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Sample records for arthritis patients receiving

  1. Associations Between Patient Characteristics and the Amount of Arthritis Medication Information Patients Receive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geryk, Lorie Love; Blalock, Susan; DeVellis, Robert F; Morella, Kristen; Carpenter, Delesha Miller

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about factors associated with the receipt of medication information among arthritis patients. This study explores information source receipt and associations between demographic and clinical/patient characteristics and the amount of arthritis medication information patients receive. Adult patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 328) completed an online cross-sectional survey. Patients reported demographic and clinical/patient characteristics and the amount of arthritis medication information received from 15 information sources. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to investigate whether those characteristics were associated with the amount of medication information patients received. Arthritis patients received the most information from health professionals, followed by printed materials, media sources, and interpersonal sources. Greater receipt of information was associated with greater medication adherence, taking more medications, greater medication-taking concerns, more satisfaction with doctor medication-related support, and Black compared to White race. RA patients reported receiving more information compared to OA patients, and differences were found between RA patients and OA patients in characteristics associated with more information receipt. In conclusion, arthritis patients received the most medication information from professional sources, and both positive (e.g., greater satisfaction with doctor support) and negative (e.g., more medication-taking concerns) characteristics were associated with receiving more medication information.

  2. Associations Between Patient Characteristics and the Amount of Arthritis Medication Information Patients Receive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geryk, Lorie Love; Blalock, Susan; DeVellis, Robert F; Morella, Kristen; Carpenter, Delesha Miller

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about factors associated with the receipt of medication information among arthritis patients. This study explores information source receipt and associations between demographic and clinical/patient characteristics and the amount of arthritis medication information patients receive. Adult patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 328) completed an online cross-sectional survey. Patients reported demographic and clinical/patient characteristics and the amount of arthritis medication information received from 15 information sources. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to investigate whether those characteristics were associated with the amount of medication information patients received. Arthritis patients received the most information from health professionals, followed by printed materials, media sources, and interpersonal sources. Greater receipt of information was associated with greater medication adherence, taking more medications, greater medication-taking concerns, more satisfaction with doctor medication-related support, and Black compared to White race. RA patients reported receiving more information compared to OA patients, and differences were found between RA patients and OA patients in characteristics associated with more information receipt. In conclusion, arthritis patients received the most medication information from professional sources, and both positive (e.g., greater satisfaction with doctor support) and negative (e.g., more medication-taking concerns) characteristics were associated with receiving more medication information. PMID:27668523

  3. The incidence of malignant disease in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsner, A B; Farber, S. J.; Sheon, R P; Finkel, R I

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-six patients with definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis admitted to hospital between 1965 and 1974 for cytotoxic therapy were studied for the presence and type of malignant disease. Each of the cytotoxic treated patients was age and sex matched to a rheumatoid arthritis patient admitted to hospital during the same years but who did not receive cytotoxic therapy. There was no increase in malignancy in the cytotoxic treated group over the control group.

  4. MRI assessment of suppression of structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving rituximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterfy, Charles; Emery, Paul; Tak, Paul P;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in structural damage and joint inflammation assessed by MRI following rituximab treatment in a Phase 3 study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) who were naive to biological therapy. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive...... two infusions of placebo (n=63), rituximab 500 mg (n=62), or rituximab 1000 mg (n=60) intravenously on days 1 and 15. MRI scans and radiographs of the most inflamed hand and wrist were acquired at baseline, weeks 12 (MRI only), 24 and 52. The primary end point was the change in MRI erosion score from...... baseline at week 24. RESULTS: Patients treated with rituximab demonstrated significantly less progression in the mean MRI erosion score compared with those treated with placebo at weeks 24 (0.47, 0.18 and 1.60, respectively, p=0.003 and p=0.001 for the two rituximab doses vs placebo) and 52 (-0.30, 0...

  5. Case Report of Transverse Myelitis in a Patient Receiving Etanercept for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Defty; Edward Sames; Teresa Doherty; Rodney Hughes

    2013-01-01

    Etanercept is a monoclonal antibody targeted against Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-a) which is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and is in cases where conventional disease modifying agents such as methotrexate have failed. Neurological complications of treatment have been documented. We describe a case of transverse myelitis occurring in a 48 year-old lady with RA since 1994 who had been receiving etanercept for four years.

  6. Case Report of Transverse Myelitis in a Patient Receiving Etanercept for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Defty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Etanercept is a monoclonal antibody targeted against Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-a which is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and is in cases where conventional disease modifying agents such as methotrexate have failed. Neurological complications of treatment have been documented. We describe a case of transverse myelitis occurring in a 48 year-old lady with RA since 1994 who had been receiving etanercept for four years.

  7. Disseminated cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma in a patient receiving triptolide/tripdiolide for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E.; Frankiewicz, Dorota; Bręborowicz, Danuta; Matławska, Irena; Bylka, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To date, Kaposi sarcoma has not been mentioned among the adverse effects of triptolide/tripdiolide, ethyl acetate extracts or polyglycosides of the Chinese herbal remedy Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. Case Report A patient was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 29 years. She underwent treatment with corticosteroids, methotrexate and gold sodium thiosulfate, and was chronically taking ketoprofen. At the age of 59 years she started to take a powder (≈2 g/day) f...

  8. Remission and rheumatoid arthritis: Data on patients receiving usual care in twenty-four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Hetland, Merete Lund; Mäkinen, Heidi;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of different definitions of remission in a large multinational cross-sectional cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA) database, which (as of January 2008) included 5...... exercise were statistically significantly associated with remission. CONCLUSION: The use of different definitions of RA remission leads to different results with regard to remission rates, with considerable variation among countries and between sexes. Reported remission rates in clinical trials...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis vs Osteoarthritis in Patients Receiving Total Knee Arthroplasty: Perioperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stundner, Ottokar; Danninger, Thomas; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Sun, Xuming; Goodman, Susan M; Russell, Linda A; Figgie, Mark; Mazumdar, Madhu; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of data available on perioperative outcomes of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We determined differences in demographics and risk for perioperative adverse events between patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA) versus RA using a population-based approach. Of 351,103 entries for patients who underwent TKA, 3.4% had a diagnosis of RA. RA patients were on average younger [RA: 64.3 years vs OA: 66.6 years; p<0.001] and more likely female [RA: 79.2% vs OA: 63.2%; P<0. 001]. The unadjusted rates of mortality and most major perioperative adverse events were similar in both groups, with the exception of infection [RA: 4.5% vs. OA: 3.8%; P<0.001]. RA was not associated with increased adjusted odds for combined adverse events. PMID:23764034

  10. Remission and rheumatoid arthritis: Data on patients receiving usual care in twenty-four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Hetland, Merete Lund; Mäkinen, Heidi;

    2008-01-01

    ,848 patients receiving usual care at 67 sites in 24 countries, was used for this study. Patients were clinically assessed by rheumatologists and completed a 4-page self-report questionnaire. The database was analyzed according to the following definitions of remission: American College of Rheumatology (ACR......: The overall remission rate was lowest using the ACR definition of remission (8.6%), followed by the Clin42 (10.6%), Clin28 (12.6%), CDAI (13.8%), MD remission (14.2%), and RAPID3 (14.3%); the rate of remission was highest when remission was defined using the DAS28 (19.6%). The difference between the highest...

  11. Lymphoma in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis receiving methotrexate treatment: successful treatment with rituximab

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, M; Malkovska, V; Krishnan, J.; Lessin, L; Barth, W.

    2001-01-01

    A 55 year old man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), treated for four years with methotrexate (MTX), who developed a B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL), is described. The tumour was localised to the shoulder and axillary lymph nodes, and positive for Epstein-Barr viral antigens. After failure of radiation and chemotherapy, a complete remission was achieved with a combination of antibody treatment (rituximab) and EPOCH. The development of a second malign...

  12. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  13. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  14. Estimating the monetary value of the annual productivity gained in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept plus methotrexate: interim results from the PRIZE study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure and value the impact of combined etanercept (ETN) and methotrexate (MTX) therapy on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 52 weeks. Methods MTX- and biological-naïve patients with RA (symptom onset ≤12 months; Disease Activity Score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28) >3.2) received open-label ETN50/MTX for 52 weeks. The Valuation of Lost Productivity (VOLP) questionnaire, measuring paid and unpaid work productivity impacts, was completed a...

  15. Assessment by MRI of inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis patients with methotrexate inadequate response receiving golimumab: results of the GO-FORWARD trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate golimumab's effect on MRI-detected inflammation and structural damage in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX).......To evaluate golimumab's effect on MRI-detected inflammation and structural damage in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX)....

  16. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Receiving DMARDs Therapy: Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Elham; Mowla, Karim; Ghorbani, Ali; Bahadoram, Sara; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Dargahi-Malamir, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a symmetric peripheral polyarthritis of unknown etiology that, untreated or if unresponsive the therapy, typically leads to deformity and destruction of joints due to erosion of cartilage and bone. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce morning stiffness, the number of tender joints and swollen joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This study is designed for evaluation of omega-3 effects on disease activity and remission of rheumatoid arthritis in DMARDs treated patients and on weight changes and reduction of analgesic drugs consumption versus placebo. Methods: Sixty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (49 female and 11 male) underwent rheumatologist examination and disease activity score were calculated. Then patients were enrolled in this 12 week, double blind, randomized, placebo- controlled study. The patients in both groups continued their pre study standard treatment. The patients were visited every 4 weeks, 4 times and data were recorded. Results: Significant improvement in the patient’s global evaluation and in the physician’s assessment of disease was observed in those taking omega-3. The proportions of patients who improved and of those who were able to reduce their concomitant analgesic medication were significantly greater with omega-3 consumption. There were no weight changes. Conclusion: Daily supplementation with omega-3 results has significant clinical benefit and may reduce the need for concomitant analgesic consumption without weight changes. PMID:26925896

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging for accelerated assessment of drug effect and prediction of subsequent radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a study of patients receiving combined anakinra and methotrexate treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Nielsen, H;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By MRI to assess the efficacy of addition of anakinra for controlling synovitis and stopping erosive progression in patients with clinically active RA despite receiving methotrexate, and to determine the predictive value of MRI for subsequent radiographic erosive progression. METHODS...... at 36 weeks. Baseline MRI synovitis and erosion scores, but no clinical/biochemical parameters, correlated significantly with subsequent erosive progression. CONCLUSION: Addition of anakinra did not significantly reduce MRI signs of synovitis, and most patients had progressive joint destruction...

  18. Patient education for adults with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Kirwan, J.R.; Taal, E.; Rasker, H.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education shows short-term benefits for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of patient education interventions on health status (pain, functional disability, psychological well-being and disease activity) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  19. Pulmonary involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Hisham M; Eisa, Ashraf A; Arafat, Waleed R; Marie, Mohamed A

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common and can be due to the disease itself as well as to the therapies used to treat it. The purpose of this study was to disclose the pulmonary involvement in early RA patients not more than 2 years disease duration using the computed tomography (CT) as well as the pulmonary function tests as ways of pulmonary involvement assessment. Forty patients aged 37.6 ± 10.3 with early rheumatoid arthritis not more than 2 years of disease duration were recruited for the study. All patients were assessed clinically for their RA with DAS28, which was utilized for disease activity determination. Ten percent of our patients were found to be clinically involved by interstitial lung disease (ILD), where 27% have abnormal HRCT finding and 32.5% with abnormal PFT. Predilection for clinically manifest ILD was evident in active RA patients with high DAS28 score, seropositive RA patients, and in patients receiving steroids and anti-TNFα therapy. ILD occurs early in the course of RA, with more predilection for clinically active RA disease.

  20. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  1. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  2. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Amirdzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the joint management of rheumatoid arthritis patients needing endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower extremities by rheumatologists and orthopedic traumatologists.Due to the fact that there are no conventional standards or guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases, adopted by international rheumatology associations, the authors generalize their experience in managing the patients in terms of international approaches and guidelines from different countries. The medical assessment and reduction of cardiovascular risks, the prevention of infectious complications, hemorrhages, and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, and the specific features of management of patients with osteoporosis are under consideration. The authors' experience in managing the patients receiving antirheumatic therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine, is detailed. Recommendations for managing patients taking glucocorticoids and biologic agents (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, anti-B-cell therapy, and interleukin-6 receptor inhibitors in the preoperative andpostoperative periods are given.

  3. Modifications in Lipid Levels Are Independent of Serum TNF-α in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of an Observational 24-Week Cohort Study Comparing Patients Receiving Etanercept Plus Methotrexate or Methotrexate as Monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Alejandra Rodriguez-Jimenez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the modifications in lipids between patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA receiving etanercept plus methotrexate (ETA + MTX versus methotrexate (MTX and their relationship with serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Methods. In an observational cohort study, we compared changes in lipid levels in patients receiving ETA + MTX versus MTX in RA. These groups were assessed at baseline and at 4 and 24 weeks, measuring clinical outcomes, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TNF-α. Results. Baseline values for lipid levels were similar in both groups. HDL-C levels increased significantly only in the ETA + MTX group (from 45.5 to 50.0 mg/dL at 4 weeks, a 10.2% increase, P<0.001, and to 56.0 mg/dL at 24 weeks, a 25.1% increase, P<0.001, while other lipids underwent no significant changes. ETA + MTX also exhibited a significant increase in TNF-α (44.8 pg/mL at baseline versus 281.4 pg/mL at 24 weeks, P<0.001. The MTX group had no significant changes in lipids or TNF-α. Significant differences in HDL-C between groups were observed at 24 weeks (P=0.04 and also in TNF-α  (P=0.01. Conclusion. HDL-C levels increased significantly following treatment with ETA + MTX, without a relationship with decrease of TNF-α.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging for accelerated assessment of drug effect and prediction of subsequent radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a study of patients receiving combined anakinra and methotrexate treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Nielsen, H;

    2005-01-01

    : 100 mg anakinra subcutaneously/day was added to the treatment of 17 patients with clinically active RA despite methotrexate. MRI of the non-dominant wrist and 2nd-5th MCP joints (OMERACT evaluation) was performed at weeks 0, 12, and 36, and radiography of both hands and wrists (modified Sharp...... evaluation) at weeks 0 and 36. RESULTS: MRI synovitis scores were not significantly changed. Radiography of both hands and wrists after 36 weeks showed erosive progression in 11 patients, and MRI after 12 weeks in 10 patients. Nine of 10 patients with MRI progression at 12 weeks had radiographic progression....... Baseline MRI findings predicted subsequent radiographic erosive progression. Unilateral wrist and MCP joint MRI after 12 weeks had a similar sensitivity for detection of erosive progression as bilateral hand and wrist radiography after 36 weeks....

  5. [Dry eye syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanská, V; Hlinomazová, Z; Fojtík, Z; Nemec, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to review the incidence of the dry eye syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, evaluate the association among the incidence of the dry eye syndrome, presence of positive rheumatoid factor (RF), the RA stage, and the duration of the disease. The group consisted of altogether 100 patients, 16 men and 84 women; the average age was 58.9 years (SD 14.6). The average duration of RA was 12.3 years, SD 11.0. In each patient, the Schirmer test I was performed, the presence of the LIPCOF (Lid Parallel Conjunctival Folds) on the slit lamp was assessed, the BUT (Tear Break-Up Time) was measured and vital fluorescein staining was performed. In each patient the data of the presence or absence of the RF in the serum, RA severity according to the X-ray examination, and the disease duration were recorded. The Pearson's association test for nominal variables was used for statistical evaluation of the association between the rheumatoid arthritis presence and the dry eye syndrome. In our group of 100 patients, the Schirmer test I was positive in 67% of patients. Positive BUT was marked in 84 % of patients. The conjunctival folds were present in 45 % of patients only. The pathological findings after cornea fluorescein staining appeared in 18 % of patients. The dry eye syndrome incidence was marked in 74% of patients with RA. Subjective difficulties were declared by 38.3% of patients only. The local treatment was already established in 23.0% of patients only. We did not find statistically significant correlation between the RF positive rheumatoid arthritis appearance and dry eye syndrome, nor between the stage of the rheumatoid arthritis and presence of the dry eye syndrome. We proved statistical connection between the presence of dry eye syndrome and the duration of rheumatoid arthritis longer than 10 years. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common ocular complication in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We proved the connection

  6. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...... of living independent of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: SB is perceived, motivated, and performed differently in patients with RA. An individually tailored approach may be essential in understanding and encouraging patients' motivation towards sustainable change in SB and activity patterns....

  7. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  8. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  9. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  10. Experience with conservative rehabilitation in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shelepina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate a need for conservative rehabilitation treatment in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA.Material and methods. Data on the principles and procedures of rehabilitation treatment were analyzed in patients with JCA on the basis of 25- year experience. The need for these packages of measures in 1999, 2008, and 2014 was compared. Standard procedures for joints at different sites were described. According to the degree of joint functions, there were rehabilitation treatment packages: corrective, mobilization, and general health-improving.Results and discussion. All patients with juvenile arthritis need rehabilitation (physical, psychological, and social. Comparison of the total number of patients who had received rehabilitation treatment in 1999, 2008, and 2014 showed a small trend towards its reduction. This is due to the smaller number of patients with dysfunctions and to the larger number of those without movement disorders who had received adequate treatment in early periods of the disease. The high percentage of patients having limited joint functions needs a mobilization package. Analysis of the data available in the literature and the authors' experience may lead to the conclusion that all patients with JCA need exercise therapy. The latter is a major procedure for physical rehabilitation and should be included in the standards for adjuvant treatment during basic medical therapy. Emphasis is laid on the importance of the early initiation of treatment to prevent incapacitating deformity at early stages of the disease.

  11. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Y. Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients. In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking m...

  13. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  14. Interplay between environmental factors, articular involvement, and HLA-B27 in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpa, R.; DEL PUENTE A; di Girolamo, C; Della Valle, G.; E. Lubrano; Oriente, P

    1992-01-01

    Medical records of 138 patients with psoriatic arthritis and 138 with rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed for the occurrence of an environmental factor triggering arthritis. Twelve (9%) of the patients with psoriatic arthritis had had an acute disorder immediately preceding onset of arthritis (an operation in four cases, articular trauma in three, abortion in two, myocardial infarction, thrombophlebitis, and phosphoric ester intoxication in one case each). Peripheral arthritis occurred in all ...

  15. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  17. Histoplasmosis infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 1998-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteson Eric L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA are at increased risk for infections related to both the disease and its treatments. These include uncommonly reported infections due to histoplasmosis. Methods Medical record review of all patients with a diagnosis of RA who developed new histoplasmosis infection in an endemic region between Jan 1, 1998 and Jan 30, 2009 and who were seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota was performed. Results Histoplasmosis was diagnosed in 26 patients. Most patients were on combination therapies; 15 were on anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF agents, 15 on corticosteroids and 16 on methotrexate. Most received more than 6 months of itraconazole and/or amphotericin treatment. Two patients died of causes unrelated to histoplasmosis. Anti-TNF treatment was restarted in 4/15 patients, with recurrence of histoplasmosis in one. Conclusions In this largest single center series of patients with RA and histoplasmosis in the era of immunomodulatory therapy, we found that most patients had longstanding disease and were on multiple immunomodulatory agents. Most cases were pulmonary; typical signs and symptoms of disease were frequently lacking.

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan;

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients with...

  19. Physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeppenthin, K; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience of physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: A qualitative salutogenic-oriented interview study. SETTING: A rheumatology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS: A purposive sample of 16 physically active patients (mean age 50, range 37......-67) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on average 21 years previously (range 4-46 years). METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide to illuminate how the phenomenon 'physical activity maintenance' was experienced by patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The interviews......, the essential meaning of the phenomenon of physical activity maintenance for patients with rheumatoid arthritis was summarized into 'striving for a transparent body and participation', pointing to experiences of sensations of wellbeing, liberation from restrictions and social participation on equal terms...

  20. Spouse Confidence in Self-Efficacy for Arthritis Management Predicts Improved Patient Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Lynn M.; Keefe, Francis J.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to patient self-efficacy, spouse confidence in patient efficacy may also independently predict patient health outcomes. However, the potential influence of spouse confidence has received little research attention. Purpose The current study examined the influence of patient and spouse efficacy beliefs for arthritis management on patient health. Methods Patient health (i.e., arthritis severity, perceived health, depressive symptoms, lower extremity function), patient self-efficacy, and spouse confidence in patients’ efficacy were assessed in a sample of knee osteoarthritis patients (N = 152) and their spouses at three time points across an 18-month period. Data were analyzed using structural equation models. Results Consistent with predictions, spouse confidence in patient efficacy for arthritis management predicted improvements in patient depressive symptoms, perceived health, and lower extremity function over 6 months and in arthritis severity over 1 year. Conclusions Our findings add to a growing literature that highlights the important role of spouse perceptions in patients’ long-term health. PMID:24604529

  1. Infrared sauna in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, Frederikus G.J.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Floors, Mark; Landkroon, Robert; Rennes, van Bob; Zwijnenberg, Jan; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Koel, Gerard J.

    2009-01-01

    To study the effects of infrared (IR) Sauna, a form of total-body hyperthermia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients were treated for a 4-week period with a series of eight IR treatments. Seventeen RA patients and 17 AS patients were studied. IR was well

  2. Risk of serious infection in biological treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Cameron, Chris; Noorbaloochi, Shahrzad;

    2015-01-01

    infection was the primary measure of treatment effect and calculated 95% credible intervals using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. FINDINGS: The systematic review identified 106 trials that reported serious infections and included patients with rheumatoid arthritis who received biological drugs. Compared......BACKGROUND: Serious infections are a major concern for patients considering treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence is inconsistent as to whether biological drugs are associated with an increased risk of serious infection compared with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs......Trials.gov from their inception to Feb 11, 2014. Search terms included "biologics", "rheumatoid arthritis" and their synonyms. Trials were eligible for inclusion if they included any of the approved biological drugs and reported serious infections. We assessed the risk of bias with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool...

  3. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project

    OpenAIRE

    Petkova VB

    2009-01-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients’ disease management, medication compliance and from there patients’ quality of life. Objective: To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general...

  4. Effect of methotrexate on the temporomandibular joint and facial morphology in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, D O; Ince, A; Moore, T L

    2000-07-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is a disease characterized by chronic inflammation in one or more joints; it affects children and adolescents up to 18 years of age. This disease may cause significant skeletal joint destruction, and the temporomandibular joint, like other joints, may become severely affected resulting in aberrant mandibular growth, abnormal dentofacial development, and/or altered orofacial muscle function. Methotrexate is the most common remittive agent used in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis to modify the course of inflammatory destruction of peripheral joints. The purpose of this study was: (1) to evaluate the effect of methotrexate therapy on the prevalence of temporomandibular joint lesions and aberration in craniofacial development in children afflicted with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis; (2) to further examine the relationship between the temporomandibular joint/cephalometric findings and rheumatologic data (ie, age at onset, duration of disease); and (3) to evaluate further pauciarticular- and polyarticular-onset disease in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and the prevalence of temporomandibular joint lesions and facial dysmorphology. The following information was obtained from 45 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: (1) routine rheumatologic clinical examination data; (2) anamnestic temporomandibular joint evaluation data; (3) clinical temporomandibular joint examination data; (4) lateral cephalometric measurement data; (5) posteroanterior cephalometric measurement data; and (6) individually corrected axial tomographic data. The results demonstrated the following: (1) radiographic evidence of condylar degeneration was apparent in 63% of all patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with pauciarticular patients showing less temporomandibular involvement than polyarticular patients; (2) polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving methotrexate showed less severe temporomandibular joint involvement than the polyarticular

  5. Impact of Managed Care Health Insurance System for Indigent Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago-Casas, Yesenia; González-Rivera, Tania; Castro-Santana, Lesliane; Ríos, Grissel; Martínez, David; Rodríguez, Vanessa; González-Alcover, Rafael; Mayor, Ángel M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome among indigent patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Puerto Rico receiving their healthcare in a managed care system, as compared to non-indigent patients treated in fee-for-service settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 214 Puerto Ricans with RA (per American College of Rheumatology classification criteria). Demographic features, health-related behaviors, cumulative clinical manifestations, disease...

  6. Psychophysiological responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    de Brouwer, Sabine J. M.; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Donders, Rogier T.; Agnes Eijsbouts; Saskia van Koulil; van Riel, Piet L C M; Evers, Andrea W. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress management interventions may prove useful in preventing the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study assessed the effects of a stress management intervention on the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Seventy-four patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short-term stress management training, performed a standardized psychosocial stress task (Trier Socia...

  7. Characterisation of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, E.; Macaluso, D.; Edwards, A.; ROSENBAUM, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of uveitis related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and also to compare the uveitis in PsA to the uveitis in spondyloarthropathy (SA).
METHODS—Sixteen patients with uveitis and PsA were evaluated in a tertiary care uveitis clinic. These patients were compared retrospectively to a series of 89 patients with uveitis and SA.
RESULTS—Eight (50%) of the 16 patients with uveitis had strictly peripheral arthritis, while two...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  9. Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohn’s anetoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rondinone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the emergence of arthritis following a physical trauma, in a young man with clinical and histopathologic features of primary anetoderma (Jadassohn type of 13 years’ duration. Diagnosis of post-traumatic arthritis in a young patient with genetic predisposition was assumed. Indeed septic arthritis and other possible cause of arthritis were ruled out.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF CYTOKINE PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH REACTIVE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Gaponova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pathogenesis of reactive arthritis (ReA is not clear yet. Several trials suggest that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines is responsible for development of arthritis in ReA, while other studies report that Th1 cytokine response in ReA is impaired in favor of Th2 response. The aim of our study was to investigate serum levels of cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ and IL-1Ra in the patients with ReA of different etiology, as compared with infection-related arthritis. The results of our study had demonstrated that serum levels of IL-1β and TNFα in the patients with ReA were significantly higher, whereas IL-1Ra, IL-4, IL-6 proved to be significantly lower than in healthy controls. Serum levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in patients with chronic ReA, as compared to the cases of acute and recurrent ReA. No significant differences in cytokine profiles were found between the patients with ReA, and the persons with infection-related arthritis. The data obtained are, generally, suggestive for proinflammatory Th1 cytokine profile in ReA patients studied, this confirming the mostly assumed pathogenetic hypothesis for reactive arthritis where an underlying cytokine imbalance is suggested. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 167-172.

  11. EFFICACY OF UNDERWATER INTERFERENTIAL CURRENT ON HAND FUNCTION IN PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fathy Samhan. PhD PT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an entity of inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of underwater interferential current therapy on hand function in psoriatic arthritis of both hands. Method: Thirty patients (18 females and 12 males had psoriatic arthritis of hands, aged 42 to 50 years with 45.77 ± 3.52 mean, were assigned randomly into two groups of equal number: study group received 20 minutes underwater interferential current for one month, 3 times per week (12 sessions and control group received placebo interferential current. Visual analogue scale for patient-reported pain, the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, and hand function (grip force in Pound of dominant hand were assessed pretreatment and post-treatment. Results: showed significant improvement in the 3 outcomes in study group (p 0.005. Visual analogue scale had a strong positive correlation (p < 0.001 with the disability score and a strong negative correlation (p < 0.001 with the grip force. Conclusion: Using underwater interferential current therapy in patient with psoriatic arthritis of hands was effective in improvement of hand function and quality of life.

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease: a cost effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Krijnen (Pieta); C.J. Kaandorp; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); D. van Schaardenburg (Dirkjan); H.J. Moens; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease. METHODS: In a decision analysis, data from a prospective study on bacterial arthritis in 4907 patients with joint dise

  13. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jonathan D; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  14. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Barlow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc. or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.. Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition, and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population.

  15. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage...

  16. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... view charts and maps. State Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. — Washington, D.C. 20201

  17. The radiographic features of rheumatoid arthritis in HLA-B27-positive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Rosenberg, Z.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Solomon, G. (Dept. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Institute, New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Radiographs were reviewed in a group of nine patients with classical seropositive rheumatoid arthritis who on tissue typing were found to express the class I HLA-B27 allele. Radiographs were analyzed with regard to whether or not they demonstrated radiographic features of (1) classical rheumatoid arthritis, (2) seronegative arthritis, or (3) mixed features of rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis. Five patients (55%) displayed radiographic features consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, two patients (22%) showed radiographic features of seronegative disorder (periostitis and sacroiliitis), and two patients (22%) showed a mixed picture with evidence of both rheumatoid arthritis and a seronegative disorder. Thus, the HLA-B27 allele contributed to the radiographic features in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and associated HLA-B27. Thus, the wide range of findings in our population indicates that the radiographic attributes are not specific enough to constitute a unique subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  18. Which patients improve the most from arthritis rehabilitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagel, Sofia; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Petersson, Ingemar F;

    2014-01-01

    functioning (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)), self-efficacy (Arthritis Self Efficacy Scale (ASES)), psychological health (Hopkins Symptom Check List (HSCL-25)), pain/fatigue (numeric rating scales (NRS)), age, sex, diagnosis, comorbidity, education, clinical setting and change of medication during......Objective: To study health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in arthritis rehabilitation performed by multidisciplinary teams in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Predictors of change in health-related quality of life and the proportion of patients with clinical improvement were...... = 0.000) or fatigue (b 0.02, p = 0.000) at admission predicted improved HRQoL. Change in medication during rehabilitation (b 0.08, p = 0.013) was associated with greater improvement in HRQoL. These EQ-5D findings were supported by SF-36 findings. Positive minimal important differences were noted in 46...

  19. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Risks and Prophylaxis Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Shunsuke Mori; Mineharu Sugimoto

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii infection causes fulminant interstitial pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia, PCP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are receiving biological and/or nonbiological antirheumatic drugs. Recently, we encountered a PCP outbreak among RA outpatients at our institution. Hospital-acquired, person-to-person transmission appears to be the most likely mode of this cluster of P. jirovecii infection. Carriage of P. jirovecii seems a time-limited phenomenon in immunocompet...

  20. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  1. Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawser Jahan, Noorzahan Begum, Sultana Ferdousi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Altered cardiovascular autonomic nerve function with impaired sympathovagal balance is found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Heart Rate Variability (HRV analysis is an important tool for assessment of autonomic nerve activity.Objective: To assess cardiac autonomic nerve function status in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA by time domain measures of HRV.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU, Dhaka from January to December 2010. Sixty female RA patients, age range 18-50 years were constituted study group enrolled from the Out- patient Rheumatology Wing, Department of Medicine, BSMMU. Age matched thirty apparently healthy females were studied as control. Time domain measures of Heart Rate Variability (HRV such as Mean RR intervals, Mean HR, SDNN, RMSSD, NN50% and PNN 50% were recorded for 5 minutes by a Polygraph machine to observe cardiac autonomic nerve function activity. Data were analyzed by independent sample t test.Results: Mean R-R interval, SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50%, NN50% were significantly lower (p<0.001 but heart rate was significantly (P<0.001 higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic nerve function is impaired and characterized by reduced resting parasympathetic activity in female Rheumatoid Arthritis patients.

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: A retrospective study of 162 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in the patients with psoriasis and to analyze retrospectively the results of a 34-year multidisciplinary management of the patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods. The study included 162 out of 183 treated patients with psoriatic arthritis, aged 48 ± 15 years. All the patients satisfied the current diagnostic criteria for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology. Results. Psoriatic arthritis developed in 183 (9.3% out of 1976 patients with psoriasis. Time interval for establishing the diagnosis was 4 years. A positive family history of the disease had 15.0% of the studied patients. Its onset was most often at 42 years of age in 70.4% of the cases, and 2 months to 59 years after the appearance of psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis without psoriasis appeared in 1.8% of the patients. A severe form of arthritis had 64.2% of the patients, mainly the patients with scalp psoriasis (χ2=3.2; p<0.05. Nail changes had 35% of the patients. Distal interphalangeal joints were involved in 63.6%, axial skeleton in 36.4%, oligoarthritis in 45.0%, polyarthritis in 55.0%, and mutilating form in 6.8% of the patients. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate was reveald in 61.7% of the patients. Immunoglobulin M (IgM rheumatoid factor was altered in 4.3% of the patients. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing in the 28 patients were: A2 32.0%, A3 18.0%, Al and A9 14.0%, A28 and A29 3.5%, B8 and B16 14.0%, B5 and B12 11.0%, B13,B15, B18, B27 and B35 7.0%. Radiologic changes were most often in hand and foot joints, less frequently in the knees and quite infrequently in hips and shoulders joints. Sacroiliitis was found in 46.4% of the patients. Psoriasis was treated with topical corticosteroids and salicylic ointments in all the patients, ultraviolet (PUVA therapy in 5.6% and retinoids in 4.3% of them. Artrithis was treated with nonsteroidal anti

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  7. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  8. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage......-time feedback to the physician is feasible, although the goal of treat-to-target is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients in routine care....

  9. Maintenance of physical activity in patients with rheumaoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løppenthin, Katrine; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several exercise trials indicate that physical activity (PA) may improve physical function and quality of life, and reduce pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 1, 2. Few of these studies have included physical activity maintenance. Thus, it is still unknown how and why some...

  10. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Alina González Otero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, it has varied clinical manifestations and cause different degrees of discomfort and disability. Objective: to conduct a clinical and epidemiological characterization of all rheumatoid arthritis patients admitted to the clinical services of the Arnaldo Milián Castro Provincial University Hospital. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted in the clinical services of the Arnaldo Milián Castro University Hospital from 2009 through 2013. The universe consisted of 280 patients hospitalized due to rheumatoid arthritis. The following variables were studied: age, sex, skin color, past medical history, clinical manifestations, complications, affected organs, time of diagnosis and treatment. Chi square and prevalence ratio with a 95% confidence interval were calculated. Results: arthritis was found in 2 men every 5 women. White middle-aged patients predominated. Hypertension was the major illness described in the past medical history. Arthralgia and movement limitations prevailed. No family history of rheumatic disease was found. The time of diagnosis was less than six months and infection was among the most frequent complications. The most common treatment was the combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids, especially in seropositive patients. Conclusions: rheumatoid arthritis was more common in females and white middle-aged patients. Hypertension was the major illness found in the past medical history. Patients with two target organs affected predominated. Arthralgia and movement limitations prevailed in the clinical picture. The most common treatment was the combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids.

  11. Subtalar joint septic arthritis in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynes, Jacob; Harris, William; Hadfield, Robert A; Malay, D Scot

    2013-01-01

    The clinical presentation of a monoarticular, red, hot, and swollen joint has many possible diagnoses, including septic arthritis, which is 1 of the most devastating. The morbidity associated with this pathologic process involves permanent joint damage and the potential for progression to systemic illness and, even, mortality. The common risk factors for joint sepsis include a history of rheumatoid arthritis, previous joint surgery, joint prosthesis, intravenous drug abuse, alcoholism, diabetes, previous intra-articular steroid use, and cutaneous ulceration. The diagnosis is primarily determined from the culture results after arthrocentesis and correlation with direct visualization, imaging, and various serologies, including synovial analysis. In the present report, a case of an insidious presentation of subtalar joint septic arthritis and its association with a unique patient presentation concomitant with primary immunodeficiency and culture-proven Myocplasma hominis infection is discussed. Septic arthritis has a predilection for the lower extremities and typically is isolated to the hip or knee, with less common involvement of the ankle or metatarsophalangeal joints. Owing to the uncommon nature of primary immunodeficiency disorders and the paucity of studies discussing their association with septic arthridites, we aimed to raise awareness of subtalar joint septic arthritis and to provide a brief overview of the pathogenesis as it presented in a 33-year-old male with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia/agammaglobulinema.

  12. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Amaral de Ávila Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs. METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67 for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11 for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD in patients with ankylosing

  13. Septic arthritis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in an immunosuppressive patient: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Dal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis is a serious medical problem that causes rapidly chronic and irreversible joint damage when diagnosisand treatment are delayed. Although, the bacteria are the most frequent cause of septic arthritis, rarely fungi may beresponsible for this disease. We presented here a case of septic arthritis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, developed ina 65 years-old-male patient with diabetes mellitus. The patient admitted to our hospital with complaints of pain, swelling,redness in the right knee and high fever, which are not exceeding despite using vancomycin and ceftriaxone for 18days. Imipenem was started to the patient in our hospital. At the end of 7 days because of no regression of patient’scomplaints, arthroscopic synovectomy and lavage were performed for the patient’s right knee. Aspergillus fumigatuswas isolated from the aspiration biopsy specimen that received during the surgical operation and patient was treatedwith voriconazole, successfully. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(1: 29-32

  14. Labour force participation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chorus, A; Miedema, H.; Wevers, C; Linden, S.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess work history and labour force participation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Netherlands.
METHODS—A random sample of 1056 patients with RA aged 16-59 years from 17 rheumatology practices in the Netherlands was examined. Data on disease status and outcome were obtained by a questionnaire including standardised instruments, such as the Rapid Assessment of Disease Activity in Rheumatology (RADAR) and RAND-36 questionnaires. Labour force participation was ...

  15. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by i...

  16. Imatinib induces hypothyroidism in patients receiving levothyroxinc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, JWB; Zonnenberg, BA; Plukker, JTM; van Der Graaf, WTA; Links, TP

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of imatinib with other drugs have been scarcely reported. We report a previously unknown effect of imatinib on levothyroxine therapy. Eleven patients (1 with gastrointestinal stromal tumor and 10 with medullary thyroid carcinoma) received imatinib. Eight had undergone thyroidectomy and

  17. Non-pharmacological treatment effects on psychosomatic and immune regulatory mechanisms in patients with rheumatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharikova I.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative analysis of the influence of the methods of the lateral ophthalmotilapia and low-intensity magnetic therapy on the Central and peripheral nervous system and the immune status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Material and methods: a comparative analysis of the impact of the 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 18 to 65 years, of which 19 patients (43.2 percent — 1 group received low-frequency low-intensity magnetic therapy and 25 patients (56.8 per cent — group 2, the lateral ophthalmotilapia. Results. In group 1 significantly improved memory both short-term (from 69.2±9.0 to 81,7±12,7, p=0.003, and the reminiscence relating to medium-term characteristics of memory (57,3±22 to 79,0±14,5; p=0.004. In patients of the 2nd group in the course of treatment was observed more pronounced dynamics of improvement of parameters of higher nervous activity, namely short-term memory (79,4±17 to 88,2±12, p=0.003and reminiscences of memory (from 69.4±27 to 82.4±19,5, p=0,0016. Conclusion. Lateral ophthalmotilapia and low-frequency magnetotherapy for help expand the list of rehabilitation programs in rheumatoid arthritis, the disease having dual autoimmune and psychosomatic genesis.

  18. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Efficiency of teaching patients with early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

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    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education programs are an important part of the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Objective: to develop a unified model of an education program for RA patients and to evaluate its efficiency at the early stage of the disease.Material and methods. A group education program was worked out with the support of the All-Russian public organization of the disabled “The Russian rheumatology organization “Nadezhda” (Hope” and encompassed 4 daily classes lasting 90 min. All information was presented by a multidisciplinary team of specialists (rheumatologists, a cardiologist, a psychologist, a physiotherapist, and a physical trainer. The study included 55 patients with early RA (89.1% of women aged 18 to 62 years; the duration of the disease was 2 to 22 months; of them 25 were taught using the education program (a study group; 30 received drug therapy only (a control group. Following 3 and 6 months, the number of tender and swollen joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and pain were determined applying a 100-ml VAS, DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3. Adherence to non-drug treatments was assessed employing a special patient questionnaire.Results. Three and six months after being taught, two patient groups showed increases in adherence to joint protection methods by 13 and 10 times (p<0.01, regular physical training by 4 and 3.25 times (p<0.01, uses of orthoses for the wrist joint by 2 times and 75% (p<0.01 and knee orthoses by 33.3 and 50.0% (p<0.01, and orthopedic insoles by 71.4 and 57.1% (p<0.01, respectively. Following 6 months, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in most parameters (p<0.05, except for ESR, CRP, and DAS28 (p>0.05. Further more, a good response to treatment was significantly more common in these periods, as shown by the EULAR response criteria (DAS28: 56.3% versus 40% in the control group (p<0.05.Conclusion. The education program decreases the intensity

  20. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova VB

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients’ disease management, medication compliance and from there patients’ quality of life.Objective: To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner’s visits and hospitalizations are expected.Methods: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71, attending pharmacies – intervention group; and 43 individuals – control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. Results: Parameters assessed during the four stages of the program were: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner’s visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients’ health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients’ pain, decrease in the physician’s visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care.Conclusions: Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient’s quality of life.

  1. Comparison of packages for suppositories by patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen-Laming, B N; Phiferons, H; Mulder, E F; van der Meij, N T; van Harten, R P; Dijkmans, B A

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with rheumatoid arthritis were asked via a questionnaire about the convenience of packages containing tablets, capsules, or suppositories for home use. Almost half of the patients stated that they had difficulty in opening packages containing capsules or tablets, and two-thirds had difficulty with the packages used for suppositories. The characteristics of six packages used for suppositories were also compared. Patients were given the packages in random order and were asked to open them and remove a suppository. Many of them were unable to open three of the packages with their hands. The evaluation of the six packages by the patients differed widely.

  2. Do rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical practice benefit from switching from infliximab to a second tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjardem, Elisabeth; Østergaard, Mikkel; Pødenphant, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of switching to a second biological drug in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. METHODS: Since 2000, Danish RA patients (n = 1021) receiving biological therapy have been registered in the nationwide DANBIO database. The first and second treatment series...... biological therapy was higher than of the first, but lower than that of non-switchers. No difference between various sequences of drugs were found. Danish post-marketing data thus support that RA patients may benefit from switching biological therapy....

  3. Developing the Thai Siriraj Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Tool and validating the Thai Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool and the Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena; Wattanamongkolsil, Luksame; Srinonprasert, Varalak; Petcharat, Chonachan; Siriwanarangsun, Palanan; Katchamart, Wanruchada

    2016-10-01

    To validate the Thai language version of the Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and the Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients Questionnaire (EARP), as well as also to develop a new tool for screening psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among psoriasis (Ps) patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Ps patients visiting the psoriasis clinic at Siriraj Hospital were recruited. They completed the EARP and PEST. Full musculoskeletal history, examination, and radiography were evaluated. PsA was diagnosed by a rheumatologist's evaluation and fulfillment of the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity, and specificity were used to evaluate the performances of the tools. The Siriraj Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Tool (SiPAT) contained questions most relevant to peripheral arthritis, axial inflammation, and enthesitis, selected from multivariate analysis. Of a total of 159 patients, the prevalence of PsA was 78.6 %. The ROC curve analyses of Thai EARP, PEST, and SiPAT were 0.90 (95 % CI 0.84, 0.96), 0.85 (0.78, 0.92), and 0.89 (0.83, 0.95), respectively. The sensitivities of SiPAT, Thai EARP, and PEST were 91.0, 83.0, and 72.0 %, respectively, while the specificities were 69.0, 79.3, and 89.7 %, respectively. All screening questionnaires showed good diagnostic performances. SiPAT could be considered as a screening tool with its desirable properties: higher sensitivity and taking less time. Thai PEST and EARP could possibly be sequentially administered for people with a positive test from SiPAT to reduce the number of false positives. PMID:27333800

  4. Morganella morganii-associated arthritis in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Meryem; Ocak, Sabahattin; Kuvandik, Guven; Aslan, Bahadir; Temiz, Muhyittin; Aslan, Ahmet

    2008-03-01

    This case report involves a 60-year-old diabetic man who developed septic arthritis as a result of the pathogen Morganella morganii. The patient had complaints of elevated body temperature, malaise, rigors and pain in the left knee, despite no history of trauma. On examination of the knee, erythema, warmth, tenderness and swelling was observed. Arthrocentesis performed on his left knee indicated the presence of straw-coloured, cloudy fluid without crystals. Bacterial identification based on biochemical and automated methods indicated the growth of M morganii. M morganii was also isolated sedimentafrom the exudate of a diabetic ulcer in the left foot, with antibiotic susceptibilities identical to those from the knee effusion. This case indicates that M morganii may be considered as a possible cause of septic arthritis in diabetic patients, especially those with diabetic foot infections.

