

  6. Child labour. Refuting the "nimble fingers" argument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    According to an International Labor Organization (ILO) study, approximately 130,000 children work in India's hand-knotted carpet industry. In one-loom enterprises, children comprise 14% of all weavers; in businesses with five or more looms, this rate increases to 33%. India's Factories Act, which applies costly health, safety, and labor regulations to larger firms, has led to a proliferation of cottage industries. The finding that children are more likely to work on low-quality rather than highest-quality carpets refutes the "nimble fingers" argument used by apologists of child labor. Although child and adult weavers have similar productivity, children earn less while apprentices than trained weavers and serve to depress wages throughout the industry. According to ILO estimates, replacing the 22% of the work force currently occupied by children with adults would cause wages to rise by about 5%. The overall savings in production costs from the use of child labor are very small when compared to the foreign retail price of the carpets, which is often four times the Indian export price. The ILO has urged an international approach to the elimination of child labor, in which all carpet-producing countries simultaneously implement a no-child-labor strategy to avoid placing any one country at a competitive disadvantage. Given the thousands of cottages where one or two carpets are woven per year, strategies such as labelling and regulation are likely to be ineffective. Solutions that address the general problems of poverty, while developing alternative sources of education and employment, are most likely to be effective in reducing child labor in countries such as India.

  7. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA.

  8. Total hip arthroplasty after previous fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Peter C; Braud, Jared L; Whatley, John M

    2015-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty can be a very effective salvage treatment for both failed fracture surgery and hip arthritis that may occur after prior fracture surgery. The rate of complications is significantly increased including especially infection, dislocation, and loosening. Complications are more likely to occur after failed open reduction and internal fixation than after posttraumatic arthritis. Adequately ruling out infection before hip arthroplasty can be difficult. The best predictor of infection is a prior infection. Long-term outcomes can be comparable to outcomes in other conditions if complications are avoided.

  9. Revision Total Hip Replacement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Hafizur Rahman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. Conventional, primary total hip replacement is a durable operation in the majority of patients. A hip replacement is a mechanical device with parts that are assembled before and during the operation. But the possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, and its clinical performance over time, is a challenging occasion to the surgeons, and such a challenge we faced with our presenting patient. A 68 year old lady with history of cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty done in a tertiary care hospital, due to fracture neck of the left femur having the history of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, heart disease, anaemia, and mental disorders presented with loosened prosthesis, thinning of medial proximal cortex of the femur which had broken within few months after surgery. She complained of painful walking at left hip joint. There was also evidence of chronic infective and degenerative arthritis of acetabular component of the affected hip joint. Cemented revision total hip replacement surgery was performed with expert multidisciplinary involvement. On 2nd postoperative day the patient was allowed to walk on operated limb with the aid of walker. On 12th postoperative day all the stitches were removed and wound was found healthy.

  10. Poor 10-year survivorship of hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppänen, Matti; Karvonen, Mikko; Virolainen, Petri; Remes, Ville; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Eskelinen, Antti; Liukas, Antti; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose In a previous registry report, short-term implant survival of hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) in Finland was found to be comparable to that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Since then, it has become evident that adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMDs) may also be associated with HRA, not only with large-diameter head metal-on-metal THA. The aim of the study was to assess medium- to long-term survivorship of HRA based on the Finnish Arthroplasty Register (FAR). Patients and methods 5,068 HRAs performed during the period 2001–2013 in Finland were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate survival probabilities and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, diagnosis, femoral head size, and hospital volume was used to analyze implant survival of HRA devices with revision for any reason as endpoint. The reference group consisted of 6,485 uncemented Vision/Bimetric and ABG II THAs performed in Finland over the same time period. Results The 8-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, was 93% (CI: 92–94) for Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR), 86% (CI: 78–94) for Corin, 91% (CI: 89–94) for ReCap, 92% (CI: 89–96) for Durom, and was 72% (CI: 69–76) for the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR). The 10-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, for reference THAs was 92% (CI: 91–92) and for all HRAs it was 86% (CI: 84–87%). Female HRA patients had about twice the revision risk of male patients. ASR had an inferior outcome: the revision risk was 4-fold higher than for BHR, the reference implant. Interpretation The 10-year implant survival of HRAs is 86% in Finland. According to new recommendations from NICE (The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence), an HRA/THA should have a revision rate of 5% or less at 10 years. None of the HRAs studied achieved this goal. PMID:27759474

  11. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p < 0.01). Higher levels of BMP-2, 4 and reduced levels of AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches.

  12. Post-operative auto-transfusion in total hip or knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Haien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Total hip or knee arthroplasty is an elective procedure that is usually accompanied by substantial blood loss, which may lead to acute anemia. As a result, almost half of total joint arthroplasty patients receive allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT. Many studies have shown that post-operative auto-transfusion (PAT significantly reduces the need for ABT, but other studies have questioned the efficacy of this method. METHODS: The protocol for this trial and supporting CONSORT checklist are available as supporting information; see Checklist S1. To evaluate the efficacy of PAT, we conducted a Cochrane systematic review that combined all available data from randomized controlled trials. Data from the six included trials were pooled for analysis. We then calculated relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous outcomes. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis to compare the clinical results between PAT and a control in joint replacement patients. This meta-analysis has proven that the use of a PAT reinfusion system reduced significantly the demand for ABT, the number of patients who require ABT and the cost of hospitalization after total knee and hip arthroplasty. This study, together with other previously published data, suggests that PAT drains are beneficial. Larger, sufficiently powered studies are necessary to evaluate the presumed reduction in the incidence of infection as well as DVT after joint arthroplasty with the use of PAT.

  13. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  14. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Corten

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA is a concept of hip replacement that allows treating young active patients with a femoral bone preserving procedure. The proposed advantages of resuming an active lifestyle with increased frequency and duration of sports activities have been shown to be realistic. The 30-year cost-effectiveness in young male patients has been shown to be higher in resurfacing compared to conventional total hip replacement (THA. However, prognosticators of an inferior outcome have also been identified. The most important patient related factors are secondary osteoarthritis as the indication for surgery such as post-childhood hip disorders or AVN, female gender, smaller component sizes and older age (>65 years for males and >55 years for females. In addition, surgical technique (approach and cementing technique and component design are also important determinant factors for the risk of failure. Moreover, concerns have surfaced with respect to high metal ion concentrations and metal ion hypersensitivities. In addition, the presumed ease of revising HRA has not reflected in improved or equal survivorship in comparison to a primary THA. This highlights the importance of identifying patient-, surgery-, and implant-related prognosticators for success or failure of HRA. Rather than vilifying the concept of hip resurfacing, detailed in depth analysis should be used to specify indications and improve implant design and surgical techniques.

  15. Effect of proximal femoral osteoporosis on cementless hip arthroplasty: A short-term clinical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Xian-feng; LI Yu-hong; LIN Xiang-jin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective investigation was to explore the influence of femoral osteoporosis on short-term curative effects of cementless hip arthroplasty and to evaluate the femoral metaphyseal bone mineral density (BMD) for femoral osteoporosis in order to guide prosthesis choice and rehabilitation. Methods: We performed 127 total arthroplasty operations between June 1999 to February 2003 and investigated 49 cementless hip replacements with the Metalcancellous cementless Lubeck Ⅱ system being used in all hips. There were twenty men and twenty-nine women whose mean age at the time of the operation was 60 years (range, 52~81 years). The patients were divided into osteoporosis or normal groups according to the femoral metaphyseal BMD measured preoperatively. The average duration of follow-up was 30 months (range, 8~52 months). We evaluated all of the patients from a clinical standpoint with use of a standard-terminology questionnaire with respect to the short-term curative effects and patients' satisfaction. Hip pain status and functional ability were important indicators of treatment efficacy. Results: Harris hip score and patients' satisfaction in femoral osteoporosis patients who underwent noncemented hip arthroplasty were lower (P=0.004, P=0.03) while the incidence of thigh pain was higher (P=0.03) than the patients with non-osteoporosis. Conclusion: The higher incidence of pain, as well as the decrease in function experienced by the patients in osteoporosis group, supports the case that cementless arthroplasty is not a better choice for those patients and that we had better select prosthesis based on the femoral metaphyseal BMD.

  16. Neurovascular lesion after total hip arthroplasty in congenital hip dysplasia: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković-Jovanović Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, the total hip arthroplasty is a very frequent surgical intervention. In some cases, vascular and nerve injuries may happen around the hip with total hip arthroplasty. Although they are very rare, they may be very dangerous for the patient in some cases. This paper presents a case of a female patient, in whom the nervous fibularis lesion was detected after the total hip arthroplasty, and the occlusion of the iliac femoral artery was revealed later during physical therapy. Case Report. We described a case of a 32-year-old female patient, in whom the nervous fibularis lesion was detected after the total hip arthroplasty. The patient was referred to a ward for physical therapy. On the 19th postoperative day, she felt a vigorous ache and numbness on the left operated leg during stimulation of the paretic fibular musculature. Clinically weak inguinal arterial pulse was detected. After the examination, iliac-femoral occlusion was diagnosed. The patient was referred to the vascular surgeon. In the next few months, she was treated conservatively and eventually underwent surgery. The revascularization was achieved with a satisfactory effect. A year after the total hip replacement, the patient continued with rehabilitation and physical treatment, which lasted one and a half month and had an incomplete functional result - the patient walked with a walking stick and had weak fibular musculature of a severe degree. The vascular status of the leg was good. Conclusion. In this case, neurovascular lesions led to an incomplete functional recovery of the patient and compromised the expected treatment outcome. According to the scoring system used to assess the functionality, the result was marked as poor.

  17. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Alexander; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Schneider, Philipp; Kuster, Markus S

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed using three platinum coils with good clinical result and good knee joint function. Hemarthrosis has not recurred since embolization.

  18. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Rukavina, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Schneider, P.; Kuster, M S

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed using three platinum coils with good clinical result and good knee joint function. Hemarthrosis has not recurred since embolization.

  19. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rukavina, A.; Kerkhoffs, G.M.M.J.; Schneider, P.; Kuster, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed usin

  20. SOFT TISSUE BALANCING IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pencho Kosev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with the soft tissue balancing in total hip arthroplasty. Detailed indications, planning and surgical technique are presented. The described procedures are performed on 278 hips for a period of 6 years (2008-2014. We conclude that the outcome of a THA can be improved by balancing the stability, ROM, muscle strength and limb length equality.

  1. Dilemmas in Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, J.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, different aspects that are related to the survivorship and clinical outcome in uncemented total hip arthroplasty are analysed. In Chapter 2, the survival rate, Harris Hip score and radiographic features of a proximally hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy femoral stem (Bi-Metric, Bio

  2. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery...

  3. Knee arthroplasty in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Lidgren, Lars; Mehnert, Frank; Odgaard, Anders; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The number of national arthroplasty registries is increasing. However, the methods of registration, classification, and analysis often differ. Methods We combined data from 3 Nordic knee arthroplasty registers, comparing demographics, methods, and overall results. Primary arthroplasties during the period 1997–2007 were included. Each register produced a dataset of predefined variables, after which the data were combined and descriptive and survival statistics produced. Results The incidence of knee arthroplasty increased in all 3 countries, but most in Denmark. Norway had the lowest number of procedures per hospital—less than half that of Sweden and Denmark. The preference for implant brands varied and only 3 total brands and 1 unicompartmental brand were common in all 3 countries. Use of patellar button for total knee arthroplasty was popular in Denmark (76%) but not in Norway (11%) or Sweden (14%). Uncemented or hybrid fixation of components was also more frequent in Denmark (22%) than in Norway (14%) and Sweden (2%). After total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the cumulative revision rate (CRR) was lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having a relative risk (RR) of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6) and 1.6 (CI: 1.4–1.7) times higher. The result was similar when only including brands used in more than 200 cases in all 3 countries (AGC, Duracon, and NexGen). After unicompartmental arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the CRR for all models was also lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having RRs of 1.7 (CI: 1.4–2.0) and 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8), respectively. When only the Oxford implant was analyzed, however, the CRRs were similar and the RRs were 1.2 (CI: 0.9–1.7) and 1.3 (CI: 1.0–1.7). Interpretation We found considerable differences between the 3 countries, with Sweden having a lower revision rate than Denmark and Norway. Further classification and standardization work is needed to permit more elaborate studies. PMID:20180723

  4. Fingering Convection in Red Giants Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wachlin, F C; Althaus, L G

    2014-01-01

    Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in Red Giant stars due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show however that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed (BGS). The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than the ones previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. We use the LPCODE stellar evolution code with the GNA generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute Red Giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fing...

  5. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  6. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  7. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  8. Case Reports: Thumb Reconstruction Using Amputated Fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Nguyen T.; Staudenmaier, R.; Hoehnke, C.

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and ...

  9. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    the finger to another element is Ω(q− 1(logn)), where t is the rank distance between the query element and the finger. We present an optimal implicit static structure matching this lower bound. We furthermore present a near optimal implicit dynamic structure supporting search, change-finger, insert......We address the problem of creating a dictionary with the finger search property in the strict implicit model, where no information is stored between operations, except the array of elements. We show that for any implicit dictionary supporting finger searches in q(t) = Ω(logt) time, the time to move......, and delete in times $\\mathcal{O}(q(t))$, $\\mathcal{O}(q^{-1}(\\log n)\\log n)$, $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, respectively, for any q(t) = Ω(logt). Finally we show that the search operation must take Ω(logn) time for the special case where the finger is always changed to the element...

  10. Artificial cervical disc replacement: Principles, types and techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhon L

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical arthroplasty after anterior decompression with insertion of a prosthetic total disc replacement has been suggested as an alternate to anterior cervical fusion. Currently there are four cervical arthroplasty devices available on the market whose results in clinical use have been reported. Each device varies in terms of materials, range of motion, insertion technique and constraint. It is not known which device is ideal. Early studies suggest that in the short term, the complication rate and efficacy is no worse than fusion surgery. Long-term results have not yet been reported. This review examines the current prostheses available on the market as well as discussing issues regarding indications and technique. Pitfalls are discussed and early experiences reviewed. In time, it is hoped that a refinement of cervical arthroplasty occurs in terms of both materials and design as well as in terms of indications and clinical outcomes as spinal surgeons enter a new era of the management of cervical spine disease.

  11. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  12. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  13. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  14. Total joint arthroplasties: current concepts of patient outcomes after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C Allyson; Beaupre, Lauren A; Johnston, D W C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2007-02-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasties are effective surgical interventions for relieving hip pain and improving physical function caused by arthritis. Although the majority of patients substantially improve, not all report gains or are satisfied after receiving total joint arthroplasty. This article reviews the literature on patient outcomes after total hip and knee arthroplasties for osteoarthritis, and the evidence pertaining to factors that affect these patient-centered outcomes. Mounting evidence suggests that no single patient-related or perioperative factor clearly predicts the amount of pain relief or functional improvement that will occur following total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  15. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Jinfeng Yang; Ben Zhang; Yihua Shi

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of f...

  16. Web Page Content and Quality Assessed for Shoulder Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, John R; Harrison, Caitlyn M; Hughes, Travis M; Dezfuli, Bobby; Sheppard, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has become a major source for obtaining health-related information. This study assesses and compares the quality of information available online for shoulder replacement using medical (total shoulder arthroplasty [TSA]) and nontechnical (shoulder replacement [SR]) terminology. Three evaluators reviewed 90 websites for each search term across 3 search engines (Google, Yahoo, and Bing). Websites were grouped into categories, identified as commercial or noncommercial, and evaluated with the DISCERN questionnaire. Total shoulder arthroplasty provided 53 unique sites compared to 38 websites for SR. Of the 53 TSA websites, 30% were health professional-oriented websites versus 18% of SR websites. Shoulder replacement websites provided more patient-oriented information at 48%, versus 45% of TSA websites. In total, SR websites provided 47% (42/90) noncommercial websites, with the highest number seen in Yahoo, compared with TSA at 37% (33/90), with Google providing 13 of the 33 websites (39%). Using the nonmedical terminology with Yahoo's search engine returned the most noncommercial and patient-oriented websites. However, the quality of information found online was highly variable, with most websites being unreliable and incomplete, regardless of search term.

  17. Finger arterial versus intrabrachial pressure and continuous cardiac output during head-up tilt testing in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Goudoever, J. van; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1996-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were to determine the clinical feasibility of continuous, non-invasive Finapres recordings as a replacement for intrabrachial pressure during a 30 min head-up tilt, and the reliability of continuous cardiac output computation by pulse contour analysis from the finger arteri

  18. Genome editing in plant cells by zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinthal, Dan; Tovkach, Andriy; Zeevi, Vardit; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2010-06-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful tool for functional gene studies. However, only a handful of reports have been published describing the successful targeting of genome sequences in model and crop plants. Gene targeting can be stimulated by induction of double-strand breaks at specific genomic sites. The expression of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can induce genomic double-strand breaks. Indeed, ZFNs have been used to drive the replacement of native DNA sequences with foreign DNA molecules, to mediate the integration of the targeted transgene into native genome sequences, to stimulate the repair of defective transgenes, and as site-specific mutagens in model and crop plant species. This review introduces the principles underlying the use of ZFNs for genome editing, with an emphasis on their recent use for plant research and biotechnology.

  19. A Case of Acute Prosthesis Migration after Femoral Head Replacement due to Osteomalacia by FGF23-Induced Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Hayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 was recently identified as an important factor involved in the development of hypophosphatemic rickets and osteomalacia. We experienced a rare case of acute prosthesis migration after hemihip arthroplasty due to FGF23-induced tumor. The patient underwent femoral head replacement because of femoral neck fracture, but prosthesis migration was occurred at 1 week after operation. The patient took various examinations, and FGF23-induced tumor was found in his right wrist. The tumor was resected, and he underwent total hip arthroplasty 8 month later. Finally, he was able to obtain free gait without pain.

  20. Patellar resurfacing versus nonresurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis: experience at a tertiary care institution in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakdawala RH

    2012-02-01

    patients undergoing primary Total Knee Arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, there is no added advantage of performing resurfacing of the patellar at 3 years of follow-up.Keywords: patellar, patellar ligament, patellofemoral pain syndrome, arthroplasty subchondral, arthroplasy replacement knee, osteoarthritis knee, Pakistan

  1. Rehabilitation for total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterman, Scott; Rubin, Lee E

    2013-05-01

    Total hip and knee replacement are two of the most common and successful elective surgeries preformed in the United States each year. Preoperative medical preparation and postoperative rehabilitation are equally important to a successful outcome. Physical deconditioning, tobacco use, obesity and medical co-morbidities can adversely affect outcomes and should be addressed before any elective procedure. Formal postoperative therapy is geared towards the specific surgery and is aimed at returning the patient to independent activity.

  2. Design of a 2-Finger Hand Exoskeleton for Finger Stiffness Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Emanuele Fiorilla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of human arm movements have suggested that the control of stiffness may be important both for maintaining stability and for achieving differences in movement accuracy. Several studies in the robotic field demonstrated that grasp stiffness is useful for modelling and controlling manipulators but, even though it is accredited that having models of the human finger impedance would be very desirable for the control of anthropomorphous robot's hands, relatively few studies have focused on finger and hand stiffness. To allow the measurement of such entities at the finger level, an appropriate device capable of applying fast force transients while at the same time be able to monitor the finger movements is required. The work presented in this paper is a very detailed report about the design of a new hand exoskeleton system that will be used in our future works to investigate the finger stiffness range in different grasping postures and conditions.

  3. Age and Comorbidities Affect Quality of Life in Patients With Osteoarthrtitis and Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Cuadros

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial, disabling and degenerative disease that worsens with age and affects patient’s health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Objectives The current study aimed to assess if age and comorbidities have an influence on knee OA and knee replacement outcome before and after the surgery. Methods A quasi-experimental intervention study was conducted on a sample of 125 patients with knee osteoarthritis and designed to assess total knee arthroplasty (TKA outcomes before and after the surgery. One orthopedic surgeon performed all surgeries with the same type of joint prosthesis from 2008 to 2012. The HRQOL was assessed by the short form (36 health survey (SF-36 questionnaire. Results It was observed that knee osteoarthritis significantly affects all the dimensions of HRQOL before the surgery included in the SF-36 questionnaire and a clinical improvement observed after the intervention with total knee arthroplasty. Age influenced bodily pain (P = 0.012 and vitality (P = 0.002 in knee osteoarthritis (before the intervention, and on physical (P = 0.040 and mental health components (P = 0.002, after total knee arthroplasty. Previous arthroplasties and comorbidities had no effect on knee OA. However, previous total knee/hip arthroplasty were associated with the improvement in physical functioning (P = 0.021 after the TKA; comorbidities influenced the dimension of mental health (MH (P = 0.036 after the surgery. Conclusions Total knee arthroplasty is justified according to the perception of clinical improvement and the improvement in the dimensions of HRQOL reported by the patients. Age affects knee osteoarthritis and TKA outcomes. Comorbidities have no influence on knee OA, but affect mental health after the intervention.

  4. Delayed cementless total hip arthroplasty for neglected dislocation of hip combined with complex acetabular fracture and deficient bone stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavaskar Ashok S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Total hip arthroplasty (THA for an un-treated acetabular fracture is technically challenging and the long-term result is not so favorable. A 45-year-old fe-male patient with untreated column and comminuted poste-rior wall fracture of the acetabulum was treated in our insti-tution by reconstruction of the posterior wall using iliac strut autograft and plate stabilization of the posterior col-umn with cancellous grafting and cementless THA in a single stage. At 3 years’ follow-up, the patient was independently mobile without limb length discrepancy. Radiological evalu-ation showed well integrated components and bone grafts. No evidence of aseptic loosening or osteolysis was found. This report aims to emphasize that bony acetabular recon-struction allows the use of primary hip components, which improves prosthesis longevity and preserves bone stock for a future revision. Key words: Acetabulum; Fractures, bone; Hip dislocation; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  5. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    KAUST Repository

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  6. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  7. Thromboembolism prophylaxis practices in orthopaedic arthroplasty patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2010-10-01

    Thromboembolic events are a post-operative complication of arthroplasty surgery for up to 3 months. The incidence however, is not fully known. Some form of prophylaxis should be provided to all arthroplasty patients. Clinicians are wary of side effects, compliance profile and the associated cost. The objective of this study is to investigate practice patterns and their relevance to 3 risk groups. Ninety questionnaires were sent to orthopaedic surgeons with 3 hypothetical clinical scenarios and 10 prophylaxis regimes for thromboembolism across different risk groups. The response rate was 81\\/90 (90%). The most popular options in all 3 cases were early mobilisation, thrombo-embolism deterrant (TED) stockings and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (51\\/81, 62% of all cases). An inconsistent relationship exists between preferred practice and relevant guidelines. Preferred practice does not correlate with each level of risk.

  8. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care.

  9. On reducing the need for arthroplasty: benefits for patients and budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John T

    2003-04-01

    The need for arthroplasty, especially in the hip, arises primarily because of failure to replace damaged structural proteins as a result of improper balance in essential nutrients. The principal failure is an inadequate production of elastin resulting in cartilage consisting primarily of a collagen that may be flexible but is not elastic. In spite of the fact that an excess of protein, with adequate lysine, is commonly consumed by the affluent societies, this lysine is not utilized because of the inadequate intake of ascorbic acid necessary for virtually every step of the structural protein synthetic reactions. Experiments in animals support these conclusions. It is anticipated that dietary correction in candidates for total hip replacement will be able to restore normal hip cartilage (with corresponding improvements of other structural protein deficits throughout the body) in less than a year. Adoption of this regimen should result in: (1) a greatly decreased need for arthroplasties; and (2) better results in those that are performed, with less failures and less need for revisions. The benefits include much less suffering for patients and far lower medical costs.

