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Sample records for arthrography

  1. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real- ... methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions ... may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time ...

  4. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies – especially ...

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... vessel or a nerve adjacent to the joint. Injury to these structures, however, is minimal particularly when ... be detected with conventional direct arthrography. Some joint injuries cannot be detected with conventional direct arthrography including ...

  6. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Direct Arthrography Arthrography is medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions and unexplained pain. ... ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real- ... of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast ...

  8. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions ...

  9. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is ... risks of excessive sedation. However, the technologist or nurse monitors your vital signs to minimize this risk. ...

  10. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x- ... methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material ...

  11. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conventional direct arthrography and may be supplemented by air to produce a double contrast CT arthrogram. CT ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ...

  12. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions and unexplained pain. It is very effective ... direct, where contrast material is injected into the joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic ...

  13. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and cartilage. It may be indirect, where contrast material is injected into the bloodstream, or direct, where contrast material is injected into the joint. Arthrography may use ...

  14. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x-ray ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting ...

  15. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT arthrography and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... and sometimes air are injected into the joint space while the radiologist observes with fluoroscopy or ultrasound. ...

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... guide the procedure. Alternate methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ... the injection is typically monitored by fluoroscopy, the examination also commonly involves taking radiographs for documentation. The ...

  17. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected into the joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – ... may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material injection into the joint. ...

  18. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... No special preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material used ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting ... used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

  20. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology ...

  1. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  2. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your preparation may vary depending on which imaging method your exam will use. Tell your doctor if ... into the joint. Direct arthrography is the preferred method because it is better for distending or enlarging ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... or enlarging the joint and imaging small internal structures, thus allowing for better evaluation of diseases or ... conventional direct arthrography, the contrast material outlines the structures within the joint, such as cartilage, ligaments and ...

  4. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... injected into the joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – ... also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material injection into the joint. ...

  5. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given contrast material for having an MRI. If you are scheduled to have MR or CT arthrography and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician about ...

  6. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related pain or inflammation and provide physicians additional information about possible sources of joint pain. top of page How should I prepare? No special preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be restricted, unless a sedative will be ...

  7. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography ... imaging method your exam will use. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant and ...

  8. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for this examination consists of a ... in a separate room from the scanner. Other equipment necessary for performing arthrography include a variety of ...

  9. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. Patients who have known allergies to iodine may ...

  10. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... true for the shoulder in the setting of shoulder dislocation and in the hip, wrist and elbow. Exams involving x-ray imaging: No radiation remains in a patient's body after an x-ray ... Images related to Direct Arthrography Videos related to ...

  11. Clinical arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  12. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthrography was performed in 105 cases with freshly sprained ankles and signs of rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. They were subsequently operated upon. The arthrographic films were examined retrospectively to assess the value of different criteria for the differential diagnosis between rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined rupture of this and the calcaneofibular ligament. The diagnostic value of arthrography was found to be high in isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament, and is acceptable in the combined ruptures. (Auth.)

  13. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a clinical prospective investigation 102 patients with fresh ankle injuries underwent ankle arthrography and surgery for rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Three hypotheses concerning the improvement of the arthrographic diagnosis of rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament were tested. Two were rejected. Improvement in the diagnostic specificity was possible by combining arthrography with a stress inversion test, but the sensitivity of this combination was low. It was demonstrated that absence of peroneus sheath filling was a better diagnostic sign with good rather than with poor recess filling. (Auth.)

  14. The arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main reason for making an arthrography of the shoulder is to confirm, or exclude, a rupture of the rotator cuff. In the years 1978 to 1987, 650 arthrographies of the shoulder joint have been made in the radiological center of Freiburg University, Department for X-ray diagnostics, and in 75.1% of the cases the reason was clinically suspected rupture of the rotator cuff. In 74 cases, (i.e. 11.4%), surgical treatment was confirmed to be necessary by the arthrography. (orig./GDG)

  15. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  16. Direct MR arthrography of plica synovialis mediopatellaris

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    Kobayashi, Y.; Murakami, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Ichikawa, T. [Tama-Nagayama Hospital, Nippon Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Tajima, H.; Kumazaki, T. [Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Mase, Y. [Tama-Nagayama Hospital, Nippon Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2001-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of direct MR arthrography for diagnosing plica synovialis mediopatellaris (PSM). Material and Methods: Twenty-two knees of 19 patients were examined by direct MR arthrography. In 19 of those knees, field-echo T2*-weighted transaxial images were obtained with intra-articular administration of 40 ml of saline (direct MR arthrography). In the other 3 knees, T1-weighted transaxial images were obtained with intra-articular administration of 40 ml of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Conventional MR images were evaluated prior to direct MR arthrography in 12 of the 22 knees. The results of direct MR arthrography and conventional MR imaging were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: Direct MR arthrography demonstrated 17 of 19 PSMs proved on arthroscopy. The features of 16 PSMs on direct MR arthrography corresponded accurately with the arthroscopic classification. Conventional MR demonstrated only 3 plicae. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrography enabled accurate diagnosis of PSMs and could replace diagnostic arthroscopy.

  17. MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: MR arthrography is a minimal invasive method, where first contrast media (CM) is applied intraarticular under fluoroscopic guidance and then MR examination is performed. the well-distended joint and the CM entering through the damaged structures enhance greatly the diagnostic capabilities of the method. Learning objectives: to present the technical aspects of performing MR arthrography of the shoulder; to outline the advantages and indications of the method; to demonstrate the normal variants and some of the most common pathological findings seen on MR arthrography of the shoulder. The shoulder joint pathologies are very heterogeneous in nature. Rotatory cuff and labral tears present major portion of the pathology seen in athletes and elderly people with degenerative changes. MR arthrography significantly improves the depiction of complete and partial tears of the rotatory cuff and damages to the capsular ligamentous complex and the glenoid labrum. The method also helps differentiating some normal variants from traumatic injuries. MR arthrography is affirming as golden standard for the investigation of patients with shoulder instability and surpasses conventional MRI examination in the diagnosis of partial rotatory cuff tears and labral tears

  18. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  19. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates the diagnostic value of MR arthrography in the assessment of cartilaginous lesions, including osteochondritis dissecans. One hundred thirty-two knees of 125 patients were examined with MR arthrography performed on a 1.5-T magnet with a knee resonator. T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences were obtained after intraarticular administration of 40 mL of 2-mmol GD-DTPA solution. Seventy-five patients were also imaged without contrast agent. The description of the articular surface was classified into four types: I, normal cartilage surface and thickness; II, surface normal or slightly irregular; III, severe surface irregularities and cartilage defects; and IV, extensive cartilage defects, scar formation. MR findings were correlated with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy (n = 75)

  20. MR arthrography of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR arthrography of the hip joint is usually performed after a conventional MRI has been obtained to rule out other pathologies of the hip joint as for instance bone marrow edema or osteonecrosis of the hip. MR arthrography is mainly performed as a very special investigation, and it is executed in most cases if the clinician asks for the diagnosis of a labral lesion. In very rare cases, MR arthrography of the hip is performed to image cartilage disease or osteochondrosis dissecans or free intraarticular bodies. In this paper, the indications, the technique, and the most important pathology of the hip joint - labral lesions - will be described as well as variants of the normal acetabular labrum. After a conventional MRI of the hip joint has been performed, a MR arthrography of the hip will be obtained to search for labral pathology or cartilage disease. MR arthrography is obtained after the intraarticular injection of 10-20 ml of a 0.1 mmol solution of gadopentate-dimeglumine has been performed. The intraarticular injection can either be fluoroscopic-guided or CT-guided or directly MR-guided. After the intraarticular injection, MR arthrography will be performed by the use of paracoronal and parasagittal T1-weighted spin echo or gradient echo sequences. In cases of labral lesions (degeneration, labral tear, labral detachment) or cartilage disease MR arthrography proved to be more sensitive as conventional MRI as shown in the literature. The sensitivity of MRI to detect labral pathology was reported to be about 65%, and that of MR arthrography was reported to be about 92-95% compared to surgical results. According to the current literature, MR arthrography is the most sensitive method to delineate these kind of pathologies. Therefore, the invasive technique of MR arthrography may be justified for the correct diagnosis of these kind of pathologies after other pathologic entities have been ruled out by conventional MRI. (orig.)

  1. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  2. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

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    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  3. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.)

  4. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  5. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  6. Double-contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From octber 1989, in Radiology Department of Arcispedale Sant'anna in Ferrara, digital radiographic techniques have been applied to be double-contrast arthrography of the knee. In this preliminary work the diagnostic contribution of computed radiography to arthrographic findings by comparing image quality conventional and digital radiographs using a dedicated Philips unit has been examined. The digital unit is compatible with all the extant radiographic equipment in the department and automatically supplues two images, the first one resembling a conventional radiograph, the second one characterized by broader exposure range that allows a clear visualizzation of soft tissues. To obtain high-quality radiographs the processing curves of the system were modified, in particular by shifting the curve leftward, thus reducing its slope, and by amending the parameters related to spatial frequences. The changes in the reading curves made these images more useful: they were more homogeneous and allowed a better evaluation of fine details. Relative to the second type of images, characterized by both edge enhancement and a broader recording range, it was enough to shift the curve along the X-axis to compensate for a moderate image overexposure. Keeping in mind that the aim of this preliminary work was not compare the two techniques from a diagnostic point of view, in the authors' opinion the two yield similar information for the diagnostic evaluation of meniscal traumas. On the contrary, if the same principles are applied to the evaluation of capsulo-ligamentous components, digital arthrography appears to be more accurate than the conventional technique, the latter being deceptive especially in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments

  7. CT-arthrography of the cruciate ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the cruciate ligaments using CT in 218 patients shall be presented. An intraarticular administration of air must be performed. Special positionings are required in order to bring the axis of the cruciate ligaments into the cross-sectional plane of the CT. The normal appearance of the cruciate ligaments in CT-arthrography is described. A classification of the anterior cruciate ligament lesions with 4 different types is proposed. The four types of the anterior cruciate ligament lesions and the posterior cruciate ligament lesions are met with different frequency. For CT-arthrography a sensitivity of 93% and a specifity of 95% was found. In patients with previous reconstructive surgery of the cruciate ligaments the results can be objectively documented. Thus CT-arthrography can contribute in the diagnosis of postoperative complaints. (orig.)

  8. Patient perception of magnetic resonance arthrography

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    Robbins, M.I.; Anzilotti, K.F. Jr.; Katz, L.D.; Lange, R.C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Objective. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been demonstrated to be more accurate than MR imaging alone in the identification of a variety of musculoskeletal pathology. While the complication rate of intra-articular gadolinium: saline injection has been shown to be relatively low, MR arthrography is more invasive, painful, and costly, and less convenient, than MR imaging alone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients' perception of the fear and discomfort, and to assess their overall acceptance of the intra-articular gadolinium injection.Design and patients. Between October 1997 and January 1998, 113 outpatients who were referred to Yale-New Haven Hospital for MR arthrography of the ankle, elbow, hip, knee, shoulder, or wrist were asked to complete a questionnaire rating their fear of factors most commonly associated with the procedure including ''pain'', ''needles'', ''complications'', and ''discovery of results that would lead to surgery''. In addition, after having undergone the intra-articular gadolinium:saline injection, patients were asked to rate their perception of pain.Results. While many patients expressed fear of ''pain'' and ''needles'', after having undergone the injection their overall pain rating score was low. Only 6% actually found gadolinium arthrography more painful than expected.Conclusion. Despite the fact that patients expressed apprehension about certain aspects of MR arthrography, subjects who underwent the intra-articular gadolinium injection considered the discomfort less than expected. Clinicians should not hesitate to order MR arthrography because the accuracy of the procedure is high enough that patients accept the discomfort. (orig.)

  9. Patient perception of magnetic resonance arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been demonstrated to be more accurate than MR imaging alone in the identification of a variety of musculoskeletal pathology. While the complication rate of intra-articular gadolinium: saline injection has been shown to be relatively low, MR arthrography is more invasive, painful, and costly, and less convenient, than MR imaging alone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients' perception of the fear and discomfort, and to assess their overall acceptance of the intra-articular gadolinium injection.Design and patients. Between October 1997 and January 1998, 113 outpatients who were referred to Yale-New Haven Hospital for MR arthrography of the ankle, elbow, hip, knee, shoulder, or wrist were asked to complete a questionnaire rating their fear of factors most commonly associated with the procedure including ''pain'', ''needles'', ''complications'', and ''discovery of results that would lead to surgery''. In addition, after having undergone the intra-articular gadolinium:saline injection, patients were asked to rate their perception of pain.Results. While many patients expressed fear of ''pain'' and ''needles'', after having undergone the injection their overall pain rating score was low. Only 6% actually found gadolinium arthrography more painful than expected.Conclusion. Despite the fact that patients expressed apprehension about certain aspects of MR arthrography, subjects who underwent the intra-articular gadolinium injection considered the discomfort less than expected. Clinicians should not hesitate to order MR arthrography because the accuracy of the procedure is high enough that patients accept the discomfort. (orig.)

  10. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not need to be restricted, unless a sedative will be given. You should inform your physician ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  11. Arthrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need to be restricted, unless a sedative will be given. You should inform your physician ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  12. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distending or enlarging the joint and imaging small internal structures, thus allowing for better evaluation of diseases ... makes it possible to see bones, joints and internal organs in motion. When iodine contrast is injected ...

  13. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... to identify abnormalities within the: shoulder elbow wrist hip knee ankle The procedure is also used to ... the setting of shoulder dislocation and in the hip, wrist and elbow. Exams involving x-ray imaging: ...

  14. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x- ...

  15. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and ...

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. ... Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  17. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact ...

  18. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact your doctor if they persist after two days. Vigorous exercise is not recommended for at least ... your level of joint discomfort over the following days or weeks. This information may be helpful to ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... ear) implant some types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within ... may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. ...

  20. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... material directly into the joint. In some cases, ultrasound may be used to guide the procedure. Alternate ... imaging modalities such as x-ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray. Your preparation may vary depending on ... Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... rays. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Arthrographic images help physicians evaluate ... a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. If there is any ...

  3. Arthrography

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  5. MR arthrography of the ankle joint; MR-Arthrographie des Sprunggelenkes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Wien (Austria)

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [Deutsch] Aufgrund des ausgezeichneten Weichteilkontrastes ist die konventionelle MRT die bildgebende Methode der Wahl in der Beurteilung von Sprunggelenkserkrankungen. Die konventionelle MRT kann zuverlaessig normale und akut verletzte Ligamente darstellen. Im subakuten und chronischen Stadium der Verletzung fehlt jedoch oft die Gelenksfluessigkeit die fuer eine exakte Abgrenzung der verletzten Ligamente notwendig ist. Die MR-Arthrographie sollte in diesen Faellen durchgefuehrt werden, da die intraartikulaere KM-Applikation den Gelenksraum distendiert mit verbesserter Unterscheidbarkeit intraartikulaerer Strukturen. Diese Gelenksdistension mit der MR-Arthrographie ist auch in der Stadiumbeurteilung der Osteochondritis dissecans hilfreich, da in Faellen von instabilen Laesionen eine KM-Umspuelung des Dissekats leichter dargestellt werden kann. Schliesslich verbessert die MR-Arthrographie aufgrund des hohen Kontrastes und der Gelenksdistension auch den Nachweis von

  6. MR and CT arthrography of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezal, Luis; de Dios Berná-Mestre, Juan; Canga, Ana; Llopis, Eva; Rolon, Alejandro; Martín-Oliva, Xavier; del Piñal, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    The study of the wrist represents a major diagnostic challenge because of its complex anatomy and the small size of individual structures. Recent advances in imaging techniques have increased our diagnostic capabilities. However, 3T magnets, multichannel specific wrist coils, and new MRI sequences have not restricted the indications of arthrographic imaging techniques (CT arthrography and MR arthrography). Distension of the different wrist compartments at CT arthrography and MR arthrography significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy for triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) complex injuries and carpal instability. Dedicated multichannel wrist coils are essential for an adequate study of the wrist, but the placement of these coils and the positioning of the wrist are also important for proper diagnosis. The development of dynamic multislice CT studies allows a diagnostic approach that combines dynamic information and the accurate assessment of ligaments and the TFC complex. New advances in arthroscopy have changed the anatomical description of the TFC with a functional division in the proximal and distal TFC complex, and they have allowed a better characterization of lesions of the TFC complex with subclassification of Palmer 1B and 1D lesions and description of new lesions not included in the Palmer classification, such as capsular injuries. PMID:22447235

  7. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Chang, Duk Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Sung, Jung Ho; Jun, Young Hwan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space.

  8. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space

  9. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.)

  10. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder

  11. Arthrography in sport injuries of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arthrography is one of the most important diagnostic methods of sport injuries of the knee joint. The examination must give an exact information to the surgeon; a good technique and standard X-rays are an absolute postulate. The submitted examinations are based on 6687 arthrographies during a period of 5 years. The arthrography should not be carried out before the acute symptomatology has ceased, usually after an interval of 2-3 weeks. Most frequently are the meniscus injuries by rotary traumas of the knee-joint. Football as the most popular sport is responsible for more than 50% of the injuries, followed by skiing, handball and jogging. (orig.)

  12. MR arthrography for evaluation of the acetabular labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersilge, C.A. [Musculoskeletal and Emergency Radiology, Hillcrest Hospital, Mayfield Heights, OH (United States); Radiology and Orthopedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve Univ., Mayfield Heights, OH (United States)

    2001-08-01

    MR arthrography of the hip has provided new insights into the lesions underlying mechanical hip pain. Until now evaluation of these structures, especially the acetabular labrum, has been limited. With the joint distention provided by MR arthrography, labral detachments and intrasubstance tears can be identified and differentiated from the many varied appearances of the asymptomatic labrum. This article reviews the normal anatomy of the hip, the clinical presentation of internal derangement and the technique for performing MR arthrography. The variations in morphology and signal of the asymptomatic labrum are reviewed as well as the appearance of the abnormal labrum. (orig.)

  13. Diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury using arthrography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kiyonobu; Soejima, Osamu; Naito, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Twenty patients (twenty-one wrists) with chronic ulnar wrist pain who had undergone radiocarpal arthrography and MRI before arthroscopic examination were evaluated to determine the usefulness of these preoperative diagnostic procedures (arthrogrphy and MRI) for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury. Based on the arthroscopic findings, the sensitivity and specificity of arthrography were 63% and 100% respectively for detecting TFCC lesions, while they were 68% and 50% respectively for MRI. Although no significant superiority was observed between arthrography and MRI in this study, further improrumchts in the preoperative diagnostic procedures are still needed in order to more accurately detect TFCC injuries. (author)

  14. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  15. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  16. The significance of preoperative shoulder arthrography in painful arc patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative shoulder arthrography was performed on 34 patients with painful arc syndromes. Rotator cuff rupture was diagnosed in 20 cases. Out of these the arthrography correctly showed rupture in 17 cases, while in one case rupture was not seen and two examinations were unsuccessful. Rotator cuff rupture was found in 14 cases at operation. Of these, arthrography had been negative in eight cases and in six cases the rupture had merely been suspected. Sensitivity of shoulder arthrography in showing rotator cuff rupture was thus 85%, specificity 57% and accuracy 74%. The biceps tendon was intact in all cases with rotator cuff rupture. S-called ''bicipital leakage'' was seen in four cases, but its significance remains unclear. (orig.)

  17. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  18. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use; Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Grebe, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Kersjes, W. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Kirschner, P. [Elisabeth-Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Abt. fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie St. Vincenz; Schild, H.H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    1994-02-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer prospektiven Studie sollten Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes herausgearbeitet werden. 37 Patienten wurden sowohl nativ als auch nach intraartikulaerer Gabe einer 2mmolaren Gd-DTPA-Loesung untersucht. Voraussetzungen fuer die KM-Gabe waren ein fehlender Gelenkerguss und/oder ein unklarer Befund des Labrum-Kapsel-Komplexes oder der Rotatorenmanschette in der Nativuntersuchung. Durch die MR-Arthrographie wurde bei 11/22 Patienten eine verbesserte Darstellung der Labrumpathologie erzielt; in 20/22 Faellen ergabe sich eine zuverlaessige Beurteilung der Gelenkkapsel. Bei 9/15 Patienten mit Erkrankungen der Rotatorenmanschette konnten Tendinitiden von partiellen und kleinen kompletten Rotatorenmanschettenrupturen sicher differenziert werden. Die MR-Arthrographie des Schultergelenkes fuehrt bei nicht eindeutigen Befunden in der Nativuntersuchung zu einer verbesserten Treffsicherheit der MR-Diagnostik. (orig.)

  19. Diagnosis of chondromalacia patellae using CT arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Karpf, P.M.; Bernett, P.

    1982-08-01

    Using anatomical specimens for experimental investigations, the physical-technical prerequisites for proper demonstration of the femoro-patellar articulation were determined and the following results obtained: hyaline cartilage possesses an attenuation value of 25-35 HU; artificial lesions from 1 mm. deep and 2 mm. wide minimum can be visualized; the use of positive contrast medium is best suited for demonstration of chondral lesions. In clinical practice we found that the various stages of cartilaginous degeneration peculiar to chondromalacia (Fruend I to III) are clearly demonstrated by CT arthrography. In CT the predisposing changes in the morphology of the patella and the femoro-patellar articulation are more precisely defined than in conventional tangential roentgenograms. In 69 cases the CT arthrographic findings could be verified at operation. However, the extent and severity of the lesions was, at times, underestimated.

  20. Combined nuclear and digital subtraction contrast arthrography in painful knee prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of a painful knee prosthesis remains a difficult problem for both orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists. We have compared digital subtraction arthrography with nuclear-arthrography in 7 patients with a painful knee prosthesis. Three patients showed a loose tibial component, demonstrated by both digital subtraction and nuclear arthrography. All 3 underwent revision of their prosthesis. One patient had an equivocal digital subtraction arthrogram and negative nuclear arthrogram, while both studies were negative in the 3 remaining patients. Nuclear arthrography is a simple procedure and can provide useful additional information when combined with digital subtraction arthrography. (orig.)

  1. Biceps tendon disorders: ultrasound, MR imaging and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound and MR imaging are competitive imaging modalities for the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the biceps tendon. MR imaging has substantial advantages over ultrasound because biceps tendon lesions are most commonly located in the proximal part where lesions are hidden under the acromion for ultrasound assessment. The value of MR arthrography is substantiated by the capability to assess associated diagnoses which are otherwise difficult to assess. Associated diagnoses include full- and partial thickness tears of supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons, pulley lesions, and adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder). Moreover, MR arthrography is the method of choice for the assessment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions. (orig.)

  2. Arthrography of the ankle - diagnostic method in ligamental injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results were analyzed of 143 arthrographies in patients with severe distortions of the ankle: 97 men and 46 women at mean age 34,3 years. Arthrography was realized by Gordon's original technique. The following X-ray diagnostic features were considered evidential for demonstration of the ligamental apparatus of the joint: 1. Extracapsular presence of contrast matter beneath and aside for the lateral maleolus with spread in cranial direction; 2. 'effluence' of contrast matter around the medial maleolus in the antero-posterior roentgenogram; 3. Absence of contrast-matter-free zone on lateral roentgenography. The author's arthrographic interpretations were confirmed on the subsequent operative correction

  3. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author)

  4. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu (Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine); Kobayakawa, Takafumi

    1991-08-01

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author).

  5. The posterior transtriceps approach for elbow arthrography: a forgotten technique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of performing elbow MR arthrography via a posterior approach through the triceps. The images of 19 patients with elbow MR arthrography via a posterior transtriceps approach were retrospectively studied. The injections were performed by four musculoskeletal radiologists, using fluoroscopic guidance and a 22- or 25-gauge needle. The fluoroscopic and subsequent MR images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and evaluated for adequacy of joint capsular distention, degree and location of contrast leakage, and presence of gas bubbles. The injection was diagnostic in all 19 patients, with a sufficient amount of contrast agent seen in the elbow joint. No significant contrast leakage occurred in 12 patients who received injections of 8 cc or less of contrast agent, but moderate contrast leakage occurred in 6/7 patients who received injections of greater than 8 cc. Contrast leakage generally occurred within the triceps myotendinous junction. No gas bubbles were identified in the injected joints. Patients often present for MR arthrography of the elbow with medial or lateral elbow pain. Contrast leakage during a radiocapitellar approach may complicate evaluation of the lateral collateral ligament or the common extensor tendon origin. Transtriceps MR arthrography offers an alternative to the more commonly used radiocapitellar approach. With injected volumes not exceeding 8 cc, the risk of significant contrast leakage is small. An advantage of the transtriceps injection is that contrast leakage through the posterior needle tract does not interfere with evaluation of the lateral structures. (orig.)

  6. The posterior transtriceps approach for elbow arthrography: a forgotten technique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M.; Borrero, C.; Casagranda, B.; Rafiee, B.; Towers, J. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of performing elbow MR arthrography via a posterior approach through the triceps. The images of 19 patients with elbow MR arthrography via a posterior transtriceps approach were retrospectively studied. The injections were performed by four musculoskeletal radiologists, using fluoroscopic guidance and a 22- or 25-gauge needle. The fluoroscopic and subsequent MR images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and evaluated for adequacy of joint capsular distention, degree and location of contrast leakage, and presence of gas bubbles. The injection was diagnostic in all 19 patients, with a sufficient amount of contrast agent seen in the elbow joint. No significant contrast leakage occurred in 12 patients who received injections of 8 cc or less of contrast agent, but moderate contrast leakage occurred in 6/7 patients who received injections of greater than 8 cc. Contrast leakage generally occurred within the triceps myotendinous junction. No gas bubbles were identified in the injected joints. Patients often present for MR arthrography of the elbow with medial or lateral elbow pain. Contrast leakage during a radiocapitellar approach may complicate evaluation of the lateral collateral ligament or the common extensor tendon origin. Transtriceps MR arthrography offers an alternative to the more commonly used radiocapitellar approach. With injected volumes not exceeding 8 cc, the risk of significant contrast leakage is small. An advantage of the transtriceps injection is that contrast leakage through the posterior needle tract does not interfere with evaluation of the lateral structures. (orig.)

  7. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author)

  8. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Chenona (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain.

  9. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain

  10. Digital subtraction arthrography compared to ultrasound in lesions of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    60 patients with suspected lesion of the rotator cuff were examined by digital subtraction arthrography and the results were compared to ultrasound. The dynamic study of digital subtraction arthrography visualised in 22 of 23 complete or incomplete cuff tears the exact location of the extravasation of the contrast medium. All diagnoses were confirmed by surgery. Problems of conventional arthrography were not seen by the digital method. (orig.)

  11. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesive capsulitis is a clinical syndrome involving pain and decreased joint motion caused by thickening and contraction of the joint capsule. The purpose of this study is to describe the MR arthrographic findings of this syndrome. Twenty-nine sets of MR arthrographic images were included in the study. Fourteen patients had adhesive capsulitis diagnosed by physical examination and arthrography, and their MR arthrographic findings were compared with those of 15 subjects in the control group. The images were retrospectively reviewed with specific attention to the thickness of the joint capsule, volume of the axillary pouch (length, width, height(depth)), thinkness of the coracohumeral ligament, presence of extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrst filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Mean capsular thickness measured at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch was 4.1 mm in patients with adhesive capsulitis and 1.5 mm in the control group. The mean width of the axillary pouch was 2.5 mm in patients and 9.5 mm in controls. In patients, the capsule was significantly thicker and the axillary pouch significantly narrower than in controls (p<0.05). Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch (sensitivity 93%, specificity 80%) and a pouch narrower than 3.5 mm (sensitivity 93%, specificity 100%) were useful criteria for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. In patients with this condition, extra-articular contrast extravasation was noted in six patients (43%) and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa in three (21%). The MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis are capsular thickening, a low-volume axillary pouch, extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch and a pouch width of less than 3.5 mm are useful diagnostic imaging characteristics

  12. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  13. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq 99mTc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  14. Lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts: MR imaging and CT-arthrography; Lumbale intraspinale Juxta-Facettenzysten: Kernspintomograpie und CT-Arthrographie

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    Schmid, G.; Jergas, M.; Pennekamp, W.; Bickert, U.; Koester, O. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Willburger, R. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopaedie

    2002-10-01

    Purpose: To present data on the MR imaging appearance of lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts (JFC) and to assess the importance of additional CT arthrography. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (16 women, 12 men) with a mean age of 64 years (range: 43-82), who underwent MR imaging because of radicular pain or spinal claudication, were found to have an intraspinal cyst associated with the facet joint. In 14 patients, additional CT-arthrography was performed to determine whether a communication exists between the cyst and the facet joint and to try to rupture the cyst. Results: In T{sub 2}-weighted images, juxtafacet cysts show a typical pattern consisting of a hyperintense center and hypointense rim. The center is likely to be inhomogeneous because of recurrent hemorrhage in the cyst. In T1-weighted images, the cysts are hypo/isointense. Irregular hyperintensity may indicate subacute hemorrhage, which may aggravate the clinical symptoms. MR allows superior visualization of the cyst in all anatomical planes. It also enables assessment of typical accompanying changes, such as degenerative spondylolisthesis and facet hypertrophy. All patients, who had CT-arthrography, were found to have a direct communication between joint space and cyst. Transarticular rupture of the cyst was possible in five patients. Two of these five patients had good to excellent improvement, and the remaining three patients underwent surgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung der kernspintomographischen Charakteristika sowie Wertigkeit der CT-Arthrographie bei lumbalen intraspinalen Juxta-Facettenzysten (JFZ). Material und Methode: Bei 28 Patienten (16 w, 12 m) mit einem Durchschnittsalter von 64 Jahren (43-82 Jahre) wurde im Rahmen der Abklaerung einer Lumboischialgie oder einer Claudicatio spinalis eine intraspinale facettgelenksassoziierte Zyste durch CT/MR diagnostiziert. Bei 14 Patienten wurde eine CT-gesteuerte Arthrographie des betroffenen Intervertebralgelenks durchgefuehrt zum

  15. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  16. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

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    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  17. Lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts: MR imaging and CT-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present data on the MR imaging appearance of lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts (JFC) and to assess the importance of additional CT arthrography. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (16 women, 12 men) with a mean age of 64 years (range: 43-82), who underwent MR imaging because of radicular pain or spinal claudication, were found to have an intraspinal cyst associated with the facet joint. In 14 patients, additional CT-arthrography was performed to determine whether a communication exists between the cyst and the facet joint and to try to rupture the cyst. Results: In T2-weighted images, juxtafacet cysts show a typical pattern consisting of a hyperintense center and hypointense rim. The center is likely to be inhomogeneous because of recurrent hemorrhage in the cyst. In T1-weighted images, the cysts are hypo/isointense. Irregular hyperintensity may indicate subacute hemorrhage, which may aggravate the clinical symptoms. MR allows superior visualization of the cyst in all anatomical planes. It also enables assessment of typical accompanying changes, such as degenerative spondylolisthesis and facet hypertrophy. All patients, who had CT-arthrography, were found to have a direct communication between joint space and cyst. Transarticular rupture of the cyst was possible in five patients. Two of these five patients had good to excellent improvement, and the remaining three patients underwent surgery. (orig.)

  18. A clinical and radiological observation of shoulder arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyzed 23 cases of shoulder arthrography performed at Busan National University Hospital and Inje Medical College Paik Hospital for about 2.5 years from March 1981 to September 1983, both clinically and radiologically. The results obtained were as follows: 1. Of the 23 cases, 20 cases (87.0%) were male and 3 cases (13.0%) were female, and the most prevalent age group was second decade. 2. Right shoulder arthrography was performed in 16 cases (69.6%), and left in 7 cases (30.4%). 3. The number of cases which had had certain history of trauma was 13 (56.5%), and remainder of 10 cases (43.5%) had no history of trauma. 4. Frequent symptoms and signs were pain in shoulder region in 16 cases (69.6%) and limitation of motion in 14 cases (60.9%). 5. On plain film findings, 18 cases (78.3%) were normal, and 5 cases (21.7%) were abnormal. 6. On shoulder arthrographic findings, 16 cases (69.6%) were normal, and 7 cases (30.4%) were abnormal. Those abnormal cases were consisted of 2 cases (8.7%) of adhesive capsulitis, 2 cases (8.7%) of chronic shoulder dislocation, 1 case (4.3%) of rotator cuff tear, 1 case (4.3%) of loose bodies in joint cavity, and 1 case (4.3%) of rupture of biceps tendon sheath. 7. Among routine views of shoulder arthrography of normal cases, the external rotation view revealed axillary recess and biceps tendon more distincity, and the internal rotation view revealed subscapular bursa more clearly. In case of double contrast shoulder arthrography, the contour and thickness of the medial segment of the contrast coated humeral articular cartilage were well demonstrated in erect views, with air-fluid levels in axillary recess, biceps tendon sheath and subscapular bursa. 8. The 2 cases of adhesive capsulitis revealed small joint space, obliteration of the axillary recess and subscapular bursa, and failure to fill the bicipital sheath. 9. The 2 cases of capsular deformities by chronic shoulder dislocation demonstrated loss of normal concavity of

  19. Arthrography, talar tilt and surgical findings after inversion trauma of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both inversion stress examination under general anesthesia and arthrography are sensitive indicators of lateral ankle ligament pathology (91%, 96% resp.). Arthrography is significantly superior to inversion stress examination done under local anesthesia (96%, 70% resp.). Peroneus tendon sheath filling is always pathological, but although this does not always indicate calcaneo-fibular ligament rupture, such rupture cannot be excluded in its absence. Talar tilt difference cannot be correlated with the extent of ligamentous rupture and therefore inversion stress examination, while providing valuable additional information, must be regarded as a secondary technique to ankle arthrography. (orig.)