  5. Plasma TNF binding capacity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Svenningsen, Pernille; Gudbrandsdottir, Sif;

    2005-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF-beta, also called lymphotoxin (LT), are bound by soluble truncated TNF receptors (sTNFRI and II) that are released from cell surfaces and act as natural inhibitors of TNF-induced inflammation. We investigated the plasma levels of sTNFRI and II in paralle...... with LT binding capacity (LTBC) in 44 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JIA)....

  6. Listeriosis in patients receiving biologic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodro, M; Paterson, D L

    2013-09-01

    The evolution of inflammatory diseases has radically changed since the introduction of biologic therapies, such as tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (anti-TNFα). They, therefore, represent a widely used therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, post-marketing studies reveal an increased risk of infection in patients taking these drugs, especially granulomatous infections such as listeriosis. We aimed to evaluate the reported cases of listeriosis in patients treated with biologic treatments. We used the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) from 2004 to 2011. We also perform a literature review of previously reported cases of listeriosis in patients taking biologic therapies. We identified 266 cases of Listeria monocytogenes infection associated with biologic therapies. The majority of patients were receiving infliximab (77.1 %), followed by etanercept (11.7 %), adalimumab (9.8 %), rituximab (4.1 %), abatacept (0.4 %) and golimumab (0.4 %). Indications for the use of biologics were as follows: 47.7 % for rheumatologic diseases, 38 % for inflammatory bowel diseases, 3.4 % for haematological diseases and 10.5 % for other indications. Seventy-three percent of the patients were receiving concomitant immunosuppressant drugs, especially steroids (56 %) and methotrexate (31.6 %). The median time to the onset of infection was 184 days. Mortality rates range from 11.1 % in adalimumab-treated patients to 27.3 % in rituximab-treated patients (p = 0.7). Listeriosis is common in biologics-treated patients, especially related to infliximab use given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive therapies. Infections after treatment with biologics mostly occurred in the first year after initiating treatment. PMID:23568606

  7. Hypocupremia in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, F; Inglese, M G; Terno, G; Pupa, A; Sequeira, C; Migliavacca, S

    1983-01-01

    Although hypocupremia is a well-known consequence of long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN), its incidence as well as the duration of TPN necessary to induce it are still unsettled. The purpose of this study is to review the changes in serum copper level in 25 patients receiving TPN for a period longer than 2 wk (mean duration 6 wk) at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan and to evaluate the possible relationship of cupremia with the basic disease. Main indications for TPN included enterocutaneous fistulas (11 patients), cancer cachexia (10 patients), radiation enteropathy (two patients), and severe postoperative stricture following esophagogastric resection (two patients). Mean value of serum copper at the beginning of the study was 143 micrograms/100 ml (normal value 65-165 micrograms/100 ml), and the regression analysis showed a mean fall of 5.64 micrograms/100 ml/wk. Hypocupremia occurred in four patients (three with intestinal fistulas and one with radiation obstructive enteritis) at 5th, 6th, 9th, and 6th wk of TPN, respectively. No patient with cancer cachexia developed hypocupremia. No patient with hypocupremia had clinical evidence of a copper deficiency syndrome. We conclude that 1) hypocupremia does not occur within the first month of TPN; 2) its incidence is about 16% in patients intravenously fed for period longer than 2 wk; 3) it is more frequent in patients with enterocutaneous fistulas, whereas it never occurs in patients with cancer cachexia, and 4) it is not necessarily associated to a clinicometabolic syndrome of copper deficiency. Finally, the "nutritional" meaning of serum copper should be questioned in cancer patients since it could represent a "tumor marker."

  8. Higher prevalence of peripheral arthritis among ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jae-Bum; Jung, Sungsoo; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Think-You; Kim, Seong Yoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed to define the clinical spectrum and disease manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in a referral hospital setting. We identified the differences in clinical manifestations according to the sex, the age at onset, the presence of peripheral arthritis and the presence of HLA B27. A total 412 patients (357 males, 55 females) were recruited. Eighty-seven percent were men and 155 out of 412 patients (35%) were juvenile-onset. HLA B27 was detected in 385 patients (93%...

  9. THE PROBLEM OF OSTEOPOROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko; O. Yu. Barysheva; N N Vezikova

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the frequency and degree of osteopenia and osteoporosis (OP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus those in patients with osteoarthrosis (OA). Subjects and methods. The study included 150 patients aged above 18 years with the valid diagnosis of RA or OA, in whom the risk factors of OP were assessed. Bone mineral density (BMD) (the relative units were T test) of the lumbar spine in the frontal projection (LII-LIV) and the proximal femur (head, neck, WardXs...

  10. EULAR evidence-based recommendations for cardiovascular risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, M.J.L.; Symmons, D P M; McCarey, D; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; de Nicola, P.; Kvien, T K; McInnes, I B; Haentzschel, H.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Provan, S.; Semb, A.; Sidiropoulos, P.; Kitas, G; Smulders, Y.M.; Soubrier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Additional tables are published online only at http:// ard.bmj.com/content/vol69/ issue2 Objectives: To develop evidence-based EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular (CV) risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods: A multidisciplinary expert committee was convened as a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Affairs (ESCCA), comprising 18 members including rhe...

  11. Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Genotypes in Patients with Lyme Arthritis: High Frequency of RST 1 Strains in Antibiotic-Refractory Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn L.; McHugh, Gail A.; Glickstein, Lisa J.; Steere, Allen C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Most of the B. burgdorferi genotypes have been isolated from erythema migrans (EM) skin lesions in patients with Lyme disease; outer-surface protein C (OspC) type K strains, which are 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer type 2 (RST 2), are most commonly recovered, but a higher percentage of OspC type A strains (RST 1), the next most common type, are detectable in blood. Our goals were to determine the B. burgdorferi genotypes in the joints of patients with Lyme arthritis. Methods Joint fluid samples from 124 patients seen over a 30-year period were analyzed for OspC types by semi-nested PCR and sequencing, and for RST by nested PCR and RFLP techniques. This information was correlated with clinical outcome. Results OspC and RST genotypes could be determined in 49 of the 124 joint fluid samples (40%). Of the 49 samples, 21 (43%) were OspC type K (RST 2), 11 (22%) were type A (RST 1), and 17 (35%) were distributed among 8 other OspC types and all 3 RSTs. However, among 17 patients who received current antibiotic regimens, all 7 infected with RST 1 strains had antibiotic-refractory arthritis compared with 4 of 6 patients infected with RST 2 strains and only 1 of 4 infected with RST 3 strains (P=0.03). Conclusions Most of the B. burgdorferi genotypes infected the joints of patients with Lyme arthritis, particularly OspC type K (RST 2); and genotype frequencies reflected those in EM skin lesions. However, RST 1 strains were most frequent in patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis. PMID:19565522

  12. Altered composition of gut microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

      Manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Some researchers have been focusing on intestinal microbiota which is thought to be one of the environmental factors that may enhance the development of RA. The advancement of culture-independent, high throughput microbial DNA sequencing had enabled us to understand the interplay between intestinal microbiota and host immune systems. In this study, we have reviewed the previous findings in animal and human studies with respect to the role of intestinal microbiota in RA. Mouse models of arthritis have demonstrated that gut microbiota plays a critical role in the disease development. K/BxN and IL-1 receptor-antagonist knock-out mice did not develop disease in germ free condition, however, colonization of particular intestinal bacteria was sufficient to induce arthritis. Moreover, the dysbiosis was observed in the human RA patients from United States, China and Finland. Thus, we believe that endeavors to improve the dysbiosis would serve as a novel therapeutic or preventive strategy in RA patients. PMID:27181236

  13. Discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey assessing workplace and household productivity in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Osterhaus, Jane T; Purcaru, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The novel arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) was developed to estimate patient productivity limitations associated with arthritis within and outside the home, which is an unmet need in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The WPS has been validated in rheumatoid arthritis. This report assesses the discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the WPS in adult-onset PsA. Methods Psychometric properties were assessed using data from the RAPID-PsA trial (NCT01087788)...

  14. Quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V N Amirdzanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ревматоидный артрит (РА – наиболее частое аутоиммунное воспалительное заболевание суставов, приводящее к появлению костных эрозий, суставной деструкции и деформации суставов. Боль в суставах и ограничение объема движений оказывают существенное влияние на выполнение больны- ми действий в повседневной жизни, значительное ухудшая ее качество.Качество жизни (КЖ – это интегральный показатель различных сфер функционирования чело- века, основанный на субъективном восприятии пациента, оцениваемый с помощью специально созданных опросников. Поскольку КЖ является многомерным понятием, то не существует единого инструмента для его оценки. Американская коллегия ревматологов (АКР рекомендует в этих случаях применять комбинацию специфических и общих опросников. При ревматоидном артрите (РА наиболее часто в клинических исследованиях используются специфический опросник HAQ (Health Assessment Questionnaire [1] и общие опросники SF-36 (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form [2] и EQ-5D (Euro QOL [3,4]. Они имеют хорошие психометрические характеристики: высокую надежность, валидность и чувствительность к изменениям в состоянии здоровья пациентов.

  15. DMARD non-use in low-income, elderly rheumatoid arthritis patients: results of 86 structured interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Erika M; Garneau, Katie L; Tsao, Hsun; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have become the treatment standard for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although several general-population studies document that a large population of patients diagnosed with RA do not use DMARDs, little is known about this group. We explored the characteristics, experiences, and knowledge of a low-income, elderly RA population not currently using DMARDs, or receiving care from a rheumatologist. Methods We administered struc...

  16. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Thomsen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA describe their daily SB. Methods: Fifteen patients with RA (10 women and 5 men from 23 to 73 years of age and with a disease duration ranging from 4 to 27 years were interviewed following a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed using the content analysis method described by Graneheim. Results: SB appeared in three categories covering: 1 A constant battle between good and bad days; SB could be a consequence of RA in terms of days with pronounced pain and fatigue resulting in many hours of SB. 2 Adaptation to everyday life; living with the unpredictability of RA included constant modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3 It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way of living independent of the disease. Conclusions: SB is perceived, motivated, and performed differently in patients with RA. An individually tailored approach may be essential in understanding and encouraging patients’ motivation towards sustainable change in SB and activity patterns.

  17. Staphylococcal Superantigens in Synovial Fluid of 62 Patients With Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tabatabaei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determining the etiologic causes of septic arthritis is of the most importance. Goal of this study was to investigate presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, C and Toxic Shock Staphylococcal toxin-1 in the synovial fluid of patients with arthritis. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Pediatric and Orthopedic Wards of Hazrat Rasoul Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2008- 2010. Gram stains, conventional cultures, direct detection of soluble bacterial antigens were used to detect H. influenza, S. pneumonia, group B streptococci, and N. meningitidis while Latex particle agglutination test was used for staphylococcal supper antigens (by enzyme immunoassays upon synovial fluid tapping of 62 individuals (5 mo to 16 yrs, mean=113.8 yrs. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Positive SF cultures (n=11: 5 positive cases of S. aureus; 5 S. pneumonia; 1 H. influenza, and 1 Klebsiella. Positive gram stains: 10%; and positive LPA: 4%. Staphylococcal arthritis was diagnosed in 7 (39% cases upon positive culture or positive gram stain. The most common type was TSST-1 (47% and the least common was enterotoxin B (18%. Isolation of S. aureus (positive culture was correlated to presence of enterotoxin A in synovial fluid but not to enterotoxins B, C or TSST-1. Conclusion: Staph. aureus had a prominent role in arthritis. 47% of cases with negative culture for S. aureus had at least one type of staphylococcal super antigens in the synovial fluid. Searching for antigens of usual organisms or staphylococcal supper antigens could be helpful for diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

  18. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis *

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Garcia Ruiz; Mário Newton Leitão de Azevedo; Omar Lupi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES: To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All...

  19. Expression of public idiotypes in patients with Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, J S; Watts, R A; Long, A A; Isenberg, D A; Steere, A C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Joints are often affected in Lyme disease and in some instances this may be due to immune autoreactivity. To characterise further the immune response in this disease investigations were carried out to determine the expression of three public idiotypes on serum immunoglobulins in patients with Lyme disease during the development of varying degrees of arthritis. METHODS: The expression of idiotypes (Ids) 16/6, BEG2, and PR4, first identified on monoclonal antibodies to DNA, was determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serial blood samples from 12 patients with Lyme disease over a mean period of six years during the development of a variety of arthritic symptoms, and in serum samples from healthy control subjects and control subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus. RESULTS: Expression of serum IgM or IgG public Ids 16/6 and BEG2 was significantly increased in patients with Lyme disease. IgA Id 16/6 expression, in contrast, was significantly increased only during episodes of arthritis and was also related to its severity. IgM and IgG Id 16/6 expression was related to their respective total immunoglobulin concentration and, in the case of IgM, to the level of IgM antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, whereas similar findings were not apparent with IgA antibodies. This may indicate that the IgA response is related to the pathogenesis of arthritis, especially as total IgA and IgA Id 16/6 levels were found to increase over the duration of disease. Sequential analysis of antibodies also showed restriction in the expression of Id 16/6 as it was never found on all immunoglobulin isotypes at the same time, and Id PR4 was never expressed. Ids 16/6 and BEG2 expression, however, may be associated as seven patients expressed these idiotypes simultaneously. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate the use of public idiotypes in the immune response against B burgdorferi, which may be restricted in terms of idiotype class and isotype expression, and a

  20. Psychological variables and physical exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Dario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to provide a literature review aiming to clarify the most prevalent psychological changes present in individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the impact of exercise on such changes, and the exercise protocols commonly adopted to improve these individuals' mental health. The few studies available report anxiety disorders and depression as most prevalent and physical exercise as a significant therapeutic strategy for this population. There is some evidence of the beneficial effects of exercise on those psychological variables providing RA patients with more effective treatments.

  1. Psychological variables and physical exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amabile Borges Dario

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to provide a literature review aiming to clarify the most prevalent psychological changes present in individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the impact of exercise on such changes, and the exercise protocols commonly adopted to improve these individuals' mental health. The few studies available report anxiety disorders and depression as most prevalent and physical exercise as a significant therapeutic strategy for this population. There is some evidence of the beneficial effects of exercise on those psychological variables providing RA patients with more effective treatments.

  2. Vascular Function and Handgrip Strength in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Alomari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the relationship of handgrip strength with forearm blood flow (BF and vascular resistance (VR in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Methods. Forearm BF at rest (RBF and after upper arm occlusion (RHBF, and handgrip strength were examined in 78 individuals (RA=42 and controls (CT=36. Subsequently, VR at rest (RVR and after occlusion (RHVR were calculated. Results. The patients’ RBF (P=0.02 and RHBF (P=0.0001 were less, whereas RVR (P=0.002 and RHVR (P=0.0001 were greater as compared to the CTs. Similarly, handgrip strength was lower in the RAs (P=0.0001. Finally, handgrip strength was directly associated with RBF (r=0.43; P=0.0001, and RHBF (r=0.5; P=0.0001, and inversely related to RVR (r=-0.3; P=0.009 and RHVR (r=-0.3; P=0.007. Conclusion. The present study uniquely identifies an association between regional measures of forearm blood flow and handgrip strength in patients and healthy control. In addition, this study confirms the presence of vascular and muscle dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as evidenced by lower forearm blood flow indices, at rest and following occlusion, and lower handgrip strength as compared to healthy individuals.

  3. Dietary recommendations for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitetta L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Luis Vitetta,1 Samantha Coulson,1 Janet Schloss,1 Shoshannah L Beck,1 Robert Allen,2 Avni Sali21Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, 2National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Dietary interventions can assist with the management of disease symptoms that accompany rheumatoid arthritis (RA, such as pain, tender swollen joints, stiffness, and associated disability and disease progression. Dietary interventions have gained widespread appeal for both clinicians and RA patients. Interventions that promote self-help through education can have significant benefits for patients as they negotiate pain and musculoskeletal disability. There is substantial scientific evidence that demonstrates patients diagnosed with RA may benefit from dietary interventions; however, recent systematic reviews remain uncertain about the therapeutic efficacy of dietary manipulation for RA due to clinical trials with a high risk of bias. However, dietary interventions with plausible therapeutic activity may be indicated for reducing RA-associated symptoms, including elimination of foods that may trigger an allergic or intolerant response, introduction of known anti-inflammatory dietary compounds and correction of food, or drug-induced gastrointestinal tract microbiota abnormalities and permeability.Keywords: diet, rheumatoid arthritis, vegetarian, vegan, Mediterranean, fish oils, probiotics

  4. Prediction of MRI erosive progression: a comparison of modern imaging modalities in early rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøyesen, Pernille; Haavardsholm, Espen A; van der Heijde, Désirée;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the associations between modern imaging modalities and joint damage measured as 1-year MRI erosive progression, in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.......To examine the associations between modern imaging modalities and joint damage measured as 1-year MRI erosive progression, in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients....

  5. Lack of effect of doxycycline on disease activity and joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A double blind, placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W. van der; Molenaar, E.; Ronday, K.; Verheijen, J.; Breedveld, F.; Greenwald, R.; Dijkmans, B.; Tekoppele, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of doxycycline on disease activity and joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A 36 week double blind, placebo controlled crossover trial was conducted. Patients (n = 66) received 50 mg doxycycline or placebo twice a day during 12,

  6. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

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    A. P. Rebrov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  7. Cost of tumor necrosis factor blockers per patient with rheumatoid arthritis in a multistate Medicaid population

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    Bonafede M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Machaon Bonafede,1 George J Joseph,2 Neel Shah,2 Nicole Princic,1 David J Harrison2 1Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, 2Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to estimate the annual cost per treated patient for the tumor necrosis factor (TNF blockers, etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients covered by Medicaid. Methods: The MarketScan Medicaid Multistate Database was used to identify adult RA patients who used etanercept, adalimumab, or infliximab (index agents from 2007 to 2011. The index date was the first claim preceded by 180 days and followed by 360 days of continuous enrollment. Patients with other conditions for which these agents are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration were excluded. “Continuing” patients had one or more pre-index claim for their index biologic, and "new" patients did not. Cost per treated patient was calculated in the 360 day post-index period for each index agent as the total index drug and administration cost to the payer and the costs of switched-to agents divided by the number of patients who received the index agent. Results: A total of 1,085 patients met the study criteria. Forty-eight percent received etanercept (n=521; 37% received adalimumab (n=405; and 15% received infliximab (n=159. Patient characteristics were similar across groups (mean age 47.4 years, 83% female. The annual cost per treated patient was lowest for etanercept ($18,466, followed by adalimumab ($20,983 and infliximab ($26,516. For all agents, annual costs were lower for new patients ($17,996 for etanercept, $18,992 for adalimumab, and $24,756 for infliximab than for continuing patients ($19,004 for etanercept, $24,438 for adalimumab, and $28,127 for infliximab. Conclusion: Etanercept had lower costs per treated patient than adalimumab or infliximab in both new and continuing Medicaid enrollees with RA. Keywords: cost, tumor necrosis factor

  8. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  9. The effect of physical training on patients with rheumatoid arthritis: changes in disease activity, muscle strength and aerobic capacity. A clinically controlled minimized cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngberg, K; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Halskov, O

    1988-01-01

    For decades, physical training of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-patients has been controversial, especially for patients with active disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RA-patients could receive graduated training without increasing the activity of the disease. In a controlled...... in the chronically swollen joints. The rheumatoid arthritis activity decreased with fewer swollen joints and higher hemoglobin level after training....... cross-over study the effect of graduated progressive training has been evaluated in 18 RA-patients with moderately active disease. The training was performed twice weekly with aerobic conditioning and strength exercises progressing to strenuous exercises over an 8-week period. The design was a crossover...

  10. Treating approaches of neurotic disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkin Toirov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available During investigation of neurotic conditions in 168 patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 65.6% patients it was determined neurotic disorders (ND of different severity. Astheno-vegetative disorders were diagnosed in most cases (61.3%. Treatment of ND was carried out depending on the type and degree of its significance. In case of mild ND degree the complex treatment included sing general stimulating medications, physiotherapy and treatable physical training. Treatment for moderate ND degree used sedative medication (novopassit, sedavit, glisin, pion tincture, and the one for severe disease degree used antidepressants and tranquilizers. The treatment duration depended on the type of therapy (10-21 days.The treatment course provided significant reduction of ND symptoms in 66 patients (54.1% and full reduction of symptoms - in 44 patients (36.1%. In 12 patients (9.8% we did not determine any reductions of clinical symptoms of ND. Psychotherapy course provided positive outcomes in 62.3% of patients, satisfactory - in 26.2% of patients, and unsatisfactory - in 11.5% of patients. In the control group (46 patients without ND these results were taken accordingly in 52.2%, 37.0% and 10.8% of patients.

  11. Identification of Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Catalina; Olsen, Nancy J.

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis that affects the adult population. Early diagnosis and treatment are the cornerstones to prevent joint damage and avoid long-term costs and disability. This article reviews the limitations of the currently available tools for the evaluation of patients with early arthritis, including clinical assessment, serologic markers and imaging modalities. It also discusses gene expression analysis, a newer and potentially promising approach to the early diagnosis of RA. PMID:17162371

  12. Identification of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Catalina; Olsen, Nancy J

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis that affects the adult population. Early diagnosis and treatment are the cornerstones to prevent joint damage and avoid long-term costs and disability. This article reviews the limitations of the currently available tools for the evaluation of patients with early arthritis, including clinical assessment, serologic markers and imaging modalities. It also discusses gene expression analysis, a newer and potentially promising approach to the early diagnosis of RA. PMID:17162371

  13. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  14. Immunological evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with itolizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aira, Lazaro E; Hernández, Patricia; Prada, Dinorah; Chico, Araceli; Gómez, Jorge A; González, Zuyén; Fuentes, Karla; Viada, Carmen; Mazorra, Zaima

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation that affects approximately 1% of the general population. Itolizumab, a monoclonal antibody specific for the human CD6 molecule mainly expressed on T lymphocytes, has been shown to inhibit proliferation of T cells and proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriasis patients. We have now assessed the immunological effect of itolizumab in combination with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing clinical samples taken from 30 patients enrolled in a clinical trial. T and B cell subpopulations were measured at different time points of the study. Plasma cytokine levels and anti-idiotypic antibody response to itolizumab were also evaluated. The combined treatment of itolizumab and methotrexate led to a reduction in the frequency of T cell subpopulations, and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines showed a significant decrease up to at least 12 weeks after treatment ended. No anti-idiotypic antibody response was detected. These results support the relevance of the CD6 molecule as a therapeutic target for the treatment of this disease.

  15. Responsiveness of health status measures and utility-based methods in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, F; Stancati, A; Carotti, M

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the responsiveness of disease-specific (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2, AIMS2), generic (Medical Outcome Study Short Form Health Survey, SF-36) and preference-based instruments (rating scale, RS and time tradeoff, TTO) to changes in articular status and perceived health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-eight consecutive patients with RA, attending the care facilities of the Department of Rheumatology of Ancona, were recruited in this longitudinal study. In order to assess the responsiveness three strategies were used: effect size (ES), standardised response mean (SRM) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC). There were 55 women and 23 men with a mean age of 56 years (range 19-78) and arthritis duration of 7.1 years (range 6 months to 24 years). Using three-category EULAR criteria as external indicators of improvement/response, 21 patients (27%) reported a significant improvement, 23 (29.5%) moderate improvement, and 34 (43.5%) no change over the 12-month period. The mean change scores in generic and specific health status instruments and utility measures were significantly related to response category. The AIMS2 subscales (physical function, pain, psychological function and social interaction) were slightly more responsive than those of SF-36. The physical and pain dimensions were most sensitive for measuring change over a 12-month period, followed by psychological and social dimensions. For the utility measurement, RS scores were found to be significantly more responsive in detecting changes in preferences than TTO scores. These results may have implications for the application of the health status and utility measures in clinical trials in patients with RA. PMID:12447631

  16. An Insight into Methods and Practices in Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Mosleh-shirazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total hip arthroplasty (THA has improved the quality of life of patients with hip arthritis. Orthopedic community is striving for excellence to improve surgical techniques and postoperative care. Despite these efforts, patients continue facing postoperative complications. In particular, patients with rheumatoid arthritis display a higher risk of certain complications such as dislocation, periprosthetic infection, and shorter prosthesis durability. In this review we present the current knowledge of hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with more insight into common practices and interventions directed at enhancing recovery of these patients and current shortfalls.

  17. Population Pharmacokinetics of Ofatumumab in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Follicular Lymphoma, and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struemper, Herbert; Sale, Mark; Patel, Bela R;

    2014-01-01

    Ofatumumab is a human monoclonal antibody directed at CD20 approved for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The population pharmacokinetics of intravenous ofatumumab were characterized in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia, relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma......, and rheumatoid arthritis, diseases with widely varying CD20(+) B-cell counts in blood. Serum concentration data from a total of 477 patients who received ofatumumab doses ranging from 100 mg to 2000 mg in different dosing regimens were analyzed to determine the pharmacokinetic characteristics of ofatumumab...... across different patient groups and to identify factors contributing to the pharmacokinetic variability. Ofatumumab pharmacokinetics were well described by a linear two-compartment model component to represent non-specific monoclonal antibody clearance from the central compartment interacting...

  18. Plasma Homocysteine Concentrations In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljevic Dragan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the concentration of serum homocysteine (Hcy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA compared with the control group and the connection between homocysteine and parameters of inflammation and disease activity. Sixty RA patients and 20 healthy controls were included in the study, and clinical examination and investigation were performed during which disease activity was assessed. Peripheral blood samples were used for all of the assays. Levels of Hcy were 33% higher in the RA patients than in the control subjects (mean +/− SD 11.79±3.72 μmol/L versus 8.90±1.38 μmol/L; p< 0.01. A significant correlation was found between parameters of inflammation (C-reactive protein and homocysteine in patients (r=0.322, p=0.012. Patients with high disease activity had a significantly greater increase in homocysteine (p<0.05. An increase in plasma homocysteine in RA patients is related to the parameters of inflammation and disease activity. Elevated Hcy levels occur commonly in patients with RA and may explain some of the increased cardiovascular mortality seen in RA patients.

  19. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  20. TELOMERE SHORTENING IN MONOCYTES OF THE PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Borisov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Present study deals with size measurements of telomeric DNA from the human peripheral mononuclear immune cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A method for measuring the relative telomere length by in situ hybridization followed by flow cytometric analysis (flow-FISH was used. Relative telomere length (RTL in monocytes was estimated as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of test cells divided by MFI values of internal control cells. Hybridization conditions for analysis of telomere length in monocytes have been optimized in advance. It has been shown that RTL of monocytes was significantly lower in RA patients compared to donors. Significant differences in telomere length of monocytes between RA patients and donors were revealed for the young persons under 30 years old. The findings obtained may be considered as an additional argument confirming the hypothesis on genetic defects of hematopoietic stem cells determining RA development.

  1. Successful reintroduction of methotrexate after pneumonitis in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, N J; Carroll, G J

    1992-01-01

    Two patients are described with severe and progressive rheumatoid arthritis in whom methotrexate was reintroduced despite previous methotrexate related pneumonitis. In both patients a marked improvement in disease control occurred without a recurrence of the pneumonitis.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  3. Dosing celecoxib in pediatric patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Sriram; Hutmacher, Matt M; Robbins, Jeffery L; Bello, Akintunde; West, Christine; Bloom, Bradley J

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to derive dosing recommendations for the use of celecoxib in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) using pharmacokinetic (PK) and exposure-response data. PK and efficacy data from a randomized, double-blind, 12-week study of celecoxib dosed at 3 and 6 mg/kg twice a day (bid) as an investigational suspension formulation in 152 JRA patients aged 2 to 17 years, PK data from 36 adult RA patients, and relative bioavailability data in healthy adults comparing suspension or capsule sprinkles with the commercial capsule were analyzed. Typical oral clearance (L/h) values were 40% and 24% lower in patients weighing 10 and 25 kg, respectively, compared with a 70-kg patient. Longitudinal, logistic pharmacodynamic models incorporating linear effects of dose/area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) over 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12)) suggested that the percentage of responders increased with celecoxib exposure. Systemic exposures (AUC) were similar for the suspension, capsule sprinkles, and intact capsule. Administration of a 50-mg bid capsule (or sprinkles) for patients weighing 10 to 25 kg and 100 mg bid for patients >25 kg was predicted to yield similar exposures and response rates as those observed in the JRA trial. Doses and dosage forms not studied in the JRA trial were approved based on the results of this analysis.

  4. Risk factors for septic arthritis in patients with joint disease: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Kaandorp; D. van Schaardenburg (Dirkjan); P. Krijnen (Pieta); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); M.A.F.J. van de Laar (Mart)

    1995-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective. To quantify potential risk factors for septic arthritis, in order to identify a basis for prevention. Methods. The occurrence of potential risk factors for septic arthritis in patients with joint diseases attending a rheumatic disease clinic was prospectively monitored

  5. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  6. Stress response system and personality in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcenaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Various factors such as immunogenetic determinants, sex, age and stress paly an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The relationship between stress and RA is still unclear and undefined; however, various lines of research are developing in order to evaluate environmental, psychologic, and biologic stressors as predisposing factors. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether stress-related psychologic factors and personality disorders might be involved in the development of RA, by using a psychometric investigation-methodology in a series of patients. Twenty-three patients underwent a clinical inteview and other specific psychometric tests. Macro and microstressful life-events preceded RA in 83% of the cases. Sixty percent of the patients showed a correlation between flare-ups of the disease and appearance of microevents. An obsessive-compulsive personality was found in 26% of the patients. Anxia was detected in 40% of the patients. Among the group of patients with borderline disorder’s was also detected alexithymia. The high prevalence of major life-events preceding the onset of RA and the presence of personality disorders support the role of the altered stress response system as an importunat pathogenetic factor in the disease.

  7. Salmonella septic arthritis of the knees in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S S; Perino, G; Boettner, F; Miller, A; Goodman, S

    2013-06-01

    Hematogenous Salmonella osteomyelitis is uncommon in immunocompetent hosts, but occurs with some regularity in immunosuppressed patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surgical debridement with resection of compromised tissue is central to the surgical management of osteomyelitis. Persistence of septic arthropathy may result from inadequate debridement, areas of osteonecrosis (ON), and an abnormal cellular and humoral dysregulation characteristic of SLE. We describe a 53-year-old Hispanic female with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy, who developed acute salmonella-induced septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of both knees associated with ON and recurrent SLE synovitis. She received prolonged antibiotic therapy and an extensive surgical debridement as part of a successful two-stage bilateral total knee replacement. This report illustrates the significance of Salmonella enterica infection in SLE patients, and the role of underlying bone and joint pathology such as bone infarcts, sub-acute osteomyelitis, and SLE synovitis.

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. EULAR recommendations for patient education for people with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangi, Heidi A; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Adams, Jo;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The task force aimed to: (1) develop evidence-based recommendations for patient education (PE) for people with inflammatory arthritis, (2) identify the need for further research on PE and (3) determine health professionals' educational needs in order to provide evidence-based PE....... METHODS: A multidisciplinary task force, representing 10 European countries, formulated a definition for PE and 10 research questions that guided a systematic literature review (SLR). The results from the SLR were discussed and used as a basis for developing the recommendations, a research agenda...... and an educational agenda. The recommendations were categorised according to level and strength of evidence graded from A (highest) to D (lowest). Task force members rated their agreement with each recommendation from 0 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). RESULTS: Based on the SLR and expert opinions...

  10. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2016-04-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27091583

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  12. Initial experience with oral gold salts in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in patients followed up for one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignère, G C; Giavarini, S; Longatti, S

    1984-01-01

    Fifteen patients, eight males and seven females, suffering from classic or definite rheumatoid arthritis were treated for 1 year with Auranofin, a new gold salt active by the oral route, different from parenteral gold as far as dosage, mechanism of action and toxicity are concerned. Patients received a dosage of 3 mg twice daily, equivalent to 0.85 mg of elemental gold, in order to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of this new compound. Subjective and objective parameters were monitored during the trial and serum gold levels were assayed every 2 months by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Our study, which is on-going, shows the therapeutic efficacy of Auranofin which seems better tolerated than parenteral gold salts and will probably become a widely used drug in the long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. The assessment of diastolic function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Tomašević Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune chronic disease. In comparison with the overall population, mortality and morbidity of RA patients are increased due to cardiovascular diseases. There is increasing evidence that autoimmunity mechanisms are included in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Isolated disorder of diastolic function can, even with normal heart contractility, lead to heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic function in RA patients and determine factors causing diastolic dysfunction. Material and methods. The study included 88 patients with RA treated at Rheumatology Department, Clinical Hospital Centre, Zemun. All the patients were thoroughly examined (clinical findings, laboratory and echocardiographic examination. All parameters of diastolic function (mitral and pulmonary flow were measured. Results. In RA patients 98,9% had diastolic function disorder. This parameter had been changed prior to clinical signs of heart failure and decrease of ejection fraction. Indicators of diastolic function, velocities E, A and their ratio VE/VA, as well as velocities S, D and their ratio VS/VD were lower in patients with positive rheumatoid factor. The patients' age (p<0.01, duration of the disease (p<0.05, high level of cholesterol (p<0.05, triglycerides (p<0.05 and arterial hypertension (p<0.05 were significant factors considerably affecting diastolic function. Conclusion. These findings suggest subclinical myocardial disorder in a great number of RA patients. Apart from early and aggressive treatment of the chronic inflammatory process, it is also necessary to prevent further heart complications by timely recognition and treatment of 'standard' risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Atypical Presentation of Disseminated Zoster in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have 2-fold increased risk of herpes zoster. In literature, limited information exists about disseminated cutaneous zoster in RA patients. An 83-year-old African-American female with RA presented with generalized and widespread vesicular rash covering her entire body. Comorbidities include hypertension, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Patient was on methotrexate 12.5 mg and was not receiving any corticosteroids, anti-TNF therapy, or other biological agents. The patient was afebrile (98 F with no SIRS criteria. Multiple vesicular lesions were present covering patient’s entire body including face. Lesions were in different stages, some umbilicated with diameter of 2–7 cm. Many lesions have a rim of erythema with no discharge. On admission, patient was also pancytopenic with leukocyte count of 1.70 k/mm3. Biopsies of lesions were performed, which were positive for Varicella antigen. Subsequently, patient was started on Acyclovir. The patient’s clinical status improved and rash resolved. Our patient presented with “atypical” clinical picture of disseminated cutaneous zoster with no obvious dermatome involvement. Disseminated zoster is a potentially serious infection that can have an atypical presentation in patients with immunocompromised status. High index of suspicion is needed to make the diagnosis promptly and to initiate therapy to decrease mortality and morbidity.

  15. The humoral immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis in patients with acute reactive arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, B; Birkelund, Svend; Mordhorst, CH;

    1994-01-01

    Sera from 25 patients with clinical signs of reactive arthritis were analysed for antibodies against Chlamydia trachomatis by immunoblotting. Purified elementary bodies, purified Chlamydia outer membrane complexes, and purified recombinant subcomponents were used as antigens. Antibodies against C...

  16. Reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, G. A. W.; Naredo, E.; Moeller, I.; Moragues, C.; Garrido, J.; de Bock, G. H.; d'Agostino, M-A; Filippucci, E.; Iagnocco, A.; Backhaus, M.; Swen, W. A. A.; Balint, P.; Pineda, C.; Milutinovic, S.; Kane, D.; Kaeley, G.; Narvaez, F. J.; Wakefield, R. J.; Narvaez, J. A.; de Augustin, J.; Schmidt, W. A.; Moller, I.; Swen, N.; de Agustin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intra and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography ( US) among rheumatologists in detecting destructive and inflammatory shoulder abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) and to determine the overall agreement between US and MRI. Meth

  17. Progressive subretinal fibrosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; Matsuo, N

    1998-01-01

    We present two patients (56-year-old and 71-year-old women) who developed subretinal fibrosis in parallel with exacerbation of rheumatoid arthritis and deteriorated renal function. The first patient developed subretinal fibrosis in the right eye, coupled with multifocal choroiditis and serous retinal detachment in both eyes, in the course of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis complicated with rheumatoid arthritis. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was positive in a perinuclear pattern (pANCA) and the increased dose of prednisolone to 40 mg/day resulted in subsidence of the subretinal inflammation. The second patient developed subretinal fibrosis in the left eye with mottled retinal pigment epithelium of both eyes, in the course of rheumatoid arthritis and stable chronic renal failure. Although the manifestations of subretinal fibrosis and concurrent renal dysfunction were different between these two patients, subretinal fibrosis might be noted as a complication of rheumatoid arthritis and renal dysfunction.

  18. Effect of intermittent aerobic exercise on sleep quality and sleep disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løppenthin, Katrine; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Jennum, Poul;

    2014-01-01

    of an intermittent aerobic exercise intervention on sleep, assessed both objectively and subjectively in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial including 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomly assigned to an exercise training intervention or to a control group...... disturbances, fatigue, pain, depressive symptoms, physical function, health-related quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness. DISCUSSION: This trial will provide evidence of the effect of intermittent aerobic exercise on the improvement of sleep in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which is considered......BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is prevalent in patients with systemic inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, and, in addition to fatigue, pain, depression and inflammation, is associated with an increased risk of co-morbidity and all-cause mortality. Whereas non...

  19. Reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2009-03-01

    To assess the intra and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) among rheumatologists in detecting destructive and inflammatory shoulder abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the overall agreement between US and MRI.

  20. Decreased prolactin response to hypoglycaemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with disease activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsbouts, A.M.M.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Putte, L.B.A. van de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare basal and stimulated prolactin levels between patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls, and to assess the effects of antirheumatic treatment on prolactin concentrations. METHODS: Serum prolactin was assessed under basal conditions and during an insulin tolerance

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  2. Small airway obstruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shunsuke; Koga, Yukinori; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2011-04-01

    This work was intended to evaluate the prevalence of obstructive small-airway disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with clinical characteristics. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) were performed on 189 consecutive RA patients. Each case was diagnosed based on abnormal HRCT findings. We defined obstructive dysfunction of small airways as a forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of vital capacity (FEF(25-75)) value >1.96 residual standard deviation (RSD) below predicted values. We found 19 patients (10.1%) with an interstitial pneumonia (IP) pattern and 15 (7.9%) with a bronchiolitis pattern; the other 155 (82.0%) had no abnormal HRCT patterns. In patients with neither abnormal pattern, median values of percentage predicted for carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DL(CO)) and ratio of DL(CO) to alveolar ventilation (DLco/VA) were within the normal range, but median FEF(25-75), forced expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (V(25)), and V(25)/height were dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that this type of abnormality is strongly associated with respiratory symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 5.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.70-15.75; p = 0.012), smoking history (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.10-6.99; p = 0.03), and disease duration >10 years (OR 2.86; 95% CI 1.27-6.48; p = 0.012). Parenchymal micronodules, bronchial-wall thickening, and bronchial dilatation on HRCT scans were also predictive factors for abnormal FEF(25-75), although these morphological changes were too limited for us to diagnose these patients with the bronchiolitis pattern. Obstructive dysfunction of small airways is apparently common among RA patients, even among those with neither the IP nor the bronchiolitis pattern on HRCT scans. Factors significantly associated with abnormal FEF(25-75) are respiratory symptoms, smoking history, and RA duration.

  3. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BIFIFORM USE IN PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND COLON DISBIOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Malyarchuk AR; Klymnyuk SI; Kuchmak OB

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of research clinical features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a determined degree of dysbiosis colon analyzed corrective action Bifiform probiotics on the microflora of the colon treated with different types of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease. In the process we used the following methods: a list of complaints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the gastrointestinal tract, conducted bacteriological research content oral microbiota o...

  4. Candida Parapsilosis Arthritis Involving the Ankle in a Diabetes Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Kyeong; Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Candida parapsilosis is a rare opportunistic fungal pathogen of the musculoskeletal region. Immune function of almost all patients is severely disturbed. Most reported cases of septic arthritis of joints by Candida involve the knee, especially Candida parapsilosis. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of Candida parapsilosis involving the ankle presented on only plain radiography. We report a case of Candida parapsilosis arthritis involving the ankle in a diabetes patient which was shown on MR imaging.

  5. Surgical treatment for septic arthritis of the knee joint in elderly patients: a 10-year retrospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis is the most rapidly destructive joint disease, but its early diagnosis remains challenging; delayed or inadequate treatment, even by expert physicians, can lead to irreversible joint destruction. Between 25% and 50% of patients develop irreversible loss of joint function, which is especially concerning in elderly patients. To understand the factors influencing the outcome of septic arthritis, the authors reviewed patients aged older than 50 years who had undergone debridement surgery for primary septic arthritis at their institution between 1998 and 2008. Ninety-two patients (92 knees) were enrolled in the study; 14 did not meet inclusion criteria and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the 78 included patients, 7 underwent arthrodesis, 22 underwent total knee arthroplasty, 19 were indicated for total knee arthroplasty for severe knee joint osteoarthritis but did not undergo surgery by the end of this study, and the remaining 30 had no or mild symptoms of osteoarthrosis and did not receive any surgical procedure. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogenic agent (38%), followed by mixed bacterial infection (10%). Several factors negatively influenced the final clinical outcome, including delayed treatment, advanced macroscopic staging made during debridement surgery, performing multiple debridement surgeries, and a larger Lysholm score difference pre- and posttreatment. More antibiotics administered, longer duration of antibiotic treatment, and more pathogenic agents present were also significantly correlated with poor outcome. These findings shed new light on the management of septic arthritis. Accurate diagnoses and effective treatments are important for the clinical outcome of knee joint bacterial infection in elderly patients.

  6. Foreign patients in ER: receiving, understanding, treating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dal Molin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the presence of foreign patients inside Emergency Departments is increased, this means many problems, like misunderstanding, communication difficulties and more problematic situations when, our work or our expectations meet the values sideboards and life style of our patients. This article purpose is to describe this phenomenon inside Biella Emergency Departments, because if you know a situation you can solve it better.

  7. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation and Tocilizumab in a Patient with Juvenile Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Andrei Chiran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents effects of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI in a transient immunodeficiency patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA treated with an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor (Tocilizumab. Biological agents induce JIA remission, but some patients do not respond favorably to this final therapeutic line of defense. ILBI was performed in a 16-year-old male patient, with JIA and transient immunodeficiency. When ILBI was introduced, the patient was receiving disease-modifying drugs, steroids, tocilizumab, and physical therapy. Because the disease was not well controlled, ILBI was applied in addition to other ongoing therapies. The patient underwent 1 session daily, and 10 successive sessions per month, repeated every 3 months, for 7 months. Patient evaluation was performed before ILBI was started and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after ILBI initiation, using the ACR Pediatric response. The outcome was evaluated using Pediatric 50, 70, and 90 responses and compared to initial status, after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At the end of study, the titre of IgA and IgG levels returned to normal. Synergistic anti-inflammatory effect of ILBI was evident, if applied additionally in combination with tocilizumab, in a patient with a therapy-resistant severe form of JIA and related subacute transient immunodeficiency.

  8. "Wegener’s granulomatosis in a patient with Rheumatoid arthritis "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ahmadi Nejad Z

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Wegener’s Granulomatosis is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis involving small and medium sized vessels. The syndrome is classically defined as having involvement of kidney, lungs and upper respiratory tract (i.e. sinuses. Wegener’s Granulomatosis may be present in other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases, particulary systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE, but most frequently has been associated with polyarteritis and glumerulonephritis.We present a case of wegener’s Granulomatosis (WG in a middle age lady with Rheumatiod Arthritis (RA; and discuss the implications of these two conditions co-existing in one patient. As for as we are aware, through medline and interent research, this is probably the fourth case with such as association of WG and RA and the fist one in Iran.Presentation of new uncontrollable sing and symptoms, in a previously well controlled RA patient, might suggest a new overlapping syndrome like Wegener’s Granulomatosis besides to flare up of previous disease as differential diagnosis

  9. Pharmacokinetics of CTLA4Ig fusion protein in healthy volunteers and patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying MA; Bi-rong LIN; Bei LIN; Sheng HOU; Wei-zhu QIAN; Jing LI; Min TAN; Jian MA; Bo-hua LI; Hao WANG; Ai-dong WEN; Ya-jun GUO

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate single-dose and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 fusion protein (CTLA4Ig) in healthy volunteers and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The clinical trials included two phase I open studies: study 1 was an open-label dose-escalation study in 27 healthy volunteers and study 2 was a single-group, open-label study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In study 2, 9 patients were arranged to receive 10 mg/kg of CTLA4Ig at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. The concentration-time data obtained by a validated ELISA method were subjected to non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis by DAS 2.1 software. Results: In study 1, serum CTLA4Ig concentrations climbed rapidly to the peak and declined slowly with a t1/2 of 15.1±2.6 d, 14.2±2.3 d, and 11.8±1.2 d after a single infusion of 1, 10, and 20 mg/kg, respectively. Cmax and AUC0-∞increased propor-tionally with the dose. In study 2, the steady-state condition for CTLA41g following multiple doses of 10 mg/kg appeared to be attained at the fourth dose (d 56), with peak and trough concentrations of 239.8±45.3 mg/L and 20.5±7.9 mg/L, respec-tively. After multiple infusions, serum concentrations dropped slowly and the terminal half-life was 12.6±4.7 d. Conclusion: Intravenous infusion of CTLA4Ig was well tolerated in healthy volunteers and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. CTLA4Ig exhibited linear pharmacokinetics over the dose range of 1 to 20 mg/kg in healthy volunteers. The pharmacokinetics in RA patients appeared to be similar to that in healthy volunteers. No system accumulation appeared upon repeated infusions of 10 mg/kg every 4 weeks.