  10. Clinical effects of applying a tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty on blood loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-jiang; XIAO Yu; LIU Ya-bin; TIAN Xu; GAO Zhi-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Tourniquets used during total knee arthroplasty may lead to many complications. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative blood loss and its clinical relevance in total knee replacement surgery after applying a tourniquet.Methods From June 2009 to October 2009, 60 consecutive patients who underwent routine total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into two groups and were treated with or without a tourniquet (30 patients/group). There were no significant differences in patient baseline characteristics between the two groups. We compared the two groups of patients in terms of intra- and postoperative bleeding, invisible or visible bleeding, and total blood loss.Results None of the patients showed poor wound healing, lower extremity deep venous thrombosis or other complications. The amount of blood loss during surgery was lower in the tourniquet group than in the control group (P<0.01). However, postoperative visible bleeding (P <0.05) and occult bleeding (P <0.05) were significantly greater in the toumiquet group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in the total amount of blood loss between the two groups (P >0.05).Conclusions Tourniquet can reduce bleeding during total knee replacement surgery, but is associated with greater visible and invisible blood loss.

  11. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  12. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eBerteletti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense.

  13. Imaging of hip arthroplasty; Bildgebung bei Hueftprothesen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Radiodiagnostik chirurgischer Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Mayerhoefer, M. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Radiodiagnostik chirurgischer Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Gottsauner-Wolf, F. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria); Abteilung fuer Orthopaedie, Allgemeines oeffentliches KH, Krems (Austria); Krestan, C.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Toma, C.D. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Hip arthroplasty has become a common and still increasing procedure for the treatment of osteoarthritis, advanced head necrosis, post-inflammatory arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.Radiography is the most important imaging modality for monitoring the normal, asymptomatic hip arthroplasty. Radiographs are obtained at the end of a surgical treatment, to exclude complications like fracture or component misplacement. In the follow-up radiographs are used for the diagnosis of loosening and infection of the hip arthroplasty as well as soft tissue ossification. Together with the history and clinical information, the analysis of morphological findings allows to find the grade of loosening. MRI has been advocated in the diagnosis of infection, in particular in the localisation of soft tissue involvement.Imaging, especially by radiographs, is used for the evaluation of the normal and complicated follow-up of hip arthroplasty. (orig.) [German] Die Implantation einer Hueftgelenkprothese ist eine immer haeufiger verwendete medizinische Massnahme bei Erkrankungen des Hueftgelenks wie Koxarthrose, Hueftkopfnekrose, postentzuendliche Arthrose oder rheumatoide Arthritis.Von den bildgebenden Methoden ist das konventionelle Roentgen die wichtigste Untersuchung, um den normalen Behandlungsverlauf einer Hueftprothese zu monitieren. Das Roentgen kann fruehzeitige Komplikationen wie Fraktur oder Fehlposition intraoperativ oder eine Luxation postoperativ erfassen. Im laengerfristigen Verlauf ist das Roentgen zur Diagnose von Infektion, Prothesenlockerung und Weichteilverknoecherung geeignet. In Zusammenschau mit der Klinik ermoeglicht die Analyse morphologisch-radiologischer Details, die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Lockerung abzuschaetzen. Bei Protheseninfektionen ermoeglicht die MRT die Lokalisation von Weichteilentzuendungen.Die Methoden der Bildgebung, besonders das Roentgen, haben in der Beurteilung des normalen und in der Diagnose des komplizierten Verlaufes einen hohen Stellenwert

  14. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    PETRICCIOLI, DARIO; BERTONE, CELESTE; MARCHI, GIACOMO

    2015-01-01

    The design of humeral implants for shoulder arthroplasty has evolved over the years. The new-generation modular shoulder prostheses have an anatomical humeral stem that replicates the three-dimensional parameters of the proximal humerus. An anatomical reconstruction is the best way to restore stability and mobility of the prosthetic shoulder and improve implant durability. However, a perfect anatomical match is not always possible in, for example, patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis o...

  15. Dilemmas in Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Goosen, J. H. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, different aspects that are related to the survivorship and clinical outcome in uncemented total hip arthroplasty are analysed. In Chapter 2, the survival rate, Harris Hip score and radiographic features of a proximally hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy femoral stem (Bi-Metric, Biomet) was evaluated. In conclusion, at an average follow-up of 8 years, this proximally HA-coated femoral component showed favorable clinical and radiological outcome and excellent survivorship. In ...

  16. New concepts in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, Kelly G; Droll, Kurt; Chivas, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Revision knee arthroplasty should be regarded as a discipline separate from primary surgery. A disciplined approach to diagnosis is mandatory in which the following categories for failure are useful: (a) sepsis, (b) extensor mechanism rupture, (c) stiffness, (d) instability, (e) periprosthetic fracture, (f) aseptic loosening and osteolysis, (g) patellar complications and malrotation, (h) component breakage, and (i) no diagnosis. In the event of no coherent explanation for pain and disability, the possibilities of chronic regional pain syndrome, hip or spine pathology, and inability of current technology to meet patient expectations should be considered and revision surgery should be avoided. Revision arthroplasty cannot be performed as if it were a primary procedure and indeed will be eight (or more) different surgeries depending on the cause of failure. Though perhaps counterintuitive, there is a logical rationale and empirical evidence to support complete revision in virtually every case. In general, revision implant systems are required. The early dependence on the "joint line" is inadequate, failing as it does to recognize that the level of the articulation is a three-dimensional concept and not simply a "line." The key to revision surgery technique is that the flexion gap is determined by femoral component size and the extension gap by proximal distal component position. Accordingly, a general technical pathway of three steps can be recommended: 1) tibial platform; 2) stabilization of the knee in flexion with (a) femoral component rotation and (b) size selected with evaluation of (c) patellar height as an indication of "joint line" in flexion only; and 3) stabilization of the knee in extension, an automatic step. Stem extensions improve fixation and, if they engage the diaphysis, may be used as a guide for positioning. Porous metals designed as augments for bone defects may prove more important as "modular fixation interfaces." It is postulated that with the

  17. Recurrent hemarthrosis after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kunihiro; Ito, Haruo; Ogawa, Akito; Asanuma, Yumiko; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Sudo, Akihiro

    2011-09-09

    Recurrent hemarthrosis after knee arthroplasty can be disabling, requiring adequate and immediate diagnosis and treatment for recovery of symptoms and joint function. The most commonly reported cause is impingement of proliferative synovium between prosthetic components. Although various procedures for hemarthrosis have been reported after knee arthroplasty for patients who do not respond to conservative treatment, the recommended first-line therapy is open surgery or embolization. Although hyperplastic synovium was observed during the first and second arthrotomy, in our case, tissue impingement was not detected. We describe a rare case of recurrent hemarthrosis after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and successful treatment by open synovectomy. A 66-year-old woman presented with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle in the right leg. She underwent UKA of the right knee of the medial condyle. Eighteen months after UKA, the patient developed recurrent hemarthrosis. Open arthrotomy was performed 22 months after UKA, revealing only hematoma with no obvious hemorrhage or loosening of the prosthesis. No history of trauma or use of anticoagulant medications was present. After a symptom-free period of 8 months, another 2 episodes of hemarthrosis occurred over the course of 8 months. A second open arthrotomy was performed. Hyperplastic synovium with fibrin and hemosiderin pigmentation was observed, again without hemorrhage or loosening. There were no pathological features of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Synovectomy was performed, and no hemarthrosis has recurred for 2 years.

  18. Analysis of the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Firsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012-2014 total 67 unicompartmental arthroplasty surgeries with use of Oxford knee meniscal bearing were performed. The surgeries were performed by a single surgeon. Minimally invasive approach was used. All patients were evaluated clinically, radiographically and with Oxford Knee score scale, Knee Society score scale and functional scale. Obtained data was processed with nonparametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results were processed using the statistical analysis application package SPSS, version 10.07. Analysis of of mid-term results showed that the average for Oxford Knee score increased from 16.4 (95% CI 9-23 to 41.3 (95% CI 29-47. Average for Knee Society score scale increased from 42.7 (95% CI 31-55 to 88.6 (95% CI 73-100. No occurrence of early postoperative complications have been reported. Statistically significant improvements of knee function in patients after unicompartmental arthroplasty have been observed. Unicompartmental arthroplasty currently can be considered as an advanced treatment option for medial knee joint pathology. Meniscal bearing cemented prostheses such as Oxford III are preferable.

  19. Perioperative blood saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstmann, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores and discusses different aspects of blood loss and blood-saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty. Background: Worldwide, approximately 1 million total hip and 1 million total knee prostheses are implanted each year. Total hip arthroplasty and total knee art

  20. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben B; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related functional outcomes after fast-track total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, we wanted to assess physical areas where an additional need for rehabilitation could be identified, and finally, we...

  1. Arthroplasties of hips and knees ankylosis in an adolescent with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipo Samuel OLABUMUYI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children, representing one third of all paediatric malignancies. Patients are often at high risk for complications due aggressive chemotherapy regimes required for treatment. Musculoskeletal complications include septic arthritis, osteonecrosis, osteoporosis, avascular necrosis and bony ankylosis. We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with ALL who developed osteonecrosis of multiple bones on a background of septicaemia, resulting in bony ankylosis of both hips and knees. He was treated with bilateral conversion of ankylosed hips (one hip to total hip replacement, the second hip to Girdlestone arthroplasty and bilateral ankylosed knees to total knee replacements. He remained well in remission five years after the last surgery. Our case highlights he possible musculoskeletal complications of ALL. 

  2. Results of porous-coated anatomic and duracon total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Jonathon; Quinlan, John; Doyle, Terry; Bayan, Ali; Theis, Jean-Claude

    2010-12-01

    The Duracon total knee replacement and its forerunner the Porous-Coated Anatomic (PCA) knee system have been associated with good results. This study reviews a series of 181 knee replacements performed with these systems by seven general orthopedic surgeons with follow-up to a mean of 6.7 years. The mean Knee Society knee and function scores were 72 and 68. The mean Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score was 76, and the mean 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey result was 55. A mean flexion of 104 degrees was recorded, and 93.8% of patients rated their satisfaction as good to excellent. Fifty-five percent of patients had minor radiographic lucencies-these were of questionable clinical significance. Seven patients required revision. These knee systems used in a relatively low-volume general unit provide consistent results comparable with those from larger arthroplasty units.

  3. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  4. Development and first validation of a simplified CT-based classification system of soft tissue changes in large-head metal-on-metal total hip replacement: intra- and interrater reliability and association with revision rates in a uniform cohort of 664 arthroplasties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Warringa, Niek [Isala Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Edens, Mireille A. [Isala Hospital, Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Lingen, Christiaan P. van; Ettema, Harmen B.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M. [Isala Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Zwolle (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [AMC, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    After implantation of a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA), a large incidence of pseudotumor formation has been described recently. Several centers have invited patients for follow-up in order to screen for pseudotumor formation. The spectrum of abnormalities found by CT in MoM THA patients can be unfamiliar to radiologists and orthopedic surgeons. Previously, a CT five-point grading scale has been published. In this paper, a simplification into a three-point classification system gives insight in the morphological distinction of abnormalities of the postoperative hip capsule in MoM implants in relation to the decision for revision. The reliability of this simplified classification regarding intra- and interrater reliability and its association with revision rate is investigated and discussed. All patients who underwent MoM THA in our hospital were invited for screening. Various clinical measures and CT scan were obtained in a cross-sectional fashion. A decision on revision surgery was made shortly after screening. CT scans were read in 582 patients, of which 82 patients were treated bilaterally. CT scans were independently single read by two board-certified radiologists and classified into categories I-V. In a second meeting, consensus was obtained. Categories were subsequently rubricated in class A (categories I and II), B (category III), and C (categories IV and V). Intra- and inter-radiologist agreement on MoM pathology was assessed by means of the weighted Cohen's kappa. Categorical data were presented as n (%), and tested by means of Fisher's exact test. Continuous data were presented as median (min-max) and tested by means of Mann-Whitney U test (two group comparison) or Kruskal-Wallis test (three group comparison). Logistic regression analysis was performed in order to study independence of CT class for association with revision surgery. Univariate statistically significant variables were entered in a multiple model. All statistical

  5. Knee Muscles Power Evolution in Patients with Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Monica BORDA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure changes in muscle power from before to 6 months after total knee arthroplasty and to compare outcomes with those from a control group of healthy adults. Material and Methods: 26 patients who underwent a total knee replacement were compared with 12 healthy age-matched adults in a prospective cohort study. Patients’ assessment was performed preoperatively, as well as at 1, 2 and 6 months postoperatively, by the isokinetic method. Healthy adults were assessed once by the same method. Isokinetic evaluation of knee extensor and flexor muscles was performed using a Gimnex Iso 2 dynamometer. After a warm-up protocol, measurements were done at angular velocities of 90 and 180°/sec. Results: Compared to healthy adults, patients performed significantly worse at all evaluation times, for both extensors and flexors of the knee, except for the 6-month evaluation at 180°/sec. One month postoperatively losses from preoperative levels were registered in patients, but without statistically significance, except for extension at 180°/sec. At 6 months postoperatively patients surpassed the preoperative levels, with statistical significance at 180°/sec. Conclusions: Power is an important parameter to follow after TKA, in parallel with peak torque. Increasing muscle power should be one of the central issues to address during postoperative rehabilitation.

  6. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  7. Ballooning osteolysis in 71 failed total ankle arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Reichard, Theresa; Hameister, Rita; Awiszus, Friedemann; Schenk, Katja; Feuerstein, Bernd; Roessner, Albert; Lohmann, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). In contrast to other total joint replacements, large periarticular cysts (ballooning osteolysis) have frequently been observed in this context. We investigated periprosthetic tissue responses in failed TAA, and performed an element analysis of retrieved tissues in failed TAA. Patients and methods - The study cohort consisted of 71 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed TAA, all with hydroxyapatite-coated implants. In addition, 5 patients undergoing primary TAA served as a control group. Radiologically, patients were classified into those with ballooning osteolysis and those without, according to defined criteria. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, and elemental analysis of tissues was performed. Von Kossa staining and digital microscopy was performed on all tissue samples. Results - Patients without ballooning osteolysis showed a generally higher expression of lymphocytes, and CD3+, CD11c+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells in a perivascular distribution, compared to diffuse expression. The odds of having ballooning osteolysis was 300 times higher in patients with calcium content >0.5 mg/g in periprosthetic tissue than in patients with calcium content ≤0.5 mg/g (p < 0.001). Interpretation - There have been very few studies investigating the pathomechanisms of failed TAA and the cause-effect nature of ballooning osteolysis in this context. Our data suggest that the hydroxyapatite coating of the implant may be a contributory factor.

  8. Autonomous control of multi-fingered hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIU Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand based on a modular control system of dexterous manipulation. A simple proportional-integral-derivative(PID) position control with friction compensation, which requires few friction parameters, is used to realize accurate and smooth trajectory tracking in pregrasp phase. In grasp and manipulation phases, an event-driven switcher is adopted to determine the switching between unconstrained position control and constrained torque control, and an improved explicit integral force control strategy is implemented to realize simultaneously stable contact transition and accurate force tracking. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand.

  9. Fingering instability in combustion: an extended view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zik, O; Moses, E

    1999-07-01

    We detail the experimental situation concerning the fingering instability that occurs when a solid fuel is forced to burn against a horizontal oxidizing wind. The instability appears when the Rayleigh number for convection is below criticality. The focus is on the developed fingering state. We present direct measurements of the depletion of oxygen by the front as well as new results that connect heat losses to the characteristic scale of the instability. In addition, we detail the experimental system, elaborate (qualitatively and quantitatively) on the results that were previously presented, and discuss new observations. We also show that the same phenomenological model applies to electrochemical deposition.

  10. Admittance Control of a Multi-Finger Arm Based on Manipulability of Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the previous studies, admittance control and impedance control for a finger‐arm robot using the manipulability of the finger were studied and methods of realizing the controls have been proposed. In this study, two 3‐DOF fingers are attached to the end‐effector of a 6‐DOF arm to configure a multi‐finger arm robot. Based on the previous methods, the authors have proposed an admittance control for a multi‐finger arm robot using the manipulability of the fingers in this study. Algorithms of the averaging method and the mini‐max method were introduced to establish a manipulability criterion of the two fingers in order to generate a cooperative movement of the arm. Comparison of the admittance controls combined with the top search method and local optimization method for the multi‐finger arm robot was made and features of the control methods were also discussed. The stiffness control and damping control were experimentally evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. ANALYSIS WITH MSC ADAMS OF A 5-FINGER AND 3-PHALANX /FINGER UNDER-ACTUATEDMECHANICAL HAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analysis with MSC ADAMS of a 5-fingered and 3-phalanx/finger underactuatedmechanical hand, designed by the author to work on industrial robots. Moreover, in order to increasegrasping safety in the automated handling process, the author has fitted each finger with a locking sequence inthe final phase of grasping. Thus, the mechanism of mechanical hand is considered to be a mechanical systemand is treated like a set of rigid bodies connected by mechanical linkages and elastic elements. To model andsimulate this mechanism with MSC ADAMS programme, the author covered the following stages: constructionof the model, testing-simulation, validation, finishing, parameterization, and optimization

  12. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  13. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Guillière

    Full Text Available While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  14. Acceleration Workspace of Cooperating Multi-Finger Robot Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyungwon Shim; Jihong Lee

    2008-01-01

    We present a mathematical method for acceleration workspace analysis of cooperating multi-finger robot systems using a model of point-contact with friction. A new unified formulation from dynamic equations of cooperating multi-finger robots is derived considering the force and acceleration relationships between the fingers and the object to be handled. From the dynamic equation, maximum translational and rotational acceleration bounds of an object are calculated under given constraints of contact conditions, configurations of fingers, and bounds on the torques of joint actuators for each finger. Here, the rotational acceleration bounds can be applied as an important manipulability index when the multi-finger robot grasps an object. To verify the proposed method, we used a set of case studies with a simple multi-finger mechanism system. The achievable acceleration boundary in task space can be obtained successfully with the proposed method and the acceleration boundary depends on the configurations of fingers.

  15. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  16. The effect of single-level, total disc arthroplasty on sagittal balance parameters: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Huec, Jc; Basso, Y; Mathews, H; Mehbod, A; Aunoble, S; Friesem, T; Zdeblick, T

    2005-06-01

    A prospective radiographic study of the influence of total disc replacement on spinal sagittal balance. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the effect of a single-level, total disc replacement on the sagittal balance of the spine, especially on sacral tilt (ST), pelvic tilt (PT), and lumbar lordosis. It has been shown that lumbar fusion may deleteriously alter the sagittal balance of the spine, including a decrease in the ST and lumbar lordosis. Clinically, postfusion pain has been shown to be significantly related to a decreased ST, increased PT, and decreased lumbar lordosis, independent of other factors such as pseudoarthrosis. To our knowledge, the influence of total disc replacement on spinal sagittal balance has not yet been reported in the literature. This is a prospective study of 35 patients who received a single level disc replacement using the Maverick Total Disc Arthroplasty system (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee) by a single surgeon at one institution from March 2002 to September 2003. The preoperative and postoperative radiographic evaluation included standing anteroposterior and lateral full spine films that included the femoral heads. The parameters studied were ST, PT, global and segmental lordosis, and global kyphosis. The average age of the 35 patients studied was 44.3 years (range 35-57). There were 18 females and 17 males. The disc arthroplasty was performed at the L4-L5 level in 19 patients and at the L5-S1 level in 16 patients. The average follow-up was 14 months (range 6-22 months). The preoperative values of global lordosis, ST, and PT were 51.5 degrees , 37.8 degrees , 16.9 degrees and, at last follow-up, they were 51.4 degrees , 37.4 degrees , and 17.5 degrees , respectively. These changes were not significantly different. When the groups were separated according to the level operated, there was still no statistical difference with regard to the overall lordosis, ST, PT or kyphosis from pre- to postoperative

  17. Zinc finger structure-function in Ikaros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marvin; A; Payne

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger motif was used as a vehicle for the initial discovery of Ikaros in the context of T-cell differentiation and has been central to all subsequent analyses of Ikaros function.The Ikaros gene is alternately spliced to produce several isoforms that confer diversity of function and consequently have complicated analysis of the function of Ikaros in vivo.Key features of Ikaros in vivo function are associated with six C2H2 zinc fingers;four of which are alternately incorporated in the production of the various Ikaros isoforms.Although no complete structures are available for the Ikaros protein or any of its family members,considerable evidence has accumulated about the structure of zinc fingers and the role that this structure plays in the functions of the Ikaros family of proteins.This review summarizes the structural aspects of Ikaros zinc fingers,individually,and in tandem to provide a structural context for Ikaros function and to provide a structural basis to inform the design of future experiments with Ikaros and its family members.

  18. Finger Search in Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge;

    2016-01-01

    random access, that is, given a position in the original uncompressed string report the character at that position. In this paper we study the random access problem with the finger search property, that is, the time for a random access query should depend on the distance between a specified index f...

  19. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  20. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward th

  1. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; Krul, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O’Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet

  2. Finger-jointed beams in bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lotte; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamic and static fatique of finger-jointed beams in bending was carried out. Results were obtained for five different frequencies from static loading to a load cycle period of two minutes. A total of seven series were long-term tested and five series were short-term tested...

  3. Coriolis effects on fingering patterns under rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2008-08-01

    The development of immiscible viscous fingering patterns in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is investigated. We focus on understanding how the time evolution and the resulting morphologies are affected by the action of the Coriolis force. The problem is approached analytically and numerically by employing a vortex sheet formalism. The vortex sheet strength and a linear dispersion relation are derived analytically, revealing that the most relevant Coriolis force contribution comes from the normal component of the averaged interfacial velocity. It is shown that this normal velocity, uniquely due to the presence of the Coriolis force, is responsible for the complex-valued nature of the linear dispersion relation making the linear phases vary with time. Fully nonlinear stages are studied through intensive numerical simulations. A suggestive interplay between inertial and viscous effects is found, which modifies the dynamics, leading to different pattern-forming structures. The inertial Coriolis contribution plays a characteristic role: it generates a phase drift by deviating the fingers in the sense opposite to the actual rotation of the cell. However, the direction and intensity of finger bending is predominantly determined by viscous effects, being sensitive to changes in the magnitude and sign of the viscosity contrast. The finger competition behavior at advanced time stages is also discussed.

  4. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  5. Relative finger position influences whether you can localize tactile stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, K.E.; Anema, H.A.; Brenner, E.; Dijkerman, H.C.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether the relative positions of the fingers influence tactile localization, participants were asked to localize tactile stimuli applied to their fingertips. We measured the location and rate of errors for three finger configurations: fingers stretched out and together so that they a

  6. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke.