  20. Value of arthrography in the evaluation of sacroiliac pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors attempted to assess the sacroiliac joint as a source of low back pain by using arthrography with a local anesthetic injection. Intraarticular injection of contrast agent and local anesthetic was attempted in 29 patients (35 joints), aged 24-69 years. The intraarticular injection was successful in 24 cases (68.5%). Periarticular infiltration of anesthetic was done in the remaining 11 cases. Pain relief was obtained in 19 cases, of which 13 involved intraarticular and six involved periarticular injections. On the basis of these results, patients were treated by surgical fusion, medication, or conservative management. Referring physicians found that the results obtained were valuable and helpful in assessing these patients

  1. Comparison of MRI and arthrography in patients with functional disturbances of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    31 patients with clinically diagnosed dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 Tesla, TR/TE 600/30) in closed and open mouth position and functional arthrography with digital image recording. Both methods agreed in the evaluation of the disc position. In 23 joints with displaced disc reposition was found in 11 cases and in 14 cases using MRI or arthrography, respectively. MRI proved to be superior in the diagnosis of sideways disc rotations. Joint hypermobility, eccentric disc displacement (n=4) and perforation (n=3) were shown by functional arthrography. Due to the good demonstration of osseous, muscular and discoligamentous structures, MRI as a noninvasive imaging modality is the method of choice for TMJ evaluation. Arthrography can be advantageous in complex functional disturbances or if MRI and clinical findings are inconclusive. The clinical diagnosis of disc displacement was found to be accurate in only 68% of the cases. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of MRI and arthrography in the preoperative work up of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Comparison between conventional arthrography and MRI in the preoperative work up of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Material and methods. We studied 17 children (18 hips) who had arthrography and MRI (open-magnet configuration) the same day. Coronal and sagittal T1 weighted were realised with the hip in neutral position. Additional coronal T1 weighted with abduction of the hip were obtained. Two readers analysed individually MRI and arthrographic findings: shape of femoral head, index of Heyman (antero-external covering), came effect, re-centering of femoral head and quality of examination. Results. No statistical difference between MRI and arthrography could be noted-exception made for the index of Heyman. Conclusion. MRI can replace arthrography in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. (authors)

  3. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  4. Feasibility of ultrasonography and MR arthrography during evaluation of rotator cuff injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR arthrography and ultrasonography in evaluating shoulder pain. The subject group consisted of all patients who visited our institute complaining of shoulder pain or instability form June 2002 to December 2004. There were a total of 92 patients with an mean age of 48. On the basis of arthroscopic results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ultrasonography and MR arthrography were evaluated by comparing them with each other. In the diagnosis of separateness tendon tears, ultrasonography had sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 64%, respectively, whereas MR arthrography had sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 94%, respectively. Ultrasonography also had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of subscapularis tendon tears (100% and 90%). MR arthrography was appropriate for identifying glenoid labral abnormalities (sensitivity, 95% and specificity, 61%). Similar results from ultrasonography and MR arthrography were obtained in the diagnosis of subscapular tendon tears or full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendons (kappa value, 0.644 and 0.911). While evaluating rotator cuff abnormalities, ultrasonography was appropriate for screening, whereas MR arthrography was useful to confirm the results of the ultrasonography

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging or arthrography for shoulder problems: a randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Diagnostic technologies are often assessed merely by their accuracy, rather than by their impact on diagnosis and patient management. To this end the authors have undertaken a study to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthrography of the shoulder for patients referred from a rheumatology clinic. Methods and patients: Patients referred from a rheumatology clinic with symptoms warranting imaging of the shoulder were randomised to either MRI or arthrography. Data on the clinician's diagnostic confidence and management were recorded before and after imaging using questionnaires. Patients were followed-up at least 10 months after imaging to see how management plans evolved, and what proportion of patients required further imaging. Results: Fifty three shoulders underwent imaging over a year and entered into the study; 29 randomised to MRI and 24 to arthrography. Both MRI and arthrography had a similar beneficial diagnostic impact in terms of clinical diagnoses (refuted and retained) and new diagnoses established. MRI and arthrography had a similar therapeutic impact, although MRI was associated with a significant shift towards surgical intervention. Conclusion: MRI and arthrography a have similar diagnostic and therapeutic impact

  6. Comparison of MRI and arthrography in patients with functional disturbances of the temporomandibular joint; Vergleich von Kernspintomographie und Arthrographie bei Funktionsstoerungen des Kiefergelenkes

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    Fischbach, R. [Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Heindel, W. [Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Lin, Y. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Friedrich, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde, Abt. fuer Vorklinische Zahnheilkunde, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Brochhagen, H.G. [Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    31 patients with clinically diagnosed dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 Tesla, T{sub R}/T{sub E} 600/30) in closed and open mouth position and functional arthrography with digital image recording. Both methods agreed in the evaluation of the disc position. In 23 joints with displaced disc reposition was found in 11 cases and in 14 cases using MRI or arthrography, respectively. MRI proved to be superior in the diagnosis of sideways disc rotations. Joint hypermobility, eccentric disc displacement (n=4) and perforation (n=3) were shown by functional arthrography. Due to the good demonstration of osseous, muscular and discoligamentous structures, MRI as a noninvasive imaging modality is the method of choice for TMJ evaluation. Arthrography can be advantageous in complex functional disturbances or if MRI and clinical findings are inconclusive. The clinical diagnosis of disc displacement was found to be accurate in only 68% of the cases. (orig.) [Deutsch] 31 Patienten mit klinisch diagnostizierter Funktionsstoerung des Kiefergelenkes wurden mittels Kernspintomographie (MRT; 1,5 Tesla, T{sub R}/T{sub E} 600/30) bei geschlossenem und geoeffnetem Mund und mittels Funktionsarthrographie mit digitaler Bildaufzeichnung untersucht. Die Diskusoperation wurde mit beiden Verfahren in allen Faellen uebereinstimmend bewertet. Bei 23 verlagerten Disci zeigte die MRT in 11 Faellen, die Arthrographie in 14 Faellen eine Reposition. Die MRT erwies sich im Nachweis seitlicher Verlagerungen als ueberlegen. Gelenkhypermobilitaet, exzentrische Diskusverlagerungen (n=4) und Diskusperforationen (n=3) waren in der Funktionsarthrographie nachzuweisen. Sie ist zur Gesamtbeurteilung aufgrund guter Darstellung ossaerer, muskulaerer und diskoligamentaerer Strukturen Methode der Wahl. Die Arthrographie kann bei komplexen Funktionsstoerungen oder uneindeutigen klinischen und kernspintomographischen Befunden von Vorteil sein. Die

  7. Comparison of MRI and arthrography in the diagnosis of intercarpal ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 500 cases undergoing wrist arthrography at this hospital since 1984-, 40 ligaments of 37 wrists in which injury to the scapho-lunate ligament (S-L, 22 ligaments) or luno-triquetral ligament (L-T, 18 ligaments) was confirmed and both MRI and wrist arthrography were performed within the 3-month period before surgery were investigated. On arthrography the presence/absence of communication between the midcarpal joint (M-C) and radiocarpal joint (R-C) and its location were determined. S-L and L-T on routine MR coronal images are depicted as a low-signal small triangular area. The presence, absence of injuries to these structures was determined, and the two compared with the site of ligament injury confirmed by arthroscopy. On arthrography the site of leakage and site of ligament injury were consistent in 19 of 22 at S-L ligament (86.4%), 15 of 18 at L-T ligament (83.3%), totally 34 of 40 cases (accuracy=85%). In 16 of 22 S-L ligament (72.7%) and 11 of 18 L-T ligament (61.1%), totally 27 cases in which ligament injury was discernible on MRI the accuracy was 67.5%, which was a lower figure as compared with arthrography. On arthrography the site of communication between R-C and M-C was largely consistent with the site of ligament injury, and the site of injury could be relatively easily diagnosed At the presently feasible resolution of MRI accurate grasp of the findings is difficult and so with respect to the diagnosis of ligament injury wrist arthrography is superior to MRI. (K.H.)

  8. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small (3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  9. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis. (orig.)

  10. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography

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    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-11-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis.

  11. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Traditional plain film arthrography can achieve reasonable accuracy and is an accepted method of investigation of patients with knee pain and possible meniscal tear. Multi-detector CT can potentially provide a more detailed and accurate examination due to its high-resolution crosssectional and multi-planar capabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of our technique. All patients who underwent a multi-detector CT knee arthrogram in an initial 8 month period were identified. Initially the referring clinician was contacted. If the patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon the outcome of orthopaedic review was recorded using clinical, arthroscopic and / or MRI follow-up of the patient population. One hundred and twelve patients had a Multi-detector CT knee arthrogram performed within and 8 month period. Follow-up information was received in 69.7% of patients. Of these 68.9% had orthopaedic assessment - of which 69.2% underwent a knee arthroscopy.There was total agreement of findings in 67%, agreement of meniscal findings in 67% and chondral findings in 100%. Overall, orthopaedic opinion agreed with CT findings in 76.9%. At this stage, all meniscal tears not described in the initial CT arthrogram report have in retrospect been visible. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography is an accurate and elegant technique for investigation of knee pain, providing information in a format familiar to those reporting knee MRI. There is an initial learning curve. The technique is particularly useful in chondral assessment. It is accurate for meniscal pathology, although caution and recognition of potential pitfalls is required. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. MR-guided MR arthrography of the shoulder

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    Purpose: To develop an MR-guided technique for joint puncture in MR arthrography of the shoulder and to confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip by visualization of the flow of contrast media into the joint. Materials and methods: Three unfixed human shoulder joint specimens were examined on a 1.0 T unit. The optimal point of entrance and depth for joint puncture were estimated by means of MR-compatible markers on the skin. Needle orientation and localization of the needle tip (MR-compatible 22-gauge needle) in the shoulder joint were monitored by rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences in two orthogonal planes. To confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip, diluted gadolinium-DTPA was administered via a long connecting tube and the flow of contrast media into the joint was viewed directly on an LCD screen using real-time MR imaging (local look technique). Results: The MR-compatible markers on the skin allowed determination of the optimal point of entrance and estimation of the depth for joint puncture. Passive visualization of the MR-compatible needle due to spin dephasing and signal loss provided adequate localization of the intra-articular needle tip position in all specimens, although significant artefacts were present on rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences with an increase in width of the apparent needle shaft. Real-time MR imaging of the flow of contrast media was possible using the local look technique and the LCD screen of the MR unit and allowed confirmation of the intracapsular position. Conclusion: MR-guided joint puncture and real-time MR-assisted contrast media application results in improved MR arthrography and may replace conventional fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  13. Intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears of the wrist: comparison of MDCT arthrography, conventional 3-T MRI, and MR arthrography

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    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Ng, Alex W.H.; Tong, Cina S.L.; Griffith, James F. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Tse, W.L.; Wong, C.; Ho, P.C. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China)

    2013-09-15

    This study compares the diagnostic performance of multidetector CT arthrography (CTA), conventional 3-T MR and MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears of the wrist. Ten cadaveric wrists of five male subjects with an average age 49.6 years (range 26-59 years) were evaluated using CTA, conventional 3-T MR and MRA. We assessed the presence of scapholunate ligament (SLL), lunotriquetral ligament (LTL), and TFCC tears using a combination of conventional arthrography and arthroscopy as a gold standard. All images were evaluated in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy being calculated. Sensitivities/specificity/accuracy of CTA, conventional MRI, and MRA were 100 %/100 %/100 %, 66 %/86 %/80 %, 100 %/86 %/90 % for the detection of SLL tear, 100 %/80 %/90 %, 60 %/80 %/70 %, 100 %/80 %/90 % for the detection of LTL tear, and 100 %/100 %/100 %, 100 %/86 %/90 %, 100 %/100 %/100 % for the detection of TFCC tear. Overall CTA had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy among the three investigations while MRA performed better than conventional MR. CTA also had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying which component of the SLL and LTL was torn. Membranous tears of both SLL and LTL were better visualized than dorsal or volar tears on all three imaging modalities. Both CT and MR arthrography have a very high degree of accuracy for diagnosing tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC with both being more accurate than conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  14. Imaging diagnostics of the wrist: MRI and Arthrography/Arthro-CT; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Handgelenkes: MRT und Arthrographie/Arthro-CT

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    Klein, H.M.; Balas, R.; Neugebauer, F. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Betzdorf (Germany); Vrsalovic, V. [Handchirugie, Marienhospital Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with arthrography and arthro-CT (AG/ACT) in patients with wrist pain. Methods: MRI and arthrography/arthro-CT (AG/ACT) of the wrist joint were retrospectively evaluated in 346 patients over a three-year period. Imaging findings were correlated to surgical results (n=78) or clinical course in an at least 6-month follow-up. Results: For tears of the triangular fibrocartilage, arthrography, arthro-CT, and MRI demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of more than 0.96. Only the positive predictive value was superior for arthrography/arthro-CT (0.99 and 0.98, respectively) compared with MRI (0.94). Arthrography was superior for functional diagnosis of scapho-lunate ligament tears (n=25). Ulno-lunate and ulno-triquetral ligament defects were demonstrated more exactly by arthrography. Traumatic osseous defects, particularly scaphoid fractures (n=33) and avascular necrosis (n=17), were better diagnosed using MRI. Conclusion: For suspected lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, AG/ACT is slightly more reliable than MRI. However, MRI was found to be highly accurate in diagnosing TFC tears, and is superior to AG/ACT in detecting traumatic and vascular lesions of the wrist. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Untersuchung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Magnetresonanz-Tomographie (MRT), Arthrographie (AG) und Arthro-CT (ACT) bei Erkrankungen des Handgelenkes. Methodik: Insgesamt 346 Untersuchungen des Handgelenkes wurden fuer einen dreijaehrigen Beobachtungszeitraum retrospektiv ausgewertet. Es wurden 211 MRT, 151 Arthrographien (AG) und 126 Arthro-CT (ACT) durchgefuehrt. Alle Diagnosen wurden operativ (n=78) oder durch den klinischen Verlauf in einer 6-monatigen Nachbeobachtung gesichert. Ergebnisse: Fuer die Diagnostik von Laesionen des diskoulnaren Komplexes lag die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet von AG, ACT und MRT ueber 0,96. Lediglich der positive Vorhersagewert differierte, allerdings nicht

  15. Cone-beam computed tomography arthrography: an innovative modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament and cartilage injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become an important modality in dento-facial imaging but remains poorly used in the exploration of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the performance and radiation exposure of CBCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligament and cartilage injuries in cadaveric wrists, with gross pathology findings as the standard of reference. Conventional arthrography was performed under fluoroscopic guidance on 10 cadaveric wrists, followed by MDCT acquisition and CBCT acquisition. CBCT arthrography and MDCT arthrography images were independently analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists working independently and then in consensus. The following items were observed: scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) (tear, integrity), and proximal carpal row cartilage (chondral tears). Wrists were dissected and served as the standard of reference for comparisons. Interobserver agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined. Radiation dose (CTDI) of both modalities was recorded. CBCT arthrography provides equivalent results to MDCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligaments and cartilage with sensitivity and specificity between 82 and 100%, and interobserver agreement between 0.83 and 0.97. However, radiation dose was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for CBCT arthrography than for MDCT arthrography with a mean CTDI of 2.1 mGy (range 1.7-2.2) versus a mean of 15.1 mGy (range 14.7-16.1). CBCT arthrography appears to be an innovative alternative to MDCT arthrography of the wrist as it allows an accurate and low radiation dose evaluation of ligaments and cartilage. (orig.)

  16. Sacro-iliac joint arthrography in low back pain: feasibility of MRI guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Evaluation of the feasibility of MR-guidance in sacro-iliac joint arthrography in patients whose low back pain is suspected to arise from the sacro-iliac joint (SIJ). Methods and patients: Twenty patients with low back pain underwent MR-guided sacro-iliac joint arthrography. Needles made from titanium (size 20 G, MDTech, USA) were used. For image guidance a 0.23T open-configuration C arm magnet (Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, USA) with special interventional hardware and software package (I-Path 200, Marconi Medical Systems) containing an MR compatible in-room console, large-screen (36'') display, optical navigator and accompanying software with dedicated sequences was used. No other image guidance modalities were used. Results: MR-guided SIJ arthrography was successfully performed in all twenty patients without complications. The optimal imaging sequence both for preoperative and intraoperative images was 3D-Gradient Echo sequence. The dispersal of the injected saline and anaesthetic could be determined inside the joint in all cases with heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence. In the present study, 60% of the patients had significant reduction of pain after sacro-iliac joint arthrography and sacro-iliac joint was considered to be the source of patients low back pain in these patients. Conclusion: The present study shows that MR guidance with open configuration low field scanner is an accurate guiding method for sacro-iliac joint arthrography

  17. MR arthrography of elbow: evaluation of the ulnar collateral ligament of elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury of the elbow in throwing athletes by MRI and MR arthrography. Design. Ten elbows of throwing athletes were examined on both plain MRI and MR saline arthrography and the injuries subsequently surgically proven. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted and fast SE T2-weighted coronal images were obtained. Results. The UCL was unclear in all ten cases on T1-weighted MRI. In five cases an avulsion fracture was also found on T1-weighted MRI. On T2-weighted MRI, abnormal high-intensity areas were identified in or around the UCL. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, extracapsular high-intensity areas, which represent extracapsular leakage, were found in four of five cases with avulsion fracture. At surgery, all these four cases showed avulsion fractures with instability; the other case had a fracture but it was stable and adherent to the humerus. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, an extracapsular high-intensity area was found in one of the five cases without avulsion fracture. At surgery this patient had a complete tear of the UCL itself. Conclusion. MR arthrography provided additional information for evaluating the degree of UCL injury. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

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    Sahin, Guelden [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: gsahin@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Demirtas, Mehmet [Department of Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established.

  19. MR-plastination-arthrography: a new technique used to study the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique called MR plastination arthrography to study both intra- and extra-articular anatomy. In six human cadaveric lower legs MR arthrography was performed in either a one-step or two-step procedure. In the former a mixture of diluted Gadolinium and dyed polymer was injected. In the latter the dyed polymer was injected after arthrography wih diluted Gadolinium. Three-millimeter slices of these legs, obtained in a plane identical to that of the MR images, were plastinated according to the E12 technique of von Hagens. The plastination slices were subsequently compared with the MR images. The one-step procedure resulted in an inhomogeneous arthrogram. The two-step procedure resulted in a good correlation between the high-resolution MR images and plastination slices, as expressed by a good comparison of anatomic detail of the small syndesmotic recess. Images of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis obtained with plastination arthrography correlated well with images acquired by MR arthrography when performed in a two-step procedure. (orig.)

  20. MR-plastination-arthrography: a new technique used to study the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, John J.; Wentink, Noortje [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Neurosciences, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beumer, Annechien [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedics, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique called MR plastination arthrography to study both intra- and extra-articular anatomy. In six human cadaveric lower legs MR arthrography was performed in either a one-step or two-step procedure. In the former a mixture of diluted Gadolinium and dyed polymer was injected. In the latter the dyed polymer was injected after arthrography wih diluted Gadolinium. Three-millimeter slices of these legs, obtained in a plane identical to that of the MR images, were plastinated according to the E12 technique of von Hagens. The plastination slices were subsequently compared with the MR images. The one-step procedure resulted in an inhomogeneous arthrogram. The two-step procedure resulted in a good correlation between the high-resolution MR images and plastination slices, as expressed by a good comparison of anatomic detail of the small syndesmotic recess. Images of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis obtained with plastination arthrography correlated well with images acquired by MR arthrography when performed in a two-step procedure. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging arthrography of traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently arthroscopic Bankart suture repair has been performed for the traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. We investigated the use of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of anterior instability of the shoulder. The purpose of this study was to compare MR arthrography findings of an anterior inferior glenohumeral ligament-labrum complex with arthroscopic findings. Fifty shoulders with traumatic initial anterior dislocation and 50 shoulders with recurrent anterior dislocation and 10 shoulders of a control group without complaints were evaluated. Spin echo T1-weighted images in the transaxial plane and oblique coronal plane were obtained after injecting 20 ml of Gd-DTPA diluted with saline (1:100). Bankart lesion was evaluated by MR arthrography according to Hirose's classification (Type Na, Nb, 1a, 1b, 2, 3). There was a difference in the type of Bankart lesion between traumatic initial anterior dislocation and recurrent anterior dislocation. In the thickness of the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL), there was a significant correlation between traumatic initial anterior dislocation and recurrent anterior dislocation (p<0.01) although the types of Bankart lesion were not related to the number of dislocation. Secondly, MR arthrography findings were compared with the Arthroscopic findings in 97 shoulders of 97 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation. Arthroscopic findings were classified according to Kurokawa's classification (Type 1, 2n, 2a, 3n, 3a, 4a). MR arthrography findings of the Bankart lesion significantly correlated with the arthroscopic findings (p<0.01). MR arthrography clearly visualized AIGHL and was helpful in determining operative indications. (author)

  2. Direct MR arthrography in the diagnosis of injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with arthroscopy of the wrist for evaluation of injury in the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). Methods: Fourteen cases with suspicion of injury of triangular fibrocartilage complex were performed with conventional MR and direct MR arthrography, 10 cases were done by arthroscopy. In the direct MR arthrography, needle placement was obtained using clinical landmark under sterile technique and fluoroscopy, intra-articular injection was performed at the radius-scaphoid space with 5-7 ml 0.3% mixture of Gadolinium (0.1 mmol/ L) and saline(0.3 ml Gd-DTPA + 100 ml saline). The findings of MRI and MR arthrography were analyzed with results of arthroscopy. Results: (1) Among 14 cases with injury of TFCC, there were ulnar tear in 5 cases, radius tear in 4 cases, complete tear in 5 cases (included 2 cases with long term rheumatoid). (2) High signal intensity and isointensity signal of injury of TFCC were revealed on STIR or T2WI and T1WI respectively, normal hypointensity signal of the TFCC was partially or completely absent. Contrast media at the ulnar insertion (5 cases with ulnar tear) or radius attachment of the TFCC (4 cases with radius tear) were seen in the MR arthrography with different extent, 5 cases with complete tear showed contrast media at the both ulnar insertion and radius attachment of the TFCC. The findings of MR arthrography were well corresponded with results of arthroscopy on the lesion site, including ulnar tear in 3 cases, radius tear in 4 cases and complete tear in 3 cases. (3) Among 14 cases with TFCC, 8 cases had dislocation of radius-ulnar joint, 6 cases had bone contusion of radius or ulnar, synovial reaction was also clearly depicted on conventional MRI and direct MR arthrography in all cases. Conclusion: Compared with results of arthroscopy, direct MR arthrography can adequately reveal the injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, synoviat reaction and edema changes

  3. Shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography in the sagittal oblique plane: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the imaging study of choice for investigating glenohumeral instability. The axial and coronal oblique planes have traditionally been used because it is on these planes that the glenoid labrum, as well as the biceps anchor and rotator cuff, are thought to be best evaluated. The purpose of this illustrative review is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of the sagittal oblique plane in shoulder MR arthrography. Images identifying the normal and abnormal appearance of the labral, ligamentous, myotendinous and osteocartilaginous structures are presented, and comparisons to the axial and coronal oblique planes are made. (author)

  4. Experience of CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments in 512 patients has shown that this new procedure provides a reproducible method for demonstrating these ligaments and for making a confident diagnosis of abnormalities. A classification of cruciate ligament lesions into five injury types was introduced in order to distinguish the morphological CT findings. The indication for CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments is uncertainty after clinical examination. CT can help materially in deciding on treatment and in planning surgery, particularly in cases of possible knee joint instability with a long history, in recent cases with marked muscle spasm and in patients with isolated anterior ligament rupture. (orig.)

  5. Digital subtraction arthrography in preoperative evaluation of painful total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital subtraction arthrograms, scintigrams and plain radiographs of 70 consecutive patients who underwent revision hip arthroplasty were scored individually and in masked fashion for the presence or absence of features indicating loosening of femoral and/or acetabular components. The operative findings acted as the gold standard. Digital subtraction arthrography was best for predicting a loose acetabular component, while no significant additional predictive value was found for plain radiographs and scintigraphy. Digital subtraction arthrography was also the most important modality for predicting a loose femoral component, while the plain radiograph was of significant additional value and scintigraphy was of no additional value on multivariate analysis. (orig./MG)

  6. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

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    Spick, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.spick@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Reittner, Pia; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred [Diagnostikum Graz-Südwest, Weblinger Guertel 25, 8054 Graz (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess pain intensity with and without subcutaneous local anesthesia prior to intraarticular administration of contrast medium for magnetic resonance arthrography (MRa) of the shoulder. Materials and methods: This single-center study was conducted after an IRB waiver of authorization, between January 2010 and December 2012. All patients provided written, informed consent for the procedure. Our prospectively populated institutional database was searched, based on our inclusion criteria. There were 249 outpatients (178 men and 71 women; mean age, 44.4 years ± 14.6; range, 15–79) who underwent MRa and were enrolled in this study. Patients were excluded if they had received surgery of the shoulder before MRa, had undergone repeated MRa of the same shoulder, and/or had undergone MRa of both shoulders on the same day. Patients were randomly assigned into one of three groups. Patients in group A (n = 61) received skin infiltration with local anesthesia. Patients in control group B (n = 92) and group C (n = 96) did not receive local anesthesia. Pain levels were immediately assessed after the injection for MRa using a horizontal visual analog scale (VAS) that ranged from 0 to 10. To compare the pain scores of the three groups for male and female patients, a two-way analysis of variance was used. A p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a significant result. Results: Patients who received local anesthesia (group A) showed a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.3. In patients who did not receive local anesthetics (groups B and C), a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.2 and 2.7 ± 2.4 were detected, respectively. Between the three groups, no statistically significant difference in pain intensity was detected (p = .960). There were significant differences in subjective pain perception between men and women (p = .009). Moreover, the sex difference in all three groups was equal (p = .934). Conclusion: Local anesthesia is not required to

  7. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess pain intensity with and without subcutaneous local anesthesia prior to intraarticular administration of contrast medium for magnetic resonance arthrography (MRa) of the shoulder. Materials and methods: This single-center study was conducted after an IRB waiver of authorization, between January 2010 and December 2012. All patients provided written, informed consent for the procedure. Our prospectively populated institutional database was searched, based on our inclusion criteria. There were 249 outpatients (178 men and 71 women; mean age, 44.4 years ± 14.6; range, 15–79) who underwent MRa and were enrolled in this study. Patients were excluded if they had received surgery of the shoulder before MRa, had undergone repeated MRa of the same shoulder, and/or had undergone MRa of both shoulders on the same day. Patients were randomly assigned into one of three groups. Patients in group A (n = 61) received skin infiltration with local anesthesia. Patients in control group B (n = 92) and group C (n = 96) did not receive local anesthesia. Pain levels were immediately assessed after the injection for MRa using a horizontal visual analog scale (VAS) that ranged from 0 to 10. To compare the pain scores of the three groups for male and female patients, a two-way analysis of variance was used. A p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a significant result. Results: Patients who received local anesthesia (group A) showed a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.3. In patients who did not receive local anesthetics (groups B and C), a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.2 and 2.7 ± 2.4 were detected, respectively. Between the three groups, no statistically significant difference in pain intensity was detected (p = .960). There were significant differences in subjective pain perception between men and women (p = .009). Moreover, the sex difference in all three groups was equal (p = .934). Conclusion: Local anesthesia is not required to

  8. Direct magnetic resonance arthrography. Pt. I. Shoulder and elbow; Direkte MR-Arthrografie. T. I. Schulter- und Ellenbogengelenk

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    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionele Radiologie; Schmitt, Rainer [Herz- und Gefaessklinik, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging has reached high acceptance in the diagnostic work-up of joint pathologies. Direct magnetic resonance arthrography extends the capabilities of conventional MR imaging and utilizes the natural advantages gained from joint effusion. The imaging technique has been applied in the shoulder, ellbow, hand, hip, knee and ankle joints. Besides technical aspects, this article wants to discuss indications for direct MR arthrography for clinical purposes. They are based on the recommendations of the 'Arbeitsgemeinschaft Muskuloskelettale Radiologie' of the German Radiology Society. This implies recognizing the inherent strengths and weaknesses of concurring imaging modalities as a basis for the distinguished clinical use of direct MR arthrography. Part I of this article describes the techniques of arthrography and MR imaging as well as magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder and elbow. At present, a final assessment of the technique at 3 T is not possible. However, it is anticipated that the possibilities of cartilage imaging may improve considerably so that MR arthrography at 3 T will replace CT-arthrography for detection of cartilage lesions especially in small joints. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Pahwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2, 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard. Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears.

  10. Double-contrast CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in evaluating the cruciate ligaments was assessed by studying an amputated knee in order to find the most suitable position for detecting minimal defects of the ligaments. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), or both, of 60 patients (61 knees) were then examined by CT and the findings were compared with those of arthroscopy. Defects 3 mm in length were shown by CT. A sufficient quantity of air and an adequate amount of positive contrast medium were required to obtain an accurate picture of the ligaments. For the ACL, the sensitivity of CT was 96.6%, specificity was 95.5%, and accuracy was 96.1%. For the PCL, sensitivity was 78.6%, specificity was 91.7%, and accuracy was 84.6%. Ruptures of the cruciate ligaments shown by CT were classified into four types. Their CT images coincided significantly with their arthroscopic findings. This study shows double-contrast CT arthrography to be a valuable method for evaluating the cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL. (author)

  11. Arthrography of the lumber facet joint and facet block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of numerous clinical and patho-anatomical studied made in the past, there are still different opinions concerning the mechanism of low back pain. We have focused attention on the posterior structures as an alternative source of low back pain with sciatica. So we have studied and analyzed the finding of arthrography of facet joint and effect of the injection of methyprednisolone acetate suspension (Depomedrol) 20mg into the each facet joint. Our results are as follows: 1. Abnormal findings of facet joint arthrogram were degenerative osteoarthritis of facet joint (70.5%), synovial cyst (11.8%), accessory bone (11.8%), and spondylolysis (5.9%). 2. The mean facet angulations of patients of facet syndrome were abnormal on lower lumbar facet joint in 9 of 13 cases (69.2%). 3. On initial assessment, 11 of 17 cases (64.7%) showed complete relief and one month later, 6 of 11 cases (35.3%) showed continuous relief, after steroid injection.

  12. Magnetic resonance arthrography of the acetabular labral lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) is a reliable diagnostic method with high sensitivity and accuracy for acetabular labral lesion in the hip joint. This paper describes the present state and task of the method mainly based on authors' experience. Subjects are 18 patients with the lesion, whose 10 joints have dysplastic shelf (Sharp angle >45 degrees). Enhanced T1-weighted, and 3D T2 as well, MRA is conducted with the machine Signa Excite 3.0 T (GE), rapidly after injection in the joint cavity of 10-20 mL of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) 100 times-diluted by iopamidol. Abnormal MRA findings involve the labral morphology of circular edge, flatness, irregular contour and shrink/disappearance, and the image of high brightness in parenchyma, invasion of the contrast medium there, and discontinuousness between the shelf edge and labrum. The lesion predominantly exists at anterior and superior portion on the labrum and the images of ganglion and synovial cyst suggest the existence of labral tear. Normal variants can give a part of the abnormal MRA findings above, and thus who require the differential diagnosis for the lesion. Education of MRA is a task for general orthopedists. (R.T.)

  13. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

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    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  14. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  15. Ultrasound-guided injection for MR arthrography of the hip: comparison of two different techniques

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    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the two different ultrasound-guided injection techniques for MR arthrography of the hip. Fifty-nine consecutive patients (21 men, 38 women) referred for MR arthrographies of the hip were prospectively included in the study. Three patients underwent bilateral MR arthrography. The two injection techniques were quantitatively and qualitatively compared. Quantitative analysis was performed by the comparison of injected contrast material volume into the hip joint. Qualitative analysis was performed with regard to extraarticular leakage of contrast material into the soft tissues. Extraarticular leakage of contrast material was graded as none, minimal, moderate, or severe according to the MR images. Each patient rated discomfort after the procedure using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The injected contrast material volume was less in femoral head puncture technique (mean 8.9 ± 3.4 ml) when compared to femoral neck puncture technique (mean 11.2 ± 2.9 ml) (p < 0.05). The chi-squared test showed significantly more contrast leakage by femoral head puncture technique (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis showed no difference between the head and neck puncture groups in terms of feeling of pain (p = 0.744) or in the body mass index (p = 0.658) of the patients. The femoral neck injection technique provides high intraarticular contrast volume and produces less extraarticular contrast leakage than the femoral head injection technique when US guidance is used for MR arthrography of the hip. (orig.)