  10. Disentangling Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Annemiek J; Vandeberg, Lisa; Wennekers, Annemarie M; Vervloet, Marcia; van Dijk, Liset; van den Bemt, Bart J F

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major public health problem that has been termed an 'invisible epidemic.' Non-adherence is not only associated with negative clinical consequences but can also result in substantial healthcare costs. Up to now, effective adherence interventions are scarce and a more comprehensive model of adherence determinants is required to target the determinants for not taking the medication as prescribed. Current approaches only included explicit attitudes such as self-reported evaluations of medication as determinants, neglecting the role of associative processes that shape implicit attitudes. Implicit processes can predict daily behavior more accurately than explicit attitudes. Our aim is to assess explicit and implicit attitudes toward medication and explore the relation with beliefs, adherence and clinical (laboratory) outcomes in chronically ill patients. Fifty two Rheumatic Arthritis (RA) patients' attitudes toward Methotrexate (MTX) were explicitly (self-reported) and implicitly (Single-Category Implicit Association Test) assessed and related to the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire, the Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology and laboratory parameters [Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP)]. Results show that explicit attitudes were positive and health-related. Implicit attitudes were, however, negative and sickness-related. Half of the patients displayed explicitly positive but implicitly negative attitudes. Explicit attitudes were positively related to ESR. A positive relationship between implicit attitudes and disease duration was observed. In this study, we have obtained evidence suggesting that the measurement of implicit attitudes and associations provides different information than explicit, self-reported attitudes toward medication. Since patients' implicit attitudes deviated from explicit attitudes, we can conclude that the relationship between implicit attitudes and medication adherence is worthwhile

  11. Folylpolyglutamate synthase is a major determinant of intracellular methotrexate polyglutamates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shikano, Kotaro; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated major determinants of the intracellular concentrations of methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPGs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 271 RA patients on stable oral low dose weekly pulse MTX therapy, the concentrations of MTXPGs in red blood cells (RBCs) were measured by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed to determine the genotypes of solute carrier family 19 member 1 (SLC19A1), folylpolyglutamate synthase (FPGS), and gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH). The mean total MTXPG concentration and the concentrations of individual MTXPGs increased dose-dependently, but reached a plateau at MTX doses >10 mg weekly. The MTXPG3-5/1-2 ratio was lower in patients with adverse events related to MTX than in patients without adverse events. Three polymorphisms of FPGS significantly influenced the MTXPG3-5/1-2 ratio in RBCs, while polymorphisms of SLC19A1 and GGH had no impact. The minor allele frequencies of 2 FPGS genotypes were significantly increased in our patients compared with a Caucasian population. FPGS may have a major role in regulating intracellular polyglutamation of MTX in RA patients receiving low-dose weekly MTX therapy. PMID:27752107

  12. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Reffelmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Thorsten Reffelmann, Robert A KlonerUniversity of Southern California, The Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED, cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and

  13. An unusual cause of pain post ankle arthrodesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease which frequently affects the ankle and foot. End stage ankle arthritis from rheumatic disease is commonly managed by the established practice of ankle arthrodesis. Among the adverse sequelae causing pain following this surgery is infection, pseudo-arthrosis and non-union. Stress fracture of the distal third is a recognised but unusual cause of pain of tibia following ankle arthrodesis. The authors\\' present three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who sustained a stress fracture of the distal tibia following arthrodesis, and discuss the contributing factors and highlight the need for orthopaedic surgeons to be suspicious of this complication post surgery.

  14. Gap between short- and long-term effects of patient education in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedermann, K.; Fransen, J.; Knols, R.H.; Uebelhart, D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review educational or psychoeducational interventions for patients with rheumatoid arthritis focusing on long-term effects, especially health status. METHODS: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodologic quality of the included randomized controlled trials, publi

  15. Influence of physical treatment on disease activity and health status of patients with chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustur Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This is an open uncontrolled study about effects of physical treatment on disease activity parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Objective The aim of the study was to establish if there was any improvement of disease activity parameters after four weeks of physical and spa treatment. METHOD We compared morning stiffness, tender and swollen joint count, body pain level and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS-28 in patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and assessed the effect of physical and spa treatment on those parameters. The research encompassed 109 patients: 69 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group and 40 with psoriatic arthritis (PA group. They were from Norway, staying for four weeks in June-September 2003. The groups served as their own controls - "one group pre-test post test" study. Disease activity measurement was made twice: at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The therapeutic set consisted of mud applications, kinesitherapy, mineral water pool and electrotherapy. Results At the beginning there was no significant difference in observed disease activity parameters between patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis (p>0.05. After four weeks of physical and spa treatment disease activity was significantly reduced in all observed parameters in both groups: morning stiffness (p<0.001 RA+PA, tender joint count (p<0.01 RA+PA, swollen joint count (p<0.01 RA; p<0.05 PA, body pain (p<0.01 RA+PA and DAS-28 score (p<0.01 RA+PA. Conclusion Physical and spa treatment, together with climatic factors in Igalo, lead to a significant reduction of disease activity parameters of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. .

  16. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  17. Septic arthritis as the first sign of Candida tropicalis fungaemia in an acute lymphoid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicari Perla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections caused by Candida species have increased in incidence during the past two decades in England, North America and Europe. Candidal arthritis is rare in patients who are not intravenous drug users or are who not using a prostheses. We report the case of a 24-year-old man with acute lymphoid leukemia, who developed Candida tropicalis arthritis during an aplastic period after chemotherapy. This is the eighth case described in the literature of C. tropicalis causing arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. We call attention to an unusual first sign of fungal infection: septic arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. However, this case differs from the other seven, since despite therapy a fast and lethal evolution was observed. We reviewed reported cases, incidence, risk factors, mortality and treatment of neutropenic patients with fungal infections.

  18. Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Synovia of Patients with Treatment-Resistant Lyme Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Akin, Evren; Aversa, John; Steere, Allen C.

    2001-01-01

    The expression of adhesion molecules in synovium in patients with Lyme arthritis is surely critical in the control of Borrelia burgdorferi infection but may also have pathologic consequences. For example, molecular mimicry between a dominant T-cell epitope of B. burgdorferi outer surface protein A and an adhesion molecule, human lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. Using immunohistochemical methods, we...

  19. Mycobacterium Avium Arthritis with Extra-articular Abscess in a Patient with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Choong Won; Sung, Han Dong; Choi, Byong Moon; Kim, Chun Wook; Jun, Su Jin; Min, Sang Jo

    2003-01-01

    A case of Mycobacterium avium arthritis in a 39-year-old female patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was reported. An extra-articular abscess had formed outside the knee joint and extended down the calf. A culture was taken of the abscess and synovial fluid disclosed Mycobacteriun avium. This was resistant to most anti-tuberculosis agents. A combination of anti-tuberculosis drugs followed a total resection of the abscess. We concluded that M avium septic arthritis could insidio...

  20. Features of diagnosis and treatment of anemic syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    N V Koryakova; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Features of diagnostics and course of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients Objective. To study features of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pts, to estimate influence of disease modifying anti – rheumatic drug therapy efficacy on the course of anemic syndrome. Material and methods. 62 pts with definite RA and level of hemoglobin less than 130g\\l for men and less than 120g\\l for women were examined. Research of hemoglobin, red cells count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV),...

  1. Treatment of knee flexion contracture in patients with chronic juvenile arthritis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Matijević Radmila; Stanković Milan; Ninković Srđan; Savić Dragan; Milankov Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Knee flexion contractures are common after-effects of juvenile arthritis. Treatment is usually conservative and may include physical therapy and kinesitherapy. Surgical treatment, particularly of the soft parts, indicated for contractures resistant to conservative treatment, helps to correct the deformity, maintain movements, and relieves pain. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is of special importance. Case report. A 23-year-old female patient with chronic juvenile arthriti...

  2. PREDICTION OF CLINICAL EFFICIENCY OF SIMVASTATIN TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Shirinsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Treatment with statins results in reduction of disease activity in one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The aim of this study was to assess some factors that may predict clinical response to simvastatin therapy before starting the treatment. We evaluated an association of treatment efficacy with baseline clinical and laboratory parameters including disease activity measures, cytokine profiles in sera and culture supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thirty-three patients with active RA were enrolled in the study. The patients were treated with simvastatin at 40 mg/day for three months. Eleven patients (33% developed a moderate response according to EULAR criteria. It was shown that serum IL-10 concentrations was higher in responders, and positively correlated with clinical response to simvastatin. We carried out a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis in order to assess the accuracy of serum IL-10 for the predicting of EULAR response development. The cut-off threshold corresponding to the highest sensitivity (89% and specificity (62% was a value of 6.5 pg/ml. In conclusion, the performance characteristics of serum IL-10 measurement proved to be good enough to predict EULAR response to simvastatin therapy in RA patients.

  3. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  4. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (R.A. have a marked increase in Carotid Atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors like family history of myocardial infarction in first degree male relatives younger than 55 years of age or first degree female relatives younger than 65 years of age, smoking, hypertension (D efined as blood pressure of 140/90 mm hg or higher, diabetes mellitus and fasting serum cholesterol levels including age. Chronic inflammation and possibly disease severity and duration are atherogenic in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. Preclinical disease may also be identified by using ultrasonography to determine carotid intimal - media thickness, an indirect measure of atherosclerosis. The common carotid artery Intima media thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients is positively associated with disease duration, Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (D uration less or = 1 year is associated with lesser Intima media thickness than was Rheumatoid Arthritis of longer duration. Increased carotid artery Intima media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque are associated with markers of systemic inflammation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To determine preclinical atherosclerosis occurring prematurely in patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis by ultrasonograhic measurement Common Carotid Artery Intima media thickness and to evaluate the risk factors associated with arterial intima media thickness in patient of Rheumatoid Arthritis. RESULTS: In RA patients, common carotid artery IMT was significantly higher when compared to healthy controls (0.65 ± 0.06 v/s 0.57 ± 0.049 and was significantly associated with the duration of RA, swollen joint count and erosive changes on hand x - ray independently of other confounding variables. CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a marked increase in carotid atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors

  5. Motivation, self-regulation and physical activity among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knittle, Keegan

    2013-01-01

    Regular participation in moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) is beneficial for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, a large proportion of patients with RA are not physically active. In this dissertation, we describe the pilot-testing of an intervention to promote PA among patients

  6. Exercise therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.; Mulder, P.H.; Bijlsma, W.J.; Oostendorp, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA) is controversial, because both improvement and deterioration of the patients' condition can be expected to occur. The literature was searched for studies on the outcome of exercise therapy in RA- and OA-patients. Twen

  7. Humoral responses after influenza vaccination are severely reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with rituximab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assen, Sander; Holvast, Albert; Benne, Cornelis A.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Blom, Marlies; Risselada, Anke P.; De Haan, Aalzen; Westra, Johanna; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Objective. For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), yearly influenza vaccination is recommended. However, its efficacy in patients treated with rituximab is unknown. The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficacy of influenza vaccination in RA patients treated with rituximab and t

  8. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an altered circulatory aggrecan profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic auto-immune disease with extensive articular cartilage destruction. Aggrecan depletion, mediated by aggrecanases is one of the first signs of early cartilage erosion. We investigated, whether measurement of aggrecan and fragments thereof in serum, could be used as biomarkers for joint-disease in RA patients and furthermore characterized the fragments found in the circulation. Methods The study consisted of 38 patients, 12 males (62.2 ± 16.0 years and 26 females (59.8 ± 20.7 years diagnosed with RA: 41.5 ± 27.5 mm/h erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, 38.4 ± 34.7 mg/ml C-reactive protein (CRP and 4.8 ± 1.7 disease activity score (DAS and 108 healthy age-matched controls. Aggrecan levels were measured using two immunoassays, i.e. the 374ARGSVI-G2 sandwich ELISA measuring aggrecanase-mediated aggrecan degradation and the G1/G2 sandwich assay, detecting aggrecan molecules containing G1 and/or G2 (total aggrecan We further characterized serum samples by western blots, by using monoclonal antibodies F-78, binding to G1 and G2, or by BC-3, detecting the aggrecanase-generated N-terminal 374ARGSVI neo-epitope. Results Total aggrecan levels in RA patients were significantly decreased from 824.8 ± 31 ng/ml in healthy controls to 570.5 ± 30 ng/ml (31% decrease, P Conclusion This is the first study, which characterizes different aggrecan fragments in human serum. The data strongly suggests that total aggrecan levels, i.e. aggrecan molecules containing G1 and/or G2 are lower in RA patients, and that RA patients have at least one specific subpopulation of aggrecan fragments, namely aggrecanse generated 374ARGSVI fragments. Further clinical studies are needed to investigate the potential of G1/G2 as a structure-related biochemical marker in destructive joint-diseases.

  9. Cerebral tuberculoma in a patient receiving anti-TNF alpha (adalimumab) treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Karen

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of a cerebral tuberculoma in a 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis while receiving the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody, adalimumab (Humira), for active disease. MR brain imaging for dyspraxia revealed a left parietal ring-enhancing lesion, which on resection was shown to be a necrotizing granuloma. There were no associated pulmonary lesions, and the patient was systemically well. Sputum and urine cultures were negative for tuberculosis. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculous medications and made an excellent recovery. We consider this to be the first documented case of tuberculosis involving the central nervous system occurring in the setting of adalimumab treatment.

  10. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BIFIFORM USE IN PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND COLON DISBIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malyarchuk AR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research clinical features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a determined degree of dysbiosis colon analyzed corrective action Bifiform probiotics on the microflora of the colon treated with different types of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease. In the process we used the following methods: a list of complaints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the gastrointestinal tract, conducted bacteriological research content oral microbiota of the colon by conventional methods. The classic method of a determined degree of dysbiosis large intestine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with different types of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease before and after probiotic therapy by Bifiform. The studies established the presence of various complaints of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. All of the surveyed patients had microbiological characteristics of different degrees of dysbiosis colon. Confirmed the positive effect of probiotics on the composition of microbiota Bifiform in colon of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with different schemes of pathogenetic treatment.

  11. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in an afebrile patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Erin L; Kovacs, Mitch; Gair, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare infection usually involving the knee or hip but can infrequently affect less obvious joints such as the pubic symphysis.Risk factors for septic arthritis include joint repair or replacement surgery, systemic infection, intravenous recreational drug use, and alcoholism.We present the case of a 48-year-old man with a final diagnosis of septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis who had no risk factors besides alcoholism. The presentation was unusual in that the patient was afebrile,and the infection seemed to be spontaneous. The infecting pathogen was identified as Streptococcus anginosus or S constellatus, both being normal intestinal flora. Infection by either bacterium is rare in septic arthritis.

  12. Prescribing pattern and adverse drug reactions monitoring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Prabha M; Geetha Rani A; Meenakshi Balasubramanian; Ezhil Ramya J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which requires lifelong treatment to prevent the damage to joints and to maintain day to day functioning of patients. All the drugs used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis show significant toxicity and hence it is very important that their use require regular monitoring for adverse reactions. The present study is designed to estimate the prescribing pattern and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions in patients with ...

  13. Measurement of the Common Carotid Arteries Intima-Media Thickness by Ultrasonography in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf Rahim Merza; Salah Muhammed Fateh; Hawar Ali Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disabling disease affecting articular and extra articular organs and one of these important organs is cardiovascular system which its involvement is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of Rheumatoid arthritis patients ; it is important to look for the relation of Rheumatoid arthritis and the extent of cardiovascular involvement among those patients by Ultrasound (US ) which is feasible, simple and low cost investigation and so...

  14. Intake of antioxidants in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Nolasco Siqueira Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate dietary intake of antioxidants in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: this is a cross-sectional case series study with 53 women accompanied at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic, Hospital das Clínicas/UFPE, from January to October 2012. Demographic and anthropometric parameters (weight, height, body mass index, weight change were collected by means of a form. The assessment of food consumption was conducted using a semi-quantitative food frequency survey, analyzed according to a food composition table. Database construction and statistical analysis were performed using Excel and SPSS version 18.0, using chi-squared test, Anova, and Student’s t-test, at a confidence level of 5%. Results: the sample was composed of 53 women with a mean age of 54.51 ± 4.24 years and BMI of 25.97 ± 5.94 kg/m². In the sociodemographic variables, statistically significant differences in origin, occupation, and income were observed. Daily consumption showed significance for vitamins A, C, and zinc. In adults, vitamins A and C were in accordance with recommendations, while in the elderly a low intake of vitamin E and selenium was observed. The relation between vitamin E and origin was significant. Conclusion: the sample was composed of 53 women with a mean age of 54.51 ± 4.24 years and BMI of 25.97 ± 5.94 kg/m². In the sociodemographic variables, statistically significant differences in origin, occupation, and income were observed. Daily consumption showed significance for vitamins A, C, and zinc. In adults, vitamins A and C were in accordance with recommendations, while in the elderly a low intake of vitamin E and selenium was observed. The relation between vitamin E and origin was significant.

  15. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  16. DYNAMICS OF CYTOKINE PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AS INFLUENCED BY INFLIXIMAB (REMIKEID ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Zhugrova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune systemic disease with predominantly destructive lesions of peripheral joints, with prevalence of 0.6 to 1.6% in general population. An important pathogenetic role in this disease is now attributed to imbalance between pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. Clinical introduction of biological preparations, such as Infliximab (monoclonal antibodies to TNFα within last years have changed therapeutic approach to treatment of rheumatic diseases. The aim of our research was to evaluate dynamics of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine profile in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RА during combined therapy with Infliximab and Methotrexate (MT. The study included 30 patients (27 females, 3 males, mean age of 52.5±2.0 years who received combined therapy with МТ and Infliximab (Inx. Inx was initially injected at a single dose of 3 mg/kg intravenously, followed by administration 2 and 6 weeks later, and then repeated every 8 weeks. Regular examination of the patients included clinical and laboratory studies (ESR, levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, IL-4, IL-10, GSM-CSF, IFNγ. Levels of antibodies against Infliximab in the groups of RА patients were determined before treatment and 22 weeks later. Efficiency of the therapy was estimated according to DAS28 3V Index and to HAQ Questionnaire.Upon decreased activity of disease, as assessed by DAS28, and improvement of HAQ parameters, a marked decrease in proinflammatory cytokine levels (IL-6, IL-8, TNFα was detected, that confirming a pathogenetic significance of cytokine in RА patients. In patients with marked clinical effect (group I, an initially normal contents of TNFα was found in blood serum, and this group showed better response to Infliximab therapy, than groups II and III (resp., moderate and absent response with initially high contents of TNFα and other cytokines, that was proven by correlations with ACR criteria and HAQ functional index

  17. Effect of TNF antagonists on the productivity of daily work of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuya H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidekazu Furuya,1 Tsuyoshi Kasama,1 Takeo Isozaki,1,2 Masayu Umemura,1 Kumiko Otsuka,1 Sakiko Isojima,1 Hiroyuki Tsukamoto,1 TakehiroTokunaga,1 Ryo Yanai,1 Ryo Takahashi11Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Rheumatology,University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a significant cause of work disability and job loss. The resulting economic burden experienced by patients has received considerable research attention. This research assesses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonists (infliximab, etanercept on the ability of RA patients living in Japan to work and participate in society. A total of 42 patients with active RA were enrolled and given biological therapy for 12 months (mo. Of these patients, 14 were employed full-time, 6 were employed part-time, and 22 were not employed. Twenty-six patients were given infliximab, and sixteen were given etanercept. The amount of domestic labor performed before the biologics served as a baseline and was assigned a value of 0%. After treatment with biologics, the productivity was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS; −100 to +100 mm. The administration of TNF antagonists to RA patients who exhibited an insufficient response to medical treatment significantly improved the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS 28 after both 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.0001. A significant correlation was found between the improvement in their DAS 28 and improvements in their work situation (Productivity VAS (P < 0.05. Of particular interest is the significant correlation between the values of baseline mHAQ and the percent changes of Productivity VAS that was observed after 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.05. Our findings indicate that medical treatment of RA with TNF antagonists improves the patients' ability to perform their jobs and housekeeping. Because loss of productivity is an important

  18. Quality of life in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, P; Langholz, E; Mortensen, P.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Quality of life is an important determinant of the effectiveness of health technologies, but it has rarely been assessed in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN).
PATIENTS/METHODS—The non-disease specific sickness impact profile (SIP) and the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) were used on a cohort of 49 patients receiving HPN, and the results compared with those for 36 non-HPN patients with either anatomical (2.0 MJ/day (~488 kcal/da...

  19. Prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in psoriasis patients according to newer classification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado Ficco, Hernán; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) according to CASPAR criteria, ASAS peripheral and axial SpA criteria, and New York criteria for AS. The first 100 patients consecutively attending a psoriasis dermatology clinic were assessed. Demographic and clinical data were collected; all patients were questioned and examined for joint manifestations. Rheumatoid factor and radiographies of hands, feet, cervical spine, and pelvis for sacroiliac joints were obtained. X-rays were read independently by two experienced observers in blind fashion. Patients with objective joint manifestations, both axial and peripheral, were evaluated for fulfillment of CASPAR, ASAS peripheral and axial, and New York criteria. Median age 48 years; 93 % of patients had psoriasis vulgaris and 56 % nail involvement. Seventeen patients had peripheral arthritis as follows: nine mono/oligoarticular and eight polyarthritis. Median arthritis duration was 8 years. Seventeen percent of patients fulfilled CASPAR and ASAS peripheral criteria, 6 % New York, and 5 % ASAS axial criteria. Patients who met CASPAR criteria showed a significantly higher psoriasis duration compared to those without arthritis (M 16 vs. 10 years, p = 0.02), and a higher frequency of nail involvement (88.2 vs. 49.4 %, p = 0.003). Five patients (29.4 %) fulfilled ASAS axial criteria; all of them had peripheral involvement as follows: mono/oligoarticular in three patients and polyarticular in two. Patients with peripheral and axial involvement presented a significantly higher frequency of erythrodermic psoriasis compared to the other patients (35.3 vs. 1.2 %, p = 0.0006 and 80 vs. 16.7 %, p = 0.02). Prevalence of PsA, for CASPAR and ASAS peripheral criteria, was of 17 %. Five percent of patients met ASAS axial criteria, while 6 % met New York criteria. Worth noting, few patients without signs or symptoms of arthritis had radiological changes, both axial and peripheral, precluding

  20. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF 23-VALENT PNEUMOCOCCAL POLYSACCHARIDE VACCINE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Naumtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the clinical efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 70 patients (55 women and 15 men aged 23–70 years, including 40 patients with RA and 30 people without systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (a control group who had a recent history of 2 and more cases of lower respiratory tract infections (bronchitis, pneumonia. When included, all the patients received anti-inflammatory therapy with methotrexate (MT (n = 24, leflunomide (LEF (n = 6, or MT + tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors (n = 10. A single 0.5-ml dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine Pneumo-23 (Sanofi Pasteur was administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly during continuous MT or LEF therapy for the underlying disease or 3–4 weeks before the use of a TNF-α inhibitor. During control visits (1 and 3 months and 1 year after administration of the vaccine, the patients underwent physical examination and routine clinical and laboratory studies. Results. No clinical and radiological symptoms of pneumonia were recorded in any case during a 12-month follow-up. The RA and control groups showed a more than 2-fold increase in anti-pneumococcal antibody levels 1 year after vaccination. The vaccine was well tolerated by 50 patients. Sixteen patients were observed to have pain, cutaneous swelling and hyperemia and 4 had subfebrility. There were neither episodes of RA exacerbation nor new autoimmune disorders during the follow-up. Conclusion. The findings suggest that 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine shows a good clinical efficacy, adequate immunogenicity, and good tolerability in the patients with RA. 

  1. Incidences of overall and site specific cancers in TNFα inhibitor treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritides - a follow-up study from the DANBIO Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjær, Lene; Andersen, Anne Rødgaard;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of cancer in arthritis patients treated with or without TNFα inhibitors (TNF-I).......To investigate the incidence of cancer in arthritis patients treated with or without TNFα inhibitors (TNF-I)....

  2. THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY OF BEE-STINGS THERAPY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS CAUSES INFLAMMATION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FEMALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Rahman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here the present study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic activity of bee venom acupuncture in rheumatoid arthritis (RA which causes inflammation and oxidative stress in female patients. 75 female patients were divided into 5 groups as control, bee venom acupuncture, rheumatoid arthritis, treated rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis stung with bee venom groups. Serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, prostaglandins E2 and F2α, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, glutathione and total antioxidant capacity levels were determined in all groups. Rheumatoid arthritis in female patients was resulted in a significant elevation in serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, prostaglandins E2 and F2α, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels (p < 0.05 compared to control group. In addition, rheumatoid arthritis caused a significant reduction in serum glutathione and total antioxidant capacity levels. On the other hand, bee venom stings alleviated rheumatoid arthritis inflammation and oxidative stress effects, where all investigated parameters were statistically significant compared to rheumatoid arthritis group. Moreover, bee venom therapy was more potent than the routine treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in patients treated group. Bee venom acupuncture in RA patient may have therapeutic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities.

  3. The predictors of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Law, Graham; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip; Siddle, Heidi; Otter, Simon; Butters, Violet; Baker, Lesley; Hryniw, Rosemary; Bradley, Sarah; Loughrey, Lorraine; Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya; Davies, Samantha; Tranter, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the predictors of foot ulceration occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without diabetes. A multi-centre case control study was undertaken; participants were recruited from eight sites (UK). Cases were adults diagnosed with RA (without diabetes) and the presence of a validated foot ulcer, defined as a full thickness skin defect occurring in isolation on / below the midline of the malleoli and requiring > 14 days to heal. Controls met the same criteria but were ulcer naive. Clinical examination included loss of sensation (10g monofilament); ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI); forefoot deformity (Platto); plantar pressures (PressureStat); RA disease activity (36 swollen/tender joint counts) and the presence of vasculitis. History taking included past ulceration/foot surgery; current medication and smoking status. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Foot Impact Scale. A total of 83 cases with 112 current ulcers and 190 ulcer naïve controls participated. Cases were significantly older (mean age 71 years; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 69-73 vs. 62 years, 60-64) and had longer RA disease duration (mean 22 years; 19-25 vs. 15, 13-17). Univariate analysis showed that risk of ulceration increases with loss of sensation; abnormality of ABPI and foot deformity. Plantar pressures and joint counts were not significant predictors. HAQ score and history of foot surgery were strongly associated with ulceration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.704, 95 % CI 1.274-2.280 and OR = 2.256, 95 % CI 1.294-3.932). Three cases and two controls presented with suspected cutaneous vasculitis. In logistic regression modelling, ABPI (OR = 0.04; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.28) forefoot deformity (OR = 1.14; 95 % CI, 1.08-1.21) and loss of sensation (OR = 1.22; 95 % CI, 1.10-1.36) predicted risk of ulceration. In patients with RA, ABPI, forefoot deformity and loss of sensation predict risk of ulceration

  4. Correlation between subtalar varus angle and disability in patients with patellofemoral arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Birenkumar Jagdishbhai

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To find the correlation between subtalar varus angle & disability in patients with patellofemoral arthritis. Methods: A total of 30 subjects aged (48.86±5.74 referred to the department of physiotherapy, with patellofemoral arthritis and fulfilling the criteria of inclusion were recruited for the study, sampling method being convenient sampling. Disability score was measured of each patient by WOMAC index (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis disability questionnaire and subtalar varus angle was measured in non weight bearing position in prone lying. Results: Pearson’s correlation coefficient test showed a highly significant (p=0.000 positive correlation (r=0.821 between disability scores and subtalar varus angle. Conclusion: There is a highly significant relation between disabilities due to patellofemoral pain in patellofemoral arthritis patients and sub talar varus angle

  5. Potentiated antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, L V; Mukhin, N A; Rameev, V V; Sarkisova, I A; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    We studied the efficiency and safety of a new homeopathic preparation Artrofoon containing affinely purified antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Artrofoon produced a positive antiinflammatory effect on the course of rheumatoid arthritis. This preparation reduced the severity of arthralgia (indexes of Li and Ritchie) and morning stiffness and decreased the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and contents of rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. One-month therapy improved the state of patients. Artrofoon was well tolerable. The preparation did not cause the ulcerogenic and nephrotoxic effects. Artrofoon holds much promise for combination therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (including severe articular-and-visceral forms) and complications after treatment with nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations.

  6. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  7. Delayed clinical response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with etanercept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Marieke H; Prince, Femke H M; Twilt, Marinka; van Rossum, Marion A J; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Koopman-Keemink, Yvonne; Wulffraat, Nico M; Gorter, Simone L; Ten Cate, Rebecca; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W A

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who failed to meet response criteria after 3 months of etanercept treatment. METHODS: This was a prospective ongoing multicenter observational study of all Dutch patients with JIA using etanercept. Response accordin

  8. Medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a critical appraisal of the existing literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, B.J.F. van den; Zwikker, H.E.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to medication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is low, varying from 30 to 80%. Improving adherence to therapy could therefore dramatically improve the efficacy of drug therapy. Although indicators for suboptimal adherence can be useful to identify nonadherent patients, and could funct

  9. An Online Tailored Self-Management Program for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Developmental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, R.M.; Gaal, B.G. van; Dulmen, S. van; Repping-Wuts, H.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Every day rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients make many decisions about managing their disease. An online, computer-tailored, self-management program can support this decision making, but development of such a program requires the active participation of patients. OBJECTIVE: To develop an

  10. HLA-DRB1 alleles genotyping in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA. Methods: 86 patients and 106 race matched controls in whom HLADR typing was performed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP)

  11. Experience with abatacept used in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Mazurov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency and safety of therapy with abatacept in combination with methotrexate were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The performed therapy was shown to reduce the activity of an immune inflammatory process and the magnitude of articular syndrome and to improve the patients' functional status.

  12. Fatigue as experienced by patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repping-Wuts, H.; Uitterhoeve, R.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interest in fatigue research has grown since the finding that fatigue is, besides pain, the symptom most frequently reported by patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to explore the experience of fatigue from the patients' perspective. METHODS: Twenty-nine pati

  13. Adrenaline-induced immunological changes are altered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kittner, JM; Jacobs, R; Pawlak, CR; Heijnen, CJ; Schedlowski, M; Schmidt, RE

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients the immunological changes induced by adrenaline are different from healthy controls (HC). Methods. Fifteen female RA patients and 14 HC were infused with 1 mug/kg adrenaline over 20 min. Blood was drawn before, immediately after

  14. An online tailored self-management program for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a developmental study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, R.M.; Gaal, B.G.I.; Dulmen, S. van; Repping-Wuts, H.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Every day rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients make many decisions about managing their disease. An online, computer-tailored, self-management program can support this decision making, but development of such a program requires the active participation of patients. Objective: To develop an

  15. Reliability of in-Shoe Plantar Pressure Measurements in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Gaj; Novak, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressures measurement is a frequently used method in rehabilitation and related research. Metric characteristics of the F-Scan system have been assessed from different standpoints and in different patients, but not its reliability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, our objective was to assess reliability of the F-Scan plantar…

  16. Antibodies to Infliximab and Adalimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eng, Grith P; Bendtzen, Klaus; Bliddal, Henning;

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate if antibodies towards biological TNF-α inhibitors (anti-TNFi Abs) are present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission and to relate any anti-TNFi Abs to circulating level of TNF-α inhibitor (TNFi). Methods. Patients with RA, treated with infliximab...

  17. Partner participation in cognitive-behavioral self-management group treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Helmond, T. van; Näring, G.W.B.; Rooij, D.J.R.A.M. de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if participation of the spouse of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in cognitive-behavioral oriented self-management training aimed at improving disease related cognitions and coping with pain has additional benefits for the patients. METHODS: A total of 59 couples were rand

  18. Multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation for patients with chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, de Petronella D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Working gainfully is a major activity of adult life, providing income, structure, social interaction and an opportunity to learn and practice skills, and a source of self-esteem. In people with chronic arthritis work disability is common, having a major impact upon individuals as well as society. In

  19. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  20. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS

  1. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  2. Power Spectral Analysis of Heart Rate Variability in Female Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawser Jahan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Association of increased cardiovascular morbidity and higher sympathetic activity in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been recognized. Heart rate variability (HRV is a useful measure to assess sympatho-vagal balance.Objective: To assess autonomic nerve function status in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA by HRV analysis.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU, Shahbag, Dhaka from January to December 2010. Sixty female RA patients aged 18-50 years were included in the study group. They were enrolled from the Out Patient Department of Rheumatology Wing of the Department of Medicine, BSMMU, Dhaka. For comparison age matched thirty apparently healthy females were also studied as control. The HRV parameters were recorded by a Polyrite machine. For statistical analysis independent sample t test was used.Results: Mean resting pulse rate, diastolic blood pressure and mean systolic blood pressure were higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients in comparison to those of healthy control. Mean values of LF power, LF norm and LF/ HF were significantly higher (p<0.001 & TP and HF power, HF norm were significantly lower (p<0.001 in RA patients in comparison to those of healthy control.Conclusion: This study may conclude that sympathetic activity was higher with lower parasympathetic activity along with shifting of sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Stress Encountered by Significant Others of Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kay

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to identify and describe perceived stress and coping responses of family and nonfamily significant others of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Significant others were asked to identify stressful events related to treatment factors, relationship factors, and perception of the patient's condition. Coping responses were categorized in…

  4. The role of health literacy and social networks in arthritis patients' health information-seeking behavior: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Janette; Mullan, Judy; Worsley, Anthony; Pai, Nagesh

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients engage in health information-seeking behaviour to maintain their wellbeing and to manage chronic diseases such as arthritis. Health literacy allows patients to understand available treatments and to critically appraise information they obtain from a wide range of sources. Aims. To explore how arthritis patients' health literacy affects engagement in arthritis-focused health information-seeking behaviour and the selection of sources of health information available through their informal social network. Methods. An exploratory, qualitative study consisting of one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Twenty participants with arthritis were recruited from community organizations. The interviews were designed to elicit participants' understanding about their arthritis and arthritis medication and to determine how the participants' health literacy informed selection of where they found information about their arthritis and pain medication. Results. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to be engaged with health information-seeking behaviour. Participants with intermediate health literacy were more likely to source arthritis-focused health information from newspapers, television, and within their informal social network. Those with high health literacy sourced information from the internet and specialist health sources and were providers of information within their informal social network. Conclusion. Health professionals need to be aware that levels of engagement in health information-seeking behaviour and sources of arthritis-focused health information may be related to their patients' health literacy.

  5. Surgical management of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient with multiple joint involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel, Matthew P; Figgie, Mark P

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is recognized as a heterogenous group of disorders in which the common factor is persistent arthritis in at least 1 joint occurring before the age of 16 years. Although conservative management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs can be effective, approximately 10% of JIA patients have end-stage degenerative changes requiring total hip arthroplasties (THAs) and total knee arthroplasties (TKAs). This article discusses the overall epidemiology, coordination of care, and medical and surgical management of JIA patients undergoing THA and TKA.

  6. Osteopoikilosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis complicated with dry eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureten, Kemal

    2007-09-01

    Osteopoikilosis is an uncommon sclerosing bone dysplasia of unknown etiology. It is usually detected as a coincidental finding at radiographic examination. Mild joint pain and swelling may be seen in 15-20% of cases. Osteopoikilosis is rarely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. In this case report a young man with osteopoikilosis who was diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis complicated with dry eyes is presented. Although patients with osteopoikilosis may have articular symptoms, those patients should be carefully examined for a possible association with a rheumatic condition.

  7. Chronic arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: distinct features in 336 paediatric and 1830 adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Natali W S; Silva, Clovis A; Aikawa, Nadia E; Barros, Diego L; da Silva, Mariana A; Otsuzi, Carini I; Kozu, Katia; Seguro, Luciana Parente; Pereira, Rosa M R; Bonfá, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the frequency of chronic arthritis and compare the clinical and laboratory features in a large population of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and adult-onset (aSLE) patients. This historical study evaluated 336 cSLE and 1830 aSLE patients. Chronic arthritis was defined as synovitis of at least 6 weeks of duration. Rhupus was characterised as the association of SLE and chronic inflammatory arthritis with erosion and positive rheumatoid factor. Jaccoud's arthropathy is a non-erosive subluxation leading to severe deformity of the hands and feet. Data were compared using Student's t test or the Mann-Whitney test for continuous variables. For categorical variables, differences were assessed by Fisher's exact test and Pearson chi-square. Frequencies of chronic arthritis were similar in cSLE and aSLE (2.4 vs. 3.8%, p = 0.261). The median time from disease onset to appearance of chronic arthritis was shorter in cSLE (0 vs. 10 years, p lupus anticoagulant (40 vs. 1.6%, p = 0.012), anticardiolipin IgM (40 vs. 1.5%, p = 0.012) and median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) [10.5(1-20) vs. 6(4-16), p = 0.029] were higher in cSLE. Frequency of rhupus, (12 vs. 17%, p = 1.0), Jaccoud's arthropathy (0 vs. 17%, p = 0.343) and treatments were similar in cSLE and aSLE. We determined that chronic arthritis in SLE has distinct features in children, with very early onset, polyarticular involvement and association with active disease. We further demonstrated in this series that a proportion of chronic arthritis involvement in SLE is manifested as rhupus and Jaccoud's arthropathy.

  8. Assessment of psychological responses in patients about to receive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is considered to be associated with psychological distress. We assessed the mental status, anxiety, and the factors associated with these in cancer patients about to receive radiotherapy. Hospitalized patients about to receive radiotherapy participated. Psychological status was assessed by a psychiatrist, based on interview about the type of anxiety related to cancer or radiotherapy as well as self-rating questionnaires. Eligible data were collected from 94 patients. The incidence of mental disorders was 20%. The total mood disturbance scores were significantly higher in patients with poor performance status. The most common type of anxiety regarding radiotherapy was acute adverse effect, and the predictors were palliative treatment and living alone. Mental disorders, mood disturbance, and anxiety in patients cannot be neglected in radiation oncology practice. Especially careful attention should be paid to patients with these predictive factors. (author)

  9. Short-term glucocorticoid administration in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part 2 — comparison of different medication forms efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare efficacy of different glucocorticoid (GC medication forms in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration — 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination — 8 [5; 11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice — in the other. Results. Number of pts with full resolution of arthritis, recurrent exacerbation, insufficient arthritis resolution or clinically insignificant response was comparable in both groups. More rapid decrease of pain at moving was achieved during the first 2-3 days after GC administration in pts with full resolution of arthritis (p=0,03 in group receiving MP in comparison with BM. At day 14 joint damage measures did not differ between groups. Conclusion. Efficacy of short-term glucocorticoid administration does not depend on mode of administration and GC medication form (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day iv during 2 days or betamethasone 7 mg im once.

  10. Contact Frequency, Travel Time, and Travel Costs for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Sørensen; Louise Linde; Merete Lund Hetland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate travel time, and travel cost related to contacts with health care providers for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during a three-month period. Methods. Patient-reported travel time and travel cost were obtained from 2847 patients with RA. Eleven outpatient clinics across Denmark recruited patients to the study. Data collected included frequency, travel time and travel costs for contacts at rheumatology outpatient clinics, other outpatient clinics, general prac...

  11. Sexual Self-Concept and General Health in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Ramezani, Arash; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are several studies regarding sexual dysfunction in chronic diseases such as diabetes and renal failure; however, no significant study has been done on Iranian rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Objectives: In this study, we aimed to identify and compare sexual dysfunction between RA patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of females (87 RA patients and 89 controls) were randomly selected from the rheumatology clinic ...

  12. Clinical and Serological Findings in Juvenile Patients with Idiopathic Arthritis in Southwestern of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Alyasin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe clinical features and serological findings of children with idiopathic arthritis in south-western Iran.Methods: This descriptive study included 60 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who were referred to a pediatric rheumatology clinic at a university hospital during 6-month period. Initial manifestations, first laboratory tests and clinical course of patients were reviewed.Results: Sixty children (32 boys and 28 girls with idiopathic arthritis ranged in age from 1.5 to 16 years. The mean age at the first presentation was 4.92 years (SD= 3.68. Oligoarthritis was the most common subtype in 27 (45%, followed by systemic- onset in 17 (28.3% and polyarthritis in 16 (26.7% of patients. The most commonly involved joints were knee 53(88.3%, ankle 28(46.6% and wrist 27(45%. Uveitis was detected in two patients, and positivity for ANA titer was revealed in one patient. Conclusions: In this study, the pattern of most clinical features in different subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis resembles to other studies. Positive ANA was less; however, the low numbers of Iranian patients with uveitis was noteworthy.

  13. Hydroxychloroquine decreases Th17-related cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cruz da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial agent that has been used in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis treatment for many years. Recently, novel mechanisms of action have been proposed, thereby broadening the therapeutic perspective of this medication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of hydroxychloroquine in T helper 17 (Th17 cytokines in healthy individuals and patients. METHODS: Eighteen female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (mean age 39.0±12.9 years and 13 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (mean age 51.5±7.7 years were recruited from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-Brazil. The patients were included after fulfilling four classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis from the American College of Rheumatology. After being stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin in the absence or presence of different concentrations of hydroxychloroquine, the interleukin 6, 17 and 22 levels were quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in culture supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals and patients. RESULTS: We demonstrated that in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers and in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis patients, there was a significant reduction in the IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22 supernatant levels after adding hydroxychloroquine. CONCLUSIONS Our in vitro results demonstrated that hydroxychloroquine inhibits IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22 production and contributes to a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this medication.

  14. Effect of electro-acupuncture, massage, mud, and sauna therapies in patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha B Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old married woman diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in 2007, came to our hospital in July 2014 with the complaint of severe pain and swelling over multiple joints, especially over small joints, which was associated with stiffness (more in morning, deformities of fingers and toes, with disturbed sleep and poor quality of life (QOL for the past 7 years. She received a combination of electro acupuncture (14 sessions, massage (18 sessions, mud (18 sessions, and sauna (3 sessions (EMMS therapies for 30-min, 45-min, 30-min, and 15-min per session, respectively for 3 weeks. During and postintervention assessment showed reduction in visual analog scale score for pain, Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. It also showed an increase in the scores of 10-Meter Walk Test, isometric hand-grip test, and short form-36 version-2 health survey. This result suggest that, the EMMS therapy might be considered as an effective treatments in reducing pain, depression, anxiety, and stress with improvement in physical functions, quality of sleep and QOL in patient with RA. EMMS therapies were tolerated and no side effects were reported by the patient. Though the results are encouraging, further studies are required with larger sample size and advanced inflammatory markers.