  7. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  8. UNCEMENTED PRIMARY TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEONECROSIS OF HIP WITH SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN YOUNG ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a progressive disease that generally affects patients in the third through fifth decade of life, if left untreated. Currently, 18% of all Total Hip Arthroplasty performed in USA are done for Osteonecrosis.(1 The aetiology for the Osteonecrosis varies from idiopathic, alcohol intoxication, steroid abuse or due to childhood hip disorders and hip trauma. We have selected 40 patients suffering from advanced femoral head osteonecrosis with subchondral collapse leading to Osteoarthritis of hip in young adults, treated by uncemented primary total hip replacement. This study is aimed to suggest that uncemented total hip arthroplasty can be applied predictably to this younger, potentially more active patient population. MATERIAL AND METHODS We have done 54 uncemented primary hips in 40 cases with mean follow-up of 5.5 years. The average age of the patient at the time of surgery was 43 years. All the hips are clinically and radiologically examined both pre- and post-operatively. All the cases are operated through postero-lateral approach and have used the fully Hydroxyapatite coated femoral straight stem designed for press fit insertion and hemispherical HA-coated cup inserted with press fit and in few cases we used an HA-coated screw. The patients are under regular follow-up. RESULTS All the patients are reviewed at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and yearly thereafter. The clinical and functional status was recorded using the Harris Hip Score and WOMAC Hip Score. The mean Harris score has improved from an average of 44 points to an average of 93 points postoperatively; 94% showed good-to-excellent results, 2% of cases had shortening, one case developed hip dislocation after two weeks due to unguarded physiotherapy. CONCLUSION The short-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with Osteonecrosis of the femoral head were encouraging. We await further follow-up to see if these promising

  9. Total hip arthroplasty in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdil Mehmet

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare neurological entity, is characterized by varying degrees of sensory loss and autonomic dysfunction. Orthopedic manifestations of congenital insensitivity to pain include delayed diagnosis of fractures, nonunions, malunions, Charcot arthropathy, acro-osteolysis, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, heterotopic ossification and joint dislocations. We here report the case of a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain who had multiple lower extremity fractures at varying intervals, the most recent being a femoral neck fracture managed by total hip replacement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cementless hip arthroplasty in such a patient. Case presentation A 37-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of painless swellings in her lower limb and limping. She had been diagnosed with multiple lower extremity fractures at different times. On physical examination, we found multiple perioral mucosal ulcers, shortening of her nails and acro-osteolysis, a prematurely aged facial appearance, undersized skeletal structure, Charcot arthropathy of her right ankle, anosmia, insensitivity to temperature differences and evidence of mild intellectual disability. A right subtrochanteric femur fracture was treated with an intramedullary nail. Eighteen months later, she presented with similar symptoms and we diagnosed a right femoral neck fracture. We removed the nail and performed cementless total right hip arthroplasty. Conclusions Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare condition that is associated with severe orthopedic problems. This case report, which will be of particular interest to orthopedic surgeons, presents several difficulties in the management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and notes the importance of close follow-up and early recognition of complications. Cementless total hip arthroplasty may be a good therapeutic

  10. People who undergo revision arthroplasty report more limitations but no decrease in physical activity compared with primary total hip arthroplasty : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Martin; Hoekstra, Tsjerk; Wagenmakers, Robert; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Question: Do people who have had revision arthroplasty report more limitations and less physical activity than those after primary total hip arthroplasty? Can degree of limitation and physical activity be predicted by revision arthroplasty, after adjustment for age, gender, and Charnley classificati

  11. Total elbow arthroplasty: a radiographic outcome study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue Susan [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Box 357115, Seattle, WA (United States); Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M. [Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Ha, Alice S. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Box 354755, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is becoming a popular alternative to arthrodesis for patients with end-stage elbow arthrosis and comminuted distal humeral fractures. Prior outcome studies have primarily focused on surgical findings. Our purpose is to determine the radiographic outcome of TEA and to correlate with clinical symptoms such as pain. This is an IRB-approved retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 of all patients with semiconstrained TEA. All available elbow radiographs and clinical data were reviewed. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival curves for radiographic and clinical survival. A total of 104 total elbow arthroplasties in 102 patients were reviewed; 75 % were in women and the mean patient age was 63.1 years. Mean radiographic follow-up was 826 days with average of four radiographs per patient. Seventy TEAs (67 %) developed radiographic complications, including heterotopic ossification (48 %), perihardware lucency (27 %), periprosthetic fracture (23 %), hardware subluxation/dislocation (7 %), polyethylene wear (3 %), and hardware fracture/dislodgement (3 %); 56 patients (55 %) developed symptoms of elbow pain or instability and 30 patients (30 %) underwent at least one reoperation. In patients with radiographic complications, 66 % developed elbow pain, compared to 19 % of patients with no radiologic complications (p = 0.001). Of the patients with radiographic complications, 39 % had at least one additional surgery compared to 0 % of patients without radiographic complications (p = 0.056). Radiographic complications are common in patients after total elbow arthroplasty. There is a strong positive association between post-operative radiographic findings and clinical outcome. Knowledge of common postoperative radiographic findings is important for the practicing radiologist. (orig.)

  12. Prospective study comparing functional outcomes and revision rates between hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty: preliminary results for 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailhé, Régis; Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Sharma, Akash; Lafontan, Valérie; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Chiron, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is a need of independent prospective studies about modern generation of hip resurfacing implants. The aim of this propective observational study was to compare the functional outcomes and revision rates with hip resurfacing arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty and to present the preliminary results at 2 years. Patients included were recruited prospectively in the Partial Pelvic Replacement Hip Project by a single surgeon between January 2007 and January 2010. Patients were assessed with the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Postel-Merle d'Aubigné (MDA) score and Devane Score. The end point of the study was reoperation for any cause related to the prosthesis. At a mean follow up of 38.6 months there were a total of 142 patients with hip resurfacing (group 1) [100 Durom(®) (Zimmer Inc., Warsaw, IN, USA) and 42 Birmingham Hip Resurfacing(®) (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA)] and 278 patients with total hip arthroplasty (group 2). The results showed significantly greater gain of HHS, MDA and Devane score with hip resurfacing procedures. However, considering all the complications, the rate was significantly higher in group 16.4% vs 1.79% in group 2 (P<0.0001). In group 1 we observed 6 complications only concerned males with Durom(®) implants. The follow up of this cohort is still on going and may deliver more information on the evolution of these results in time.

  13. Prospective study comparing functional outcomes and revision rates between hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty: preliminary results for 2 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis Pailhé

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a need of independent prospective studies about modern generation of hip resurfacing implants. The aim of this propective observational study was to compare the functional outcomes and revision rates with hip resurfacing arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty and to present the preliminary results at 2 years. Patients included were recruited prospectively in the Partial Pelvic Replacement Hip Project by a single surgeon between January 2007 and January 2010. Patients were assessed with the Harris Hip Score (HHS and Postel-Merle d’Aubigné (MDA score and Devane Score. The end point of the study was reoperation for any cause related to the prosthesis. At a mean follow up of 38.6 months there were a total of 142 patients with hip resurfacing (group 1 [100 Durom® (Zimmer Inc., Warsaw, IN, USA and 42 Birmingham Hip Resurfacing® (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA] and 278 patients with total hip arthroplasty (group 2. The results showed significantly greater gain of HHS, MDA and Devane score with hip resurfacing procedures. However, considering all the complications, the rate was significantly higher in group 16.4% vs 1.79% in group 2 (P<0.0001. In group 1 we observed 6 complications only concerned males with Durom® implants. The follow up of this cohort is still on going and may deliver more information on the evolution of these results in time.

  14. A monolateral TMJ replacement under intraoral endoscopic assistance for jaw osteomielitis: a modified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, E; Mici, E; Mazzone, N; Catalfamo, L; Fini, G; Liberatore, G M

    2015-01-01

    Alloplastic replacement has become a valid treatment for TMJ endstage disease. The Alkayat and Bramley pre-auricular approach combined with the submandibular incision are the current surgical approaches for TMJ surgery. The present study shows a modified approach using intraoral endoscopic assistance. A female patient affected by jaw osteomielitis with condylar detachment was treated with total left TMJ alloplastic replacement combined with a right TMJ arthroplasty. No subamandibular incision was performed and, subsequently, the risks for permanent or temporary damage to the marginalis mandibulae nerve and surgical submandibular scar were avoided. Postoperative CT-Scan evidenced a good prosthesis position. No complications occurred after two years of follow-up.

  15. Increased risk for early periprosthetic fractures after uncemented total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Søren; Kjersgaard, Anne Grete

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to describe a new type of proximal periprosthetic fracture occurring within the first six weeks after total hip arthroplasty and to analyse possible causes of a rising incidence. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient files and radiographs from 2,408 uncemented...... hip replacements were analysed and patients with a periprosthetic split fracture reaching from the calcar to the medial femoral shaft below the lesser trochanter were included. RESULTS: A total of 28 fractures in 2,408 uncemented primary hip replacements were included. Almost all fractures were seen...

  16. Periprosthetic osteolysis after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose....... Conclusion Periprosthetic loosening is frequent following a TWA. In our series it was not necessarily associated with implant loosening and seemed to stabilize within 3 years. Close and continued observation is, however, recommended. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV....

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O'hEireamhoin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Children affected by mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS type IH (Hurler Syndrome, an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, are known to experience a range of musculoskeletal manifestations including spinal abnormalities, hand abnormalities, generalised joint stiffness, genu valgum, and hip dysplasia and avascular necrosis. Enzyme therapy, in the form of bone marrow transplantation, significantly increases life expectancy but does not prevent the development of the associated musculoskeletal disorders. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Hurler syndrome with a satisfactory result following uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

  18. Lower Limb Ischaemia Complicating Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Wai Chan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is about two patients having vascular injuries complicating total hip arthroplasty because of intraoperative indirect injuries. One patient had a delayed presentation of acute lower limb ischaemia, in which he required amputation of his left second toe because of ischaemic gangrene. The other patient had acute lower limb ischaemia leading to permanent muscle and nerve damage because of delayed recognition. Both patients had vascular interventions for the indirect vascular injuries. Preoperative workup for suspicious underlying peripheral vascular disease, intraoperative precautions, and perioperative period of vascular status monitoring are essential for prevention and early detection of such sinister events.

  19. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guoding; Wang Li’na; Yu Qiangpeng; Su Hua

    2014-01-01

    A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on per-formance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineer-ing fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization;in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic perfor-mance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  20. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  1. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  2. A Parametric Modelling Method for Dexterous Finger Reachable Workspaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The well-known algorithms, such as the graphic method, analytical method or numerical method, have some defects when modelling the dexterous finger workspace, which is a significant kinematical feature of dexterous hands and valuable for grasp planning, motion control and mechanical design. A novel modelling method with convenient and parametric performances is introduced to generate the dexterous-finger reachable workspace. This method constructs the geometric topology of the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, and uses a joint feature recognition algorithm to extract the kinematical parameters of the dexterous finger. Compared with graphic, analytical and numerical methods, this parametric modelling method can automatically and conveniently construct a more vivid workspace’ forms and contours of the dexterous finger. The main contribution of this paper is that a workspace-modelling tool with high interactive efficiency is developed for designers to precisely visualize the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, which is valuable for analysing the flexibility of the dexterous finger.

  3. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: mid-term results in 486 cases and current indication in our institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Manuel; Cardenas, Carlomagno; Astarita, Emanuele; Moya, Esther; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2014-10-02

    In the previous decade, metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has been considered an attractive option and theoretically advantageous over conventional total hip arthroplasty, especially in young active patients. Different authors have reported favourable mid-term clinical and functional results with acceptable survival rates. Proper indication and planning, as accurate technical execution have been advocated to be crucial elements for success.Concerns regarding serum metal ion levels and possible clinical implications have led in the last years to a decline in the use of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and metal-on-metal bearings in general.The aim of this study is to present the results of our first 486 cases of hybrid hip resurfacing arthroplasties with a second generation cementing technique, and to describe our current restricted indication of this type of prosthesis, in the light of recent findings in the literature about the possible complications related to metallosis or improper patient selection. Global survivorship of our series was 97.9% at a mean follow-up of 7.2 years.In the second season of our experience the indication is restrictive. The candidate for a resurfacing hip replacement is a young and active male patient, with good bone quality, that has been made aware of the risks and benefits of this type of prosthesis.

  4. Outlier analysis in orthopaedics: use of CUSUM: the Scottish Arthroplasty Project: shouldering the burden of improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Gavin J; Brenkel, Ivan J; Smith, Rik; Howie, Colin R

    2011-12-21

    National joint registries have become well established across the world. Most registries track implant survival so that poorly performing implants can be removed from the market. The Scottish Arthroplasty Project was established in 1999 with the aim of encouraging continual improvement in the quality of care provided to joint replacement patients in Scotland. This aim has been achieved by using statistics to engage surgeons in the process of audit. We monitor easily identifiable end points of public concern and inform surgeons if they breach our statistical limits and become "outliers." Outlier status is often associated with poor implants, and our methods are therefore applicable for indirect implant surveillance. The present report describes the evolution of our statistical methodology, the processes that we use to promote positive changes in practice, and the improvements in patient outcomes that we have achieved. Failure need not be fatal, but failure to change almost always is. We describe the journey of both the Scottish Arthroplasty Project and the orthopaedic surgeons of Scotland to this realization.

  5. Results of hip arthroplasty using Paavilainen technique in patients with congenitally dislocated hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the medium- and long-term results of hip arthroplasty using Paavilainen technique in patients with the congenitally dislocated hip. Methods: From 2001 to 2012 180 operations were carried out were using the Paavilainen technique in 140 patients with high dislocation of the hip (Crowe IV. All patients were clinically evaluated using the Harris Hip Score (HHS, VAS and radiography. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation coefficients, multiple regression analysis and classification trees analysis. Results: The average Harris score improved from preoperative 41.6 (40,3-43,5 to 79.3 (77,9-82,7 at final follow-up, and the difference was significant. Early complications were 9% (the most frequent were fractures of the proximal femur, later - 16.7% (pseudoarthrosis of the greater trochanter, 13.9%; disclocations-1,1%, aseptic loosening of the components - 1.7%, reoperation performed in 8.3% of cases. Such factors as age and limb length has statistically significant effect on functional outcomes. Established predictive model allows to get the best possible functional outcome in such patients with severe dysplasia. Conclusions: Total Hip arthroplasty using the Paavilainen technique is an effective method of surgical treatment in patients with the congenitally dislocated hip, but it is technically difficult operation with a high incidence of complications in comparison with standard primary total hip replacement.

  6. Femoral and obturator nerves palsy caused by pelvic cement extrusion after hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cement extrusion into the pelvis with subsequent palsy of the obturator and femoral nerves is a rare entity after hip replacement surgery. Cemented fixation of the acetabular cup has been considered as a safe and reliable standard procedure with very good long term results. We present a case of fifty year old female patient after hip arthroplasty procedure which suffered an obturator and femoral nerve palsy caused by extrusion of bone cement into the pelvis. Postoperative X-rays and CT-scan of the pelvis demonstrated a huge mass consisted of bone cement in close proximity of femoral and obturator nerves. The surgery charts reported shallow and weak bony substance in postero-superior aspect of the acetabulum. This weak bony acetabular substance may have caused extrusion of bone cement during press-fitting of the polyethylene cup into the acetabulum, and the following damage of the both nerves produced by polymerization of bone cement. The bone cement fragment has been surgically removed 3 weeks after arthroplasty. The female patient underwent intensive postoperative physical therapy and electro stimulation which resulted in full recovery of the patient to daily routine and almost normal electromyography results.

  7. The incidence of total hip arthroplasty after hip arthroscopy in osteoarthritic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haviv Barak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA in osteoarthritic patients who were treated by arthroscopic debridement and to evaluate factors that might influence the time interval from the first hip arthroscopy to THA. Design Retrospective clinical series Methods Follow-up data and surgical reports were retrieved from 564 records of osteoarthritic patients that have had hip arthroscopy between the years 2002 to 2009 with a mean follow-up time of 3.2 years (range, 1-6.4 years. The time interval between the first hip arthroscopy to THA was modelled as a function of patient age; level of cartilage damage; procedures performed and repeated arthroscopies with the use of multivariate regression analysis. Results Ninety (16% of all participants eventually required THA. The awaiting time from the first arthroscopy to a hip replacement was found to be longer in patients younger than 55 years and in a milder osteoarthritic stage. Patients that experienced repeated hip scopes had a longer time to THA than those with only a single procedure. Procedures performed concomitant with debridement and lavage did not affect the time interval to THA. Conclusions In our series of arthroscopic treatment of hip osteoarthritis, 16% required THA over a period of 7 years. Factors that influence the time to arthroplasty were age, degree of osteoarthritis and recurrent procedures.

  8. A quantitative assessment of facial protection systems in elective hip arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, Kieran Michael

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to assess the risk to surgeons of blood splatter during total hip arthroplasty. Hoods from personal protection systems used in 34 consecutive total hip replacements were collected and the area of blood splatter was measured and compared to goggles and visors. Thirty one primary THA\\'s (13 cemented, 4 hybrid, 14 uncemented) and 3 revisions (1 hybrid, 2 uncemented) were collected. Splashes were detected on all of the masks with a mean of 034% cover. Splatter was greatest for the operating surgeon, followed by the first assistant, though the difference was not statistically significant. Operating personnel were at greater risk of contamination during uncemented arthroplasty (p < 0.0001; 95% CI). On average 50.60% and 45.40% of blood cover was outside the area protected by goggles and visors respectively. There was a significant difference between the Personal Protection Systems (PPS) and goggles (p = 0.0231; 95% CI) as well as between the PPS and visors (p = 0.0293; 95% CI).

  9. Aeronautical Information System Replacement

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  10. Angiolipoma of index finger: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiolipomas are usually found in the upper extremities, shoulder and back. They are seldom found in the hands, face and lower extremities. They usually occur as painful soft tissue masses or they may compress the neighboring structures (e.g. nerves depending on the size and location. In this report we present an angiolipoma case located in the finger and discuss related recent cases described in the literature. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 22-25

  11. UnconStrained ShoUlder arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of 36unconstrained shoulder arthroplasties. Methods: In the series, 24 total and 12 hemiarthroplasties of the shoulders were performed with unconstrained shoulder prostheses in 29 patients who suffered from glenohumeral degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis and proximal fracture of humerus, respectively. Follow-up averaged 6.2years. All patients were evaluated pre- and post-operatively using the rating system of the Society of American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons which assesses the severity of pain,strength of muscles around shoulder, stability, range of motion and functional activities of daily living. Radiolucent line and migration of prostheses were observed postoperatively on X-rays. Results: Postoperatively, the rate of pain relief was 91.3%, and active range of motion increased by 47° inforward flexion, 43° in abduction , 30° in external rotation,and 4 segments in internal rotation. Preoperatively the average points of 6 functional activities patients could perform was 0.8, and postoperatively 3.1. On postoperative X-ray, proximal migration of the humerus was seen in 8 shoulders, 6 of which had either a torn or absent rotator cuff. Radiolucent lines were seen around 1humeral component and 9 glenoid components. Onehumeral and 2 glenoid components loosened. Conclusions: These results suggest that unconstrained shoulder arthroplasty is a satisfactory and safe technique.

  12. Radiographic analysis of shoulder anatomical arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolla, Giovanni [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)], E-mail: gmerolla@shouldertech.it; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, Naples (Italy); Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Arthroplasty is the standard treatment for advanced shoulder osteoarthritis. Modern prostheses designs have modular features whose size, shaft/head and body morphology can be adjusted. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) provides better results. A complete X-ray follow-up is essential to assess the results and evaluate the survival rates of a shoulder prosthesis. Antero-posterior at 40 deg. in both internal and external rotation (true AP view) and axillary view are recommended to assess the following parameters: orientation and translation of the humeral component, offset, size and height of the humeral head, acromio-humeral distance, distribution and fixation of the cement, stress shielding and cortical resorption, radiolucent lines, subsidence and tilt, glenoid wear and 'bone stock', prostheses instability, glenoid component shift. Shoulder hemiarthroplasty can lead to glenoid wear; the true AP film at 40 deg. of internal rotation provides the best profile of gleno-humeral joint to depict glenoid erosion. Shift of the glenoid component in TSA is identified as tilting or medial migration on true AP and axillary views in the early postoperative period (1-2 months) and at minimum of 2 years. An exhaustive radiographic analysis remains essential to monitor the prosthetic implant and detect early and late complications or risk factors of prosthetic loosening.

  13. Wedged tibial components for total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, R S; Orton, M A; Denham, R A

    1994-08-01

    Severe coronal deformity of the knee is frequently associated with erosion of one tibial condyle. This can cause problems with fixation and alignment during total knee arthroplasty. If the tibia is cut to the level of the more worn side, valuable bone is sacrificed; if the less worn side is chosen, the deficiency must be filled with bone--graft, cement, or a prosthesis. Tibial components with an integral polyethylene wedge on the undersurface were introduced in 1980 for use in patients with a bony deficit on one tibial condyle. The authors believe that the Denham prosthesis (Biomet, Wales, U.K.) was the first knee arthroplasty to offer such spacers. Twenty-six patients with preoperative varus deformity in whom a wedged component was used were compared with 29 historic control subjects. None of the wedged components loosened after a median follow-up period of 8 years compared with loosening in five of the control subjects (P = .01). In three of the control subjects a fractured triangle of cement was present on the radiographs. Use of the wedges was not accompanied by an improvement in postoperative alignment. The authors conclude that the wedges resulted in improved fixation that was independent of postoperative alignment.

  14. Extensor mechanism allograft in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Tozi, Mateus Ramos; Félix, Alessandro Monterroso; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the experience with allograft transplantation of the extensor mechanism in total knee arthroplasty and compare results with the international experience. Methods We retrospectively evaluated three cases of extensor mechanism allograft after total knee arthroplasty performed in our hospital with the aid of one of the few tissue banks in Brazil and attempt to establish whether our experiences were similar to others reported in the world literature regarding patient indication, techniques, and outcomes. Results Two cases went well with the adopted procedure, and one case showed bad results and progressed to amputation. As shown in the literature, the adequate tension of the graft, appropriate tibial fixation and especially the adequate patient selection are the better predictors of good outcomes. Previous chronic infection can be an unfavorable predictor. Conclusion This surgical procedure has precise indication, albeit uncommon, either because of the rarity of the problem or because of the low availability of allografts, due to the scarcity of tissue banks in Brazil. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453688

  15. Outcome and risk of revision following shoulder replacement in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V

    2014-06-01

    This thesis includes four studies focusing on the functional outcome, shoulder-specific quality of life and risk of revision following shoulder replacement in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis without symptomatic rotator cuff pathology. The Danish version of WOOS, translated according to international standardized guidelines, had substantial psychometric properties comparable to the original version. It is recommendable to use WOOS in the evaluation of patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis treated with shoulder replacement. Data from DSR showed that the shoulder specific quality of life following total shoulder arthroplasty was superior to that of hemiarthroplasty (resurfacing hemiarthroplasty and stemmed hemiarthroplasty). The difference between stemmed hemiarthroplasty and resurfacing hemiarthroplasty was small and did not exceed the minimal clinically important difference. The revision rate following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty was surprisingly high compared with previous reports but there were no statistical significant differences in revision rate between arthroplasty designs. The shoulder specific quality of life and revision rate in patients under the age of 55 was worrying. The use of resurfacing hemiarthroplasty has relied on the results from case series only. The efficacy in the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis has been promising but the CMS found in the randomized clinical trial indicate that the functional outcome may be inferior to that of stemmed hemiarthroplasty and less favourable than previously reported. However, the limited number of patients may have influenced the results and a larger definitive RCT is needed.Shoulder replacement is relevant and effective in the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis; however, resurfacing hemiarthroplasty was associated with a poorer outcome and a higher risk of revision than previously assumed especially in patients under the age of 55. Based on data from this thesis, and based on

  16. Palm to finger ulnar sensory nerve conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Davidowich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  17. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  18. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Thornton, Ian M; Smith, Irene J; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-03-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  19. Assessment of changes in gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces after total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objectives of arthroplasty are relief of pain and enhancement of range of motion. Currently, postoperative pain and functional capacity are assessed largely on the basis of subjective evaluation scores. Because of the lack of control inherent in this method it is often difficult to interpret data presented by different observers in the critical evaluation of surgical method, new components and modes of rehabilitation. Gait analysis is a rapid, simple and reliable method to assess functional outcome. This study was undertaken in an effort to evaluate the gait characteristics of patients who underwent arthroplasty, using an Ultraflex gait analyzer. Materials and Methods: The study was based on the assessment of gait and weight-bearing pattern of both hips in patients who underwent total hip replacement and its comparison with an age and sex-matched control group. Twenty subjects of total arthroplasty group having unilateral involvement, operated by posterior approach at our institution with a minimum six-month postoperative period were selected. Control group was age and sex-matched, randomly selected from the general population. Gait analysis was done using Ultraflex gait analyzer. Gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces assessment was done by measuring the gait cycle properties, step time parameters and VGRF variables. Data of affected limb was compared with unaffected limb as well as control group to assess the weight-bearing pattern. Statistical analysis was done by′t′ test. Results: Frequency is reduced and gait cycle duration increased in total arthroplasty group as compared with control. Step time parameters including Step time, Stance time and Single support time are significantly reduced ( P value < .05 while Double support time and Single swing time are significantly increased ( P value < .05 in the THR group. Forces over each sensor are increased more on the unaffected limb of the THR group as compared to

  20. Rural vs. urban utilization of total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Devraj; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Novicoff, Wendy M; Scaife, Steven L; Jones, Braden K; Saleh, Khaled J

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between patient demographics and hospital demographics on utilization of total joint arthroplasty in rural and urban populations from the National Inpatient Sample database. Any patient that was discharged after a primary total hip or primary total knee arthroplasty was included in this study. Results showed that rural patients living in a Northeastern hospital region compared to West, less than 65 years of age, females, Blacks and Hispanics were less likely to undergo total joint arthroplasty compared to their urban counterparts. Rural patient were more likely to undergo total joint arthroplasty compared to their urban counterparts if they were in the Midwest and had Medicare as their primary payer provider.