  16. Arthrography, ultrasound and MR imaging in the evaluation of the rotator cuff: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of arthrography, ultrasound and MR imaging in rotator cuff disease. Methods: 40 patients suffering from subacromial impingement syndrome for at least three months and who were selected for surgery, underwent ultrasound, bouble-contrast arthrography and MR imaging. Patient preselection focused on partial and small complete tears. Results: 13/26 surgically confirmed tears were partial tears (articular surface: 10, bursal surface: 2, intrasubstance tearing: 1). Arthrography, ultrasound and MR imaging yield a sensitivity for complete tears of 91%, 69% and 92% with a specificity of 100%, 93% and 93%. For partial tears sensitivity was 50%, 69% and 69% with a specificity of 100%, 79% and 86%. Concerning evaluation of localisation, extent and correct classification ultrasound was correct in 17/26 cases, MR in 21/26 cases. Conclusion: Arthrography is not helpful in detecting partial tears. Ultrasound and MR imaging yield comparable accuracy. MR imaging has advantages concerning better evaluation of extent, location and classification as well as for the detection of associated pathologies. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic anatomy and technique for arthrography of the cubital joint in clinically normal dogs

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    A technique for arthrography of the cubital joint in clinically normal large-breed dogs was developed with the objective of improving visualization of the articular margin of the medial coronoid process. A lateral approach to the cubital joint for injection of contrast medium was selected. Arthrography of 24 cubital joints was performed by using 14 dogs. Twelve combinations of iodinated contrast medium, consisting of various concentrations (3) and volumes (4), were used. Two sets of arthrograms for each of the 12 combinations of contrast medium were obtained. Five radiographic views were used for each set. All arthrograms were examined by 3 evaluators, and each articular surface received a numerical rating for how well it could be seen in each view. Results of the evaluation indicated that low volumes of contrast medium were preferable to high volumes, with 2 ml providing the best visualization. Concentration of iodine seemed less important than did volume. The numerical ratings also indicated that the articular margin of the coronoid process was clearly observed a maximum of only 24% of the time on a slightly supinated mediolateral projection. The articular margins of the head of the radius, trochlea humeri, and trochlear notch were well visualized > 90% of the time. Arthrography of the cubital joint was technically easy to perform, and complications were not encountered, but arthrographic anatomy of the cubital joint is complex. Potential uses for arthrography of the cubital joint include diagnosis of osteochondrosis, intraarticular fragments, and joint capsule ruptures

  18. MR imaging of plica synovialis mediopatellaris. Efficacy of intraarticular MR arthrography with saline administration

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    Kobayashi, Yuko; Yamamoto, Kanae [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). Tama-Nagayama Hospital; Tajima, Natsuki; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1997-10-01

    In order to determine the efficacy of MR imaging with intraarticular administration of saline (saline-MR arthrography) for detecting and diagnosing plica synovialis mediopatellaris (PSM), saline-MR arthrography was performed on 12 knees of 10 patients with arthroscopically proven PSM. Conventional MRI was also performed on 8 knees of 6 patients. On T{sub 2}-weighted images, evidence of PSM was detected in 10 knees using saline-MR arthrography as a low signal intensity band between the patella and the medial femoral condyle, whereas evidence of PSM was detected in only 2 knees using conventional MRI. Comparing arthroscopic findings with MRI findings, saline-MR arthrographic findings concurred with arthroscopic findings in 9 of 12 knees with PSM, whereas conventional MRI findings concurred with arthroscopic findings in only 2 of the 12 knees with PSM. In conclusion, our findings suggest that saline-MR arthrography is more useful than conventional MRI for detection of PSM, and shows better correlation with arthroscopic findings. (author)

  19. Labral-Ligamentous Complex of the Shoulder. Evaluation with double oblique axial MR arthrography. Technical Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the ability of double oblique axial (DOA) MR arthrography in evaluating labral-ligamentous complex compared with conventional axial (CA) MR arthrography. Material and Methods: MR arthrography of 51 shoulders, subsequently examined with arthroscopy, were retrospectively reviewed. DOA imaging was performed in all 51 shoulders and both DOA and CA imaging in 37 using a 1.5 T unit with gradient recalled-echo T2*-weighted sequences. DOA imaging was performed using perpendicular planes to the long axis of the glenoid fossa obtained by an oblique sagittal scout image. We compared the ability of DOA with that of CA MR arthrography to assess labral injuries and to demonstrate the whole length of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL), which were shown to be intact by arthroscopy. Results: For anterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 93% with CA, and 94% and 100% with DOA imaging, respectively. For posterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 47% and 100% with CA, and 79% and 96% with DOA imaging, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between CA and DOA images, except for the ability to diagnose posterior labral injuries, where DOA imaging had a significant superior sensitivity (p = 0.0327). DOA images also demonstrated the whole length of the intact AIGHL in 10 of 11 shoulders, while CA imaging showed this in only 3 of 11. Conclusion: DOA imaging was equal or better than CA imaging for evaluating the labral-ligamentous complex

  20. Prospective, double-blind comparison of shoulder MR imaging, US, arthrography, and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the efficacy of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of shoulder pain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, ultrasonography (US) and arthrography were prospectively compared in a double-blind experimental protocol. Thirty consecutive patients were studied by these modalities, which received separate, blinded interpretations. The images and interpretations were sealed in an envelope and blinded from the arthroscopist for initial arthroscopy, but second-look arthroscopy, and in some cases open surgery, was performed after the envelopes were unsealed. To avoid selection bias, negative MR and/or US examinations never affected confirmation by arthrography and/or arthroscopy, so negatives and positives were equivalently tested. To date, MR imaging and US are equally sensitive in the detection of rotator cuff tears, but the combination is more sensitive. Both MR imaging and US demonstrated tears not diagnosed by means of arthrography, and MR imaging distinguished hemorrhagic muscle tears from rotator cuff tears, which arthrography and arthroscopy did not. Both MR imaging and US showed characteristic appearances of biceps tendonitis, but neither demonstrated adhesive capsulitis. The authors conclude that all three imaging modalities have a role in shoulder diagnosis

  1. Comparison of radiographic and radionuclide hip arthrography in determination of femoral component loosening of hip arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic examination of a patient experiencing pain following total hip arthroplasty is an important step in the systematic approach to evaluating component loosening, even though the information yielded is often equivocal and nondiagnostic in assessing component loosening. The radiographic criteria for loosening are especially difficult to assess following revision surgery, for radiolucent lines frequently exist at the bone-cement interface immediately following implantation. The advent of noncemented hip prostheses poses another problem: the routinely noted disruption of bone-cement of prosthesis-cement interfaces is not present with uncemented prostheses. As the criteria for loosening of the noncemented prostheses are still evolving, plain radiographic examination is frequently nondiagnostic. Femoral component loosening is difficult to detect with standard contrast arthrography because the bone, metal, surrounding radiopaque cement and contrast agents have similar or identical radiographic appearances. In contrast arthrography, if the prosthesis is loose the injected agent opacifies the radiolucent zone encircling the prosthesis or cement mangle. Because of the similarity in the appearances of these agents and the surrounding structures on x-ray films, interpretation is difficult. The inclusion of subtraction techniques in routine contrast arthrography has improved its accuracy; however, these techniques require special equipment and demand precise patient positioning. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new form of hip arthrography using a radionuclide agent in place of the contrast agent. A comparison of the results using these two techniques is presented

  2. Ultrasound versus Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Acetabular Labral Tear Diagnostics: A Prospective Comparison in 20 Dysplastic Hips

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    Troelsen, A.; Jacobsen, S.; Bolvig, L.; Gelineck, J.; Roemer, L.; Soeballe, K. [Orthopedic Research Unit and Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Aarhus, A arhus (Denmark)

    2007-11-15

    Background: Acetabular labral tears are highly associated with hip dysplasia. Magnetic resonance arthrography (MR arthrography) is the expensive and time-consuming contemporary gold-standard method in the radiological assessment of acetabular labral tears. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic ability of noninvasive ultrasound (US) examination compared to MR arthrography in diagnosing acetabular labral tears in dysplastic hip joints. Material and Methods: The study compared US examination and MR arthrography diagnosis of labral tears in 20 consecutively referred dysplastic hip joints. Results: The ability to diagnose acetabular labral tears upon US examination was calculated: sensitivity 44%, specificity 75%, positive predictive value 88%, and negative predictive value 25%. Conclusion: The ability of US examination in diagnosing acetabular labral tears is not yet good enough. The technique is still to be developed, and more experience, especially with the interpretation of US examinations, is needed.

  3. Evaluation of lesions of the internal ligaments of the wrist; conventional magnetic resonance imaging versus MR arthrography (MRA

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    Heba Ahmed Kamal

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: MR arthrography is a potent additional tool facilitating the diagnosis of different pathologic entities affecting the major internal ligaments of the wrist joint and helps to reduce arthroscopic interventions.

  4. Ankle ligamints : comparison of MR arthrography with conventional MR imaging in amputated feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with conventional MR imaging in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Eight freshly amputated human feet underwent conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography. For the former, 1.5-T magnets in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were used, and T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Following the injection of 6-10 ml of diluted contrast media (Gd-DTPA 1:250), T1-weighted images were obtained in the same positions as conventional MR images. Paired conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography of each ankle ligament were rated on a five-point scale, and to reflect inter-group differences a Wilcoxon singed-rank test was used to compare the different measurements (p<0.05). In two ankles, MR images of the ligaments were correlated with ankle dissection. Anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments were more clearly revealed by MR arthrography than by conventional MR imaging, while calcaneofibular ligaments showed no difference between these two modalities. With regard to deltoid ligaments, visualization of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament was much improved when contrast material was used to outline the ligament's articular aspect. Visualization of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and inferior transverse ligament were also improved when the use of contrast material provided delineation of the articular side of the ligaments and separated them from adjacent bone. In addition, MR arthography was very useful for indentification of the posterior intermalleolar ligament, though its use did not enhance visualization of the calcaneofibular, tibiocalcaneal, spring or tibiospring ligaments. MR arthrography accurately revealed the anatomic details of ankle ligaments, and may therefore be more useful than conventional Mr imaging for evaluation of these structures

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic impact of MRI and arthrography in the investigation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of shoulder pain is important before surgical treatment. The presence or absence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (FTRCT) may determine the type of surgical treatment. Both MRI and conventional arthrography can be used, but little is known about their relative diagnostic and therapeutic impact. We performed a prospective trial assessing: (a) the influence of MRI and arthrography results on the clinician's diagnostic thinking (diagnostic impact); (b) the influence of the results on the clinician's therapeutic thinking (therapeutic impact); and (c) the diagnostic performance of the two techniques in patients with surgical confirmation. A total of 104 consecutive patients with shoulder problems referred to a specialist orthopaedic shoulder clinic underwent pre-operative investigation with MRI and arthrography. The surgeon's diagnosis, diagnostic confidence and planned treatment were measured before the investigation, and then again after the results of each investigation. Before the presentation of the investigation results, the patients were randomised into two groups. In one group MRI was presented first; in the other group, arthrography. The MRI results led to fewer changes in diagnostic category (14 of 46, 30 %) than arthrography (20 of 54, 37 %), but the difference was not significant (P > 0.5). Magnetic resonance imaging led to slightly more changes in planned management (17 of 47, 36 %) than arthrography (14 of 55, 25 %), but again the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.3). The results of the second investigation always had less diagnostic and therapeutic impact than the first. The accuracy of MRI for FTRCT in 38 patients with surgical confirmation was 79 %, sensitivity 81 % and specificity 78 %; the accuracy of arthrography was 82 %, sensitivity 50 % and specificity 96 %. The clinical diagnosis and management plan can be adequately defined by a single radiological investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthrography

  6. The value of contrast and subtraction arthrography in the assessment of aseptic loosening of total hip prostheses: A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize and compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast and subtraction arthrography in the assessment of aseptic loosening of total hip arthroplasties. Design: This meta-analysis was performed using methods described by the Cochrane Methods Group on Systematic Reviews of Screening and Diagnostic Tests. We included original, English-language papers published between January 1975 to October 2004 that examined contrast-enhanced arthrography with or without subtraction for diagnosis of loosening of total hip prostheses. A qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed by two investigators. Results: With regard to the acetabular component, pooled sensitivity and specificity for contrast arthrography was 70% (95% confidence interval, 52-84) and 74% (95% CI, 53-87), respectively. Subtraction arthrography had a significantly higher sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 84-93) (p = 0.01), with a similar specificity of 76% (95% CI, 68-82). For the femoral component, pooled sensitivity and specificity for contrast arthrography were 63% (95% CI, 53-72) and 78% (95% CI, 68-86). Pooled estimates for subtraction arthrography revealed a significantly higher sensitivity of 86% (95% CI, 74-93) (p = 0.003). Specificity was 85% (95% CI, 77-91) and was similar to the data of contrast arthrography (p = 0.23). Conclusion: Using the present data we found that the subtraction arthrography is a sensitive technique for detection of loosening of total hip prostheses, offering added value over contrast arthrography, especially for evaluation of the femoral component

  7. Anterior labral tear: diagnostic value of MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of anterior labral tear of the shoulder Between september 1996 and February 2000, MR arthrography of the shoulder was performed in 281 patients with a history of shoulder pain or instability. Among this total, only 157 shoulders in 154 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery 0 to 230 (average, 20.9) days after MR arthrography were included in this study; the subjects comprised of 150 males and 4 females with an average age of 23.3 years. MR arthrographs of these 154 patients were analyzed for the presence of anterior labral tears, and the findings were correlated with the arthroscopic and surgical findings. Anterior labral tear was classified as A to D according to its location, as determined by arthroscopy and surgery. (A=4 to 6 o'clock direction, anteroinferior; B=2 to 4 o'clock direction, central; C=12 to 2 o'clock direction, anterosuperior; D= SLAP lesion). The retrospective analysis of MR arthrographs showing false-positive and negative findings was also underthken.. In the diagnosis of anterior labral tear, MR arthrography showed a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and an accuracy of 91%. Anterior labral tears were confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery in 62 of the 157 shoulders (39%). Among 62 lesion, two (3%) were observed in area A, 32(52%) in area A+B, nine (15%) in area A+B+C, one(2%) in area A+B+D,13(21%) in area A+B+C+D, two (3%) in area B+C, one(2%) in area B+D, and two(3%) in area C. Among ten false-positive cases, seven were focal lessions (two, three and two lesions in area A, B and C, respectively), and in the remaining three cases, lacated in area A+B, MR arthrography revealed thickening and deformation. All four false negatives were focal lesions (two in area A and two in area C). Other than in focal lesions, in which accuracy was relatively low, MR arthrography showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of anterior labral tear

  8. 3.0 T conventional hip MR and hip MR arthrography for the acetabular labral tears confirmed by arthroscopy

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    Tian, Chun-Yan [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Jian-Quan [Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191,PR China (China); Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao, E-mail: zzhuozhao@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Ren, A.-Hong [Department of Radiology, Beijing Daxing Hospital, 26 West Huangcun Road, Daxing District, Beijing 102600 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • MR is the preferred imaging modality for diagnosing acetabular labral tears. • The diagnostic performance of MR arthrography are superior than conventional hip MR. • The hip MR arthrography is recommended for diagnosing acetabular labral lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the value of hip MR for diagnosing acetabular labrum tears, and to further compare the diagnostic performances of conventional MR with MR arthrography in acetabular labrum tears. Methods: 90 patients undergoing both hip MR examination and subsequent hip arthroscopy were retrospectively evaluated. Of these patients, 34 accepted both conventional MR and MR arthrography; while the other 56 only underwent conventional MR examination. All hip MR images were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and further compared with the results of hip arthroscopy. Results: 59 of 90 patients were confirmed with acetabular labral tears by hip arthroscopy and 31 without tears. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of conventional MR for evaluating the acetabular labral tears were 61.0%, 77.4%, 83.7% and 51.1% (radiologist A), and 66.1%, 74.2%, 82.9% and 53.4% (radiologist B), respectively, with good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.645). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of MR arthrography for assessing the acetabular labral tears were 90.5%, 84.6%, 90.5% and 84.6% (radiologist A), and 95.2%, 84.6%, 90.9% and 91.7% (radiologist B), respectively, with excellent good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.810). The sensitivity and NPV of MR arthrography for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears were significantly higher than those of conventional MR (both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Hip MR arthrography is a reliable evaluation modality for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears, and its diagnostic performance is superior to that of conventional MR at 3.0 T.

  9. Depiction of the triangular fibro-cartilage in patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain: comparison of direct multi-slice CT arthrography and direct MR arthrography

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    Omlor, Georg; Jung, Martin [Orthopaedic University Hospital, Department of Hand and Elbow Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Grieser, Thomas; Ludwig, Karl [Orthopaedic University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    To compare direct multi-slice CT arthrography (MSCT-AG) and direct MR arthrography (MR-AG) of the wrist with regard to the depiction of the triangular fibro-cartilage (TFC). Fifteen consecutive patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain suspicious for TFC tear underwent both MSCT-AG and MR-AG of the wrist. Images obtained were evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded fashion for the depiction of six anatomical areas (radial, central and ulnar portion on the proximal and distal side) of the TFC by means of a five-point scoring system (1= excellent visibility to 5= not visible). Scores for MSCT-AG and MR-AG were compared using the Student's t-test. Mean scores for MSCT-AG and MR-AG, respectively, were 2.5/2.0, 3.2/2.5 and 2.8/2.4 for the radial, central and ulnar portion of the TFC on its proximal side, and 2.7/2.0, 3.1/2.3 and 2.9/2.4 for the radial, central and ulnar portion on its distal side (n=15). Paired Student's t-test showed no significant difference between MSCT-AG and MR-AG (P>0.05). In a first, small series, depiction of the TFC with MSCT-AG is comparable to that of MR-AG. Further evaluation of direct multi-slice CT arthrography of the wrist in a larger patient population would be promising. (orig.)

  10. Depiction of the triangular fibro-cartilage in patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain: comparison of direct multi-slice CT arthrography and direct MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare direct multi-slice CT arthrography (MSCT-AG) and direct MR arthrography (MR-AG) of the wrist with regard to the depiction of the triangular fibro-cartilage (TFC). Fifteen consecutive patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain suspicious for TFC tear underwent both MSCT-AG and MR-AG of the wrist. Images obtained were evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded fashion for the depiction of six anatomical areas (radial, central and ulnar portion on the proximal and distal side) of the TFC by means of a five-point scoring system (1excellent visibility to 5= not visible). Scores for MSCT-AG and MR-AG were compared using the Student's t-test. Mean scores for MSCT-AG and MR-AG, respectively, were 2.5/2.0, 3.2/2.5 and 2.8/2.4 for the radial, central and ulnar portion of the TFC on its proximal side, and 2.7/2.0, 3.1/2.3 and 2.9/2.4 for the radial, central and ulnar portion on its distal side (n=15). Paired Student's t-test showed no significant difference between MSCT-AG and MR-AG (P>0.05). In a first, small series, depiction of the TFC with MSCT-AG is comparable to that of MR-AG. Further evaluation of direct multi-slice CT arthrography of the wrist in a larger patient population would be promising. (orig.)

  11. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

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    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important.

  12. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Comparison of conventional radiography, MR imaging, bone scintigraphy and arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study of 22 patients (24 hips) with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) the findings at conventional radiography, arthrography, bone scintigraphy and MR imaging, obtained at the time of diagnosis, were compared. MR was superior to conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy in the detection of the extent of involvement in the femoral head. Arthrography was as good as or better than MR imaging in determining the shape of the articular surfaces and the occurrence of lateral subluxation. Conventional radiography was less sensitive in identifying the degree of lateral subluxation and the extent of the necrosis in the femoral head. MR imaging provided anatomical and pathophysiological information about the extent and location of head involvement as well as the degree of lateral subluxation. Revascularisation was more clearly demonstrated with MR than with bone scintigraphy, irrespective of symptom duration. (orig.)

  13. Chronic ankle instability: evaluation with stress radiography, CT and CT arthrography

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    We retrospectively evaluated the anterior talo-fibular ligament and the tarsal sinus of 17 patients who had complained of chronic ankle external instability. This study based on both surgery and CT-arthrography findings shows the pathologic or normal aspects of the talo-fibular anterior ligament (normal, lax, fibrosis residue, ruptured). It confirms the good anatomic analysis of the tarsal sinus, i particular the anterior talo-calcaneal interosseous ligament and the search for fibrosis. We underline that capsular distension due to subtalar laxity is not detected with medical imaging. Compared with surgery (all patients), CT arthrography demonstrated the different aspects of the anterior talo fibular ligament injuries (normal, lax, discontinuous). (authors)

  14. Shoulder arthrography: comparison of morbidity after use of various contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study compares immediate and delayed patient discomfort in 177 patients following shoulder arthrography using intraarticular combinations of metrizamide, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, meglumine diatrizoate, lidocaine, epinephrine, and air. Patients receiving conventional ionic monomeric positive contrast media had a 60% (90/150) incidence of moderate or severe delayed exacerbation of their baseline symptoms; only 14% (3/21) of patients receiving metrizamide, a nonionic contrast medium had similar levels of postprocedural discomfort. Morbidity was somewhat diminished with the use of double-contrast (45%, 34/75) rather than single-contrast (75%, 56/75) examinations, and with avoidance of sodium-containing contrast agents or epinephrine. Nonionic or monovalent polymeric contrast media, despite their present high cost, may be the agents of choice if single-contrast arthrography is performed in joints associated with a high incidence of postprocedural pain

  15. Shoulder Manipulation After Distention Arthrography: Does Audible Cracking Affect Improvement in Adhesive Capsulitis? A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jun Kyu; Son, Seok Beom; Park, Bum Jun; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether an audible cracking sound during shoulder manipulation following distention arthrography is clinically significant in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Methods A total of 48 patients (31 women, 17 men) with primary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder completed the study. All participants underwent C-arm-guided arthrographic distention of the glenohumeral joint with injections of a corticosteroid and normal saline. After distention, we performe...

  16. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, Jan E. [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Mahachie John, Jestinah M. [University of Hasselt, Centre for Statistics, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Gelin, Geert [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder. (orig.)

  17. Normal anatomy and common labral lesions at MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR arthrography of the shoulder is the most accurate imaging modality in demonstrating abnormalities of the glenoid labrum and associated structures. Tears of the labrum, the capsule or the gleno-humeral ligaments can lead to pain, catching, popping or instability. The anatomy of this region is complex. We present the normal anatomy of the glenoid labrum, biceps anchor and gleno-humeral ligaments together with their normal variants and then describe common labral-ligamentous pathologies

  18. Abduction and external rotation (ABER) MR arthrography of the shoulder. Benefits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to show the benefits and limitations of using abduction and external rotation (ABER) positions of the arm during MR arthrography of the shoulder in the evaluation of the rotator-cuff tendon, the capsulolabral complex and the shoulder joint after surgery. Forty-seven patients complaining of either shoulder instability, chronic shoulder pain, pain of unknown cause or pain following shoulder surgery were studied using the direct MR arthrography technique in both the standard neutral position with the arm adducted as well as with the arm in the ABER position. A correlation was obtained between the MR arthrography findings and the surgical findings in 10 reports and clinical presentations of the examined patients. Three patients [6%] were unable to perform ABER positioning. ABER oblique axial images were better than standard oblique coronal images in revealing undersurface tears of the rotator cuff particularly of the grade I type. Four tears were missed in standard images. Oblique axial images were better than standard axial images in demonstrating non-displaced anterior labral tears. One tear was missed and two tears were suspected in the standard images. Oblique axial images were less sensitive than oblique coronal images in the diagnosis of superior labral tears. Two tears were missed in ABER images. The ABER oblique axial MR arthrogram is a useful adjunct to the standard axial and oblique coronal MR arthrograms for assessment of capsulolabral abnormalities and rotator-cuff tendon tears despite some limitations. (author)

  19. Fluoroscopically-Guided Posterior Approach for Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: Comparison with Conventional Anterior Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the fluoroscopically-guided posterior approach compared with the anterior approach for shoulder magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Among 60 shoulder MR arthrographies performed on 59 patients with symptomatic shoulders, an intra-articular injection was performed (30 cases using the anterior approach and 30 using the posterior approach). Procedure-related pain was assessed by using a 5 score visual analogue scale (VAS). Depth of the puncture and standardized depth of puncture by body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The contrast leakage along the course of the puncture was evaluated by reviewing the MR. The statistical analyses included the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test. There was no significant difference in VAS scores between the anterior and posterior groups (1.77 ± 1.10 vs. 1.80 ± 0.96). Depth of puncture and standardized depth of puncture by BMI were significantly shorter in the posterior group than those in the anterior group (4.4 ± 0.8 cm and 1.8 ± 0.3 cm vs. 6.6 ± 0.9 cm and 2.8 ± 0.4 cm, p < 0.001), respectively. The incidence of contrast leakage was more frequent in the posterior group (p = 0.003). The posterior approach will be useful in shoulder MR arthrography with a suspected anterior pathology, a postoperative follow-up study or obese patient.

  20. Diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography and 1.5T MR-arthrography for the assessment of glenohumeral joint cartilage: a comparative study with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omoumi, Patrick [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Rubini, Alexandra; Berg, Bruno C. vande; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of multi-detector CT arthrography (CTA) and 1.5-T MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting hyaline cartilage lesions of the shoulder, with arthroscopic correlation. CTA and MRA prospectively obtained in 56 consecutive patients following the same arthrographic procedure were independently evaluated for glenohumeral cartilage lesions (modified Outerbridge grade ≥2 and grade 4) by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The cartilage surface was divided in 18 anatomical areas. Arthroscopy was taken as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA was compared using ROC analysis. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement was determined by κ statistics. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA varied from 46.4 to 82.4 % and from 89.0 to 95.9 % respectively; sensitivity and specificity of MRA varied from 31.9 to 66.2 % and from 91.1 to 97.5 % respectively. Diagnostic performance of CTA was statistically significantly better than MRA for both readers (all p ≤ 0.04). Interobserver agreement for the evaluation of cartilage lesions was substantial with CTA (κ = 0.63) and moderate with MRA (κ = 0.54). Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect with both CTA (κ = 0.94-0.95) and MRA (κ = 0.83-0.87). The diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA for the detection of glenohumeral cartilage lesions is moderate, although statistically significantly better with CTA. (orig.)

  1. Direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder with maximum capsular distension for surgical planning; Direkte MR-Arthrographie des Schultergelenks mit maximaler Kapseldistension zur OP-Planung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, R.; Rothenburg, T. von; Koester, O.; Schmid, G. [Universitaet Bochum (Germany). Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Ludwig, J. [Universitaet Bochum (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopaedie und Unfallchirurgie

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of direct MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with maximum distension of the joint capsule in patients with glenohumeral instability for preoperative diagnosis and for determining the method of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: MR arthrography of the shoulder joint was performed on a 1.5 T system in 38 patients. All patients suffered from anterior or bidirectional instability. Using a fluoroscopically guided posterior approach, a 1% dilution of dimeglumine gadopentetate (5 mmol Gd-DTPA/l) was injected until full capsular stretching was achieved. MR imaging protocol included fat-saturated transversal, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo, T1-weighted 3-D and transversal T2-weighted Flash-2D. Results: MR imaging revealed significant capsule distention in 22 patients and ventral capsule defects in 9 patients. Labral lesions were depicted in 25 patients, bicipital tendon lesions in 4 patients and partial ruptures of the rotator cuff in 3 patients. 15 of the 38 patients underwent surgery. Areas of pathologic laxity of the glenohumeral capsule were correctly described in all cases. In 12 of 15 patients, the best method of intervention could be determined prospectively. In 3 of 15 patients, the necessary operation was overestimated. Regarding labral ruptures, MRI had a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 86%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 87%. (orig.)

  2. Femoral head shape in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Correlation between conventional radiography, arthrography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenthy-three children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease were examined to determine the femoral head shape. We evaluated and correlated conventional radiography, arthrography and MR imaging. In the a.p. view, measurements were obtained from the center of the femoral head along the bony or cartilaginous outline at 30 intervals. Maximum flattening of the cartilaginous outline appeared laterally, 60 from the center of the baseline of the epiphyseal index and the caput index. Maximum flattening of the bony outline was found at 75 . Arthrography and MR imaging gave the same information about the shape of the femoral head cartilage. The bony femoral head shape on conventional radiographs in the a.p. view did not reflect the cartilage shape obtained by MR and arthrography. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography in patients with unilateral wrist pain: findings and implications for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography was performed in 30 patients with unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain to assess the incidence of bilateral findings. The mean age of patients was 30 (range 18-55) years. Thirty-three percent of patients were normal bilaterally, 30% had unilateral communication in the symptomatic wrist, 30% had communications in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic wrists and 7% had communication in the asymptomatic wrist only. Unilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography is not recommended in the assessment of unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain; no advantage of three-compartment injection over radiocarpal injection alone was shown. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic value of US, CT arthrography, and 0.5-T MR imaging of lesions of the biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the role of US, CT-arthrography, and MR imaging in lesions in the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii and bicipital groove. One hundred fifty-four patients with painful shoulder were prospectively studied by means of US and axial CT-arthrography, and 45 of them were also examined with 0.5-T MR imaging. Fifty-three (34.4%) patients showed biceps tendon or bicipital groove abnormalities; including 34 bicipital groove bone spurs, 31 cases of tendinitis, eight intraarticular ruptures, four subluxations, and eight medial dislocations

  5. The preliminary application of magnetic resonance arthrography in the diagnosis of acetabular labrale tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the application value of MR arthrography (MRA) in the diagnosis of acetabular lab ral tears. Methods: Fifteen patients with a high degree of suspected acetabular lab ral tears received fluoroscope-guided injection of the contrast media into the hip joint (hip arthrography) and fat-saturated spin-echo T1-weighted images were obtained in the coronal, sagittal, oblique-axial and radial planes. Hip arthroscopy was performed on 12 of them. Results: Lab ral tears which were diagnosed in 11 patients by hip MRA were confirmed at hip arthroscopy. One patient showed no MRA indication of lab ral tear, also showed normal on arthroscopy. Tear in the anterior-superior quadrant 10 cases of 12 joints (12/13), posterior-superior quadrant 1 case of a joint (1/13). In 11 patients who underwent arthroscopy, hip MRA diagnosed 3 (3/13) joints labrale tears in coronal planes, 10 (10/13) joints in sagittal planes and 13 (13/13) labrale tears in axial-oblique and radial planes. In 15 patients with 20 hip joints, 5 cases 6 joints (6/20) with normal acetabular sublabral sulcus were performed. Conclusions: MR arthrography of hip is a reliable method in the diagnosis of acetabular labrale tears. Scanning method should be included fat-saturated spin-echo T1-weighted images in sagittal and oblique-axial planes or sagittal plus radial planes. The diagnosis of torn posterior-inferior quadrant should pay attention to the existence of a normal variation. (authors)

  6. Displaceability of SLAP lesion on shoulder MR arthrography with external rotation position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the usefulness of the external rotation (ER) position on magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography for the diagnosis of superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. Approval of institutional review board was obtained, and informed consent was waived. The MR arthrograms of 210 shoulders that were arthroscopically confirmed as SLAP lesion in 163 shoulders and intact superior labrum in 47 shoulders were retrospectively reviewed in each neutral and ER position for the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, the extent of distraction of the torn labrum, and the external rotation angle. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrograms for determining SLAP lesion were assessed in each position. For the arthroscopically confirmed group, the diagnosis of SLAP lesion and the extent of distraction about the tear were compared between neutral and ER positions by Fisher's exact test and the paired t-test. The correlation between the external rotation angle and the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, and between the external rotation angle and the differences in the extent of distraction were evaluated in the ER position using the ANOVA test. Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrography for SLAP lesion increased from 64.4% and 71.0% in the neutral position to 78.5% and 81.9% in the ER position, respectively, without change of specificity, which was 93.6% in both positions. The diagnosis of SLAP lesion was changed from negative to SLAP lesion in 16.0% of the arthroscopically confirmed group. Mean difference in the extent of distraction about the tear was 0.69 mm (range -1.40 ∝ 6.67 mm), which was statistically significant. There was no relationship between the external rotation angle and the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, and between the external rotation angle and the differences in the extent of distraction. Shoulder MR arthrography with additional ER positioning helps in the diagnosis of SLAP lesion and provides information about the displaceability of

  7. Indications for CT and MR arthrography. Recommendations of the Musculoskeletal Workgroup of the DRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ongoing discussion about CT and MR arthrography is at least in part due to the lack of definite guidelines. The intention of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft) was the establishment of recommendations for general guidance. After review of the recent literature, the indications for arthrographic examinations were discussed during a consensus meeting. Since the published data are insufficient and partially contradictory, no precise statements could be extracted from the literature. Therefore, the proposed recommendations are mainly based on expert opinions. In this review the main statements of the published literature are summarized and the recommendations of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG are presented. (orig.)

  8. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  9. Use of anesthetic arthrography in the identification of the source of chronic posttraumatic hindfoot disability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective anesthetic arthrography was performed in 18 patients to define precisely the source of chronic posttraumatic hindfoot pain. A solution composed of local anesthetic and iodinated contrast material was injected into the hindfoot articulations, and the clinical response was determined. Although there was close correlation between pain relief and abnormalities depicted with both routine radiography and CT, both imaging methods tended to underestimate the severity of articular involvement, and plain film findings in five patients were misleading as to the site of pain origin. Long-term follow-up evaluation in nine patients who underwent arthrodesis on the basis of arthrographic findings indicated satisfactory results in eight

  10. Importance of transthoracic X-ray in arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in this era of sonography, arthrography of the shoulder is an important diagnostic investigation, making it possible to exclude unrecognized connective tissue lesions in patients with chronic shoulder pain resisant to therapy. Sometimes standard X-ray techniques do not yield all the information the surgeon needs about ventral or dorsal localization of a rotator-cuff rupture. An Additional approach to the joint is needed: A transthoracic lateral-view X-ray provides the surgeon with adequate information to help in selection of the most appropriate operative approach to the shoulder. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of Labral Pathology and Hip Articular Cartilage in Patients with Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI): Comparison of Multidetector CT Arthrography and MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) arthrography (CTa) and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography (MRa) findings with surgical findings in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of these methods. Labral pathology and articular cartilage were prospectively evaluated with MRa and CTa in 14 hips of 14 patients. The findings were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists with 10 and 20 years of experience, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value were determined using surgical findings as the standard of reference. While the disagreement between observers was recorded in two cases of labral tearing with MRa, there was a complete consensus with CTa. Disagreement between observers was found in four cases of femoral cartilage loss with both MRa and CTa. Disagreement was also recorded in only one case of acetabular cartilage loss with both methods. The percent sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for correctly assessing the labral tearing were as follows for MRa/CTa, respectively: 100/100, 50/100, 86/100 (p<0.05). The same values for acetabular cartilage assessment were 89/56, 40/60, 71/71 (p>0.05) and for femoral cartilage assessment were 100/75, 90/70, 86/71 (p>0.05). Inter-observer reliability value showed excellent agreement for labral tearing with CTa (κ=1.0). Inter-observer agreement was substantial to excellent with regard to acetabular cartilage assessment with MRa and CTa (κ=0.76 for MRa and κ=0.86 for CTa) Inter-observer reliability with CTa is excellent for labral tearing assessment. CTa seems to have an equal sensitivity and a higher specificity than MRa for the detection of labral pathology. MRa is better, but not statistically significantly, in demonstrating acetabular and femoral cartilage pathology

  12. Evaluation of patellar cartilage surface lesions: comparison of CT arthrography and fat-suppressed FLASH 3D MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daenen, B.R.; Ferrara, M.A.; Marcelis, S.; Dondelinger, R.F. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of fat-suppressed fast low-angle shot (FLASH) 3D MR imaging in the detection of patellar cartilage surface lesions in comparison with CT arthrography. Fifty patients, with or without symptoms of chondromalacia, were prospectively examined by CT arthrography and fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo MR imaging. All MR examinations were evaluated by three observers, two of them reaching a consensus interpretation. The lesions were graded according to their morphology and their extent. The CT arthrography was considered as the reference examination. For both sets of observers, the final diagnosis of chondromalacia was obtained in 92.5 %. The specificity was 60 % on a patient-by-patient basis. Fissures were missed in 83 and 60 %, respectively, but were isolated findings only in 2.5 % of the cases. Considering ulcers involving more than 50 % of the cartilage thickness, 65 and 88 %, respectively, were recognized. Fat-suppressed FLASH 3D is an adequate pulse sequence for the detection of patellar cartilage ulcers. It can be applied on a routine clinical basis, but it does not show as many fissures as CT arthrography and is less precise for grading of lesions. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 21 refs.

