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Sample records for arthritis increasing organ-non-specificity

  1. Lactobacillus salivarius Isolated from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis and Increases Treg Frequency in Mice.

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Juan; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wang, Heng; Mou, Fangxiang; Wu, Like; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-12-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus salivarius was more abundant in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inflammatory autoimmune disease wherein the gut microbiota is altered, than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of L. salivarius in RA is unclear. Hence, we investigated the effect of L. salivarius isolated from patients with RA on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. L. salivarius UCC118 or L. plantarum WCFS1 isolated from patients with RA was administered orally for 5 weeks, starting from 2 weeks before the induction of arthritis in DBA/1 mice. Clinical score progression, histological changes, serum cytokine concentrations, and the proportion of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells [T helper 17 (Th17)] and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the spleen were evaluated. Bone erosion was evaluated by micro-computed tomography. CIA mice treated with either L. salivarius or L. plantarum showed lower arthritis scores, milder synovial infiltration, and less bone erosion when compared with phosphate-buffered, saline-treated CIA mice. Administration of L. salivarius and L. plantarum reduced the Th17 cell fraction and increased the Treg fraction. L. salivarius-treated CIA mice displayed a significant increase in serum anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels. Thus, pretreatment with L. salivarius could significantly improve CIA in mice and may help alleviate RA in a clinical setting.

  2. Arthritis increases the risk for fractures--results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Wright, Nicole C; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Walitt, Brian T; Eaton, Charles B; Chen, Zhao

    2011-08-01

    To examine the relationship between arthritis and fracture. Women were classified into 3 self-reported groups at baseline: no arthritis (n = 83,295), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 63,402), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 960). Incident fractures were self-reported throughout followup. Age-adjusted fracture rates by arthritis category were generated, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to test the association between arthritis and fracture. After an average of 7.80 years, 24,137 total fractures were reported including 2559 self-reported clinical spinal fractures and 1698 adjudicated hip fractures. For each fracture type, age-adjusted fracture rates were highest in the RA group and lowest in the nonarthritic group. After adjustment for several covariates, report of arthritis was associated with increased risk for spine, hip, and any clinical fractures. Compared to the nonarthritis group, the risk of sustaining any clinical fracture in the OA group was HR 1.09 (95% CI 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) and HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.26, 1.75; p < 0.001) in the RA group. The risk of sustaining a hip fracture was not statistically increased in the OA group (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.98, 1.25; p = 0.122) compared to the nonarthritis group; however, the risk of hip fracture increased significantly (HR 3.03; 95% CI 2.03, 4.51; p < 0.001) in the RA group compared to the nonarthritis group. The increase in fracture risk confirms the importance of fracture prevention in patients with RA and OA.

  3. Breast-cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis.

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may contribute

  4. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. Methods To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. Results We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor

  5. Increased circulating rather than spinal cytokines accompany chronic pain behaviors in experimental bone cancer and arthritis

    Line Pourtau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral cytokines contribute to arthritis and bone cancer pain through sensory nerve actions. However, increased spinal cytokine and glial filament expression, coined neuroinflammation, has also been proposed to play a part in chronic pain. Therefore, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and circulating cytokines were compared in murine arthritis and bone cancer models in relationship to behavioral signs of pain. Methods: Exploratory behaviors were studied after intra-articular complete Freund's adjuvant or bone intramedullary sarcoma cell injection. Nervous tissue and blood cytokine expression were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and multiplex immunoassays, respectively. Results: PCR analysis did not reveal any hallmark of spinal neuroinflammation in spontaneously-behaving mice with cartilage or bone lesions. However, imposed paw stimulation during joint inflammation increased spinal interleukin-1β (IL-1β expression. Spontaneous paw guarding during rearing was displayed by animals with joint inflammation and bone destruction and was accompanied by increased circulating IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, respectively. In addition, dorsal root ganglia were found to constitutively express receptors for this chemotactic cytokine. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that spinal neuroinflammation is not a necessary condition for chronic pain and suggest that circulating cytokine action in dorsal root ganglia may contribute to experimental joint inflammation and bone cancer pain.

  6. Neck arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased by massage therapy.

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2014-11-01

    The literature on the effects of massage therapy on neck arthritis pain is mixed depending on the dose level, and it is also based on self-report. In the present study an attempt was made to enhance the effects of weekly massage therapy by having the participants massage themselves daily. And in addition to self-reports on pain, range of motion (ROM) and the associated ROM pain were assessed before and after the first massage session and pre-post the last session one month later. Staff and faculty members at a medical school who were eligible for the study if they had neck arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a massage or a waitlist control group (N = 24 per group). The massage group received moderate pressure massages weekly by a massage therapist plus daily self-massages. The waitlist control group received the same schedule massages one month after being control subjects. The massage group showed significant short-term reductions after the first and last day massages in self-reported pain and in ROM-associated pain as well as an increase in ROM. Comparisons between the massage group (N = 23) and the control group (N = 14) on the last versus the first day data suggested significantly different changes including increased ROM and reduced ROM-associated pain for the massage group and reduced ROM and increased ROM-associated pain for the control group. These changes occurred specifically for flexion and right and left lateral flexion motions. These data highlight the importance of designing massage therapy protocols that target the most affected neck muscle groups and then assessing range of motion and related pain before and after the massage therapy. Comparisons with other studies also suggest that moderate pressure may contribute to the massage effects, and the use of daily self-massages between sessions may sustain the effects and serve as a cost-effective therapy for individuals with neck arthritis pain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Increased Frequency of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Allergic Rhinitis among Pesticide Sprayers and Associations with Pesticide Use.