  1. Recurrent Hemarthrosis Following Knee Arthroplasty Treated with Arterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Zachary D; Hamilton, William G; Smirniotopoulos, John; Bagla, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    Recurrent hemarthrosis is an uncommon but troublesome complication following knee arthroplasty. This study reports the results for 13 patients with spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis after knee arthroplasty treated with arterial embolization. The average interval between arthroplasty and embolization was 47 months (range, 2-103 months), and the average time from onset of hemarthrosis to embolization was 4.1 months (range, 1-11 months). Geniculate arterial embolization lead to resolution of hemarthrosis in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%). The one clinical failure likely represented a case of misdiagnosed periprosthetic joint infection. Two patients experienced transient cutaneous ischemia related to distal particulate embolization that resolved spontaneously. Selective geniculate arterial embolization is an effective and safe treatment modality for recurrent hemarthrosis after knee arthroplasty.

  2. Myofascial Pain in Patients Waitlisted for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA.

  3. Is cold therapy really efficient after knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kuyucu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: After knee arthroplasty, the preoperative and postoperative use of cryotherapy is effective in terms of the pain control and functional knee scores without a significant change in surgical blood loss.

  4. Primary versus secondary distal femoral arthroplasty for treatment of total knee arthroplasty periprosthetic femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Choi, Lisa E; Colman, Matthew W; Goodman, Mark A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Tarkin, Ivan S; McGough, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current methods of fixing periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are variable, and include open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) via plating, retrograde nailing, or revision using standard revision TKA components or a distal femoral arthroplasty (DFA). The purpose of this study is to compare patients who failed plating techniques requiring subsequent revision to DFA to patients who underwent primary DFA. Of the 13 patients (9.2%) who failed primary ORIF, causes included nonunion (53.8%), infection (30.8%), loosening (7.7%), and refracture (7.7%). There were significantly more surgical procedures for ORIF revision to DFA compared to primary DFA. Complications for patients who underwent primary reconstruction with DFAs included extensor mechanism disruption (8.3%), infection (5.6%), and dislocation (2.8%). Primary reconstruction via ORIF is beneficial for preserving bone stock, but primary DFA may be preferred in osteopenic patients, or those at high risk for nonunion.

  5. Association between trochanteric bursitis, osteoarthrosis and total hip arthroplasty,

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann; Felipe Loss; Leandro de Freitas Spinelli; Roque Furian; Marcelo Faria Silva; Júlia Mazzuchello Zanatta; Leonardo Carbonera Boschin; Ramiro Zilles Gonçalves; Anthony Kerbes Yépez

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: this was an epidemiological study on trochanteric bursitis at the time of performing total hip arthroplasty.METHODS: sixty-two sequential patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis, without any previous history of trochanteric bursitis, were evaluated. The bursas were collected and evaluated histologically.RESULTS: there were 35 female patients (56.5%) and 27 male patients (43.5%), with a mean age of 65 years (±11). Trochanteric bursitis was conformed histo...

  6. Preoperative Patient Education for Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Financial Benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Mark A; Dredge, Carter; Barnes, C Lowry

    2015-01-01

    Of 904 patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) at the same hospital, 802 participated in a preoperative education day called "Joint Academy" (JA). The length of stay of JA participants was 2.12 days (49.5%) less than patients who did not attend a JA (p education program may significantly reduce overall costs for primary TKA and THA procedures.

  7. Readmissions after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B;

    2010-01-01

    With the implementation of fast-track surgery with optimization of both logistical and clinical features, the postoperative convalescence has been reduced as functional milestones have been achieved earlier and consequently length of stay (LOS) in hospital has been reduced. However, it has been s...... speculated that a decrease in LOS may be associated with an increase in readmissions in general, including risk of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or manipulation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  8. Small-scale behavior of single gravity-driven fingers in an initially dry fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments investigating the behavior of individual, gravity-driven fingers in an initially dry, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Fingers were initiated from constant flow to a point source. Finger structure is described in detail; specific phenomena observed include: desaturation behind the finger-tip, variation in finger path, intermittent flow structures, finger-tip bifurcation, and formation of dendritic sub-fingers. Measurements were made of finger-tip velocity, finger width, and finger-tip length. Non-dimensional forms of the measured variables are analyzed relative to the independent parameters, flow rate and gravitational gradient.

  9. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  10. Epidemiology of Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Trends in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaworth, Christine M; Do, Huong T; Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Lyman, Stephen L; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-05-01

    The rate of total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is increasing in the United States as its popularity and indications expand. There currently is no national joint registry available to monitor outcomes, and few studies have addressed the challenges faced with TAA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence, complications, and survival rates associated with TAA using a large statewide administrative discharge database. Individuals who underwent primary TAA from 1997 to 2010 were identified in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from the New York State Department of Health. The age, sex, comorbidities, state of residence, primary diagnosis, and readmissions within 90 days were analyzed for patients with an ICD-9-CM procedure code of 81.56 (TAA). Failure of a TAA implant was defined as revision, tibiotalar arthrodesis, amputation, or implant removal. During the 14-year period, 420 patients underwent 444 TAAs (mean patient age of 61 years, 59% women, mean Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of 0.45, and 86% New York State residents). The primary diagnosis was 37.4% osteoarthritis, 34.3% traumatic arthritis, and 15.5% rheumatoid arthritis. Surgery for failure was associated only with a younger age (56.5 vs 62 years, P=.005). The rate of subsequent failure procedures following TAAs performed in New York State was 13.8%. The incidence of TAAs is steadily increasing. The overall survival rate in New York State is better than rates reported in other national registries, but it is not yet comparable to those of hip and knee replacements. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):170-176.].

  11. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  12. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You will be asked to start moving and walking as soon as the first day after surgery. Some people need a short stay in a rehabilitation center ... may need a second replacement. Younger, more active people may wear out parts of their new hip. It may need to be replaced ... Hip fracture Osteoarthritis vs. rheumatoid ...

  13. Micro-separation in vitro produces clinically relevant wear of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevelos, J.; Fisher, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering; Ingham, E. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Div. of Microbiology; Doyle, C. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Newbury (United Kingdom); Streicher, R. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kilchberg (Switzerland); Nevelos, A. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Typical clinical wear rates for well-positioned first generation ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were of the order of 1-5 mm{sup 3}/year. This wear took the form of a 'stripe' of worn area on the heads with an Ra of approximately 0.1 {mu}m. As-manufactured unworn areas have an average Ra of 0.005 {mu}m Ra. This wear pattern has not been recorded following standard simulator testing with typical wear rates of less than 0.1 mm{sup 3} per million cycles. Therefore new material combinations for ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasty cannot be validated using standard hip simulator testing methods. However, recent fluoroscopy studies have shown that the head and cup of total hip replacements can separate during normal gait. This separation would lead to rim contact upon heel strike as shown in Figure 1. (orig.)

  14. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLafay

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4- to 7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children’s performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task, even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  15. Individual finger contribution in submaximal voluntary contraction of gripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dae-Min; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate individual finger force and contribution to a gripping force, the difference between actual and expected finger forces and subjective discomfort rating at 10 different submaximal voluntary contraction (%MVC) levels (10-100% in 10 increments). Seventy-two participants randomly exerted gripping force with a multi-finger force measurement system. The individual finger force, gripping force and discomfort increased as %MVC levels increased. The middle and ring fingers exerted more force and contributed to a gripping force more than the index and little fingers due to their larger mass fractions of the digit flexor muscles. It was apparent at MVC; however, the index finger increased its contribution and exerted even more force than expected at more than 50% MVC. Subjective discomfort supported the results of the objective measures. This could explain the conflicting findings between index and ring fingers in previous finger contribution studies. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Hand tool design is of special interest in ergonomics due to its association with musculoskeletal disorders in the hand. This study reveals a different contribution pattern of the fingers in submaximal voluntary contraction of gripping exertion.

  16. A mouse model of post-arthroplasty Staphylococcus aureus joint infection to evaluate in vivo the efficacy of antimicrobial implant coatings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Bernthal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Post-arthroplasty infections represent a devastating complication of total joint replacement surgery, resulting in multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic use, extended disability and worse clinical outcomes. As the number of arthroplasties in the U.S. will exceed 3.8 million surgeries per year by 2030, the number of post-arthroplasty infections is projected to increase to over 266,000 infections annually. The treatment of these infections will exhaust healthcare resources and dramatically increase medical costs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate novel preventative therapeutic strategies against post-arthroplasty infections, a mouse model was developed in which a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain was inoculated into a knee joint containing an orthopaedic implant and advanced in vivo imaging was used to measure the bacterial burden in real-time. Mice inoculated with 5x10(3 and 5x10(4 CFUs developed increased bacterial counts with marked swelling of the affected leg, consistent with an acute joint infection. In contrast, mice inoculated with 5x10(2 CFUs developed a low-grade infection, resembling a more chronic infection. Ex vivo bacterial counts highly correlated with in vivo bioluminescence signals and EGFP-neutrophil fluorescence of LysEGFP mice was used to measure the infection-induced inflammation. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the implants was visualized at 7 and 14 postoperative days by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM. Using this model, a minocycline/rifampin-impregnated bioresorbable polymer implant coating was effective in reducing the infection, decreasing inflammation and preventing biofilm formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, this mouse model may represent an alternative pre-clinical screening tool to evaluate novel in vivo therapeutic strategies before studies in larger animals and in human subjects. Furthermore, the antibiotic-polymer implant coating

  17. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevale......Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI...... involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013...... reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may...

  18. Radiologic findings in cases involving complications arising from total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Deok Ho; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Bae, Dae Kyung [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty(TKA) has been used for the treatment of knee joint pain, deformity, and instability caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or tuberculous arthritis, and by virtue of good results and rapid development, the procedure has been increasingly employed. With the development of total knee prosthesis, complications have also increased, however, and due to complications occurring up to six years after surgery, fusion occurs in about 2% of all replaced knees. The most common complication of TKA is loosening, followed by infection. Others are thrombosis, subluxation, dislocation and fracture, and complications may be divided into four groups: biologic, technical, specific to type of components, and associated with certain diagnosis. Where these complications occur, a patient must undergo a second procedure, but the success rate is lower than for the initial procedure. Exact etiological evaluation important clinically and radiologically. We illustrate the etiologies and radiologic characteristics of TKA complications according to classification.

  19. Dislocation of primary total hip arthroplasty and the risk of redislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Stephen A

    2012-09-01

    6554 primary total hip arthroplasties were reviewed. Risk factors for dislocation were analysed to assess which were important in terms of predicting recurrent instability. The patients risk of having a second dislocation was independently associated with the surgical approach adopted (p = 0.03) and the time to first dislocation from the primary hip replacement (p = 0.002). Early dislocators whose surgery was performed through an anterolateral approach had less recurrence than late dislocators through a posterior or transtrochanteric approach. None of the other risk factors including head size (p = 0.59), modularity (p = 0.54), mechanism of dislocation (p = 0.23), leg length discrepancy (p = 0.69) and acetabular inclination (p = 0.31) were influential. The use of an abduction brace was not useful in preventing a further dislocation with 69.2% of those braced re-dislocating compared to 68.5% who were not braced (p = 0.96).

  20. [Computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty: 12 years experience in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragaglia, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty was developed in Grenoble in the mid-1990s. The first human implantation was performed on 21 January 1997, with no particular problems. Since this date more than 200,000 patients have been implanted with our device all over the world. The device is passive (not active like a robot), and requires no pre- or perioperative imaging. It is based on kinematics and palpation, the surgeon remaining in charge at all times. The computer helps to identify the lower leg axis, to accurately fix the bone cutting guides, and to check the ligament balance. These steps are not easy to perform with conventional ancillaries. The effectiveness of computer-assisted total knee replacement is well documented, although it is too early to claim that a "well-aligned" prothesis will have a better survival rate. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, with modern prostheses, to confirm the results of historical studies.

  1. Psoas abscess associated with infected total hip arthroplasty: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, R; Soriano, A; Tomas, X; Gallart, X; Garcia, S

    2006-01-01

    Psoas abscess (PA) is an uncommon disease and its diagnosis is difficult. It can be primary or secondary. Primary abscesses are of unknown origin and are presumably caused by haematogenous or lymphatic spread from a distant infectious focus. Secondary PA is caused by spreading from a contiguous infected structure, such as vertebrae (espondilodiscitis) or mesenteric abscesses (Crohns disease). PA infrequently has been associated with an infection of total hip arthroplasty (ITHA). The correct diagnosis in these cases is difficult due to the clinical similarities between PA and ITHA. Since connection between PA and ITHA is established through the acetabulum, we consider that computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate radiological test because of its efficacy in evaluating the bone structure, and the optimum therapeutic strategy is two-stage replacement surgery. We report one case of PA associated with ITHA and a review of the previous literature.

  2. Nursing experience of preoperative standardized for patients with total hip arthroplasty.%人工全髋关节置换术前规范化护理体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁勇东

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Through the analysis of artificial total hip arthroplasty in patients' nursing before operations, to discuss the preoperative standardized nursing of artificial total hip arthroplasty. Methods:The adequate preoperative preparation of 108 total hip replacement patients and the strengthening of preoperative rehabilitation guidance. Results:108 artificial total hip replacement patients can tolerate surgery, grasp the rehabilitation guidance content, and actively cooperate with therapy and nursing, no case of complications such as pressure sores and dislocations. Conclusion:Standardized preoperative care is the important prerequisite for success of total hip arthroplasty.%目的:通过回顾分析人工全髋关节置换术患者术前的护理,探讨人工全髋关节置换术前规范化护理方法.方法:对108例人工全髋关节置换术患者进行了充分的术前准备和加强术前康复指导.结果:本组108例患者能耐受手术,能掌握康复指导内容,积极配合治疗和护理,无1例发生压疮、脱位等并发症.结论:规范化的术前护理是人工全髋关节置换术成功的重要前提.

  3. Comparison of thromboprophylaxis patterns in arthroplasty in public and private hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortada, Aline Pinheiro dos Santos; da Silva, Telma Gomes; da Silva, André Campos; Golmia, Ricardo Prado; Guerra, Renata Leborato; Takemoto, Maíra Libertad Soligo; Monteiro, Roberta Dyonisio Canaveira; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare therapy for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and costs related to hospitalization of patients undergoing total knee and hip replacement within the context of the Brazilian health system. Methods A retrospective study of patients undergoing arthroplasty in 2010 in a public hospital and two private hospitals in the state of São Paulo, conducted by means of medical record review. Costs were estimated based on the use of health care resources during hospitalization. A descriptive analysis was performed using frequency and mean (standard deviation) according to the type of care delivered (by public or private organization). Results A total of 215 patients were evaluated, and 56.3% were submitted to knee surgery and 43.7%, to hip replacement. Approximately 88% and 98% of patients from public and private health services, respectively, received some form of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and enoxaparin was the drug most widely used in both systems. The total cost of prophylaxis was R$ 1,873.01 (R$ 26.38 per patient) in the public service and R$ 21,559.73 (R$ 163.33 per patient) in the private service. For the individuals who presented with thromboembolism, the average cost of hospitalization was R$ 6,210.80 and R$ 43,792.59 per patient in public and private health services, respectively. Conclusion Thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing arthroplasty is most commonly used in the private health services than public organizations, despite its high costs in both services. The cost per patient with thrombosis during hospitalization was higher than the total cost of prophylaxis, suggesting that prevention is associated to better cost-benefit ratio. PMID:26313439

  4. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Romero, Jose [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Joint Diseases at Hirslanden Clinic, EndoClinic Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ziegler, Oliver [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Ortho Zentrum Rosenheim, Rosenheim (Germany); Kamel, Ehab M. [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16),{sup 99m}Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  5. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  6. Experiments of periodic forcing of Saffman-Taylor fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralba, M.; Ortín, J.; Hernández-Machado, A.; Poiré, E. Corvera

    2008-03-01

    We report on an experimental study of long normal Saffman-Taylor fingers subject to periodic forcing. The sides of the finger develop a low amplitude, long wavelength instability. We discuss the finger response in stationary and nonstationary situations, as well as the dynamics towards the stationary states. The response frequency of the instability increases with forcing frequency at low forcing frequencies, while, remarkably, it becomes independent of forcing frequency at large forcing frequencies. This implies a process of wavelength selection. These observations are in good agreement with previous numerical results reported in [Ledesma-Aguilar , Phys. Rev. E 71, 016312 (2005)]. We also study the average value of the finger width, and its fluctuations, as a function of forcing frequency. The average finger width is always smaller than the width of the steady-state finger. Fluctuations have a nonmonotonic behavior with a maximum at a particular frequency.

  7. RECENT VIEW AT UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY AMONG OTHER SURGICAL APPROACHES TO PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Kornilov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article recent publications dedicated to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty are analyzed. Evolution of indications and contraindications, mid- and late term results, difference in functional outcomes in comparison with total knee arthroplasty are discussed. Taking into consideration all relevant information unicompartmental knee arthroplasty may be considered as effective and reliable method of treatment of patients with knee osteoarthrosis and osteonecrosis.

  8. Postoperative pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer Karlsen, Anders Peder; Geisler, Anja; Petersen, Pernille Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative pain should rely on results from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of high scientific quality. The efficacy of a particular intervention may depend on the type of surgical procedure, which supports the reporting of "procedure-specific" interventions. The aim...... of this systematic review was to document the procedure-specific evidence for analgesic interventions after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of medication-based analgesic interventions after THA. Endpoints were......, and lumbar plexus block reduced nausea and pruritus. The GRADE-rated quality of evidence ranged from low to very low throughout the analyses. This review demonstrated, that some analgesic interventions may have the capacity to reduce mean opioid requirements and/or mean pain intensity compared with controls...

  9. Extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael D; Springer, Bryan D

    2015-02-01

    Extensor mechanism disruption is a rare and potentially devastating complication associated with total knee arthroplasty. Disruption can occur at the quadriceps or patellar tendons or, in the setting of a fracture, at the patella. Recognition of the risk factors for disruption and prevention via meticulous surgical technique are critical to avoid this complication. Various management techniques and the challenges associated with treatment have been described. Nonsurgical management consists of the use of walking aids and/or knee braces, which may not be acceptable for the active patient. Surgical options include primary repair and reconstructive techniques using allograft, autograft, synthetic material, and gastrocnemius rotational flaps. However, no single method has reliably demonstrated satisfactory outcomes. Although research on reconstructive procedures with synthetic materials has been promising, further study is need to assess the use of these materials.

  10. Noise measurement in total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas A Holzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been performed to analyze noise levels produced by various surgical instruments in the operating room (OR. The highest levels of noise that have been described were due to instruments used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA. These high levels of noise might be a potential health hazard for patients and medical staff. Therefore, we aimed to measure noise levels of current instruments that are widely used worldwide. During a conventional primary TKA the levels of noise in the OR were measured using a Class 1 integrating-averaging sound level meter. The highest A-weighted equivalent level was produced when using a hammer during the implantation of the femoral and tibial components with 90.2 dBA. In total surgical instruments were used for about 10% of the total time of surgery. Noise exposure due to instrument use during TKA does not seem to be a potential health hazard for medical staff or patients.

  11. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed.

  12. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 34%, as compared to 55% in revisions of a revision prosthesis (p = 0.05). The failure rate of the 2-stage revisions was 30%. Median time interval between stages was 84 (9-597) days. 117 (54%) of the 2-stage revisions were revisions of a primary...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 21%, as compared to 29% in revisions of a previously revised prosthesis (p = 0.1). Overall postoperative mortality was 0.6% in high-volume centers (> 30 procedures within 2 years) as opposed to 7% in the remaining centers (p = 0.003). Interpretation...

  13. Total hip arthroplasty in heart transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, José Luis; Resines, Carlos; Zafra, Alberto

    2007-12-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) is a known complication after heart transplantation. In order to assess the efficacy and complications of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) in this population, the authors analysed 24 cementless THAs in 18 patients with advanced AVNFH (stage II affecting more than 15% of the articular surface, stage III and IV according to the Ficat-Arlet classification) after a heart transplant procedure. Average duration of follow-up was 35.4 months (range: 16 to 66). Pain and function scores (Harris Hip Score and WOMAC arthritis index) showed significant improvement from the preoperative levels. There was no evidence of component loosening, heart-related complications or infection following the THA. Cementless THA is a reasonable treatment option for advanced avascular necrosis of the femoral head following heart transplant procedures.

  14. Endotoxins in surgical instruments of hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Regina Goveia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To investigate endotoxins in sterilized surgical instruments used in hip arthroplasties. METHOD A descriptive exploratory study conducted in a public teaching hospital. Six types of surgical instruments were selected, namely: acetabulum rasp, femoral rasp, femoral head remover, chisel box, flexible bone reamer and femoral head test. The selection was based on the analysis of the difficulty in removing bone and blood residues during cleaning. The sample was made up of 60 surgical instruments, which were tested for endotoxins in three different stages. The EndosafeTM Gel-Clot LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method was used. RESULT There was consistent gel formation with positive analysis in eight instruments, corresponding to 13.3%, being four femoral rasps and four bone reamers. CONCLUSION Endotoxins in quantity ≥0.125 UE/mL were detected in 13.3% of the instruments tested.

  15. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non....... The wrists had been reviewed annually and analysis was done on the latest follow-up data. Results 60 patients had been operated (5 bilaterally), 5 wrists had been revised, and 52 were available for follow-up (with the revised cases excluded). The pain scores, QuickDASH scores, ulnar flexion, and supination...... for the whole group were statistically significantly better at follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences between the rheumatoid and the non-rheumatoid patients except for motion, which was better in the non-rheumatoid group. The motion obtained depended on the preoperative motion. Implant...

  16. A Color Based Touchless Finger Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kah-Meng Kwong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available People work with computers almost anytime, everywhere  in the current trend. However, continuously controlling a computer with mouse for a long time might cause much strains to people’s wrist. This work proposes a touchless finger mouse using webcam. A marker with different colours representing different actions is used. The webcam will capture the information on the marker and trigger the associated actions. This prototype is proven to be able to perform most of the actions a normal mouser can perform.

  17. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Me...

  18. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  19. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  20. BILATERAL VOLLEYBALL-RELATED DEFORMITY OF THE LITTLE FINGERS: MALLET FINGER AND CLINODACTYLY MIMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis.

  1. Effect of Finger Joint on Flexural Strength of Teak Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharatesh A. Danawade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the flexural properties of rectangular Burma teak wood beam without finger joint and with finger joint. Finger joints enable full utilization of wood. Finger jointing technique is also used to eliminate wood defects which weaken the strength of wood. This paper considers finger joint as defined defect and its effect on the flexural strength is determined. Teakwood is hard and heavy, seasons rapidly and has good durability. The specimens were studied under three point bending test. Both edge wise and flat wise tests were carried out. It is observed that Burma teakwood beam without finger joint is stronger than beams with finger joints. Because of finger jointing the flexural strength reduces. It can be concluded that the strength loss can improved upon by selecting suitable geometry of finger joint and a suitable adhesive. It is recognized that further studies are necessary on jointing techniques of wood and type of adhesive so as to equal the flexural strength properties of clear teak wood beams.