  15. Effect of electro-acupuncture, massage, mud, and sauna therapies in patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Geetha B; Mooventhan, A; Anagha, N

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old married woman diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2007, came to our hospital in July 2014 with the complaint of severe pain and swelling over multiple joints, especially over small joints, which was associated with stiffness (more in morning), deformities of fingers and toes, with disturbed sleep and poor quality of life (QOL) for the past 7 years. She received a combination of electro acupuncture (14 sessions), massage (18 sessions), mud (18 sessions), and sauna (3 sessions) (EMMS) therapies for 30-min, 45-min, 30-min, and 15-min per session, respectively for 3 weeks. During and postintervention assessment showed reduction in visual analog scale score for pain, Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. It also showed an increase in the scores of 10-Meter Walk Test, isometric hand-grip test, and short form-36 version-2 health survey. This result suggest that, the EMMS therapy might be considered as an effective treatments in reducing pain, depression, anxiety, and stress with improvement in physical functions, quality of sleep and QOL in patient with RA. EMMS therapies were tolerated and no side effects were reported by the patient. Though the results are encouraging, further studies are required with larger sample size and advanced inflammatory markers.

  16. Infection and immune-mediated meningococcal-associated arthritis: combination features in the same patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Yaqub Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 16-year-old male patient with sudden-onset, rash, arthritis and meningitis by Neisseria meningitidis one week after an acute upper respiratory infection. On the 10th day of treatment followed by neurological and arthritis clinical improvement, he presented once again a tender and swollen left knee with a moderate effusion, and active and passive range of motion was severely limited secondary to pain, and when he was submitted to surgical drainage and synovial fluid analysis he showed inflammatory characteristics. A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug was taken for five days with complete improvement of symptoms. The case is notable for its combination of features of septic and immune-mediated arthritis, which has rarely been reported in the same patient.

  17. Demographics, clinical disease characteristics, and quality of life in a large cohort of psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong B

    2015-11-01

    duration was 18 years. Those with family history had an earlier onset of PsO by ~7 years. Mean body surface area involvement with PsO was 14%. Mean body mass index was 30.7. Prevalence of PsA was 29.8%. PsA patients had a higher mean body surface area compared to patients with PsO alone (16.7% vs 13.4%, P<0.05, higher prevalence of psoriatic nail changes (54.4% vs 36%, P<0.0002, and worse QoL scores as assessed by the Short Form-12 (67 vs 52, P<0.00001, Psoriasis Quality of Life-12 questionnaire (62 vs 71, P<0.01, and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (2.3 vs 4.7, P<0.01. Strikingly, 49% of patients with PsO had never received any systemic therapy. Conclusion: These data highlight that PsO has marked negative impacts on QoL, while those patients with concomitant PsA are affected to a much greater degree. Despite large numbers of patients presenting with moderate-to-severe disease, use of systemic therapy for both PsO and PsA was uncommon. Keywords: psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, epidemiology, treatments, quality of life, patient-reported outcomes

  18. Speech recognition for 40 patients receiving multichannel cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, R C; Mecklenburg, D J; Clark, G M

    1986-10-01

    We collected data on 40 patients who received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant. Results were reviewed to determine if the coding strategy is effective in transmitting the intended speech features and to assess patient benefit in terms of communication skills. All patients demonstrated significant improvement over preoperative results with a hearing aid for both lipreading enhancement and speech recognition without lipreading. Of the patients, 50% demonstrated ability to understand connected discourse with auditory input only. For the 23 patients who were tested 12 months postoperatively, there was substantial improvement in open-set speech recognition. PMID:3755975

  19. Arthritis in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schidlow, D V; Goldsmith, D P; Palmer, J; Huang, N N

    1984-01-01

    We have confirmed previous observations of a transient, non-disabling recurrent arthritis in patients with cystic fibrosis. This arthritis differs from classic rheumatoid arthritis, is frequently associated with skin arthritis lesions, and its occurrence is unrelated to the severity of lung disease.

  20. Infliximab plus methotrexate is superior to methotrexate alone in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis in methotrexate-naive patients: the RESPOND study

    OpenAIRE

    Baranauskaite, Asta; Raffayová, Helena; Kungurov, NV; Kubanova, Anna; Venalis, Algirdas; Helmle, Laszlo; Srinivasan, Shankar; Nasonov, Evgeny; Vastesaeger, Nathan; ,

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of treatment with infliximab plus methotrexate with methotrexate alone in methotrexate-naive patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods In this open-label study, patients 18 years and older with active PsA who were naive to methotrexate and not receiving disease-modifying therapy (N=115) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either infliximab (5 mg/kg) at weeks 0, 2, 6 and 14 plus methotrexate (15 mg/week); or methotrexate (15 mg/wee...

  1. Clinical significance in detection of inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Qian Wang; Yang Tang; Xiu-Yang Li; Da-Jun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between inflammatory cytokines and rheumatoid arthritis, and explore the clinical application value of cytokines in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis.Methods:A total of 136 cases of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were regarded as the RA group. Among them, 62 patients were in remission and 74 patients were in the active phase of the disease. Besides, 53 cases of healthy volunteers were considered as the control group. The changes of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IFN-γ of the three groups were compared and the correlation of the inflammatory cytokines in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, DSA28 score and C-reactive protein would be explored. Results:The IL-1β and IFN-γ of patients in remission in the RA group showed no statistical differences as compared with those of the control group; the IL-1β and IFN-γ of patients in the active phase of the disease in the RA group presented statistical differences as compared with those of patients in the control group and patients in remission in the RA group; The IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were compared in pairs and all showed statistical differences; CRP and DSA28 score and IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were positively correlated, while IL-1β, IFN-γ and CRP and DSA 28 score had no correlations.Conclusions:It is of important significance in the clinic to detect inflammatory cytokines in the early diagnosis, disease evaluation and prognostic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation for patients with chronic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, de, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Working gainfully is a major activity of adult life, providing income, structure, social interaction and an opportunity to learn and practice skills, and a source of self-esteem. In people with chronic arthritis work disability is common, having a major impact upon individuals as well as society. In the Netherlands, rheumatic diseases account for about 15% of the costs due to work disability payments. Given this significance, work retention issues have been identified as one of the aims of th...

  3. Dietary recommendations for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Vitetta L; Coulson S; Schloss J; Beck SL; Allen R; Sali A

    2012-01-01

    Luis Vitetta,1 Samantha Coulson,1 Janet Schloss,1 Shoshannah L Beck,1 Robert Allen,2 Avni Sali21Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, 2National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Dietary interventions can assist with the management of disease symptoms that accompany rheumatoid arthritis (RA), such as pain, tender swollen joints, stiffness, and associated disability and disease progressio...

  4. Assessment of the Quality of Delivered Care for Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Using Comprehensive Quality Measurement Model in Health Care (CQMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of care has become increasingly critical in the evaluation of healthcare and healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess quality of delivered care among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a model of Comprehensive Quality Measurement in Health Care (CQMH. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 172 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA who were received care from private clinics of Isfahan University of medical sciences in 2013. CQMH questionnaires were used for assessing the quality of care. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Results: The mean scores of Quality Index, Service Quality (SQ, Technical Quality (TQ, and Costumer Quality (CQ were 72.70, 79.09, 68.54 and 70.25 out of 100, respectively. For CQ only 19.8% of participations staying the course of action even under stress and financial constraints, there is a significant gap between what RA care they received with what was recommended in the guideline for TQ. Scores of service quality was low in majority of aspects especially in "availability of support group" section. Conclusion: Study shows paradoxical findings and expresses that quality scores of service delivery for patients with arthritis rheumatoid from patient's perspective is relatively low. Therefore, for fixing this paradoxical problem, improving the participation of patients and their family and empowering them for self-management and decision should be regarded by health systems.

  5. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITHIN THE REMARCA STUDY: PRELIMINARY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Novikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a high or very high cardiovascular risk (CVR before therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Objective: to evaluate the impact of antirheumatic therapy performed in accordance with the Treat-to-Target strategy on the progression of atherosclerosis and CVR in patients with early RA. Subjects and methods. This investigation enrolled 74 patients (72% women; median age, 56 years with early RA having moderate to high activity (median DAS28, 5.6 who had not previously received DMARDs and glucocorticoids (GCs. All patients were anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive and 87% of the patients were rheumatoid factor-positive. All patients received methotrexate (MT subcutaneously with dose escalation up to 25–30 mg/week, in case of its inefficiency at 3 months a biological agent (BA was added. After 6 months, 39% of the patients achieved remission; 19% had low; 35 and 7% had moderate and high disease activity, respectively. The majority (n = 20 (69% who achieved remission received MT monotherapy; 9 (31% – MT + BA whereas among the patients who did not achieve remission 15 (33% and 30 (67% respectively. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, traditional CVR factors were assessed in all patients, by determining the total coronary risk by the SCORE scale, including that modified by EULAR (mSCORE, carotid artery atherosclerosis (CAA by duplex scanning data, coronary calcification (CC by multislice spiral computed tomography and by estimating the degree of CVR.Results and discussion. The rates of hypertension, overweight, abdominal obesity, low activity, smoking, and type 2 diabetes mellitus did not change significantly after 6 months. There were increases in the levels of total cholesterol by 7% (p < 0.05, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 9% (p<0.01, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 26% (p < 0.005, and body mass index (BMI by 1% (p < 0.01 and a decrease

  6. Compliance with methotrexate treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: influence of patients' beliefs about the medicine. A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Thurah, Annette; Nørgaard, Mette; Harder, Ingegerd;

    2010-01-01

    Objective of the study is to investigate how compliance during the first year of methotrexate (MTX) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is influenced by the patients' perception of the necessity for and concern about MTX, the patients' functional disability, and the dose of MTX. A total of 126...

  7. Long-term followup of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Field, E.H.; Hoppe, R.T.; Strober, S.

    1987-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation was administered to 32 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Twenty-four patients showed at least a 25% improvement in 3 of 4 disease activity parameters, which persisted during the followup period of up to 48 months. Eight of the 32 patients required adjunctive immunosuppressive drug therapy to maintain improvement. Four patients died after total lymphoid irradiation; the causes of death were acute myocardial infarction (1 patient), pulmonary embolism (1 patient), and rheumatoid lung disease complicated by respiratory infection (2 patients). After therapy, patients exhibited a prolonged reduction in the number and function of circulating T helper cells.

  8. Psychophysiological responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine J M de Brouwer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stress management interventions may prove useful in preventing the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study assessed the effects of a stress management intervention on the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short-term stress management training, performed a standardized psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST 1 week after the stress management training and at a 9-week follow-up. Psychological and physical functioning, and the acute psychophysiological response to the stress test were assessed. RESULTS: Patients in the intervention group showed significantly lower psychological distress levels of anxiety after the training than did the controls. While there were no between-group differences in stress-induced tension levels, and autonomic (α-amylase or endocrine (cortisol responses to the stress test 1 week after the intervention, levels of stress-induced tension and cortisol were significantly lower in the intervention group at the 9-week follow-up. Overall, the response to the intervention was particularly evident in a subgroup of patients with a psychological risk profile. CONCLUSION: A relatively short stress management intervention can improve psychological functioning and influences the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with RA, particularly those psychologically at risk. These findings might help understand how stress can affect health and the role of individual differences in stress responsiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: TrialRegister.nl NTR1193.

  9. Silibinin Improves the Effects of Methotrexate in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: Pilot Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Mortada, Ahmed Hashem; Jasim, Nazar Abdulateef; Gorial, Faiq Isho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study sought to evaluate the effects of silibinin in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate (MTX). Methods We conducted a randomized multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial over a 16-week treatment period at the Al-Sader and Baghdad Teaching Hospitals in Najaf and Baghdad, respectively. A total of 60 patients (30 of each sex) with active RA, already maintained on 12 mg MTX weekly for at least three consecutive months, were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either 120 mg silibinin twice daily or a placebo, combined with their regular MTX regimen. The patients were evaluated by measuring disease activity score using the 28-joint Disease Activity Score, Simple Disease Activity Index, and Health Assessment Questionnaire–Disability Index scores at the start and end of the study. Blood samples were evaluated for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), hemoglobin (Hb), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), creatine kinase (CK), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), and the serum cytokine levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-2. Results Silibinin significantly decreases the already elevated clinical scores compared to placebo treatment. ESR, IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, anti-CCP, hs-CRP levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, the use of silibinin significantly increases Hb, IL-10, and IL-2 levels. Conclusion Silibinin may improve the effects of MTX on certain biochemical and clinical markers of patients with active RA. PMID:27403238

  10. New risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Tomašević Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the last three decades numerous epidemiologic studies have shown the correlation between risk factors and cardiovascular diseases. Clinical research has proven that rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA have higher prevalence of classical risk factors in relation to general population, and over the last few years there has been an emphasis on some new risk factors which can contribute to cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Material and methods This study examined risk factor values for CVD in 88 patients with RA treated at Rheumatology Department, Clinical Hospital Center, Zemun. All patients have been thoroughly examined (clinical findings, laboratory and echocardiographic examination. Apart from classical factors, 'new' risk factors have been examined in all patients: C-reactive proteine (CRP, high-sensitive C-reactive proteine (hs-CRP and homocystein. Results It has been determined that RA patients have more frequent higher new risk factors in comparison to classical ones. 84.1% of patients had higher CRP values, 97.1% had hsCRP and 39.5% had homocystein. The mean CRP values, especially hsCRP have been higher in patients with positive rheumatoid factor finding. Discussion Rheumatoid arthritis patients may have worse 'background atherosclerosis' than even subjects matched for classical cardiovascular risk factors. Continuous exposure to high grade systemic inflammation may be linked to accelerated atherosclerosis. Conclusions Timely identification of patients with risk factors, particularly with new risk factors, enables adequate approach in prevention of and treatment for CVD in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  11. [Rehabilitation and outpatient physiotherapy in rheumatic disease patients. Results of cross-sectional studies of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, W; Müller, A

    2008-11-01

    Rehabilitation and outpatient physiotherapy were investigated from the perspectives of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and of rheumatologists. In 2007, 204 outpatients with RA and 47 with AS at the Arthritis Center in Halle, Germany, and 117 rheumatologists from all over the country participated in two questionnaire surveys. Patients and rheumatologists gave predominantly positive judgements of physiotherapy, psychological interventions, and patient education programs. However, outpatient care including these interventions was judged to be mainly limited by fixed budgets and other formal restrictions. Even though these therapeutic options are part of (primarily inpatient) rehabilitation programs, the estimate of the need for multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs varied widely among the rheumatologists. Significant objections against rehabilitation include reluctance of the patients, administrative burden for the physicians, payers' rejections, and limited choice of rehabilitation clinic. Despite major functional limitations, a substantial portion of the patients received no multidisciplinary medical rehabilitation, outpatient physiotherapy, psychological interventions, or patient education. Recommendations for the improvement of care are derived from these data.

  12. CCR5Δ32 variant and cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Luis; González Juanatey, Carlos; García Bermúdez, Mercedes; Vázquez Rodríguez, Tomás R.; Miranda Filloy, José Alberto; Fernández Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Llorca Díaz, Javier; Martín Ibáñez, Javier; González-Gay Mantecón, Miguel Ángel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism in the risk of cardiovascular (CV) events and subclinical atherosclerosis among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A total of 645 patients fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association 1987 revised classification criteria for RA were studied. Patients were genotyped for the CCR5 rs333 polymorphism using predesigned TaqMan assays. Also, HLA DRB1 genotyping was performed using mo...

  13. Immune responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    de Brouwer, Sabine JM; van Middendorp, Henriët; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Joosten, Irma; Donders, A Rogier T; Eijsbouts, Agnes; Koulil, Saskia Spillekom-van; van Riel, Piet LCM; Evers, Andrea WM

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Psychological stress may alter immune function by activating physiological stress pathways. Building on our previous study, in which we report that stress management training led to an altered self-reported and cortisol response to psychological stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we explored the effects of this stress management intervention on the immune response to a psychological stress task in patients with RA. Methods In this study, 74 patients with RA, who w...

  14. Sensory disturbance and polyneuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with foot deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Karaca Umay; Eda Gurcay; Pinar Bora Karsli; Aytul Cakci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Our aim in this study was to present the results of sensory evaluation tests and electrophysiological evaluations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with foot deformity and to determine their relation with general health status and lower extremity functionality. Materials and methods Fifty-one patients with RA diagnosis and foot deformity were included in the study. Demographic and disease characteristics of the patients were recorded, and a detailed neurological ex...

  15. Effect of social deprivation on disease severity and outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    McEntegart, A; Morrison, E; Capell, H; M. Duncan; Porter, D.; Madhok, R; Thomson, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Social deprivation is now recognised to have an important impact on morbidity and mortality. This study sought to ascertain the effect of deprivation, if any, on disease severity, functional disability, and outcome in rheumatoid patients in Glasgow.
METHODS—814 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were assessed for clinical, functional, and laboratory indices of disease activity. Deprivation categories for individual patients were determined using the Carstairs index. Five year f...

  16. Vasoprotective Effects of Genetically Engineered Biologic Drugs in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    N.S. Meshcherina; L.А. Knyazeva; I I Goryainov; L I Knyazeva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the impact of genetically engineered biologic drugs (GEBD) — infliximab and rituximab — on endothelium functional state in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without any concomitant cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Мethods. The study involved 77 patients with RA aged from 18 to 50. The patients matched ACR (1987) or ACR/EULAR (2010) classification criteria, had no concomitant cardiovascular diseases, and had at least a two-year RA hi...

  17. Evaluation of a Dutch version of the AIMS2 for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Taal, E.; Rasker, J.J.; Houtman, P.M.; Paassen, van H.C.; Wiegman, O.

    1996-01-01

    DUTCH-AIMS2, a Dutch version of AIMS2 and successor to DUTCH-AIMS, is an instrument to assess health status among patients with rheumatic diseases. It provides measurements of 12 areas of health status on scales for health status proper, satisfaction, attribution and arthritis impact. We assessed th

  18. Prospective comparative study of patients with culture proven and high suspicion of adult onset septic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    GUPTA, M.; Sturrock, R; Field, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether patients with acute septic arthritis (SA) diagnosed by positive synovial fluid (SF) culture (Newman grade A) have different clinical and serological features from those with sterile SF in whom there is nonetheless a high suspicion of SA (Newman grades B and C).

  19. Somatoform dissociation and traumatic experiences in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Geenen, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Trauma and dissociation tend to be interrelated. The objective of this study was to examine the frequency of traumatic experiences and somatoform dissociation in patients with Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), two conditions that are both characterized by pain and

  20. Somatoform dissociation and traumatic experiences in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Geenen, R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Trauma and dissociation tend to be interrelated. The objective of this study was to examine the frequency of traumatic experiences and somatoform dissociation in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), two conditions that are both characterized by pain and

  1. Inhibition of cytokine production by methotrexate. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, A.H.; Lathouder, de S; Groot, E.R.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Aarden, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether the beneficial effects of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could be due to inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. METHODS: Cytokine production was studied using whole blood (WB) and mononuclear cells (MNC) of healthy volunteers and RA patients. Cultur

  2. [The patient with arthritis: care by both general practitioners and rheumatologists].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, H.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Janssen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Early aggressive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs such as TNF inhibitors prevents joint damage and improves the quality of life. There is increasing insight regarding the cardiovascular risks of patients suffering from RA or gout. These aspects and ot

  3. Pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis undergoig immunosuppressive treatment: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Ceratti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease which characteristically affects the joints. Because it is an autoimmune disease, immunosuppressive drugs are widely used in its treatment. The present case report illustrates the association of immunosuppressive treatment with the development of opportunistic infections in a 64-year-old patient.

  4. Multifactorial intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Christensen, Robin; Persson, Frederik;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular morbidity is a major burden in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we compare the effect of a targeted, intensified, multifactorial intervention with that of conventional treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in pati...

  5. Effects of intensive exercise on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Breedveld, F.C.; Cessie, S. le; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Mug, A.W. de

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of a dynamic, intensive exercise regimen on pain, disease activity, and physical functioning in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: 64 patients with RA with a mean age of 60 (13) years and mean disease duration of 8 (8) years, admitted to hospital becaus

  6. Advanced glycation endproducts are increased in rheumatoid arthritis patients with controlled disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Lodewijk; Hinkema, Helmy; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc; Posthumus, Marcel D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced and can accumulate during chronic inflammation, as might be present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AGEs are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether AGEs are incr

  7. Productivity at work and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilsteren, M. van; Boot, C.R.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Voskuyl, A.E.; Steenbeek, R.; Anema, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine which combination of personal, disease-related and environmental factors is best associated with at-work productivity loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether at-work productivity loss is associated with the quality o

  8. Gene therapy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis: are we ready for the patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, F.A.J. van de; Smeets, R.L.L.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovial joints, with progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapies (e.g. soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors) ameliorate disease in 60-70% of patients with RA. However, the need for

  9. Prevalence and Severity of Periodontitis in Indonesian Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Kertia, Nyoman; Soeroso, Juwono; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Hoedemaker, Eveliene; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Soeroso§, Juwono

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have more prevalent and severe periodontitis than healthy controls. Periodontitis may increase the systemic inflammation in RA. The aim of this study is to assess periodontitis prevalence and severity and its potential association with systemic

  10. Periodontitis in established rheumatoid arthritis patients : A cross-sectional clinical, microbiological and serological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Menke de; Westra, Johanna; Vissink, Arjan; Doornbos-van der Meer, Berber; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is suggested to be linked to the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Colonization of P. gingivalis in the oral cavity of RA patients has been scarcely considered. To further explore whether the association b

  11. Scintigraphic detection of tumour necrosis factor in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera Rico, P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the biodistribution and specific targeting for tumour necrosis factor (TNF) of a fully human, radiolabelled anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (anti-TNF mAb) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To assess whether this agent is suitable for visualisation of synoviti

  12. Septic Arthritis Caused by Legionella dumoffii in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Like Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flendrie, M.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Franssen, M.; Kwa, D.; Klaassen, C.; Vos, F.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease on immunosuppressive treatment who developed septic arthritis of the knee involving Legionella dumoffii. Cultures initially remained negative. A broad-range 16S PCR using synovial fluid revealed L. dumoffii rRNA genes, a find

  13. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  14. Interleukin 6 blockage-induced neutropenia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and resolved hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielińska, Magdalena; Olesińska, Marzena; Felis-Giemza, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a 59-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis after documented recovery from hepatitis C (HCV) infection and with resolved HBV infection who has been undergoing successful tocilizumab treatment. The patient experienced moderate to severe neutropenia after consecutive tocilizumab administrations. However, no serious infections or HBV reactivation was recorded during that period.

  15. Fever of unknown origin in a patient of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kolar Vishwanath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a potentially fatal condition characterized by pathologic immune activation, which can complicate infections, childhood systemic rheumatologic diseases and malignancies. Here we report a case of reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis [macrophage activation syndrome] complicating systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which was treated successfully with dexamethasone and cyclosporine. Reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in patients of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with prolonged fever of unknown origin and cytopenias. Early diagnosis with high index of suspicion and prompt, aggressive treatment are needed for successful outcomes.

  16. PREVALENCE OF PULMONARY FUNCTION DEFECTS IN PSORIASIS PATIENTS RECEIVING METHOTREXATE IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN TAMIL NADU, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Allwyn Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate is an anti - metabolite widely used in malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis and refractory cases of psoriasis . 1 The value of low dose methotrexate is well established . 2 - 4 There are evidences of pulmonary function defects in patients on long term low dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Because methotrexate is frequently used in patients suffering from conditions such as R...

  17. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  18. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  19. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  20. Pyridoxine supplementation corrects vitamin B6 deficiency but does not improve inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have subnormal vitamin B6 status, both quantitatively and functionally. Abnormal vitamin B6 status in rheumatoid arthritis has been associated with spontaneous tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production and markers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein an...

  1. Anxiety, depression in patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumors using Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi from June 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive non probability sampling technique was used to select patients of age (25-70 years), male or female, who had received atleast 03 cycles of chemotherapy for solid tumors. Those with history of prior psychiatric illness, current use of psychotropic medication or psychoactive substance use, and any major bereavement in past one year were excluded from the study. After taking informed consent, relevant socio- demographic data was collected and HADS was administered. HADS-A cut off score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D cut off score of 7 was taken as significant depression. Results: The total number of participants was 209. The mean age of patients was 42.9 years, with 55.5% males and 44.5% females. Overall 33/209 (15.8%) patients had anxiety while 56/209 (26.8%) were found to have depression. There was a higher frequency of anxiety and depression in younger patients (less than age 40 years), females, patients who were single or divorced, and patients receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from considerable levels of anxiety and depression, thus highlighting the need for specialized interventions. (author)

  2. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Jos; de Jonge, Marieke J; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; van Riel, Piet Lcm

    2016-01-01

    Patient assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be useful in clinical practice, offering a patient-friendly, location independent, and a time-efficient and cost-efficient means of monitoring the disease. The objective of this study was to identify patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess disease activity in RA and to evaluate the measurement properties of these measures. Systematic literature searches were performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify articles reporting on clinimetric development or evaluation of PROM-based instruments to monitor disease activity in patients with RA. 2 reviewers independently selected articles for review and assessed their methodological quality based on the Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) recommendations. A total of 424 abstracts were retrieved for review. Of these abstracts, 56 were selected for reviewing the full article and 34 articles, presenting 17 different PROMs, were finally included. Identified were: Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI), RADAI-5, Patient-based Disease Activity Score (PDAS) I & II, Patient-derived Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (Pt-DAS28), Patient-derived Simplified Disease Activity Index (Pt-SDAI), Global Arthritis Score (GAS), Patient Activity Score (PAS) I & II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID) 2-5, Patient Reported Outcome-index (PRO-index) continuous (C) & majority (M), Patient Reported Outcome CLinical ARthritis Activity (PRO-CLARA). The quality of reports varied from poor to good. Typically 5 out of 10 clinimetric domains were covered in the validations of the different instruments. The quality and extent of clinimetric validation varied among PROMs of RA disease activity. The Pt-DAS28, RADAI, RADAI-5 and RAPID 3 had the strongest and most extensive validation. The measurement properties least reported and in need of more evidence were: reliability

  3. Late results of total shoulder replacement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søjbjerg, J.O.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Johannsen, H.V.;

    1999-01-01

    at the authors' institution. Total shoulder replacement yields satisfactory short and long term results even in patients with severely destructed joints. Pain relief is reliable and significant as reported in short and long term studies. In most patients the functional result is good or acceptable. Although......Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder is a progressive and destructive joint disease, and similar to arthritis in other joints, progression of the disease is unpredictable and may stop at any stage of involvement. Between 1983 and 1996, more than 500 shoulder prostheses were implanted in patients...... range of motion is only slightly increased, a satisfactory overall range of motion is achieved by most patients because of the unaffected scapulothoracic motion. However, deteriorating results, emphasizing the complexity of shoulder arthroplasty, were seen with increasing observation time in patients...

  4. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting.

  5. Impact of tofacitinib on patient outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis – review of clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyce EG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eric G Boyce, Deepti Vyas, Edward L Rogan, Cynthia S Valle-Oseguera, Kate M O'Dell Department of Pharmacy Practice, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, progressive autoimmune disease associated with inflammation and destruction of joints and systemic effects, which result in significant impact on patient's quality of life and function. Tofacitinib was approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the USA in 2012 and subsequently in other countries, but not by the European Medicines Agency. The goal of this review was to evaluate the impact of tofacitinib on patient-reported and patient-specific outcomes from prior clinical studies, focusing on quality of life, functionality, pain, global disease assessment, major adverse consequences, and withdrawals. A total of 13 reports representing 11 clinical studies on tofacitinib in rheumatoid arthritis were identified through PubMed and reference lists in meta-analyses and other reviews. Data on improvements in patient-driven composite tools to measure disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis, such as the Health Assessment Questionnaire, served as a major outcome evaluated in this review and were extracted from each study. Additional data extracted from those clinical studies included patient assessment of pain (using a 0–100 mm visual analog scale, patient global assessment of disease (using a 0–100 mm visual analog scale, patient withdrawals, withdrawals due to adverse effects or lack of effect, and risk of serious adverse effects, serious infections, and deaths. Tofacitinib 5 mg bid appears to have a favorable impact on patient outcomes related to efficacy and safety when compared with baseline values and with comparator disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and placebo. Improvements were seen in the composite and individual measures of disease activity. Serious adverse effects, other

  6. Reduction in accounts receivable begins before patient admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J M

    1985-11-01

    In this case study, a 362-bed teaching hospital reduced its accounts receivable from 80 to 59 days. The keys to success were management commitment, clear communication of goals and objectives among hospital departments, attention to the patient's account prior to admission, and emphasis on education for employees who deal with the public. PMID:10274114

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  10. Direct comparison of treatment responses, remission rates, and drug adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab: results from eight years of surveillance of clinical practice in the nationwide Danish DANBIO registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Tarp, Ulrik;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors directly regarding the rates of treatment response, remission, and the drug survival rate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to identify clinical prognostic factors for response. METHODS: The nationwide DANBIO registry...... collects data on rheumatology patients receiving routine care. For the present study, we included patients from DANBIO who had RA (n = 2,326) in whom the first biologic treatment was initiated (29% received adalimumab, 22% received etanercept, and 49% received infliximab). Baseline predictors of treatment...

  11. Prioritizing the patient: optimizing therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a patient questionnaire in northern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollenhaupt J

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Wollenhaupt,1 Inge Ehlebracht-Koenig,2 André Groenewegen,3 Dieter Fricke41Rheumatologikum Hamburg, Schön Klinik Hamburg Eilbek, Hamburg, Germany; 2Center of Rehabilitation, Bad Eilsen, Germany; 3UCB Pharma SA, Brussels, Belgium; 4UCB Pharma GmbH, Monheim, GermanyPurpose: A 40-question postal survey was developed to gain insight into the nature of difficulties experienced by patients due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA, as well as patient perceptions and priorities regarding their RA treatmentPatients and methods: A total of 3000 Lower Saxony, Germany members of Rheuma-Liga (RL, a patient support group for people with RA, were invited to participate between July 1, and August 20, 2009. The questionnaire was divided into four sections: (1 patient demographics, (2 quality of life (QOL, (3 treatment expectations and, (4 patient perceptions of RL. The questionnaire could be completed in writing or via the internet.Results: Of 959 respondents (response rate = 32.0%, 318 had diagnosed RA and were included in the analysis. The respondents were mostly retired (71.2%, female (83.3%, and >60 years of age (63.5%. Members’ responses indicated that most were generally satisfied with their current treatment (67.3%, considered it efficacious (84.0%, and reported minimal (none or little side-effects (61.2%. Patient involvement in treatment decisions, however, was reportedly low (49.6% felt insufficiently involved. Patients’ primary impairments were reflected in their treatment priorities: mobility (97.0%, ability to run errands/do shopping (97.1%, do the housework (95.6%, and be independent of others (94.2%. The primary service provided by RL and used by respondents was physiotherapy (70.6%, which was reported to benefit physical function and mood by over 90.0% of respondents.Conclusion: RA had a detrimental effect upon respondents' quality of life, specifically impairing their ability to perform daily tasks and causing pain/emotional distress

  12. Metabolic syndrome among patients receiving clozapine: A preliminary estimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving clozapine. Materials and Methods : For this study, 100 patients attending the psychiatry outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital who were receiving clozapine for more than three months were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP-III criteria. Results : Forty-six patients fulfilled IDF criteria and 47 met modified NCEP ATP-III criteria of metabolic syndrome. There was significant correlation between these two sets of criteria used to define the metabolic syndrome (Kappa value -0.821, P < 0.001. Among the individual parameters studied, increased waist circumference was the most common abnormality, followed by abnormal blood glucose levels and elevated triglyceride levels. All these abnormalities were seen in more than half (52-61% of the patients. When the sample was divided into two groups, i.e., those with and without metabolic syndrome, patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher body mass index and had spent more time in school. Logistic regression analysis revealed that these two variables together explained about 19% of the variance in metabolic syndrome (adjusted r 2 = 0193; F = 12.8; P < 0.001. Conclusion : The findings of the present study suggest that metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in subjects receiving clozapine.

  13. PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CHARACTERISTICS AND RISK FACTORS AMONG ADULT PATIENTS IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam A. El-Moselhy, Ibrahim Saad Nada, Hamed O. Khalifa,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are common, chronic, immune mediated disease of the skin and joints. Interaction between genes and environment are important in disease causation. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the socioemographic and clinical characters of adult patients with psoriasis and those with psoriatic arthritis, to define psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis etiological risk factors, and to define the relationship between psoriasis severity and these items. Subjects and methods: This study was conducted at Dermatology Clinic, Al-Hussein University Hospital. A case-control study design was chosen to perform this research. The study was conducted on 100 adult patients with psoriasis and an equal number of free adults as controls. Criteria for diagnosis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis were used. A comprehensive questionnaire was used to survey the studied groups. Body surface area of the affected patients was used as a marker of disease severity.Results: The study showed that 44.0% of the cases had psoriasis age of onset; 22-45 years. Stress was the most common etiological risk factor, 67.0%. While, the most important risk factors were family history of psoriasis, recurrent pharyngitis, smoking ≥20 cigarettes/ day and higher level of education, odds ratio (OR=7.58, 5.94, 2.78 and 2.69, respectively. Also, 32.0% of the patients had psoriatic arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis comes after psoriasis and had mild severity in 65.6% and 68.7% of the cases, respectively. The most important etiological risk factors were severe psoriasis, smoking ≥20 cigarettes/day and early onset of psoriasis, OR=9.64, 3.06 and 2.72, respectively.Conclusions and recommendations: The epidemiology of psoriasis is not well defined in Egypt. The heredity and environmental factors are the most important risk factors. Also, psoriatic arthritis is an important associated disease. The fact that it has no cure has important

  14. Relationship between Sleep Disorders, Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Purabdollah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis as one of the most common autoimmune diseases is known to be one of the leading causes of disability. Sleep disorders have direct influence on patient’s life. According to studies, sleep problems are known to have negative impact on well-being and functioning, but the exact nature of relationship between sleep disorders and Rheumatoid arthritis is not completely understood. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep disorders, pain and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: In a descriptive -correlative study, 210 patients with rheumatoid arthritis referred to Tabriz medical university clinics selected by convenience sampling and were assessed by Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, SF-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire and Visual Analog Scale (VAS. Data were analyzed using SPSS-13 by descriptive statistics such as frequency, mean (SD and inferential statistics including Spearman correlation analysis, linear regression, x2, t- test and ANOVA. Results: The mean age of participants was 48.41(12.92 years in which most of them (74% were female. The mean (SD quality of life was 40.51(22.94, sleepiness 13.14 (5.6 and pain 6.09 (2.14. There was significant negative relationship between some sleep disorders such as (naps, apnea, asphyxia, ... and pain with quality of life but pain severity had more effect on QOL compared to sleep problems. Furthermore, participants had low quality of life with more restriction in physical (mean=34.71 and general health (mean=34.42.Conclusion: Sleep problems and pain were associated with poor quality of life in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients.

  15. Diagnostics of septic arthritis in the sternoclavicular region - 10 consecutive patients and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodker, Tina; Jurik, Anne Grethe [Dept. of Radiology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)], e-mail: tina.b.madsen@gmail.com; Toettrup, Mikkel; Kjaer Petersen, Klaus [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, The Infection Team, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-02-15

    Background: Septic arthritis in the sternoclavicular (SC) region is rare and may be difficult to diagnose clinically and radiologically. It mainly affects immunocompromised persons, and can clinically be misinterpreted as tumor and rheumatic disorders. Lacking radiological reference standard, a multimodality approach may contribute to a prolonged diagnostic process. Purpose: To describe the diagnostics of septic arthritis in the SC region. Material and Methods: Between 2001 and 2011, 10 patients with Staphylococcus infection in the SC region were investigated in our institution. Clinical, biochemical, radiological, and microbiological findings were studied retrospectively; all CT and MR examinations were re-evaluated. Results: Initial radiography in nine patients and ultrasonography in six patients were inconclusive resulting in supplementary MRI and/or CT. Five patients examined by MRI were immediately diagnosed with septic arthritis whereas CT in five patients led to the diagnosis in only one. Three were subsequently diagnosed by MRI, but delayed more than 2.5 weeks, and one was diagnosed by surgery. The median time to diagnosis was 1.5 weeks. The delay caused by imaging was 0 days to 11.5 weeks (median 0 days). By re-evaluation overlooked complications included mediastinitis in seven patients (three diffuse, four localized), and abscesses and pleuritis each in four patients. Conclusion: Awareness of infection in the SC region is important to avoid diagnostic delay. MRI is proposed as the initial imaging procedure.

  16. Diagnostics of septic arthritis in the sternoclavicular region - 10 consecutive patients and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Septic arthritis in the sternoclavicular (SC) region is rare and may be difficult to diagnose clinically and radiologically. It mainly affects immunocompromised persons, and can clinically be misinterpreted as tumor and rheumatic disorders. Lacking radiological reference standard, a multimodality approach may contribute to a prolonged diagnostic process. Purpose: To describe the diagnostics of septic arthritis in the SC region. Material and Methods: Between 2001 and 2011, 10 patients with Staphylococcus infection in the SC region were investigated in our institution. Clinical, biochemical, radiological, and microbiological findings were studied retrospectively; all CT and MR examinations were re-evaluated. Results: Initial radiography in nine patients and ultrasonography in six patients were inconclusive resulting in supplementary MRI and/or CT. Five patients examined by MRI were immediately diagnosed with septic arthritis whereas CT in five patients led to the diagnosis in only one. Three were subsequently diagnosed by MRI, but delayed more than 2.5 weeks, and one was diagnosed by surgery. The median time to diagnosis was 1.5 weeks. The delay caused by imaging was 0 days to 11.5 weeks (median 0 days). By re-evaluation overlooked complications included mediastinitis in seven patients (three diffuse, four localized), and abscesses and pleuritis each in four patients. Conclusion: Awareness of infection in the SC region is important to avoid diagnostic delay. MRI is proposed as the initial imaging procedure

  17. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  18. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning. PMID:18674439

  19. Comparison between full and tapered dosages of biologic therapies in psoriatic arthritis patients: clinical and ultrasound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janta, Iustina; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; Valor, Lara; Montoro, María; Baniandres Rodriguez, Ofelia; Hernández Aragüés, Ignacio; Bello, Natalia; Hernández-Flórez, Diana; Hinojosa, Michelle; Martínez-Barrio, Julia; Nieto-González, Juan Carlos; Ovalles-Bonilla, Juan Gabriel; González, Carlos Manuel; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Monteagudo, Indalecio; Naredo, Esperanza; Carreño, Luis

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical and musculoskeletal (MS) ultrasound (US) features between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients treated with full and tapered dosage of biologic (b) disease-modified antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The secondary objective was to compare clinical and MSUS features between PsA patients treated with bDMARDs with and without concomitant synthetic (s) DMARDs. We evaluated 102 patients with PsA treated with bDMARDs. The bDMARD dosage tapering had been made in patients with a maintained remission or minimal disease activity (MDA) according to their attending rheumatologist and with the patient acceptance. The bDMARD tapering consisted of the following: increase the interval between doses for subcutaneous bDMARDs or reduction of the dose for intravenous bDMARDs. The clinical evaluation consisted of a dermatologic and rheumatologic assessment of disease activity. The presence of B-mode and Doppler synovitis, tenosynovitis, enthesopathy, and paratenonitis was investigated by a rheumatologist blinded to drug dosage, clinical assessments, and laboratory results. Seventy-four (72.5 %) patients received full dosage of bDMARDs and 28 (27.5 %) received tapered dosage. The duration with biologic therapy and with current biologic therapy was significantly higher in patients with tapered dosages (p = 0.008 and p = 0.001, respectively). We found no significant differences between clinical, laboratory, and US variables, both for BM and CD between patients with full and tapered dosage and between patients with and without concomitant sDMARD. Clinical assessment, MSUS variables, and MDA status are similar in patients receiving full and tapered dosage of bDMARDs. PMID:25636779

  20. HLA B27 allele types in homogeneous groups of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Guseinova Dinara; Lazareva Arina; Sochnevs Arturs; Zavadska Dace; Eglite Jelena; Stanevicha Valda; Shantere Ruta; Gardovska Dace

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous condition and therapeutic strategies vary in different JIA types. The routinely accepted practice to start with Sulphasalazine (SS) as the first line treatment in patients with HLA B27 positive JIA proves to be ineffective in a large proportion of children. Objective to investigate HLA B27 positive JIA patients clinical characteristics, determined HLA B27 allele types and their connection with antirheumatic treatment in homogenou...

  1. Pneumothorax necessitans in a patient with trapped lung and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Rumman; Ahmed, Usama; Syed, Imran

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the case of a patient with a background of trapped lung following thoracocentesis who developed an anterolateral intercostal pneumothoracocele resulting in a pneumothorax necessitans (PN). Our purpose is to highlight the pathophysiology and interesting radiological features associated with PN in trapped lung. Our case is particularly unique due to the subacute nature of its presentation in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and unusual pre-existing lung pathology.

  2. In-vitro T cell mediated function in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Slavin, S; Strober, S

    1981-01-01

    In-vitro synthesis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured after stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) in a short-term, serum-free culture system. Diminished responses were found in 16 out of 17 consecutive patients with active disease. Normal PHA responsiveness was recovered by assaying Ficoll-Hypaque isolated E rosette forming cells in serum-free medium, indicating basically normal T cell function in RA. Preincubation of normal peripheral bl...

  3. Self Management Behaviors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Associated Factors in Tehran 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kordasiabi, Mosharafeh Chaleshgar; Akhlaghi, Maassoumeh; Baghianimoghadam, Mohammad Hossein; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Askarishahi, Mohsen; Enjezab, Behnaz; Pajouhi, Zeinab

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a systemic, autoimmune and inflammatory disease with an unknown etiology that is associated with progressive joint degeneration, limitation of physical activity and disability. The aim of the study was to evaluate self-management behaviors and their associated factors in RA patients. Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2013 on 185 patients in Iran. Data were selected through convenient sampling. The collected data include...

  4. Prevalence and Severity of Periodontitis in Indonesian Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Kertia, Nyoman; Soeroso, Juwono; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Hoedemaker, Eveliene; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Soeroso§, Juwono

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have more prevalent and severe periodontitis than healthy controls. Periodontitis may increase the systemic inflammation in RA. The aim of this study is to assess periodontitis prevalence and severity and its potential association with systemic inflammation in Indonesian patients with RA. Methods: A full-mouth periodontal examination including probing depth, gingival recession, plaque index, and bleeding on probing was performed in 75 In...

  5. Periodontitis in established rheumatoid arthritis patients: a cross-sectional clinical, microbiological and serological study

    OpenAIRE

    de Smit, Menke; Westra, Johanna; Vissink, Arjan; Doornbos-van der Meer, Berber; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is suggested to be linked to the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Colonization of P. gingivalis in the oral cavity of RA patients has been scarcely considered. To further explore whether the association between periodontitis and RA is dependent on P. gingivalis, we compared host immune responses in RA patients with and without periodontitis in relation to presence of cultivable P. gingivalis in sub...

  6. Anterior Ischaemic Optic Neuropathy in Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis – Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Perić, S; Cerovski, B.; Perić, P.

    2001-01-01

    This case report presents a patient with long-lasting rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of fourth clinical grade, having ocular complications. RA was diagnosed according to current modified ARA criteria from 1987. Upon admission to the Department of Ophthalmology clinical examination revealed anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION), which is not characteristic manifestation of RA in the eye. The occurrence of AION in patients with RA has been explained in literature as a secondary m...

  7. Ultrasonographic Findings of the Shoulder in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Comparison with Physical Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Kim, Su Ho; Seo, Young-Il

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to identify the ultrasonographic (US) abnormalities and 2) to compare the findings of physical examination with US findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with shoulder pain. We studied 30 RA patients. Physical examination was performed systemically as follows: 1) area of tenderness; 2) range of passive and active shoulder motion; 3) impingement tests; 4) maneuvers for determining the location of the tendon lesions. US investigations included the b...