  13. The value of conventional radiograph, CT, MR arthrography in diagnosis of traumatic rotator-cuff tears of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the conventional arthrography(CA), CT arthrography(CTA), and MR arthrography (MRA) in diagnosis of traumatic rotator-cuff tears of the shoulder. Methods: Twenty patients with traumatic rotator-cuff tears confirmed by arthroscopy were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Glenohumeral joints were punctured percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance, and 15-20 ml of mixed contrast were injected [10 ml of iodinated contrast (Omnipaque) mixed with 20 ml of 3 mmol/L gadopentetate dimeglumine solution(3 ml of 0.5 mol/L Magnevist in 500 ml of normal saline)] ,and then CA, CTA and MRA was taken within 45 minutes. Result: 100% (9/9) of diagnostic accuracy was obtained in any of conventional, CT or MR shoulder arthrography in the state of complete tears. However, the accuracy of CA,CTA or MRA was 27.3% (3/11), 18.2% (2/11), 66.7% (7/11)respectively in the state of partial tears. Conclusion: MRA is more effective to demonstrate the rotator cuff tears compared to CA or CTA

  14. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas [NSI, Merritt Island, FL (United States); University of Central Florida School of Medicine, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Suk Kyoung [Joeun Madi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  17. MR arthrography of the shoulder: tolerance evaluation of four different injection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikakis, Evangelos; Drakonaki, Eleni; Karantanas, Apostolos [University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Maris, Thomas [University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    We sought to prospectively evaluate patients' pain perception and technical success of four different arthrographic techniques for shoulder MR arthrography. A total of 125 consecutive patients were referred for shoulder MR arthrography. The patients were randomly injected under fluoroscopic guidance (n{sub 1} = 37), with CT guidance using an anterior (n{sub 2} = 29) or a posterior approach (n{sub 3} = 32) and with ultrasound guidance (n{sub 4} = 27). For each patient, absolute periprocedural pain on a numerical rating pain scale (0 = ''no pain'', 10 = ''intolerable pain''), technical success of the method used, and reason for referral were recorded. The technical success rate was 100 % for all injection methods. The results regarding absolute periprocedural pain were as follows: fluoroscopic guidance showed a mean pain of 4.05 {+-} 1.24, CT anterior guidance demonstrated a mean pain of 3.87 {+-} 0.95, CT posterior guidance showed a mean pain of 1.59 {+-} 0.81, and ultrasound guidance a mean pain of 3.63 {+-} 1.12. A significant difference (p <.05) was observed for the posterior route under CT guidance. The mean pain level was significantly higher for older (> 51 year) female patients. No differences were found for the technical success rate of the aforementioned techniques. A CT-guided posterior approach seems to be a more comfortable method for the patient. (orig.)

  18. Direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder with maximum capsular distension for surgical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of direct MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with maximum distension of the joint capsule in patients with glenohumeral instability for preoperative diagnosis and for determining the method of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: MR arthrography of the shoulder joint was performed on a 1.5 T system in 38 patients. All patients suffered from anterior or bidirectional instability. Using a fluoroscopically guided posterior approach, a 1% dilution of dimeglumine gadopentetate (5 mmol Gd-DTPA/l) was injected until full capsular stretching was achieved. MR imaging protocol included fat-saturated transversal, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo, T1-weighted 3-D and transversal T2-weighted Flash-2D. Results: MR imaging revealed significant capsule distention in 22 patients and ventral capsule defects in 9 patients. Labral lesions were depicted in 25 patients, bicipital tendon lesions in 4 patients and partial ruptures of the rotator cuff in 3 patients. 15 of the 38 patients underwent surgery. Areas of pathologic laxity of the glenohumeral capsule were correctly described in all cases. In 12 of 15 patients, the best method of intervention could be determined prospectively. In 3 of 15 patients, the necessary operation was overestimated. Regarding labral ruptures, MRI had a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 86%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 87%. (orig.)

  19. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, Bernhard [University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  20. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  1. MR arthrography of the shoulder: tolerance evaluation of four different injection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to prospectively evaluate patients' pain perception and technical success of four different arthrographic techniques for shoulder MR arthrography. A total of 125 consecutive patients were referred for shoulder MR arthrography. The patients were randomly injected under fluoroscopic guidance (n1 = 37), with CT guidance using an anterior (n2 = 29) or a posterior approach (n3 = 32) and with ultrasound guidance (n4 = 27). For each patient, absolute periprocedural pain on a numerical rating pain scale (0 = ''no pain'', 10 = ''intolerable pain''), technical success of the method used, and reason for referral were recorded. The technical success rate was 100 % for all injection methods. The results regarding absolute periprocedural pain were as follows: fluoroscopic guidance showed a mean pain of 4.05 ± 1.24, CT anterior guidance demonstrated a mean pain of 3.87 ± 0.95, CT posterior guidance showed a mean pain of 1.59 ± 0.81, and ultrasound guidance a mean pain of 3.63 ± 1.12. A significant difference (p 51 year) female patients. No differences were found for the technical success rate of the aforementioned techniques. A CT-guided posterior approach seems to be a more comfortable method for the patient. (orig.)

  2. Direct magnetic resonance arthrography. Pt. 2. Hand, hip, knee and ankle joint; Direkte MR-Arthrografie. T. 2. Hand-, Hueft-, Knie- und oberes Sprunggelenk

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    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Schmitt, Rainer [Herz- und Gefaessklinik Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging has reached high acceptance in the diagnostic work-up of joint pathologies. Direct magnetic resonance arthrography extends the capabilities of conventional MR imaging and utilizes the natural advantages gained from joint effusion. The imaging technique has been applied in the shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee and ankle joints. Besides technical aspects, this article wants to discuss indications for direct MR arthrography for clinical purposes. They are based on the recommendations of the ''Arbeitsgemeinschaft Muskuloskelettale Radiologie'' of the German Radiology Society. This implies to recognize the inherent strengths and weaknesses of concurring imaging modalities as a basis for the distinguished clinical use of direct MR arthrography. Part II of this article describes direct magnetic resonance arthrography of wrist, hip, knee and ankle joints. Actually, a final assessment of the technique at 3 T is not possible. However, it is anticipated that the possibilities of cartilage imaging may improve considerably so that MR arthrography at 3 T will replace CT-arthrography for detection of cartilage lesions especially in small joints. (orig.)

  3. Potential Utility of a Combined Approach with US and MR Arthrography to Image Medial Elbow Pain in Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedl, Johannes B; Gonzalez, Felix M; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Nevalainen, Mika T; Ciccotti, Michael G; Nazarian, Levon N

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate a combined imaging approach with both ultrasonography (US; conventional US and valgus stress US) and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in baseball players with medial elbow pain. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained and the requirement for informed consent was waived. The study is compliant with HIPAA. Baseball players with medial elbow pain underwent US in addition to MR arthrography. Findings were assessed with each modality alone and both combined in this retrospective investigation. For the evaluation of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears with stress US, the interval gapping of the medial elbow joint was measured between rest and valgus stress both at the injured and at the uninjured (contralateral) elbow. Surgical or arthroscopic correlation was available as the so-called gold standard. McNemar tests compared the accuracies of the imaging modalities. Results In this study, 144 baseball players had 191 findings of medial elbow pain, including 53 UCL tears. With stress US, joint gapping at the injured elbow greater than 1.0 mm compared with the contralateral elbow yielded a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 96%, 81%, and 87%, respectively, for diagnosing UCL tears. With MR arthrography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for UCL tears were 81%, 91%, and 88%, respectively, and increased to 96% (P = .013, McNemar test), 99% (P = .023), and 98% (P < .001), respectively, when combined with US to a dual modality MR and US approach. For 31 patients with ulnar neuritis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy increased from 74%, 92%, and 88%, respectively, with MR arthrography alone to 90% (P = .07, McNemar test), 100% (P < .001), and 98% (P < .001) combined with US. For the 59 myotendinous and the 48 osteochondral diagnoses, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with MR arthrography alone were 93%, 93%, and 93%, and 94%, 98%, and 97%, respectively, with no additional diagnostic value

  4. Usefulness of MR arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres injuries

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    Cerezal, Luis; Fernandez-Hernando, Moises [Department of Radiology, Diagnostico Medico Cantabria, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Perez Carro, Luis [Learnig Trauma Med. Centro de Consultas Medicas CCM, Orthopedic Surgery department, Santander (Spain); Llorca, Javier [University of Cantabria - IDIVAL, Santander (Spain); CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health, Santander (Spain); Llopis, Eva [Alzira Hospital, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Montero, Juan Antonio [Cantabria University, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Santander (Spain); Canga, Ana [Cantabria University, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Santander (Spain); Department of Radiology Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres lesions and to evaluate whether there is increased articular distraction, possibly indicating secondary instability, in hips with ligamentum teres injuries. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this retrospective study. MR arthrograms of the hip with leg traction of 184 consecutive patients, including 108 men (mean age, 32.6 years; range, 19-53 years) and 76 women (mean age, 38.5 years; range, 18-56 years), who underwent hip arthroscopy were assessed for the presence of ligamentum teres lesions. The MR arthrographic findings were independently assessed by two radiologists who were blinded to the arthroscopic results. The inclusion criteria stipulated no previous surgery, arthroscopy within 1 month after MR arthrography, and availability of a detailed surgical report with ligamentum teres findings. The arthroscopy findings served as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and K statistics for interobserver and intraobserver agreement were calculated. At arthroscopy, 32 ligamentum teres injuries were found. The ligamentum teres was normal in 152 (82.6 %) patients and had suffered low-grade partial tears in 15 (8.1 %) patients, high-grade partial tears in 10 (5.4 %) patients, and complete ruptures in 7 (3.8 %) patients. MR arthrography with axial traction demonstrated moderate sensitivity and high specificity for both low-grade (62/93 %) and high-grade (66/96 %) partial tears. Grouping low- and high-grade partial tears increased the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography, yielding a sensitivity of 87 % and a specificity of 95 %. For complete ligamentum teres tears, MR arthrography with leg traction demonstrated high sensitivity (92 %) and specificity (98 %). Articular distraction was significantly increased in patients with complete ruptures of the

  5. Usefulness of MR arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres lesions and to evaluate whether there is increased articular distraction, possibly indicating secondary instability, in hips with ligamentum teres injuries. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this retrospective study. MR arthrograms of the hip with leg traction of 184 consecutive patients, including 108 men (mean age, 32.6 years; range, 19-53 years) and 76 women (mean age, 38.5 years; range, 18-56 years), who underwent hip arthroscopy were assessed for the presence of ligamentum teres lesions. The MR arthrographic findings were independently assessed by two radiologists who were blinded to the arthroscopic results. The inclusion criteria stipulated no previous surgery, arthroscopy within 1 month after MR arthrography, and availability of a detailed surgical report with ligamentum teres findings. The arthroscopy findings served as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and K statistics for interobserver and intraobserver agreement were calculated. At arthroscopy, 32 ligamentum teres injuries were found. The ligamentum teres was normal in 152 (82.6 %) patients and had suffered low-grade partial tears in 15 (8.1 %) patients, high-grade partial tears in 10 (5.4 %) patients, and complete ruptures in 7 (3.8 %) patients. MR arthrography with axial traction demonstrated moderate sensitivity and high specificity for both low-grade (62/93 %) and high-grade (66/96 %) partial tears. Grouping low- and high-grade partial tears increased the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography, yielding a sensitivity of 87 % and a specificity of 95 %. For complete ligamentum teres tears, MR arthrography with leg traction demonstrated high sensitivity (92 %) and specificity (98 %). Articular distraction was significantly increased in patients with complete ruptures of the

  6. CT arthrography of the wrist using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Haapamaeki, Ville V.; Kortesniemi, Mika [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Salo, Jari [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, UEF, Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Kuopio (Finland); Lindfors, Nina C. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, Lauri [Planmed Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Kimmo T. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland)

    2013-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and intra- and interobserver agreement of CBCT arthrography of wrist ligaments, triangular fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC), and to assess the sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), accuracy (ACC), and positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) of CBCT arthrography in the diagnosis of scapholunate (SLL) and lunotriquetral (LTL) ligament tears, TFCC, and cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity CBCT scanner. Fifty-two consecutively enrolled subjects (26 M, 26 F, mean age 38 years, range 18-66 years) with suspected wrist ligament tears underwent CBCT-arthrography before normally scheduled MR arthrography.An extremity CBCT was used for imaging with isotropic voxel size of 0.4 x 0.4 x 0.4 mm{sup 3}. Subsequent routine 1.5 T MRI was performed using a dedicated wrist coil.Two observers reviewed the anonymized CBCT images twice for contrast enhancement (CE) and technical details (TD), for tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC. Also, cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) were evaluated. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was determined using weighted kappa statistics. Since no surgery was performed, MRI served as a reference standard, and SE and SP, ACC, PPV, and NPV were calculated. Intra- and interobserver kappa values for both readers (reader 1/reader 2; first reading/second reading) with 95 % confidence limits were: CE 0.54 (0.08-1.00)/ 0.75 (0.46-1.00); 0.73 (0.29-1.00)/ 0.45 (0.07-0.83), TD 0.53 (0.30-0.88)/ 0.86 (0.60-1.00); 0.56 (0.22-0.91)/ 0.67 (0.37-0.98), SLL 0.59 (0.25-0.93)/ 0.66 (0.42-0.91); 0.31 (0.06-0.56)/ 0.49 (0.26-0.73), LTL 0.83 (0.66-1.00)/ 0.68 (0.46-0.91); 0.90 (0.79-1.00)/ 0.48 (0.22-0.74); TFCC (0.72-1.00)/ (0.79-1.00); 0.65 (0.43-0.87)/ 0.59 (0.35-0.83), radius (scaphoid fossa) 0.45 (0.12-0.77)/ 0.64 (0.31-0.96); 0

  7. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

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    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong [Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images.

  8. MR arthrography of partial thickness tears of the undersurface of therotator cuff: and arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of MR arthrography (MR-ARTH) in diagnosing these tears. Design and patients The study design was a retrospective review of medical records of patients who had presented with refractory shoulder complaints and subsequently undergone MR arthrography with multiple signal MRI sequences followed by shoulder arthroscopy. Of particular interest were patients who had oblique T1 fat suppression (COT1FS), coronal oblique T2 (COT2), and coronal oblique T2 fat suppression (COT2FS) images taken. Seventy-six subjects met the study criteria. Investigators examined the MR-ARTH images from these patients' charts while blinded as to arthroscopic results, clinical signs and symptoms. Results Based on COT1FS images, investigators identified nine subjects as having had full thickness tears, 28 as having had partial thickness tears of the undersurface of the rotator cuff (PRTC), and 39 as having had intact RTC. These results were compared to actual findings at arthroscopy: nine full thickness tears, 26 of 28 with PRTC and 34 of 39 intact. The sensitivity of MR-ARTH was 84%, with a positive predictive value of 93%. The overall accuracy was 91% (69/76). The specificity was 96%. That is, if a PRTC was not seen on the MR-ARTH images, it was very unlikely to exist. COT2 and COT2FS sequences failed to increase sensitivity and overall efficacy of MRI. Conclusion PRTC can be diagnosed accurately by MR-ARTH with gadopentatate contrast. A COT1FS sequence is recommended for evaluation when tears are suspected

  9. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

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    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  10. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  11. Gradient-recalled echo sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating the labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Marc J.; Motamedi, Kambiz; Chow, Kira; Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, 200 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Box 956952, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of fat-suppressed gradient-recalled echo (GRE) compared with conventional spin echo T1-weighted (T1W) sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating labral tears. Three musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR arthrograms performed over a 12-month period for which surgical correlation was available. Of 180 serial arthrograms, 31 patients had surgery with a mean of 48 days following imaging. Paired coronal oblique and axial T1W or GRE sequences were analyzed by consensus for labral tear (coronal oblique two-dimensional multi-echo data image combination, 2D MEDIC; and axial three-dimensional double-echo steady-state, 3D DESS; Siemens MAGNETOM Sonata 1.5-T MR system). Interpretations were correlated with operative reports. Of 31 shoulders, 25 had labral tears at surgery. The GRE sequences depicted labral tears in 22, while T1W images depicted tears in 16 (sensitivity 88% versus 64%; p < 0.05). Subdividing the labrum, GRE was significantly more sensitive for the posterior labrum (75% versus 25%; p < 0.05) with a trend toward greater sensitivity at the anterior labrum (78% versus 56%; p = 0.157) but not significantly different for the superior labrum (50% versus 57%; p > 0.7). Specificities were somewhat lower for GRE. Thin section GRE sequences are more sensitive than T1W for the detection of anterior and posterior labral tears. As the specificity of GRE was lower, it should be considered as an adjunctive imaging sequence that may improve depiction of labral tears, particularly smaller tears, in routine MR arthrography protocols. (orig.)

  12. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

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    Koivikko, M.P.; Mustonen, A.O.T. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  13. Optimization of the Contrast Mixture Ratio for Simultaneous Direct MR and CT Arthrography: an in Vitro Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to determine the optimal mixture ratio of gadolinium and iodinated contrast agent for simultaneous direct MR arthrography and CT arthrography. An in vitro study was performed utilizing mixtures of gadolinium at six different concentrations (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 mmol/L) and iodinated contrast agent at seven different concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 37.5, 50, 75 and 92-99.9%). These mixtures were placed in tissue culture plates, and were then imaged with CT and MR (with T1-weighted sequences, proton-density sequences and T2-weighted sequences). CT numbers and signal intensities were measured. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to assess the correlations between the gadolinium/iodinated contrast agent mixtures and the CT numbers/MR signal intensities. Scatter diagrams were plotted for all gadolinium/iodinated contrast agent combinations and two radiologists in consensus identified the mixtures that yielded the optimal CT numbers and MR signal intensities. The CT numbers showed significant correlation with iodinated contrast concentrations (r = 0.976, p < 0.001), whereas the signal intensities as measured on MR images showed a significant correlation with both gadolinium and iodinated contrast agent concentrations (r = -484 to -0.719, p < 0.001). A review of the CT and MR images, graphs, and scatter diagram of 42 combinations of the contrast agent showed that a concentration of 1.25 mmol/L gadolinium and 25% iodinated contrast agent was the best combination for simultaneous CT and MR imaging. A mixture of 1.25 mmol/L gadolinium and 25% iodinated contrast agent was found to be optimal for simultaneous direct MR arthrography and CT arthrography

  14. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  15. Spiral CT arthrography of the knee: technique and value in the assessment of internal derangement of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography imaging has achieved excellent multiplanar capability and submillimeter spatial resolution due to the development of the spiral acquisition mode and multidetector row technology. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography (CTA) yields valuable information for the assessment of internal derangement of the joints. This article focuses on the value of spiral CTA of the knee in the assessment of the meniscus, anterior cruciate ligament, and hyaline cartilage lesions. Advantages and disadvantages of spiral CTA with respect to MR imaging are presented. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of MR arthrography with arthroscopy of the hip for the assessment of intra-articular loose bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the specificity and sensitivity of MR arthrography of the hip in comparison with arthroscopy for the evaluation of intra-articular loose bodies. Over a 3-year period, 81 consecutive patients underwent a total of 82 hip arthroscopies by a single orthopedic surgeon for intractable hip pain. Of the 82 arthroscopies, 70 had pre-operative MR arthrograms. Of these, 57 were available for retrospective review, after which they were compared with the operative notes of the subsequent arthroscopies. Of 82 arthroscopies 16 (20%) demonstrated intra-articular loose bodies, while, in the study group, nine of 57 had loose bodies (16%). There was a total of seven discordant cases (five false negatives and two false positives). The sensitivity of MR arthrography for detection of intra-articular loose bodies was 44%, while the specificity was 96%. While the specificity of MR arthrography for the detection of intra-articular loose bodies was high (96%), the sensitivity was not nearly as good (44%). (orig.)

  17. A prospective study on the detection of labral lesions by indirect MR-arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Aim of this prospective study was the evaluation of signal-alterations of anatomic shoulder structures before and after intravenous application of Gd-DTPA. Furthermore, the tested clinical value of indirect MR-arthrography in detecting labral lesions was tested. Material and Methods: 52 patients with suspected shoulder injury were examined on a 1.5 T system: Sequences were T1-weighted axial and oblique-coronary, additionally oblique-coronary T2-weighted, PD-weighted- and axial FLASH-2D-Sequences. After intravenous injection of contrast medium T1-weighted sequences were repeated. Signalintensities (SI) of anatomic structures were measured by ROI-technique, the percentual contrast-enhancement (CE) and alterations in SNR (signal-noise-ratio) and CNR (contrast-noise-ratio) were calculated. Labral tears were graded by three observers, their results could be confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery in 24 patients. Results: Contrast-enhancement was shown in all structures, most remarkable in the joint cavity. In pathologic findings of the labrum the SI and CE were significantly higher compared to intact strictures (p<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity in the detection of labral tears were 70% and 71.4% without contrast media, respectively 100% and 71,4% with indirect arthrography. Conclusions: The indirect arthrography improves the signal parameters of the structures. The detection of labral lesions is improved, but still remains difficult. (orig.)

  18. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: Magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Emre, Cahit; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topai, Murat; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit [Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  19. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: Magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  20. Indirect MR arthrography of the wrist in the diagnosis of TFCC-lesions; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie des Handgelenks bei TFCC-Laesionen

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    Herold, T.; Lenhart, M.; Held, P.; Feuerbach, S.; Link, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Babel, M.; Ruf, S. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: The objective of this prospective study was to assess the value of the indirect MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the wrist in the detection of lesions of the TFCC. Material and methods: Indirect MR-AR was performed in 45 patients (23 f/22 m) with unclear ulnar wrist pain. After i.v. injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA and after a motion-phase of the wrist (15 minutes) MRI was performed in a coronal plane. We used a STIR-, a fatsaturated (fs) T1-SE and a 3D-DESS sequence. The images were evaluated by two radiologists using a consensus score. The lesions were assigned to the system of Palmer and correlated with arthroscopy. Results: Indirect MR-AR showed in 35 of 45 patients a lesion of the TFCC, but arthroscopy only revealed a defect in 32 cases. This means three false positive but no false negative assessments by MRI. Using this MRI protocol sensitivity and specificity in the detection of TFCC lesions were calculated as 100% and 77%. The accuracy was 93%. Small degenerative changes of the fibres were most common (Palmer type IIA). In trauma patients the ligaments usually showed tears near the insertion at the ulna (Palmer type IB). The sensitivity and specificity was 88% and 95% for evaluation of the scapho-lunate (SL) ligament, the accuracy was 93%. Arthroscopy and MRI did not diagnose any rupture of the lunate-triquetral (LT) ligament. Conclusion: Indirect MR-AR is a non-invasive method with a high sensitivity in the evaluation of the TFCC and associated injuries. Therefore, it is an excellent screening procedure to assess the indication for therapeutic arthroscopy. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie ist die Evaluierung der Leistungsfaehigkeit der indirekten MR-Arthrographie (MR-AR) bei der Erfassung von TFCC-Laesionen. Material und Methode: Es wurden 45 Patienten (23 w/22 m) mit unklarem ulnaren Handgelenksschmerz mittels einer indirekten MR-AR untersucht. Nach i.v. Injektion von 0,1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA und einer anschliessenden Bewegungsphase von 15 Minuten wurde

  1. MORPHOLOGICAL AND SIGNAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS ON CONVENTIONAL MRI AND MR ARTHROGRAPHY:COMPARING WITH GROSS ANATOMY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-rong; DENG Xia; HUA Jia; CAI Wei-min; LI Lei; ZHU Jian-shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the MR characterizations of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon lesions by comparing with gross anatomy and histopathology. Methods The study group consisted of 20 cadaver shoulders which were underwent the same imaging protocols of conventional MRI and MR arthrography. Results SE-T2WI images or MR arthrography respectively possessed of high specificity (95.6%, 100%), but low sensitivity (70.6%, 58.8%) for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. By uniting two images techniques, could remedy its limitations and would markedly increase the sensitivity (88.2%). There were many factors influencing the visualizations of partial thickness tears of rotator cuff on MR images, from which uppermost factors are tear extent, ruptured synovial capsule, scar and synovial proliferation. Conclusion MRI diagnoses of rotator cuff lesions (especially partial thickness tears) must carefully be estimated by combining T2WI images and MR arthrography.

  2. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions

  3. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@aspetar.com [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Jomaah, Nabil [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Hayashi, Daichi [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Jarraya, Mohamed [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Silva, Jose Roberto [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, Jingbo [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); and others

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions.

  4. Use of MR arthrography in detecting tears of the ligamentum teres with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Gill, Corey M.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Simeone, Frank J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, Joseph C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To demonstrate the normal appearance of the ligamentum teres on MR arthrography (MRA) and evaluate the accuracy of MRA in detecting ligamentum teres tears with arthroscopic correlation. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained with a waiver for informed consent because of the retrospective study design. A total of 165 cases in 159 patients (111 females, 48 males; mean age 41 ± 12 years) who underwent both MRA and hip arthroscopy were evaluated for appearance of the ligamentum teres, including the size, number of bundles, and ligamentum teres tears. Marrow edema of the fovea capitis adjacent to the ligamentum teres insertion and the presence of hip plicae were also recorded. The mean thickness and length of the ligamentum teres were 3.5 ± 1.5 mm and 25.2 ± 3.8 mm, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and accuracy of MRA for the detection of ligamentum teres tears were 78, 97, 74, 97, and 95 %, respectively. MRA is an accurate method to evaluate the normal morphology and to detect tears of the ligamentum teres. (orig.)

  5. Indirect wrist MR arthrography: the effects of passive motion versus active exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. In the wrist, to determine whether passive motion or active exercise yields a better indirect MR arthrographic effect following intravenous gadolinium administration.Design and patients. Twenty-six consecutive patients were studied by indirect wrist MR arthrography. In half active exercise and in half passive motion was performed. Four regions of interest were studied including the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, the midcarpal joint, and the triangular fibrocartilage. Ranges and means of signal intensity were calculated. Surgical follow-up was performed in 22 patients.Results. The joint fluid intensity was greatest in the distal radioulnar joint. Fluid signal intensity was greater and more consistent in the passive motion group although the results did not achieve statistical significance. Imaging accuracy appeared similar in the two groups and was excellent for the triangular fibrocartilage (100%) and scapholunate ligaments (96%).Conclusion. Active exercise and passive motion yield similar degrees of wrist arthrographic effect, but the effect of passive motion is somewhat more consistent. Preliminary data show good accuracy for internal derangements. (orig.)

  6. The diagnostic value of direct CT arthrography using MDCT in the evaluation of acetabular labral tear: with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Jae Yoon [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Ah; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Departments of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 166 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of this study was first, to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MDCT arthrography (CTA) for the diagnosis of acetabular labral tear and sulcus; second, to correlate tear types using the Lage classification system on CTA compared with the arthroscopic classification; and third, to correlate CTA localization with arthroscopic localization. Direct CTA was performed using 16- or 64-slice MDCT in 126 hips (124 patients) who had chronic groin pain and positive impingement test. Images were reviewed and evaluated by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists preoperatively. CTA findings were compared with arthroscopic findings in 58 hips (56 patients) under consensus by two orthopedic surgeons. Forty-one of the 58 hips were diagnosed as labral tears on CT arthrography. Forty-three of the 58 hips were shown to have a labral tear on arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detecting labral tear and sulcus by CTA were 90.7%, 86.7%, and 89.7%, and 93.8%, 97.6% and 96.6% respectively for observer 1, and 90.7% and 80.0%, 87.9% and 87.5%, 95.2%, and 93.1 % respectively for observer 2. Thirty-five out of 41 hips (85%) that were diagnosed with labral tear on CTA correlated substantially with arthroscopic Lage classification (kappa coefficient = 0.65). CTA and arthroscopic findings showed similar distribution patterns of the tears with most lesions located in antero- and postero-superior areas (p = 0.013). Direct CT arthrography using MDCT may be a useful diagnostic technique in the detection of acetabular labral tear. (orig.)

  7. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrography: results of a five year prospective study and various examples of TMJ abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TMJ pain dysfunction is an important and common clinical problem. TMJ arthrography is most helpful in diagnosing internal derangements of the joint. The best technique of examination includes: a) both joint spaces opacification; b) spot films in the sagittal and coronal planes; and c) a videofluoroscopic taping. The distribution of the TMJ abnormalities detected in 585 TMJ arthrograms is reported. Women are much more affected than men (ratio: 4/1). The most frequent entity is meniscus displacement (65.4%). Complications are not frequent and mild (slight post arthrographic pain or transitory facial paresia). (author)

  8. MR imaging of the shoulder: Spectrum of abnormalities in 65 patients and correlation with arthrography and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging has previously been used to demonstrate the appearance of the normal shoulder. In this investigation the authors employed MR imaging in 65 consecutive patients with shoulder pain. Subsequent arthrography was performed in 31 patients and surgery in 15. Clinical follow-up was obtained in 35 patients treated conservatively. MR imaging was highly accurate in depicting the spectrum of rotator cuff abnormalities associated with mechanical impingment, including both large and small rotator cuff tears as well as tendinitis. Abnormalities of the capsular mechanisms, osseous tumors, ostenonecrosis, and injuries to the supporting musculature were also well depicted. Considerable potential exists for MR imaging in evaluating shoulder joint disease

  9. Comparison of shoulder positions at MR arthrography: change of labroligamentous complex shape and diagnosis of labral tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the neutral, internal, and external rotation positions of the glenohumeral joint during magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography performed to assess changes in the shape of the labroligamentous complex (LLC) and in the labral tear. MR arthrography of the shoulder was retrospectively evaluated in 36 patients aged 14-66 (mean, 40) years. Fourteen cases were confirmed by arthroscopic surgery (7 SLAP lesions, 2 Bankart lesions, 1 both SLAP and Bankart lesions). Axial fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo images were acquired with each shoulder in the neutral position, and with internal and external rotations. In each position, we measured the angle of rotation between the perpendicular line on the glenoid fossa and the long axis of the humeral head, analyzing the relationship between the rotational angle and changes in the shape of the LLC at each internal and external rotation, relative to the neutral position. In addition, labral tears in 14 arthroscopically confirmed joints were evaluated in each position. Mean angles of rotation relative to the neutral position were 44.1 and 45.3 degrees in internal and external rotation, respectively. Changes in the anterior LLC occurred in 25 and 24 cases of internal and external rotation, respectively. There was a significantly meaningful relationship between rotational angle and changes in the shape of the anterior LLC during external rotation, and when this changes was noticed, the rotational angle was wider (p<0.05). The posterior LLC changed in shape in 13 and 16 cases of internal and external rotation, respectively, but changes according to the angle of rotation were not statistically significant. In arthroscopically confirmed joints, diagnosis of the eight SLAP lesions at external rotation tended to become more accurate, but no statistically significant differences were noted (p=0.07). Two Bankart lesions were interpreted as a tear in all three positions, and one other such lesion was interpreted as a tear in the

  10. Low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder: early results using an open 0.2 T MR system; Niederfeld MR-Arthrographie der Schulter: Erste Ergebnisse mit einem offenen 0,2 T MR-System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, R.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Zoellner, J. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie

    1998-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the practicability and image quality of doing MR arthrography of the shoulder using a 0.2 T system. Results: Image quality of the T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted FLASH 2D sequences was regarded as good or adequate and movement artifacts were minor or moderate. STIR sequences were statistically significantly worse in respect of image quality and movement artifacts (p<0.001, p<0.005). The sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of rotator cuff rupture as confirmed by surgery was 100% (labrum lesions 100%, 93%). Agreement in the diagnosis of rupture of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons was 0.93 and 0.65. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die Durchfuehrbarkeit und die Bildqualitaet einer MR-Arthrographie der Schulter an einem 0,2 Tesla Niederfeldsystem sollten ueberprueft werden. Ergebnisse: Fuer die T{sub 1}-gewichteten und die T{sub 2}{sup *}-gewichteten FLASH-2D-Sequenzen wurde die Bildqualitaet als gut bzw. ausreichend und Bewegungsartefakte als gering oder moderat bewertet. STIR-Sequenzen wurden in bezug auf Bildqualitaet und Bewegungsartefakte statistisch signifikant schlechter beurteilt (p<0,001, p<0,005). Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der operierten Patienten in der Beurteilung von Rotatorenmanschettenrupturen betrugen 100% (Labrumlaesionen 100%, 93%). {kappa}-Werte fuer die Uebereinstimmung der Beurteilung von Rupturen der Supraspinatussehne und der Infraspinatussehne betrugen 0,93 und 0,65. (orig./AJ)

  11. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients; Direkte MR-Arthrographie des Handgelenks im Vergleich zur Arthroskopie: Eine prospektive Studie an 125 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H. [Klinik fuer Handchirurgie GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  12. Indirect MR-arthography in the fellow up of autologous osteochondral transplantation; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie zur Verlaufskontrolle nach autologer osteochondraler Transplantation

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    Herber, S.; Pitton, M.B.; Kalden, P.; Thelen, M.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie

    2003-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following autologous osteochondral transplantation. Patients and Methods: 10 patients with autogenous osteochondral homografts underwent indirect MR-arthrography at three, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The MR protocol at 1.5T comprised unenhanced imagings with PD- and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequences with and without fat-suppression as well as T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed SE-sequences before and after iv. contrast administration and after active joint exercise. Image analysis was done by two radiologists in conference and comprised the evaluation of signal intensity (SI) and integrity of the osseous plug and the cartilage surface, as well as the presence of joint effusion or bone marrow edema. Results: At three months, all cases demonstrated a significant bone marrow edema at the recipient and donor site that corresponded to a significant enhancement after iv. contrast administration. The interface between the transplant and the normal bone showed an increased SI at three and 6 months in T{sub 2}-weighted images as well as in indirect MR-arthrography. The marrow signal normalized in most cases after 6 to 12 months, indicating vitality and healing of the transplanted osteochondral graft. The SI of the interface decreased in the same period, demonstrating the stability of the homograft at the recipient site. The osteochondral plugs were well-seated in 9/10 cases. Indirect MR-arthrography was superior to unenhanced imaging in the assessment of the cartilage surface. Cartilage coverage was complete in every case. The transplanted hyaline cartilage as well as the original cartilage showed a significant increase of the SI in indirect MR-arthrography, that did not change in follow up studies. There were no pathological alterations of signal and thickness alterations of the transplanted cartilage in follow up investigations. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool

  13. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  14. Comparison of image quality of shoulder CT arthrography conducted using 120 kVp and 140 kVp protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Sae Hoon; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jee Won [Dept. of Radiology, Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare the image quality of shoulder CT arthrography performed using 120 kVp and 140 kVp protocols. Fifty-four CT examinations were prospectively included. CT scans were performed on each patient at 120 kVp and 140 kVp; other scanning parameters were kept constant. Image qualities were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with respect to noise, contrast, and diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostic acceptabilities were graded using a one to five scale as follows: 1, suboptimal; 2, below average; 3, acceptable; 4, above average; and 5, superior. Radiation doses were also compared. Contrast was better at 120 kVp, but noise was greater. No significant differences were observed between the 120 kVp and 140 kVp protocols in terms of diagnostic acceptability, signal-to-noise ratio, or contrast-to-noise ratio. Lowering tube voltage from 140 kVp to 120 kVp reduced the radiation dose by 33%. The use of 120 kVp during shoulder CT arthrography reduces radiation dose versus 140 kVp without significant loss of image quality.