  2. Spatial Circular Granulation Method Based on Multimodal Finger Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Finger-based personal identification has become an active research topic in recent years because of its high user acceptance and convenience. How to reliably and effectively fuse the multimodal finger features together, however, has still been a challenging problem in practice. In this paper, viewing the finger trait as the combination of a fingerprint, finger vein, and finger-knuckle-print, a new multimodal finger feature recognition scheme is proposed based on granular computing. First, the ridge texture features of FP, FV, and FKP are extracted using Gabor Ordinal Measures (GOM. Second, combining the three-modal GOM feature maps in a color-based manner, we then constitute the original feature object set of a finger. To represent finger features effectively, they are granulated at three levels of feature granules (FGs in a bottom-up manner based on spatial circular granulation. In order to test the performance of the multilevel FGs, a top-down matching method is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves higher accuracy recognition rate in finger feature recognition.

  3. Acute finger injuries: part I. Tendons and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Improper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries can cause deformity and dysfunction over time. A basic understanding of the complex anatomy of the finger and of common tendon and ligament injury mechanisms can help physicians properly diagnose and treat finger injuries. Evaluation includes a general musculoskeletal examination as well as radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views). Splinting and taping are effective treatments for tendon and ligament injuries. Treatment should restrict the motion of injured structures while allowing uninjured joints to remain mobile. Although family physicians are usually the first to evaluate patients with finger injuries, it is important to recognize when a referral is needed to ensure optimal outcomes.

  4. Simulation results of the grasping analysis of an underactuated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niola Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a number of simulations concerning the grasping analysis is presented. The grasping device consist in an under-actuated finger driven by un-extendible tendon that is one of the fingers of a mechanical prosthesis that was principally conceived as human prosthesis. The results, however, are useful for any similar finger to be used in grasping devices for industrial and agricultural applications, Aanalysis maps of the grasping were obtained which show the “robustness” of the socket. The method seems to be a suitable tool for the optimum design of such under-actuated fingers for grasping devices.

  5. The design and development of a finger joint simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Artificial finger joints lack the long-term clinical success seen with hip and knee prostheses. In part, this can be explained by the challenges of rheumatoid arthritis, a progressive disease which attacks surrounding tissues as well as the joint itself. Therefore, the natural finger joints' biomechanics are adversely affected, and consequently, this imbalance due to subluxing forces further challenges any prosthesis. Many different designs of finger prosthesis have been offered over a period of greater than 50 years. Most of these designs have failed, and it is likely that many of these failures could have been identified had the prostheses been appropriately tested prior to implantation into patients. While finger joint simulators have been designed, arguably only those from a single centre have been able to reproduce clinical-type failures of the finger prostheses tested in them. This article describes the design and development of a finger simulator at Durham University, UK. It explains and justifies the engineering decisions made and thus the evolution of the finger simulator. In vitro results and their linkage to clinical-type failures are outlined to help to show the effectiveness of the simulator. Failures of finger implants in vivo continue to occur, and the need for appropriate in vitro testing of finger prostheses remains strong.

  6. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  7. Product Platform Replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – It is argued in this article that too little is known about product platforms and how to deal with them from a manager's point of view. Specifically, little information exists regarding when old established platforms are replaced by new generations in R&D and production environments...... originality and value is achieved by focusing on product platform replacements believed to represent a growing management challenge....

  8. Toward a Code for the Interactions of Zinc Fingers with DNA: Selection of Randomized Fingers Displayed on Phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    1994-11-01

    We have used two selection techniques to study sequence-specific DNA recognition by the zinc finger, a small, modular DNA-binding minidomain. We have chosen zinc fingers because they bind as independent modules and so can be linked together in a peptide designed to bind a predetermined DNA site. In this paper, we describe how a library of zinc fingers displayed on the surface of bacteriophage enables selection of fingers capable of binding to given DNA triplets. The amino acid sequences of selected fingers which bind the same triplet are compared to examine how sequence-specific DNA recognition occurs. Our results can be rationalized in terms of coded interactions between zinc fingers and DNA, involving base contacts from a few α-helical positions. In the paper following this one, we describe a complementary technique which confirms the identity of amino acids capable of DNA sequence discrimination from these positions.

  9. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  10. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  11. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  12. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  13. Prosthetic Lumbar disc replacement for degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Arvind

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical articulated device to replace intervertebral disc as a treatment for low back pain secondary to disc degeneration has emerged as a promising tool for selected patients. The potential advantages are prevention of adjacent segment degeneration, maintenance of mobility as well as avoidance of all the complications associated with fusion. The short-term results have been comparable to that of fusion, a few mid-term results have shown mixed outcome, but information on long-term results and performance are not available at present. The rationale for lumbar disc arthroplasty, indications, contraindications, the various artificial devices in the market and the concepts intrinsic to each of them, basic technique of insertion, complications are discussed and a brief summary of our experience with one of the devices is presented.

  14. Finger-like voids induced by viscous fingering during phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The formation mechanism of phase-inversion ceramic hollow fibre membranes has not been well understood. In this paper, we report on the formation of finger-like macrovoids during non-solvent-induced phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. A membrane structure without such finger-like macrovoids was observed when the suspension was slowly immersed into pure ethanol or a mixture of 70. wt% NMP and 30. wt% water, whereas finger-like macrovoids occurred when the suspension was slid into the non-solvents at higher speeds. We found that the formation process of finger-like macrovoids could be fully or partially reversed when nascent membranes were taken out from water shortly after immersion, depending on the duration of the immersion. Splitting of the fingers during the formation of the macrovoids was also observed during the phase inversion of two alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. These experimental observations were not predicted by current theories of finger-like macrovoid formation in polymer membranes, but appear to mimic the well-known viscous fingering phenomenon. We therefore propose that in the phase inversion of ceramic suspensions, the viscous fingering phenomenon is an important mechanism in the formation of finger-like voids. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  15. A preliminary report of patellofemoral arthroplasty in isolated patellofemoral arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiang; XU Zheng-jian; HE Rong-xin; YAN Shi-gui; WU Li-dong

    2010-01-01

    Background Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is not uncommon. Surgical treatment of isolated patellofemoral arthritis remains controversial and poses a challenging treatment dilemma. The present study aimed to evaluate the short-term results of patellofemoral arthroplasty for patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis.Methods We analyzed 11 patellofemoral arthroplasties performed from March 2006 to September 2009 in 11 patients with isolated patellofemoral arthritis. The patients comprised 2 males and 9 females with an average age of 53.7 years (range, 46-74 years). Standard weightbearing radiographs were taken in the anteroposterior, lateral, and 45° axial views.The knee pain and functional status were evaluated by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scales and American Knee Society (AKS) scores. For comparison, 23 total knee arthroplasties in 23 patients with primary tibiofemoral osteoarthritis were matched according to age, gender, bilaterality and body mass index.The duration of follow-up was 23.7 months (range, 12-47 months).Results The majority of the 11 patients experienced improvement in their patellofemoral symptoms after patellofemoral arthroplasty. The WOMAC scores improved considerably by 7.4 points with respect to pain and by 5.2 points with respect to function. The AKS scores also improved considerably by 23.9 points with respect to pain and 44.3 points with respect to function. Although the clinical outcomes after patellofemoral arthroplasty were not better than those after total knee arthroplasty, patellofemoral arthroplasty exhibited advantages in the shorter operation time, lower blood loss and increased postoperative range of motion. At the latest follow-up, there was no clinical or radiographic evidence of patellofemoral maltracking, loosening or wear.Conclusions On the basis of our experience in this relatively small series of patients with a short-term follow-up,patellofemoral arthroplasty

  16. A review of ceramic bearing materials in total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, B S; Garino, J; Ries, M; Rahaman, M N

    2007-01-01

    Bearings made of ceramics have ultra-low wear properties that make them suitable for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). When compared to cobalt chrome (CoCr)-on-polyethylene (PE) articulations, ceramics offer drastic reductions in bearing wear rates. Lower wear rates result in fewer wear particles produced by the articulating surfaces. In theory, this should reduce the risk of periprosthetic osteolysis and premature implant loosening, thereby contributing to the longevity of total joints. In addition to ceramics, other alternative bearing couples, such as highly cross-linked PE (XLPE) and metal-on-metal also offer less wear than CoCr-on-PE articulations in total joint arthroplasty. Alumina and zirconia ceramics are familiar to orthopaedic surgeons since both materials have been used in total joints for several decades. While not new in Europe, alumina-on-alumina ceramic total hips have only recently become available for widespread use in the United States from various orthopaedic implant manufacturers. As the search for the ideal total joint bearing material continues, composite materials of existing ceramics, metal-on-ceramic articulations, and new ceramic technologies will offer more choices to the arthroplasty surgeon. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of material properties, clinical applications, evolution, and limitations of ceramic materials that are of interest to the arthroplasty surgeon.

  17. Infected primary knee arthroplasty: Risk factors for surgical treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Gabriel Duarte Paes Pradella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present epidemiological data and risk factors associated with surgical out-comes favorable or unfavorable for the treatment of infection in infected total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 48 patients who underwent treatment of primary total knee arthroplasty for infection between January 1994 and December 2008, in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. The variables associated with favorable outcome of surgical treatment (debridement and retention or exchange arthroplasty in two days or unfavorable (arthrodesis or death infection. RESULTS: A total of 39 cases of infection after primary total knee arthroplasty, 22 progressed to 17 for a favorable outcome and unfavorable outcome. Early infections (OR: 14.0, 95% CI 1.5-133.2, p = 0.016 and diabetes (OR: 11.3, 95% CI 1.4-89.3, p = 0.032 were associated with arthrodesis joint and death respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients with early infection had a higher risk of developing surgical procedure with unfavorable outcome (arthrodesis and diabetics had higher odds of death after infection of primary knee arthroplasties.

  18. Inferior outcome after hip resurfacing arthroplasty than after conventional arthroplasty. Evidence from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database, 1995 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johanson, Per-Erik; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove;

    2010-01-01

    The reported outcomes of hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) vary. The frequency of this procedure in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden is low. We therefore determined the outcome of HRA in the NARA database, which is common to all 3 countries, and compared it to the outcome of conventional total hip...

  19. The effect of the Oxford uncemented medial compartment arthroplasty on the bone mineral density and content of the proximal tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, G J; Gilchrist, N; Maxwell, R; March, R; Heard, A; Frampton, C

    2013-11-01

    We studied the bone mineral density (BMD) and the bone mineral content (BMC) of the proximal tibia in patients with a well-functioning uncemented Oxford medial compartment arthroplasty using the Lunar iDXA bone densitometer. Our hypothesis was that there would be decreased BMD and BMC adjacent to the tibial base plate and increased BMD and BMC at the tip of the keel. There were 79 consecutive patients (33 men, 46 women) with a mean age of 65 years (44 to 84) with a minimum two-year follow-up (mean 2.6 years (2.0 to 5.0)) after unilateral arthroplasty, who were scanned using a validated standard protocol where seven regions of interest (ROI) were examined and compared with the contralateral normal knee. All had well-functioning knees with a mean Oxford knee score of 43 (14 to 48) and mean Knee Society function score of 90 (20 to 100), showing a correlation with the increasing scores and higher BMC and BMD values in ROI 2 in the non-implanted knee relative to the implanted knee (p = 0.013 and p = 0.015, respectively). The absolute and percentage changes in BMD and BMC were decreased in all ROIs in the implanted knee compared with the non-implanted knee, but this did not reach statistical significance. Bone loss was markedly less than reported losses with total knee replacement. There was no significant association with side, although there was a tendency for the BMC to decrease with age in men. The BMC was less in the implanted side relative to the non-implanted side in men compared with women in ROI 2 (p = 0.027), ROI 3 (p = 0.049) and ROI 4 (p = 0.029). The uncemented Oxford medial compartment arthroplasty appears to allow relative preservation of the BMC and BMD of the proximal tibia, suggesting that the implant acts more physiologically than total knee replacement. Peri-prosthetic bone loss is an important factor in assessing long-term implant stability and survival, and the results of this study are encouraging for the long-term outcome of this arthroplasty.

  20. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint...

  1. Compliance Analysis of an Under-Actuated Robotic Finger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, Martin; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Under-actuated robotic hands have multiple applications fields, like prosthetics and service robots. They are interesting for their versatility, simple control and minimal component usage. However, when external forces are applied on the finger-tip, the mechanical structure of the finger might not b

  2. A force feedback master finger in exoskeleton type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Honggen; Liu Hong; Xie Zongwu

    2010-01-01

    In order to eliminate the drawbacks of conventional force feedback gloves,a new type of master finger has been developed.By utilizing three"four-bar mechanism joint"in series and wire coupling mechanism,the master finger transmission ratio is kept exactly 1:1.4:1 in the whole movement range and it can make active motions in both extension and flexion directions.Additionally,to assttre faster data transmission and near zero delay in the master-slave operation,a digital signal processing/field programmable gate array(DSP/FPGA-FPGA)structure with 200μs cycle time is designed.The operating modes of the master finger can be contact or non-contact,which depends on the motion states of a slave finger,free motion or constrained motion.The position control employed in non-contact mode ensures unconstrained motion and the force control adopted in contact mode guarantees natural contact sensation.To evaluate the performances of the master finger,an experiment between the master finger and a DLR/HIT dexterous finger is conducted.The results demonstrate that this new type master finger can augment telepresence.

  3. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barneveld, van S.; Palen, van der J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a usefu

  4. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Barneveld, S.; van der Palen, J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a useful test fo

  5. Robust finger vein ROI localization based on flexible segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu; Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-10-24

    Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI) definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system.

  6. Robust Finger Vein ROI Localization Based on Flexible Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sun Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system.

  7. Finger-vein image separation algorithms and realization with MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Junshan; Wu, Jiajie

    2010-10-01

    According to the characteristics of the finger-vein image, we adopted a series of methods to enhance the contrast of the image in order to separate the finger-vein areas from the background areas, and made prepare for the subsequent research such as feature extraction and recognition processing . The method consists of three steps: denoising, contrast enhancement and image binarization. In denoising, considering the relationship between gray levels in the adjacent areas of the finger-vein image, we adopted the Gradient Inverse Weighted Smoothing method. In contrast enhancement, we improved the conventional High Frequency Stress Filtering method and adopted a method which combined the traditional High Frequency Stress Filtering algorithm together with the Histogram Equalization. With this method, the contrast of the finger-vein area and the background area has been enhanced significantly. During the binarization process, after taking the differences of the gray levels between the different areas of the finger-vein image into consideration, we proposed a method which combined the binarization by dividing the image into several segments and the Morphological Image Processing means. Our experiment results show that after a series of processing mentioned above by using MATLAB, the finger-vein areas can be separated from the background areas obviously. We can get a vivid figure of the finger-vein which provided some references for the following research such as finger-vein image feature extraction, matching and identification.

  8. Predicted and observed finger diameters in field soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.; Steenhuis, T.S.; Parlange, J.Y.; Dekker, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    Wetting front instability resulting in fingered flow has been found in both wettable and non-wettable soils. Laboratory research has resulted in a number of expressions for finger diameter. The applicability of one of these equations was tested for three soils where detailed soil moisture contents w

  9. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. De Quervain Tenosynovitis Following Trapeziometacarpal Ball-and-Socket Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubau, Jean F; Goubau, Laurent; Goorens, Chul Ki; van Hoonacker, Petrus; Kerckhove, Diederick; Vanmierlo, Bert; Berghs, Bart

    2015-02-01

    Background One of the surgical treatment options for trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint arthritis is a prosthetic ball-and-socket replacement. One of the complications in the postoperative setting is de Quervain tendinopathy. Purposes Although this complication has been reported following a resection athroplasty, we questioned whether lengthening of the thumb following the Ivory (Memometal, Stryker Corporate, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) ball-and-socket arthroplasty could be a causal factor. Methods In a prospective study regarding the overall outcome of the Ivory prosthesis, we analyzed 96 cases (83 patients; 69 female, 12 male, 8 bilateral) of primary implanted Ivory prosthesis and the incidence of de Quervain disease during the first year following surgery. We found a particularly high incidence (17%) of de Quervain tendinopathy the first year following this ball-and-socket arthroplasty. We measured the lengthening of the thumb radiographically in the group presenting de Quervain and the asymptomatic group and compared this measure between the two groups. Results We did not find any measurable or statistically significant difference between the groups regarding lengthening. Discussion These findings suggest that lengthening of the thumb following ball-and-socket arthroplasty is not a causal factor in the development of de Quervain tendinopathy within one year after surgery.

  11. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  12. Active Finger Recognition from Surface EMG Signal Using Bayesian Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Nozomu; Hoashi, Yuki; Konishi, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposed an active finger recognition method using Bayesian filter in order to control a myoelectric hand. We have previously proposed a finger joint angle estimation method based on measured surface electromyography (EMG) signals and a linear model. However, when we estimate 2 or more finger angles by this estimation method, the estimation angle of the inactive finger is not accurate. This is caused by interference of surface EMG signal. To solve this interference problem, we proposed active finger recognition method from the amplitude spectrum of surface EMG signal using Bayesian filter. To confirm the effectiveness of this recognition method, we developed a myoelectric hand simulator that implements proposed recognition algorithm and carried out real-time recognition experiment.

  13. Finger gnosia: a predictor of numerical abilities in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2005-10-01

    This paper aimed to test the specificity of predicting power of finger gnosia on later numerical abilities in school-age children and to contribute to the understanding of this effect. Forty-one children were tested in the beginning of Grade 1 on finger gnosia, left-right orientation (another sign of the Gerstmann "syndrome"), and global development. Fifteen months later, numerical and reading abilities were assessed. Analyses of the results indicated that, contrary to the general measures of cognitive development, performance in the finger gnosia test was a good predictor of numerical skills 1 year later but not of reading skills, which proves the specificity of that predictor. The same conclusion was also true for the left-right orientation. However, finger gnosia could equally predict performance in numerical tasks that do or do not rely heavily on finger representation or on magnitude representation. Results are discussed in terms of the localizationist and the functional hypotheses.

  14. The effects of exercise on finger extension of CVA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, C A; Quintana, L A

    1983-03-01

    The choice of activity to improve finger extension of post-CVA patients is based on untested assumptions and hypotheses. In this study, using electromyography of the extrinsic finger muscles and electrogoniometry of wrist and finger joints, the effects of five types of exercise on the finger extension of post-CVA patients were documented. Results indicated that resisted and rapid exercises recruited high percentages of output of all three muscles. Slow, unresisted extension exercises preferentially recruited the extensor digitorum. No exercise caused significant immediate changes in range of motion (ROM), flexor/extensor balance, time required to open the hand, or level of activity of the extensor digitorum during opening of the hand. Resisted grasp did not limit the patients' ability to extend the fingers. Variability in percent of motor output among the subjects of this study indicates the need to monitor each patient during therapy.

  15. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  16. Geometric approach to viscous fingering on a cone

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, J A

    2003-01-01

    We study fluid flow and the formation of viscous fingering patterns on a two-dimensional conical background space, defined as the conical Hele-Shaw cell. We approach the problem geometrically and study how the nontrivial topological structure of the conical cell affects the evolution of the interface separating two viscous fluids. We perform a perturbative weakly nonlinear analysis of the problem and derive a mode-coupling differential equation which describes fluid-fluid interface behaviour. Our nonlinear study predicts the formation of fingering structures in which fingers of different lengths compete and split at their tips. The shape of the emerging patterns show a significant sensitivity to variations in the cell's topological features, which can be monitored by changing the cone opening angle. We find that for increasingly larger values of the opening angle, finger competition is inhibited while finger tip-splitting is enhanced.

  17. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals......The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use...... are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain...

  18. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  19. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty-current results and designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean; Athwal, George S

    2016-03-01

    Stemless shoulder arthroplasty was originally introduced in 2004 by a single manufacturer. Now, over a decade later, numerous designs are available outside the USA, but as yet, only one implant has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is available for use within the USA. Often referred to as "canal sparing," these implants are designed for metaphyseal fixation to minimize humeral bone removal, avoid intraoperative and postoperative humeral fracture complications, and to decrease morbidity associated with revision operations. Recently, the second generation of stemless arthroplasty, a convertible implant allowing use in either anatomic or reverse arthroplasty configuration, was released for use outside the USA. This paper will review the available designs, reported results, and raise potential concerns for this emerging technology.

  20. Association between trochanteric bursitis, osteoarthrosis and total hip arthroplasty,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this was an epidemiological study on trochanteric bursitis at the time of performing total hip arthroplasty.METHODS: sixty-two sequential patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis, without any previous history of trochanteric bursitis, were evaluated. The bursas were collected and evaluated histologically.RESULTS: there were 35 female patients (56.5% and 27 male patients (43.5%, with a mean age of 65 years (±11. Trochanteric bursitis was conformed histologically in nine patients (14.5%, of whom six were female (66.7% and three were male (33.3%.CONCLUSIONS: 14.5% of the bursas analyzed presented inflammation at the time that the primary total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis was performed, and the majority of the cases of bursitis were detected in female patients.

  1. Early total hip arthroplasty for severe displaced acetabular fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shu-hua; ZHANG Yu-kun; XU Wei-hua; LI Jin; LIU Guo-hui; YANG Cao; LIU Yong; TIAN Hong-tao

    2006-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the effect of early total hip arthroplasty for severe displaced acetabular fractures.Methods: Total hip arthroplasty was performed on 17 cases of severe fracture of the acetabulum from 1997 to 2003. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (1-6 years) and the average period from fracture to operation was 8 days (5-21 day). The average age of the patients was 53 years (26-69 years).Results: At the final follow-up the Harris hip score averaged 82(69-100) points and 15 cases have got a good outcome. There was one case of heterotopic bone formation. There were no radiographic evidences of late loosening of the prosthesis. One patient had severe central displacement of the cup.Conclusions: In patients with severe displaced acetabular fractures, particularly in elderly patients, early total hip arthroplasty is probably an alternative efficient way to achieve a painless and stable hip.

  2. Mechanics of finger-tip electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yewang; Li, Rui; Cheng, Huanyu; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew P; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang

    2013-10-28

    Tactile sensors and electrotactile stimulators can provide important links between humans and virtual environments, through the sensation of touch. Soft materials, such as low modulus silicones, are attractive as platforms and support matrices for arrays sensors and actuators that laminate directly onto the fingertips. Analytic models for the mechanics of three dimensional, form-fitting finger cuffs based on such designs are presented here, along with quantitative validation using the finite element method. The results indicate that the maximum strains in the silicone and the embedded devices are inversely proportional to the square root of radius of curvature of the cuff. These and other findings can be useful in formulating designs for these and related classes of body-worn, three dimensional devices.

  3. EFFECT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE EXERCISES IN OSTEOARTHRITIC AND REPLACED KNEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Metgud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease involving thinning or destruction of the smooth cartilage that covers the ends of bones and changes to the bone. Joint arthroplasty is an intervention for those patients who have severe disease, with severe pain and radiographic evidence. Objective: To compare the effect of proprioceptive exercises in osteoarthritic and total replaced knees using the Knee Society Score and Joint Position Sense. Design: A randomised clinical trial. Subjects: A total of 95 subjects were selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Intervention: Participants were divided into two groups; Group A comprised of the Total Knee Replacement and Group B was the osteoarthritic group. Group A was given exercises along with ambulation and static and resistance cycling and training of functional activities. Group B was given exercises and seven proprioceptive exercises followed by continuous short wave diathermy cross-fire method for 15 minutes. Outcome measure: Pain Intensity, Functional Outcome and Joint Position Sense (JPS were measured by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS, Knee Society Score (KSS and Absolute angle of error, respectively. Results: The results show a significant difference between the two groups using VAS and JPS whereas showed no significant difference between the two groups on using the KSS. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it was observed that proprioceptive exercises are beneficial in improving the joint position sense in patients with osteoarthritis as well as total knee replacements.

  4. Vertical finger displacement is reduced in index finger tapping during repeated bout rate enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2017-01-01

    , and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency......, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip....... Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping....