  8. Relationship between depression and physical activity, disability, burden, and health-related quality of life among patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Namita; Khanna, Rahul; Shah, Ruchit M

    2015-04-01

    This study purports to examine the relationship of depression with physical activity, disability, arthritis-attributable burden (joint limitation, work limitation, social activity limitation, and joint pain), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among arthritis patients. Data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults in the United States, was used for the purpose of this study. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to address the study objectives. The final study sample included 167,068 arthritis patients, 45,459 of whom had comorbid depression. Arthritis patients with depression had lower odds of engaging in physical activity (odds ratio [OR]=1.070, confidence interval [CI] 1.006-1.139) and higher odds of being disabled (OR=1.411, CI 1.306-1.524). Arthritis patients with depression also had greater odds of arthritis-attributable joint limitations (OR=1.551, CI 1.460-1.648), work limitations (OR=1.506, CI 1.414-1.604), social activity limitations (OR=1.647, CI 1.557-1.742), and pain (OR=1.438, CI 1.364-1.517) as compared to those without depression. Arthritis patients with versus without depression had greater odds of poor general health status (OR=1.698, CI 1.586-1.819), physical HRQOL (OR=1.592, CI 1.486-1.704), mental HRQOL (OR=6.225, CI 5.768-6.718), and activity limitations (OR=2.345, CI 2.168-2.537). Study results indicate toward a negative functional impact of depression among arthritis patients. Policy makers should consider incorporating screening and management of depression into routine clinical care of arthritis patients.

  9. [Recurrent new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during anti-TNFalpha treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gangi, M; Foti, R; Leonardi, R; Leonetti, C; Castellino, P

    2007-01-01

    Inflammation involving the uveal tract of the eye, termed uveitis, is frequently associated with various rheumatic disease, including seronegative spondylarthropathies, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and Behçet's disease. Scleritis and keratitis may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic vasculitides such as Wegener's granulomatosis. Immune-mediated uveitis can have a chronic relapsing course and produce numerous possible complications, many of which can result in permanent vision loss. Treatment typically includes topical or systemic corticosteroids with cycloplegic-mydriatic drugs and/or noncorticosteroid immunosuppressants, but often there is an insufficient clinical effectiveness. Anti-TNFalpha therapy is promising in the treatment of sight threatening uveitis, particularly in patients with Behçet's disease. However, there have been also reports of new-onset uveitis during treatment of joint disease with TNFalpha inhibitors. We describe a case of new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during therapy with etanercept at first and infliximab at last. Although we cannot exclude uveitis as linked to rheumatoid arthritis, it is unlike that the uveitis arises when the joint disease is well controlled. The hypothetical paradoxical effect of anti-TNF is here discussed.

  10. Recurrent new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during anti-TNFα treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leonetti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation involving the uveal tract of the eye, termed uveitis, is frequently associated with various rheumatic disease, including seronegative spondylarthropathies, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and Behçet’s disease. Scleritis and keratitis may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic vasculitides such as Wegener’s granulomatosis. Immune-mediated uveitis can have a chronic relapsing course and produce numerous possible complications, many of which can result in permanent vision loss. Treatment typically includes topical or systemic corticosteroids with cycloplegic-mydriatic drugs and/or noncorticosteroid immunosuppressants, but often there is an insufficient clinical effectiveness. Anti-TNFα therapy is promising in the treatment of sight threatening uveitis, particularly in patients with Behçet’s disease. However, there have been also reports of new-onset uveitis during treatment of joint disease with TNFα inhibitors. We describe a case of new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during therapy with etanercept at first and infliximab at last. Although we cannot exclude uveitis as linked to rheumatoid arthritis, it is unlike that the uveitis arises when the joint disease is well controlled. The hypothetical paradoxical effect of anti-TNF is here discussed.

  11. Determinants of survival in patients receiving dialysis in Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alashek, Wiam A; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2013-04-01

    Maintenance dialysis is associated with reduced survival when compared with the general population. In Libya, information about outcomes on dialysis is scarce. This study, therefore, aimed to provide the first comprehensive analysis of survival in Libyan dialysis patients. This prospective multicenter study included all patients in Libya who had been receiving dialysis for >90 days in June 2009. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected upon enrollment and survival status after 1 year was determined. Two thousand two hundred seventy-three patients in 38 dialysis centers were followed up for 1 year. The majority were receiving hemodialysis (98.8%). Sixty-seven patients were censored due to renal transplantation, and 46 patients were lost to follow-up. Thus, 2159 patients were followed up for 1 year. Four hundred fifty-eight deaths occurred, (crude annual mortality rate of 21.2%). Of these, 31% were due to ischemic heart disease, 16% cerebrovascular accidents, and 16% due to infection. Annual mortality rate was 0% to 70% in different dialysis centers. Best survival was in age group 25 to 34 years. Binary logistic regression analysis identified age at onset of dialysis, physical dependency, diabetes, and predialysis urea as independent determinants of increased mortality. Patients receiving dialysis in Libya have a crude 1-year mortality rate similar to most developed countries, but the mean age of the dialysis population is much lower, and this outcome is thus relatively poor. As in most countries, cardiovascular disease and infection were the most common causes of death. Variation in mortality rates between different centers suggests that survival could be improved by promoting standardization of best practice.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies in non-rheumatoid arthritis patients with mucosal inflammation : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Koen M. J.; de Smit, Menke J.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; de Kok, Fenne A. C.; Kraan, Jan; Altenburg, Josje; Verheul, Marije K.; Trouw, Leendert A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vissink, Arjan; Westra, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies (RA-AAB) can be present in serum years before clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been hypothesized that initiation of RA-AAB generation occurs at inflamed mucosal surfaces, such as in the oral cavity or lungs. The aim of t

  13. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  14. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis - A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, F.A. van; Linn-Rasker, S.P.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Jong, B.A. de; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  15. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, van FA; Linn-Rasker, SP; Venrooij, W.J.; Jong, B.A.; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, RE; Huizinga, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  16. Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in stationary spa treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Jaganjac

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic diseases are nonsurgical diseases of the locomotor system and connective tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory disease of connective tissue of unknown cause, with progressive chronic or subacute course. The aim of the research is to determine whether stationary spa treatment leads to improvement of the functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: We included 35 patients with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, referred for treatment at the spa " Ilidža " Gradačac from February to April 2014. Patients not adhering to treatment protocols were excluded. We used Visual analogue pain scale (VAS, HAQ questionnaire and assessment of the clinical condition before and after the treatment based on the scores 1-5.Results: There were 32 female and 3 male patients. The average age was 62.28±8.31 years. Based on the HAQ, 12 patients had no difficulties, 9 of them perform activities with little difficulties, 10 with many difficulties, and 4 patients cannot perform certain activities. Before treatment VAS was 6.63±2.36, and after treatment the 2.51±2.27. Ratings of clinical condition before treatment was 2.38±0.74, and after the treatment 3.64±0.98. The most frequently used therapies were kinesitherapy, magnetotherapy and interferential electricity. Conclusions: Stationary treatment at the spa „Ilidža“ Gradačac leads to an improvement of the functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Preventive Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis: Issues Regarding Patient Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, Axel; Escher, Monica; Liang, Matthew H; Bansback, Nick

    2016-08-01

    The detection of biomarkers in the preclinical phase of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and recent therapeutic advances suggest that it may be possible to identify and treat persons at high risk and to prevent the development of RA. Several trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention in primary prevention. This paper reviews potential populations that might be considered for preventative medication. Further, we review the medications that are being explored to treat individuals considered at high risk of developing RA. Finally, in a group of asymptomatic individuals at high risk of developing RA, we assessed which factors mattered most when considering a preventive therapeutic intervention and what type of preventive treatment would be most acceptable to them. Understanding subjects' perceptions of risks and benefits and willingness to undergo preventive therapy will be important in designing and implementing screening and preventive strategies. PMID:27402108

  18. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis II: An Innovative Strategy to Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients through Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Brooks, Sydney; De Angelis, G.; Bell, Mary; Egan, Mary; Poitras, Stephane; King, Judy; Casimiro, Lynn; Loew, Laurianne; Novikov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine if an updated online evidence-based educational programme delivered through Facebook is effective in improving the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of patients with arthritis in relation to evidence-based self-management rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid…

  19. Difference in the risk of serious infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, infliximab and etanercept: results from the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dartel, van Sanne A.A.; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; Flendrie, Marcel; Broeder, den Alfons A.; Visser, H.; Hartkamp, A.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Riel, van Piet L.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibiting therapy increases the risk of serious infections in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is not clear whether this risk differs between TNF inhibitors. Objective To analyse whether the risk of serious infections in patients with RA treated with

  20. Difference in the risk of serious infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, infliximab and etanercept: results from the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dartel, S.A.A. van; Fransen, J.; Kievit, W.; Flendrie, M.; Broeder, A. den; Visser, H.; Hartkamp, A.; Laar, M.A. van der; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibiting therapy increases the risk of serious infections in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is not clear whether this risk differs between TNF inhibitors. OBJECTIVE: To analyse whether the risk of serious infections in patients with RA treated with

  1. TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 in the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to psoriatic arthritis and its response to tumour necrosis factor blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W.R. van Kuijk; C.A. Wijbrandts; M. Vinkenoog; T.S. Zheng; K.A. Reedquist; P.P. Tak

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14) in the inflamed synovium of patients with arthritis, as TWEAK blockade has been observed to have a beneficial effect in an ani

  2. E-Cigarette Use in Patients Receiving Home Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lacasse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors’ position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and/or e-cigarette smokers.

  3. The importance of an ophthalmologic examination in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis occurs within the first year of arthritis onset in 73% of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) considered at risk. The intraocular inflammation is characterized by an insidious onset and a silent and chronic clinical course capable of producing significant visual loss due to complications such as: cataract formation, secondary glaucoma, maculopathy and optic neuropathy. The absence of initial signs and symptoms, along with a deficient ophthalmic monitoring produce a delay in diagnosis with serious consequences. It has been estimated that 47% of JIA patients at risk for developing uveitis are legally blind (20/200 or worse) at least in one eye at the time of their first visit to the ophthalmologist. To reduce ocular complications and improve their visual outcome, it is necessary that rheumatologists refer all patients recently diagnosed (within the first month) with JIA for an ophthalmic evaluation, and maintain periodical follow-up visits based on classification and risk category of the disease.

  4. Goal-setting in multidisciplinary team care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meesters, Jorit; Hagel, Sofia; Klokkerud, Mari;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To make a cross-cultural comparison of the contents of rehabilitation goals of patients admitted for rehabilitation and to compare the contents with the comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for rheumatoid arthritis, by linking...... their contents to the ICF. Patients: A random sample of 80 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was retrieved from rehabilitation clinics in 4 countries. Methods: Rehabilitation goals were extracted from the medical records and linked to the ICF using standardized linking rules. Results: A total of 495...... rehabilitation goals were identified and linked to 952 ICF codes, resulting in 151 unique ICF codes. Two-hundred and seventy-five (29%) of the 952 ICF codes were related to "Body Functions" (b-codes), 80 (8%) to "Body Structures" (s-codes), 419 (44%) to "Activities and Participation" (d-codes) and 178 (19...

  5. Employment is maintained and sick days decreased in psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis patients with etanercept treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggs, Robert L; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Li, Wenzhi;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impair quality of life, including reduction in employment or job duties. The PRESTA (Psoriasis Randomized Etanercept STudy in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis) study, a randomized, double-blind, two-dose trial, examined the efficacy of etanercept...... treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and PsA and the main results have been presented previously. This analysis examined employment status, job duties and sick days, pre-defined endpoints in PRESTA, among this patient population. METHODS: Participants (N=752) were randomized...... at baseline, week 12 and week 24 of treatment. The questionnaire included employment status and changing job responsibilities and sick time taken due to psoriasis or PsA. The statistical methods included analysis of covariance, t-test, Fisher's exact test and McNemar's test. Last...

  6. HLA B27 allele types in homogeneous groups of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseinova Dinara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a heterogeneous condition and therapeutic strategies vary in different JIA types. The routinely accepted practice to start with Sulphasalazine (SS as the first line treatment in patients with HLA B27 positive JIA proves to be ineffective in a large proportion of children. Objective to investigate HLA B27 positive JIA patients clinical characteristics, determined HLA B27 allele types and their connection with antirheumatic treatment in homogenous patient groups. Materials and methods 56 patients diagnosed with JIA and observed over the period 2006 to 2009 included in the study. HLAB27 allele types were determined using PCR method. Results In HLA B27 positive JIA patients mean disease onset was 12.34 ± 3.3 years. Most common (44% JIA type was enthesitis related arthritis. Positive response to the treatment with SS was found in 32% of patients, Methotrexate (MTX - in 43%, combined treatment - SS with MTX was effective in 12.5%. 12.5% of patients required combination MTX with Enbrel. Eight HLA B27 allele types were found in JIA patients in Latvia: *2702, *2703, *2704, *2705, *2710, *2715, *2717, *2728. The most common was *2705 - in 55% of cases. Among all the patients enthesitis related arthritis most commonly occurred in patients with HLAB*2705 allele (OR = 2.01, p Conclusions There are 8 different HLA B27 alleles in JIA patients in Latvia and the most common is *2705, but in order to assert them to be disease associated alleles, more extensive studies are needed, including control group of HLA B27 positive healthy individuals. Standard treatment approach with SS proves to be unsatisfactory in the majority of JIA patients. To improve children's quality of life achieving rapid disease control, the first line treatment in HLA B27 positive patients should be MTX. In order to start with the most appropriate drug it is necessary to determine HLAB 27 type at the onset of disease.

  7. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S;

    2016-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors a...

  8. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    ) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13 721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...

  9. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    ) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13,721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...

  10. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepak; Aggarwal, Hari K; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily ("quotidian") for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids.

  11. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  12. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B A; Knol, D L; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design: A longitudinal study of an inception cohort. Setting: A large outpatient clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients who attended the Early Arthritis Clinic for at least 2 years and fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA at baseline and/or at the 1-year follow-up were invited to participate until 200 pa...

  13. Treatment of knee flexion contracture in patients with chronic juvenile arthritis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Radmila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee flexion contractures are common after-effects of juvenile arthritis. Treatment is usually conservative and may include physical therapy and kinesitherapy. Surgical treatment, particularly of the soft parts, indicated for contractures resistant to conservative treatment, helps to correct the deformity, maintain movements, and relieves pain. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is of special importance. Case report. A 23-year-old female patient with chronic juvenile arthritis since the age of one was admitted for treatment of flexion con­tractures in both knees, muscle hypotrophy, loss of strength and gait disability. The patient underwent arthroscopic synovectomy. The operation was first performed on the right and after 3 mouths on the left knee. The pre operative range of motion in the rigth knee was 30°-70° and in the left 40°-80°. The patient underwent intensive physical therapy to reduce postoperative swelling of knees and firstly passive and then active kinesitherapy. Nine months after the first surgery and six months after the second, the range of motion in the right knee was 0°-100° and in the left 0°-105°. The strength of tested muscles was increased and gait was improved. Conclusion. Management and rehabilitation of patients with chronic juvenile arthritis include maintenance or improvement in position and function of joints that is achieved with synovectomy. The results depend on combined interdisciplinary rehabilitation, well-experienced staff, and pre- and post-operative physiotherapy as well as kinesitherapy. Arthroscopic synovectomy has many advantages and we believe that it was a better solution than open capsulosynovectomy in this patient with chronic juvenile arthritis of the knee. .

  14. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  15. Descriptive Study of Patients Receiving Excision and Radiotherapy for Keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review and describe our institution's outcomes in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy after keloid excision. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study. Patients who received radiotherapy between July 1994 and January 2004 after keloid excision were identified. A questionnaire was mailed regarding sociodemographic factors, early and late radiation toxicities, the need for additional therapy, and satisfaction level. All patients had received a total of 15 Gy in three daily 5-Gy fractions. Treatment started within 24 h after surgery and was delivered on a Siemens orthovoltage machine. The data were analyzed using the STATA statistical package. Results: A total of 234 patients were approached. The response rate was 41%, and 75% were female. The mean age was 36.5 years (range, 16-69 years). The patients were mainly of European (53.1%) or African (19.8%) descent. For early toxicity outcomes, 54.2% reported skin redness and 24% reported skin peeling. For late toxicity outcomes, 27% reported telangiectasia and 62% reported permanent skin color changes. No association was found with gender, skin color, or age for the late toxicity outcomes. Of the patients responding, 14.6% required adjuvant treatment. On a visual scale of 1-10 for the satisfaction level, 60% reported a satisfaction level of ≥8. Telangiectasia was the most significant predictor of a low satisfaction level (≤3, p < 0.005). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that orthovoltage-based radiotherapy after surgical excision for keloids is a good method for the prevention of relapse. It is well tolerated, causes little toxicity, and leads to a high patient satisfaction level

  16. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26476882

  18. Mebrofenin-Tc-99m identification of liver damage in a patient undergoing therapy with Methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A female patient (65) with rheumatoid arthritis receiving 3 1/2 years methotrexate became subicteric. Liver biopsy identified cirrhosis in contrast to good clinical condition, normal level of hepatocellular enzymes. Hepatic extraction fraction of mebrofenin-Tc-99m was normal (100%), but 'wash out' of the radio pharmaceutical was prolonged T 1/2 = 35 m, normal less than 20 m. Congenital hyper bilirubinemias (Rotors d., Dubin-Johnson, chronic binary stasis) present a similar biological pattern: normal transaminases but deviated storage capacity, uptake rate and excretion rate of bilirubin. Mebrofenin-Te-99m dynamic studies, particular 'wash out' of mebrofenin could be useful in an attempt to make rarer serial biopsies in methotrexate-induced hepatotoxicity (Author)

  19. Lipid Extract from Hard-Shelled Mussel (Mytilus coruscus Improves Clinical Conditions of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested a lipid extract from hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus (HMLE possessed strong anti-inflammatory activity in arthritis model of rats. This study investigated whether HMLE could improve clinical conditions of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Fifty rheumatoid arthritis patients (28–75 years were randomly assigned to receive HMLE capsules or receive placebo capsules for 6 months. Forty-two subjects and 50 subjects were included in per-protocol and intention-to-treat analysis, respectively. Significant differences in changes on disease activity score (DAS28 and clinical disease activity index (CDAI after 6-month intervention (p < 0.01 were observed in both analyses with more evident efficacy shown in per-protocol population (∆DAS28 = 0.47; ∆CDAI = 4.17, which favored the benefits of the HMLE group. TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL-1β and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2 but not IL-6, were significantly decreased in both groups, and the decrements were much larger in the HMLE group for TNF-α and PGE2 after 6 months from baseline (p < 0.05. IL-10 was significantly increased in both groups and the change was much more evident in the HMLE group (p < 0.05. In conclusion, HMLE exhibited benefits for the clinical conditions of rheumatoid patients in relation to improvement in the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors, which indicated its potential to serve as adjunctive treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02173587.

  20. FEATURES OF THE CHRONIC PAIN SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC TACTICS

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    M. A. Gromova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to establish features of a chronic pain syndrome disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to reveal correlation with psychoemotional disorders and to develop the differential approach to maintaining patients. Materials and methods. 101 patients at the age of 60.6 ± 11.8 years, 92 % of women, with reliable rheumatoid arthritis (American College of Rheumatology – ACR, 1987, were examined. The visual analog scale was used for an assessment of pain strength at the moment; the Van Korff’s questionnaire – for determination of pain strength at the moment and retrospectively for the last half a year with an assessment of disadaptation level and disability, ranging of a chronic pain syndrome on classes; the McGill Pain Questionnaire – for the characteristic of touchsensitive and emotional components of pain. Neuropathic pain was revealed by DN4 questionnaire. Anxiety and depression were determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Fibromyalgia diagnosed by criteria of ACR, (1990. Results. Pain estimated by various scales and questionnaires varied from moderated to intensive. According to Van Korff’s questionnaire it was characterized by average level of disadaptation and easy disability that corresponded to the second class of chronic pain. The Rank pain index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire touch scale testified that pain was described by a smaller number of definitions on a touch scale than on emotional. This indicates a moderate impact of pain syndrome on a state of mind. Neuropathic pain is diagnosed for 37.3 % of patients with tunnel syndrome, mononeuritis and touch polyneuropathy. The secondary fibromyalgia is revealed for 2 % of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis of high activity. According to HADS anxiety and depression was revealed for 58 and 59 % of patients correspondingly. This demanded psychotherapeutic consultation and additional correction. We proposed the algorithm of diagnostic and

  1. PREVALENCE OF PULMONARY FUNCTION DEFECTS IN PSORIASIS PATIENTS RECEIVING METHOTREXATE IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN TAMIL NADU, INDIA

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    Allwyn Vijay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Methotrexate is an anti - metabolite widely used in malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis and refractory cases of psoriasis . 1 The value of low dose methotrexate is well established . 2 - 4 There are evidences of pulmonary function defects in patients on long term low dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Because methotrexate is frequently used in patients suffering from conditions such as RA, dermatomyositis or sarcoidosis, which can be associated wi th interstitial lung disease, determining the exact role of methotrexate in the development of pulmonary complications in these patients seems to be difficult. Therefore, we conducted a cross - sectional study to analyse the findings found on chest x - rays, h igh resolution computed tomography (HRCT and pulmonary function tests (PFT in a cohort of patients without previous recognized interstitial lung disease who were taking methotrexate as a treatment for psoriatic arthritis, a condition not associated with pleuro pulmonary disease. RESULTS: In this study 154 patients from the outpatient department of psoriasis clinic of dermatology department of government general hospital, Chennai who were receiving methotrexate for psoriasis were screened. Out of which 30 patients who were eligible as per inclusion criteria were included in the study. In this study 9 patients showed normal radiology and pulmonary function test. 21 patients had pulmonary function abnormalities. In this study there were 13(43% patients with restrictive pulmonary function defect. Belzenegui . 14 et al reported 2 cases with mild restriction among 27 patients in a similar study. There were 10(33% patients with diffusion defect in this study. Belzenegui et al reported 2 cases among 27 patients in a similar study. There were 5(16% patients with small airway disease as suggested by decrease in mean mid expiratory flow. Belzenegui et al reported 5 cases among 27 patients in a similar study. There were 3(3% patients with

  2. Survey of a community-based infusion program for Australian patients with rheumatoid arthritis requiring treatment with tocilizumab: patient characteristics and drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns

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    Voight L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Louisa VoightCoast Joint Care, Maroochydore, Queensland, AustraliaBackground: Tocilizumab is an effective therapy for patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis that is administered by infusion over one hour every 4 weeks. The community-based infusion (ACTiv program was introduced to Australia in August 2010 to provide accessible and convenient treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who require tocilizumab. The primary objectives of this study were to determine the characteristics of patients in the ACTiv program, patient satisfaction, and patient-perceived benefits and concerns with the ACTiv program, and drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns.Methods: A voluntary self-administered survey was given to all 608 patients in the ACTiv program between January 27, 2011 and March 31, 2011.Results: A total of 351 surveys were returned completed, giving a response rate of 58% (351/608. Most patients in the ACTiv program were women aged 40–64 years, with a mean disease duration of 13.7 years and moderate disability, who had been in the ACTiv program for ≥5 months. Most patients (88%, 302/342 were either very satisfied or satisfied with the ACTiv program and believed that they were very unlikely or somewhat unlikely to switch from the ACTiv program (64%, 214/335. The most important benefit was the reassurance of receiving treatment from a trained nurse in a professional medical environment (33%, 102/309. The most important concern was the fear of side effects (48%, 134/280. The main drivers of patient satisfaction and patient-perceived benefits and concerns of patients were health profile, previous medication experience, and length of treatment time in the program.Conclusion: The ACTiv program is used by patients of various ages, family life situations, and locations. Patient satisfaction with the program is high, which enables patients to benefit from long-term use of tocilizumab

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, G. J.; Dijkmans, B A; Bloem, J. L.; Kroon, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect shoulder abnormalities 18 patients (36 shoulders) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and shoulder complaints were studied. Osseous abnormalities of the glenoid and humeral head were readily detected with MRI. The imaging planes used were not suitable for the evaluation of acromioclavicular joint involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted soft tissue abnormalities that were not clearly visualised by plain film radiography,...

  4. The kinase inhibitor tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: latest findings and clinical potential

    OpenAIRE

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages, T and B cells, and neutrophils concentrate mainly into the synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and produce several inflammatory mediators including cytokines. More recently, small molecule inhibitors of signalling mediators which have intracellular targets (mainly in T and B cells) such as the Janus kinase (JAK) family of tyrosine kinases have been introduced in RA treatment. The JAK family consist of four types: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TyK2. In particular, JAK3 is...

  5. Isolated talonavicular arthrodesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the foot and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorný David; Štursa Pavel; Vavřík Pavel; Hromádka Rastislav; Popelka Stanislav; Jahoda David; Sosna Antonín

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The foot is often affected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Subtalar joints are involved more frequently than ankle joints. Deformities of subtalar joints often lead to painful flatfoot and valgus deformity of the heel. Major contributors to the early development of foot deformities include talonavicular joint destruction and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction, mainly due to its rupture. Methods Between 2002 and 2005 we performed isolated talonavicular arthrodesis...

  6. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a patient on etanercept for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lahiff, C

    2007-12-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is a rare form of pneumonia associated with immune-suppression. It is common in patients with AIDS and with a CD4 count of less than 200 cells\\/mm(3). We report a case of PCP secondary to immune-suppression in a 41-year-old man with psoriatic arthritis being treated with the immune-modulatory agent etanercept.

  7. Effects of intensive exercise on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised clinical trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Breedveld, F C; Cessie, S Le; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; de Mug, A W

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of a dynamic, intensive exercise regimen on pain, disease activity, and physical functioning in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: 64 patients with RA with a mean age of 60 (13) years and mean disease duration of 8 (8) years, admitted to hospital because of active disease, were randomly assigned to an intensive exercise programme or to a conservative exercise programme during their period in hospital with a mean length of 30 (14) days. The intens...

  8. SECONDARY AMYLOIDOSIS WITH LUNG INVOLVEMENT INA FEMALE PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko; Ya A Avdeyeva; I I Polskaya

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of secondary amyloidosis that more frequently occurs in patients with various arthritides, both seropositive and seronegative. According to the data available in the literature, the most common manifestations of secondary amyloidosis are involvements of the kidney, liver, nervous system, and, less frequently, the lung. The authors describe their own observation of secondary amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, which is accompanied by the involvement of the lung...

  9. Use of Complementary Therapies Among Primary Care Clinic Patients With Arthritis

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    Carla J. Herman

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. There is little information, however, on CAM use among adults with clinic-confirmed diagnoses, including arthritis, who are treated by primary care physicians. Methods To assess the frequency and types of CAM therapy used by Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women and men with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or fibromyalgia, we used stratified random selection to identify 612 participants aged 18–84 years and seen in university-based primary care clinics. Respondents completed an interviewer-administered survey in English or Spanish. Results Nearly half (44.6% of the study population was of Hispanic ethnicity, 71.4% were women, and 65.0% had annual incomes of less than $25,000. Most (90.2% had ever used CAM for arthritis, and 69.2% were using CAM at the time of the interview. Current use was highest for oral supplements (mainly glucosamine and chondroitin (34.1%, mind-body therapies (29.0%, and herbal topical ointments (25.1%. Fewer participants made current use of vitamins and minerals (16.6%, herbs taken orally (13.6%, a CAM therapist (12.7%, CAM movement therapies (10.6%, special diets (10.1%, or copper jewelry or magnets (9.2%. Those with fibromyalgia currently used an average of 3.9 CAM therapies versus 2.4 for those with rheumatoid arthritis and 2.1 for those with osteoarthritis. Current CAM use was significantly associated with being female, being under 55 years of age, and having some college education. Conclusion Hispanic and non-Hispanic white arthritis patients used CAM to supplement conventional treatments. Health care providers should be aware of the high use of CAM and incorporate questions about its use into routine assessments and treatment planning.

  10. Psoriatic Arthritis in Psoriasis Patients: Evaluation of Clinical and Radiological Features

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    Hatice Reşorlu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to perform radiological and clinical determination of the presence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in patients with psoriasis and to evaluate associations with clinical findings. Materials and Methods: The medical files of 72 patients with psoriasis presenting to our clinic between years 2009-2014 with a pre-diagnosis of PsA were reviewed retrospectively. Hand, foot and sacroiliac joint radiograms were evaluated by a radiologist who was blinded to the patient’s clinical status and who is experienced on musculoskeletal radiology. Patients with psoriasis were divided into two groups according to the presence of arthritis which was determined based on radiographic findings or on Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR criteria. All patients’ demographic characteristics, length of disease, nail involvement, smoking-alcohol consumption were recorded. Results: The mean age of all patients was 47.24±14.61 years, and the mean duration of disease was 14.13±11.92 years. Smoking and alcohol consumptions were determined in 54.2% (n=39 and 23.6% (n=17 of the cases, respectively. Nail involvement was determined in 56.9% (n=41 of the cases. PsA was determined based on radiological findings in 58.3% (n=42 of the patients. The mean age and age at onset of disease were higher in PsA (+ patients than in radiologically non-PsA subjects. Based on clinical findings, PsA based on CASPAR criteria was determined in only 18.1% (n=13 of all patients. Conclusion: A higher level of PsA was determined using radiological evaluation in this study. The main cause of this condition is the existence of asymptomatic-subclinical patients. A detailed medical history should therefore be taken from patients, and good clinical evaluation is very important. Radiological and clinical evaluation should be performed together in the diagnosis.

  11. Clinical subgroups and HLA antigens in Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P L; Zizzi, F; Mantovani, W; Rossi, F; Baricchi, R; Ghirelli, L; Frizziero, L; Portioli, I

    1989-01-01

    The frequencies of HLA antigens were studied in 101 Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis. The total group showed a significant increase in frequency of A1 and B38, and a reduction of B5 when compared to healthy controls. No association between DR and/or DQw antigens and PA were demonstrated. The comparisons between the clinical subgroups and normal controls revealed a significant association of B38 with asymmetric peripheral arthritis, B27 and B39 with spondylitis (with or without peripheral involvement). When intergroup comparison were made, the patients with spondylitis had an increase in frequency of B27 and DQw3 as compared to those with symmetric and asymmetric peripheral disease. DR4 and DRw53 were associated with earlier age of onset of arthritis. There were also significant associations between DQw3 and severe disease, and between A9, B5 and presence of erosions and joint space narrowing. No association with DR4 was showed in a subgroup of patients with symmetric polyarthritis without DIP involvement. PMID:2591112

  12. Sensory disturbance and polyneuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with foot deformity

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    Ebru Karaca Umay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Our aim in this study was to present the results of sensory evaluation tests and electrophysiological evaluations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients with foot deformity and to determine their relation with general health status and lower extremity functionality. Materials and methods Fifty-one patients with RA diagnosis and foot deformity were included in the study. Demographic and disease characteristics of the patients were recorded, and a detailed neurological examination was performed. Superficial sensation, pain, heat, vibration, and two-point discrimination sensation were evaluated in each foot, and their sum was used to determine the sensory deficits index (SDI of 0–10. The presence of polyneuropathy was evaluated with electrophysiological methods. The Health Assessment Questionnaire and mobility and walking subscales of the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales-2 were used to assess general health status and lower extremity functionality, respectively. According to the sensory examination and electromyography results, patients were compared in terms of their general health status and lower extremity functional status. Results Sensory disturbance was detected in 39 patients (74% during the examination; however, 27 patients (52.9% had polyneuropathy determined electrophysiologically. In patients with sensory deficits, statistically significant deterioration was detected in general health and foot functionality, including mobility and walking, when compared to patients with a normal sensory evaluation. Conclusions Even in the presence of normal electrophysiological tests, sensory dysfunction alone seems to be associated with severe disability in general health status and foot functionality when compared to patients with a normal sensory examination.

  13. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease: Safety of Biological Antirheumatic Drugs and Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accompanying the increased number of reports on the development or exacerbation of ILD in RA patients following therapy with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD) has aroused renewed interest. Although such cases have been reported mainly in association with the use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, the use of other biological DMARDs has also become a matter of concern. Nevertheless, it is difficult to establish a causative relationship between the use of biological DMARDs and either the development or exacerbation of ILD. Such pulmonary complications may occur in the natural course of RA regardless of the use of biological DMARDs. Since rheumatologists currently aim to achieve remission in RA patients, the administration of biological DMARDs is increasing, even for those with RA-ILD. However, there are no reliable, evidence-based guidelines for deciding whether biological DMARDs can be safely introduced and continued in RA-ILD patients. A standardized staging system for pulmonary conditions of RA-ILD patients is needed when making therapeutic decisions at baseline and monitoring during biological DMARD therapy. Based on the available information regarding the safety of biological DMARDs and the predictive factors for a worse prognosis, this review discusses candidate parameters for risk evaluation of ILD in RA patients who are scheduled to receive biological antirheumatic therapy.

  14. Features of lipid metabolism disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    A E Sizikov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize specters of common and modified lipoproteins (LP in serum of pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA according to age and sex and compare with healthy donors (with normal lipid level. Material and methods. 103 pts with RA (88 female and 15 male aged 21 to 69 years were included. Specters of common and modified LP in serum and plasma were evaluated with small-angle x-ray scattering. Results. Low level of intermediate density lipoproteins (IDLP subfractions and very low density lipoproteins (VLDLP as well as high level of low density lipoproteins (LDLP30 was revealed in pts with RA. Mean level of LP modification was about 60%. High density lipoproteins (HDLP subfraction was least and IDLP subfraction – most susceptible to modification. LP modification level increased due to LDLP and VLDLP fractions. This level had a tendency to increase with age because of elevation of atherogenic LP part. Mean values of common LP did not differ between sex and age groups of pts with RA. Unexpectedly low (in comparison with normal lipid content level of LP modification of the whole fraction of HDLP was the feature of modified LP specter in pts with RA. Conclusion. Level of common and modified LP in blood plasma and serum of RA pts is connected with general state of lipid metabolism and immune defense factors balance. Low level of VLDLP cholesterol and high level of LDLP cholesterol as well as high degree of LP of these fractions modification may be probably considered as markers of RA activity.

  15. Distal bronchial tubes damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    M V Sheyanov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study prevalence and clinical picture of distal parts of bronchial tree(bronchiolitis in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 104 nonsmoking pts with RA and 100 pts without RA and chronic diseases of respiratory apparatus were included. General clinical examination, spirometry, bodyplethysmography, examination of lung diffusion capacity (LDC and multispiralcomputed tomography (MSCT of lungs were performed. Results. Direct and indirect bronchiolitis signs were revealed with MSCT in 36 (35% ptswith RA and 1 pt of control group (p<0,01. Pts with signs of bronchiolitis complained of shortness of breath (69% of pts, cough (56%, phlegm discharge (56%, heavy breathing (25%. Obstructive lung ventilation disturbances were revealed in 19 (53% RA pts with bronchiolitis. Restrictive disturbances and LDC decrease were present in 3 (8% pts. High frequency of oligosymptomatic bronchiolitis course was found in RA pts. Bronchiolitis symptoms in RA pts coincided with signs of proximal bronchial tubes damage forming picture of diffuse damage of bronchial tree. Conclusion. Bronchiolitis is a prevalent variant of respiratory apparatus damage in pts with RA. Pts with MSCT signs of bronchiolitis often have cough, phlegm discharge, shortness of breath, heavy breathing. Lung ventilation disturbances of obstructive type are common but part of pts has normal lung functional measures or restriction. Oligosymptomatic forms of distal bronchial tubes damage are prevalent in RA pts. Lung MSCT is the main method of bronchiolitis diagnostics because bronchiolitis induces nonspecific clinical signs and RA pts have multilevel respiratory apparatus damage. MSCT reveals signs of distal bronchial tubes damage in 35% of RA pts.

  16. Clinical and subclinical neuropsychiatric abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients

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    Eman M Khedr

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety and peripheral neuropathy are common in RA patients. Early diagnosis and management of neuropsychiatric disorders in RA patients may greatly improve the patients′ health-related quality of life.

  17. High Frequency of Fibromyalgia in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: A Pilot Study

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    Marina N. Magrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Widespread pain from fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. We hypothesized that there is increased frequency of FMS in patients with PsA that contributes to fatigue and pain. Method. We prospectively enrolled patients with PsA based on the Classification criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis and healthy subjects were used as controls. The frequency of FMS was determined using London Fibromyalgia Epidemiologic Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ and Symptoms Intensity scale (SIs. Results. 34 PsA patients and 44 controls fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Median age of PsA patients was 52 years with 53.33% females. Median age of controls was 50.5 years with 59% females. FMS was present in 53.33% of PsA patients compared to 4.54% of the controls (, based on LFESSQ. 37.50% of PsA had FMS compared to 6.66% of controls ( based on SIs. There was a significant correlation between LFESSQ and SIs in the psoriatic group (. 76.66% of PsA patients complained of fatigue compared to 40.90% of controls, but the mean fatigue score between the two groups was comparable (5.03 versus 5.18. Conclusion. FMS-associated pain and fatigue are significantly more frequent in patients with PsA compared to controls.

  18. Clinical Risk Factors for the Development of Psoriatic Arthritis Among Patients with Psoriasis: A Review of Available Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Gelfand, J M

    2015-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory arthritis, affects about 10% of patients with psoriasis with higher prevalence seen in patients with more extensive skin disease. Early identification of PsA may result in improved outcomes. While it remains unclear which patients with psoriasis will develop PsA, several studies have identified potential risk factors for PsA among patients with psoriasis. This review examines the basic epidemiologic principles of identifying risk factors and reviews the evidence to date about risk factors for PsA among patients with psoriasis.

  19. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  20. Large Vessel Vasculitis Occurring in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient under Anti-TNF Therapy

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    Valentina Cestelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of necrotic inflammatory phenomena and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic or secondary to infections, connective tissue diseases and drugs but can also be considered as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Evidence shows that the increasing use of biological agents results in a growing number of reports of autoimmune diseases induced by these therapies. An inflammatory articular chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis may be complicated by extra-articular manifestations, such as cutaneous or systemic vasculitis. Herewith, we describe the case of a great vessels arteritis in a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis in therapy with an anti-TNF agent (etanercept.

  1. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Olivia Meira Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD.

  2. Small Airways Involvement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: One of the common causes of morbidity in patients with RA is pulmonary involvement. Some studies have shown that the possible abnormal results of pulmonary function tests in rheumatoid disease are higher than usual. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities in patients with RA. Materials & Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 99 patients with RA who referred to a rheumatology clinic in Qazvin, northwest Iran. Sixty five age- and sex-matched heal...

  3. Identification of novel autoantigen in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients using an immunoproteomics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagarika Biswas

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune and inflammatory joint disease with a poorly understood etiology. Despite widespread diagnostic use of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and rheumatoid factor proteins there is a strong demand for novel serological biomarkers to improve the diagnosis this disease. The present study was aimed to identify novel autoantigens involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis through immune-proteomic strategy. Synovial fluid samples from clinically diagnosed RA patients were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Samples from patients with non-RA rheumatisms (osteoarthritis and trauma were used as controls. Immunoreactive proteins were spotted by Western blotting followed by identification through Q-TOF mass spectrometer analysis. Forty Western blots were generated using plasma from ten individual RA patients and 33 reactive spots were identified, 20 from the high molecular weight (HMW gel and 13 from the low molecular weight (LMW gel. Among the 33 common immunogenic spots, 18 distinct autoantigens were identified, out of which 14 are novel proteins in this context. Expression analysis of five important proteins, vimentin, gelsolin, alpha 2 HS glycoprotein (AHSG, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and α1B-glycoprotein (A1BG by Western blot analysis using their specific antibodies revealed their higher expression in RA synovial fluid as compared to non-RA samples. Recombinantly expressed GFAP and A1BG protein were used to develop an in-house ELISA to quantify the amount of autoantibodies in the RA patients. RA patients revealed an increase in the expression of GFAP and A1BG in the plasma as compared to osteoarthritis patients. Therefore, GFAP and A1BG can be proposed as potential new autoantigens of diagnostic importance for RA subjects. Further characterization of these proteins in rheumatoid arthritis will be helpful in understanding the role of these proteins in the disease

  4. Malnourished patients on hemodialysis improve after receiving a nutritional intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaiane Calegari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malnutrition is multifactorial and may be modified by nutritional intervention. We aimed to assess the impact of an intervention on the nutritional status of malnourished hemodialysis patients and their acceptance of a non-industrialized nutritional supplement. METHODS: 18 patients were studied, they were selected from a previous nutritional assessment where nutritional risk was defined as: subjective global assessment > 15 plus one criterion for malnutrition. The following variables were assessed: anthropometric parameters, subjective global assessment, dietary intake, six-minute walking test, quality of life (SF-36, and biochemical tests. Patients were randomized to either Control or Intervention Groups. The Intervention Group received a dietetic supplement during dialysis containing 355 kcal, prepared from simple ingredients. After three months, subjects from the Control Group and other patients also considered at nutritional risk underwent the same intervention. The study groups were compared after three months, and all patients were analyzed before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Fifteen men and three women, aged 56.4 ± 15.6 years-old, nine in each group, were studied. The Intervention Group showed an improvement in the subjective global assessment (p = 0.04. There were differences in role physical and bodily pain domains of SF-36, with improvement in the Intervention Group and worsening in the Control Group (p = 0.034 and p = 0.021. Comparisons before and after intervention for all patients showed improvement in the subjective global assessment (16.18 ± 4.27 versus 14.37 ± 4.20, p = 0.04, and in the six-minute walking test (496.60 ± 132.59 versus 547.80 ± 132.48 m; p = 0.036. The nutritional supplement was well tolerated by all patients, and it did not cause side effects. CONCLUSIONS: The nutritional intervention improved the subjective global assessment and quality of life of hemodialysis patients at short-term. A

  5. Validity of rheumatoid arthritis diagnoses in the Danish National Patient Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Klarlund, Mette; Jacobsen, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnoses recorded in the NPR. We identified medical records for 217 patients recorded as having RA in the NPR between 1977 and 2001. Using two definitions of RA (clinically confirmed RA and fulfilment of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1987 diagnostic criteria for RA...... to RA satisfying the ACR 1987 classification criteria was estimated to 26%. Our conclusion is that with careful attention to the limitations in the data, discharge diagnoses for patients with records of RA in the Danish NPR can be used for epidemiological research purposes; however, our findings prompt...

  6. The use of TNF-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis patients with latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Atteno, Mariangela; Costa, Luisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Del Puente, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Bocchino, Maria Luisa; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy associated with skin and/or nail psoriasis. TNF-α is an essential cytokine for the host defense, and its depletion by treatment may facilitate the risk of infections or their reactivation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TNF-α blockers in patients with PsA and concomitant latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) comparing their outcome with non-infected PsA patients. This is a retrospective study in 321 pati...

  7. Trends of inflammatory markers and cytokines after one month of phototherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    José Meneses Calderón; Irma González Sánchez; Guillermo Aburto Huacuz; Arely Sarai Alonso Barreto; María del Carmen Colín Ferreyra; Hugo Mendieta Zerón

    2015-01-01

    Objective. to evaluate changes in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with rheumatoid arthritis submitted to phototherapy. Materials and methods. This was an open label study, enrolling ten patients. The phototherapy scheme within a range of 425 to 650 nm, 11.33 Joules/cm2, 30 cm above the chest was as follows: a) 45-min daily sessions from Monday to Friday for 2 to 3 months; b) three, 45min weekly sessions for 1 to 2 months; c) twice weekly 45-min sessions for 1 to 2 months...

  8. Health-related quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Which factors are of significance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Ostergaard, M.;

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing joint pain, loss of function and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL in RA patients is associated with several risk factors; in this paper the evidence relating to the most important risk factors is reviewed....... Modern medical therapy has improved HRQoL in RA patients, while demographic factors (female sex and older age), low socioeconomic status (in terms of education and position in the work force) and the presence of comorbid conditions appear to be associated with poorer HRQoL Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/3...

  9. Association between Periodontal Disease and serum levels of IL-17 in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kiani F; Setoudeh Maram Sh.; Masoumi S.; Kamali sarvestani E.; Aflaki E.

    2012-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Several lines of evidence have indicated that IL-17 might be important in the pathogenesis of RA and chronic periodontitis. IL-17 could be secreted primarily by T-helper cells.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal status of rheumatoid arthritis patients and its correlation with serum level of IL-17 in comparison to chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Method: In the present case-control study, serum level of I1-17 was determined by Eliza...

  10. Anti-TNFa treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Airò, P; R. Gorla; M. Vianelli; M. Frassi; Danieli, E; F. Franceschini; I. Cavazzana; Cattaneo, R

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyse clinical efficacy, onset of new autoantibodies or symptoms of autoimmune disease in patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis with anti-Ro/SSA treated with anti-TNFa agents. Methods: Six anti-Ro/SSA positive subjects with RA were studied every six months until 24th month of treatment in order to detect ANA titer (IFI), anti-dsDNA (Farr), anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2glycoprotein I (ELISA), anti-ENA (CIE). The titre of anti-Ro/SSA were analysed by ELISA. Four patients w...