  15. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  16. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Radiology, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria); Forstner, Thomas [Johannes Keppler University, Department for Applied Systems Research and Statistics, Linz (Austria); Reichkendler, Markus [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria)

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  17. The use of MR arthrography to document an occult joint communication in a recurrent peroneal intraneural ganglion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathogenesis of intraneural ganglia remains controversial. Only half of the reported cases of the most common type, the peroneal nerve at the fibular neck, have been found to have pedicles connecting the cysts to neighboring joints detected with preoperative imaging or intraoperatively. We believe that all intraneural ganglia arise from joints, and that radiologists and surgeons need to look closely preoperatively and intraoperatively for connections. Not identifying these connections with imaging and surgical exploration has led not only to skepticism about an articular origin of the cyst, but also to a high recurrence rate after surgery. We present a patient who had two recurrences of a peroneal intraneural ganglion in whom a joint connection was not detected on previous MRIs and operations. Reinterpretation of the original films and high-resolution MRI demonstrated an ''occult'' joint connection to the superior tibiofibular joint. MR arthrography performed after exercise and 1 h delay, however, clearly showed the connection and communication. The joint connection was then confirmed at surgery through an articular branch. Postoperatively the patient regained nearly normal neurologic function, and follow-up MRI showed no cyst recurrence. MR arthrography with delayed imaging should be considered in cases of intraneural ganglia when a joint connection is not obvious on MRI. (orig.)

  18. The use of MR arthrography to document an occult joint communication in a recurrent peroneal intraneural ganglion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Rock, Michael G. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2006-03-15

    The pathogenesis of intraneural ganglia remains controversial. Only half of the reported cases of the most common type, the peroneal nerve at the fibular neck, have been found to have pedicles connecting the cysts to neighboring joints detected with preoperative imaging or intraoperatively. We believe that all intraneural ganglia arise from joints, and that radiologists and surgeons need to look closely preoperatively and intraoperatively for connections. Not identifying these connections with imaging and surgical exploration has led not only to skepticism about an articular origin of the cyst, but also to a high recurrence rate after surgery. We present a patient who had two recurrences of a peroneal intraneural ganglion in whom a joint connection was not detected on previous MRIs and operations. Reinterpretation of the original films and high-resolution MRI demonstrated an ''occult'' joint connection to the superior tibiofibular joint. MR arthrography performed after exercise and 1 h delay, however, clearly showed the connection and communication. The joint connection was then confirmed at surgery through an articular branch. Postoperatively the patient regained nearly normal neurologic function, and follow-up MRI showed no cyst recurrence. MR arthrography with delayed imaging should be considered in cases of intraneural ganglia when a joint connection is not obvious on MRI. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  20. Humeral avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizing structures after anterior shoulder dislocation: demonstration by MRI and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To demonstrate the MRI findings of an anterior shoulder capsular avulsion from the humerus, with or without subscapularis rupture, after anterior dislocation or severe abduction external rotation injury. Design and patients. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI and MR arthrographic examinations of seven patients who were identified at surgery with avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizers from the humerus. MRI was correlated with clinical history and surgical results. Results. MRI findings included: inhomogeneity or frank disruption of the anterior capsule at the humeral insertion (all), fluid intensity anterior to the shoulder (six patients), tear of the subscapularis tendon (six patients), dislocation of the biceps tendon (four patients), and a Hill-Sachs deformity (four patients). MR arthrography additionally found extravasation of contrast through the capsular defect (two patients). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that MRI is helpful for diagnosing humeral avulsion of the anterior glenohumeral capsule, especially when a tear of the subscapularis tendon insertion is present. MR arthrography may be of benefit for diagnosing capsular avulsion without associated subscapularis tendon abnormality. (orig.). With 4 figs

  1. Synovial plicae of the hip: evaluation using MR arthrography in patients with hip pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencardino, Jenny T.; La Rocca Vieira, Renata [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Kassarjian, Ara [Corades, S.L., Majadahonda-Madrid (Spain); Schwartz, Richard [Longwood MRI Specialists, Brookline, MA (United States); Mellado, Jose M. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Department of Radiology, Tudela (Spain); Kocher, Mininder [Children' s Hospital of Boston, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The appearance and distribution of the intra-articular plicae of the hip have been addressed in few reports in the anatomic and radiological literature. This study aims to determine the prevalence of visible synovial hip plicae using MR arthrography and to measure the association of visible synovial hip plicae with MR arthrographic diagnosis of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. Following institutional review board approval, 63 direct MR arthrographic examinations of the hip in 61 patients with a clinical history of hip pain were retrospectively reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. The following variables were measured using a binary system (0 = absent; 1 = present): labral plica, neck plica, ligamental plica, labral tear, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. The surgical reports and arthroscopic images of 10 patients were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test. In all 63 cases at least one plica was visualized on MR-arthrographic images. Labral, neck, and ligamental plicae were found with a prevalence of 76, 97, and 78%, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis among patients with visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. The prevalence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis in our patient population was 79, 28, and 28%, respectively. The presence of intra-articular plicae was the only MR-arthrographic finding in 5 of our 63 symptomatic cases. Visible labral, neck, and/or ligamental plicae are highly prevalent on MR-arthrographic images of the hip performed in the setting of hip pain. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis and visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. (orig.)

  2. A comparison of magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic findings in the assessment of anterior shoulder dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, R.W.; Naeem, R.; Srinivas, K.; Shyamalan, G. [Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the investigation of patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing both magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic assessment after a traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation between January 2011 and 2014 was performed. Demographic data were collected from electronic records. Images were interpreted by 8 musculoskeletal radiologists and patients were treated by 8 consultant orthopaedic surgeons. Arthroscopic findings were obtained from surgical notes and these findings were used as a reference for MRA. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were calculated for the different injuries. Sixty-nine patients underwent both an MRA and shoulder arthroscopy during the study period; however, clinical notes were unavailable in 9 patients. Fifty-three patients (88 %) were male, the mean age was 28 years (range 18 to 50) and 16 subjects (27 %) had suffered a primary dislocation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of MRA to all associated injuries was 0.9 (CI 0.83-0.95) and 0.94 (CI 0.9-0.96) retrospectively. The lowest sensitivity was seen in osseous Bankart 0.8 (CI 0.44-0.96) and superior labral tear (SLAP) lesions 0.5 (CI 0.14-0.86). The overall positive predictive value was 0.88 (CI 0.76-0.91) with the lowest values found in rotator cuff 0.4 (CI 0.07-0.83) and glenohumeral ligament (GHL) lesions 0.29 (CI 0.05-0.7). Magnetic resonance angiography has a high sensitivity when used to identify associated injuries in shoulder dislocation, although in 8 patients (13 %) arthroscopy identified an additional injury. The overall agreement between MRA and arthroscopic findings was good, but the identification of GHL and rotator cuff injuries was poor. (orig.)

  3. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan [Scripps Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chang, Eric Y. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  4. Ankle post-traumatic osteoarthritis: a CT arthrography study in patients with bi- and trimalleolar fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraniotis, Pantelis; Petsas, Theodore [University Hospital of Patras, Department of Radiology, Rion, Patras (Greece); Maragkos, Spyridon; Tyllianakis, Minos [University Hospital of Patras, Department of Orthopedics, Rion, Patras (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University Hospital, Heraklion, Department of Medical Imaging, Stavrakia, Crete (Greece)

    2012-07-15

    To detect radiographically occult cartilage lesions using CT arthrography (CTa) in patients with malleolar fractures treated with open reduction internal fixation and to correlate the lesions with the functional outcome score. Twenty-one patients (13 men and 8 women, mean age 35 years, range 16-55) underwent ankle CTa after a mean postoperative period of 565 days (range 271-756). CTa images were analyzed by two radiologists. Articular surface post-traumatic collapse and subsequent cartilage defects or erosions were recorded in millimeters and in a binary mode (i.e., present if >50% of cartilage thickness) respectively. The functional outcome was assessed using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score by two orthopaedic surgeons. The statistical analysis correlated the AOFAS score with both imaging parameters and was performed with ANOVA using the MedCalc statistical package, version 11.3. Of the total of 12 articular surface steps recorded, 2/12 (16.67%) were anterolateral, 4/12 (33.33%) posterolateral, 5/12 (41.67%) anteromedial, and 1/12(8.33%) posteromedial. Of the total of 42 cartilage lesions, 7/42 (16.67%) were anterolateral, 14/42 (33.33%) posterolateral, 12/42 (28.57%) anteromedial, and 9/42 (21.43%) posteromedial. The mean AOFAS score was 8.67 (range 5.95-9.70). There was no statistically significant correlation between the AOFAS score and the post-traumatic internal derangement of the ankle joint (p = 0.524). CTa detects radiographically silent cartilage lesions in patients with fractures of the ankle joint. There is no correlation of the extent of lesions and the patient's AOFAS score. (orig.)

  5. Synovial plicae of the hip: evaluation using MR arthrography in patients with hip pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance and distribution of the intra-articular plicae of the hip have been addressed in few reports in the anatomic and radiological literature. This study aims to determine the prevalence of visible synovial hip plicae using MR arthrography and to measure the association of visible synovial hip plicae with MR arthrographic diagnosis of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. Following institutional review board approval, 63 direct MR arthrographic examinations of the hip in 61 patients with a clinical history of hip pain were retrospectively reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. The following variables were measured using a binary system (0 = absent; 1 = present): labral plica, neck plica, ligamental plica, labral tear, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. The surgical reports and arthroscopic images of 10 patients were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test. In all 63 cases at least one plica was visualized on MR-arthrographic images. Labral, neck, and ligamental plicae were found with a prevalence of 76, 97, and 78%, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis among patients with visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. The prevalence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis in our patient population was 79, 28, and 28%, respectively. The presence of intra-articular plicae was the only MR-arthrographic finding in 5 of our 63 symptomatic cases. Visible labral, neck, and/or ligamental plicae are highly prevalent on MR-arthrographic images of the hip performed in the setting of hip pain. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis and visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. (orig.)

  6. A comparison of magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic findings in the assessment of anterior shoulder dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to establish the sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the investigation of patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing both magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic assessment after a traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation between January 2011 and 2014 was performed. Demographic data were collected from electronic records. Images were interpreted by 8 musculoskeletal radiologists and patients were treated by 8 consultant orthopaedic surgeons. Arthroscopic findings were obtained from surgical notes and these findings were used as a reference for MRA. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were calculated for the different injuries. Sixty-nine patients underwent both an MRA and shoulder arthroscopy during the study period; however, clinical notes were unavailable in 9 patients. Fifty-three patients (88 %) were male, the mean age was 28 years (range 18 to 50) and 16 subjects (27 %) had suffered a primary dislocation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of MRA to all associated injuries was 0.9 (CI 0.83-0.95) and 0.94 (CI 0.9-0.96) retrospectively. The lowest sensitivity was seen in osseous Bankart 0.8 (CI 0.44-0.96) and superior labral tear (SLAP) lesions 0.5 (CI 0.14-0.86). The overall positive predictive value was 0.88 (CI 0.76-0.91) with the lowest values found in rotator cuff 0.4 (CI 0.07-0.83) and glenohumeral ligament (GHL) lesions 0.29 (CI 0.05-0.7). Magnetic resonance angiography has a high sensitivity when used to identify associated injuries in shoulder dislocation, although in 8 patients (13 %) arthroscopy identified an additional injury. The overall agreement between MRA and arthroscopic findings was good, but the identification of GHL and rotator cuff injuries was poor. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain. Artografia con Risonanza Magnetica (arto-RM) nelle malattie dolorose croniche del polso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Radiologia); Carloni, S. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Ortopedia) (and others)

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures.

  8. Spiral CT arthrography of multiplanar reconstruction and virtual arthroscopy technique in diagnosis of knee with internal derangements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊传芝; 郝敬明

    2004-01-01

    5Objective:To evaluate the values of spiral CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstruction and virtual arthroscopy technique in diagnosis of internal derangements of the knee. Methods:Ten bovine knees were used for experiment. The menisci, anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and cartilage of these 10 bovine knees were injured with a hook. Each of the joints was injected with 100 mi air, then soon scanned with a PQ6000 spiral computed tomography scanner. The data obtained was input into the work station, and multiplanar reconstruction technique was used to illustrate lesions in the knees. The results of CT diagnosis were compared to those found by gross inspection of the specimens. Clinically, 10 knees of 9 patients diagnosed as internal derangement were evaluated with the same method after 50-70 ml air was injected into each of the joints. Nine months later, the data of 2 patients were used for CT endoscopy reconstruction. The results were compared with intraoperative findings. Results:Experimentally,the sensitivity and specificity were 88.9% and 93.9% by detection of meniscal abnormalities, 85.7% and 100% by detection of cruciate ligament lesions, and 72.7% and 100% by detection of cartilage damage, respectively. Clinically, the sensitivity and specificity were 90. 0% and 95.0% by detection of meulscal lesion. As to ligament, the figures were 85.7% and 100% respectively. Images of virtual arthroscopy simulated the images of real arthroscopy. Conclnsious:Spiral CT arthrography of multiplanar reconstruction technique offers fime images of internal structures of the knee, with clear border and internal structure. It is an accurate method for detecting meulscal, cruciate and collateral ligament and cartilaginous lesions that cause internal derangement of the knee.Virtual arthroscopy technique is a hopeful method for detecting reasons of derangement of the knee.

  9. Arthrosonography of the shoulder joint for evaluation of the glenoid labrum, glenoid rim and humeral head: comparison with conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic role of arthrosonography, conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography in the assessment of glenoid labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture of the shoulder joint. The findings of arthrosonography, conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography were prospectively evaluated in 62 consecutive patients with chronic pain or a history of recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint. The glenoid labrum was arbitrarily divided into four quadrants: anterosuperior, anteroinferior, posterosuperior, and posteroinferior, and for each, visibility at arthrosonography and conventional ultrasonography was subjectively scored as one of four grades. By means of statistical analysis, the two techniques were then compared. Twenty-six patients subsequently underwent arthroscopy, and the presence or absence of labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture was determined. The sensitivity and specificity of each modality were separately calculated for each of the three types of shoulder joint injury, and observed differences in these findings were statistically analysed. For all individual quadrants of the labrum, visibility at arthrosonography was high than at conventional ultrasonography (p.05), though its specificity was significantly higher (p=.003). In this respect, there was no significant difference in sensitivity of specificity between arthrasonography and MR arthrography (p>.05). For the detection of glenoid rim and humeral head fracture, there were no statistical differences in sensitivity and specificity between the three imaging modalities (p>.05). Compared with conventional ultrasonography, arthrosonography provides higher visibility of the labrum, thus improving the capacity of ultrasonography to detect labral tear. Arthrosonography could there fore be useful in the diagnosis of labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture, and may thus partially replace MR arthrography

  10. Injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments as well as the TFCC in intra-articular distal radius fractures. Prevalence assessed with MDCT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prevalence of injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments (SLIL, LTIL) as well as the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in intra-articular distal radius fractures (iaDRF). Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute iaDRF underwent MDCT arthrography. The SLIL and LTIL were described as normal, partially or completely ruptured. Major injuries of the SLIL were defined as completely ruptured dorsal segments, those of the LTIL as completely ruptured palmar segments. The TFCC was judged as normal or injured. Interobserver variability was calculated. Injury findings were correlated with the types of iaDRF (AO classification). In 159 patients (68.2 %), no SLIL injuries were seen. Minor SLIL injuries were detected in 54 patients (23.2 %), major injuries in 20 patients (8.6 %). No correlation was found between the presence of SLIL lesions and the types of iaDRF. Minor LTIL injuries were seen in 23 patients (9.9 %), major injuries in only 5 patients (2.2 %). The TFCC was altered in 141 patients (60.5 %). Interobserver variability was high for MDCT arthrography in assessing SLIL and TFC lesions, and fair for LTIL lesions. In iaDRF, prevalence of major injuries of the most relevant SLIL is about 9 % as evaluated with CT arthrography. (orig.)

  11. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  12. Injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments as well as the TFCC in intra-articular distal radius fractures. Prevalence assessed with MDCT arthrography

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    Klempka, A.; Wagner, M.; Fodor, S.; Schmitt, R. [Cardiovascular Center Bad Neustadt an der Saale, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Prommersberger, K.J. [Clinic for Hand Surgery, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Uder, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments (SLIL, LTIL) as well as the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in intra-articular distal radius fractures (iaDRF). Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute iaDRF underwent MDCT arthrography. The SLIL and LTIL were described as normal, partially or completely ruptured. Major injuries of the SLIL were defined as completely ruptured dorsal segments, those of the LTIL as completely ruptured palmar segments. The TFCC was judged as normal or injured. Interobserver variability was calculated. Injury findings were correlated with the types of iaDRF (AO classification). In 159 patients (68.2 %), no SLIL injuries were seen. Minor SLIL injuries were detected in 54 patients (23.2 %), major injuries in 20 patients (8.6 %). No correlation was found between the presence of SLIL lesions and the types of iaDRF. Minor LTIL injuries were seen in 23 patients (9.9 %), major injuries in only 5 patients (2.2 %). The TFCC was altered in 141 patients (60.5 %). Interobserver variability was high for MDCT arthrography in assessing SLIL and TFC lesions, and fair for LTIL lesions. In iaDRF, prevalence of major injuries of the most relevant SLIL is about 9 % as evaluated with CT arthrography. (orig.)

  13. Labral and cartilage abnormalities in young patients with hip pain: accuracy of 3-Tesla indirect MR arthrography

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    Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rybak, Leon D. [NYU Langone Medical Center-Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Dunham, Kevin S.; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lattanzi, Riccardo [NYU Langone Medical Center, The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Assess the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (iMRA) for hip cartilage and labral pathology detection using arthroscopy as the reference standard and compare it to the published performance of direct magnetic resonance arthrography (dMRA). Between 2009 and 2011, 290 patients suspected of having femoroacetabular impingement underwent iMRA. Our study group consisted of 41 of these patients (17 males, mean age 35 years; 24 females, mean age 33 years) who did not have a prior history of hip surgery and who subsequently underwent arthroscopy. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists separately evaluated the randomized and anonymized studies for the presence and quadrant location of labral and cartilage pathology. These recorded data were compared to arthroscopic reports. Forty-one patients had labral pathology, 34 patients had acetabular and 5 patients had femoral cartilage pathology at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative- and positive-predictive values for labral lesion detection were respectively 98, 99, 99, 99 and 98 %; for acetabular cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 98, 89, 87 and 95 %; for femoral cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 95, 93 and 39 %. Sensitivities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum were 100.0, 95.0, NA and 85.7 %, for acetabular cartilage were NA, 58.8, NA and 39.5 % and for femoral cartilage were 50.0, 33.3, 75.0 and 75.0 %. NA indicates results not available because of the absence of findings in those quadrants. Specificities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum (95.0, 100.0, 95.1, 67.5 %), acetabular (100.0, 85.7, 92.6, 79.5 %) and femoral cartilage (100.0, 94.7, 96.2, 85.9 %). iMRA at 3 T is accurate in detecting labral pathology suggesting that it is a viable alternative to dMRA. (orig.)

  14. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder

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    Schaeffeler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Chur (Switzerland); Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Center for Sports Orthopedics and Medicine, Orthosportiv, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. (orig.)

  15. Prevalence of the acetabular sublabral sulcus at MR arthrography in patients under 17 years of age: does it exist?

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    Magerkurth, Olaf [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Jacobson, Jon A.; Morag, Yoav; Fessell, David [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bedi, Asheesh; Sekiya, Jon K. [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-04-18

    To retrospectively determine characteristics of contrast-filled acetabular labral clefts in patients under the age of 17 years at MR arthrography (Mra) correlated with arthroscopy, which may impact the thinking regarding the existence of a sublabral sulcus. After IRB approval, 41 patients under the age of 17 who had MRa were identified. The following observations of contrast-filled clefts were assessed: (1) presence/absence, (2) location, (3) depth, (4) abnormal signal within the labrum and (5) shape (linear, gaping, complex). Fisher's exact and the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test were performed. Interreader agreement was calculated with Cohen's k. Reader 1 found clefts in 41 %. Depth was less than half in 6 %, more than half in 65 % and full thickness in 29 %. Shape was linear in 53 %, gaping in 18 % and complex in 29 %. Signal changes occurred in 88 %. Reader 2 found clefts in 29 %. Depth was less than half in 17 %, more than half in 58 % and full thickness in 25 %. Shape was linear in 50 %, gaping in 42 % and complex in 17 %. Signal changes occurred in 50 %. None of the clefts fulfilled the criteria for a sublabral sulcus at MRa and arthroscopy. None of the clefts found in our subjects under the age of 17 years met the MRa and arthroscopy criteria for a sublabral sulcus, which supports the theory that such clefts represent labral tears. (orig.)

  16. Three-dimensional thickness and volume measurements of knee joint cartilage with MRI. Validation in anatomical specimens via CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the present study we intended to validate knee joint cartilage volume and thickness measurements with MRI. Methods: Ten fresh cadaver knees (age 29 to 64 yrs.) were sagitally imaged, using a fat-suppressed FLASH-3D sequence with a resolution of 2x0,31x0,31 mm3. Then a contrast agent was injected and the specimens submitted to CT arthrography. From both modalities the patellar, femoral, and tibial cartilages were segmented semiautomatically and reconstructed three-dimensionally. The cartilage thickness was determined independently of the sectional plane, based on a 'minimal distance algorithm'. Results: The volumes and the regional distribution patterns yielded a very high degree of similarity on direct comparison of both imaging modalities. The average volume error between MRI and CT was 3.8% (±3.0%), the correlation 0.998, the slope of the regression line 1.04 and the y-intercept -80 mm3. The analysis yielded no significant differences between the two methods (Wilcoxon signed rank test, 5% level) in the patella, femur, medial, and lateral tibia. (orig.)

  17. A radiological study of the patella and the cartilage of patella by computed tomography following double-contrast arthrography

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    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    Recurrent subluxation or dislocation of the patella is a painful condition that frequently leads to chondromalacia or arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint. A radiographic evaluation of the patella and patella cartilage is important in the diagnosis of chondromalacia and mal alignment. Authors performed the patellofemoral joint CT following the double contrast arthrography in 53 patients with knee joint pains who had visited to Capital Armed Forces General Hospital from July to December, 1986. Authors analysed the shape and position of patella and the shape of patella cartilage. The results were as follows; 1. shape of patella:The most common types are type II/III (14 cases) and type III (14 cases). type III {yields} IV-9 cases, type I-5 cases, type IV-5 cases, other type-4 cases, type II-2 cases, no type V. 2. position of patella:Only 2 cases showed subluxation and external rotation of patella. 3. shape of patella cartilage:a)congruous cartilage-21 cases (39.6%) b)regular cartilage-22 cases (41.5%) c)irregular cartilage-10 cases (18.9%) irregular imbibition of contrast media-7 cases localized loss of cartilage or erosion-2 cases thinning of cartilage-1 case 4. Fissure and erosions of cartilages in 3 cases were confirmed by operation and knee arthroscopy.

  18. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA

  19. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces

  20. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

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    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Clinique Longeraie and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Avenue de la Gare 9, 1003 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces.

  1. Supraspinatus tendon tears at 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography: diagnosis with 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo SPACE sequence versus 2D conventional sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shoulder MR arthrography with 3D isotropic fat-suppressed (FS) turbo spin-echo sequence (TSE-SPACE) for supraspinatus tendon tears in comparison with 2D conventional sequences at 3.0 T. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board with a waiver of informed consent. Eighty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients who underwent 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography with 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE were included in a consecutive fashion from March 2009 to February 2010. Two reviewers independently analyzed 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement (κ) were compared between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE for full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together and for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone. There were 33 full-thickness tears and 28 partial-thickness tears of supraspinatus tendons. For full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both readers were 96, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 91, 84, and 89% on 3D TSE-SPACE. For partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 84, 85, and 84% on 3D TSE-SPACE. There was no statistical difference between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Interobserver agreements were almost perfect on 2D conventional sequences and substantial on 3D TSE-SPACE. Compared with 2D conventional sequences, MR arthrography using 3D TSE-SPACE was comparable for diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears despite limitations in detecting small partial-thickness tears and in discriminating between full-thickness and deep partial-thickness tears. (orig.)

  2. SLAP tears: diagnosis using 3-T shoulder MR arthrography with the 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo space sequence versus conventional 2D sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with three-dimensional (3D) isotropic intermediate-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) in the diagnosis of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) lesions compared with two-dimensional (2D) TSE at 3.0 T. MR arthrograms, including 2D TSE and 3D TSE-SPACE, in 87 patients who underwent arthroscopy were retrospectively analysed by two reviewers for the presence and type of SLAP lesions. Sensitivity and specificity were compared using McNemar's test, and inter-observer agreement was calculated using Cohen's kappa. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. The mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90%, 85% and 86% for 2D TSE, and 81%, 86% and 85% for 3D TSE-SPACE respectively, with no statistically significant differences. Inter-observer agreements were substantial in 2D TSE (κ = 0.76) and 3D TSE-SPACE (κ = 0.68). The areas under the ROC curves were 0.92 for 2D TSE and 0.90 for 3D TSE-SPACE, which were not significantly different. MR arthrography with 3D TSE-SPACE showed comparable accuracy and substantial inter-observer agreement for the diagnosis of SLAP lesions circle MR arthrography is regarded as the definitive method of shoulder imaging circle Different MR sequences are evolving for SLAP lesions circle 3D TSE-SPACE demonstrated comparable overall accuracy to 2D TSE for SLAP lesions. (orig.)

  3. Arthrography and its value in comparison with fixation radiography in the diagnosis of lesions to the capsular ligament of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From May 1981 till May 1982, we consistently performed arthography of the injured joint and fixation radiography according to Scheuba (pressure: 15 kp) of both ankle joints for reasons of comparison in all patients with a distorsion trauma of the ankle joint and with suspected lesions to the ligaments. 259 cases were used for the assessment. Fixation radiography should not be used any more. Mere clinical examination combined with the case history can be assumed to be superior to fixation radiography still. Arthrography clearly is the more sensitive method for the diagnosis of injuries to the external capsular ligament of the ankle joint. (orig./SHA)

  4. Indications for CT and MR arthrography. Recommendations of the Musculoskeletal Workgroup of the DRG; Indikationen der MR- und CT-Arthrografie. Empfehlungen der AG Muskuloskelettale Radiologie der DRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W. [Hessingpark Clinic, Radiologengemeinschaft Augsburg (Germany); Bohndorf, K.; Zentner, J. [Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Kreitner, K.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Schmitt, R. [Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Woertler, K. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2009-05-15

    The ongoing discussion about CT and MR arthrography is at least in part due to the lack of definite guidelines. The intention of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft) was the establishment of recommendations for general guidance. After review of the recent literature, the indications for arthrographic examinations were discussed during a consensus meeting. Since the published data are insufficient and partially contradictory, no precise statements could be extracted from the literature. Therefore, the proposed recommendations are mainly based on expert opinions. In this review the main statements of the published literature are summarized and the recommendations of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG are presented. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  6. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Banfi, Giuseppe [IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Aliprandi, Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Unita di Radiologia Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato, Milanese (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  7. Dual- energy computed tomography arthrography of the shoulder joint using virtual monochromatic spectral imaging: Optimal dose of contrast agent and monochromatic energy level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To optimize the dose of contrast agent and the level of energy for dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) arthrography of the shoulder joint and to evaluate the benefits of the optimized imaging protocol. Dual-energy scans with monochromatic spectral imaging mode and conventional single energy scans were performed on a shoulder phantom with 10 concentrations from 0 to 210 mg/mL of iodinated contrast medium at intervals of 15 or 30 mg/mL. Image noise, tissue contrast, and beam hardening artifacts were assessed to determine the optimum dose of contrast agent and the level of monochromatic energy for DECT shoulder arthrography in terms of the lowest image noise and the least beam hardening artifacts while good tissue contrast was maintained. Material decomposition (MD) imaging for bone-iodine differentiation was qualitatively assessed. The optimized protocol was applied and evaluated in 23 patients. The optimal contrast dose and energy level were determined by the phantom study at 60 mg/mL and 72 keV, respectively. This optimized protocol for human study reduced the image noise and the beam-hardening artifacts by 35.9% and 44.5%, respectively. Bone-iodine differentiation by MD imaging was not affected by the iodine concentration or level of energy. Dual-energy scan with monochromatic spectral imaging mode results in reduced image noise and beam hardening artifacts.

  8. Optimization of computed tomography (CT) arthrography of hip for the visualization of cartilage: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, Paolo; Leyder, Pierre-Philippe; Malchair, Francoise; Marechal, Carole; Alvarez Miezentseva, Victoria [CHU de Liege, Diagnostic Imaging Department, MSK Imaging, Liege (Belgium); Albert, Adelin [CHU de Liege, Biostatistics Department, Liege (Belgium); Scarciolla, Laura; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [Campus Bio-Medico University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Gillet, Philippe [CHU de Liege, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    We sought to optimize the kilovoltage, tube current, and the radiation dose of computed tomographic arthrography of the hip joint using in vitro methods. A phantom was prepared using a left femoral head harvested from a patient undergoing total hip arthroplasty and packed in a condom filled with iodinated contrast. The right hip joint of a cadaver was also injected with iodinated contrast. The phantom and the cadaver were scanned using different values of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and tube current (milliamp seconds, mAs). Three different regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the cartilage, subchondral bone plate, and intraarticular contrast. The attenuation values, contrast/noise ratio (CNR), and effective dose were calculated. Two independent observers classified the quality of the contrast-cartilage interface and the cartilage-subchondral bone plate interface as (1) diagnostic quality or (2) nondiagnostic quality. Contrast, cartilage, and subchondral bone plate attenuation values decreased at higher kVp. CNR increased with both kVp and mAs. The qualitative analysis showed that in both phantom and cadaver, at 120 kVp and 50 mAs, the contrast-cartilage and cartilage-subchondral bone plate interfaces were of diagnostic quality, with an effective dose decreased to 0.5 MSv. The absolute effective dose is not directly related to the quality of images but to the specific combination of kVp and mAs used for image acquisition. The combination of 120 kVp and 50 mAs can be suggested to decrease the dose without adversely affect the visibility of cartilage and subchondral bone plate. (orig.)