  5. Unilateral vs one stage bilateral total knee replacement in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A controversy exists regarding simultaneous or staged bilateral total knee replacement. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral and 50 undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively to compare the clinical, radiological results and complication rates. Eighty-four patients belonged to ASA category II or III preoperatively. The study included a high proportion of rheumatoid patients and osteoarthritis patients with severe deformities. Results: Bilateral group had greater blood loss and required more blood transfusion, but there was no difference in requirement of postoperative intensive care and the complication rates. Rheumatoid knees had lower pre and postoperative knee score and functional score as compared to osteoarthritic knees. Morbidity and mortality of one stage bilateral knee replacement was no greater than unilateral operation. Conclusion: Simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in younger patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis is safe and effective

  6. Functional Outcomes of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Following Failed Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ironside

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA can be used to treat medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Some of these knees will eventually fail, and need to be revised. There is controversy about using UKA in younger patients as a definitive procedure or as a means to delay total knee arthroplasty (TKA because the outcomes of subsequent revision surgery may be inferior to a primary TKA. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 46 revision TKA patients following failed UKA (UKA revisions using functional outcomes questionnaires and compared the results with a cohort of age and gender matched primary TKA patients. Our hypothesis was that UKA revision surgery would be inferior to primary TKA surgery. Results: Data was collected on 33 knees after a mean follow-up period of five years. There was no significant difference in the Oxford Knee Score (33.7 vs 37.1, p = 0.09 or the Western Ontario and MacMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC (24.8 vs. 19.1, p = 0.22. A subgroup analysis demonstrated that UKAs, which fail early, are more likely to produce an inferior outcome following revision surgery than those that survive more than five years. Discussion: We conclude that UKA can be used effectively in appropriately selected patients, as the functional outcome of their subsequent revision to TKA is not significantly inferior to a primary TKA.

  7. Use of an electronic finger dosimeters in optimisation of finger doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C. J.; Whitby, M.; Hilditch, T.; Anstee, D.

    2002-07-01

    Optimisation of radiation doses to the hands is problematic. Doses recorded by passive dosimeters include contributions from many different manipulations, so it is difficult to ascertain which actions make significant contributions to the doses received. A device for electronic monitoring of finger doses called and Advanced Extremity Gamma Instrumentation system (AEGIS), which records instantaneous dose rates at the finger, can assist in providing this information. AEGIS ha been employed in a number of hospital departments where radionuclides are used, including a large hospital radionuclide dispensary and nuclear medicine departments. Data were recorded throughout complete sessions and analysed to identify the actions which made the most significant contributions to doses. Study of the patterns of radiation dose rate has enabled finger doses in the radionuclide dispensary to be optimised through raising staff awareness of doses from each manipulation. Optimisation has been achieved through changes following evaluation of alternative manipulation techniques and use of shielding devices. AEGIS has also been used to determine dose distributions across the hand and establish a relationship between the dose to the most exposed part and that at the monitoring position. For radionuclide dispensary staff, the tip of the index finger on the dominant hand receives the highest dose. Studies carried out in nuclear medicine departments have shown that withdrawals of radiopharmaceutical into a syringe, where a shield is not used routinely, tend to make the largest contribution to the dose. This can vary from 5 to 500 {mu}Gy per manipulation. Doses for injections varied from 1.5 to 300{mu}Gy. (Author)

  8. Intensity Variation Normalization for Finger Vein Recognition Using Guided Filter Based Singe Scale Retinex

    OpenAIRE

    Shan Juan Xie; Yu Lu; Sook Yoon; Jucheng Yang; Dong Sun Park

    2015-01-01

    Finger vein recognition has been considered one of the most promising biometrics for personal authentication. However, the capacities and percentages of finger tissues (e.g., bone, muscle, ligament, water, fat, etc.) vary person by person. This usually causes poor quality of finger vein images, therefore degrading the performance of finger vein recognition systems (FVRSs). In this paper, the intrinsic factors of finger tissue causing poor quality of finger vein images are analyzed, and an int...

  9. The Silent Language of Fingers and Hands-The Role of Finger and Hand Motions in Non-verbal Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周樱

    2013-01-01

    This paper engages in the discussion about nonverbal intercultural communication from the perspective of hand and finger gestures, probing into the functions of non-verbal cues in cross-cultural interaction, talking over two different attitudes to⁃ward gestures, and giving a detailed analysis about the silent language of some specific gestures with fingers and hands in different cultures.

  10. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 2: Normal and abnormal radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Frequently, the decision made by general practitioners or musculoskeletal triage assessment services to refer patients for specialist review is initiated by a radiological report. Following shoulder arthroplasty it is important to ensure that any patient with asymptomatic evidence of a failing prosthesis is referred for review so that revision surgery can be contemplated and planned before the situation becomes unsalvageable. The first paper in this series described the various types of shoulder arthroplasty and indications for each. This follow-up paper will concentrate on their modes of failure and the associated radiographic features, and is aimed at radiology trainees and non-musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.

  11. History and factors of survival of total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolundžić, Robert; Trkulja, Vladimir; Orlić, Dubravko

    2012-02-01

    Since the 1960s total hip arthroplasty (THA) has represented one of the greatest accomplishments in orthopedic surgery. It improves the functionality, working ability and quality of life of patients with non-functional hip joint due to various reasons. This article reviews general and regional history of THA, current knowledge and concepts regarding the long-term outcomes of the procedure and emphasizes the need for establishing national (and international) THA registries as an essential way of gathering data critical for decision making in daily practice as well as in defining national healthcare policies in respect to arthroplasty procedures.

  12. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  13. Robotic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Degirmencioglu, Aleks; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform mitral valve surgery. This procedure has gained acceptance, particularly for mitral valve repair in degenerative mitral disease. However, mitral repair may not always be possible, especially in severely calcified mitral valve of rheumatic origin. This study demonstrates the basic concepts and technique of robotic mitral valve replacement for valve pathologies that are not suitable for repair.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complications following hip replacement: A pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Pilania

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip replacement surgery helps millions of people worldwide walk painlessly each year. With increasing life spans and decreased clinical threshold for surgery, this number will continue to rise. With the increase in the number of surgeries and the longevity of implants, the need for early and prompt diagnosis of complications is also rising. This essay underlines the fact that magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5T scanner with specialized metal artefact reduction sequences is a viable technique to image the post-arthroplasty hip and has vast potential in the prompt and early diagnosis of complications in these patients.

  15. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future.

  16. The femoral sulcus in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraj, Krishna; Bartlett, John

    2009-05-01

    The position of the femoral sulcus relative to the midline of the distal femoral resection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied to determine if centralized placement of the femoral component on the distal femur was justified in terms of aligning the prosthetic sulcus with the native femoral sulcus. The location of the femoral sulcus was studied in 112 consecutive patients undergoing TKA. The mean sulcus position was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline of the distal femoral resection (SD 1.4, 95% CI, 0.5-1.0 mm). However, the variation in sulcus positions ranged from 4 mm medial to 4 mm lateral to the midline. The mean sulcus position in valgus knees was 1.0 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.8), and that in varus knees was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.2) (P = 0.501). It appears prudent to centre the femoral component on the native sulcus rather than the midline of the distal femoral resection, so as to ensure accurate alignment of the prosthetic sulcus with the native sulcus and to encourage normal patella tracking.

  17. Muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Siri B; Husby, Vigdis S; Foss, Olav A; Wik, Tina S; Svenningsen, Svein; Engdal, Monika; Haugan, Kristin; Husby, Otto S

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Minimizing the decrease in muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty (THA) might allow patients to recover faster. We evaluated muscular strength in patients who were operated on using 3 surgical approaches. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 60 patients scheduled for primary THA were allocated to the direct lateral, posterior, or anterior approach. Leg press and abduction strength were evaluated 2 weeks or less preoperatively, 2 and 8 days postoperatively, and at 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Results Differences in maximal strength change were greatest after 2 and 8 days. The posterior and anterior approaches produced less decrease in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach. 6 weeks postoperatively, the posterior approach produced greater increase in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach, and resulted in a greater increase in abduction strength than the anterior approach. At 3-month follow-up, no statistically significant differences between the groups were found. The operated legs were 18% weaker in leg press and 15% weaker in abduction than the unoperated legs, and the results were similar between groups. Interpretation The posterior and anterior approaches appeared to have the least negative effect on abduction and leg press muscular strength in the first postoperative week; the posterior approach had the least negative effect, even up to 6 weeks postoperatively. THA patients have reduced muscle strength in the operated leg (compared to the unoperated leg) 3 months after surgery. PMID:26141371

  18. Total Knee Arthroplasty in the Combined Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.J. Voskresensky

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We have offered modified access to a knee to work out a method for restoration of extensive apparatus of the knee. 91 patients with degenerative damages of the knee were under out su-pervision. All patients were differentiated in groups according to the form of access and pa-thology of the knee. At all stages of studying the following method of investigation were made: goniometry — for estimation of the knee functional condition; electroneiromyography — for reveling deficiency of muscular activity and determination of its kind. Patient's satisfac-tion by operation was defined by means of WOMAC scale subjective indexes. The received digital material was subjected to statistical processing. Thus, it has been proved that applica-tion of the modified access to a knee offered by us in total knee arthroplasty in patients with combined contracture in comparison with traditionally applied technologies of extensive ap-paratus releasing allows in short terms to restore the volume and force of movements in a knee that reduces time of rehabilitation and improves quality of patient's life

  19. Can technology improve alignment during knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Fennema, Peter; Price, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Component malalignment remains a concern in total knee arthroplasty (TKA); therefore, a series of technologies have been developed to improve alignment. The authors conducted a systematic review to compare computer-assisted navigation with conventional instrumentation, and assess the current evidence for patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation. An extensive search of the PubMed database for relevant meta-analyses, systematic reviews and original articles was performed, with each study scrutinised by two reviewers. Data on study characteristics and outcomes were extracted from each study and compared. In total 30 studies were included: 10 meta-analyses comparing computer-assisted navigation and conventional instrumentation, 13 studies examining patient-matched instrumentation, and seven investigating robot-assisted implantation. Computer-assisted navigation showed significant and reproducible improvements in mechanical alignment over conventional instrumentation. Patient-matched instrumentation appeared to achieve a high degree of mechanical alignment, although the majority of studies were of poor quality. The data for robot-assisted surgery was less indicative. Computer-assisted navigation improves alignment during TKA over conventional instrumentation. For patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation, alignment benefits have not been reliably demonstrated. For all three technologies, clinical benefits cannot currently be assumed, and further studies are required. Although current technologies to improve alignment during TKA appear to result in intra-operative benefits, their clinical impact remains unclear, and surgeons should take this into account when considering their adoption.

  20. Continuous cold therapy in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, D W; Harris, H

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a retrospective study that assessed 52 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between January 1, 1992 and September 15, 1992. Thirty-three patients underwent TKA and received cold therapy pads placed over a thin dressing in the operating room. Nineteen patients underwent TKA using an identical operative and postoperative procedure, but did not receive continuous cold therapy. Continuous cold therapy consisted of two sterile plastic pads connnected by rubber hoses containing cool water from an electric main unit that maintained a constant temperature of 42 degrees F for the immediate postoperative period. Cold therapy pads were used an average of 3 days and removed with the first dressing change. Patients who had continuous cold therapy averaged a 200 cc decrease in postoperative blood loss. There was no significant difference in the amount of narcotic use, transfusion requirements, or hospital stay between the two groups. Postoperative swelling and range of motion were not consistently recorded. Twenty-eight other variables also examined not significant. Based on these results, we cannot recommend continuous cold therapy or justify the extra expense for all patients who undergo TKA.

  1. Five- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia and calculation abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children's representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation.

  2. Five- to 7-Year-Olds’ Finger Gnosia and Calculation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds’ finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children’s representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation. PMID:22171220

  3. Five- to 7-Year-Olds’ Finger Gnosia and Calculation Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eReeve

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds’ finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory and finger-use solving single digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic RT were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children’s representational abilities between five and seven years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation.

  4. Pain catastrophizing as a risk factor for chronic pain after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns LC

    2015-01-01

    predictor of chronic pain persisting ≥3 months following TKA in five of the studies assessed. Limitations of studies included lack of large-scale data, absence of standardized pain measurements, inadequate multivariate adjustment, such as failure to control for analgesic use and other relevant covariates, and failure to report non-significant parameter estimates. Conclusion: This study provides moderate-level evidence for pain catastrophizing as an independent predictor of chronic pain post-TKA. Directions for future research include larger, well-controlled studies with standard pain outcomes, identification of clinically-relevant catastrophizing cut-offs that predict pain outcomes, investigation of other psychosocial risk factors, and assessment of interventions aimed to reduce pain catastrophizing on chronic pain outcomes following TKA surgery. Keywords: pain catastrophizing, total knee arthroplasty, total knee replacement, knee arthroplasty, risk factors, chronic pain

  5. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05) and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index. PMID:25207187

  6. The strength and function of hip abductors following anterolateral minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Jixiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the extent of postoperative hip abductor insufficiency in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA patients undergoing anterolateral minimally invasive (ALMI approach, and to investigate whether the clinical outcomes are more favorable in femoral neck fracture (FNF patients than in non-femoral neck fracture (nFNF patients. Methods:A total of 48 patients were enrolled in this study. Each patient underwent a clinical examination preoperatively and 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks postoperatively. The abductor torque, Trendelenburg's sign, gait velocity, Harris hip score, Oxford hip score, Westren Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC score and visual analog scale pain score were recorded. Statistical evaluation was performed with SPSS software version 18.0. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results:The abductor torque of the operated hip and the recovery ratio showed a gradual improving tendency from 6 weeks postoperatively until the last follow-up. Gait velocity, Harris hip score, Oxford hip score and WOMAC score improved significantly after the operation until 24 weeks postoperatively. In the FNF group, the abductor torque of the operated side and the recovery ratio were significantly higher than in nFNF group at 6 weeks postoperatively, however, as time passed, this trend tended to disappear. Conclusion:This study demonstrates that patients can obtain good abductor strength and function in the early postoperative period and the hip abductor function of patients who suffer from hip osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head could be significantly improved following ALMI THA. Key words: Arthroplasty, replacement, hip; Surgical procedures, minimally invasive; Recovery of function

  7. The Inflammatory Phenotype in Failed Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Correlates with Blood Metal Concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erja-Leena Paukkeri

    Full Text Available Hip arthroplasty is the standard treatment of a painful hip destruction. The use of modern metal-on-metal (MOM bearing surfaces gained popularity in total hip arthroplasties during the last decade. Recently, worrisome failures due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD, including pseudotumor response, have been widely reported. However, the pathogenesis of this reaction remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ARMD response by flow cytometry approach.Sixteen patients with a failed Articular Surface Replacement (ASR hip prosthesis were included in the study. Samples of pseudotumor tissues collected during revision surgery were degraded by enzyme digestion and cells were typed by flow cytometry. Whole blood chromium and cobalt concentrations were analyzed with mass spectrometry before revision surgery.Flow cytometry analysis showed that the peri-implant pseudotumor tissue expressed two principal phenotypes, namely macrophage-dominated and T-lymphocyte-dominated response; the average portions being 54% (macrophages and 25% (T-lymphocytes in macrophage-dominated inflammation and 20% (macrophages and 54% (T-lymphocytes in T-lymphocyte-dominated response. The percentages of B-lymphocytes and granulocytes were lower in both phenotypes. Interestingly, the levels of blood chromium and cobalt were significantly higher in patients with macrophage-dominated response.The results suggest that the adverse tissue reactions induced by MOM wear particles contain heterogeneous pathogeneses and that the metal levels are an important factor in the determination of the inflammatory phenotype. The present results support the hypothesis that higher metal levels cause cytotoxicity and tissue injury and macrophages are recruited to clear the necrotic debris. On the other hand, the adverse response developed in association with lower metal levels is T-lymphocyte-dominated and is likely to reflect hypersensitivity reaction.

  8. Effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis: a systematic review of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Karen L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiotherapy has long been a routine component of patient rehabilitation following hip joint replacement. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise after discharge from hospital on function, walking, range of motion, quality of life and muscle strength, for osteoarthritic patients following elective primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods Design: Systematic review, using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Quorom Statement. Database searches: AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, KingsFund, MEDLINE, Cochrane library (Cochrane reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, DARE, PEDro, The Department of Health National Research Register. Handsearches: Physiotherapy, Physical Therapy, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (Britain Conference Proceedings. No language restrictions were applied. Selection: Trials comparing physiotherapy exercise versus usual/standard care, or comparing two types of relevant exercise physiotherapy, following discharge from hospital after elective primary total hip replacement for osteoarthritis were reviewed. Outcomes: Functional activities of daily living, walking, quality of life, muscle strength and range of hip joint motion. Trial quality was extensively evaluated. Narrative synthesis plus meta-analytic summaries were performed to summarise the data. Results 8 trials were identified. Trial quality was mixed. Generally poor trial quality, quantity and diversity prevented explanatory meta-analyses. The results were synthesised and meta-analytic summaries were used where possible to provide a formal summary of results. Results indicate that physiotherapy exercise after discharge following total hip replacement has the potential to benefit patients. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists to establish the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise following primary hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Further

  9. Perioperative safety of two-team simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty in the obese patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaines Steven T

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality with simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty remain a concern, multiple studies have shown the procedure to be safe in selected patient populations. Evidence also remains mixed regarding the outcomes of total knee arthroplasty in obese patients. The purpose of this paper is to compare the rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality in consecutive obese patients undergoing two-team simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty and unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Methods The records on all two-team simultaneous total knee arthroplasties and unilateral total knee arthroplasties from October 1997 to December 2007 were reviewed. A total of 151 patients with a body mass index (BMI >30 undergoing two-team simultaneous total knee arthroplasty and 148 patients with a BMI >30 undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed to determine perioperative morbidity and mortality as well as one-year mortality rates. Results Preoperative patient characteristics did not show any significant differences between groups. The simultaneous bilateral group had significantly longer operative times (127.4 versus 112.7 minutes, p Conclusions Two-team simultaneous total knee arthroplasty appears to be safe in obese patients, with similar complication rates as compared to unilateral procedures. Two-team simultaneous total knee arthroplasty also appears to have potential benefits over a staged procedure in the obese patient, although more study is required regarding this topic.

  10. Design Considerations for an Underactuated Robotic Finger Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Shuangji; CECCARELLI Marco; ZHAN Qiang; ARBONE Giuseppe; LU Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A design approach is presented in this paper for underactuation in robotic finger mechanisms. The characters of underactuated finger mechanisms are introduced as based on linkage and spring systems. The feature of self-adaptive enveloping grasp by underactuated finger mechanisms is discussed with feasible in grasping unknown objects. The design problem of robotic fingers is analyzed by looking at many aspects for an optimal functionality. Design problems and requirements for underactuated mechanisms are formulated as related to human-like robotic fingers. In particular, characteristics of finger mechanisms are analyzed and optimality criteria are summarized with the aim to formulate a general design algorithm. A general multi-objective optimization design approach is applied as based on a suitable optimization problem by using suitable expressions of optimality criteria. An example is illustrated as an improvement of finger mechanism in Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM) Hand. Results of design outputs and grasp simulations are reported with the aim to show the practical feasibility of the proposed concepts and computations.

  11. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Abdallah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop" in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object with variable torque – behavior that is sufficient for primarily gripping fingers. In addition, introducing asymmetric joint radii to the design allows the finger to command an expanded range of joint torques and to scan an expanded set of external surfaces. This study is motivated by the design and control of the secondary fingers of the NASA-GM R2 humanoid hand.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  12. Tangential finger forces use mechanical advantage during static grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-02-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, the central controller utilizes the mechanical advantage of the normal forces of the fingers for torque production. Whether the same is valid for tangential forces is unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of finger tangential forces and the use of mechanical advantage as a control mechanism when dealing with objects of nonuniform finger positioning. A complementary goal was to explore the interaction of mechanical advantage (moment arm) and the role a finger has as a torque agonist/antagonist with respect to external torques (±0.4 N m). Five 6-df force/torque transducers measured finger forces while subjects held a prism handle (6 cm width × 9 cm height) with and without a single finger displaced 2 cm (handle width). The effect of increasing the tangential moment arm was significant (p forces (in >70% of trials) and hence creating greater moments. Thus, the data provides evidence that the grasping system as a rule utilizes mechanical advantage for generating tangential forces. The increase in tangential force was independent of whether the finger was acting as a torque agonist or antagonist, revealing their effects to be additive.

  13. Finger vein verification system based on sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yang; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Haixia; Zhang, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Finger vein verification is a promising biometric pattern for personal identification in terms of security and convenience. The recognition performance of this technology heavily relies on the quality of finger vein images and on the recognition algorithm. To achieve efficient recognition performance, a special finger vein imaging device is developed, and a finger vein recognition method based on sparse representation is proposed. The motivation for the proposed method is that finger vein images exhibit a sparse property. In the proposed system, the regions of interest (ROIs) in the finger vein images are segmented and enhanced. Sparse representation and sparsity preserving projection on ROIs are performed to obtain the features. Finally, the features are measured for recognition. An equal error rate of 0.017% was achieved based on the finger vein image database, which contains images that were captured by using the near-IR imaging device that was developed in this study. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is faster and more robust than previous methods.

  14. Finger milling-cutter CNC generating hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on modified-roll method and machining simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Genggeng; Deng, Xiaozhong; Wei, Bingyang; Lei, Baozhen

    2011-05-01

    The two coordinate systems of cradle-type hypoid generator and free-form CNC machine tool by application disc milling-cutter to generate hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on the modified-roll method were set up, respectively, and transformation principle and method for machine-tool settings between the two coordinate systems was studied. It was presented that finger milling-cutter was mounted on imagined disc milling-cutter and its motion was controlled directly by CNC shafts to replace disc milling-cutter blades effective cutting motion. Finger milling-cutter generation accomplished by ordered circular interpolation was determined, and interpolation center, starting and ending were worked out. Finally, a hypoid pinion was virtually machined by using CNC machining simulation software VERICUT.

  15. The social and economic consequences of finger amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, C; Angermann, P; Hovgaard, D

    1994-06-01

    120 patients with amputation of at least 1 of the 4 ulnar fingers were admitted to hospital. In none was replantation considered to be possible because of serious damage to the soft tissues and bone. 12 (3-18) years after the accident 80 percent of the patients assessed their condition as good or fair, even those with proximal amputation or loss of 2 or 3 fingers. Our observations do not support replantation when only one of the second-to-fifth fingers have been amputated.

  16. Improving esthetics of finger prosthesis by glove silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Singh Kaira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finger and partial finger amputations are some of the most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. A high quality esthetic prosthesis with passive function can be helpful to the patient since loss or congenital absence or malformation have both a social and psychological impact on the patient. Prosthetics is an art and science, which provides lifelike appearance to the lost structures of the patient. This case report presents the fabrication of a silicone finger prosthesis, which had good suspension, adequate function, was comfortable to use and esthetically acceptable to the patient.

  17. Dorsal finger texture recognition: Investigating fixed-length SURF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Daniel; Kückelhahn, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We seek to create fixed-length features from dorsal finger skin images extracted by the SURF interest point detector to combine it in the privacy enhancing helper data scheme. The source of the biometric samples is the GUC45 database which features finger vein, fingerprint and dorsal finger skin...... images for modality fusion. First, the region of interest (ROI) is extracted, after which SURF features are extracted, and finally two different approaches for creating fixed length feature vectors are applied. SURF performance on the ROI is comparable to the PolyU database reported in the literature...