  11. [The effect of Na-aurothiomalate on circulating immune complex dynamics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlak, T; Jajić, I

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research has been to determine the efficacy of Na-aurothiomalate, under the trade name Tauredon, on the development of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. During a continuous six month administering of Tauredon to a group of patients with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis various parameters have been observed. The group comprised 43 patients, 8 men and 35 women, their average age being 50. By continuous observations of both the patients and their laboratory reports in regular intervals during six-month administering of Tauredon, a positive effect of Tauredon on the development of the CIC IgM values (P = 0.006) has been proved, i.e. reducing their level in the patients' serum. Owing to great individual differences in the decrease of the CIC IgG values, it has been difficult to prove the consequences of this fall (P = 0.086). The impossibility of testing the significant decrease of the CIC IgA values is due to a small number of patients with the positive CIC IgA values. PMID:1366145

  12. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  13. Standardizing of Pathology in Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Veerle; Symmans, W Fraser

    2016-10-01

    The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy for the treatment of breast cancer patients is increasing. Pathologic response in the form of pathologic complete response (pCR) and grading systems of partial response, such as the residual cancer burden (RCB) system, gives valuable prognostic information for patients and is used as a primary endpoint in clinical trials. The breast cancer and pathology communities are responding with efforts to standardize pathology in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the challenges that postneoadjuvant systemic therapy surgical specimens pose and how pathologists and the multidisciplinary team can work together to optimize handling of these specimens. Multidisciplinary communication is essential. A single, standardized approach to macroscopic and microscopic pathologic examination makes it possible to provide reliable response information. This approach employs a map of tissue sections to correlate clinical, gross, microscopic, and imaging findings in order to report the presence of pCR (ypT0 ypN0 and ypT0/is ypN0) versus residual disease, the ypT and ypN stage using the current AJCC/UICC staging system, and the RCB. PMID:27380637

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  15. Evaluation of a patient-initiated review system in rheumatoid arthritis: an implementation trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paudyal Priyamvada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects the joints causing unpredictable episodes of pain, stiffness and disability. People with rheumatoid arthritis usually require lifelong specialist follow-up but frequently have periods when their disease can be managed through self-care or that provided by their general practitioner. Compared to the traditional clinician-driven care in rheumatoid arthritis, patient-initiated care has proven to be more beneficial in terms of reducing unnecessary medical reviews, providing greater satisfaction to patients and staffs and maintaining the patient’s physical and psychological status. We aim to evaluate the implementation of a patient-initiated review system in a routine secondary care rheumatology service in a public hospital in England, where patients get the opportunity to self-manage their disease by requesting specialist reviews at times of need instead of clinician-scheduled appointments. Methods/design Three hundred and eighty patients attending routine review at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust will be randomised to either enrol immediately into a patient-initiated review system (direct access group, or to be seen regularly by a clinician at the hospital (regular clinician-initiated group. Patients (or their general practitioner in the direct access group can arrange a review by calling a rheumatology nurse-led advice line that enables telephone delivered clinical advice, or where appropriate, an appointment with a rheumatologist within 10 working days. Patients in the regular clinician-initiated group will attend their planned appointments at regular intervals during the intervening period of 12 months. The primary outcome of interest is patient satisfaction; secondary outcomes include service use, waiting times and clinical measures. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews will be conducted with a subset of patients and staff with the aim of identifying

  16. Blood flow in the forearm in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects under local thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mucha

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Muscle blood flow in the forearm of patients with rheuma-toid arthritis and healthy volunteers following treatment with temperature increasingarm baths, mudpacks and short- or decimeter-wave diathermy was studied in thisinvestigation. The aim of the study was to find out the difference of reactive hyperemia between the different temperature methods as well as the influence on theconsensual reaction. Subjects: Eighty patients with rheumatoid arthritis, stage 3 according toSteinbrocker, as well as 80 healthy human subjects had been assigned numerically in the four therapy- and controlgroups. Patients with diseases influencing the peripheral blood flow were excluded. Design: Blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography in both forearms with the subjects lyingsupine. The application of the local heat therapies had been excluded on the left forearm. The forearm blood flow wasmonitored before heat therapy, directly after as well as in two further 10 minutes intervals. An analysis of variancewas used to determine the influence on blood flow of the response to the heat therapies in patients with rheumatoidarthritis and healthy subjects.Results: Under homogeneous starting conditions and a statistically uniformed high blood flow in rest the reactive values of blood flow on the left-hand side of application and the right consensual side showed high significant differencesbetween all methods of therapy. Differences between the patients and the healthy subjects only showed tendencies withpartially lower reactions, concerning the patients with rheumatoid arthritis. All methods of heat therapy caused a statistically provable consensual reaction that turned out smaller after diathermic methods. Here the post therapeuticreaction of the blood flow on the side of application was also lower or rather shorter. Conclusion: Greater differences of the blood flow in rest between the patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthysubjects

  17. Periodontal disease in a patient receiving Bevacizumab: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujral Dorothy M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF thereby acting as an angiogenesis inhibitor. As a result, supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues is impaired and tumour cell growth is reduced. Reported side effects due to bevacizumab are hypertension and increased risk of bleeding. Bowel perforation has also been reported. Periodontal disease in patients on bevacizumab therapy has not been reported before. Case Presentation We report a case of a forty-three year old woman who developed periodontitis whilst receiving bevacizumab for lung cancer. The periodontal disease remained stable on discontinuation of the drug. Conclusion Further investigations are needed to determine the mechanism for bevacizumab-induced periodontal disease.

  18. Impact of salivary flow and lysozyme content and output on the oral health of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zalewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:The aim of the study was to examine salivary flow rate, DMF index, lysozyme concentration and its output in two groups of rheumatoid patients and to compare the results with those of healthy controls.Material/Methods:Rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients were divided into two study groups: with reduced salivary flow rate ≤0.15 ml/min (RA HS, hyposalivation and with normal salivary secretion rate >0.2 ml/min (RA NS, normal salivation. The healthy control group (C was recruited from the Department of Conservative Dentistry. Salivary lysozyme concentration was determined by radial immunodiffusion. ANOVA followed by LSD test were used for the statistical analysis.Results:We found that lysozyme concentration was higher and lysozyme output and salivary flow rate were statistically lower in the RA HS group in comparison to the RA NS and C groups. The DMF index was statistically higher in both RA groups in comparison to the control group.Conclusions:RA disease impacts negatively on oral health and salivary parameters. Hyposalivation of RA patients increases the negative influence of RA on oral health. RA patients should receive more stomatological attention.

  19. Features of diagnosis and treatment of anemic syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Koryakova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of diagnostics and course of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients Objective. To study features of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pts, to estimate influence of disease modifying anti – rheumatic drug therapy efficacy on the course of anemic syndrome. Material and methods. 62 pts with definite RA and level of hemoglobin less than 130g\\l for men and less than 120g\\l for women were examined. Research of hemoglobin, red cells count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean concentration of hemoglobin (MCH, serum iron and ferritin was carried out. In a part of pts serum transferrin receptor and erythropoietin concentrations was defined. 30 pts were examined after 6 month of disease modifying therapy. Results. In 49(79 % of the pts the anemia was an easy degree of weight, MCH decreased in 33(53 % of the pts and 15(24 % pts had decreased values for MCV. Deficiency of iron in 16(26% of pts has been established at research of concentration a ferritin, sTfR and an index sTfR \\log ferritin. At the dynamic research after 6 month of disease modifying therapy the authentic gain levels of hemoglobin, red cells count and serum iron significantly increased in the pts with good and satisfactory effect of therapy. Сonclusion. Definition of MCH, MCV and ferrokinetic data for assessment of iron defi- ciency in the RА pts is necessary. sTfR and sTfR\\log ferritin may be study for pts with normal and increased ferritin levels. The major factor influencing on the course of anemia of chronic disease in the rheumatoid arthritis pts is the course rheumatoid arthritis, that efficacy disease modifying treatment to control.

  20. Candida tropicalis arthritis of the elbow in a patient with Ewing’s sarcoma that successfully responded to itraconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Youn Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are rarely responsible for arthritis. Few cases of fungal arthritis have been reported, even in immunocompromised hosts susceptible to low-virulence organisms. Herein, the authors report the first case of Candida tropicalis arthritis in a child with a solid tumor. A 13-year-old boy with Ewing’s sarcoma developed arthritis in his elbow during the neutropenic period after chemotherapy. Despite treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, his condition did not improve and serial blood cultures failed to reveal any causative organisms. After surgical drainage, culture of the joint fluid revealed the presence of C. tropicalis . Itraconazole treatment was started and after 3 months of therapy, the patient completely recovered full elbow function.

  1. HLA-DRB1 ALLELES GENOTYPING IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩; 董怡; 朱席林; 邱长春

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To explore the role of HLA-DRB1 genes in the development of rheumatoid arthritis(RA) and the correlations between HLA-DR alleles and clinical manifestations of patients with RA.Methods. 86 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 106 race matched controls were studied in whom HLA-DR typing was perfomed by the method of DNA amplification with sequence-specific primers(PCR-SSP). The subtypes of HLA-DR4 were determined by the method of hybridization of PCR products with sequence-specific oligonucletides(PCR SSO). The absence or presence of the patients.Results.Compared with controls,an increased gene frequency of HLA-DR4(48.8% vs 17.9%,P<0.001) and a decreased frequency of HLA-DR7(16.3% vs 27.4%,P=0.06) were found.The DRB1 0405 account for 61.9% of DR4+RA patients with respect to age,sex,duration of disease,rheumatoid factor(RF),extra-articular manifestations including secondary Sjogren's syndrome.According to the wrisr X-ray stage,the patlents of DR4+were more severe than that of DR4-P(P<0.05).Conclusion.HLA-DR4 and DR4 subtype of DRB1 0405 are related to the development of RA in Chinese.HLA-DR4 can be a useful prognosric marker in the patients with RA.

  2. Association between Periodontal Disease and serum levels of IL-17 in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiani F.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Several lines of evidence have indicated that IL-17 might be important in the pathogenesis of RA and chronic periodontitis. IL-17 could be secreted primarily by T-helper cells.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal status of rheumatoid arthritis patients and its correlation with serum level of IL-17 in comparison to chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Method: In the present case-control study, serum level of I1-17 was determined by Eliza technique using PCR-RFLP method in 142 RA patients and 106 control subjects. Specific measures for periodontitis included probing pocket depth (PDD, clinical attachment level (CAL. Bleeding score (BI and plaque score (PI were also assessed and compared in the two groups.Results: No significant association was found between different paraclinical findings (including CRP, RF, ESR and age of the onset of RA. The highest level of IL-17 was found in RA patients with moderate to severe periodontitis ( p =0.013. The prevalence and severity of periodontitis were higher in the test group. In the present study, Kruskal-Wallis test was used for evaluation of serum level of IL-17.Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that rheumatoid arthritis patients are prone to severe periodontitis and the level of IL-17 in the serum is positively associated with severity of periodontitis.

  3. REHABILITATIVE TACTICS OF TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A Shelepina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary The aim of the study is the substantiation of movement regimen for children with JCA and damage of hip joints. 20 patients with prevalent hip joints damages in clinical picture were examined. Clinical, laboratory, anthropometric methods and U-sound diagnostics were used. Basing on the analysis of anamnestic, clinical data and U-sound examination the regimen of loads for patients with hip joints damage was substantiated. Method of Junctional treatment was suggested including the treatment by position, exercise therapy in combination with gradually increasing regimen of locomotive loads, its efficacy was assessed.

  4. Satisfaction with Access to Health Services: The Perspective of Estonian Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja Põlluste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this cross-sectional study we explained the possible determinants of satisfaction with access to health services in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Of the 2000 randomly selected Estonian adult patients with RA, a total 1259 completed the survey. Regression analysis was used to analyse the predictors of patients' satisfaction with access to health services. Half of the respondents were satisfied with their access to health services. Factors that had a negative impact on satisfaction included pain intensity, longer waiting times to see the doctors, as well as low satisfaction with the doctors. Transportation costs to visit a rheumatologist and higher rehabilitation expenses also affected the degree of satisfaction. Patients who could choose the date and time at which they could visit the rheumatologist or who could visit their “own” doctor were more likely to be satisfied than patients whose appointment times were appointed by a healthcare provider.

  5. Contact frequency, travel time, and travel costs for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Linde, Louise; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate travel time, and travel cost related to contacts with health care providers for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during a three-month period. Methods. Patient-reported travel time and travel cost were obtained from 2847 patients with RA. Eleven outpatient clinics...... across Denmark recruited patients to the study. Data collected included frequency, travel time and travel costs for contacts at rheumatology outpatient clinics, other outpatient clinics, general practitioners, privately practicing medical specialists, inpatient hospitals and accident and emergency...... and 13 € on travelling per contact, corresponding to a total of 4.6 hours and 56 € during the 3-month period. There was great variation in patient travel time and costs, but no statistically significant associations were found with clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusion. The results...

  6. An Unexpected Cause of Knee Pain in a Patient with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Eroğlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic diseases may sometimes be underestimated because of the relapsing nature of the disease and thus some newly developing phenomena may be overlooked. In this case we present a 12- year old female patient who was followed up for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and applied to us as an exacerbation of the disease. After initiation of therapy all her complaints but the right knee improved. In the examination of knee, limitation in hip movements was detected. X- ray of the hip revealed a mass neighboring the minor trochanter. On magnetic resonance imaging the mass was detected to be an osteoid osteoma. The patient is free of pain with conservative treatment for tumor after twelve months. It is important to evaluate the patient thoroughly without focusing on a single point and keep in mind that in especially skeletally immature patients hip pain can be felt in the knee.

  7. Promoting physical activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Machteld Heleen van den

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to study: 1. The engagement of patients with RA in various forms of physical activity and their preferences regarding the delivery of physical activity interventions; 2. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical activity interventions delivered by means of the I

  8. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  9. Role of golimumab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, in the treatment of the psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Michelon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Melissa A Michelon1, Alice B Gottlieb1,21Tufts University School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis that affects many psoriasis patients and can often have a debilitating disease progression. Golimumab is a new tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonist recently approved by the FDA for controlling signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with PsA, patients receiving golimumab showed significant improvement in the signs and symptoms of disease. It was usually well tolerated, but adverse events generally occurred more in patients receiving golimumab compared to placebo. Golimumab has also recently shown efficacy in slowing structural damage in PsA. This new biologic therapy provides physicians with another option in the treatment of this inflammatory arthritis while offering patients certain advantages over other TNF antagonists.Keywords: golimumab, psoriatic arthritis, TNF-alpha inhibitor

  10. Comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: results of 6-month program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of a comprehensive rehabilitation program (CRP in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA for 6 months. Subjects and methods. Sixty patients with early RA were examined. During medical therapy, 6-month CRP was implemented in 34 patients in the study group. The 2-week in-hospital stage involved ten sessions of 15-min local air cryotherapy (-60 °C of the hands, knee or ankle joints; ten classes of 45-min therapeutic exercises (TE under the supervision of a trainer; ten sessions of 45-min ergotherapy (training people how to therapeutically position their joints, to apply their protective methods, to lift and move things, to use assistive devices, and to do hand exercises; orthotics (working wrist orthoses, knee ones, or individual orthopedic insoles; and four 90-min educational program classes. The outpatient and domiciliary stages included 45-min TE thrice weekly; creation of a correct functional stereotype; and orthotics. Twenty-six patients received medical therapy only (a control group. The authors estimated tender joint count (TJC, swollen joint count (SJC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, joint pain on 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS, DAS28, HAQ, RAPID3, hand grip strength, average maximum knee extension and ankle flexion by the EN-TreeM movement analysis, and compliance with drug and non-drug treatments. Results. The study group showed a stably high compliance with therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, less need for symptomatic agents, higher adherence to the methods of creating a correct functional stereotype, orthotics, and regular TE. Twenty-two patients completed 6-month CRP; 12 patents did not complete the treatment because of non-compliance with nondrug methods, primarily TE. Upon completion of the in-hospital stage of CRP, the study group exhibited significant positive changes in pain and functional status and no significant impact on global

  11. Knee cartilage quality assessed with dGEMRIC in rheumatoid arthritis patients before and after treatment with a TNF inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiderius, Carl Johan; Dahlberg, Leif E. (Dept. of Orthopedics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: carl-johan.tiderius@skane.se; Svensson, Jonas (Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)); Sandin, Joakim; Jacobsson, Lennart (Dept. of Rheumatology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background: TNF-a inhibitors are potent anti-inflammatory drugs that have revolutionized the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a non-invasive method to study cartilage quality, in particular the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Purpose: To evaluate knee cartilage quality before and after treatment with a TNF-a inhibitor (infliximab) in patients with RA using dGEMRIC and to study clinical parameters and serum cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) after the same treatment. Material and Methods: Seven patients with chronic RA received infusions of 3 mg/kg infliximab at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22. Clinical examination, serum COMP level, and dGEMRIC scans (1.5 T) were performed at baseline and after 7 months. The dGEMRIC index (ms), reflecting cartilage GAG content, was calculated using an inversion recovery sequence in the femoral weight-bearing cartilage. Seven years after treatment, charts were reviewed regarding joint replacement surgery (T{sub k}A). Results: Clinical parameters showed an improvement for all patients after the 7-month treatment period. Serum COMP decreased from 13+-4.5 to 11+-3.4 (mug, mean +- SD) mug/ml (P<0.05). The dGEMRIC index was lower at follow-up than at baseline, 332+-85 and 382+-69 (ms, mean +- SD), respectively (P<0.05), indicating loss of GAG. The two patients with the lowest dGEMRIC index had received a T{sub k}A 7 years after treatment. Conclusion: This longitudinal study indicates a substantial GAG loss from the knee cartilage matrix in patients with chronic RA. Treatment with infliximab does not seem to protect the cartilage from further deterioration despite improvements in clinical parameters and decreased serum COMP

  12. Trends of inflammatory markers and cytokines after one month of phototherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    José Meneses Calderón

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. to evaluate changes in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with rheumatoid arthritis submitted to phototherapy. Materials and methods. This was an open label study, enrolling ten patients. The phototherapy scheme within a range of 425 to 650 nm, 11.33 Joules/cm2, 30 cm above the chest was as follows: a 45-min daily sessions from Monday to Friday for 2 to 3 months; b three, 45min weekly sessions for 1 to 2 months; c twice weekly 45-min sessions for 1 to 2 months, and d one weekly session for 1 to 2 months until completion. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor were measured in peripheral blood and tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10 in leukocytes by quantitative real-time Reverse transcriptase-Polymerase chain reaction. In all the patients the next indexes: Karnofsky scale, Rheumatoid Arthritis-specific quality of life instrument, Steinbrocker Functional Capacity Rating and the Visual Analog Scale were evaluated. Results. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor declined notoriously after the indicated sessions. In gene expression, there was a tendency in tumor necrosis factor-α to decrease after 1 month, from 24.5±11.4 to 18±9.2 relative units, without reaching a significant statistical difference. The four tested indexes showed improvement. Conclusion. Phototherapy appears to be a plausible complementary option to reduce the inflammatory component in rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Diagnostic utility of oxidative damage markers for early rheumatoid arthritis in non-smokers and negative anti-CCP patients

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    E. Melguizo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Besides the development of new markers and diagnostic criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA, many patients are still diagnosed after several years of symptoms. Oxidative stress markers are already increased at an early stage of RA. Our aim was to evaluate the additional diagnostic value of these markers. Methods. A case-control study was performed. Patients met the 1987 RA ACR criteria, less than 2 years of symptoms and no previous treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD, steroids or vitamin E. Controls were selected from patient's relatives and matched (1:1 by gender, age, and current smoking habit. Oxidative damage markers were malonyldialdehyde (MDA, Lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH and Carbonyl proteins (CP. Statistical analysis was performed in agreement with the STARD initiative. Results. Sixty-five RA patients without treatment and 65 healthy controls were included. LOOH, CP, antibodies against citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor (RF were significantly higher in patients, and MDA higher in controls. The same results were obtained in the subgroups of patients who smoke or not, and in anti-CCP positive or negative. The diagnosis performance of traditional markers showed good specificity but low sensitivity. The addition of LOOH and CP increased the sensitivity and the area under the receiving operating characteristic (ROC curve especially in non-smoking (66% and negative anti-CCP (51% patients. Conclusions. The separate or combined addition of LOOH or CP to the traditional disease markers improved the diagnosis of RA, especially in non-smoking or negative anti-CCP patients.

  14. Isolated talonavicular arthrodesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the foot and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction

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    Pokorný David

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foot is often affected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Subtalar joints are involved more frequently than ankle joints. Deformities of subtalar joints often lead to painful flatfoot and valgus deformity of the heel. Major contributors to the early development of foot deformities include talonavicular joint destruction and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction, mainly due to its rupture. Methods Between 2002 and 2005 we performed isolated talonavicular arthrodesis in 26 patients; twenty women and six men. Tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction was diagnosed preoperatively by physical examination and by MRI. Talonavicular fusion was achieved via screws in eight patients, memory staples in twelve patients and a combination of screws and memory staples in six cases. The average duration of immobilization after the surgery was four weeks, followed by rehabilitation. Full weight bearing was allowed two to three months after surgery. Results The mean age of the group at the time of the surgery was 43.6 years. MRI examination revealed a torn tendon in nine cases with no significant destruction of the talonavicular joint seen on X-rays. Mean of postoperative followup was 4.5 years (3 to 7 years. The mean of AOFAS Hindfoot score improved from 48.2 preoperatively to 88.6 points at the last postoperative followup. Eighteen patients had excellent results (none, mild occasional pain, six patients had moderate pain of the foot and two patients had severe pain in evaluation with the score. Complications included superficial wound infections in two patients and a nonunion developed in one case. Conclusions Early isolated talonavicular arthrodesis provides excellent pain relief and prevents further progression of the foot deformities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction.

  15. Tofacitinib versus methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis: patient-reported outcomes from the randomised phase III ORAL Start trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Lee, Eun Bong; Fleischmann, Roy; Koncz, Tamas; Zwillich, Samuel H; Gruben, David; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Wallenstein, Gene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in methotrexate (MTX)-naive patients (defined as no prior treatment or ≤3 doses) receiving tofacitinib versus MTX. Methods In the 24-month, phase III, randomised, controlled, ORAL Start trial (NCT01039688), patients were randomised 2:2:1 to receive tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day (n=373), tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day (n=397) or MTX (n=186). PROs assessed included Patient Global Assessment of disease (PtGA), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) and health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). Results PROs improved following tofacitinib and MTX treatment: benefits were sustained over 24 months. Patients receiving tofacitinib reported earlier responses which were significantly different between each tofacitinib dose and MTX at month 3 through month 24. At month 6 (primary end point), significant improvements versus MTX were observed in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), 5/8 domain scores and FACIT-F with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day; all PROs, except SF-36 Mental Component Summary Score and Medical Outcomes Survey-Sleep, with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day. At month 6, the proportion of patients reporting improvements ≥minimum clinically important difference were significant versus MTX with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day in PtGA and 3/8 SF-36 domains; and with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 PCS, 4/8 domains and FACIT-F. Conclusions Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times per day monotherapy versus MTX reported statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in multiple PROs over 24 months; onset of benefit with tofacitinib treatment occurred earlier. Trial registration number NCT01039688.

  16. Diagnosis and management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in adults : summary of SIGN guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Burden, A. D.; Boon, M. Hilton; Leman, J.; Wilson, H; Richmond, R; Ormerod, A D; Guideline Dev Grp; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2010-01-01

    No funding was received for writing this summary. The degree of disability and negative impact on quality of life caused by psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are comparable to those of ischaemic heart disease, diabetes, depression, and cancer.1 Severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are associated with an increased risk of conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression.2 3 4 5 Psoriatic arthritis is underdiagnosed; about a fifth of patients with psoriasis also have p...

  17. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Carlotta Nannini, Laura NiccoliSecond Division of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hospital of Prato, ItalyAbstract: Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX, as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.Keywords: anti-TNF, anti-cytokine agents, rituximab, abatacept, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

  18. Destructive arthritis in a patient with chikungunya virus infection with persistent specific IgM antibodies

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    Receveur Marie-Catherine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya fever is an emerging arboviral disease characterized by an algo-eruptive syndrome, inflammatory polyarthralgias, or tenosynovitis that can last for months to years. Up to now, the pathophysiology of the chronic stage is poorly understood. Case presentation We report the first case of CHIKV infection with chronic associated rheumatism in a patient who developed progressive erosive arthritis with expression of inflammatory mediators and persistence of specific IgM antibodies over 24 months following infection. Conclusions Understanding the specific features of chikungunya virus as well as how the virus interacts with its host are essential for the prevention, treatment or cure of chikungunya disease.

  19. Effect of intensive exercise on patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Ende, C H M; Breedveld, F.; Le Cessie, S; Dijkmans, B; de Mug, A W; Hazes, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the effects of a dynamic, intensive exercise regimen on pain, disease activity, and physical functioning in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—64 patients with RA with a mean age of 60 (13) years and mean disease duration of 8 (8) years, admitted to hospital because of active disease, were randomly assigned to an intensive exercise programme or to a conservative exercise programme during their period in hospital with a mean length of 30 (14) days. The intensive...

  20. SECONDARY AMYLOIDOSIS WITH LUNG INVOLVEMENT INA FEMALE PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of secondary amyloidosis that more frequently occurs in patients with various arthritides, both seropositive and seronegative. According to the data available in the literature, the most common manifestations of secondary amyloidosis are involvements of the kidney, liver, nervous system, and, less frequently, the lung. The authors describe their own observation of secondary amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, which is accompanied by the involvement of the lung, kidney, and intestine, resulting in fatal outcome. The lifetime diagnosis of amyloidosis was histologically verified.

  1. Patients' Experiences of Nurse-Led Screening for Cardiovascular Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Jannie Christina; Primdahl, Jette

    2015-01-01

    are screened for CVD. Such information is important in order to organize and further develop screening programmes for CVD in patients with RA. The aim of the present study was to explore RA patients' experiences of participation in nurse-led screening for CVD and to identify key issues for the future......BACKGROUND: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Screening for cardiovascular risk is recommended by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). There is a lack of evidence of the experiences of RA patients who...... organization of screening programmes. METHODS: Three qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with 14 outpatients diagnosed with RA. The participants were stratified into groups, depending on whether they had a low-to-moderate or high ten-year risk of cardiovascular death according to the European...

  2. Serum YKL-40 concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: relation to disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Stoltenberg, M; Hansen, M;

    1999-01-01

    according to disease activity in RA, but provides in some respect information different from conventional markers. Our previous studies are consistent with a local release of YKL-40 in the arthritic joint followed by a secondary increase in serum YKL-40. YKL-40 may prove to be a new tool for the study of......OBJECTIVE: YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, macrophages and neutrophils. Studies have shown that YKL-40 is an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated whether serum YKL-40 was related to disease activity in patients with...... RA. METHODS: Serum YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 156 patients with RA during a 1 yr longitudinal study. RESULTS: Serum YKL-40 was increased in 54% of the patients with clinically active disease. Patients with clinically active disease initially who became inactive after 12 months had a...

  3. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Arthroscopic Debridement in Combination with Oral Medication Versus Oral Medication in Patients with Gouty Knee Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wanyan, Pingping; Wang, Jian Min; Tian, Jin Hui; Hu, Long; Shen, Xi Ping; Yang, Ke Hu

    2015-12-01

    Gouty knee arthritis refers to a form of inflammatory diseases caused by deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in knee joint. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic debridement in combination with oral medication versus oral medication alone for the treatment of gouty knee arthritis. A total of 60 patients with gouty knee arthritis were randomized to receive either arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication or oral medication alone. Efficacy was assessed with the angle of motion, functions, and visual analog scale (VAS). These indices were measured prior to treatment and at 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks posttreatment. Surgery- and medication-related complications were observed. Significant differences in flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and VAS were detected between the two groups at 2, 4, and 12 weeks posttreatment (P  0.05) . Significant differences in these indices were detected at different time points in each group (P  0.05). Arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication is superior to single oral medication in the flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and pain relief (VAS) before 24 weeks, although no statistical differences were detected in the efficacy after 24 weeks, and in medication-related safety between the two groups. Although arthroscopic debridement cannot replace systemic uric acid-lowering treatments such as medication and dietary control, it is still an effective approach.

  4. Perceived need to take medication is associated with medication non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwikker HE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hanneke E Zwikker,1,2 Sandra van Dulmen,3–5 Alfons A den Broeder,1,2 Bart J van den Bemt,1,2,6 Cornelia H van den Ende1,2 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Pharmacy, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 4NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 5Department of Health Science, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway; 6Department of Pharmacy, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Background: This is the first cross-sectional study that aims to examine associations between beliefs about medication and non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, taking potential psychological confounders into account.Methods: Eligible patients (diagnosed with RA for ≥1 year or ≥18 years, using greater than or equal to one disease-modifying antirheumatic drug were included by their rheumatologist during regular outpatient visits between September 2009 and September 2010. Included patients received questionnaires. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire was used to measure the perceived need to take medication (necessity beliefs, the concerns about taking medication (concern beliefs, general medication beliefs, and attitudes toward taking medication. Medication non-adherence (no/yes was measured using the Compliance Questionnaire Rheumatology (CQR. Associations between beliefs and non-adherence, and the influence of demographical, clinical, and psychological factors (symptoms of anxiety/depression, illness cognitions, self-efficacy were assessed using logistic regression.Results: A total of 580 of the 820 eligible patients willing to participate were included in the analyses (68% female, mean age 63 years, 30% non-adherent to their medication. Weaker necessity beliefs (OR [odds ratio]: 0.8, 95% CI

  5. Blood levels of CD11b+ memory T lymphocytes are selectively upregulated in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Petersen, A A; Skjødt, H;

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion molecules CD11b (a beta2-integrin component) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on blood leukocytes were studied by flow cytometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The fractions of CD4+ cells co-expressing CD11b were elevated in 16 patients with active RA compared with those in 16 RA...

  6. Adherence and satisfaction of rheumatoid arthritis patients with a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program (RAPIT program).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Jansen, A.; Ronday, H.K.; Peter, W.F.; Boonman, D.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate adherence and satisfaction of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program. METHODS: A total of 146 RA patients started an intensive (strength and endurance training for 75 minutes, twice a week, for 2 years) exercise program (Rheum

  7. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design: A longitudinal study of an inception cohort. Setting: A large outpatient clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients who attended t

  8. Correlates of functional disability in early rheumatoid arthritis : A cross-sectional study of 706 patients in four European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedstad, LM; Moum, T; Guillemin, F; Kvien, TK; Finch, MB; Suurmeijer, TPBM; vandenHeuvel, WJA

    1996-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study of 706 European patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of less than or equal to 4 yr duration, we examined possible correlates of functional disability assessed by the Health Assessment Questionnaire. First, we examined a subsample of 237 Norwegian patients. The Ritchi

  9. Monitoring rheumatoid arthritis using an algorithm based on patient-reported outcome measures: a first step towards personalised healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, J.; Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this proof of concept study was to evaluate alerts generated by a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM)-based algorithm for monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The algorithm was constructed using an example PROM score of an equally weighted mea

  10. Predictors of infusion reactions during infliximab treatment in patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanovic, Meliha C; Larsson, Lotta; Truedsson, Lennart; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Saxne, Tore; Geborek, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated the impact of baseline antinuclear antibody (ANA) status and use of methotrexate on development of infliximab-related infusion reactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or spondylarthropathies (SpAs), including psoriatic arthritis. All patients with RA (n = 213) or SpA (n = 76) treated with infliximab during the period 1999-2005 at the Department of Rheumatology in Lund, Sweden were included. ANAs were present in 28% and 25% of RA and SpA patients, respectively. Because of differences in baseline characteristics, we used a binary logistic regression model to calculate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for age, sex and prednisolone dosage. Altogether 21% of patients with RA and 13% of patients with SpA developed infusion reactions (P = 0.126). The OR for development of infusion reactions in RA patients with baseline ANA positivity alone was 2.1. Infliximab without methotrexate and infliximab as monotherapy were associated with ORs of 3.1 and 3.6, respectively. Combining infliximab without methotrexate and ANA positivity yielded an OR for infusion reaction of 4.6. Lower age at disease onset and longer disease duration were associated with infusion reactions (P = 0.012 and P = 0.036, respectively), but age, sex, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Disease Activity Score-28 at baseline were not. No predictors of infusions reactions were identified in SpA patients. RA patients treated with infliximab without methotrexate, and who are positive at baseline for ANAs are at increased risk for developing infliximab-related infusion reactions.

  11. Is it Crohn's disease? A severe systemic granulomatous reaction to sulfasalazine in patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftel Hilary M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfasalazine is a widely used anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and several rheumatological disorders. Although as many as 20% of treated patients may experience reversible, dose-dependent side effects, less frequent but potentially severe, systemic reactions have also been reported. Case Presentation A severe systemic reaction to sulfasalazine developed in a 21-year old female with rheumatoid arthritis characterized by eosinophilia, granulomatous enteritis and myelotoxicity, cholestatic hepatitis, and seizures. The clinical course and management of this patient are presented as well as a review of the incidence and outcome of severe systemic reactions to sulfasalazine. Conclusions Granulomatous myelotoxicity and enteritis developed in a 21 year old female within 3 weeks of initiating sulfasalazine for rheumatoid arthritis. Following a short course of corticosteroids, the patient had resolution of her cholestatic hepatitis, rash, eosinophilia, and gastrointestinal symptoms with no residual manifestations at 7 months follow-up. Although severe reactions to sulfasalazine are rare and unpredictable, practicing physicians should be aware of unusual clinical presentations of toxicity when prescribing sulfasalazine.

  12. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms. PMID:27489064

  13. BIOLOGICAL THERAPY AND INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: RELEVANCE AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Belov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past decades are marked by the obvious progress in rheumatology, which is related to the practical introduction of biological agents. At the same time the use of these drugs is associated with the increasing risk of infections of different nature and locations, including opportunistic ones (invasive mycoses, Pneumocystis pneumonia, etc., and with the greater risk of reactivation of latent infection, primary with that of tuberculosis. Beyond that point, there are cases of severe infections (pneumonia, sepsis, bacterial arthritis, skin and soft tissue lesions, etc., including those with a fatal outcome. This review analyzes mainly the past 3-year literature data on the rate and location of infections treated with biologics, which have been obtained in the placebo-controlled and direct comparative studies of patients with rheuma- toid arthritis. It characterizes the importance of different infections (tuberculosis, pneumonia, chronic viral hepati- tides, herpesvirus infections, etc. for treatment policy in the above patients. This underlines the need for wider immu- nization with different vaccines (chiefly against pneumococcus and influenza in patients with autoimmune inflam- matory rheumatic diseases. 

  14. Circadian rhythm of C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, M; Günther, R

    1987-01-01

    Ten men with classic rheumatoid arthritis were studied for 23 days in Badgastein, Austria, in August, 1980. One man (patient 07) showed a marked increase of disease activity after a few days. C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations increased from 8.7 mg/dl on day 2 to 13.0 mg/dl on day 16. CRP values expressed as percent mean of a day showed a significant circadian rhythm with the acrophase at -30 degrees. For the same patient we also found significant circadian rhythms in grip strength and pearl stringing with acrophases in the evening and a circadian rhythm in walking time with the acrophase in the early morning. Seven of the ten men in the study had elevated CRP concentrations during the 3 weeks of observation. Population-mean cosinor results of CRP, grip strength, pearl stringing, and walking time revealed acrophases similar to the single cosinor results of patient 07. Our results suggest that inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is a circadian rhythmic process with lowest disease activity in the evening.

  15. Efficacy of educational programm for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Bolshakova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate influence of educational programm on the level of knowledge of patients with RA about the disease, readiness for compliance, quality of life, efficiency of therapy and attitude to the disease. Methods. 103 women with RA were included in the study. They were divided into four groups: a control group, "passive" school and "active" school groups and a group with individual training (33, 21, 29 and 20 pts respectively. At the discharge from hospital and 12 months later medical estimation of patient knowledge and 10 test tasks were performed including "Index of biotic satisfaction" (N.Panin, quality of life estimation on visual analogous scale, a self-rating "of health and happiness" (Dembo- Rubinstein, "Level of social frustration" and "type of attitude to illness" (SPb Bechterev’s institute, readiness for complianse (original questionnaire. Results. At the time of discharge and in after 12 months test tasks and medical estimation of pts knowledge indices in "active" school and individual training groups were significantly higher, than in of control group and group of "passive" school (p < 0,001. The collective medical assessment demonstrated a correlation between treatment efficacy and the method of information transfer (p=0.29: p < 0,05. The quality of life correlates with the method of training according to all assessment techniques. Estimation of training method influencing on compliance provided similar results (p: = 0.45; p < 0,05. In groups of "active" school and individual training the number of pts who strictly followed the regimens of physical rehabilitation increased. Conclusion. Our data confirm the necessity of purposeful and systematic educational training in RA. The active methods and individual training promote the achievement of best results

  16. Polymorphisms within the IL-1 gene cluster: effects on cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures of patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Bendtzen, Klaus;

    2007-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of cytokines have been associated with the susceptibility, severity, and clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and chronic arthritis. An important question to address is how interleukin (IL)-1 polymorphisms affect the cytokine profiles of patients ...

  17. Quality-Adjusted Life Expectancies in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis-Comparison of Index Scores from EQ-5D, 15D, and SF-6D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Linde, Louise; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis generated from three generic health-related quality-of-life instruments.......The aim of this study was to compare quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis generated from three generic health-related quality-of-life instruments....

  18. Clinical Response, Drug Survival, and Predictors Thereof Among 548 Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis Who Switched Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Krogh, Niels Steen;

    2013-01-01

    To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care.......To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care....

  19. Is a long-term high-intensity exercise program effective and safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Z. de; Munneke, M.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Kroon, H.M.; Jansen, A.; Ronday, H.K.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Breedveld, F.C.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are insufficient data on the effects of long-term intensive exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We undertook this randomized, controlled, multicenter trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of a 2-year intensive exercise program (Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

  20. Efficacy of golimumab plus methotrexate in methotrexate-naïve patients with severe active rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Fleischmann, Roy M; Hsia, Elizabeth C; Xu, Stephen; Zhou, Yiying; Baker, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the treatment benefit of golimumab + methotrexate (MTX) vs. MTX monotherapy in MTX-naïve patients with severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This was a post hoc analysis of MTX-naïve RA patients in the GO-BEFORE trial who were randomized to receive placebo + MTX (n = 160), golimumab 50 mg + MTX (n = 159), or golimumab 100 mg + MTX (n = 159). Subsets of patients with severe disease were identified using these baseline criteria: C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥1.5 mg/dL, CRP ≥3.0 mg/dL, swollen joint count (SJC) ≥10 and tender joint count (TJC) ≥12, SJC ≥ 20/TJC ≥ 12, 28-joint count Disease Activity Score using CRP (DAS28-CRP) >5.1, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive status. The treatment effect of golimumab + MTX vs. MTX alone was evaluated for these outcomes: the proportions of patients achieving ≥20, 50, and 70 % improvement in the American College of Rheumatology criteria; DAS28-CRP European League Against Rheumatism response; DAS28-CRP golimumab + MTX groups vs. placebo + MTX for all of the outcomes evaluated. Furthermore, the treatment effect of golimumab + MTX was consistently greater among patients in the severe disease subsets when compared with the overall GO-BEFORE trial population. The treatment benefit of golimumab + MTX vs. MTX monotherapy was most pronounced within the subsets of patients with CRP ≥3.0 mg/dL and SJC ≥ 20/TJC ≥ 12. Following treatment with golimumab + MTX, improvements in RA signs/symptoms and in progression of structural damage were evident for the overall GO-BEFORE population, with the treatment effect more pronounced among patients with severe active disease.

  1. A mathematical prognosis model for pancreatic cancer patients receiving immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefang; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer since it typically spreads rapidly and can seldom be detected in its early stage. Pancreatic cancer therapy is thus a challenging task, and appropriate prognosis or assessment for pancreatic cancer therapy is of critical importance. In this work, based on available clinical data in Niu et al. (2013) we develop a mathematical prognosis model that can predict the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients who receive immunotherapy. The mathematical model incorporates pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic stellate cells, three major classes of immune effector cells CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, helper T cells, and two major classes of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The proposed model describes the dynamic interaction between tumor and immune cells. In order for the model to be able to generate appropriate prognostic results for disease progression, the distribution and stability properties of equilibria in the mathematical model are computed and analysed in absence of treatments. In addition, numerical simulations for disease progression with or without treatments are performed. It turns out that the median overall survival associated with CIK immunotherapy is prolonged from 7 to 13months compared with the survival without treatment, this is consistent with the clinical data observed in Niu et al. (2013). The validity of the proposed mathematical prognosis model is thus verified. Our study confirms that immunotherapy offers a better prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients. As a direct extension of this work, various new therapy methods that are under exploration and clinical trials could be assessed or evaluated using the newly developed mathematical prognosis model. PMID:27338302

  2. Adipokines in psoriatic arthritis patients: the correlations with osteoclast precursors and bone erosions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Significant bone remodeling with disordered osteoclastogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA. And there is a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS in PsA patients. Adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, have recently been reported to be involved in the development and regulation of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the alternation of circulating osteoclastogenesis related cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, osteoprotegerin (OPG and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL] and adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin, omentin in PsA patients, and analysed the correlations between these factors and osteoclast precursors numbers, radiographic damage scores, and disease activity index. 41 PsA patients, 20 psoriasis patients, and 24 healthy controls were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for detecting the levels of TNF-α, OPG, RANKL and the adipokines. The numbers of osteoclast precursors (OCs in peripheral blood were assessed. Radiographs of affected joints in PsA patients were scored for erosion, joint-space narrowing, osteolysis, and new bone formation. Compared with healthy controls, patients with PsA had higher TNF-α, RANKL, OCs, leptin and omentin but lower adiponectin and chemerin. Increased serum levels of TNF-α, RANKL, leptin, and omentin were positively correlated with OCs numbers. In contrast, serum adiponectin levels were decreased in PsA patients and negatively correlated with OCs numbers. TNF-α, RANKL and leptin were positively correlated with Psoriatic Arthritis Joint Activity Index (PsAJAI. Only TNF-α was positively correlated with radiographic damage scores. Our data demonstrated that systemic expression of soluble mediators of osteoclastogenesis and adipokines were disordered in PsA. Certain adipokines were elevated in the circulation of patients with PsA and might contribute to pathogenesis of arthritis. Prospective

  3. Effectiveness of radiation synovectomy with samarium-{sup 153} particulate hydroxyapatite in rheumatoid arthritis patients with knee synovitis: a controlled randomized double-blind trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marla Francisca dos; Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Konai, Monique Sayuri; Natour, Jamil, E-mail: jnatour@unifesp.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Reumatologia; Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira; Marchetti, Renata Rosa [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Medicina Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    Objectives: the aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite radiation synovectomy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic knee synovitis. Methods: fifty-eight rheumatoid arthritis patients (60 knees) with chronic knee synovitis participated in a controlled double-blinded trial. Patients were randomized to receive either an intra-articular injection with 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide alone (TH group) or 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide combined with 15 mCi Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (Sm/TH group). Blinded examination at baseline (T0) and at 1 (T1), 4 (T4), 12 (T12), 32 (T32), and 48 (T48) weeks post-intervention were performed on all patients and included a visual analog scale for joint pain and swelling as well as data on morning stiffness, flexion, extension, knee circumference, Likert scale of improvement, percentage of improvement, SF-36 generic quality of life questionnaire, Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne index, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or oral corticosteroids, events and adverse effects, calls to the physician, and hospital visits. Results: the sample was homogeneous at baseline, and there were no withdrawals. Improvement was observed in both groups in relation to T0, but no statistically significant differences between groups were observed regarding all variables at the time points studied. The Sm/TH group exhibited more adverse effects at T1 (p<0.05), but these were mild and transitory. No severe adverse effects were reported during follow-up. Conclusion: intra-articular injection of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (15 mCi) with 40 mg of triamcinolone hexacetonide is not superior to triamcinolone hexacetonide alone for the treatment of knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at 1 y of follow-up. (author)

  4. The assessment of knowledge level about their disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yavuz Karahan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate, the level of knowledge about the disease of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and its relationship with the disease activity. Methods: A total of 50 patients with RA, diagnosed according to 2010 ACR/EULAR Rheumatoid Arthritis classification criteria, included in this study. Demographic features of patients were recorded. Turkish version of Patient Knowledge Questionnaire (PKQ used to evaluate the level of knowledge about the disease of patients with RA. Daily activity score (DAS-28, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and visual analog scale (VAS were used to evaluate the activity of the disease. Results: The mean age of patients was 57.2±12.2 (36 females and 14 males. The mean of disease duration was 6.2±5.8 years. The mean was 3.2 (maximum value 9 for etiology, symptom and laboratory components, the mean of medication component: 2.9 (maximum value 7, the mean of exercise component: 2.4 (maximum value 7, the mean of protection of joints and energy component: 2.4 (maximum value 7 of PKQ. The total mean point was 10.9 (maximum value 30. There was no correlation between PKQ points and HAQ, DAS-28 and VAS parameters but there was a positive correlation between disease duration and PKQ points. Conclusion: The results of the study show no relationship between level of knowledge about the disease and disease activity and also functional status. On the other hand the level of knowledge about disease of patients with RA is very low. The results show the need for education programs and informative activities about RA. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 429-434

  5. Soluble P-selectin levels in synovial fluid and serum from patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valesini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: P-selectin is an adhesion molecule expressed by activated endothelial cells and platelets favouring the leukocyte adherence to microvascular endothelium. A soluble form of this molecule has been described, whose serum levels were found to be elevated and correlate with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Aim of this study was to determine soluble P-selectin levels in synovial fluid (SF and serum from patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, where it has never been investigated, to define its involvement in PsA synovial damage. Methods: we analysed, by ELISA, soluble P-selectin serum and SF levels in 100 patients presenting a knee joint effusion: 38 of them presented PsA, 40 RA and 22 osteoarthritis (OA. We examined the main clinical and laboratory parameters of these patients. Soluble P-selectin serum levels were also detected in 15 healthy subjects. Results: soluble P-selectin SF levels were significantly higher in PsA and RA patients respect to OA subjects. Soluble P-selectin SF levels were lower than those found in serum and the SF/serum ratio was higher in PsA and RA patients respect to OA. Soluble P-selectin serum levels were not significantly different among patients and controls. No correlation was found between SF and serum levels of soluble P-selectin and the main clinical parameters. Conclusions: our study of soluble P-selectin in PsA reveals a prominent local role of this molecule, with no differences respect to RA. Histological findings may be of help in understanding the role of this adhesion molecule in PsA.