  9. High origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: MR arthrography with anatomic and histologic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Ruiz, Francisco Alejandro [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California and VA healthcare system, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe, Departamento de Radiologia, Medellin (Colombia); Baranski Kaniak, Beatriz Cristina; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L. [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California San Diego, VA Healthcare System Dan Diego, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament has been described to arise from the anteroinferior labrum, but we have observed that in some persons its origin is from the anterior or anterosuperior labrum, creating diagnostic difficulties. Ten fresh unembalmed cadaveric shoulders underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using a posterior approach with a 1.5 T GE magnet, with the following sequences: T1-weighted fast spin-echo in axial, coronal and sagittal planes, and T1 fat-suppressed spin-echo in the axial plane (TR/TE 600/20, section thickness 2.5 mm, 0.5 mm interslice space, number of signals acquired, two, field of view 12 x 12 cm, and matrix 512 x 256 pixels). Following imaging, the shoulders were frozen and later sectioned using a band saw into 3-mm sections corresponding to the axial imaging plane. Histological analysis was also performed to determine the origin of the anterior band. Four of the ten shoulders had an origin of the anterior band above or at the 3 o'clock position: one at the 1 o'clock position, two at the 2 o'clock position, and one at the 3 o'clock position. In another shoulder, the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament originated from the middle glenohumeral ligament, and in five other shoulders, the anterior band originated from the anteroinferior labrum as has been described in the literature. This finding is of clinical significance as a high origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament leads to MR arthrographic finding that can simulate those of labral tears or detachments. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy of gadolinium versus saline for rotator cuff and labral pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helms, Clyde A.; McGonegle, Shane J.; Vinson, Emily N.; Whiteside, Michael B. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of intra-articular gadolinium versus saline alone in magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder. Our database was reviewed for 100 consecutive shoulder MRA examinations performed between January 2007 and December 2007. Patient information was blinded and images were retrospectively reviewed by at least two radiologists with dedicated musculoskeletal training. T2-weighted (T2W) images were initially analyzed in isolation to simulate MRA with saline alone. After a delay, the full study was analyzed including T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W images. If there was a significant discordance between the two analyses with regard to rotator cuff or labral pathology, the study was again reviewed by all evaluators in consensus to determine if the T1W images offered additional diagnostic information and increased diagnostic confidence. Of the 100 MRA examinations, there were 15 discordant cases. Two cases were discordant with regard to rotator cuff pathology and 13 were discordant on the basis of labral pathology. When the discordant cases were reviewed in consensus, the T2W images appeared to display rotator cuff and labral pathology as definitively as the T1W images. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was favored to have played a role in causing the discordances. MRA of the shoulder performed with joint distention provided by saline alone appears to offer equivalent diagnostic information to MRA performed with gadolinium enhancement. This protocol modification improves efficiency by eliminating several image series and provides a small cost savings by eliminating gadolinium. (orig.)

  11. Usefulness of intra-articular bupivacain and lidocain adjunction in MR or CT arthrography: A prospective study in 148 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosimann, Pascal J., E-mail: pascal.mosimann@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine; Becce, Fabio; Knoepfli, Anne-Sophie; Mino, Vincent; Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Department of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of shorter- and longer-acting intra-articular anaesthetics on post-arthrographic pain. Materials and methods: 154 consecutive patients investigated by MR or CT arthrographies were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: 1 – intra-articular contrast injection only; 2 – lidocain 1% adjunction; or 3 – bupivacain 0.25% adjunction. Pain was assessed before injection, at 15 min, 4 h, 1 day and 1 week after injection by visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: At 15 min, early mean pain score increased by 0.96, 0.24 and 0 in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Differences between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 2 were statistically significant (p = 0.003 and 0.03, respectively), but not between groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.54). Delayed mean pain score increase was maximal at 4 h, reaching 1.60, 1.22 and 0.29 in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Differences between groups 1 and 2 and 2 and 3 were statistically significant (p = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively), but not between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.46). At 24 h and 1 week, the interaction of local anaesthetics with increase in pain score was no longer significant. Results were independent of age, gender and baseline VAS. Conclusion: Intra-articular anaesthesia may significantly reduce post-arthrographic pain. Bupivacain seems to be more effective than lidocain to reduce both early and delayed pain.

  12. Magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy of gadolinium versus saline for rotator cuff and labral pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of intra-articular gadolinium versus saline alone in magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder. Our database was reviewed for 100 consecutive shoulder MRA examinations performed between January 2007 and December 2007. Patient information was blinded and images were retrospectively reviewed by at least two radiologists with dedicated musculoskeletal training. T2-weighted (T2W) images were initially analyzed in isolation to simulate MRA with saline alone. After a delay, the full study was analyzed including T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W images. If there was a significant discordance between the two analyses with regard to rotator cuff or labral pathology, the study was again reviewed by all evaluators in consensus to determine if the T1W images offered additional diagnostic information and increased diagnostic confidence. Of the 100 MRA examinations, there were 15 discordant cases. Two cases were discordant with regard to rotator cuff pathology and 13 were discordant on the basis of labral pathology. When the discordant cases were reviewed in consensus, the T2W images appeared to display rotator cuff and labral pathology as definitively as the T1W images. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was favored to have played a role in causing the discordances. MRA of the shoulder performed with joint distention provided by saline alone appears to offer equivalent diagnostic information to MRA performed with gadolinium enhancement. This protocol modification improves efficiency by eliminating several image series and provides a small cost savings by eliminating gadolinium. (orig.)

  13. Computed tomography arthrography with traction in the human hip for three-dimensional reconstruction of cartilage and the acetabular labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To develop and demonstrate the efficacy of a computed tomography arthrography (CTA) protocol for the hip that enables accurate three-dimensional reconstructions of cartilage and excellent visualization of the acetabular labrum. Materials and methods: Ninety-three subjects were imaged (104 scans); 68 subjects with abnormal anatomy, 11 patients after periacetabular osteotomy surgery, and 25 subjects with normal anatomy. Fifteen to 25 ml of contrast agent diluted with lidocaine was injected using a lateral oblique approach. A Hare traction splint applied traction during CT. The association between traction force and intra-articular joint space was assessed qualitatively under fluoroscopy. Cartilage geometry was reconstructed from the CTA images for 30 subjects; the maximum joint space under traction was measured. Results: Using the Hare traction splint, the intra-articular space and boundaries of cartilage could be clearly delineated throughout the joint; the acetabular labrum was also visible. Dysplastic hips required less traction (∼5 kg) than normal and retroverted hips required (>10 kg) to separate the cartilage. An increase in traction force produced a corresponding widening of the intra-articular joint space. Under traction, the maximum width of the intra-articular joint space during CT ranged from 0.98–6.7 mm (2.46 ± 1.16 mm). Conclusions: When applied to subjects with normal and abnormal hip anatomy, the CTA protocol presented yields clear delineation of the cartilage and the acetabular labrum. Use of a Hare traction splint provides a simple, cost-effective method to widen the intra-articular joint space during CT, and provides flexibility to vary the traction as required. - Highlights: • We present a hip CTA protocol to clearly delineate the intra-articular space. • A Hare traction splint provides a simple, cost-effective way to apply traction. • The required traction force depends on individual hip morphology. • The traction force

  14. Cam-type femoral-acetabular impingement: is the alpha angle the best MR arthrography has to offer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our institutional experience, determination of the alpha (α) angle at MR arthrography as an indicator of the likelihood of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is fraught with inconsistency. The aims of this study were to quantify the degree of variability in and calculate the diagnostic accuracy of the α angle in suggesting a diagnosis of cam impingement, to determine the accuracy of a positive clinical impingement test, and to suggest alternative MR arthrographic measures of femoral head-neck overgrowth and determine their diagnostic utilities. We carried out a retrospective analysis of MR arthrographic studies performed during a 4-year period, combined with chart analysis, which allowed identification of 78 patients in whom surgical correlation was also available. The status of a preoperative clinical impingement test was also noted. Patients were designated as having cam-type FAI (Group A, n = 39) if intra-operative femoral head-neck junction bony osteochondroplasty/arthoscopic femoral debridement was performed. Group B (n = 39) acted as controls. Three radiologists independently and blindly performed a series of measurements (α angle and two newly proposed measurements) in each patient on two separate occasions. An α angle of greater than 55 was considered indicative of the presence of cam-type FAI. Performance values for α angle measurement were poor for each observer. There was considerable (up to 30% of the mean value) intra-observer variability between the first and second α angle measurements for each subject. Binary logistic regression analysis confirmed that the α angle is of no value in predicting the presence or absence of cam-FAI. A statistically significant difference existed between Groups A and B with regard to the newly proposed anterior femoral distance (AFD; p = 0.004). Using an AFD value of 3.60 mm or greater as being indicative of the presence of cam-FAI yields a 0.67 performance measure (95% confidence interval 0

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging arthrography following type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior repair: interobserver and intraobserver reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurji HM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hafeez M Kurji,1 Yohei Ono,2,3 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Ben Wong,4 Corinne Dyke,4 Richard S Boorman,2 Gail M Thornton,2,5 Ian KY Lo2 1College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 5Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Background: Arthroscopic repair of type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP lesions is a common surgical procedure. However, anatomic healing following repair has rarely been investigated. The intraobserver and interobserver reliability of magnetic resonance imaging arthrography (MRA following type II SLAP repair has not previously been investigated. This is of particular interest due to recent reports of poor clinical results following type II SLAP lesion repair. Purpose: To evaluate the MRA findings following arthroscopic type II SLAP lesion repair and determine its intraobserver and interobserver reliability. Study design: Cohort study (diagnosis, Level of Evidence, 2. Methods: Twenty-five patients with an isolated type II SLAP lesion (confirmed via diagnostic arthroscopy underwent standard suture anchor-based repair. At a mean of 25.2 months postoperatively, patients underwent a standardized MRA protocol to investigate the integrity of the repair. MRAs were independently reviewed by two radiologists and a fellowship trained shoulder surgeon. The outcomes were classified as healed SLAP repair or re-torn SLAP repair. Results: On average, 54% of MRAs were interpreted as healed SLAP repairs while 46% of MRAs were interpreted as having a re-torn SLAP repair. Overall, only 43% of the studies had 100% agreement across all

  16. Cam-type femoral-acetabular impingement: is the alpha angle the best MR arthrography has to offer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohan, Derek G.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Motamedi, Kambiz; Sayre, James [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hame, Sharon [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In our institutional experience, determination of the alpha ({alpha}) angle at MR arthrography as an indicator of the likelihood of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is fraught with inconsistency. The aims of this study were to quantify the degree of variability in and calculate the diagnostic accuracy of the {alpha} angle in suggesting a diagnosis of cam impingement, to determine the accuracy of a positive clinical impingement test, and to suggest alternative MR arthrographic measures of femoral head-neck overgrowth and determine their diagnostic utilities. We carried out a retrospective analysis of MR arthrographic studies performed during a 4-year period, combined with chart analysis, which allowed identification of 78 patients in whom surgical correlation was also available. The status of a preoperative clinical impingement test was also noted. Patients were designated as having cam-type FAI (Group A, n = 39) if intra-operative femoral head-neck junction bony osteochondroplasty/arthoscopic femoral debridement was performed. Group B (n = 39) acted as controls. Three radiologists independently and blindly performed a series of measurements ({alpha} angle and two newly proposed measurements) in each patient on two separate occasions. An {alpha} angle of greater than 55 was considered indicative of the presence of cam-type FAI. Performance values for {alpha} angle measurement were poor for each observer. There was considerable (up to 30% of the mean value) intra-observer variability between the first and second {alpha} angle measurements for each subject. Binary logistic regression analysis confirmed that the {alpha} angle is of no value in predicting the presence or absence of cam-FAI. A statistically significant difference existed between Groups A and B with regard to the newly proposed anterior femoral distance (AFD; p = 0.004). Using an AFD value of 3.60 mm or greater as being indicative of the presence of cam-FAI yields a 0.67 performance measure (95

  17. Value of computed tomography arthrography with delayed acquisitions in the work-up of ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel: report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omoumi, Patrick [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Medical Imaging, Avenue Hippocrate 10/2942, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Tours, Department of Medical Imaging, Tours (France); Gheldere, Antoine de; Leemrijse, Thibaut [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedics, Brussels (Belgium); Galant, Christine [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pathology, Brussels (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Peter [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neurology, Brussels (Belgium); Malghem, Jacques; Simoni, Paolo; Berg, Bruno C.V.; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Medical Imaging, Avenue Hippocrate 10/2942, 1200, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    Ganglion cysts are a common cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. As in other locations, these cysts are believed to communicate with neighboring joints. The positive diagnosis and preoperative work-up of these cysts require identification and location of the cyst pedicles so that they may be excised and the risk of recurrence decreased. This can be challenging with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three cases of symptomatic ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel, diagnosed by MR imaging, where computed tomography (CT) arthrography with delayed acquisitions helped to confirm the diagnosis and identify precisely the topography of the communication with the subtalar joint. These cases provide new evidence of the articular origin of ganglion cysts developing in the tarsal tunnel. (orig.)

  18. Value of computed tomography arthrography with delayed acquisitions in the work-up of ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel: report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganglion cysts are a common cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. As in other locations, these cysts are believed to communicate with neighboring joints. The positive diagnosis and preoperative work-up of these cysts require identification and location of the cyst pedicles so that they may be excised and the risk of recurrence decreased. This can be challenging with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three cases of symptomatic ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel, diagnosed by MR imaging, where computed tomography (CT) arthrography with delayed acquisitions helped to confirm the diagnosis and identify precisely the topography of the communication with the subtalar joint. These cases provide new evidence of the articular origin of ganglion cysts developing in the tarsal tunnel. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  20. Indirect MR arthrography of anterior shoulder instability in the ABER and the apprehension test positions: a prospective comparative study of two different shoulder positions during MRI using intravenous gadodiamide contrast for enhancement of the joint fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of MRI for the evaluation of anterior shoulder instability can be enhanced by shoulder positions that stress the stabilising structures. The ABER position is one that has been described in combination with intra-articular gadopentetate dimeglumine arthrography. We believe that MRI in the Apprehension test position with 90 abduction and maximal tolerable external rotation provides maximum tension on the anterior stabilising structures and with this technique it is sufficient to use indirect gadodiamide arthrography following intravenous injection of the contrast medium. The purpose of this study was to make a prospective comparative evaluation of the ABER and Apprehension test positions when using indirect arthrography with intravenous gadodiamide administration in shoulders with anterior instability. Results. Both the ABER and the Apprehension test position were useful techniques in detecting capsulolabral pathology and Hill-Sachs lesions. The Apprehension test position produced significantly better gadodiamide-enhanced joint fluid in the region of pathology in both the capsulolabral lesion and the Hill-Sachs lesion. It also visualised the size of the Hill-Sachs lesion significantly better than did the ABER position. (orig.)

  1. What happens to the triangular fibrocartilage complex during pronation and supination of the forearm? Analysis of its morphology and diagnostic assessment with MR arthrography

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    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Service de Radiologie, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Botte, M.J. [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic morphologic changes of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) during pronation and supination of the forearm using high-resolution MR arthrography in cadavers and to evaluate the impact of these changes on the diagnostic assessment of the normal and abnormal TFCC. Design and specimens: High-resolution MR arthrography of 10 wrists of cadaveric specimens was obtained in maximum pronation, in the neutral position, and in maximum supination of the forearm. The structures of the TFCC were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and correlated with anatomic sections. The position of the forearm that allowed the best visualization of normal structures and lesions of the TFCC was determined. Results: The shape and extent of the articular disc as well as the radial portions of the radioulnar ligaments did not change with pronation and supination. The articular disc was horizontal in the neutral position and tilted more distally to align with the proximal carpal row in pronation and supination. The fibers of the ulnar part of the radioulnar ligaments (ulnar attachment of the articular disc) revealed the most significant changes: their orientation was coronal in the neutral position and sagittal in positions of pronation and supination. The ulnomeniscal homologue was largest in the neutral position and was reduced in size during pronation and supination. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was centered in its groove in the neutral position and pronation. In supination this tendon revealed subluxation from this groove. The dorsal capsule of the distal radioulnar joint was taut in pronation, and the palmar capsule was taut in supination. The preferred forearm position for analysis of most of the structures of the TFCC was the neutral position, followed by the pronated position. The neutral position was rated best for the detection of ulnar and radial detachments of the TFCC, followed by the pronated position, except for two central

  2. What happens to the triangular fibrocartilage complex during pronation and supination of the forearm? Analysis of its morphology and diagnostic assessment with MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic morphologic changes of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) during pronation and supination of the forearm using high-resolution MR arthrography in cadavers and to evaluate the impact of these changes on the diagnostic assessment of the normal and abnormal TFCC. Design and specimens: High-resolution MR arthrography of 10 wrists of cadaveric specimens was obtained in maximum pronation, in the neutral position, and in maximum supination of the forearm. The structures of the TFCC were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and correlated with anatomic sections. The position of the forearm that allowed the best visualization of normal structures and lesions of the TFCC was determined. Results: The shape and extent of the articular disc as well as the radial portions of the radioulnar ligaments did not change with pronation and supination. The articular disc was horizontal in the neutral position and tilted more distally to align with the proximal carpal row in pronation and supination. The fibers of the ulnar part of the radioulnar ligaments (ulnar attachment of the articular disc) revealed the most significant changes: their orientation was coronal in the neutral position and sagittal in positions of pronation and supination. The ulnomeniscal homologue was largest in the neutral position and was reduced in size during pronation and supination. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was centered in its groove in the neutral position and pronation. In supination this tendon revealed subluxation from this groove. The dorsal capsule of the distal radioulnar joint was taut in pronation, and the palmar capsule was taut in supination. The preferred forearm position for analysis of most of the structures of the TFCC was the neutral position, followed by the pronated position. The neutral position was rated best for the detection of ulnar and radial detachments of the TFCC, followed by the pronated position, except for two central

  3. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases · Early reduction: 2 cases · Intermediate reduction: 3 cases · Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases · Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  4. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of artrography in the diagnosis of acute ligaments injuries of the ankle is discussed. The technique of examination is described. An anatomic review, diagnostic elements and the proceeding are presented emphasizing the lateral ligaments. (M.A.C.)

  5. Direct MR arthrography in the diagnosis of injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist%MR直接关节造影在腕三角纤维软骨复合体损伤中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爽; 徐文东; 冯晓源

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare direct magnetic resonance(MR)arthrography with arthroscopy of the wrist for evaluation of injury in the triangular fibrocartilage complex(TFCC).Methods Fourteen cases with suspicion of injury of triangular fibrocartilage complex were performed with conventional MR and direct MR arthrography,10 cases were done by arthroscopy.In the direct MR arthrography,needle placement was obtained using clinical landmark under sterile technique and fluoroscopy,intra-articular injection was performed at the radius-scaphoid space with 5-7 ml 0.3%mixture of Gadolinium (0.1 mmol/L)and saline(0.3 ml Gd-DTPA+100 ml saline).The findings of MRI and MR arthrography were analyzed with results of arthroscopy.Resuits (1)Among 14 cases with injury of TFCC,there were ulnar tear in 5cases,radius tear in 4 cases,complete tear in 5 cases(included 2 cases with long term rheumatoid).(2)High signal intensity and isointensity signal of injury of TFCC were revealed on STIR or T2 WI and T1 WIrespectively,normal hypointensity signal of the TFCC was partially or completely absent.Contrast media at the ulnar insertion(5 cases with ulnar tear)or radius attachment of the TFCC(4 cases with radius tear)were seen in the MR arthrography with difierent extent,5 cases with complete tear showed contrast media at the both ulnar insertion and radius attachment of the TFCC.The findings of MR arthrography were well corresponded with results of arthroscopy on the lesion site,including ulnar tear in 3 cases,radius tear in 4cases and complete tear in 3 cases.(3)Among 14 cases with TFCC,8 cases had dislocation of radius-ulnar joint,6 cases had bone contusion of radius or ulnar,synovial reaction was also clearly depicted on conventional MRI and direct MR arthrography in all cases.Conclusion Compared with results of arthroscopy,direct MR arthrography can adequately reveal the injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex,synovial reaction and edema changes are depicted on conventional MRI.%目的 通

  6. Ultrasonographic evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint: Correlation of findings with gross anatomy and MR arthrography in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M., E-mail: florian.buck@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Nico, Marcelo A.C., E-mail: nico.marcelo@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Gheno, Ramon, E-mail: ramon.gheno@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Trudell, Debra J., E-mail: debtrudell@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Resnick, Donald, E-mail: dresnick@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Methods and materials: Ten cadaveric specimens were obtained. US evaluation of cartilage degeneration and thickness was performed by two independent and blinded readers (R1 and R2). Gross anatomy and MR arthrography evaluated by two readers in consensus served as the reference standard. The joint surface not accessible to US was measured. Results: US interreader agreement was non-existent for cartilage thickness measurements and moderate for cartilage degeneration grading (weighted kappa = 0.41). Comparing US and MR imaging evaluation, there was no correlation between US R1 and MR imaging (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC] = 0.352) and a moderate correlation between US R2 and MR imaging (PCC = 0.570) concerning cartilage thickness measurements. Concerning cartilage degeneration grading, there was a moderate to strong (R1 Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC] = 0.729)/R2 SCC = 0.767) correlation concerning cartilage degeneration grading. Comparing US and gross anatomic evaluation, there was no correlation for US R1 (PCC = 0.220) and a strong correlation for US R2 (PCC = 0.922) concerning cartilage thickness measurements, and a strong to moderate correlation (R1 SCC = 0.808/R2 SCC = 0.597) concerning cartilage degeneration grading. The mean sector of the articular surface of the ulna head not accessible to US was 13{sup o}. Conclusion: In conclusion the DRUJ is accessible to US except in the central 13{sup o} sector of the joint surface. US was approved to be sufficient in demonstrating advanced stages of cartilage degeneration. Thus, US of the DRUJ is recommended in patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain.

  7. Ultrasonographic evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint: Correlation of findings with gross anatomy and MR arthrography in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Methods and materials: Ten cadaveric specimens were obtained. US evaluation of cartilage degeneration and thickness was performed by two independent and blinded readers (R1 and R2). Gross anatomy and MR arthrography evaluated by two readers in consensus served as the reference standard. The joint surface not accessible to US was measured. Results: US interreader agreement was non-existent for cartilage thickness measurements and moderate for cartilage degeneration grading (weighted kappa = 0.41). Comparing US and MR imaging evaluation, there was no correlation between US R1 and MR imaging (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC] = 0.352) and a moderate correlation between US R2 and MR imaging (PCC = 0.570) concerning cartilage thickness measurements. Concerning cartilage degeneration grading, there was a moderate to strong (R1 Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC] = 0.729)/R2 SCC = 0.767) correlation concerning cartilage degeneration grading. Comparing US and gross anatomic evaluation, there was no correlation for US R1 (PCC = 0.220) and a strong correlation for US R2 (PCC = 0.922) concerning cartilage thickness measurements, and a strong to moderate correlation (R1 SCC = 0.808/R2 SCC = 0.597) concerning cartilage degeneration grading. The mean sector of the articular surface of the ulna head not accessible to US was 13o. Conclusion: In conclusion the DRUJ is accessible to US except in the central 13o sector of the joint surface. US was approved to be sufficient in demonstrating advanced stages of cartilage degeneration. Thus, US of the DRUJ is recommended in patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain.

  8. Arthrography of the dog's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different volumes with varying concentrations of meglumine-sodium diatrizoate were injected to study positive contrast shoulder arthrograms in six experimental dogs weighing 23-37 kg. The best delineation of the articular cartilage was obtained following injection of 1.5 ml of a 25% solution (185 mg iodine/joint). To visualize the bicipital tendon sheet and the different pouches of the shoulder joint, 6 ml of a 25% solution (750 mg iodine/joint) should be used. If no definite lesions are previewed, 6 ml of a 19% solution (550 mg iodine/joint) offers an acceptable compromise since with this volume and concentration no pooling of contrast medium overlapping the caudal area of the humeral head was seen. Radiographs should be obtained within 5 minutes after injection of the contrast medium. After that period the delineation of the joint structures is vaguening by absorption of the contrast medium. Repeated contrast examination with meglumine-sodium diatrizoate should be avoided. After four procedures at weekly intervals, the necropsy performed on two dogs showed inflammatory changes of the synovial membrane

  9. Frequency and topography of lesions of the femoro-tibial cartilage at spiral CT arthrography of the knee: a study in patients with normal knee radiographs and without history of trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vande Berg, B.C.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J. [Department of Radiology, Clinique St Luc, 10 avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-11-01

    To determine the frequency and topography of cartilage lesions involving the femoro-tibial joints in patients with normal knee radiographs and without a remembered history of trauma.Design and patients. A radiologist retrospectively reviewed the dual-detector spiral CT knee arthrograms performed in 209 consecutive patients (mean age 37.6 years) with normal knee radiographs. Images were analyzed for the presence, grade (Noyes classification system) and location of cartilage lesions, the location being designated by dividing each articular surface into a grid of 16 parts.Results. Fifty-three percent of knees had cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher that involved articular surfaces to a variable extent: lateral tibial plateau (31%), medial femoral condyle (27%), medial tibial plateau (14%) and lateral femoral condyle (5%). Areas of the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau and of the inner half of the medial femoral condyle were statistically more frequently involved than their counterparts (P<0.0001). The bare area of the medial tibial plateau, but not that of the lateral tibial plateau, was more frequently involved than the corresponding meniscus-covered area (P<0.0001).Conclusion. Cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher, detected at spiral CT arthrography in 53% of the knees, predominantly involved the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau, the inner half of the medial femoral condyle and the bare area of the medial tibial plateau. (orig.)

  10. Frequency and topography of lesions of the femoro-tibial cartilage at spiral CT arthrography of the knee: a study in patients with normal knee radiographs and without history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency and topography of cartilage lesions involving the femoro-tibial joints in patients with normal knee radiographs and without a remembered history of trauma.Design and patients. A radiologist retrospectively reviewed the dual-detector spiral CT knee arthrograms performed in 209 consecutive patients (mean age 37.6 years) with normal knee radiographs. Images were analyzed for the presence, grade (Noyes classification system) and location of cartilage lesions, the location being designated by dividing each articular surface into a grid of 16 parts.Results. Fifty-three percent of knees had cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher that involved articular surfaces to a variable extent: lateral tibial plateau (31%), medial femoral condyle (27%), medial tibial plateau (14%) and lateral femoral condyle (5%). Areas of the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau and of the inner half of the medial femoral condyle were statistically more frequently involved than their counterparts (P<0.0001). The bare area of the medial tibial plateau, but not that of the lateral tibial plateau, was more frequently involved than the corresponding meniscus-covered area (P<0.0001).Conclusion. Cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher, detected at spiral CT arthrography in 53% of the knees, predominantly involved the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau, the inner half of the medial femoral condyle and the bare area of the medial tibial plateau. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of three-dimensional isotropic and conventional MR arthrography with respect to the diagnosis of rotator cuff and labral lesions: Focus on isotropic fat-suppressed proton density and VIBE sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracies of three-dimensional (3D) isotropic magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using fat-suppressed proton density (PD) or volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences with that of conventional MRA for the diagnosis of rotator cuff and labral lesions. Materials and methods: Eighty-six patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery were included. 3D isotropic sequences were performed in the axial plane using fat-suppressed PD (group A) in 53 patients and using VIBE (group B) in 33 patients. Reformatted images were obtained corresponding to conventional images, and evaluated for the presence of labral and rotator cuff lesions using conventional and 3D isotropic sequences. The diagnostic performances of each sequence were determined using arthroscopic findings as the standard. Results: Good to excellent interobserver agreements were obtained for both 3D isotropic sequences for the evaluation of rotator cuff and labral lesions. Excellent agreement was found between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D isotropic MRA, except for supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by both readers and for subscapularis tendon (SCT) tears by reader 2 in group B. 2D MRA and 3D isotropic sequences had high diagnostic performances for rotator and labral tears, and the difference between the two imaging methods was insignificant. Conclusions: The diagnostic performances of 3D isotropic VIBE and PD sequences were similar to those of 2D MRA

  12. 磁共振平扫与磁共振关节造影在肩袖撕裂诊断中的应用价值%Application value of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树学; 李水连; 任明达; 肖铮; 吴宇峰; 洪云恒; 张雄彪; 唐玉德; 罗丽好; 陈志明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the imaging features of conventional MR] and MR arthrography(MRA) of rotator cuff tear, evaluate the value of these two techniques,and explore the indications of MRA . Methods 79 cases with rotator cuff tear confirmed by arthroscopic or surgery were divided into five types according to the intraopcrativc findings, Image features of conventional MRI and MRA of rotator cuff tear were retrospectively analysed, and the sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques for various rotator cuff tears were comparatcd. Results Type I rotator cuff tear was showed in 18 cases, the two methods all made the right diagnosis (accuracy rate of 100 % ) ; type Ⅱ rotator cuff tear in 18 cases, conventional MRI correctly diagnosed 1 6 cases(accuracy rate of 89 % ) , MRA correctly diagnosed 18 cascs( accuracy rate of 100%); type Ⅲrotator cuff tear in 7 cases, conventional MRI correctly diagnosed 7 cascs(accuracy rate of 100% ), MRA correctly diagnosed 0 case; type Ⅳ rotator cuff tear in 22 cases, conventional MRI correctly diagnosed 1 6 cascs( accuracy rate of 73 % ) , MRA correctly diagnosed 22 cascs(accuracy rate of 100% ); type Ⅴ rotator cuff tear in 14 cases, conventional MRI correctly diagnosed 14 cascs(accuracy rate of 100%), MRA correctly diagnosed 0 case. Conclusion Conventional MRI can make the right diagnosis for most cases of rotator cuff tear, but not accurate enough for the diagnosis of type Ⅱ and typeⅣ rotator cuff tear, there arc some false positive and false negative dianosis:thc MRA has an important value for the diagnosis of type Ⅱ and type Ⅳ rotator cuff tear, but it docs not help the diagnosis of type Ⅲ and type Ⅴ rotator cuff tear; magnetic resonance shoulder check should first select the conventional MRI. If a suspicious rotator cuff tear is not determined on conventional MRI, MRA should be performed to diagnose type Ⅱ and type Ⅳ rotator cuff tear.%目的 研究肩袖撕裂的磁共振平扫(MRI

  13. Digital subtraction arthrography of the hips and of the shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study on 60 patients, it could be shown that very good results can be achieved in the region of the shoulder joint with the use of the digital subtraction technique and of digital image intensifier radiography. A further possibility of using the digital subtraction technique for proving endoprosthesis loosenings of the hip demonstrated its importance after a short time and has become a routine method in the meantime. These two examination techniques are displayed methodologically and their clinical possibilities of use are assessed in this contribution. (orig.)

  14. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows ; 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 53%, 79%, 40%, and the trauma history of each group was 50%, 40%, 60%.

  15. Bicipital tenosynovitis in the dog: evaluation with positive contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes seven dogs with traumatic bicipital tenosynovitis in which complete clinical, radiographic, and surgical evaluations were performed. All were adult dogs of medium to large breed and were presented with a chronic front limb lameness of several months' duration and shoulder muscle atrophy. Survey radiographs of the scapulohumeral joint showed new bone production almost exclusively in the region of the biceps tendon, i.e., the intertubercular groove and the supraglenoid tuberosity. Arthrograms in six of seven dogs revealed difficulty in filling or irregular filling of the bicipital tendon sheath, best seen on the mediolateral view of the shoulder. On surgical exploration, macroscopic lesions of the tendon and/or the sheath were observed in all dogs and included adhesions, fibrosis, scar tissue, edema, and thickening. Partial tear of the tendon was observed in three dogs

  16. A clinical study of temporomandibular joint disorders by using arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to prove the relationship between arthrographic and clinical features in temporomandibular joint disorders. In order to carry out this study, ninety-eight arthrographic examinations of temporomandibular joints were performed in eighty-two patients who had the temporomandibular joint disorders. As the arthrographic examination, the cases were classified in three groups, disk displacement with reduction, disk displacement without reduction, within normal limit. After this, the cases were clinically examined, and the results were compared and analyzed in each other group. The obtained results were as follows: 1. As the classification by arthrographic examination, three groups (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) were 41%, 54%, 5% of total cases in this study, respectively. 2. The third decade (65%) was most frequent in this study. The average age of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 24, 28, 21, and disc displacement without reduction group was higher than any other group. 3. In the chief complaint, pain was the most frequent in all three groups. Joint sound was also frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but in disc displacement without reduction group, limitation of mouth opening was more frequent. 4. Of the various pain, the movement pain was most frequent (61%) in this study. In joint sound, click (63%) was the most frequent in disc displacement with reduction group, but sound history (42%) and no sound (31%) were more frequent in disc displacement without reduction group. 5. The average maximum opening of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 44 mm, 32.9 mm, 44 mm, and disc displacement without reduction group was less than any other group. 6. The masticatory disturbance of each group (disc displacement with reduction, disc displacement without reduction, within normal limit) was 53%, 79%, 40%, and the trauma history of each group was 50%, 40%, 60%.

  17. Treatment of Frozen Shoulder Using Distension Arthrography (Hydrodilatation)

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, J. Keith; Budge, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis) is a common, painful and disabling condition which is typically slow to resolve. Patients with this condition will be seen in every musculoskeletal practitioner’s clinic on a regular basis. There is a wide variety of treatment modalities available, some more effective than others. This article reviews the literature on the aetiology and natural history of the condition, and the common treatments provided. The literature on hydraulic arthrographic capsular...

  18. Positive contrast shoulder arthrography in dogs with uropolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positive contrast radiography of both shoulder joints with different concentrations of Uropolin (containing 1.6 g sodium amidotrizoate and 10.4 g meglumine amidotrizoate in 20 ml ampules; Polfa, Poland) has been performed in six dogs, divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected with 20% Uropolin, the second - with 30% Uropolin and the third - with 30% Uropolin and 0.2 ml 0.1% adrenaline hydrochloride. Shoulder radiographs were performed 2, 5 and 10 min after the injection of the contrast medium in mediolateral and craniocaudal views. The quality of radiographs was assessed visually using a four score system for five independent parameters in both views. The results showed a better quality of mediolateral radiographs 5 minutes after injection of 30% Uropolin (average score 12.5) compared to 20% Uropolin (average score 8.5), at p<0.05. The addition of 0.1% adrenaline hydrochloride to 30% Uropolin resulted in a better quality of arthrographs up to 10 minutes following the administration (average score 10 compared to 8.5 in the group with independent application, p<0.01)

  19. Arthrography and the medical compartment of the patello-femoral joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thijn, C.J.P.; Hillen, B.