  18. Application of cervical arthroplasty with Bryan cervical disc:long-term X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging follow-up results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-bin; SUN Yu; CHEN Zhong-qiang; LIU Zhong-jun

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is a new technique for treating degenerative cervical disease. Its goal is to avoid the degeneration of adjacent levels by preserving motion at the treated level. The aims of this study were to evaluate the radiologic outcomes of Bryan cervical disc replacement and the degenerative status of adjacent segments.Methods Twenty-two patients at a single center underwent discectomy and implantation of Bryan cervical disc. The mean follow-up period was 60 months (57-69 months). Twenty patients underwent single-level arthroplasty and two underwent arthroplasty at two levels. The levels of surgery included C3/4 (3 levels), C4/5 (2 levels), C5/6 (18 levels) and C6/7 (1 level). Radiographic evaluation included dynamic X-ray examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and at final follow-up.Results On X-ray examination, the range of motion (ROM) at the operated level was 7.2° (2.5°-13.0°) at baseline and 7.8° (1.0°-15.0°) at final follow-up (P >0.05). Heterotopic ossification around the prosthesis was observed in eight levels,and two levels showed loss of motion (ROM <2°). MRI showed worsening by a grade at the upper level in 2/22 patients,and worsening by a grade at the lower level in 3/22, according to Miyazaki's classification. No further impingement of the ligamentum flavum into the spinal canal was observed at adjacent levels, though the disc bulge was slightly increased at both the adjacent upper and lower levels at final follow-up.Conclusions Arthroplasty using Bryan cervical disc prosthesis resulted in favorable radiologic outcomes in this study.Disc degeneration at adjacent levels may be postponed by this technique.

  19. Low manipulation prevalence following fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jørgensen, Christoffer C.; Gromov, Kirill;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose - Postoperative joint stiffness following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may compromise the outcome and necessitate manipulation. Previous studies have not been in a fast-track setting with optimized pain treatment, early mobilization, and short length of stay (LOS), which may...

  20. The association between metal allergy, total knee arthroplasty, and revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münch, Henrik J; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Olesen, Jens T;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose - It is unclear whether delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions against implanted metals play a role in the etiopathogenesis of malfunctioning total knee arthroplasties. We therefore evaluated the association between metal allergy, defined as a positive patch test reaction ...

  1. Successful total knee arthroplasty in the presence of sporotrichal arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter, S.; Jackson, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Articular sporotrichosis, a chronic granulomatous fungal infection, is a rare entity but when present may lead to significant joint destruction. Severe knee arthrosis due to sporotrichal arthritis has traditionally been treated with arthrodesis. Total knee arthroplasty in the presence of sporotricha

  2. Gluteal tendon reconstruction in association with hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Ali S; Campbell, David G; Comely, Andrew S; Lewis, Peter L

    2011-01-01

    We studied a prospective cohort of patients in whom gluteal tendon reconstruction was undertaken in association with hip arthroplasty. Over the course of 10 years, 24 patients had gluteal tendon reconstruction performed either at the time of hip arthroplasty or post-operatively, using the Ligament Augment and Reconstruction System (LARS), suture anchors, direct suture to bone, or a combination of these techniques. All patients were assessed clinically and by patient-centred outcome measures, including the hip disability and osteoarthritis score (HOOS). The mean post-operative HOOS was significantly better than pre-operative score (p pain, activities of daily living (ADL), sports and quality of life (QoL) was 72 (SD 12.8), 73 (SD 15.9), 71 (SD 11.8), 54 (SD 22.6) and 57 (SD 21.76) respectively. There were two failures of gluteal tendon reconstruction which required revision using LARS. One patient died of an unrelated cause. Surgical intervention should be considered in gluteal tendinopathy at the time of hip arthroplasty or when symptoms occur following arthroplasty.

  3. Outcome Assessment after Aptis Distal Radioulnar Joint (DRUJ Implant Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Kachooei

    2014-09-01

    Distal radioulnar joint injuries are disabling and patients usually undergo one or more salvage surgeries prior to receiving an arthroplasty. The Scheker prosthesis has shown satisfactory results with 100% survival rate in all reports. The constrained design of this prosthesis gives enough stability to prevent painful subluxation.

  4. The association between metal allergy, total hip arthroplasty, and revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Engkilde, Kåre;

    2009-01-01

    in general with THA. Furthermore, we compared the prevalence of metal allergy in dermatitis patients with and without THA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (DHAR) contained detailed information on 90,697 operations. The Gentofte patch-test database contained test results...

  5. Wear particles and osteolysis in patients with total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Toxværd, Anders; Bansal, Manjula;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether the amount of polyethylene debris in the interphase tissue between prosthesis and bone in patients with total wrist arthroplasty correlated with the degree of periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO); and to investigate the occurrence of metal particles in the periprosthetic...

  6. Nationwide trends in total shoulder arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofa, David; Rajaee, Sean S; Smith, Eric L

    2014-04-01

    Recent literature reports an increase in the rate of shoulder arthroplasties, particularly total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs), being performed in the United States. However, the national epidemiology of use of hemiarthroplasty (HA) and TSA as treatments for glenohumeral osteoarthritis has not been elucidated. We conducted a study to analyze trends in using HA and TSA as treatments for glenohumeral osteoarthritis from 2000 to 2010, and to compare patient characteristics and inpatient complications. US Nationwide Inpatient Sample patients with a primary inpatient diagnosis of shoulder arthritis and a principal procedure of HA or TSA were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedural codes. From 2000 to 2010 the nationally adjusted population rate of shoulder arthroplasty performed for osteoarthritis increased 3.7-fold. Specifically, the population rate of TSA increased 5.0-fold, and that of HA increased 1.9-fold. In 2010, 80.3% of patients having shoulder arthroplasty for arthritis underwent TSA. TSA patients were older (P < .0001) and had a higher mean number of chronic illnesses (P = .034). TSA-associated discharges had a higher rate of surgical and medical care complications (P = .011) and blood transfusions (P = .041) after adjusting for comorbidities.

  7. Criteria used when deciding on eligibility for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Ross, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical decision-making in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a complex process needing further clarification. The aim of this study was to compare TKA eligibility criteria considered most important by orthopedic surgeons (OSs) to characteristics of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA...

  8. Fast-track knee arthroplasty – status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Fast-track programs have been developed for different surgical procedures leading to higher patient satisfaction and lower morbidity. This concept has been extended to knee arthroplasty in recent years. The purpose of this narrative review was to discuss the different aspects of fast-track knee a...

  9. Compartment syndrome and popliteal vascular injury complicating unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter; Van Raay, Jos J. J. A. M.; van Horn, Jim R.

    2007-01-01

    Popliteal vascular injury and the compartment syndrome of the leg are rare but important complications of knee arthroplasties. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance in preventing the devastating complications of these conditions. To our knowledge, these complications have not bee

  10. Navigation improves accuracy of rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckl, Bernd; Nogler, Michael; Rosiek, Rafal; Fischer, Martin; Krismer, Martin; Kessler, Oliver

    2004-09-01

    Successful total knee arthroplasty is dependent on the correct alignment of implanted prostheses. Major clinical problems can be related to poor femoral component positioning, including sagittal plane and rotational malalignment. A prospective randomized study was designed to test whether an optical navigation system for total knee arthroplasty achieved greater implantation precision than a nonnavigated technique. The primary variable was rotation of the femoral component in the transverse plane, measured from postoperative radiographs and computed tomography images. Sixty-four patients were included in the study. All patients received the Duracon total knee prosthesis. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group C patients had conventional total knee arthroplasty without navigation; Group N patients had total knee arthroplasty using a computer-assisted knee navigation system. Analysis showed that patients in Group N had significantly better rotational alignment and flexion angle of the femoral component than patients in Group C. In addition, superior postoperative alignment of the mechanical axis, posterior tibial slope, and rotational alignment was achieved for patients in Group N. The use of a navigation system provides improved alignment accuracy, and can help to avoid femoral malrotation and errors in axial alignment.

  11. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M.; Pötzelsberger, B.; Scheiber, P.;

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of alpine skiing for 12 weeks on skeletal muscle characteristics and biomarkers of glucose homeostasis and cardiovascular risk factors. Twenty-three patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were studied 2.9 ± 0.9 years (mean ± SD) after the operation. Fourteen...

  12. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koesters, A.; Poetzelsberger, B.; Dela, F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the long-term effects of skiing on health-related parameters and implant related factors like loosening and wear in patients with total knee arthroplasty. This paper describes the overall study design, general demographics, and physiological demand of the inte...

  13. Large head metal-on-metal cementless total hip arthroplasty versus 28mm metal-on-polyethylene cementless total hip arthroplasty : design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Wierd P.; Bos, Nanne; van Raaij, Jos J. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the hip is successfully treated by total hip arthroplasty with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. Polyethylene wear debris can however lead to osteolysis, aseptic loosening and failure of the implant. Large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty may overcome polyet

  14. Incidence of Heterotopic Ossification after Surface and Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study Using Anterolateral Approach and Indomethacin Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Regis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and severity of heterotopic ossification (HO in two homogeneous groups of patients that received surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA and conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA were evaluated retrospectively. Thirty-nine patients undergoing 42 hip resurfacing procedures and 41 primary cementless THAs through an anterolateral approach received a 10-day course of 150 mg/die of indomethacin postoperatively. The median surgical time was 190 minutes and 156 minutes, respectively (. At a minimum 1-year followup, the development of HO was assessed on standard X-ray using Brooker grading. Ectopic bone formation was detected in five cases (11.9%, two Brooker grade I and three grade II in the SRA group and in 14 hips (34.1%, 12 grade I and two grade II treated with conventional THA, but the difference was not significant (. No clinically relevant periprosthetic ossification (Brooker III or IV occurred in both groups. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the incidence of HO after SRA was lower than conventional THA. More extensive soft tissue trauma, bone debris, and longer operative time in hip resurfacing are not likely to be absolute risk factors for HO. Further investigations including larger patient populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  15. Clinical trade-offs in cross-linked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene used in total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Lisa A; Ansari, Farzana; Kury, Matt; Mehdizah, Amir; Patten, Elias W; Huddlestein, James; Mickelson, Dayne; Chang, Jennifer; Hubert, Kim; Ries, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    Highly cross-linked formulations of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (XLPE) offer exceptional wear resistance for total joint arthroplasty but are offset with a reduction in postyield and fatigue fracture properties in comparison to conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Oxidation resistance is also an important property for the longevity of total joint replacements (TJRs) as formulations of UHMWPE or XLPE utilizing radiation methods are susceptible to free radical generation and subsequent embrittlement. The balance of oxidation, wear, and fracture properties is an enduring concern for orthopedic polymers used as the bearing surface in total joint arthroplasty. Optimization of material properties is further challenged in designs that make use of locking mechanisms, notches, or other stress concentrations that can render the polymer susceptible to fracture due to elevated local stresses. Clinical complications involving impingements, dislocations, or other biomechanical overloads can exacerbate stresses and negate benefits of improved wear resistance provided by XLPE. This work examines trade-offs that factor into the use of XLPE in TJR implants.

  16. Implementation of an Accelerated Rehabilitation Protocol for Total Joint Arthroplasty in the Managed Care Setting: The Experience of One Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B. Robertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated rehabilitation following total joint replacement (TJR surgery has become more common in contemporary orthopaedic practice. Increased utilization demands improvements in resource allocation with continued improvement in patient outcomes. We describe an accelerated rehab protocol (AR instituted at a community based hospital. All patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA and total hip arthroplasty (THA were included. The AR consisted of preoperative patient education, standardization of perioperative pain management, therapy, and next day in-home services consultation following discharge. Outcomes of interest include average length of stay (ALOS, discharge disposition, 42-day return to Urgent Care (UC, Emergency Department (ED, or readmission. A total of 4 surgeons performed TJR procedures on 1,268 patients in the study period (696 TKA, 572 THA. ALOS was reduced from 3.5 days at the start of the observation period to 2.4 days at the end. Discharge to skilled nursing reduced from 25% to 14%. A multifaceted and evidence based approach to standardization of care delivery has resulted in improved patient outcomes and a reduction in resource utilization. Adoption of an accelerated rehab protocol has proven to be effective as well as safe without increased utilization of UC, ER, or readmissions.

  17. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulou Si

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients’ indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05 and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients’ flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05 and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients’ joint recovery.

  18. CUSTOMIZED ACETABULAR COMPONENTS IN REVISION HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kavalersky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a trend of increasing demand for revision hip arthroplasty. Among these patients there are many with complex acetabular defects, including patients with pelvic discontinuity. To ensure stability for revised acetabular components in such cases becomes a challenging or unachievable task. Such defects give indications for printing customized tri-flange acetabular component. The authors analysed own experience of creating and applying custom made acetabular components in 3 patients with complex acetabular defects. Material and methods. Among the patients there were 2 women and 1 man. Average age was 60,3±19,4 years (38 to 78 years. Two patients had III B defects with pelvic discontinuity and one patient had III A defect by Paprosky classification. As the first step, the authors in collaboration with engineers printed a plaster full size pelvic 3D model, as the second step a customized tri-flange acetabular component was designed and printed. Harris Hip Score was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results. Average follow-up period was 5,3±2,5 months (3 to 8 months. The authors observed no cases of implant loosening, dislocation or deep periprosthetic infection. Average Harris Hip Score before surgery was 27,13 and after surgery – 74,1 indicating a significant improvement in 3 months postoperatively. Conclusion. Indications for use of individual acetabular components in reported patients correspond to indications formulated by Berasi et al. The authors obtained encouraging early follow-up outcomes that correspond to data of other authors. In one patient certain difficulties were reported due to insufficient pelvic distraction. Component’s flanges prevented achieving adequate pelvic distraction. Nevertheless, good primary stability was achieved. Modern software and 3D metal printers can significantly reduce the production cost of customized acetabular components. Application of this technology can be

  19. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  20. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  1. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vujović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT and male to female transsexuals (MFT and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male’s left hand ratio was lower than in control female’s left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism.

  2. Radial fingering at an active interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagilla, Amarender; Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the shapes of single cells crawling on surfaces and those of the fronts of thin layers of cells collectively expanding to close a wound are the results of fingering instabilities. Motivated by these studies, we investigate the conditions under which an actively forced interface between a pair of immiscible viscous fluids will destabilize under Hele-Shaw confinement. The case of a circular active interface with surface tension and bending resistance is considered. Active forces exerted by the inner fluid at the interfacial region can be either completely internal or due to interactions with the confining substrate. In addition, the effects of cell growth or actin depolymerization or external injection of cell suspensions are modeled by including a distributed source and a point source of arbitrary strengths. Linear stability analysis reveals that at any given mean radius of the interface, its stability is dictated by two key dimensionless parameters. We discuss the different regions in a state space of these parameters.

  3. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  4. Correlations between the Harris Hip Score and the Visual Analogue Scale in the assessment of total hip replacement in hip dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    S.G Zuh; Ö. Nagy; Ancuța Zazgyva; O.M. Russu; Gergely, I; T.S. Pop

    2014-01-01

    Total hip replacement is one of the most frequently performed orthopaedic interventions that can significantly improve the functional status and the quality of life of patients suffering from hip arthrosis. Recently patient satisfaction and patient-reported results of total hip arthroplasty are increasingly emphasised as important tools for the assessments of these interventions. For patients with arthrosis secondary to hip dysplasia, these evaluations can be more difficult, due to younger ag...

  5. Numerically determined transport laws for fingering ("thermohaline") convection in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Traxler, Adrienne; Stellmach, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional simulations of fingering convection performed in a parameter regime close to the one relevant for astrophysics, and reveal the existence of simple asymptotic scaling laws for turbulent heat and compositional transport. These laws can straightforwardly be extrapolated to the true astrophysical regime. Our investigation also indicates that thermocompositional "staircases," a key consequence of fingering convection in the ocean, cannot form spontaneously in stellar interiors. Our proposed empirically-determined transport laws thus provide simple prescriptions for mixing by fingering convection in a variety of astrophysical situations, and should, from here on, be used preferentially over older and less accurate parameterizations. They also establish that fingering convection does not provide sufficient extra mixing to explain observed chemical abundances in RGB stars.

  6. [Raynaud's phenomenon and other circulatory disorders of the fingers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Felix

    2014-02-26

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is defined as attacks of blanking, subsequent cyanosis and rubeosis of fingers due to vasospasms in response to cold or emotional stimuli. Primary RP has no known underlying cause and occurs mainly in young and otherwise healthy women. Secondary RP goes along with various causes such as connective tissue diseases, toxic substances, drugs, physical trauma or organic finger artery occlusions, and occurs at any age and in both genders. Related affections are acrocyanosis and finger artery occlusions either due to arteriosclerosis or vasculitis. Also spontaneous finger hematoma may provoke an episode of RP. Therapeutically strict cold protection and avoidance of possible noxa is recommended besides the treatment of underlying diseases. No standard vasoactive drug has proven ideal for RP due to side effects. In cases with rest pain or ulcerations the same principles are applied as in ischemic diseases with no possibility for revascularization.

  7. Online Credit Card Transaction Using Finger Print Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Sivasubramanian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet shopping, a strong alternative to traditional “go, see, touch and buy” shopping, has been one of the mostly used facilities of the Internet. Security in online payment systems has been a wide research area since the early days of the Internet and several approaches have been devised by various Organizations. But, none of the system overcome the weakness in those system. Several online shopping systems serve internet users all around the world and enable people to get the products they need with a small effort. This paper proposes a new solution that combines finger print recognition with online credit card transactions. Here the proposed system provides more security then existing system with finger print recognitionbecause of finger print is unique. Here no need to remember the more passwords, your finger is your password.

  8. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  9. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, J.M.; Pakvis, D.F.M.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Susante, J.L.C. van

    2013-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=

  10. Periacetabular Bone Mineral Density Changes After Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty Versus Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty. A Randomized Controlled DEXA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, J.M.H.; Pakvis, D.F.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Susante, van J.L.C.

    2013-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt–chromium cup (n

  11. Long-term results of patellofemoral arthroplasty - A report of 56 arthroplasties with 17 years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, HJ; Driessen, APPM; van Horn, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    We studied retrospectively the outcome of patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) using the Richards prosthesis in 51 patients (56 knees). Their mean age was 50 years (30 to 77). In 43 patients (45 knees), the American Knee Society score and the patients' subjective judgement were assessed. Excellent or g

  12. Th1 type lymphocyte reactivity to metals in patients with total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finnegan Alison

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All prostheses with metallic components release metal debris that can potentially activate the immune system. However, implant-related metal hyper-reactivity has not been well characterized. In this study, we hypothesized that adaptive immunity reaction(s, particularly T-helper type 1 (Th1 responses, will be dominant in any metal-reactivity responses of patients with total joint replacements (TJAs. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating lymphocyte reactivity to metal "ions" in subjects with and without total hip replacements, using proliferation assays and cytokine analysis. Methods Lymphocytes from young healthy individuals without an implant or a history of metal allergy (Group 1: n = 8 were used to assess lymphocyte responses to metal challenge agents. In addition, individuals (Group 2: n = 15 with well functioning total hip arthroplasties (average Harris Hip Score = 91, average time in-situ 158 months were studied. Age matched controls with no implants were also used for comparison (Group 3, n = 8, 4 male, 4 female average age 70, range 49–80. Group 1 subjects' lymphocyte proliferation response to Aluminum+3, Cobalt+2, Chromium+3, Copper+2, Iron+3, Molybdenum+5, Manganeese+2, Nickel+2, Vanadium+3 and Sodium+2 chloride solutions at a variety of concentrations (0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 10.0 mM was studied to establish toxicity thresholds. Mononuclear cells from Group 2 and 3 subjects were challenged with 0.1 mM CrCl3, 0.1 mM NiCl2, 0.1 mM CoCl2 and approx. 0.001 mM titanium and the reactions measured with proliferation assays and cytokine analysis to determine T-cell subtype prominence. Results Primary lymphocytes from patients with well functioning total hip replacements demonstrated a higher incidence and greater magnitude of reactivity to chromium than young healthy controls (p 2 fold stimulation index response, p 10 mM. The differential secretion of signature T-cell subsets' cytokines (Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes

  13. Metal on metal hip resurfacing versus uncemented custom total hip replacement - early results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muirhead-Allwood Sarah K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is no current consensus on the most appropriate prosthesis for treating symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA of the hip in young, active patients. Modern metal on metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HR has gained popularity as it is theoretically more stable, bone conserving and easier to revise than total hip arthroplasty. Early results of metal on metal resurfacing have been encouraging. We have compared two well matched cohorts of patients with regard to function, pain relief and patient satisfaction. Methods This prospective study compares 2 cohorts of young, active patients treated with hip resurfacing (137 patients, 141 hips and custom uncemented (CADCAM stems (134 patients, 141 hips. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon. Outcome measures included Oxford, WOMAC and Harris hip scores as well as an activity score. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired student's t-test. Results One hundred and thirty four and 137 patients were included in the hip replacement and resurfacing groups respectively. The mean age of these patients was 54.6 years. The mean duration of follow up for the hip resurfacing group was 19.2 months compared to 13.4 months for the total hip replacement group. Pre operative oxford, Harris and WOMAC scores in the THA group were 41.1, 46.4 and 50.9 respectively while the post operative scores were 14.8, 95.8 and 5.0. In the HR group, pre- operative scores were 37.0, 54.1 and 45.9 respectively compared to 15.0, 96.8 and 6.1 post operatively. The degree of improvement was similar in both groups. Conclusion There was no significant clinical difference between the patients treated with hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty in the short term.

  14. Repeatability Evaluation of Finger Tapping Device with Magnetic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuko; Kandori, Akihiko; Shima, Keisuke; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Toshio; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    We tested the repeatability of a finger tapping device with magnetic sensors to determine its reliability. This device, which was developed to assist in the diagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and strokes, measures the distance between the first and index fingers during finger tapping movements (opening and closing the fingers repeatedly). We evaluated three types of repeatability based on ICC (interclass correlation coefficient) and Welch's test (test for equal means in a oneway layout): repeatability when measured at different times, when using different devices, and when using different measurers. We calculated these three types for three finger tapping tasks on both hands for 21 characteristics calculated from finger tapping waveforms. Results demonstrated that the repeatability when using different devices is high regardless of the task or hand. The repeatability when measuring at different times and when using different measurers is high at some tasks, but not all. One of the finger tapping tasks (finger tapping movement with the largest amplitude and highest velocity), which is used in a conventional PD diagnosis method (UPDRS), does not have enough repeatability, while other tasks show high repeatability. Results also showed that five characteristics have the highest repeatability (ICC ≥ 0.5 or significance probability of Welch's test ≥ 5% in all tasks): “total moving distance,” “average of local minimum acceleration in opening motion,” “average of local minimum acceleration in closing motion,” “average of local maximum distance” and “average of local minimum velocity”. These results clearly demonstrate the strong repeatability of this device and lead to more precise diagnosis of movement disorders.

  15. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry.

  16. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  17. A Parametric Modelling Method for Dexterous Finger Reachable Workspaces

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The well-known algorithms, such as the graphic method, analytical method or numerical method, have some defects when modelling the dexterous finger workspace, which is a significant kinematical feature of dexterous hands and valuable for grasp planning, motion control and mechanical design. A novel modelling method with convenient and parametric performances is introduced to generate the dexterous-finger reachable workspace. This method constructs the geometric topology of the dexterous-finge...

  18. Hip arthroplasty in patients with complex femoral deformity after surgical treatment of dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Bliznyukov; R. M. Tikhilov; I. I. Shubnyakov; A. O. Denisov; V. A. Shilnikov; A. Z. Chernyi; S. S. Bilyk

    2014-01-01

    Objective - based on the analysis of remote results of total hip arthroplasty in patients with complex deformities of the femur to compare the effectiveness of operations with standard cases and identify the factors that determine the surgery effectiveness. Material and methods. in Vreden clinic 73 patients with complex deformities of the femur underwent surgical treatment between 2001 and 2013 by various surgical interventions: arthroplasty without femoral osteotomy (23); arthroplasty accomp...