  6. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Enteropathic Arthritis Learn About Spondylitis / Enteropathic Arthritis Overview For The ... Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Overview: Enteropathic Arthritis Enteropathic (en-ter-o-path-ic) arthritis is ...

  7. Drug delivery options to increase patient adherence and satisfaction in the management of rheumatoid arthritis – focus on subcutaneous tocilizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yasuharu Nakashima,1 Masakazu Kondo,2 Hisaaki Miyahara,3 Yukihide Iwamoto11Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Kondo Clinic of Rheumatology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease associated with joint destruction. Tocilizumab (TCZ is a humanized monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody that was initially developed for use as an intravenous (IV infusion. Previous studies have shown that TCZ-IV is an important treatment option in patients with moderate-to-severe RA. A subcutaneous (SC formulation of 162 mg TCZ that was recently developed and approved provides an additional treatment option for RA patients. In the present review, we provide an update on the efficacy and safety of TCZ-SC, compared with TCZ-IV. The TCZ-SC doses of 162 mg every 2 weeks (q2w or weekly (qw were selected based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Both TCZ-SC q2w and qw regimens showed equivalent effects to TCZ-IV in most patients; however, the TCZ-SC qw regimen consistently showed a more rapid effect in terms of C-reactive protein normalization. Randomized controlled studies showed that TCZ-SC monotherapy or combined with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs demonstrated comparable efficacy to TCZ-IV in patients who were both biologic-naïve and refractory to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. TCZ-SC at both qw and q2w were generally well-tolerated for up to 24 weeks. There was a low rate of withdrawal due to adverse events, and their incidence was comparable with that seen with TCZ-IV. An injection site reaction was seen in approximately 10% of patients who received the subcutaneous formulation. In conclusion, although clinical results are still limited, the currently available evidence

  8. The comparative responsiveness of the EQ-5D and SF-6D to change in patients with inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, M. J.; Davies, L M; Bansback, N. J.; McCoy, M J; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Watson, K.; Symmons, D P M; ,

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Comparative evidence regarding the responsiveness of the EQ-5D and SF-6D in arthritis patients is conflicting and insufficient across the range of disease severity. We examined the comparative responsiveness of the EQ-5D and SF-6D in cohorts of patients with early inflammatory disease through to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Responsiveness was tested using the effect size (ES) and standardised response mean (SRM). Correlation of change in EQ-5D and SF-6D with disease speci...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane volume as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M;

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease-modifying a......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease......-Pratt analysis). The rate of erosive progression on MRI was highly correlated with baseline scores and, particularly, with area under the curve (AUC) values of synovial membrane volume (Spearman's sigma = 0.69, P < 0.001), but not with baseline or AUC values of local or global clinical or biochemical parameters...

  10. Physical activity and the association with fatigue and sleep in Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loppenthin, K.; Esbensen, B. A.; Østergaard, M.;

    2015-01-01

    . An inverse univariate association was found between moderate to vigorous physical activity, and fatigue (MFI mental, MFI activity, MFI physical and MFI general), sleep, diabetes, depression, pain, patient global assessment, HAQ and disease activity. The multivariate prediction model demonstrated that fatigue......The aim of this study was to examine physical activity behavior in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to identify potential correlates of regular physical activity including fatigue, sleep, pain, physical function and disease activity. A total of 443 patients were recruited from a rheumatology...... outpatient clinic and included in this cross-sectional study. Physical activity was assessed by a four-class questionnaire, in addition to the Physical Activity Scale. Other instruments included the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Health Assessment...

  11. Anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy in patient with rheumatoid arthritis--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, S; Cerovski, B; Perić, P

    2001-01-01

    This case report presents a patient with long-lasting rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of fourth clinical grade, having ocular complications. RA was diagnosed according to current modified ARA criteria from 1987. Upon admission to the Department of Ophthalmology clinical examination revealed anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION), which is not characteristic manifestation of RA in the eye. The occurrence of AION in patients with RA has been explained in literature as a secondary manifestation of hypertension in these patients or, by the presence of other connective tissue disease apart from RA (for example, MCTD--mixed connective tissue disease). Both mentioned causes were excluded in our case, as well as any other condition that could lead to AION. Therefore, we had concluded that AION presented a late complication of RA.

  12. Cytomegalovirus ileocolitis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Dag

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune, systemic, chronic, inflammatory disease generally treated with various immunosuppressive drugs. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is an opportunistic, viral infection that is commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients. A sixty-four-year old female diagnosed with RA and treated with immunosuppressive agents was admitted to our rheumatology outpatient service with complaints of diarrhea and abdominal pain, which had lasted longer than four weeks. The patient’s colonoscopy revealed inflamed and ulcerated areas in the colon and in the terminal ileum. A biopsy showed intra-nuclear inclusion particles consistent with CMV. We started an oral valganciclovir therapy in this serum-CMV-polymerase chain reactionpositive patient. The concomitant use of immunosuppressive agents and anti-viral drugs eased the patient’s complaints, and the endoscopic picture improved. Consequently, cytomegalovirus ileocolitis in immunosuppressed patients admitted with severe diarrhea must be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  13. Sleep quality and correlates of poor sleep in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løppenthin, Katrine Bjerre; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Jennum, Poul;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine sleep quality and correlates of poor sleep in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five hundred patients with RA were recruited from a rheumatology outpatient clinic and included in this cross-sectional study. Sleep quality and disturbances were...... assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Other instruments included the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Disease activity was assessed according to disease activity score DAS28-CRP-based. Complete scores on PSQI were...... obtained from 384 patients (77 %). In those, the prevalence of poor sleep (PSQI >5) was 61 %, and the mean global PSQI score was 7.54 (SD 4.17). A linear association was found between poor sleep and mental fatigue, reduced activity related to fatigue, physical fatigue, and general fatigue. Mental fatigue...

  14. Iodine-131 uptake in a patient with thyroid cancer and rheumatoid arthritis during acupuncture treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, N.; Fukunaga, M.; Morita, K.; Ono, S.; Nagai, K.; Katagiri, M.; Harada, T.; Morita, R. (Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    A patient with thyroid carcinoma had abnormal accumulation of I-131 in the areas of both feet and hands on whole body scan. The sites of abnormal accumulation of I-131 were similar to those on bone scintigraphy. The radiographic examination of the lesions showed characteristic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, and the presence of small gold needles for acupuncture treatment was demonstrated. There were no findings of bone metastases. Although the mechanism of accumulation of I-131 in this patient is unknown, interpreters of I-131 whole body scintigraphs should keep this case in mind when acupuncture treatment has been done. The authors can only speculate on a common blood flow mechanism for enhanced HMDP and I-131 uptake in this arthritic patient who had been treated by acupuncture.

  15. Pain behavior, spouse responsiveness, and marital satisfaction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, D; Robinson, M E; Melamed, B

    1997-01-01

    Although the pain behavior of some diagnostic groups has been shown to be reactive to social influences, the reactivity of pain behavior in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population remains an open question. The authors in this article combined laboratory and self-report assessment techniques to examine the extent to which the pain report and behavior of 52 RA patients was susceptible to influence of social factors within the marital unit. The authors' findings suggest that (a) different types of spouse responsiveness (e.g., solicitous, punishing) may be viewed differently by the RA population than more general chronic pain populations; (b) the patient's perception of spouse responsiveness is a significant predictor of the pain behavior, whereas the spouse's perception of these same behaviors is not; and (c) the patient's perception of the spouse's responsive behavior adds significantly to the prediction of pain behavior over a model based on "disease impact" variables alone. PMID:8995045

  16. Comparison of discrimination and prognostic value of two US Doppler scoring systems in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Terslev, Lene; Christensen, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to investigate sensitivity to change (SRM), predictive validity and discriminative ability of a quantitative (QS) and a semi-quantitative (SQS) Doppler ultrasound scoring systems in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS......: RA patients with wrist joint affection treated with TNF-α inhibitor were followed for one year. The wrist was examined with Doppler before initiating therapy and after one year. DAS28 was determined at both visits. One person trained in the SQS system and one in the QS system evaluated the anonymised...... images. The SRM, predictive validity and discriminative ability for both systems were calculated using DAS28 as the measure of disease improvement. RESULTS: Fourty-six patients with RA (80% females) were included. The mean Doppler activity at baseline was QS:24.4% (SD=17.7%) and SQS:2.0 (SD=0...

  17. Anserina Bursitis—A Treatable Cause of Knee Pain in Patients with Degenerative Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookler, Morton I.; Mongan, Edward S.

    1973-01-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient. PMID:4731586

  18. Anserina bursitis. A treatable cause of knee pain in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookler, M I; Mongan, E S

    1973-07-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient.

  19. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein on fibroblast-like synoviocytes in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients: a potential mechanism for multidrug resistance in rheumatoid arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y M; Chen, J W; Chen, L X; Xie, X; Mao, N

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression level in drug resistance to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RRA). We evaluated and compared the expression levels of P-gp in fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and investigated the potential mechanism of P-gp-induced multidrug resistance in RRA. Ten patients were enrolled and divided into two groups: six in the RA group and four in the OA group. The expression level of P-gp in FLS cells was detected by western blotting following cell culture. A linear correlation algorithm was used to assess the association between the level of P-gp and disease activity  (using DAS28 scoring), as well as the duration of methotrexate (MTX) treatment in the RRA patients. The level of P-gp in the RRA patients was markedly higher than that in the OA patients (P P-gp level in FLS cells and the duration of MTX treatment in the RRA group (Г = 0.733, P P-gp level and DAS28 scoring (Г = 0.206, P > 0.05). P-gp might be upregulated during the progression of RRA, which possibly correlates with the development of resistance to MTX. PMID:27323187

  20. Pulmonary Mycobacterium szulgai infection and treatment in a patient receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ingen, J.; Boeree, M. J.; Janssen, M.; Ullmann, E.F.; Lange, W; P. HAAS; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A 54-year-old man with a 22-year history of rheumatoid arthritis and an 8-year history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with dyspnea on exertion, nonproductive cough and fatigue of 1 month's duration. His medication at presentation consisted of etanercept, azathioprine, naproxen and inhaled fluticasone and salbutamol. INVESTIGATIONS: At presentation, the patient underwent physical examination, chest X-ray and high-resolution CT, blood tests, and bronchoalveolar l...

  1. Usefulness of Patients-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Focus Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Botello-Corzo, Diana; Calixto, Omar-Javier; Calderón-Rojas, Rolando; Domínguez, Aura-Maria; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis; Mantilla, Ruben-Dario; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become an essential part of the assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to evaluate the agreement and correlation between PROs and the physician's measurements. Methods. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 135 patients with RA were clinically evaluated during two different sessions of focus group interviews. Rheumatologist recorded 28 swollen (SJCs) and tender joint counts (TJCs). The patients filled out the PROs instruments (MDHAQ, RADAI, RAPID3, 4, and 5 and self-report articular index (SAI) diagram for pain and joint swelling). DAS28 was calculated (C-reactive protein). An adjusted multiple lineal regression model was done (DAS28 as dependent variable). Results. Highly significant agreements were found between SJC and TJC registered by the physician and patient. There was moderate correlation between DAS28 with patient SJC (r = 0.52), patient TJC (r = 0.55), RADAI (r = 0.56), RAPID3 (r = 0.52), RAPID4 (r = 0.56), RAPID5 (r = 0.66), and VAS-Global (r = 0.51). Likewise, we found moderate to high correlations between CDAI and SDAI with all variable measurements done by the patients. The resulting predictive equation was DAS28(CRP) = 2.02 + 0.037 × RAPID4 + 0.042× patient SJC. Conclusion. PROs applied in focus groups interview are a useful tool for managing patients with RA regardless of gender, educational level, and duration of disease. PMID:23097701

  2. Usefulness of Patients-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Focus Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs have become an essential part of the assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We aimed to evaluate the agreement and correlation between PROs and the physician's measurements. Methods. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 135 patients with RA were clinically evaluated during two different sessions of focus group interviews. Rheumatologist recorded 28 swollen (SJCs and tender joint counts (TJCs. The patients filled out the PROs instruments (MDHAQ, RADAI, RAPID3, 4, and 5 and self-report articular index (SAI diagram for pain and joint swelling. DAS28 was calculated (C-reactive protein. An adjusted multiple lineal regression model was done (DAS28 as dependent variable. Results. Highly significant agreements were found between SJC and TJC registered by the physician and patient. There was moderate correlation between DAS28 with patient SJC (r=0.52, patient TJC (r=0.55, RADAI (r=0.56, RAPID3 (r=0.52, RAPID4 (r=0.56, RAPID5 (r=0.66, and VAS-Global (r=0.51. Likewise, we found moderate to high correlations between CDAI and SDAI with all variable measurements done by the patients. The resulting predictive equation was DAS28(CRP=2.02+0.037×RAPID4+0.042× patient SJC. Conclusion. PROs applied in focus groups interview are a useful tool for managing patients with RA regardless of gender, educational level, and duration of disease.

  3. Colour Doppler ultrasonography evaluation of vascularization in the wrist and finger joints in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy subjects

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    Carotti, M. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Salaffi, F., E-mail: fsalaff@tin.it [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Morbiducci, J. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Ciapetti, A., E-mail: ciapetti.a@libero.it [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Bartolucci, L. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Gasparini, S. [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Ferraccioli, G. [Division of Rheumatology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Giuseppetti, G.M. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Grassi, W. [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the presence of blood flow by colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) in the wrist and finger joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy subjects and to define a cut-off value of CDUS resistive index (RI). Methods: Forty-three patients with RA and 43 healthy controls were examined by CDUS. The wrists, second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints were evaluated in each patient and healthy subject. Spectral Doppler analysis was performed in order to characterize the type of flow and a mean RI was measured to define a cut-off level. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the screening method's performance. Results: Flow was detected in 219 of the 430 total joints (50.9%) of RA patients (111 in the wrists, 49 in the MCP and 30 in the PIP joints). Healthy subjects had a quantifiable flow in 45 of the 430 joints (10.5%) and, in particular, 39 (86.4%) in the wrist, 5 (11.14%) in the MCP and 1 (2.2%) in the PIP joints. The intra- and inter-reader agreements for the detection of Doppler signal were very good (kappa 0.82 and 0.89, respectively). Mean RI values were 0.72 {+-} 0.06 in RA patients and 0.86 {+-} 0.06 in healthy subjects (p < 0.01). At cut-off point of RI < 0.79 the sensitivity was 89.6% and the specificity was 78.8% (positive likelihood ratio 4.22). Conclusion: DUS is a useful tool for the detection of abnormal blood flow in inflammatory joints of RA patients.

  4. Effectiveness and drug adherence of biologic monotherapy in routine care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cohort study of patients registered in the Danish biologics registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steen Hylgaard; Rasmussen, Claus; Espesen, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of cholesterol crystals (CC) in synovial fluid (SF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Injection of triamcinolone had satisfactory effect on the bursitis in one patient which is in contrast to previous reports. Both patients died short after presentation. There is evi...

  5. TNF-alpha antagonist survival rate in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients observed under conditions of standard clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesoni, Antonio; Zaccara, Eleonora; Gorla, Roberto; Bazzani, Chiara; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Caporali, Roberto; Bobbio-Pallavicini, Francesca; Favalli, Ennio Giulio

    2009-09-01

    A cohort of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in the Lombardy Rheumatology Network (LOHREN) registry and receiving anti-TNF therapy was evaluated after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Of the 1114 patients in the registry 1064 met the clinical criteria for inclusion with 519 receiving infliximab, 303 adalimumab, and 242 etanercept. The therapeutic survival curve of these patients showed that the likelihood of continuing anti-TNF therapy was 78.8% after 12 months, 65.2% after 24 months, and 52.9% after 36 months, with a risk of dropout similar for inefficacy and adverse events. There were 405 anti-TNF therapy discontinuations (38.1%): 180 (16.9%) due to inefficacy, 194 (18.2%) adverse events, and 31 (2.9%) other reasons. Four deaths (2 septicemia, 1 postinfective cerebritis, 1 heart failure) were considered to be related to anti-TNF therapy. Of the discontinuations, 219 (54.1%) occurred within the first 12 months: 110 due to adverse events, 89 inefficacy, and 20 due to other reasons. After 36 months, the likelihood of survival on etanercept (62.5%) was significantly greater than the likelihood of survival on infliximab (49.1%) or adalimumab (53.6%). A higher risk of therapy discontinuations due to adverse events was associated with increasing age, a corticosteroid > 5 mg/day, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), a higher risk of therapy discontinuations due to inefficacy was associated with the previous use of > or = 4 disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and a high ESR. Comorbidities, increasing DAS28 values and co-therapy with methotrexate were associated with a lower risk of discontinuation. PMID:19758236

  6. Sexual health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: experiences, needs and communication with health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Kristina Areskoug; Gard, Gunvor

    2012-06-01

    Pain, fatigue and decreased joint mobility caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often decrease sexual health in RA patients. Regular physiotherapy interventions in patients with RA are often aimed at improving those factors. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and views of patients concerning the impact of RA on their sexual health, the possible impact of physiotherapy interventions, and communication in clinical situations. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to patients with RA at two rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The questionnaire included questions concerning the impact of RA on intimate relationships and sexual function, as well as experiences of physiotherapy and sexual health communication with health professionals. The questionnaire was answered by 63 patients. The majority of the patients thought that pain, stiffness, fatigue and physical capacity were related to sexual health. Communication between health professionals and patients about sexual health was less common, even if the desire for communication about sexual health was higher in this study than in other studies. The authors concluded that physiotherapists need to be aware that pain, fatigue, decreased joint mobility and physical capacity can affect sexual health and that physiotherapy can make a difference in sexual health in patients with RA. The impact of RA on sexual health is rarely discussed by health professionals and RA patients, and needs greater attention.

  7. HLA class II genes in Latvian patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Nilsson, B; Sanjeevi, C B

    1997-01-01

    PCR-based HLA genotyping was used to analyze the association of HLA-DR and -DQ genes in 127 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and 111 population-based controls from Latvia. The results show DQA1*03 to be positively associated in overall patients and DRB1*01-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 to be negatively associated with JRA in overall patients and in polyarthritis patients compared to controls. These data indicate the immunogenetic heterogeneity in the JRA patients, in the disease subgroups and in different ethnic groups. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was assayed in patients (n = 119) and controls (n = 98). RF was present in patients (7/119, 6%) compared to controls (5/98, 5%). None of the DQA1, DQB1 alleles, DQ and DR-DQ haplotypes was associated in seropositive patients compared to seropositive controls. DR1-DQ5 (DQA1*0101-B*0501) was decreased in seronegative patients (11/111, 10%) compared to seronegative controls (24/105, 23%), but the difference was not significant after correction of the p value.

  8. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay for screening arthritis patients for latent tuberculosis infection before starting anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment.

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    Hyun Lee

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF treatment are at an increased risk of reactivating a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT assay for diagnosing LTBI in arthritis patients undergoing anti-TNF treatment.We enrolled 342 consecutive patients from August 2007 to October 2013: 176 (51.5% patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 166 (48.5% with rheumatoid arthritis. Screening tests included tuberculin skin test (TST and QFT assay. Positive QFT results, regardless of TST results, were considered an indicator for LTBI treatment.Bacillus Calmette-Guérin scars were found in 236 (69.0% patients. Of 342 patients, TST and QFT were positive in 122 (35.7% and 103 (30.1% patients, respectively, and discordant in 101 (29.5% patients. During a median follow-up duration of 41.7 months, five patients (1.5% developed TB in a median of 20.8 months after initiation of anti-TNF treatment (428/100,000 person-years. TB did not occur in 62 TST+/QFT+ patients who received LTBI treatment. Of 41 TST-/QFT+ patients who received LTBI treatment, one (2.4% developed TB 20.5 months after starting anti-TNF treatment (705/100,000 person-years. Of 60 TST+/QFT- patients who did not receive LTBI treatment, two (3.3% developed TB 20.8 and 22.0 months after starting anti-TNF treatment (871/100,000 person-years. Of 179 TST-/QFT- patients, two (1.1% developed TB 7.2 and 22.7 months, respectively, after initiating anti-TNF treatment (341/100,000 person-years. TB incidence rate during the follow-up period did not differ among TST-/QFT+, TST+/QFT-, and TST-/QFT- patients (P = 0.661.QFT might be used instead of TST for diagnosing LTBI in patients before starting anti-TNF therapy in countries, such as Korea, where the TB prevalence is intermediate and the BCG vaccination is mandatory at birth. In the absence of a true gold standard test for LTBI, however, there is still a risk of TB development

  9. Neurological Recovery after Amantadine Treatment in a Patient with Septic Arthritis: A Case Report

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    Esra Özayar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY In this case report a patient with septic arthritis who developed impaired consciousness that responded to amantadine sulfate treatment was presented. A 67 years old male patient who had high fever, leukocytosis, hypotension, and generalized organ failure findings after knee prosthesis revision surgery was accepted to intensive care unit. Patient was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilation as he lost consciousness during non-invasive mechanical ventilation. In the follow-up he was diagnosed with bone abscess and was started penicillin according to culture results. Despite of clinical and laboratory resolving of sepsis finding, patient had tonic-clonic seizures especially on the right upper extremity with normal cranial computerized tomography findings. Septic course of the patient improved with antibiotic treatment, while impaired consciousness and seizures continued. Radiological evaluation of the patient was within normal ranges; however he was diagnosed as organic neurological dysfunction that developed secondary to sepsis. Amantadine sulfate 200 mg/day was initiated after neurology department consultation. Neurological suppression and seizures started to improve after the 6th day and completely resolved after the 10th day of the treatment. Patient was discharged from intensive care unit after resolution of septic clinic after 57 days. As a result we believe that amantadine is an efficient agent in treatment of neurological patients with coma and significantly decrease rehabilitation duration

  10. Effect of fibromyalgia on bone mineral density in patients with fibromylagia and rheumatoid arthritis

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    M A Buyukbese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM may t cause a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD because of decreased mobility. The condition is relatively frequent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and RA patients with FM have more disability than those without FM. We evaluated the effect of FM on BMD and investigated the effect of FM on BMD in RA patients. Materials and Methods: We included age-matched 56 FM, 52 RA patients, and 37 healthy females as controls. Twenty three of all RA subjects met 1990 ACR FM criteria. Patients using the antiresorptive drugs, those on hormone replacement therapy, patients with thyroid or parathyroid dysfunction were excluded. Self-reported pain and fatigue severity, functional items of FM impact questionnaire were questioned in FM and RA patients. In all subjects, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur neck were determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry, and T-scores were recorded. Results: Self-reported pain and fatigue scores in FM subjects were significantly higher than in RA patients (P00.05. There was a significant negative correlation between self-reported pain score and lumbar spine BMD in FM subjects (r=–0.41, P=0.006. Conclusions: In spite of functional disability, FM does not cause a decrease in BMD. The presence of FM in RA patients does not result in a change in BMD.

  11. Comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang-Ming; Han, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the associations between comorbid conditions and healthcare utilization, medical charges, or mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nebraska state emergency department (ED) discharge, hospital discharge, and death certificate data from 2007 to 2012 were used to study the comorbid conditions of patients with RA. RA was defined using the standard International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM 714 or ICD-10-CM M05, M06, and M08). There were more comorbid conditions in patients with RA than in patients without RA. Comorbid conditions were majorly related to healthcare utilization and mortality of patients with RA. In addition to injury, fracture, sprains, and strains, symptoms of cardiovascular and digestive systems, respiratory infection, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were common comorbid conditions for ED visits. In addition to joint replacement and fracture, infections, COPD and cardiovascular comorbidities were common comorbid conditions for hospitalizations. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory comorbidities, dementia, malignant neoplasm, and diabetes mellitus were common comorbid conditions for deaths of patients with RA. In addition, the numbers of comorbid conditions were significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and hospital charges for patients with RA. The findings in this study indicated that comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges, and mortality of patients with RA. PMID:27106546

  12. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent pain is a major concern for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pain may be due to inflammatory activity or augmented central pain processing. Unawareness of the origin and mechanisms of pain can lead to misinterpretation of disease activity (by composite scores......) and erroneous treatments. Ultrasonography (US) is a highly sensitive method to detect tissue inflammation. Evaluating pain mechanisms in relation to US measures may prove valuable in predicting response to treatment in PsA. AIMS: To study the association and prognostic value of pain mechanisms, ultrasonic...... activity and clinical outcomes in patients with PsA who intensify antirheumatic treatment. METHODS AND ANALYSES: 100 participants >18 years of age with PsA who initiate or switch antirheumatic treatment (biologicals and/or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs...

  13. Detection of gene expression signatures related to underlying disease and treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serikawa, Kyle A; Jacobsen, Søren; Lundsgaard, Dorthe;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gene expression signatures can provide an unbiased view into the molecular changes underlying biologically and medically interesting phenotypes. We therefore initiated this study to identify signatures that would be of utility in studying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We used...... microarray profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 30 RA patients to assess the effect of different biologic agent (biologics) treatments and to quantify the degree of a type-I interferon (IFN) signature in these patients. A numeric score was derived for the quantification step and applied...... to be heterogeneous for an IFN component. A comparison of individuals currently untreated with a biologic with those treated with infliximab, tocilizumab, or abatacept suggested that each biologic induces a specific gene signature in PBMCs. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to observe signs of type-I IFN pathway activation...

  14. Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Antibody Therapy-Induced Retinopathy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Asumi Tada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tocilizumab, a humanized anti-human interleukin-6 (IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, is beneficial for treating autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The most common adverse event is upper respiratory tract infection; ocular side effects are rare. We describe a case of skin ulceration and bilateral retinopathy with multifocal cotton-wool spots and retinal hemorrhages in a patient with RA treated with tocilizumab. Tocilizumab administration increased the serum level of IL-6 without affecting the IL-8 levels. We could not exclude the possibility of blood coagulation or retinal vascular changes caused by tocilizumab. The current case highlights the need to consider that ocular adverse effects can develop in patients treated with tocilizumab.

  15. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from......) within and between countries was graphically analysed. A median regression model was applied to analyse differences in disease activity between countries. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and October 2006, the QUEST-RA (Quantitative Patient Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid...... Arthritis) project included 4363 patients from 48 sites in 15 countries; 78% were female, >90% Caucasian, mean age was 57 years and mean disease duration was 11.5 years. More than 80% of patients had been treated with methotrexate in all but three countries. Overall, patients had an active disease...

  16. CULTURES OF FIBROBLAST-LIKE SYNOVIAL CELLS FROM PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: PROPERTIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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    M. A. Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review contains data from literature concerning the in vivo structure of synovial membranes in healthy people and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The properties of in vitro cultured fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS from RA patients are considered, including FLS morphology, phenotype and function. A standard protocol of in vitro FLS culturing is described. Notably, the FLS are characterized by autonomic functioning, ability for invasive growth/migration, e.g., into non-affected joints. These FLS properties may a reason of multiple joint involvement typical to RA. Special attention is drawn to characterization of stable phenotypic profile of FLS which results from certain epigenetic disturbances, i.e., changes of the DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and micro-RNA effects.The FLS from RA patients are characterized with stable and extensive hypomethylation of genes which occurs in vivo and persists after repeated culture passages. Some promoters of genes involved into RA pathogenesis (for example, CXCL12, IL-6 are hypomethylated. By contrary, some other gene promoters (e.g., the death receptor 3 gene are shown to be hypermethylated. An increased histone acetylation of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators (such as MMP1 may be an important mechanism of persistent inflammation in RA. Changes in histone acetylation in FLS are related to high levels of ubiquitin-like SUMO-1 protein and concurrent decrease in specific protease SENP1activity. A role of histone acetylation in RA pathogenesis is supported by efficacy of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (Trichostatin A in collagen-induced murine arthritis. Local concentrations of micro RNA-155, micro-RNA-146а, and micro-RNA-203 are permanently increased in FLS cultures, synovial tissues, and PBMC of the RA patients. Expression of micro RNA-124а is decreased in FLS from RA, as compared with OA FLS.One may conclude that the fibroblast-like synovial cells are key cellular

  17. RANTES and chemotactic activity in synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Joanna; Kowalski, Marek L; Grzegorczyk, Janina; Szkudlinska, Barbara; Jarzebska, Marzanna; Marciniak, Marek; Synder, Marek

    2005-12-14

    A massive accumulation of inflammatory cells in synovial tissues is a major pathological feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Neutrophiles dominate synovial fluid while rheumatoid synovium is infiltrated with mononuclear cells. Mechanisms regulating influx of particular subpopulations of leukocytes into articular cavity and synovium compartment are not completely defined. An increasing amount of data supports a crucial role of a C-C chemokine RANTES in the RA pathogenesis. Our objective is to evaluate chemotactic activity for neutrophils (NCA), lymphocytes (LCA), and monocytes (MoCA) in SFs obtained from patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA). We also aimed to characterise the relation between chemotactic activity, RANTES, and percentage distribution of leukocytes in SF. SFs from 11 patients with RA and 6 with OA were included in the study. Modified microchamber Boyden method was employed to assess chemotactic activity. Cytological and biochemical analysis of SF was performed. RANTES was measured with ELISA. Rheumatoid SFs were rich in cells with predominance of neutrophiles while osteoarthritic fluids were lymphocytic. RA SFs were also characterised by increased lactoferrin level. Both NCA and LCA were higher in SF from patients with RA (62 +/- 12 and 24 +/- 6 cells/HPF, resp) as compared to patients with OA (23 +/- 6; P < .05 and 6 +/- 2 cells/HPF; P < 0.05). The chemoattractive effect of RA SF was more pronounced on neutrophiles than on lymphocytes. RA SF expressed high RANTES levels (145+/- 36 pg/mL), while OA SF was characterised by only trace amount of this chemokine (2 +/- 1 pg/mL). We found positive correlation of RANTES with chemotactic activity for mononuclear cells (LCA + MoCA; R = 0.61; P < .05). Surprisingly, RANTES correlated also positively with neutrophiles number (R = 0.77; P < 0.001). Rheumatoid SF possesses strong chemotactic potency for leukocytes. RANTES is overexpressed in RA SF and is a potential mediator influencing intensity and

  18. Patterns of compensation of functional deficits of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of pathological syndromes of unknown aetiology, observed at the developmental age. Their common feature is sustained chronic arthritis with flares and remissions. Clinical signs and symptoms include joint pain, periarticular tissue oedema or articular exudate, frequently associated with hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. The intra- and extra-articular structural damage impairs the motion range and smoothness. The disease process may involve any joint. The knee joint is the most frequently affected in oligo- and polyarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine a direct correlation between disorders of knee joint function and the change in the range of motion of the ankle and hip joints of both lower extremities, and the so-called indirect impact of these changes on patients’ posture. Material and methods The study included 36 JIA patients and 56 healthy controls aged 8–16 years. The evaluation was based on physical examination. Results The results showed differences in the values of quality and range of motion between patients and controls. In the patient group pes planovalgus was more frequently associated with knee joint dysfunction along with the inherent restriction of dorsal flexion of the foot. Shortening of the iliotibial band, increased outward rotation of the right lower extremity with enlarged joint contour and augmented inward rotation of the contralateral healthy extremity all proved significant. Changes in motion range in the joints below and over the knee were associated with alterations of antero-posterior spine curvatures and vertebral rotation along the long spinal axis. Based on the results, the mechanism of the compensation is outlined. Conclusions The observed differences in the range and quality of motion in the ankle, hip and spinal joints between patients and healthy children provide evidence that dysfunction of the knee joint affects the function of the other above

  19. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

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    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice.PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators.Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides.We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum.

  20. USE OF SUBCUTANEOUS METHOTREXATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: THE REMARCA TRIAL

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    D. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The early administration of methotrexate (MTX and the use of its high (by the rheumatology practice standards doses contribute to the enhanced efficiency of therapy and the reduced severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the important merits of MTX in the treatment of RA is the possibility of adjusting its dose and choosing its (oral or subcutaneous administration routes, which makes it possible to individualize treatment. Particular emphasis has been recently placed just on a subcutaneous MTX formulation that creates prerequisites for substantially improving the efficiency of RA therapy. The paper gives the data of the REMARCA (Russian investigation of methotrexate and biologicals for early active arthritis trial assessing the results of RA treatment in the use of the subcutaneous MTX dosage form as a first-line drug and in the elaboration of management tactics for this disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation included 191 patients (34 men and 157 women with active RA; of whom 51.8% had very early RA (< 6 months' disease duration. 115 patients with RA completed a 24-month follow-up period; and their data were analyzed in more detail.Results and discussion. The findings may substantiate treatment policy based on the prescription of subcutaneous MTX (without previously administering its oral formulation in patients with early RA and high disease activity, starting the drug at 15 mg/week and rapidly escalating with the highest tolerable doses during 4-8 weeks, which allows remission (or low disease activity in the majority of patients without using glucocorticoids and biological agents.

  1. Increasing feasibility and patient comfort of MRI in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hemke, Robert [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jan van Breemen Institute, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but has practical limitations. Optimizing the scanning protocol is, therefore, necessary to increase feasibility and patient comfort. To determine the feasibility of bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore MRI of knees and to assess the presence of literature-based MRI features in unsedated children with JIA. Children were classified into two clinical subgroups: active arthritis (group 1; n = 29) and inactive disease (group 2; n = 18). MRI features were evaluated using a literature-based score, comprising synovial hypertrophy, cartilage lesions, bone erosions, bone marrow changes, infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity, effusion, tendinopathy and popliteal lymphadenopathy. The MRI examination was successfully completed in all 47 children. No scan was excluded due to poor image quality. Synovial hypertrophy was more frequent in group 1 (36.2%), but was also seen in 19.4% of the knees in group 2. Infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity was more prevalent in group 2 (86.1%; P = 0.008). Reproducibility of the score was good (Cohen kappa, 0.49-0.96). Bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore knee MRI is feasible in the assessment of disease activity in unsedated children with JIA. Signs differing among children with active and inactive disease include infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity and synovial hypertrophy. (orig.)

  2. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol.

  3. Increasing feasibility and patient comfort of MRI in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but has practical limitations. Optimizing the scanning protocol is, therefore, necessary to increase feasibility and patient comfort. To determine the feasibility of bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore MRI of knees and to assess the presence of literature-based MRI features in unsedated children with JIA. Children were classified into two clinical subgroups: active arthritis (group 1; n = 29) and inactive disease (group 2; n = 18). MRI features were evaluated using a literature-based score, comprising synovial hypertrophy, cartilage lesions, bone erosions, bone marrow changes, infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity, effusion, tendinopathy and popliteal lymphadenopathy. The MRI examination was successfully completed in all 47 children. No scan was excluded due to poor image quality. Synovial hypertrophy was more frequent in group 1 (36.2%), but was also seen in 19.4% of the knees in group 2. Infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity was more prevalent in group 2 (86.1%; P = 0.008). Reproducibility of the score was good (Cohen kappa, 0.49-0.96). Bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore knee MRI is feasible in the assessment of disease activity in unsedated children with JIA. Signs differing among children with active and inactive disease include infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity and synovial hypertrophy. (orig.)

  4. Different Risk of Tuberculosis and Efficacy of Isoniazid Prophylaxis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with Biologic Therapy: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ling Liao

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB for rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients receiving biologic therapy, and the effectiveness of isoniazid prophylaxis (INHP in TB prevention. We aimed to examine 1 the incidence rate (IR and risk factors for TB among RA patients receiving different therapies; 2 INHP effectiveness for TB prevention; 3 mortality rates after TB diagnosis in patients receiving different therapies. This retrospective study was conducted using a nationwide database: 168,720 non-RA subjects and a total of 42,180 RA patients including 36,162 csDMARDs-exposed, 3,577 etanercept-exposed, 1,678 adalimumab-exposed and 763 rituximab-exposed patients. TB risk was 2.7-fold higher in RA cohort compared with non-RA group, with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR of 2.58. Advanced age, male, the use of corticosteroids ≧ 5 mg/day, and the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease were risk factors for developing TB. Using csDMARDs-exposed group as reference, aHR of TB was the highest with adalimumab treatment (1.52, followed by etanercept (1.16, and the lowest with rituximab (0.08. INHP could effectively reduce TB risk in biologics-exposed patients. Mortality rates after TB diagnosis were higher in RA patients, particularly the elderly and those with DM, with lower rates in adalimumab-exposed patients compared with csDMARDs-exposed patients. In conclusion, TB risk was increased in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors, but the risk associated with rituximab therapy was relatively low. With the effectiveness of INHP shown in the prevention of biologics-associated TB, stricter implementation of INHP should be beneficial. The mortality from biologics-associated TB may be efficiently reduced through increased awareness.

  5. Alcohol in Primary Care. Differential characteristics between alcohol-dependent patients who are receiving or not receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Miquel, Laia; Moreno-España, Jose; Martínez, Alicia; Ortega, Lluisa; Teixidor, Lidia; Manthey, Jakob; Rehm, Jürgen; Gual, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    primary health care services for other reasons. The aim of the present study is to describe the differential characteristics of AD patients in primary care, distinguishing between those who receive treatment and those who do not, and their reasons for not seeking it. In a cross-sectional study patients were evaluated by their general practitioner (GP) and interviewed by a member of the research team. Sociodemographic, diagnostic and clinical data were collected. From 1,372 patients interviewed in Catalonia, 118 (8.6%) were diagnosed as AD. These patients showed a lower socioeconomic status (48.3% vs 33.3%, odds ratio 2.02), higher unemployment rates (32.2% vs 19.2 %, odds ratio 2.11), and greater psychological distress and disability. Patients with AD receiving treatment (16.9%), were older (44 vs 36 years of age), reported higher unemployment rates (66% vs 25.5%, odds ratio 6.32) and higher daily alcohol consumption (61.5 vs 23.7 grams), suggesting a more advanced disease. Patients with AD in general showed a higher degree of comorbidity compared to other patients, with patients in treatment showing the most elevated level. The main reasons given for not seeking treatment were shame, fear of giving up drinking and barriers to treatment. Taken together, the data suggest the need to implement earlier strategies for the detection and treatment of AD. PMID:26990264

  6. Alcohol in Primary Care. Differential characteristics between alcohol-dependent patients who are receiving or not receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Miquel, Laia; Moreno-España, Jose; Martínez, Alicia; Ortega, Lluisa; Teixidor, Lidia; Manthey, Jakob; Rehm, Jürgen; Gual, Antoni

    2016-03-02

    primary health care services for other reasons. The aim of the present study is to describe the differential characteristics of AD patients in primary care, distinguishing between those who receive treatment and those who do not, and their reasons for not seeking it. In a cross-sectional study patients were evaluated by their general practitioner (GP) and interviewed by a member of the research team. Sociodemographic, diagnostic and clinical data were collected. From 1,372 patients interviewed in Catalonia, 118 (8.6%) were diagnosed as AD. These patients showed a lower socioeconomic status (48.3% vs 33.3%, odds ratio 2.02), higher unemployment rates (32.2% vs 19.2 %, odds ratio 2.11), and greater psychological distress and disability. Patients with AD receiving treatment (16.9%), were older (44 vs 36 years of age), reported higher unemployment rates (66% vs 25.5%, odds ratio 6.32) and higher daily alcohol consumption (61.5 vs 23.7 grams), suggesting a more advanced disease. Patients with AD in general showed a higher degree of comorbidity compared to other patients, with patients in treatment showing the most elevated level. The main reasons given for not seeking treatment were shame, fear of giving up drinking and barriers to treatment. Taken together, the data suggest the need to implement earlier strategies for the detection and treatment of AD.

  7. Blood levels of CD11b+ memory T lymphocytes are selectively upregulated in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Petersen, A A; Skjødt, H;

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion molecules CD11b (a beta2-integrin component) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on blood leukocytes were studied by flow cytometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The fractions of CD4+ cells co-expressing CD11b were elevated in 16 patients with active RA compared with those in 16 RA patie...... patients who improved during therapy and 8 healthy controls: 0.8+/-0.12% (mean+/-SEM) versus 0.3+/-0.06% (p...

  8. The characteristics of bony ankylosis of the facet joint of the upper cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Iizuka, Haku; Nishinome, Masahiro; Sorimachi, Yasunori; Ara, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Iizuka, Yoichi; Takagishi, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the bony ankylosis of the upper cervical spine facet joints in patients with a cervical spine involvement due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using computed tomography (CT) and then examined the characteristics of the patients showing such ankylosis. Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment for RA involving the cervical spine were reviewed. The radiographic diagnoses included atlanto-axial subluxation in 30 cases, vertical subluxation (VS) in 10 cas...

  9. CLINICAL-PATHOGENIC IMPORTANCE OF CORRELATION BETWEEN HISTOCHEMICAL INDICES OF BLOOD SYSTEM AND RHEUMATOID FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    A B Zborovsky; B V Zavodovsky; A V Rvacliev; Bykova, O.V.; T V Serdiukova; Pankratova TA

    2001-01-01

    Summary Relation between rheumatoid factor (RF) and levels of Myeloperoxidase (MPO), Na*-K +-A TPh- ase (ATPh-ase), 5'-Nucleotidase (5 ’-NT), Succinate dehydrogenase (SDG) in cells of peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was investigated. 83 RA patients were observed. The activities of MPO, ATP-ase, 5’NT, SDG in blood cells were determined by hystochemical methods. In patients having increasing MPO activity in monocytes, normal level of SDG in lymphocytes an...