    1984-03-01

    In four groups of patients with normal patellar cartilage, synovitis, patellar chondropathy, and degenerative changes of the patellar surface of the femur, the anatomical relationships within the medial compartment of the patello-femoral joint were examined. Clear differences were observed between these groups in the incidence of visualization of the medial alar plica and the mediopatellar synovial plica. As a consequence, an explanation has been sought for the occurrence of patellar chondropathy and degenerative changes of the patellar surface of the femur. It seems probable that a long-standing traumatic synovitis with effusion, attenuation of the synovial membrane, and the composition of the synovial fluid can lead to patellar chondropathy. The degenerative changes of the patellar surface of the femur are usually secondary to those of the load-bearing patellar facet. Insufficient covering of the cartilage by soft tissue may play a role in chondropathy of the nonload-bearing portion of the patella and the femoral condyle.

  20. Normal anatomy and pathological changes of the infrapatellar pad of fat in double contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic validity of double-contrast angiography in patients with Hoffa's disease was studied by re-evaluation of 1566 arthrographs without knowing the surgical findings. In order to obtain more information on the anatomy and pathology of the intrapatellar pad of fat, so knee joints of corpses were dissected who had died at different stages of life. As the studies showed, the decisive diagnostic factors in Hoffa's disease are the clinical complaints and an enlarged pad of fat in the arthrographic picture. (orig.)

  1. Frequency of glenoid chondral lesions on MR arthrography in patients with anterior shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J., E-mail: juliemobrien@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Grebenyuk, J., E-mail: julia.grebenyuk@utoronto.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Leith, J., E-mail: jleith@shaw.ca [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, B.B., E-mail: Bruce.Forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of glenoid chondral abnormalities in relation to Hill Sachs (HS) lesions in MR arthrograms of patients with anterior shoulder instability versus controls. Such glenoid lesions can directly impact surgical decision-making and approach, and potentially negatively impact outcome if missed. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of direct MR shoulder arthrograms in 165 subjects, (101 with anterior instability/64 controls) was performed independently by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Outcome measures were the presence of a HS, anterior labral pathology and glenoid chondral injury. Kappa statistic, Pearson Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis were employed for analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for the presence of HS, labral and chondral lesions was 0.964, 0.965 and 0.858 respectively, with intra-observer variability of 1.0, 0.985 and 0.861 for the principle reader. 58% of patients and 8% of controls had HS (p < 0.001). 72% of patients and 25% of controls had anterior labral injury (p < 0.001). 36% of instability patients and 10% controls had glenoid chondral lesions (p < 0.001). 46% of anterior instability patients with HS defects had chondral injury as opposed to 21% of patients without HS defects (p = 0.009). Depth of the HS lesion did not increase the likelihood of a glenoid chondral lesion (p = 0.7335). Conclusion: In the clinical anterior instability cohort, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher number of HS and glenoid chondral lesions than in controls. In anterior instability patients, the presence of a HS lesion confers a statistically significant greater likelihood of having a glenoid chondral lesion when compared to patients with instability and no HS.

  2. Frequency of glenoid chondral lesions on MR arthrography in patients with anterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of glenoid chondral abnormalities in relation to Hill Sachs (HS) lesions in MR arthrograms of patients with anterior shoulder instability versus controls. Such glenoid lesions can directly impact surgical decision-making and approach, and potentially negatively impact outcome if missed. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of direct MR shoulder arthrograms in 165 subjects, (101 with anterior instability/64 controls) was performed independently by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Outcome measures were the presence of a HS, anterior labral pathology and glenoid chondral injury. Kappa statistic, Pearson Chi-square and Mann–Whitney analysis were employed for analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for the presence of HS, labral and chondral lesions was 0.964, 0.965 and 0.858 respectively, with intra-observer variability of 1.0, 0.985 and 0.861 for the principle reader. 58% of patients and 8% of controls had HS (p < 0.001). 72% of patients and 25% of controls had anterior labral injury (p < 0.001). 36% of instability patients and 10% controls had glenoid chondral lesions (p < 0.001). 46% of anterior instability patients with HS defects had chondral injury as opposed to 21% of patients without HS defects (p = 0.009). Depth of the HS lesion did not increase the likelihood of a glenoid chondral lesion (p = 0.7335). Conclusion: In the clinical anterior instability cohort, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher number of HS and glenoid chondral lesions than in controls. In anterior instability patients, the presence of a HS lesion confers a statistically significant greater likelihood of having a glenoid chondral lesion when compared to patients with instability and no HS.

  3. Diagnostic value of digital subtraction arthrography (DSAr) and radionuclide arthrography (AS) in planning revesion operation in hip endoprothesis loosening; Stellenwert der digitalen Subtraktionsarthrografie und Arthroszintigrafie in der Indikationsstellung und Planung der Hueft-TEP-Wechseloperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, J.D.; Patsalis, T.; Mueller, R.T. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Essen (Germany); Seifert, J. [Klinik Essen Sued (Germany). Zentrum fuer Klinische Radiologie; Goymann, V. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Orthopaedie; Stuckmann, B. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Orthopaedische Rheumatologie

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical and radiographic findings are of little value in the diagnosis of hip endoprothesis loosening. Refined contrast and radionuclide arthrographic techniques are more precise in predicting endoprothesis loosening. Here we compare both techniques with respect to the surgical result. Material and methods: 68 patients with hip pain after various arthroplasty procedure were investigated by clinical examination, X-ray, DSAr and AS. Surgical proof was obtained in 73.5%. Results: An acetabular component loosening was detected in 89% by DSAr and in 86% by AS with a specificity for both methods of 93%. The femoral component loosening was seen with a sensitivity of 89% by DSAr and 100% by AS, respectively. Specificity of DSAr in the femoral compartment was 94%, of AS 88%. Conclusions: DSAr and AS are useful tools in the diagnosis of hip endoprothesis loosening and in planning surgical treatment. Both methods are comparable concerning the acetabular component, whereas AS is more sensitive in detecting femoral stem loosening. Combination of both methods is not recommended for routine diagnosis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Indikation zur Wechseloperation nach Implantation einer Hueft-Totalendoprothese (TEP) laesst sich auch unter Einsatz verschiedener diagnostischer Verfahren oft nicht zweifelsfrei stellen. Die Subtraktionsarthrografie (DSAr) und die Arthroszintigrafie (As) leisten einen entscheidenden Beitrag zur Diagnose einer TEP-Lockerung. In dieser Untersuchung werden beide Methoden verglichen und der Nutzen beider Verfahren in Kombination geprueft. Material und Methode: 68 Patienten mit Schmerzsymptomatik nach Implantation einer Hueft-TEP erhielten eine digitale Subtraktionsarthrographie und Arthroszintigrafie. Als Goldstandard zur Ueberpruefung der Befunde diente in 73,5% die Revisionsoperation in den verschiedenen beteiligten orthopaedischen Zentren. Ergebnisse: Fuer die Subtraktionsarthrografie lag die Spezifitaet fuer den Nachweis einer Pfannenlockerung bei 93%, beim Schaft bei 94%. Die Sensitivitaet kann mit 89% angegeben werden. Im Bereich der Pfanne unterscheiden sich beide Methoden in der Sensitivitaet (Arthroszintigrafie 86%), waehrend im Bereich des Schaftes die Arthroszintigrafie eine hoehere Sensitivitaet (100%) bei geringerer Spezifitaet (88%) aufweist. Schlussfolgerung: Die digitale Subtraktionsarthrografie ist zur Diagnosestellung einer Hueft-TEP Lockerung bei verschiedenen Implantaten und Verankerungstechniken geeignet. Die Arthroszintigrafie zeigt ueberlagerungsfrei das Ausmass der Implantatumspuelung bei fehlender direkter Abbildung des Knochens und der Implantate. (orig.)

  4. A new method for measurement of subcoracoid outlet and its relationship to rotator cuff pathology at MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orthopaedic surgical studies have shown that variations in the vertical distance between the tip of the coracoid process and the supra-glenoid tubercle alter the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. Our objective was to measure the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supra-glenoid tubercle (CTGT) on MR and to assess whether this showed better correlation with rotator cuff pathology compared with the axial coraco-humeral distance. A retrospective review was performed of 100 consecutive shoulder MR arthrograms. Vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle was measured in the sagittal oblique plane. Separate assessment was then made of tendon pathology of the subscapularis, supraspinatus and long head of biceps tendons. Axial coraco-humeral distance was then measured. Correlation between tendon abnormalities and the two measurements was then made. Of the 100 cases, 42 had subscapularis tendon lesions, 21 had lesions of the long head of biceps and 53 had supraspinatus tendon lesions. Mean vertical distance from the coracoid tip to supraglenoid tubercle was greater in those with lesions of any of these tendons and was statistically significant for the supraspinatus group (P = 0.005). Reduced axial coraco-humeral distance was also seen in patients with tendinopathy, although with less statistically significant difference (p = 0.059). Our results support orthopaedic studies that have shown that the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle increases the incidence and risk of rotator cuff disease by altering the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance arthrography assessment of the superior labrum using the BLC system: age-related changes mimicking SLAP-2 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziak, Adrian [Queen' s School of Medicine, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Chuang, Michael J.; Jancosko, Jason J.; Nottage, Wesley M. [The Sport Clinic Orthopedic Medical Associates, Inc., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Burnett, Keith R. [Saddleback Valley Radiology, Laguna Hills, CA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of the superior labrum with increasing age by assessing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms. Inclusion criteria were used to include only the MR arthrograms of patients devoid of clinical labral pathology. Two hundred thiry-six MR arthrograms were blindly assessed for biceps-labral complex (BLC) type 1-3 and sublabral recess size by a musculoskeletal radiologist. We have chosen the BLC system, which defines normal superior labral variants, since it is established in the literature and is used by reporting musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists. The MR arthrograms demonstrated that the majority of patients <40 years old were BLC type 1 and showed a steady increase in BLC types 2 and 3 with increasing age. Assessments demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.01) mean BLC types (1.62 vs 1.29) and recess size (1.35 vs 0.66 mm) in those over 40 compared with those less than 40 years of age. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted between mean BLC assessments between different decades of age. There appears to be a physiologic deepening of the superior labrum sulcus with age, which becomes significant after the age of 40. These findings can contribute to whether the superior labrum is considered abnormal when assessed radiographically. The differentiation of normal age-related changes in the shoulder, from those of a type 2 SLAP tear can reduce the rates of unnecessary SLAP-2 repairs. This is the first reported series to use the BLC system; we believe it provides a common nomenclature to allow clear communication between specialists. (orig.)

  6. Shoulder MR arthrography of the posterior labrocapsular complex in overhead throwers with pathologic internal impingement and internal rotation deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit have thickening of the posterior inferior labrocapsular complex on MR arthrogram images. This study was approved and a waiver of consent granted by our institutional review board. Twenty-six overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit, and 26 controls who had undergone MR arthrograms, were retrospectively examined. The MR studies were combined and read in a blind fashion. On an axial image through the posteroinferior glenoid rim, the readers measured the labral length, capsule-labrum length, and the posterior recess angle. A t-test was used to determine statistical significance. The mean labral length was 4.9 mm [standard deviation (SD) 1.4 mm] for the controls, and 6.4 mm (SD 1.6 mm) for the athletes (P = 0.001). The mean capsule-labrum length was 5.4 mm (SD 2.1 mm) for the controls, and 8.8 mm (SD 2.9 mm) for the athletes (P < 0.001). The mean posterior recess angle measured 65 (SD 27 ) for the controls and 94 (SD 38 ) for the athletes (P = 0.002). Overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit tend to have a thicker labrum and a shallower capsular recess in the posterior inferior shoulder joint than do non-overhead-throwing athletes. In many, the posteroinferior capsule is also thickened. These MR findings should alert the radiologist to closely inspect the posterior cuff and posterosuperior labrum for the tears associated with internal impingement. (orig.)

  7. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 28 Yeongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Joo Han [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Soyeon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seongnam-si, Gyeongi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 28 Yeongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jee Won [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 425 Shindaebang-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p < 0.05). Inter-observer reliability of fatty degeneration grades were excellent to substantial on both pre- and postoperative CTA in supraspinatus (0.8685 and 0.8535) and subscapularis muscles (0.7777 and 0.7972), but fair in infraspinatus/teres minor muscles (0.5791 and 0.5740); however, quantitative Hounsfield units measurements showed excellent reliability for all muscles (ICC: 0.7950 and 0.9346 for SST, 0.7922 and 0.8492 for SSC, and 0.9254 and 0.9052 for IST/TM). No muscle showed improvement of fatty degeneration after surgical repair on qualitative and quantitative assessments; there was no difference in changes of fatty degeneration after surgical repair according to preoperative tear size and post-operative cuff integrity (p > 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy . cm) was 365.2 mGy . cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy . cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier grades correlated well with HUs of rotator cuff muscles. Reliability was excellent for both systems, except for FD grade of IST/TM muscles, which may be more reliably assessed using quantitative measurements. (orig.)

  8. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudisco Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA, showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that leakage of the contrast medium is due to an incomplete tendon-to-bone sealing, which is not a re-tear. This phenomenon could have important medicolegal implications. Level of evidence III. Treatment study: Case–control study.

  9. A new method for measurement of subcoracoid outlet and its relationship to rotator cuff pathology at MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, N.A.; Singh, J.; Tins, B.J.; Lalam, R.K.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Orthopaedic surgical studies have shown that variations in the vertical distance between the tip of the coracoid process and the supra-glenoid tubercle alter the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. Our objective was to measure the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supra-glenoid tubercle (CTGT) on MR and to assess whether this showed better correlation with rotator cuff pathology compared with the axial coraco-humeral distance. A retrospective review was performed of 100 consecutive shoulder MR arthrograms. Vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle was measured in the sagittal oblique plane. Separate assessment was then made of tendon pathology of the subscapularis, supraspinatus and long head of biceps tendons. Axial coraco-humeral distance was then measured. Correlation between tendon abnormalities and the two measurements was then made. Of the 100 cases, 42 had subscapularis tendon lesions, 21 had lesions of the long head of biceps and 53 had supraspinatus tendon lesions. Mean vertical distance from the coracoid tip to supraglenoid tubercle was greater in those with lesions of any of these tendons and was statistically significant for the supraspinatus group (P = 0.005). Reduced axial coraco-humeral distance was also seen in patients with tendinopathy, although with less statistically significant difference (p = 0.059). Our results support orthopaedic studies that have shown that the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle increases the incidence and risk of rotator cuff disease by altering the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. (orig.)

  10. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy . cm) was 365.2 mGy . cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy . cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier grades correlated well with HUs of rotator cuff muscles. Reliability was excellent for both systems, except for FD grade of IST/TM muscles, which may be more reliably assessed using quantitative measurements. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance arthrography assessment of the superior labrum using the BLC system: age-related changes mimicking SLAP-2 lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of the superior labrum with increasing age by assessing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms. Inclusion criteria were used to include only the MR arthrograms of patients devoid of clinical labral pathology. Two hundred thiry-six MR arthrograms were blindly assessed for biceps-labral complex (BLC) type 1-3 and sublabral recess size by a musculoskeletal radiologist. We have chosen the BLC system, which defines normal superior labral variants, since it is established in the literature and is used by reporting musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists. The MR arthrograms demonstrated that the majority of patients <40 years old were BLC type 1 and showed a steady increase in BLC types 2 and 3 with increasing age. Assessments demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.01) mean BLC types (1.62 vs 1.29) and recess size (1.35 vs 0.66 mm) in those over 40 compared with those less than 40 years of age. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted between mean BLC assessments between different decades of age. There appears to be a physiologic deepening of the superior labrum sulcus with age, which becomes significant after the age of 40. These findings can contribute to whether the superior labrum is considered abnormal when assessed radiographically. The differentiation of normal age-related changes in the shoulder, from those of a type 2 SLAP tear can reduce the rates of unnecessary SLAP-2 repairs. This is the first reported series to use the BLC system; we believe it provides a common nomenclature to allow clear communication between specialists. (orig.)

  12. Noncontrast MR imaging and MR arthrography of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow: prospective evaluation of two-dimensional pulse sequences for detection of complete tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare MR imaging techniques with differing contrast and spatial resolution for evaluation of complete disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) anterior bundle in a cadaveric elbow model. Design: Complete UCL tears were surgically created at the typical location for clinical tears in eight of 28 fresh frozen cadaveric elbow specimens. All specimens underwent 1.5 T MR imaging in the oblique coronal plane, using an extremity coil. The sequences employed were: T1-weighted spin echo (T1 SE), proton density-weighted (PD) fast spin echo (FSE), fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE (T2 FSE), gradient recalled echo (GRE) with a high matrix, PD FSE with a high matrix (HRPD), and fat suppressed T1-weighted SE with intra-articular gadolinium (MRAr). Two radiologists independently graded the UCL with separate and side-by-side assessments. Results: Sensitivity/specificity pairs were as follows for reader A and reader B, respectively: T1 SE: 0.25/0.95, 0.50/0.95; PD FSE: 0.38/1.00, 0.25/1.00; T2 FSE: 0.50/0.95, 0.63/0.95; GRE: 0.63/0.85, 0.63/0.60; MRAr: 0.88/1.00, 1.00/0.80; HRPD: 0.50/1.00, 0.88/0.80. Kappa statistics for measuring interobserver reliability for each sequence were poor under T1 SE (-0.13) and GRE (0.19), moderate under HRPD (0.41) and T2 FSE (0.44) and good under MRAr (0.62) and PD FSE (0.78). For both readers, the rating for overall image quality was highest for HRPD, and the rating for UCL lesion conspicuity was the highest for MRAr. Conclusions: Of the MR imaging pulse sequences tested, MRAr showed the greatest ability to identify complete ligamentous injuries with good agreement between readers and had the highest subjective preference for lesion conspicuity. However, HRPD had the least interobserver variability and the highest subjective preference for overall image quality. (orig.)

  13. Noncontrast MR imaging and MR arthrography of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow: prospective evaluation of two-dimensional pulse sequences for detection of complete tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrino, J.A.; Morrison, W.B. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Zou, K.H. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Steffen, R.T. [Wilford Hall Medical Center, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Lackland Air Force Base, TX (United States); Snearly, W.N. [TMC Advanced Imaging, Glendale, AZ (United States); Murray, P.M. [Mayo Clinic, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Objective: To compare MR imaging techniques with differing contrast and spatial resolution for evaluation of complete disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) anterior bundle in a cadaveric elbow model. Design: Complete UCL tears were surgically created at the typical location for clinical tears in eight of 28 fresh frozen cadaveric elbow specimens. All specimens underwent 1.5 T MR imaging in the oblique coronal plane, using an extremity coil. The sequences employed were: T1-weighted spin echo (T1 SE), proton density-weighted (PD) fast spin echo (FSE), fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE (T2 FSE), gradient recalled echo (GRE) with a high matrix, PD FSE with a high matrix (HRPD), and fat suppressed T1-weighted SE with intra-articular gadolinium (MRAr). Two radiologists independently graded the UCL with separate and side-by-side assessments. Results: Sensitivity/specificity pairs were as follows for reader A and reader B, respectively: T1 SE: 0.25/0.95, 0.50/0.95; PD FSE: 0.38/1.00, 0.25/1.00; T2 FSE: 0.50/0.95, 0.63/0.95; GRE: 0.63/0.85, 0.63/0.60; MRAr: 0.88/1.00, 1.00/0.80; HRPD: 0.50/1.00, 0.88/0.80. Kappa statistics for measuring interobserver reliability for each sequence were poor under T1 SE (-0.13) and GRE (0.19), moderate under HRPD (0.41) and T2 FSE (0.44) and good under MRAr (0.62) and PD FSE (0.78). For both readers, the rating for overall image quality was highest for HRPD, and the rating for UCL lesion conspicuity was the highest for MRAr. Conclusions: Of the MR imaging pulse sequences tested, MRAr showed the greatest ability to identify complete ligamentous injuries with good agreement between readers and had the highest subjective preference for lesion conspicuity. However, HRPD had the least interobserver variability and the highest subjective preference for overall image quality. (orig.)

  14. Is it possible to diagnose idiopathic chondropathia of the patella by radiological methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, J.; Langlotz, M.

    1984-10-01

    In a retrospective study of 47 cases of chondromalacia proved by operation, a correct diagnosis had been made by arthrography in three cases. In 44 patients a false negative finding had been obtained. A prospective study was carried out comparing single and double contrast arthrography as well as double contrast arthrotomography and scintigraphy in ten patients with typical chondropathia. It was confirmed by arthroscopy in nine cases. Only two patients with severe chondromalacia showed abnormal findings by arthrography or scintigraphy. Our investigation has led to the conclusion that arthrography is not a suitable method for demonstrating idiopathic chondropathia of the patella.

  15. Arthrography of upper caving of temporomandibular joint sydrome and comparative analysis of clinical symptom%颞颌关节紊乱综合征上腔造影影像与临床症状对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高红旗; 赵凤祥; 李强; 王培源; 魏长亭

    2006-01-01

    自1944年Norgaard首先报告颞下颌关节造影术(TMJ Arthrography)并于1947年发表专著以来,颞下颌关节造影术得到了较广泛推广和应用.近年来虽然CT、MR等已应用于颞下颌关节紊乱综合征(Temporomandibular joint disturbance syndrome,TMJDS)的诊断,但CT检查不能清楚地显示关节盘,MR虽能显示关节盘的形态、大小、位置,却不能明确关节盘有无穿孔及穿孔的位置和程度,故TM造影检查仍是TMJDS诊断的重要方法.

  16. The Value of Indirect MR Arthrography in Diagnosis of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury%间接法MR膝关节造影在前交叉韧带损伤中的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮; 王颖; 王琦; 张雪峰

    2012-01-01

    目的:评价间接法MR膝关节造影对前交叉韧带(ACL)损伤的诊断价值.方法:分析78例经手术证实的膝关节MR平扫加间接法MR膝关节造影扫描的膝关节外伤患者的MR资料,与关节镜手术结果对比分析.结果:常规MR平扫诊断ACL损伤的敏感性、特异性、准确性、阳性似然比和阴性似然比分别为83.3%、80.5%、86.5%、4.3421和0.1645,间接法MR关节造影诊断ACL损伤的敏感性、特异性、准确性、阳性似然比和阴性似然比分别为93.5%、92.8%、94.4%、11.7317和0.0531,两者对诊断ACL的损伤在统计学分析上有显著性差异.结论:间接法MR膝关节造影相比于常规MR平扫明显提高了对ACL损伤的诊断符合率.

  17. Clinical Results and MRI Arthrography Evaluation of Meniscal Repair with FasT-Fix System%FasT-Fix半月板缝合的临床疗效与MRI造影评估愈合研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚熹; 余家阔; 敖英芳

    2010-01-01

    目的:了解关节镜下使用FasT-Fix系统进行半月板缝合的临床疗效与MRI造影下的愈合情况.方法:2006年4月至2007年7月,17例患者、18侧损伤半月板在我所应用Fast-Fix系统进行了关节镜下全内的半月板缝合,所有患者同时进行了交叉韧带重建,于术后平均11个月进行临床随访,依照Barrett标准评价半月板缝合的临床愈合情况,并对随访患者进行IKDC、Lysholm和Tegner评分.所有18侧半月板应用MR/造影评价半月板愈合情况.结果:18侧缝合的半月板有17侧得到了临床愈合,临床愈合率为94.4%.平均IKDC评分由术前的46.4分提高至术后的75.2分,平均Lysholm评分由术前的44.8分提高至术后的80.6分,平均Tegner评分由术前的2.5分提高至术后的5.4分.MRI造影显示18侧半月板中13侧为完全愈合,2侧为部分层厚不愈合,3侧为全层厚不愈合,总愈合率为83.3%,完全愈合率为72.2%.结论:应用Fast-Fix系统进行半月板缝合具有很好的临床效果,MRI造影显示有较高的愈合率.

  18. T2* weighted MR imaging for the diagnosis of the perforation of triangular fibrocartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) has been considered an important factor in the etiology of pain in the ulnar wrist joint, and arthrography has been used conventionally to diagnose the perforation. Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to diagnose TFC perforation. Gundy et al. examined cadaver wrists with Tl weighted imaging and arthrography, and obtained findings suggesting that arthrography provides a more accurate diagnosis of the TFC perforation. To our knowledge, no comparison has yet been made between T2* weighted imaging and arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC perforation. The present study compared the usefulness of T2*-weighted imaging and arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC perforation in 22 wrist joints of 11 cadavers (5 males and 6 females with ages ranging from 61 to 92 years and an average age of 78.8 years) fixed in 60% formalin. The specimens were firstly analyzed by a T2*-weighted 0.5T MRI scan and subsequently by arthrography. After diagnosing the image obtained by the two methods, the accuracy of the diagnosis was determined by comparison with the macroscopic findings of autopsy, including the presence and degree of TFC perforation. A T2*-weighted MRI scan of the TFC perforation showed high-intensity areas over the distal radio-ulnar joint, and demonstrated the same diagnostic accuracy as arthrography, providing correct diagnoses in all cases other than linear perforation. However, neither of the image diagnostic methods allowed definition of the type of perforation. (author)

  19. What is the role of clinical tests and ultrasound in acetabular labral tear diagnostics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Mechlenburg, Inger; Gelineck, John;

    2009-01-01

    . PATIENTS AND METHODS: We examined 18 patients (18 hips, 2 men, median age 43 (32-56) years) with impingement test, FABER test, resisted straight leg raise test, ultrasound, and MR arthrography. They had had previous periacetabular osteotomies due to symptomatic, acetabular dysplasia. All hips showed no or...... only slight signs of osteoarthritis (Tönnis grade 0-1). RESULTS: MR arthrography identified labral tears in 17 of the 18 hips. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 94%, a positive predictive value of 94%, and was false negative in only 1 case compared to MR arthrography. The impingement test had the best...

  20. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Value of special investigations of desion of the external tendon of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of special radiological investigations after damage of the external tendon of the ankle joint is absolutely certain. Clinical findings, functional X-ray pictures, and for some cases arthrography of the ankle joint render the correct diagnosis. Merely functional X-ray pictures will not always be sufficient, although sometimes this has been pretended. Experiences are described and indications for arthrography are pointed out. Arthrography certainly is the most accurate method for investigations of lesions of the external tendon of the ankle joint. Nevertheless is should only be performed for special cases and after critical interpretation of the functional X-ray pictures, because it is a rather invasive method. (orig.)

  3. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hi, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  7. Arthrographic diagnosis of ruptured calcaneofibular ligament. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new projection, oblique axial, is recommended for the arthrography of the acute sprained ankle for the correct diagnosis of a ruptured calcaneofibular ligament. Its value is experimentally confirmed. (Auth.)

  8. The Value of Sonography in Diagnosis of Meniscal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Forouzmehr

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the high incidence of meniscal injuries, a cost-effective, noninvasive, and also accurate diagnostic modality is highly needed. This study was conducted to assess the diagnostic value of sonography in detecting meniscus tears in comparison with arthrography. Methods: A total of 136 patients with symptoms of meniscal injury were examined with both sonography and arthrography by separate radiologists. The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of sonography were calculated versus arthrography. Results: The sensitivity of sonography in diagnosing meniscus tear was 75 percent, specificity 88 percent, positive predictive value 80 percent, and negative predictive value 85 percent. Conclusion: Our results show that we can’t yet replace other methods with higher diagnostic value with sonography completely but regarding its advantages, it can be used along with other routine modalities. Keywords: Meniscus Tear, Sonography, Arthrography, Diagnostic Value.

  9. Supra-scapular nerve entrapment by ganglion cyst. Value of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six cases of supra-scapular nerve entrapment by a ganglion cyst within the spino-glenoid notch or developed from the glenoid labrum are reported. Causes of injury or entrapment of the supra-scapular nerve are described including traction or kinking of the nerve, trauma, repetitive exercise, or compression by ganglion cyst. The patients had non specific pain, weakness, and atrophy of the spinatus musculature. Electromyography showed evidence of denervation atrophy. Patients had plain radiographs, arthrography, CT-arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR-arthrography. Masses that caused supra-scapular nerve entrapment were well localized and characterized with magnetic resonance imaging, reflecting the superior soft-tissue contrast of this modality. In addition, MRI may demonstrate atrophy of the spinatus muscles. MR-arthrography allows to visualize lesions of the glenoid labrum and in some cases, demonstrates cysts filling. (authors)

  10. Supra-scapular nerve entrapment by ganglion cyst. Value of imaging modalities; Compression kystique du nerf sus-scapulaire. Interet de l`imagerie. A propos de 6 cas et revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Ph.; Roger, B.; Tardieu, M.; Ghebontni, L.; Thelen, Ph.; Richard, O.; Grenier, Ph. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    Six cases of supra-scapular nerve entrapment by a ganglion cyst within the spino-glenoid notch or developed from the glenoid labrum are reported. Causes of injury or entrapment of the supra-scapular nerve are described including traction or kinking of the nerve, trauma, repetitive exercise, or compression by ganglion cyst. The patients had non specific pain, weakness, and atrophy of the spinatus musculature. Electromyography showed evidence of denervation atrophy. Patients had plain radiographs, arthrography, CT-arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR-arthrography. Masses that caused supra-scapular nerve entrapment were well localized and characterized with magnetic resonance imaging, reflecting the superior soft-tissue contrast of this modality. In addition, MRI may demonstrate atrophy of the spinatus muscles. MR-arthrography allows to visualize lesions of the glenoid labrum and in some cases, demonstrates cysts filling. (authors). 35 refs.

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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  12. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

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  15. Calculation of patient skin dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief letter describes a simple, cheap modification to the Stoker technique for double contrast knee arthrography, which provides excellent joint distraction and immobilisation with minimum effort, useful in particular for the evaluation of meniscal injuries. (U.K.)

  16. The ankle joint - value of different radiological examinations especially in external ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a correct radiological positioning of the ankle joint the bimalleolar line is helpful as well for the A.P.-view as for the lateral view. For the examination of external ligament lacerations Radiography with functional test is not always sufficient. After critical comparison of functional radiographs, clinical symptoms and case history arthrography is necessary in certain cases to come to a final conclusion. Indications for arthrography are stated and explained. (orig.)

  17. Primary synovial osteochondromatosis presenting as constrictive capsulitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary synovial chondromatosis of the joints can present as capsular constriction with peri-articular osteopenia. This rare presentation is highlighted in three cases (two hips and one shoulder). The diagnosis in all the patients was made on arthrography and/or MRI/CT and was confirmed histologically. Synovial chondromatosis should be considered in patients with this presentation. Arthrography is the best imaging modality to confirm the cause (synovial chondromatosis) and effect (constrictive capsulitis). (orig.)

  18. US of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty five healty people and 25 patients with shoulder pain underwent US control over a 12-month period: 24 patients with shoulder pain had rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon lesions. The US findings on rotator cuff and biceps tendon lesions are compared with those of arthrography and/or surgery (96% sensitivity). US is rapid, safe, non invasive, inexpensive and often more accurate, and its use is recommended for the routine examination of the shoulder joint insteat of arthrography

  19. Ranking of MR in the diagnosis of diseases of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study 43 patients with shoulder pain were examined by sonography and MRI. The findings were controlled by plain radiography, arthrography, and CT arthrography. Joint effusions and humeral head defects were equally identified by MR and sonography. In the diagnosis of labrum lesions, rotator cuff lesions, subacromial spurs, and synovial inflammatory disease sonography was not as accurate as MR. A special MR scoring system improved the diagnosis of an impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  20. MR a rthrographaphy of the shoulder - to do or not to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: The shoulder is a complex joint, capable of the highest volume of movement in comparison with all other joints in the body. Injuries, repetitive microtrauma and age and wear of the joint are responsible for most problems in the shoulders. What you will learn: the compilation of standardized MR protocol for the study of the shoulder joint, the advantages and disadvantages of MR arthrography, the possible errors in the technical performance of MR arthrography, the necessity of preparation of the patient. Discussion: In the joint MRI imaging diagnostic success requires differentiation of complex anatomical structures and demonstration of subtle abnormalities. MR arthrography expands potentialities of the conventional MR images. In arthrography a contrast medium is introduced into the joint cavity, thereby achieving expansion of the cavity and a better differentiation of the articular structures and the articular and synovial surfaces. Conclusion: MRI and MR arthrography in particular are the methods of choice for pathological changes of the shoulder joint. MR arthrography is more sensitive and more specific method in the demonstration of the intra-articular structures, but the invasiveness of the procedure limited its routine application

  1. Double contrast CT arthrographic findings of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenno-humeral joint is a ball and socket joint. It has the greatest range of movement among all the joints of the body. The greatest range of movement is inevitably accompanied by a considerable loss in stability. Thirty three persons underwent Double Contrast CT arthrography of the shoulder for the evaluation of suspected shoulder derangement. We performed 62 shoulder arthrography(33 abnormal shoulders and 29 normal shoulders) and reviewed their findings retrospectively. They had recurrent shoulder dislocation(30 shoulders) or nonspecific shoulder pain(3 shoulders). Injury of the glenoid labrum was seen in 28 shoulders at double contrast CT arthrography. Among 28 cases of the labral injury, labral detachment was seen in 15 cases, labral tear in 5 cases, and labral erosion in 8 cases. Double contrast CT arthrography also showed Hill-Sachs defection in 20 shoulders. The numbers of type 1, type 2, and type 3 capsulolabral attachment in 33 shoulder instability cases were 10, 16,and 7, respectivity, while, 16, 12, and , 1 in 29 normal controls. Type 2 and 3 are more common in shoulder instability group than normal control group. Operation was done in 18 shoulders. Comparing with operation findings, the sensitivity of double contrast CT arthrography in the detection of Hill-Sachs defect was 100% with the specificity of 71% and the accuracy of 89%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of double contrast CT arthrography in the detection of labral injury were 94%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. Double contrast CT arthrography is a minimally invasive and highly accurate technique for in the evaluation of glenohumeral instability

  2. Arthrographic examination for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by limited cone beam X-CT for dental use (Ortho-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TMJ arthrography has been performed with a surgical X-ray television system (fluoroscope) and a tomographic apparatus for patients with disturbance of opening of the mouth. Limited cone beam X-CT for dental use (Ortho-CT) developed by Arai et al. is small and very effective for the small maxillofacial area. We performed TMJ arthrography by using Ortho-CT for TMD patients, and obtained good results, compared with those of MRI. Objects were 13 joints in 12 patients diagnosed as having TMD. As a result, there was a high percentage of agreement with figure and position of the articular disk and it was certain that Ortho-CT had the accuracy similar to that of MRI, because there was no statistically significant difference. We conclude that Ortho-CT is very effective for TMJ arthrography. (author)

  3. Conventional angiography in comparison with magnetic resonance tomography and arthroscopy for the diagnosis of knee joint lesion - specific indications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-one patients with suspected internal knee joint lesions were examined prospectively. In all patients an MRI was carried out first and was followed within two weeks by an arthrography and an arthrocopy. Lesions of the menisci, cruciate ligaments, hyaline cartilage, and synovial tissues were evaluated. Arthroscopy findings were defined as the 'gold standard'. MRI achieved an accuracy of 96.4%, a sensitivity of 93.6%, and a specifity of 92.5%, whereas arthrography achieved an accuracy of 67.8%, a sensitivity of 66.6%, and a specifity of 71.4%. These statistical data as well as the single findings revealed no special indications for arthrography in suspected knee joint lesions. (orig.)