  19. Malnutrition in Joint Arthroplasty: Prospective Study Indicates Risk of Unplanned ICU Admission

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition has been linked to poor outcomes after elective joint arthroplasty, but the risk of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission in malnourished arthroplasty patients is unknown. Methods: 1098 patients were followed as part of a prospective risk stratification program at a tertiary, high-volume arthroplasty center. Chronic malnutrition was defined as preoperative albumin Results: The overall incidence of malnutrition was 16.9% (primary and revision arth...

  20. Imaging evaluation of complications of hip arthroplasty: review of current concepts and imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Omer; Chen, Lina; Resnik, Charles S

    2013-11-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved along with improvements in component materials and design. The radiologist must accurately diagnose associated complications with imaging methods and stay informed about newer complications associated with innovations in surgical technique, prosthetic design, and novel materials. This pictorial essay presents clinical and imaging correlation of modern hip arthroplasty complications, with an emphasis on the most common complications of instability, aseptic loosening, and infection as well as those complications associated with contemporary metal-on-metal arthroplasty.

  1. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.C. van den; Beek, N. van; Kraan, T. van der; Veeger, D.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Veltink, P.H.; Maas, H.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instr

  2. Variable and asymmetric range of enslaving: fingers can act independently over small range of flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den Josien C.; Beek, van Nathalie; Kraan, van der Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H.E.J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub; Cymbalyuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving movement in non-instru

  3. Minimally invasive total hip replacement: the posterolateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottner, Friedrich; Delgado, Samuel; Sculco, Thomas P

    2006-05-01

    Our experience with the posterolateral mini-incision technique over the last 8 years has shown that total hip arthroplasty can be performed safely and effectively in properly selected patients through a much smaller incision than the one traditionally used. The main advantage of the posterolateral approach compared with other mini-incisions is its simplicity, with shortened operating time as a result. While the surgical time for a posterior approach is an average of 37 to 70 minutes throughout the literature, the 2-incision approach prolongs the surgery by a factor of 2 or 3. Compared with the anterior or 2-incision approach, the posterolateral and anterolateral approaches also have a much lower incidence of perioperative complications, with the rate being similar to rates seen with a standard incision. For the 2-incision technique and the anterior mini-incision approach, perioperative periprosthetic fracture rates of up to 8.7% and 8.4%, respectively, have been described. Surgeons who traditionally used an anterolateral standard approach might prefer an anterolateral mini-incision. The anterolateral mini-incision total hip arthroplasty has demonstrated excellent results; in the past it was suggested that the anterolateral approach has a higher incidence of heterotopic bone formation and impaired early abductor function, but more recent studies show no difference in abductor strength and limping between the anterolateral and posterior approaches. On the other hand, the posterior approach has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative dislocations. We did not encounter an increased incidence of postoperative dislocation at our institution. This might be related to the routine repair of the external rotators and the capsule in all patients. In summary, both the anterolateral and the posterior mini-incision approaches are reasonable alternatives, and surgeons should choose the approach that they feel most comfortable with. Statements in the press and by

  4. Toleration, Synthesis or Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Jakob v. H.; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    , in order to answer is not yet another partisan suggestion, but rather an attempt at making intelligible both the oppositions and the possibilities of synthesis between normative and empirical approaches to law. Based on our assessment and rational reconstruction of current arguments and positions, we...... therefore outline a taxonomy consisting of the following three basic, ideal-types in terms of the epistemological understanding of the interface of law and empirical studies: toleration, synthesis and replacement. This tripartite model proves useful with a view to teasing out and better articulating......) thus ultimately contributes to the development of a genuine basic science-of-law....

  5. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  6. A Two-Axis Goniometric Sensor for Tracking Finger Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lefan; Meydan, Turgut; Williams, Paul Ieuan

    2017-04-05

    The study of finger kinematics has developed into an important research area. Various hand tracking systems are currently available; however, they all have limited functionality. Generally, the most commonly adopted sensors are limited to measurements with one degree of freedom, i.e., flexion/extension of fingers. More advanced measurements including finger abduction, adduction, and circumduction are much more difficult to achieve. To overcome these limitations, we propose a two-axis 3D printed optical sensor with a compact configuration for tracking finger motion. Based on Malus' law, this sensor detects the angular changes by analyzing the attenuation of light transmitted through polarizing film. The sensor consists of two orthogonal axes each containing two pathways. The two readings from each axis are fused using a weighted average approach, enabling a measurement range up to 180 ∘ and an improvement in sensitivity. The sensor demonstrates high accuracy (±0.3 ∘ ), high repeatability, and low hysteresis error. Attaching the sensor to the index finger's metacarpophalangeal joint, real-time movements consisting of flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and circumduction have been successfully recorded. The proposed two-axis sensor has demonstrated its capability for measuring finger movements with two degrees of freedom and can be potentially used to monitor other types of body motion.

  7. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx’s dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo.

  8. Elastic fingering in rotating Hele-Shaw flows

    KAUST Repository

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.

    2014-05-21

    The centrifugally driven viscous fingering problem arises when two immiscible fluids of different densities flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. In this conventional setting an interplay between capillary and centrifugal forces makes the fluid-fluid interface unstable, leading to the formation of fingered structures that compete dynamically and reach different lengths. In this context, it is known that finger competition is very sensitive to changes in the viscosity contrast between the fluids. We study a variant of such a rotating flow problem where the fluids react and produce a gellike phase at their separating boundary. This interface is assumed to be elastic, presenting a curvature-dependent bending rigidity. A perturbative weakly nonlinear approach is used to investigate how the elastic nature of the interface affects finger competition events. Our results unveil a very different dynamic scenario, in which finger length variability is not regulated by the viscosity contrast, but rather determined by two controlling quantities: a characteristic radius and a rigidity fraction parameter. By properly tuning these quantities one can describe a whole range of finger competition behaviors even if the viscosity contrast is kept unchanged. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  9. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  10. Resurfacing of the patella in total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrack, R L; Wolfe, M W; Waldman, D A; Milicic, M; Bertot, A J; Myers, L

    1997-08-01

    During a two-year period, eighty-nine patients who were scheduled to have a total knee arthroplasty for the treatment of degenerative osteoarthrosis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: resurfacing of the patella or retention of the patella. All patients received the same posterior cruciate-sparing prosthesis, and all operations were performed by, or under the direct supervision of, one of us. Three patients died in the early postoperative period. The remaining eighty-six patients (118 knees; fifty-eight that had had resurfacing of the patella and sixty that had not) formed the study group. They were followed for a mean of thirty months (range, twenty-four to forty-four months). Evaluation was performed with use of the clinical scoring system of The Knee Society, a patient-satisfaction questionnaire, specific questions regarding patellofemoral symptoms and function, and radiographs. All clinical evaluations were performed by the same research nurse, without the involvement of a physician, in a blinded manner (neither the nurse nor the patient had knowledge of whether the patella had been resurfaced). Preoperatively, the mean Knee Society score, on a scale ranging from 0 to 200 points, was 89.7 points (range, 33 to 132 points); postoperatively, this score improved to a mean of 172.7 points (range, 98 to 200 points). With the numbers available for study, we could detect no significant difference between the knees that had had patellar resurfacing and those that had not with regard to the over-all score (p = 0.63), the subscore for pain (p = 0.56), or the subscore for function (p = 0.77). We also could detect no difference between the treatment groups, with the numbers available, with regard to patient satisfaction or the responses to questions involving the function of the patellofemoral joint, including the ability to exit from an automobile, to rise from a chair, and to climb stairs. Thirty-two patients had bilateral total knee replacement with resurfacing

  11. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  12. 15-zinc finger protein Bloody Fingers is required for zebrafish morphogenetic movements during neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanas, Saulius; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Rujuan; Lin, Shuo

    2005-07-01

    A novel zebrafish gene bloody fingers (blf) encoding a 478 amino acid protein containing fifteen C(2)H(2) type zinc fingers was identified by expression screening. As determined by in situ hybridization, blf RNA displays strong ubiquitous early zygotic expression, while during late gastrulation and early somitogenesis, blf expression becomes transiently restricted to the posterior dorsal and lateral mesoderm. During later somitogenesis, blf expression appears only in hematopoietic cells. It is completely eliminated in cloche, moonshine but not in vlad tepes (gata1) mutant embryos. Morpholino (MO) knockdown of the Blf protein results in the defects of morphogenetic movements. Blf-MO-injected embryos (morphants) display shortened and widened axial tissues due to defective convergent extension. Unlike other convergent extension mutants, blf morphants display a split neural tube, resulting in a phenotype similar to the human open neural tube defect spina bifida. In addition, dorsal ectodermal cells delaminate in blf morphants during late somitogenesis. We propose a model explaining the role of blf in convergent extension and neurulation. We conclude that blf plays an important role in regulating morphogenetic movements during gastrulation and neurulation while its role in hematopoiesis may be redundant.

  13. The Optimum Replacement of Weapon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin-chun

    2002-01-01

    The theory of LCC (Life Cycle Cost) is applied in this paper. The relation between the economic life of weapon and the optimum replacement is analyzed. The method to define the optimum replacement time of weapon is discussed.

  14. Total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine.

  15. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR/SOC

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), in order to fill in a 'fiche individuelle' form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format. The French card in their possession. An A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done...

  16. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  17. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel are asked to go to the cards office (33/1-015), taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, The French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested to take these items to the c...

  18. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. A 'personnel office' stamped photocopy of the old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), between 8:30 and 12:30, in order to fill a 'fiche individuelle' form (in black ink only), which has to be personally signed by themselves and another separately signed by members of their family, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format (signed on the back) The French card in their possession an A4 photocopy of the same Fre...

  19. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self‐funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty‐three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  20. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  1. Faster Replacement Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Virginia Vassilevska

    2010-01-01

    The replacement paths problem for directed graphs is to find for given nodes s and t and every edge e on the shortest path between them, the shortest path between s and t which avoids e. For unweighted directed graphs on n vertices, the best known algorithm runtime was \\tilde{O}(n^{2.5}) by Roditty and Zwick. For graphs with integer weights in {-M,...,M}, Weimann and Yuster recently showed that one can use fast matrix multiplication and solve the problem in O(Mn^{2.584}) time, a runtime which would be O(Mn^{2.33}) if the exponent \\omega of matrix multiplication is 2. We improve both of these algorithms. Our new algorithm also relies on fast matrix multiplication and runs in O(M n^{\\omega} polylog(n)) time if \\omega>2 and O(n^{2+\\eps}) for any \\eps>0 if \\omega=2. Our result shows that, at least for small integer weights, the replacement paths problem in directed graphs may be easier than the related all pairs shortest paths problem in directed graphs, as the current best runtime for the latter is \\Omega(n^{2.5...

  2. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  3. Pre-operative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric leg loading during sit to stand in hip arthroplasty patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Weenk, Dirk; Lecumberri, Pablo; Verdonschot, Nico; Pakvis, Dean; Veltink, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure to treat patients with hip osteoarthritis. Clinicians use different questionnaires to evaluate these patients. Gait velocity and these questionnaires; usually show significant improvement after total hip arthroplasty. This clinical evaluation

  4. Automated FingerPrint Background removal: FPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgante Michele

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of a whole-genome physical map has been an essential component of numerous genome projects initiated since the inception of the Human Genome Project. Its usefulness has been proved for whole-genome shotgun projects as a post-assembly validation and recently it has also been used in the assembly step to constrain on BACs positions. Fingerprinting is usually the method of choice for construction of physical maps. A clone fingerprint is composed of true peaks representing real fragments and background peaks, mainly composed of E. coli genomic DNA, partial digestions, star activity by-products, and machine background. High-throughput fingerprinting leads to the production of thousands of BAC clone fingerprints per day. That is why background peaks removal has become an important issue and needs to be automatized, especially in capillary electrophoresis based fingerprints. Results At the moment, the only tools available for such a task are GenoProfiler and its descendant FPMiner. The large variation in the quality of fingerprints that is usually present in large fingerprinting projects represents a major difficulty in the correct removal of background peaks that has only been partially addressed by the methods so far adopted that all require a long manual optimization of parameters. Thus, we implemented a new data-independent tool, FPB (FingerPrint Background removal, suitable for large scale projects as well as mapping of few clones. Conclusion FPB is freely available at http://www.appliedgenomics.org/tools.php. FPB was used to remove the background from all fingerprints of three grapevine physical map projects. The first project consists of about 50,000 fingerprints, the second one consists of about 70,000 fingerprints, and the third one consists of about 45,000 fingerprints. In all cases a successful assembly was built.

  5. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ELCTRONIC VOTING SYSTEM USING FINGER PRINT AND ZIG-BEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRISHNA CHAITANYA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Now-a-days voting process is exercised by using EVM (Electronic voting Machine. The very common problem, rigging which can be faced in every electoral procedure. One candidate can cast the vote of all members or of some other members in electoral list illegally. This results in the loss of votes for other contestants. There is some scope of work in EVM, because there is no way of identification by EVM whether the user is authentic or not. To replace this system, a novel approach is introduced i.e.., EVM added with a finger print verifier. By this way, a single person can vote only once and also bogus voting is eliminated since it is impossible to replicate the finger print of a person. In this paper, Zig-Bee technology is used for wireless sensor data communication. The results will be updated in Master device i.e. (personal computer through Zig-Bee.The Master device is operated by election officer.

  6. The Self-Administered Patient Satisfaction Scale for Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mahomed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The objective of this study was to develop a short self-report questionnaire for evaluating patient satisfaction with the outcome of hip and knee replacement surgery. Methods. This scale consists of four items focusing on satisfaction with the extent of pain relief, improvement in ability to perform home or yard work, ability to perform recreational activities, and overall satisfaction with joint replacement. This instrument does not measure satisfaction with process of care. The responses are scored on a Likert scale, with the total score ranging from 25 to 100 per question. The instrument was tested on 1700 patients undergoing primary total hip and total knee replacement surgery, evaluated preoperatively, at 12 weeks, and one year postoperatively. Psychometric testing included internal consistency, measured with Cronbach's alpha, and convergent validity, measured by correlation with changes in measures of health status between the preoperative, 12-week, and one-year evaluations. Results. The internal consistency (reliability of the scale, measured by the Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.86 to 0.92. The scale demonstrated substantial ceiling effects at 1 year. The scale scores correlated modestly with the absolute SF-36 PCS and WOMAC scores (ρ=0.56–0.63 and also with the WOMAC change scores (ρ=0.38–0.46 at both 12-week and 1-year followups. Conclusions. This instrument is valid and reliable for measuring patient satisfaction following primary hip and knee arthroplasty and could be further evaluated for use with other musculoskeletal interventions.

  7. Anti-Phospholipid Antibodies in Patients Undergoing Total Joint Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Simpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients undergoing joint replacement remain at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE compared to other types of surgery, regardless of thromboprophylactic regimen. The pathophysiologic processes rendering this group of patients at risk for VTE are multifactorial. Procedure-specific and patient-specific exposures play a role in the postoperative development of VTE, including the development of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL. Methods. We measured three aPL (anti-cardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein, and lupus anticoagulant in 123 subjects undergoing total knee or hip arthroplasty to describe the presence of these antibodies preoperatively and to describe the rate of postoperative seroconversion among those people who were negative preoperatively. Postoperative antibodies were measured at day 7, 14, and 21. Results. The prevalence of aPL antibodies in the preoperative period was 44%, positive subjects were more likely to be smokers (P=0.05 and were less likely to have undergone a previous arthroplasty procedure (P=0.002. Subjects seroconverted in a 21 day postoperative period at a rate of 79%. Conclusions. These pilot data suggest that the prevalence of aPL in this population both preoperatively and postoperatively is higher than previously expected. Further studies are needed to describe aPL in a larger population and to establish their clinical significance in populations undergoing joint replacement surgeries.

  8. Thermal stability improvement of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations using non-uniform finger spacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liang; Zhang Wan-Rong; Jin Dong-Yue; Shen Pei; Xie Hong-Yun; Ding Chun-Bao; Xiaa Ying; Sun Bo-Tao; Wang Ren-Qing

    2011-01-01

    method of non-uniform finger spacing is proposed to enhance thermal stability of a multiple finger power SiGe hererojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations. Temperature distribution on the emitter fingers of a multi-finger SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is studied using a numerical electro-thermal model. The results show that the SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor with non-uniform finger spacing has a small temperature difference between fingers compared with a traditional uniform finger spacing heterojunction bipolar transistor at the same power dissipation. What is most important is that the ability to improve temperature non-uniformity is not weakened as power dissipation increases. So the method of non-uniform finger spacing is very effective in enhancing the thermal stability and the power handing capability of power device. Experimental results verify our conclusious.

  9. Femoral component loosening after hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zustin, Jozef; Sauter, Guido [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute of Pathology, Hamburg (Germany); Hahn, Michael [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center for Biomechanics and Skeletal Biology, Hamburg (Germany); Morlock, Michael M. [TUHH Hamburg University of Technology, Biomechanics Section, Hamburg (Germany); Ruether, Wolfgang [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthopaedics, Hamburg (Germany); Amling, Michael [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center for Biomechanics and Skeletal Biology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Before the re-introduction of the current generation of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty, component loosening and osteolysis were of great concern to the orthopaedic community. Early, mid- and long-term clinical results are encouraging, but component loosening still exists. Macroscopic, contact radiographic and histopathological analyses after undecalcified preparation of bone tissue specimens were performed. To investigate the frequency and morphological patterns of the loosening of the femoral component, we analysed a series of 190 retrieved femoral remnants that were revised for aseptic failures. Thirty-five (18.4%) hips were revised for clinical and/or radiographic loosening of the femoral component. Pseudoarthrosis (n = 17; median in situ time: 16 weeks, interquartile range [IQR]: 9 to 34), collapsed osteonecrosis (n = 5; median in situ time: 79 weeks, IQR: 63 to 97), cement-socket debonding (n = 3; median in situ time: 89 weeks, IQR: 54 to 97) and at later follow-up bone-cement loosening (n = 10; median in situ time: 175 weeks; IQR 112 to 198; p =0.005) were distinct patterns of the femoral remnant-implant loosening. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia of interface bone trabeculae (n = 38; median in situ time: 61 weeks, IQR: 32 to 138) was strongly associated with femoral component loosening (p = 0.009). Both the trabecular hyperosteoidosis (n = 32; median in situ time: 71 weeks, IQR 50 to 129) and excessive intraosseous lymphocyte infiltration (n = 12; median in situ time: 75 weeks, IQR 51 to 98) at the bone-cement interface correlated strongly with fibrocartilaginous metaplasia (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016 respectively) and all three lesions were associated with the female gender (p = 0.021, p = 0.009, and p = 0.051). Femoral component loosening at early follow-up was mostly caused by pathological changes of the femoral remnant bone tissue: pseudoarthrosis and collapsed osteonecrosis. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia was frequently observed in hips with femoral

  10. Registro de artroplastias do ombro Shoulder arthroplasty records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Motta Filho

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar as características clínico-cirúrgicas referentes a 145 artroplastias do ombro realizadas no período entre julho de 2004 a dezembro de 2006. MÉTODOS: No período de estudo foram realizadas 145 artroplastias de ombro. Através de protocolo prospectivo, informações demográficas, da anamnese, exame físico e exame radiográfico foram armazenadas em um banco de dados. Os dados coletados foram organizados em três grandes grupos: doenças articulares degenerativas, fraturas e seqüelas traumáticas. Esses dados foram correlacionados a fim de definir o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes, das lesões e artroplastias. RESULTADOS: Das 145 artroplastias de ombro realizadas 37% foram por seqüelas traumáticas, 30% por doença articular degenerativa e 33% com diagnóstico de fratura. Foram 12% artroplastias totais e 88% parciais. Ocorreram cinco complicações no pós-operatório recente. CONCLUSÃO: As artroplastias de ombro tornaram-se um procedimento frequente na prática ortopédica. Registros cirúrgicos são importantes a fim de demonstrar essa evolução progressiva e permitir avaliações de resultados clínicos no futuro.OBJECTIVE: The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. METHODOLOGY: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. RESULTS: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus

  11. Site-specific genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus C S; Lee, Andrew H; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; Fidock, David A

    2012-10-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide, and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum-induced pathogenesis, including drug-resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger homology-directed repair. Targeting an integrated egfp locus, we obtained gene-deletion parasites with unprecedented speed (2 weeks), both with and without direct selection. ZFNs engineered against the parasite gene pfcrt, responsible for escape under chloroquine treatment, rapidly produced parasites that carried either an allelic replacement or a panel of specified point mutations. This method will enable a diverse array of genome-editing approaches to interrogate this human pathogen.

  12. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  13. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  14. Toleration, Synthesis or Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Jakob v. H.; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    to have considerable problems keeping a clear focus on the key question: What are the implications of this empirical turn in terms of philosophy of legal science, of the social understanding of IL, and, not least, of the place of doctrinal scholarship after the alleged Wende? What is needed, we argue......, in order to answer is not yet another partisan suggestion, but rather an attempt at making intelligible both the oppositions and the possibilities of synthesis between normative and empirical approaches to law. Based on our assessment and rational reconstruction of current arguments and positions, we...... therefore outline a taxonomy consisting of the following three basic, ideal-types in terms of the epistemological understanding of the interface of law and empirical studies: toleration, synthesis and replacement. This tripartite model proves useful with a view to teasing out and better articulating...

  15. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional salt fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Colin Y.; Veronis, George

    1997-10-01

    Numerical calculations of unperturbed, regularly spaced fingers in the heat-salt system (with a ratio of salt to heat diffusivities of 1/80) were carried out for a configuration in which a reservoir of uniformly salty, warm fluid lies initially above a reservoir of fresh, cold fluid. Cases were calculated in which the stability ratio, Rρ, was 1.5 and 3.0, and they were calculated for different magnitudes of the destabilizing salt increment, ΔS, expressed in terms of a salt Rayleigh number, Rs. Blobs of fluid with a salt anomaly accumulate at the ends of the evolving fingers. The magnitude and size of the anomaly increase with decreasing Rρ and increasing Rs. The density of those blobs is gravitationally unstable to perturbations. In the range of parameters used in these calculations the ratio of the flux of density due to heat to that due to salt varies from 0.17 to 0.74 for the unperturbed fingers. Essentially, the flux ratio decreases when the vertical velocity in the fingers is small, so that a relatively large amount of heat is diffused laterally from warm, salty descending fingers to cool, fresh ascending ones. A detailed account of the evolution of the perturbed system describes the various stages of the instability, concluding with the formation of larger structures in the reservoirs, which squash the fingers near the interface, so that isotherms and isohaline contours at midlevel are more or less horizontal. There is an indication of three period doublings in the spacing of the unstable blobs as they penetrate into the lower reservoir. The destruction of the regular array of upright, uniformly spaced fingers appears to be the natural evolution of perturbed systems in which Rρ is near unity and Rs is large.

  16. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Vivian M; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers.

  17. Biologic Joint Reconstruction: Alternatives to Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Brian J.; Andreas H. Gmoll

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive source of information in the management of cartilage lesions of major joints using nonoperative or surgical techniques other than total joint replacement. The text also includes chapters in basic sciences, imaging and rehabilitation.The editors are aiming to provide a reference about the latest concepts and techniques in the treatment of cartilage lesions including future aspects by a comprehensive approach to the alternative joint restoration procedures such as biological, ph...

  18. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytas Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s. Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence. Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the

  19. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear.

  20. The use of postoperative suction drainage in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acus, R W; Clark, J M; Gradisar, I A; Kovacik, M W

    1992-11-01

    Two hundred eight primary total hip arthroplasties were reviewed to evaluate the effect of closed suction drainage. This review included 45 hips in which closed drains were used and 163 hips in which drains were not used. These two groups were compared for possible differences in wound problems, temperature elevations, changes in Hgb/Hct, and the need for transfusions. There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative temperatures or decrease in Hgb. However, there were four superficial wound infections in the drained group and three superficial wound infections in the non-drained group (P < .025). There were no deep infections in either group. These findings suggest closed suction drainage provides no apparent advantage in uncomplicated primary total hip arthroplasty.