  10. Psychosocial management of chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Louise

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous reviews and meta-analyses that confirm that psychological therapy is efficacious for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in terms of managing pain. Therefore, the literature has moved on to answer additional questions: 1) What types of interventions are most strongly supported by the current evidence? 2) Do different patients benefit from different approaches? 3) When is it best to intervene? 4) What modalities are best for administering the intervention? 5) What model of care should we be proposing that will result in widespread implementation and will ensure access for patients with RA? This review concludes that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most efficacious treatment for pain management in RA; however, there are indications that mindfulness may have particular benefits for patients with a history of depression. CBT is most effective when administered early in the course of the disease. However, there is at present little evidence to confirm whether or not psychosocial interventions are effective for patients with comorbid psychological disorders. One of the major challenges is ensuring access to effective interventions for patients, particularly early on in the course of the disease, with a view to preventing physical and psychological morbidity. A stepped-care model is proposed; however, we urgently need more, better-quality trials of minimal interventions, particularly in Internet-delivered CBT, which appears promising and may form the cornerstone of future stepped-care models for providing psychosocial care to patients with RA. PMID:27042139

  11. Temporomandibular joint alterations and their orofacial complications in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Renata Teixeira de; Braga, Flávia Silva Farah Ferreira; Brito, Fernanda; Capelli Junior, Jonas; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo; Sztajnbok, Flávio Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can have alterations in bone metabolism and skeletal growth, as well as damage to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which can generate extra and/or intraoral alterations, resulting in craniofacial disorders. Our goal is to carry out a review of the literature on orofacial alterations in patients with JIA. Among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth, caused by dysfunctions in the TMJ region, seem highly prevalent in these patients. The most often found alterations are: retrognathia, micrognathia, anterior open bite, dental crowding, facial asymmetry and mouth opening limitation. Thus, the rheumatologist becomes a key agent in the early detection of these disorders, helping with patient referral to a dentist. The diagnosis, in turn, should be performed by the orthodontist, using clinical examination and imaging methods, allowing early treatment and a favorable prognosis. TMJ disorders should be treated by a multidisciplinary team, including pharmacological treatment for pain control and dental care through functional appliance and/or orthodontic therapy, physical therapy and sometimes, speech therapy. We conclude that among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth generated by dysfunctions in the TMJ region seem highly prevalent. Such dysfunctions can cause mainly open bite, mandibular retrusion, micrognathia, dental crowding and facial asymmetry. The rheumatologist can detect these alterations at an early stage, with immediate patient referral to a team that should preferably be a multidisciplinary one, consisting of an orthodontist, physical therapist and speech therapist, to reduce future occlusal and mandibular growth complications.

  12. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome compared to the normal population. Patients with psoriasis and PsA may also have increased risk from nonconventional risk factors such as raised levels of homocysteine and excessive alcohol consumption. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on CVD and all cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and PsA. METHODS: Data sources: All studies identified from a Medline (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) search pertaining to CVD, individual risk factors in psoriasis, and PsA were included. Study selection: Studies included a healthy reference population, were published between 1975 and 2009, and were written in English. RESULTS: Our search yielded 14 studies that documented rates of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA compared to controls. Substantial evidence points to elevated risk of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA. CONCLUSION: It remains difficult to conclude if risk factors are caused by psoriasis or share a common pathogenesis. Physicians treating patients with psoriasis and PsA must be aware of all potential cardiovascular risk factors in their patients.

  13. Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis in Egyptian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Its Relation to Disease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawhya R. Elshereef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To detect the frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients without clinically evident atherosclerosis and to correlate its presence with the disease activity. Patients and Methods. Our study includes 112 RA patients (group 1 and 40 healthy controls (group 11. All patients and controls were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory investigations. Carotid intima media wall thickness (IMT and carotid plaques were measured in both groups by B-mode ultrasonography; also color duplex Doppler ultrasound of the brachial artery was done to detect endothelial function. Results. There is atherosclerosis in 31.3% of asymptomatic RA patients compared with only 5% in controls P=0.003**. A significant difference was detected in patients with and without atherosclerosis regarding duration of the disease P=0.0001*** and patient’s age P=0.01*. There is highly statistical significant correlation between atherosclerosis and disease activity index. Conclusion. The frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis was high in long-term active RA patients.

  14. Health status, adherence with health recommendations, self-efficacy and social support in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, Erik; Rasker, Johannes J.; Seydel, Erwin; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed in 86 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to assess their health problems, the problems they experience in adhering to health recommendations and the relationships of these problems with self-efficacy and social support. Feeling dependent, disability and pain were the most

  15. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...

  16. Long-term follow-up of a high-intensity exercise program in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. de Jong (Zuzana); M. Munneke (Marten); H.M. Kroon (Herman); D. van Schaardenburg (Dirkjan); B.A.C. Dijkmans (Ben); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); T.P.M. Vliet Vlieland (Theodora)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe aims of this study were to describe rheumatoid arthritis patients' compliance with continued exercise after participation in a 2-year supervised high-intensity exercise program and to investigate if the initially achieved effectiveness and safety were sustained. Data were gathered by

  17. Estimation of heritability of different outcomes for genetic studies of TNFi response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umicevic-Mirkov, M.; Janss, L.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Laar, M.A. van der; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Guchelaar, H.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Albers, C.A.; Coenen, M.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pharmacogenetic studies of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have largely relied on the changes in complex disease scores, such as disease activity score 28 (DAS28), as a measure of treatment response. It is expected that genetic

  18. Correlations between fatigue and disease duration, disease activity, and pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth Madsen, S.; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B.; Stockmarr, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients suffer from disabling fatigue but the causes of this condition are unknown. Our aim was to assess which of the variables disease activity, disease duration, and pain is associated with fatigue. METHOD: We conducted a systematic literature search...

  19. Self-reported health outcomes in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis randomized to two etanercept regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, R; Robertson, David; Molta, C T;

    2012-01-01

    Background Moderate/severe psoriasis combined with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impairs health-related quality of life (QoL). Etanercept, a fully human tumour necrosis factor-a receptor fusion protein, is approved for treatment of both diseases. Objective To compare patient-reported health outcomes...

  20. Methods of deriving EULAR/ACR recommendations on reporting disease activity in clinical trials of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karonitsch, T.; Aletaha, D.; Boers, M.; Bombardieri, S.; Combe, B.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Felson, D.; Gomez-Reino, J.; Keystone, E.; Kvien, T.K.; Martin-Mola, E.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Richards, P.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Siegel, J.; Smolen, J.S.; Sokka, T.; Heijde, D. van der; Vollenhoven, R. van; Ward, M.; Wells, G.; Zink, A.; Landewe, R.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To use an evidence-based and consensus-based approach to elaborate recommendations on how to report disease activity in clinical trials of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) endorsed by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). MET

  1. Perceived need to take medication is associated with medication non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwikker, H.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Broeder, A.A. den; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This is the first cross-sectional study that aims to examine associations between beliefs about medication and non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, taking potential psychological confounders into account. METHODS: Eligible

  2. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  3. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms and biological pathways associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Palermo, Giuseppe; Johansen, Julia S;

    2012-01-01

    Recently, two genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with the treatment response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to replicate these results and identify SNPs...... and the possible biological pathways associated with the treatment response to TNFα inhibitors....

  4. Case Report: Safety and Efficacy of Tocilizumab in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Filippo Iebba; Fiorella Di Sora; Agapito Tarasi; Wilma Leti; Tatiana Montella; Francesco Montella

    2012-01-01

    Tocilizumab is a monoclonal humanized anti-IL-6-receptor antibody used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The safety of tocilizumab in HCV patients is an open question. We report on safety and efficacy of tocilizumab in a 71-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic hepatitis C. Monotherapy with tocilizumab (8 mg/kg every 4 weeks, i.v.) was prescribed after the discontinuation, determined by clinical inefficacy, of anti-TNF-alfa agents (adalimumab and, subsequently, etaner...

  5. The Effect of Milnacipran on Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with Widespread Pain: A Randomized Blinded Crossover Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne C.; Massarotti, Elena; Edwards, Robert R.; Lu, Bing; Liu, ChihChin; Lo, Yuanyu; Wohlfahrt, Alyssa; Kim, Nancy D.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical trials have shown that serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, such as milnacipran, decrease pain in non-inflammatory pain conditions like fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis. We examined the effect of milnacipran on self-reported pain intensity and experimental pain sensitivity among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with widespread pain and stable RA disease activity. Methods In this double-blind, crossover study, RA patients with widespread pain, on a stable treatment regimen, were randomized (via a random number generator) to receive milnacipran 50 mg twice daily or placebo for 6 weeks, followed by a 3-week washout and crossed over to the other arm for the remaining 6 weeks. The primary outcome was change in average pain intensity, assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory short form. The sample size was calculated to detect a 30% improvement in pain with power = 0.80 and alpha = 0.05. Results Of the 43 randomized subjects, 41 received study drug, and 32 completed the 15-week study per protocol. On a 0–10 scale, average pain intensity decreased by 0.39 (95% CI −1.27, 0.49; P = 0.37) more points during 6 weeks of milnacipran treatment compared to placebo. In the subgroup of subjects with swollen joint count ≤ 1, average pain intensity decreased by 1.14 (95% CI −2.26, −0.01; P= 0.04) more points during 6 weeks of milnacipran compared to placebo. Common adverse events included nausea (26.8%) and loss of appetite (9.7%). Conclusion Compared to placebo, milnacipran did not improve overall, self-reported pain intensity among subjects with widespread pain taking stable RA medications. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01207453 PMID:26628607

  6. Comparison of interferon {gamma} release assays and conventional screening tests before tumour necrosis factor {alpha} blockade in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and conventional screening tests in patients with inflammatory arthritis undergoing screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) before treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) compounds. METHODS: Successive patients were subjected to conventional LTBI screening, including a tuberculin skin test (TST). The T-SPOT.TB test was performed on all patients and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test was performed on a large subset. The results of the IGRAs were compared with the results of conventional screening tests. RESULTS: A total 150 patients were evaluated. The majority (57.9%) had rheumatoid arthritis. Previous vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guerin was confirmed in 82% of patients. No patient had received prior anti-TB treatment. A total of 57 patients (38.0%) had at least one positive conventional risk factor. In contrast, an unequivocally positive T-SPOT.TB test was seen in only 14\\/143 (9.8%). There was 98.2% agreement between the two IGRAs. Statistically significant associations were found between each of the IGRAs and both TST and risk history, but not chest x-ray (CXR). A positive IGRA result was significantly associated with increased age. TB was not reactivated in any patient during the follow-up period. Interpretation: This study suggests that IGRAs may be useful when screening for LTBI before anti-TNFalpha therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The observations reported here also highlight the inadequate performance of CXR as a marker of LTBI.

  7. Clinical experience with the interleukin-1β blocker canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout: abolishment of arthritis and prevention of exacerbations when allopurinol is used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Eliseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interleukin (IL-1β inhibitor canakinumab may be effective in relieving an acute gout attack and in preventing an arthritis exacerbation. However, there are insufficient data on the use of this agent to abolish and prevent arthritis in patients who are resistant to another anti-inflammatory therapy.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of the interleukin (IL-1β inhibitor canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout, who are resistant to traditional anti-inflammatory therapy, in order to abolish arthritis and to prevent its exacerbations when adjusting the optimal dose of allopurinol.Subjects and methods. An open-labeled prospective study was conducted in 20 patients (mean age, 54.5±12.7 years with chronic tophaceous gout. Serum uric acid (UA levels were 486.3±135.2 μmol/l. The inclusion criteria were crystal-verified gout; arthritis affecting more than 5 joints; inefficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, glucocorticoids (GCs, or colchicine when used for over a month; more than 4 arthritis attacks during year. The exclusion criteria were Stage ≥3 chronic kidney disease, infectious diseases. All the patents received a single subcutaneous injection of canakinumab 150 mg. NSAIDs and/or colchicine was discontinued a day before the injection. The number of swollen and tender joints and visual analogue scale (VAS pain intensity were estimated before and 14 and 120 days after the injection; SF-36v1 and HAQ changes were assessed before and 120 days after the injection. 14 days after the injection, all the patients were given allopurinol, the dosage of which was individually adjusted, by starting on 100 mg/day and subsequently increasing by 100 mg/dayevery 2 weeks (not more than 800 mg/day until the goal UA level (<360 μmol/l was reached.Results. 14 days after canakinumab injection, arthritis was abolished in 8 (40% patients and 3 patients needed to continue NSAID therapy. Following 14 days of the injection

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  10. Comparison of in vivo segmental foot motion during walking and step descent in patients with midfoot arthritis and matched asymptomatic control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Smita; Baumhauer, Judith F; Tome, Josh; Nawoczenski, Deborah A

    2009-05-29

    The purpose of this study was to compare in vivo segmental foot motion during walking and step descent in patients with midfoot arthritis and asymptomatic control subjects. Segmental foot motion during walking and step descent was assessed using a multi-segment foot model in 30 patients with midfoot arthritis and 20 age, gender and BMI matched controls. Peak and total range of motion (ROM), referenced to subtalar neutral, were examined for each of the following dependent variables: 1st metatarso-phalangeal (MTP1) dorsiflexion, 1st metatarsal (MT1) plantarflexion, ankle dorsiflexion, calcaneal eversion and forefoot abduction. The results showed that, compared to level walking, step descent required greater MTP1 dorsiflexion (pwalking. Patients with midfoot arthritis responded differently to the step task compared to control subjects in terms of MT1 and calcaneus eversion excursion. During walking, patients with midfoot arthritis showed significantly less MT1 plantarflexion excursion compared to control subjects (p=0.03). However, during step descent, both groups showed similar MT1 plantarflexion excursion. During walking, patients with midfoot arthritis showed similar calcaneus eversion excursion compared to control subjects. However, during step descent, patients with midfoot arthritis showed significantly greater calcaneus eversion excursion compared to control subjects (p=0.03). Independently or in combination, these motions may contribute to articular stress and consequently to symptoms in patients with midfoot arthritis.

  11. Correlations between immunogenicity, drug levels, and disease activity in an Italian cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with tocilizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benucci, Maurizio; Meacci, Francesca; Grossi, Valentina; Infantino, Maria; Manfredi, Mariangela; Bellio, Emanuele; Bellio, Valerio; Li Gobbi, Francesca; Bazzichi, Laura; Moscato, Paolo; Caputo, Dario; Saviola, Gianantonio; Talotta, Rossella; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the real-life immunogenicity of anti-drug antibodies, drug levels, and disease activity in an Italian cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). We evaluated 126 TCZ-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (16 males and 110 females; mean age 59±12 years, range 26–83; mean disease duration 11±5 years) with inadequate 12-week response to any synthetic and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, in a retrospective analysis. One-hundred and seven patients were treated with methotrexate mean dose 12.6±1.3 mg/week in combination with TCZ, 13 received TCZ monotherapy, and six received leflunomide 20 mg/day plus TCZ; all patients were treated with prednisone mean dose 6.4±1.2 mg/day. They had a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) of >3.2, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of >30 mm/hour, and CRP levels of >1.0 mg/dL. We evaluated at baseline and after 6 months of treatment: DAS28; rheumatoid factor (RF) IgM, IgA, and IgG; anti-citrullinated peptide antibody; ESR; CRP; TNF-α; and IL-6. TCZ and anti-TCZ antibodies were detected using LISA-TRACKER Duo TCZ. TCZ levels of 10 µg/mL high. After 6 months of treatment only one patient was positive for anti-TCZ antibodies. There were correlations between DAS28, ESR, and CRP and IL-6 levels in all patients. Comparison of the 84 patients with TCZ levels of 10 µg/mL showed the following differences: DAS28: 3.09±1.32 vs 2.78±1.32, P=0.0005; ESR: 27±14.8 vs 14±12 mm/hour, P=0.0001; CRP: 1.47±1.05 vs 0.65±0.80 mg/dL, P=0.0086; TNF-α: 10.2±1.2 vs 9.9±1.1 pg/mL, P=0.999; IL-6: 3.65±4.75 vs 3.62±4.41 pg/mL, P=0.97; anti-citrullinated peptide antibody: 85.2±93.7 vs 86.7±90.3 IU/mL, P=0.94; RF IgM: 72.4±62.7 vs 68.3±61.6 IU/mL, P=0.754; RF IgA: 41.7±36.4 vs 47.8±42.1 U/mL, P=0.449; and RF IgG: 46.4±46.1 vs 59.3±58.2 U/mL, P=0.212. These findings show that the occurrence of anti-drug antibodies against TCZ is very rare and that

  12. Aerobic exercise improves oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Zeynep; Duger, Tulin; Atalay-Guzel, Nevin; Aral, Arzu; Basturk, Bilkay; Haznedaroglu, Seminur; Goker, Berna

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Although oxidative stress is known to be present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of exercise on oxidative parameters are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on serum oxidant and antioxidant levels in patients with RA. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients with RA and 10 age-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. All participants wore polar telemeters and walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes at a speed eliciting 60-75% of maximal heart rates. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately and 24 hours after exercise and malondialdehyde (MDA) and total sulfhydrile group (RSH) levels were measured. [Results] Both groups had similar heart rates during the test but the treadmill speed of the RA patients was significantly lower than that of the healthy volunteers. Serum MDA levels were lower than in both groups immediately after exercise, with greater decrements in the RA patients than controls. MDA levels returned to baseline 24 hours after the exercise only in the controls; they remained low in the RA patients. There was a slight increase in serum RSH levels after exercise compared to baseline in both groups. [Conclusion] Moderate intensity treadmill exercise did not have any adverse effect on the oxidant-antioxidant balance. The results suggest that such an exercise may be safely added to the rehabilitation program of RA for additional antioxidant effects. Morever, this antioxidant environment is maintained longer in RA patients.

  13. Interplay between patient global assessment, pain, and fatigue and influence of other clinical disease activity measures in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsmose, Emilie Lund; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-01-01

    analog scales (VAS) in the daily clinic by patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Associations with other measures of disease activity were also examined. Traditional disease activity data on 221 RA patients with active disease planned to initiate biological treatment were extracted from...

  14. Organizing Pneumonia Preceding Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiaki Kinoshita; Atsuhiko Sakamoto; Kouko Hidaka

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are susceptible to interstitial lung disease, and joint manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis usually precede lung involvements by several years. Organizing pneumonia, as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis, is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain currently unknown. We present a case and a literature review of patients who were pathologically diagnosed with organizing pneumonia first and met the diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis...

  15. THE USE OF PREPARATIONS BASED ON BACTERIAL LYSATES IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    Kolyada T.І.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the therapy of decompensated form of chronic tonsillitis (CT were used as immunomodulatory agents IRS and Ismigen. These bacterial lysates differ in the bacterial setting, the method of preparation (chemical, mechanical and the method of application.Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the important factors that could significantly complicate the therapy of chronic tonsillitis. RA is a chronic immune inflammatory disease that progressively affects connective tissue mostly of the peripheral joints and it has a wide range of extra-articular manifestations. The aim of our study was to explore the dynamics of immunologic indicators during the active disease and treatments in patients with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis, including tonsillitis complicated with RA. Materials and methods. 33 patients with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis in active period of disease observed during the study. Patients were divided into the following groups: 24 persons with the decompensate form of CT, 9 persons with the rheumatoid arthritis and 9 persons with the decompensate form of CT complicated with RA in remission stage. The control group consisted of 15 apparently healthy persons. Concentrations of serum IgA, IgM, IgG were determined by the method of radial immune diffusion by Manchini. Levels of sIgA, IFN – γ and rheumatoid factor in the blood serum of patients were evaluated using ELISA test systems of "Vector-best". Patients of group CTD (with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis were divided into subgroups CTD1 and CTD2, depending on the applied treatment. Both subgroups treated with standard therapy for two weeks and received Derynat during 1 month by 2 drops in each nostril twice a day. After 30 days of the standard therapy beginning the subgroup CTD1 patients received IRS 19 during two weeks, one intranasal inhalation in each nostril 3 times a day. Patients subgroup CTD2 and CTD+RA instead IRS 19 received Ismigen after 30 days of

  16. Serum levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP): a rapid decrease in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis undergoing intravenous steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoumal, M; Haberhauer, G; Feyertag, J; Kittl, E M; Bauer, K; Dunky, A

    2006-09-01

    To examine the influence of intravenous steroid-treatment (IST) on serum levels of Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Serum levels of COMP and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in 12 patients with highly active RA (Steinbrocker stages II-IV) and in 5 patients with highly active reactive arthritis (ReA) (positive testing for HLA-B27) before starting daily IST. Patients received a total steroid dosage between 100 and 500 mg of prednisolone. COMP was measured by a commercially available sandwich-type ELISA-kit developed by AnaMar Medical AB, Sweden. Statistical evaluation was calculated by paired t test. In the RA group, COMP levels ranged from 6.3 to 19.4 U/l (mean 12.9 U/l), CRP from 5 to 195 mg/l (mean 77.8 mg/l), the COMP levels of the ReA group ranged from 5.1 to 7.4 U/l (mean 7.9 U/l), the CRP levels from 13 to 126 mg/l (mean 49 mg/l). We found a significant difference between the initial COMP levels in RA+ and ReA patients (P<0.005). In contrast to the ReA group, serum-COMP levels of RA+ patients (P<0.004) and the VAS (P<0.0001) decreased significantly within 2-10 days after the first treatment with steroids. The CRP levels remained unchanged in both groups. Our results indicate that the intravenous treatment with steroids in patients with highly active RA leads to a significant decrease of cartilage degradation. COMP seems to be a valuable parameter not even as a prognostic factor, but as a marker for monitoring the therapy response in patients with RA. PMID:16485108

  17. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Ruiz, Andrés Felipe; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique

    2014-12-01

    This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART). A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years); these patients were from a cohort of 1,364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9). The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4%) and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1). The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively). The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  18. The use of upper limb orthoses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a literature review in the field of occupational therapy

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    Talita Silvério de Souza Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic disease that most often affects smaller joints such as hands and wrists. It may cause deformities that jeopardize hand function, thus impacting the subject occupational performance. In order to assist the hand function restoration, occupational therapists often use orthosis to improve autonomy and/or independence to perform daily activities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Objective: This study aimed to identify the upper limb’s orthoses used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, who were assisted by the Occupational Therapy, featuring the population, the type of research and the outcomes obtained. Method: This study is literature review and its selection criteria consists of publications in English, Spanish and Portuguese published within the last ten years, divided between experimental, observational and case studies, all with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and assisted by an occupational therapist. Twelve articles were selected for review. Findings: The literature review points out the benefits achieved through the use of the orthosis to manual dexterity, grip strength, pain relief and aspects related to comfort and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: In this context, the orthosis appears as an important assistive technology resource to keep function and restore compromised activities.

  19. Treatment adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Xia Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yunfei Xia,1,* Rulan Yin,1,2,* Ting Fu,1,2 Lijuan Zhang,1,2 Qiuxiang Zhang,1,2 Genkai Guo,1 Liren Li,2 Zhifeng Gu11Department of Rheumatology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 2School of Nursing, Nantong University, Nantong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Nonadherence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs may lead to joint damage and function loss. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore Chinese RA patients’ adherence rates and investigate potential risk factors for nonadherence.Methods: A total of 122 RA patients were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University from January 2014 to April 2015. Patients were asked to complete a set of standardized self-report questionnaires (Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Short Form-36 questionnaire, 28-joint Disease Activity Score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Visual Analog Scale. Independent samples t-tests, chi-square analyses, and logistic regression modeling were used to analyze these data.Results: Based on Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, 38% of the patients adhered to DMARDs. Adherence was associated with education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs. Other demographic and clinical characteristics were not associated with adherence. Logistic regression models identified income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs as predictors of medication nonadherence.Conclusion: In this study, 62% of patients with RA were not adherent to their DMARD prescription. Education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were associated with medication adherence, and income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were independent predictors of medication adherence in patients with RA. These findings could help medical personnel develop helpful interventions to improve

  20. Drug usage analysis and health care resources consumption in naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Sangiorgi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diego Sangiorgi,1 Maurizio Benucci,2 Carmela Nappi,3 Valentina Perrone,1 Stefano Buda,1 Luca Degli Esposti11CliCon S.r.l., Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, 2Unit of Rheumatology, S. Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence, 3Bristol Myers Squibb S.r.l., Rome, ItalyObjectives: The use of biologic agents has revolutionized the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in the past 2 decades. These biologic agents directly target molecules and cells involved in the pathogenesis of RA. The purpose of this study was to assess the usage of biologic agents in terms of persistence to treatment, dose escalation, and consumption of health care resources (hospitalizations, drugs, and outpatients service in the real clinical practice in naïve patients with RA.Methods: We conducted a real-world, retrospective, observational cohort study based on data obtained from administrative databases of three Local Health Units in Italy. The population included adults diagnosed with RA who had at least one prescription between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011, for a biologic that was approved for treatment of RA. The patients were followed for 12 months after enrollment. The clinical characteristics of the patients enrolled in this study were also investigated in the 1-year period before the index date. The main and secondary endpoints were evaluated only in biologic-naïve patients without switches. The overall health care costs for patients were evaluated.Results: A total of 594 patients met the study criteria (mean age 53.5±13.5, female:male ratio =3:1. Thirty-nine percent received etanercept, 25% adalimumab, 14% infliximab, 10% abatacept, 9% tocilizumab, and 3% golimumab. After 1 year of observation, patients showed similar use of other RA-related medication. For the naïve patients without switches, the persistence levels were: 78% for etanercept, 72% for tocilizumab, 71% for adalimumab, 69% for infliximab, and 64% for abatacept. For all agents, dose

  1. Plasma and synovial fluid meclofenamic acid concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koup, J R; Thomas, D; Tucker, E; Black, A; Ruderman, M; Dixon, J A; Kinkel, A

    1988-01-01

    We have measured plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of meclofenamic acid at 2, 4, 8, and 12 h during steady-state administration (100 mg three times daily for 4-7 days). Paired plasma and synovial samples were obtained pre-treatment and at one of the above times in twelve patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the extent of protein binding of meclofenamic acid was assessed in vitro in the pre-treatment plasma and synovial fluid specimens. Peak total concentrations of 1.73 and 0.86 micrograms.ml-1 were observed in plasma (at 2 h) and synovial fluid (at 4 h) respectively. The extent of protein binding was 99.7 and 99.6% (not significantly different) in plasma and synovial fluid respectively. The results of this study are compared to those from similar reported studies of other nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory compounds.

  2. Risk of Lymphoma and Solid Cancer among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Primary Care Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Lindegaard, Hanne Merete; Vestergaard, Hanne;

    2014-01-01

    lymphoproliferative malignancies or solid cancers. These risk estimates did not change when eosinophilia, CRP, and comorbidities were included in the models. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of patients with RA of short or long duration recruited from a primary care resource, RA was not associated with an increased...... risk of lymphoproliferative or solid cancers during 4 years of follow-up, when the models were adjusted for confounders. Blood eosinophilia could not be identified as a mediator of cancer development in the present setting.......BACKGROUND: Several studies have demonstrated an association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and lymphoproliferative malignancies, but pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated 1) the risk of lymphoproliferative malignancies and solid tumors in adults with RA identified in primary...

  3. Severe drug hypersensitivity syndrome due to sulphasalazine in patient with rheumatoid arthritis

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    W. Grassi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome, also known as Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms is a severe adverse reaction characterized by clinical manifestations including fever, skin eruption, lymphoadenopathy, associated with eosinophilia, leukocytosis and multiple visceral involvement, with 10% of mortality due to development of multiple organ failure. This reaction usually occurs between two and six-eight weeks after the beginning of the treatment and may not resolve with interruption of the suspected drug. Sulfonamides, anticonvulsant, allopurinol are the most frequently involved molecules, but recently cases have been described also with gabapentin and strontium ranelate. In the present report we describe a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis who presented severe drug hypersensitivity syndrome, with liver and kidney involvement due to sulphasalazine.

  4. Moraxella lacunata infection associated with septicemia, endocarditis, and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient undergoing hemodialysis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Asami; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of both endocarditis and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient caused by Moraxella lacunata and successful management of the infection with antimicrobial therapy. The route of entry leading to bacteremia may have been the oral cavity given the poor oral hygiene of the patient as evidenced by bleeding gums. We hypothesize that the bacteremia led to septic arthritis and mitral valve infective endocarditis. In this case report, we also review the literature on M. lacunata infections and conclude that this organism should be considered in bilateral septic arthritis in a patient with underlying heart abnormalities and/or with renal failure.

  5. Usefulness of Ultrasound Imaging in Detecting Psoriatic Arthritis of Fingers and Toes in Patients with Psoriasis

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    Clara De simone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Given that clinical evaluation may underestimate the joint damage and that early treatment can slow down psoriatic arthritis (PsA progression, screening psoriasis patients with imaging tools that can depict early PsA changes would entail clear benefits. Objective. To compare the ability of X-ray and ultrasound (US examination in detecting morphological abnormalities consistent with early PsA in patients with psoriasis, using rheumatological evaluation as the gold standard for diagnosis. Methods. Patients with chronic plaque psoriasis and no previous PsA diagnosis attending our outpatient dermatology clinic and reporting finger/toe joint and/or tendon pain underwent X-ray and US evaluation; they were subsequently referred to a rheumatologist for clinical examination and review of imaging findings. Results. Abnormal US and/or X-ray findings involving at least one finger and/or toe (joints and/or tendons were seen in 36/52 patients: 11 had one or more X-ray abnormalities, including erosion, joint space narrowing, new bone formation, periarticular soft tissue swelling, and periarticular osteoporosis; 36 had suspicious changes on US. Conclusion. US proved valuable in detecting joint and/or tendon abnormalities in the fingers and toes of patients with suspicious changes. The dermatologist should consider US to obtain an accurate assessment of suspicious findings.

  6. SAFETY OF USING METHOTREXATE SOLUTION FOR SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    Yu. V. Muravyev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the safety of treatment with methotrexate (MT solution for subcutaneous injections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. 237 RA patients enrolled in the study within the REMARCA protocol were given MT solution for subcutaneous injections (Metoject to assess the standard parameters of therapy safety.Results. Overall, adverse events (AE were noted in 49 (21% patients. In 30 (30% of them RA duration was less than 6 months (Group 1 and in 19 (14% – more than 6 months (Group 2, in most cases average MT dose was 20.9±3.45 mg/week. Elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, nausea, postinjection reactions, alopecia, rash, infections, and leukopenia, were common (> 1%, but <10%; diarrhea, metallic taste in the mouth, soft tissue abscess/infiltration developing far from the injection site, were uncommon (the WHO term corresponding to 0.1–1%. AE required MT discontinuation in 4.2% of the patients.Conclusion. The results of the study allow discussing subcutaneous MT administration before treatment with biologicals, which makes it possible not only to reduce financial expenditures, but also to improve patient safety

  7. Level of knowledge and sources of information about the rheumatoid arthritis in Estonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Põlluste, Kaja; Kallikorm, Riina; Lember, Margus

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this paper was to find out how many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) know about several aspects of disease, to explain the associations between the level of self-rated knowledge and patients' background and health status and to compare the importance of the main sources of information. A random sample (n = 1,259) of adult Estonian RA patients was selected from the Estonian Health Insurance Fund Database. The patients completed a self-administered questionnaire, which included information about their socio-demographic and disease characteristics, use of health services, information about the disease, and sources of information. Regression analysis was used to calculate the associations between the independent variables and level of self-rated knowledge about several aspects of RA. The results of the study indicated that the self-reported ratings of knowledge about the disease in Estonian RA patients were rather low. Health professionals were mentioned as the primary sources of information, but the longer disease history and more frequent use of health services as considerable predictors of higher ratings of knowledge refer to role of personal experience in obtaining knowledge about the disease as well.

  8. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A Comparison to Matched Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Melson, Paula G.; Darnell, Shannon C.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (P = .011) and hip flexion (P < .001) compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (P = .028) and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (P = .024) and take-off (P = .004). In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (R2 = .477, SEE = .131). Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA. PMID:20148070

  9. Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on the Rehabilitation and Quality of Life in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

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    Lee Sang-Hoon

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effects of bee venom acupuncture(BVA on the rehabilitation and quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis(RA patients Methods: Patients with RA were treated with the BVA therapy twice a week for 3 months. Tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, morning stiffness, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate(ESR, C-reactive protein(CRP, patient global assessment, physician global assessment, Korean health assessment questionnaire(KHAQ were estimated and analyzed before and after BVA therapy. Results: Tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, morning stiffness showed significant decrease after BVA therapy. But, as acute inflammatory reactants, ESR showed no significant difference and CRP showed significant increase after BVA therapy. Patient global assessment, physician global assessment, and KHAQ index showed significant improvement after BVA therapy. Conclusions: BVA therapy can improve rehabilitation and health-related quality of life in RA patients as well as clinical symptoms and signs. Further study is required in more population with large scale including acute inflammatory reaction of BVA therapy.

  10. Regional differences of vitamin D deficiency in rheumatoid arthritis patients in Italy

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    M. Rossini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is very common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among the different Italian regions and whether these variations are associated with different severity of the disease. The study includes 581 consecutive RA patients (464 women, not taking vitamin D supplements, from 22 Italian rheumatology centres uniformly distributed across Italy. Together with parameters of disease activity (disease activity score 28, functional impairment (activities of daily living and health assessment questionnaire disability index and mean sun exposure time, all patients had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD measured in a centralized laboratory. Vitamin D deficiency (25OHD level <20 ng/mL was very frequent among RA patients; its prevalence was 60%, 52% and 38% in southern, central and northern Italy, respectively. Mean disease activity and disability scores were worse in southern regions of Italy. These scores were inversely related to 25OHD levels and this correlation remained statistically significant after adjusting for both body mass index (BMI and sun exposure time. However, disease severity remained significantly higher in southern regions versus central-northern Italy after adjustment also for serum 25OHD levels, age and BMI. In RA Italian patients there are significant regional differences in the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency explained by different BMI, and sun exposure time, and inversely associated with disease activity and disability scores.

  11. Sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurizky, Patricia Shu; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da

    2012-12-01

    Psoriasis is a cutaneous-articular disease, whose incidence ranges from 1% to 3%. Stress tends to be a triggering or aggravating factor in psoriasis. In addition, the disease itself can generate emotional stress because of its lesions. Several psychological disorders can be associated with psoriasis, and feelings such as rage, depression, shame, and anxiety have been commonly reported, which can culminate in social isolation and sexual dysfunction. Despite being a common complaint among patients with psoriasis, sexual dysfunction has been rarely reported in the literature. This study aimed at performing a systematic review of the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, assessing the role played by factors such as depression and severity of disease in this relation. This systematic review showed that data on the sexual difficulties of patients with psoriasis are scarce. The hypotheses to explain sexual dysfunction in that group of patients include the severity of skin findings, the psychological effects of the condition on the patient, concerns of the sexual partner, and side effects of the medical treatments for psoriasis. Those data emphasize that this type of symptomatology is frequently neglected in medical practice, and stress the importance of assessing the impact of psoriasis regarding not only cutaneous and joint involvements, but also psychosocial and sexual impairments. Considering the sociocultural diversities of each population, a specific study of the Brazilian population to provide more information about our patients is required.

  12. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  13. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA: A Comparison to Matched Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Ford

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (=.011 and hip flexion (<.001 compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (=.028 and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (=.024 and take-off (=.004. In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (2=.477, =.131. Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA.

  14. Reasons for discontinuation of subcutaneous biologic therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a patient perspective

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    Bolge SC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Amir Goren,2 Neeta Tandon1 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Objective: To examine reasons why rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinued subcutaneous (SQ anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF treatment in the past 12 months, so as to help inform successful, uninterrupted therapy.Methods: Data were collected in March and April 2011 using self-reported, internet-based questionnaires. Study inclusion criteria comprised: rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis; discontinuation of SQ anti-TNF medication (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, or golimumab within the past 12 months; aged ≥18 years; United States residency; and consent to participate. Patients reported primary and other reasons for discontinuation of their most recently discontinued anti-TNF.Results: Questionnaires from 250 patients were analyzed; 72.8% were female, 80.8% were white, and median age was 51 years. Patients had discontinued etanercept (n=109, adalimumab (n=98, certolizumab (n=24, or golimumab (n=19 within the past 12 months. When prompted about their primary reason for discontinuation, lack of effectiveness (40.8% was cited most often, followed by injection experience (18.4%. Combining prompted primary and other reasons for discontinuation, 60.8% of patients reported lack of effectiveness, while 40.8% reported injection experience, which included: pain/burning/discomfort after injection (14.4%; pain/burning/discomfort during injection (13.2%; injection reactions such as redness/swelling after injection (12.4%; dislike of self-injection (11.6%; dislike of frequency of injection (10.4%; and fear of injection/needles (6.8%. Conclusion: From the patient perspective, there are unmet needs with regard to the effectiveness and injection experience associated with SQ anti-TNF medications, which may lead to discontinuation. Treatment options with a

  15. The Results of Fetal Chondrocytes Transplantation in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Natalya Krivoruchko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy has significantly improved the quality of life and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Nevertheless, there are still many patients with progressive rheumatoid inflammation, resulting in the destruction of joints. Cell therapy seems like a promising direction in rheumatology. The aim of our research was to evaluate the efficacy of fetal chondrocyte transplantation in patients with RA.Methods. We examined 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (I - III stages between 20 and 63 years of age. They were divided into 2 groups: the first group underwent the fetal chondrocytes transplantation (n = 40, and the second was a control group who got conservative therapy (n = 20. Donor cells were taken from the chondrogenic layer of the humerus or femur heads and hip condyles of human embryos in gestation for 17-20 weeks. A suspension of fetal chondrocytes injected into affected areas of the articular surfaces under X-ray control. Cell viability was determined before the injection. Efficacy of the therapy was assessed by clinical, instrumental, and laboratory tests. This clinical trial was allowed by The Ministry of Public Health and Ethics Committee. All of our patients gave informed consent for the fetal chondrocytes transplantation.Results. Evaluation of the clinical manifestations of RA in the first group of patients showed 3.7 times decrease in pain and 1.6 times relief of synovitis. Complete reduction of contracture was observed in 82% of patients in the first group. Morphometric changes in X-ray demonstrated inhibition of the destruction in articular cartilage and surfaces of bones after transplantation of fetal chondrocytes. The dynamics of morphological changes in synovium showed 2.5 times reduction of the inflammatory reaction. Transplantation of fetal chondrocytes led to a significant reduction in ESR, CRP, fibrinogen , γ-globulin after a period of 12 months (p < 0

  16. Management of rheumatoid arthritis in People's Republic of China – focus on tocilizumab and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Geng Wang,1 Rong Mu,2 Huji Xu1 1Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Changzheng Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is 0.19%–0.41% in Chinese population. RA exerts profound influence on health-related quality of life (HRQoL, which imposed huge burdens on patients physically, mentally, and economically. As a developing country, People’s Republic of China faces enormous challenges in management of RA. Conventional-synthesized disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs remain the most selective therapeutic options for RA in People’s Republic of China owing to their affordable price and fair efficacy as well as tolerability. Unfortunately, there are substantial RA patients who are poor responders to csDMARDs, even to subsequently combined therapy with tumor necrosis factor antagonist (anti-TNF. Tocilizumab (TCZ has been approved as a subsequent-line biological agent in patients with moderate-to-severe RA worldwide including People’s Republic of China. TCZ is the first biological agent approved for the treatment of RA inhibiting interlukin-6 (IL-6 by blocking both membrane-bound and soluble IL-6 receptors. Open-label studies in real-life practice and strictly controlled clinical trials demonstrated its high efficacy and safety profile in treatment of patients with RA who have inadequate responses to csDMARDs and anti-TNF. HRQoL of RA patients was improved in various measurements. TCZ was associated with 1.2 times the risk of adverse events, such as infections, dyslipidemia, and hepatic transaminases elevation, compared with pooled placebo. A relatively long half-life allowing for monthly intravenous administration and a newly developed subcutaneous injection make TCZ more acceptable. However, data are not enough so far comparing TCZ to

  17. Subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a case-control study. Preliminary data

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    M. Zanon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, correlated with some traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis and with PsA-related disease factors. Methods: Forty-one patients and 41 healthy subjects were evaluated for intima-media thickness (IMT and flow-mediated dilation (FMD, using carotid duplex scanning. IMT values were expressed like IMT mean (cumulative mean of all the IMT mean and M-MAX (cumulative mean of all the higher IMT. Subclinical atherosclerosis markers were correlated with age, body mass index (BMI and blood pressure in both groups, with duration of arthritis, duration of psoriasis, tender and swollen joints, BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, BASFI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP in patients. Results: IMT mean and M-MAX were both higher in PsA patients compared with controls (0.7±0.15 vs 0.62±0.09 mm; p<0.01 and 0.86±0.21 vs. 0.74±0.13 mm; p<0.01 respectively. FMD was smaller in patients than in controls (5.9±2 vs 7.5±2.8%; p<0.01. Univariate analysis showed a correlation between IMT mean and SBP (r=0.217; p=0.05 and a correlation between M-MAX and age (r=0.392; p<0.001, BMI (r=0.252; p<0.05, SBP (r=0.446; p<0.001 in both groups. In PsA patients M-MAX resulted correlated with ESR (r=0.338; p<0.05 and BASDAI (r=0.322; p<0.05. Conclusions: PsA patients exhibited endothelial dysfunctions which is an early marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, as well as an higher IMT. An interesting correlation between M-MAX and PsA activity index (ESR and BASDAI was found.

  18. Changes in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 during Treatment with Etanercept and Methotrexate or Etanercept alone in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Despite Methotrexate Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lene Surland; Hetland, Merete Lund; Johansen, Julia Sidenius;

    2009-01-01

    Changes in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients during treatment with etanercept alone or in combination with methotrexate. Twenty-five patients with active RA (DAS28 >/= 3.2) were randomized to receive etanercept (25 mg sc. biweekly) plus...... methotrexate (n = 12) or etanercept alone (n = 13). Plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined by ELISA. The 3 biomarkers and DAS28 scores were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of treatment. At inclusion all patients had significantly (p

  19. Clinical efficacy, radiographic and safety findings through 2 years of golimumab treatment in patients with active psoriatic arthritis: results from a long-term extension of the randomised, placebo-controlled GO-REVEAL study

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, A.; McInnes, I B; Mease, P J; Krueger, G. G.; Gladman, D. D.; van der Heijde, D; Mudivarthy, S.; Xu, W; Mack, M.; Z. Xu; Beutler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess long-term golimumab efficacy/safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Adult PsA patients (≥3 swollen, ≥3 tender joints, active psoriasis) were randomly assigned to subcutaneous injections of placebo, golimumab 50 mg or 100 mg every 4 weeks (q4wks) through week 20. All patients received golimumab 50 or 100 mg beginning week 24. Findings through 2 years are reported. Efficacy evaluations included ≥20% improvement in American C...

  20. Acute anterior uveitis after discontinuation of tocilizumab in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Sato T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomohito Sato,1 Shinya Minakuchi,1 Manabu Mochizuki,2 Masaru Takeuchi11Department of Ophthalmology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Tocilizumab is a humanized monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6 receptor antibody and has been approved in Japan for the treatment of Castleman's disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Conjunctivitis and dry eye are known ocular adverse effects, but uveitis has not been reported.Case report: A 72-year-old woman had undergone bilateral cataract surgery without complications. Six months after the surgery, she was diagnosed with RA and treated with tocilizumab infusion every 4 weeks. However, severe malaise and dizziness occurred after the third tocilizumab infusion, and the treatment was suspended. Since the symptoms associated with RA had resolved, she was followed without any medication thereafter. At 5 weeks after the third tocilizumab infusion, she developed severe anterior inflammation with hypopyon in her left eye, and her visual acuity dropped to less than 2/200. Considering her age and history of cataract surgery, endophthalmitis was suspected and a vitrectomy was performed, but no pathogens were detected from the intraocular fluid samples collected during surgery. The ocular inflammation was gradually resolved with systemic antibiotics and corticosteroids. However, severe anterior uveitis recurred in the same eye during the tapering of the systemic corticosteroids, when the aqueous humor IL-6 level was 46,100 pg/mL. The recurrent ocular inflammation was resolved with increased doses of topical and systemic corticosteroids, and the patient has since remained relapse-free. No symptom of inflammation was observed in the right eye during the follow-up period.Conclusion: This case indicates a possibility that acute