  4. RCM-induced PGE2 liberation in the synovial fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RCM have been observed to cause (during arthrography) the appearance of a slow onset painful symptomathology with the clinical characteristics of a slight and transient acute arthritis. These substances are supposed to set in a production of humoral mediators of inflammation with algogenic action, PGE2 in particular. During arthrography of the knee the release of synovial fluid PGE2 after RCM introduction was studied. Two RCM were compared: meglumin iothalamate and iopamidol. Twenty patients underwent arthrography of the knee: synovial fluid PGE2 concentration was measured both before and 15' after RCM introduction with 125I-RIA method. Results show a significant increase in PGE2 concentration after both iothelamate (p<0.0001) and iopamidol (p<0.01) - especially in iothalamate - treated patients (p<0.01). A physiopathologic mechanism about postarthrographic pain and, more generally, about RCM toxicity is thus hypothesized

  5. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint. Roentgendiagnostik der Bandlaesionen des oberen Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V. (Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik)

    1991-12-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.).

  7. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  8. Diagnosis of TFCC lesions. Its clinical findings and diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaeda, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Ryogo; Shionoya, Kaoru; Goto, Yasuko; Hosokawa, Hisayo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Branch Hospital

    1996-12-01

    Thirty-five patients with persistent ulnar wrist pain after conservative treatment and with positive ulnocarpal stress test underwent several examinations. X-ray findings revealed a lunate ulcer or cyst in 20% and accumulation of isotopes in the ulnar wrist was identified in 94% by scintigraphy. Arthroscopy revealed triangular fibrocartilage lesions in 60%. Ulnocarpal stress test is sensitive enough to note arthroscopic pathology of TFC lesions. One hundred and two wrists had undergone MRI and radiocarpal arthrography before arthroscopic examination. Arthrography had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 100% in detection of TFC lesions. MRI had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 72%. These were lower than the corresponding values of arthrography. (author)

  9. Double contrast CT diagnosis of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study clinical importance of double contrast CT arthrography in the diagnosis of shoulder instability. Materials and methods: Eight patients were diagnosed as having shoulder instability with double contrast CT. The technique involved injection of 4 ml, 76% urografin and 10 ml of room air through an anterior shoulder puncture. The CT images were obtained with the patients supine and prone position. Results: The results of the CT arthrography were confirmed during the surgical operation afterward. The characteristics of abnormal double contrast CT arthrograms. They included anterior labral tear: the rounded anterior glenoid labrum, detached anterior labrum and anterior labral fragment; anterior capsular stripping off the anterior scapular glenoid neck; and enlargement of anterior and posterior capsular stripping off the anterior scapular glenoid neck; and enlargement of anterior and posterior capsular cavity. Conclusion: The current CT arthrography provides important X-ray information for both diagnosis of shoulder instability and anatomical repair of shoulder instability

  10. Diagnosis of TFCC lesions. Its clinical findings and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five patients with persistent ulnar wrist pain after conservative treatment and with positive ulnocarpal stress test underwent several examinations. X-ray findings revealed a lunate ulcer or cyst in 20% and accumulation of isotopes in the ulnar wrist was identified in 94% by scintigraphy. Arthroscopy revealed triangular fibrocartilage lesions in 60%. Ulnocarpal stress test is sensitive enough to note arthroscopic pathology of TFC lesions. One hundred and two wrists had undergone MRI and radiocarpal arthrography before arthroscopic examination. Arthrography had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 100% in detection of TFC lesions. MRI had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 72%. These were lower than the corresponding values of arthrography. (author)

  11. Indirect MR-arthography in the fellow up of autologous osteochondral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following autologous osteochondral transplantation. Patients and Methods: 10 patients with autogenous osteochondral homografts underwent indirect MR-arthrography at three, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The MR protocol at 1.5T comprised unenhanced imagings with PD- and T2-weighted TSE-sequences with and without fat-suppression as well as T1-weighted fat-suppressed SE-sequences before and after iv. contrast administration and after active joint exercise. Image analysis was done by two radiologists in conference and comprised the evaluation of signal intensity (SI) and integrity of the osseous plug and the cartilage surface, as well as the presence of joint effusion or bone marrow edema. Results: At three months, all cases demonstrated a significant bone marrow edema at the recipient and donor site that corresponded to a significant enhancement after iv. contrast administration. The interface between the transplant and the normal bone showed an increased SI at three and 6 months in T2-weighted images as well as in indirect MR-arthrography. The marrow signal normalized in most cases after 6 to 12 months, indicating vitality and healing of the transplanted osteochondral graft. The SI of the interface decreased in the same period, demonstrating the stability of the homograft at the recipient site. The osteochondral plugs were well-seated in 9/10 cases. Indirect MR-arthrography was superior to unenhanced imaging in the assessment of the cartilage surface. Cartilage coverage was complete in every case. The transplanted hyaline cartilage as well as the original cartilage showed a significant increase of the SI in indirect MR-arthrography, that did not change in follow up studies. There were no pathological alterations of signal and thickness alterations of the transplanted cartilage in follow up investigations. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool following autologous

  12. Radiography, radionuclide imaging, and asthrography in the evaluation of total hip and knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients with 21 total joint replacements including 17 hips and 4 knees were studied by plain film radiography, radionuclide imaging, and subtraction arthrography to evaluate these procedures for assessing prosthetic complications. Surgery was performed in 14 patients and confirmed loosening of 8 femoral and 7 acetabular hip prosthesis components and 1 femoral and 4 tibial knee prosthesis components. Plain films suggested loosening of only 9 hip components and no knee components. In contrast, radionuclide imaging and subtraction arthrography were considerably more effective in demonstrating loosening as well as other causes of the painful total joint prosthesis

  13. X-ray diagnosis in acute and chronic sport injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress X-ray and arthrography are of importance in the diagnosis of joint injuries. Stress X-rays are of great value to testify instability of acromioclavicular joint, metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, but also the knee and the ankle joint. With arthrography it is possible to show up a rupture of the rotator cuff of the shoulder and also a lesion of the triangular disc of the wrist. Indication, technique and the interpretation of the stress X-rays and the arthrogramms are discussed. (orig.)

  14. MRI of atraumatic sports injuries of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI of operatively or arthroscopically proven atraumatic sports injuries of 12 shoulders were reviewed retrospectively. Although it is difficult to diagnose the lesions localised at the superior glenoid labrum and to decide whether rotator interval is injured or not by MRI, MRI could detect thickening of subacromial bursae or rotator cuff injuries due to impingement syndrome and glenoid labrum injuries, such as Bankart lesion. On our limited experience, MRI was more valuable examination than arthrography and CT arthrography. MRI is a useful modality for screening or preoperative evaluation of atraumatic sports injuries of the shoulder. (author)

  15. Value of computed tomography scanning in chondromalacia patellae

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    Boven, F.; Bellemans, M.A.; Geurts, J.; de Boeck, H.; Potvliege, R.

    1982-06-01

    Sixtyseven patients with pain in the knee were studied. A computed tomography (CT) score indicating chondromalacia was devised, based on the results of CT after arthrography. This score takes account of the regularity, the congruity, and the imbibition of contrast material. Thus the patients could be divided into four groups: those who definitely have chondromalacia (++), probably (+), probably not (+-), and definitely not (-). These results were compared with the clinical diagnosis based on clinical signs, arthroscopy, or operation. Eighteen patients had clinically proved chondromalacia, CT scored 14++, 3+ and 1+-. Twentynine patients had no chondromalacia, CT scored 19-, 8+-, and 2+. Twenty patients had an uncertain clinical diagnosis. Arthrography was less accurate in detecting chondromalacia.

  16. Lesions of cartilage in the femoropateliar joint, diagnosis by computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Anacker, H.; Karpf, P.M.; Hoerterer, H.; Paar, O.; Riel, K.A.

    1982-01-21

    The conventional arthrographic methods for demonstration of the femoro-patellar joint are not sufficiently reliable. Through the use of CT-arthrography a cross-sectional image free of superimposition and possessing a high density resolution is available thus facilitating a direct demonstration of the joint cartilage. Traumatic and degenerative lesions of the cartilage can be clearly shown by CT-arthrography. Damage of cartilage in patients with chondromalacia patellae can be differentiated in its different stages. The shape of the patella and its relation to femoral condyles can be evaluated more accurate than by conventional axial X-rays.

  17. Painful/unstable shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography of the painful/unstable shoulder that was evaluated in more than 300 patients. We have encountered a great variety of painful shoulder pathology, including impingement syndrome, cuff tear arthropathy, lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon, calcifying tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, dead arm syndrome, and degenerative joint disease. Lesions related to instability include cases of capsular avulsions, disruption of the glenohumeral ligaments, labral pathology, glenoid fractures, Hill-Sachs lesions, and changes in glenoid angulation. CT-arthrography is an accurate exploration for both unstable and painful shoulders

  18. Imaging of hand injuries. Anatomic and radiodiagnostic considerations; Radiologie beim Handtrauma. Anatomie, Untersuchungsstrategie und Bildanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Rainer [Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH Bad Neustadt, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-03-15

    Imaging recommendations for assessing injuries of the forearm, wrist, metacarpus and the digits are given with respect to anatomic considerations. Furthermore, dedicated algorithms of advanced imaging are introduced with radiography as the primary diagnostic tool. High-resolution CT is used for detecting and staging the complex fractures of the radius and the wrist, whereas contrast-enhanced MRI serves for depicting the injured soft tissues. At the wrist, tears of the intrinsic ligaments and the TFCC are assessed with high accuracy when applying MR arthrography or CT arthrography. Dedicated radiologic tools as well as comprehensive reports are suggested in the management of the various hand injuries. (orig.)

  19. Chest X-Ray

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  20. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  1. X-ray diagnosis of retropatellar diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on a comprehensive, stepwise diagnosis in diseases of the knee joints. This includes a description of the indication, the technique of taking X-ray films, and X-ray findings, as well as arthrography of the femoropatellar joint in retropatellar diseases such as chondropathia patellae, osteochondrosis dissecans, traumas of the knee joints and arthrosis deformans. (orig.)

  2. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2*-weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  3. MR ARTHOGRAPHY OF THE GLENOHUMERAL JOINT : ITS ROLE IN THE EVALUATION OF SHOULDER INSTABILITY AND PERSISTENT PAIN

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    Thukral

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of MR arthrography in identification and characterization of normal variants , rotator cuff tears and tears of labro - ligamentous complex of the glenohumeral joint and compare it with conventional MRI . AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : Identification , signal characterization and grading of rotator cuff tears and to detect , localize and characterize tears of the labroligamentous complex and to differentiate them from the normal variants . METHODS : Thirty three patients in the age group of 18 - 60 years with history of shoulder instability or persistent pain due to previous injury were prospectively evaluated with conventional MRI fol lowed by MR arthrography . Patients with active joint infection , contrast allergy and joint effusion were excluded from the study . Conventional MRI and MR arthrographic findings were recorded separately and then compared . RESULTS : Statistically significant difference was found between conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the identification and characterization of labro - ligamentous tears while no statistical difference was found between the two in detection of rotator cuff tears . High incidence of co - occur rence was found between hill - sachs defect and bankart lesions/variants . CONCLUSIONS : MR arthrography is superior to conventional MRI for the delineation of intra - articular structures of the glenohumeral joint and in the detection and characterization of labral tears . Since rotator cuff tears are commoner in older age group in comparison to labral tears which are commoner in patients aged less than 40 years , MR arthrography is the imaging modality of choice in younger age group , irrespective of the clinica l indication .

  4. [Palmar wrist arthroscopy for evaluation of concomitant carpal lesions in operative treatment of distal intraarticular radius fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohendorff, B; Eck, M; Mühldorfer, M; Fodor, S; Schmitt, R; Prommersberger, K-J

    2009-10-01

    Fractures of the distal radius, which currently are treated with palmar locking plates, are often accompanied by carpal lesions. Tears of the scapholunate interosseus ligament (SL) can affect the outcome. Between January 2007 and May 2008, 28 patients with distal intraarticular fractures of the radius were included in a prospective study. Preoperative CT-arthrography was performed. SL tears were found in 11 patients, with 10 partial and one complete rupture observed. A tear of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was detected in 16 patients. Every patient was operated with a palmar locking plate through a palmar approach between the flexor carpi radialis tendon and the radial artery. Then, a palmar wrist arthroscopy using a palmar portal was performed. Eleven SL tears with 9 partial and two total ruptures were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Ten lesions were associated with a C1-fracture with a fracture line projected onto the scapholunate interval. The TFCC was appraisable by palmar wrist arthroscopy only in 4 patients. Three of the SL tears detected by CT-arthrography could not be confirmed by palmar wrist arthroscopy. One complete rupture and one partial lesion confirmed by palmar wrist arthroscopy were found by CT-arthrography to be intact. Palmar wrist arthroscopy affords certainty when assessing the SL ligament. In this study, an assessment of ulnocarpal structures was not possible. For assessment of the ulnocarpal structures, CT-arthrography was superior to palmar wrist arthroscopy. However, the latter is an alternative during emergency treatment or when CT-arthrography is not available. PMID:19790024

  5. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist clinical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheurecker, G

    2001-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG...

  6. Enlargement of the iliopsoas comportment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iliopsoas or iliopectineal comportment is a normal structure that occasionally communicates with the synovial cavity of the hip. Rarely, in association with certain pathologies that raise the intraarticular pressure, it becomes enlarged, producing an inguinal or pelvic mass, also referred to as iliopsas bursitis. We present five cases of this pathology detected over the past year in our hospitals. Three of the patients had undergone previous vascular punctures in the hip involved, one presented brucellosis-related arthropathy and the fifth had generative joint abnormalities. The plain radiography, arthrography, ultrasound, CT,CT-guided arthrography and MR images are provided and discussed. We present an etiological factor of this process (previous vascular puncture) that has not been previously reported in the literature. 13 refs

  7. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429142

  8. Efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint disorder. Correlation between arthrographic findings using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use and mouth opening distance in 20 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use. The subjects were 20 patients with TMJ closed lock. Arthrography and pumping manipulation treatment were performed, and the correlation between maximal mouth opening and arthrographic findings was examined. Arthrography showed 16 cases of anterior disk displacement, and 4 cases of sideways displacement. Disk configuration showed 15 abnormal cases and 3 cases of disk perforation. Before treatment, mouth opening distance was 24.2 mm and 1 week after treatment it was 34.4 mm. After 3 months this had improved significantly to 41.0 mm. Comparison of mouth opening distance with arthrographic findings showed that disk perforation was significantly different after 3 months. These results suggest that pumping manipulation treatment might be useful in patients with TMJ closed lock without internal derangement or disk perforation. (author)

  9. MR imaging in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy-eight MR examinations of various stages of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease have been performed in 36 children (5-11 years), in 18 prior to arthrography. The effect of varus osteotomy was assessed with MR imaging in 12 children. MR imaging provided information about the extent of the epephyseal necrosis and revascularization, improving interpretation of conventional radiographs. In addition, MR imaging depicted the increased thickness and shape of the epiphyseal cartilage in good correlation with arthrography. Spherical remodeling and improved containment following varus osteotomy was observed in nine hips. Poor containment with large epiphyseal deformities not available for surgical treatment was identified in early stages of the disease, making MR imaging a useful tool in the prognostication and monitoring of these patients

  10. Pseudotumoral ganglion cyst of a finger with unexpected remote origin: multimodality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleau, Loic; Malghem, Jacques; Omoumi, Patrick; Simoni, Paolo; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Barbier, Olivier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    The case of a ganglion cyst in the pulp of a fifth finger in an elderly woman initially mimicking a soft tissue tumor is described. Most typical sites of ganglion cysts are well documented at the wrist and in the vicinity of inter-phalangeal and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. In this case, ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a cystic lesion within the pulp of the fifth finger and indicated carpal osteoarthritis as the distant - and unexpected - origin of the lesion. The suggested diagnosis of ganglion cyst was confirmed by computed tomography arthrography (CT arthrography) of the wrist, which showed opacification of the cyst on delayed acquisitions after intra-articular injection into the mid-carpal joint, through the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath. The communications between the degenerative carpal joint, the radio-ulnar bursa, the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath and the pedicle of the cyst were well demonstrated. (orig.)

  11. MRI of the wrist. Technical aspects and anatomic variants indicative of disease; MRT des Handgelenks. Technische Aspekte und anatomische Varianten mit Krankheitswert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M. [Radiologie Haydnhaus, Bonn (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    In order to produce high quality MR images of the wrist and hand, it is of major importance to consider the technical aspects of the examination. In this article the basics of patient positioning, MR sequences, acquisition plane, and application of contrast media are discussed. Additional issues such as MR arthrography, MR angiography, and magnetic field strength are addressed as well as anatomical variants, which may result in painful conditions. These include in particular the variability in length of the ulna with possible consecutive impaction or impingement syndromes. (orig.) [German] Um qualitativ hochwertige MRT-Bilder des Handgelenks zu erzeugen, muss eine ausgefeilte Untersuchungstechnik eingesetzt werden. In diesem Artikel werden daher Grundsaetze der Patientenlagerung, Sequenzwahl, Schichtfuehrung sowie Kontrastmittelanwendung besprochen. Besondere Aspekte, wie MR-Arthrographie, -Angiographie und unterschiedliche Feldstaerken werden ebenso besprochen wie anatomische Besonderheiten und Varianten, die zu schmerzhaften Zustaenden am Handgelenk fuehren koennen. Dazu zaehlen besonders die variable Laenge der Ulna mit der moeglichen Folge eines Impaktions- oder Impingementsyndroms. (orig.)

  12. Shoulder imaging with MR, US, arthography, and arthoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, the true efficacies of shoulder imaging modalities remain uncertain, as no prospective study controlling for significant selection bias has been reported. A minimum of 25 double-blind examinations now have definitive confirmation, not selected by the imaging modalities. The images and interpretations were sealed in an envelope and blinded from the arthroscopist for initial arthroscopy, but second-look arthroscopy, and in some cases open surgery, was performed after unsealing the envelope. Therefore, negative and positive cases were equivalently tested. To date, MR imaging and US remain equally sensitive (85%) for detection of rotator cuff tears, but the combination is more sensitive (90%), and both are more sensitive than arthrography. Arthrography increased specificity when MR imaging and US in combination appear useful for diagnosis of biceps tendinitis

  13. Clinical or radiological diagnosis of impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a clinically common entity involving trapping of tendons or bursa with typical clinical findings. Important radiological procedures are ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography. Projection radiography and computed tomography (CT) are ideal to identify bony changes and CT arthrography also serves as an alternative method in cases of contraindications for MRI. These modalities support the clinically suspected diagnosis of impingement syndrome and may identify its cause in primary diagnosis. In addition, effects of impingement are determined by imaging. Therapy decisions are based on a synopsis of radiological and clinical findings. The sensitivity and specificity of these imaging modalities with regard to the diagnostics of a clinically evident impingement syndrome are given in this review article. Orthopedic and trauma surgeons express the suspicion of an impingement syndrome based on patient history and physical examination and radiologists confirm structural changes and damage of intra-articular structures using dedicated imaging techniques. (orig.)

  14. Pseudotumoral ganglion cyst of a finger with unexpected remote origin: multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a ganglion cyst in the pulp of a fifth finger in an elderly woman initially mimicking a soft tissue tumor is described. Most typical sites of ganglion cysts are well documented at the wrist and in the vicinity of inter-phalangeal and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. In this case, ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a cystic lesion within the pulp of the fifth finger and indicated carpal osteoarthritis as the distant - and unexpected - origin of the lesion. The suggested diagnosis of ganglion cyst was confirmed by computed tomography arthrography (CT arthrography) of the wrist, which showed opacification of the cyst on delayed acquisitions after intra-articular injection into the mid-carpal joint, through the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath. The communications between the degenerative carpal joint, the radio-ulnar bursa, the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath and the pedicle of the cyst were well demonstrated. (orig.)

  15. MR Imaging of Ankle Impingement Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ankle impingement syndromes are characterized by painful friction of joint tissues. This is both the cause and the effect of altered joint biomechanics. The leading causes of impingement lesions are posttraumatic ankle injuries, usually ankle sprains, resulting in chronic ankle pain. "nBased on anatomic and clinical viewpoints, there are five types of ankle impingement syndromes:"n1. Anterolateral"n2. Anterior"n3. Anteromedial"n4. Posteromedial"n5. Posterior"nCareful analyses of patient history and signs and symptoms at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most patients. MR imaging and MR arthrography are the most useful imaging methods for detecting the osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities present in these syndromes and for ruling out other potential causes of chronic ankle pain. "nThis presentation summarizes the MR imaging, and MR arthrography findings of ankle impingement syndromes.

  16. Systematics of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.)

  17. Significant use of diagnostic radiology for sport injuries and damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of a sport injury or a sport damage is usually made by the clinical investigation. However, the X-ray examination is indispensable. In addition to standard projections further radiologic techniques such as passive motion, tomography, computed tomography, arthrography or angiography are necessary. The relevant use of these X-ray methods with regard to sports injuries or damages of the particular regions of the locomotor system are described. (orig.)

  18. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  19. MR imaging of ulnar impaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although arthrography and bone scintigraphy are helpful in this work-up, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appears to be both a sensitive and a specific means of evaluation. The imaging studies in four patients with clinically and surgically diagnosed ulnar impaction are described, with emphasis on MRI findings. MRI appears to be the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected ulnolunate impingement. (orig./VHE)

  20. Arthrographic study of the Wiberg's CE angle in cadavers of children under 3 years old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty hip arthrographies in cadavers of children under 3 years of age are presented. The articular relationships of the hip through the definition of the morphology of the proximal femoral epyphysis are evaluated. The location of point 'C' and the evaluation of 'CE' angle in this age group are related. The results of the arthrographic 'CE' osseous angle are compared with Salvati's method and with Massie and Howorth's method. (M.A.C.)

  1. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A book has been written on the procedures used in diagnostic radiology covering the subject areas of the urinary tract, gastrointestinal and biliary tracts, vascular radiology, cerebral angiography and arthrography. The explanation of each procedure follows a common layout which includes indications, equipment, technique and complications. The book is intended to be a reference book for radiology trainees learning to do practical procedures for the first time and also for practising radiologists not habitually performing certain diagnostic procedures. (UK)

  2. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.)

  3. Hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with problems following implantation of cemented total hip prostheses must be clinically examined. This examination is followed by a series of diagnostic imaging procedures. These include X-ray diagnosis, 3-phase 99mTc-MDP bone scans, scientigraphy for inflammation, and arthrography, performed singly or as sequential studies. X-ray findings and scientigraphic patterns arousing or confirming a suspicion of aseptic (mechanical) or septic (infectious) loosening of the prosthesis are evaluated and discussed. (orig.)

  4. Radiological examinations of complications after total hip replacement Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological findings of complications after total hip replacement are summarized by analizing the data of control examinations of the operated patients at the National Institute for Rheumatology and Physiotherapy. In this first part the types of total hip replacements and the radiological methods (native x-ray, fistulography, arthrography, needle biopsy and scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc isotope) are surveyed, and the radiological findings of the septic surgical complications are described. (author)

  5. Dosimetry of computerized tomography in the evaluation of hip dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyer, B.; Bassano, D.A.; Levinsohn, E.M.; Smith, D.S.; Cady, R.B.

    1984-07-01

    The usefulness of computerized tomography (CT) in the assessment of hip dysplasia has recently been given attention in the literature and concern regarding radiation dose has been raised. This study was undertaken to measure the radiation dose, both in and out of plaster, for plain films, arthrography, tomography, and CT. A method is suggested to reduce dosage by 80% without compromising diagnostic information. Our experience with 25 scans of patients aged 4 months to 39 years is presented.

  6. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M. and others

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations.

  7. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations

  8. Imaging of hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T., E-mail: millertt@hss.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E. 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The imaging evaluation of the prosthetic hip begins with radiography, but arthrography, aspiration, scintigraphy, sonography, CT and MR imaging all have roles in the evaluation of the painful prosthesis. This article will review the appearance of normal hip arthroplasty including hemiarthroplasty, total arthroplasty, and hip resurfacing, as well as the appearances of potential complications such as aseptic loosening and osteolysis, dislocation, infection, periprosthetic fracture, hardware failure, and soft tissue abnormalities.

  9. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  10. Clinical or radiological diagnosis of impingement; Klinische oder radiologische Diagnose des Impingements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, J.K.; Weber, M.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Zeifang, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Orthopaedie, Unfallchirurgie und Paraplegiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a clinically common entity involving trapping of tendons or bursa with typical clinical findings. Important radiological procedures are ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography. Projection radiography and computed tomography (CT) are ideal to identify bony changes and CT arthrography also serves as an alternative method in cases of contraindications for MRI. These modalities support the clinically suspected diagnosis of impingement syndrome and may identify its cause in primary diagnosis. In addition, effects of impingement are determined by imaging. Therapy decisions are based on a synopsis of radiological and clinical findings. The sensitivity and specificity of these imaging modalities with regard to the diagnostics of a clinically evident impingement syndrome are given in this review article. Orthopedic and trauma surgeons express the suspicion of an impingement syndrome based on patient history and physical examination and radiologists confirm structural changes and damage of intra-articular structures using dedicated imaging techniques. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom der Schulter ist ein haeufiges Einklemmungsphaenomen von Sehnen oder Bursen mit typischem klinischem Befund. Wichtige radiologische Verfahren sind Sonographie, MRT und MR-Arthrographie. Projektionsradiographie und CT sind ideal, um knoecherne Veraenderungen aufzuzeigen. Die CT-Arthrographie dient zudem als Ersatzverfahren bei Kontraindikationen fuer die MRT. Diese genannten Modalitaeten koennen in der Primaerdiagnostik die Diagnose eines Impingementsyndroms stuetzen und dessen Ursache aufzeigen. Zudem werden bildgebend Folgen der Einklemmung festgestellt und in Zusammenschau von klinischer Symptomatik und radiologischem Befund Therapieentscheidungen getroffen. Die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der zuvor genannten bildgebenden Verfahren in Bezug auf die diagnostische Aufarbeitung einer klinisch evidenten Impingementsymptomatik

  11. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwang Won; Seo, Dong Wook; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up per...

  12. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  13. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.)

  14. Differences between radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist in the study of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments: magnetic resonance imaging and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheno, Ramon; Buck, Florian M.; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To demonstrate how radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist can affect the visualization of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers. The detectability of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments of ten fresh human wrists was analyzed in coronal, axial and sagittal images in the neutral position and in radial and ulnar deviation with MR imaging and MR arthrography. The findings were then correlated with gross anatomic inspection. Additionally, quantitative measurements including the radiocarpal distances and capitate angles were performed. Differences were noted in the visual conspicuity of only the intercarpal ligaments of the proximal carpal row with different techniques and wrist positions. The average width of the radiocarpal joint was 0.62 mm, 1.55 mm and 2.0 mm (radial side) and 3.78 mm, 2.25 mm and 1.16 mm (ulnar side) in radial deviation, neutral position, and ulnar deviation of the wrist, respectively. Statistically, these maneuvers produced significant opening in the ulnar side during radial deviation (Student's t-test; P = 0.0005) and in the radial side in ulnar deviation (P = 0.007). Significant differences in the width of the radiocarpal joint were observed during radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, influencing the visualization of the intrinsic ligaments, mainly the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments. The use of MR arthrography with radial and/or ulnar deviation has the potential to improve diagnosis in clinical cases in which injury to one or both of these ligaments is suggested. (orig.)

  15. Initial clinical experience of MRI microscopy coil to triangular fibrocartilage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the efficacy of high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil at 1.5 T for diagnosing triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury, compared with arthroscopy and arthrography. All subjects were imaged in the prone position with the arm over the head. The wrist was kept in the pronation position and a microscopy coil was placed on the center of ulnar head. All MR images were obtained at 1.5 T. Two-dimensional gradient-echo (GRE), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fast spin echo (FSE) images of the wrist were acquired using a microscopy coil (47 mm in diameter). Eight patients with injured TFCC were studied with both arthrography and MRI, and three patients were studied with both arthroscopy and MRI. The structures of TFCC were classified into 6 regions (radius attachment, disc proper, triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment, volar side radio-ulnar ligament, and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament), and were evaluated by one orthopedics surgeon and two radiologists. It was possible to distinguish each structure of the TFCC using high-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil. The injuries were pointed out at radius attachment in 3 patients, disc proper in 4, triangular ligament in 4, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament in 3, volar side radioulnar ligament in 7, and lunate-triquetral attachment in 7 on MRI. Using arthroscopy, injuries at lunate-triquetral attachment in 1, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, and triangular ligament in 3 were not observed possibly because of dorsal approach. Another TFCC injuries on MRI in 3 patients were consistent with those with arthroscopy. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil allowed to describe most of TFCC injuries, and to evaluate triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, which could not be observed by arthroscopy and arthrography. (author)

  16. Differences between radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist in the study of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments: magnetic resonance imaging and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate how radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist can affect the visualization of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers. The detectability of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments of ten fresh human wrists was analyzed in coronal, axial and sagittal images in the neutral position and in radial and ulnar deviation with MR imaging and MR arthrography. The findings were then correlated with gross anatomic inspection. Additionally, quantitative measurements including the radiocarpal distances and capitate angles were performed. Differences were noted in the visual conspicuity of only the intercarpal ligaments of the proximal carpal row with different techniques and wrist positions. The average width of the radiocarpal joint was 0.62 mm, 1.55 mm and 2.0 mm (radial side) and 3.78 mm, 2.25 mm and 1.16 mm (ulnar side) in radial deviation, neutral position, and ulnar deviation of the wrist, respectively. Statistically, these maneuvers produced significant opening in the ulnar side during radial deviation (Student's t-test; P = 0.0005) and in the radial side in ulnar deviation (P = 0.007). Significant differences in the width of the radiocarpal joint were observed during radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, influencing the visualization of the intrinsic ligaments, mainly the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments. The use of MR arthrography with radial and/or ulnar deviation has the potential to improve diagnosis in clinical cases in which injury to one or both of these ligaments is suggested. (orig.)

  17. Value of different MR techniques in diagnosis of degenerative disorders of the hyaline cartilage - in vitro study on 50 joint specimens of the knee with 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: An experimental study was performed on joint specimens of the knee to assess the advantages and disadvantages of 14 generally available sequences in cartilage imaging. Methods: Each of the 50 surgically exposed cadaveric joints of the knee was examined by the following sequences: T1, proton- and T2 weighted spin echo(SE) sequences, proton- and T2 weighted Turbo-SE, T1 weighted SE with fat suppression, MTC combined with T1-weighted SE and T2 weighted FLASH-2 D, STIR, FISP-3 D, FLASH-3 D (with fat suppression), and MR arthrography. We assessed the image quality by a scale, signal to noise-ratio of cartilage and joint fluid, and the accuracy in detection of cartilage lesions. Pathology and arthroscopy were reference methods to MRI, and demonstrated grade 1-4 lesions on 186 of 300 joint facettes. Results: Advanced stages of cartilage lesions (65 grade 3 and 4 lesions) were detected by standard SE sequences in 67-94%. Application of volume techniques (FISP-3 D, FLASH-3 D), high definition matrix (512 pixel), MTC with FLASH-2 D and MR-arthrography improved the sensitivity up to 82-100%. Superficial lesions (65 grade 2 lesions) were demonstrated in 3-38%, and on MR arthrography in 45%. Structural changes (56 Grade 1 lesions) were recorded on MRI in only 10%. Conclusions: With regard to standard SE sequences, the detectability of cartilage lesions can be improved by techniques that use 512 matrices, selective cartilage imaging, and volume acquisition. (orig.)

  18. The significance of imaging methods in the diagnosis of periarticular diseases of the shoulder caused by sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous kinds of sports lead to lesions of the periarticular tissue of the shoulder, which can result in the supraspinatus syndrome or incomplete and complete rupture of the rotator cuff. Standard radiography is of limited use in the diagnosis of periarticular diseases of the shoulder. Osseous alterations in the greater tubercle and undersurface of the acromion can be explained as a supraspinatus syndrome or a long-standing rupture of the rotator cuff in connection with high positioning of the head of the humerus. A rupture of the rotator cuff is demonstrated by arthrography of the shoulder joint, a diagnostic method that we think is necessary despite regular examinations with ultrasonography. (orig.)

  19. Sport injuries of the knee in young people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biggest number of injuries of the knee are in highly result interested sportsmen. The portion of girls has reached 30%. More than 50% of all injuries regard the ligaments and the menisci. Especially in these cases and in combined lesions gives the arthrography good results. All possibilities of investigations should be used for acute injured sportsmen, because of the specific readiness of risks and the dissimulation of young sportspeople and because of the danger of too late established diagnosis and within those of late damages. (orig.)

  20. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.