    Koureas, Michalis; Rachiotis, George; Tsakalof, Andreas; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2017-08-01

    Objective : The aim of this study was to identify diseases linked with the pesticide sprayer occupation and explore possible associations with exposure history data. Methods : Α cross sectional study was conducted among pesticide sprayers ( n = 80) and the general population ( n = 90) in Thessaly (Greece). Medical history, demographic characteristics and detailed exposure history were recorded by conducting personal interviews. Lifetime exposure indicators were calculated for several pesticide chemical subclasses. Moreover, organophosphate metabolite levels were quantified in urine samples of all participants by using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multinomial analysis was used to determine associations between occupational pesticide exposure and diseases or disorders. Results : In the pesticide sprayers group, significantly higher frequencies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and allergic rhinitis were observed compared with the control group ( p = 0.002 and p = 0.024 respectively). Within the pesticide sprayers group, high lifetime pesticide exposure was associated with increased risk for reporting RA (OR: 43.07 95% CI: 3.09-600.67) and allergic rhinitis (OR: 9.72 95% CI: 2.31-40.89), compared with low pesticide exposure. Exposure to organophsphate, guanidine and quinone pesticides were associated with RA while organophosphates, pyrethroids and paraquat were associated with allergic rhinitis. Despite the higher levels of certain pesticide metabolites observed among participants with rheumatoid arthritis, the differences were not statistically significant. One metabolite (diethylthiophosphate) was found to be significantly increased in allergic rhinitis cases ( p = 0.037). Conclusion s : The results from the current study suggest a possible association of occupational pesticide exposure with RA and allergic rhinitis that should be further investigated.

  8. Knee arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased following moderate pressure massage therapy.

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2015-11-01

    The literature on massage therapy effects on knee pain suggests that pain was reduced based on self-report, but little is known about range of motion (ROM) effects. Medical School staff and faculty who had knee arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure massage therapy or a waitlist control group (24 per group). Self-reports included the WOMAC (pain, stiffness and function) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. ROM and ROM-related pain were assessed before and after the last sessions. The massage group showed an immediate post-massage increase in ROM and a decrease in ROM-associated pain. On the last versus the first day of the study, the massage group showed greater increases in ROM and decreases in ROM-related pain as well as less self-reported pain and sleep disturbances than the waitlist control group. These data highlight the effectiveness of moderate pressure massage therapy for increasing ROM and lessening ROM-related pain and long-term pain and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of furin results in increased growth, invasiveness and cytokine production of synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Wu, Changshun; Song, Zezhong; Liu, Huiling; Pan, Jihong; Jiang, Huiyu; Liu, Chao; Yan, Zexing; Feng, Hong; Sun, Shui

    2017-07-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis play a key role by local production of cytokines and proteolytic enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix and cartilage. These synoviocytes acquire phenotypic characteristics commonly observed in transformed cells, like anchorage-independent growth, increased proliferation and invasiveness, and insensitivity to apoptosis. Furin is a ubiquitous proprotein convertase that is capable of cleaving precursors of a wide variety of proteins. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, furin is reported to be highly expressed in the synovial pannus compared with healthy persons. However, the mechanisms are poorly understood. This study is to explore the effect of furin overexpression in rheumatoid synoviocytes. In this study, RNA interference was used to knock down furin expression and to assess the resultant effects on biological behaviors of synoviocytes, such as cell proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and cell apoptosis. In addition, the production of inflammatory cytokines was evaluated. The results showed that the inhibition of furin enhanced proliferation, invasion, and migration of synoviocytes in vitro. Cell cycle was accelerated and cell death was affected by furin knockdown. Also, the inhibition of furin increased interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion of synoviocytes. Inhibition of furin enhances invasive phenotype of synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, implying a protective role of furin. Agents targeting upregulation of furin may have therapeutic potential for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Proinflammatory Soluble Interleukin-15 Receptor Alpha Is Increased in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Ana Cecilia Machado Diaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease in which many cytokines have been implicated. In particular, IL-15 is a cytokine involved in the inflammatory processes and bone loss. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence in synovial fluid of soluble IL-15Rα, a private receptor subunit for IL-15 which may act as an enhancer of IL-15-induced proinflammatory cytokines. Soluble IL-15Rα was quantified by a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in samples of synovial fluid from patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA. The levels of IL-15Rα were significantly increased in RA patients compared to OA patients. Also, we studied the presence of membrane-bound IL-15 in cells from synovial fluids, another element necessary to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines through reverse signaling. Interestingly, we found high levels of IL-6 related to high levels of IL-15Rα in RA but not in OA. Thus, our results evidenced presence of IL-15Rα in synovial fluids and suggested that its pro-inflammatory effect could be related to induction of IL-6.

  11. Arthritis - resources

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  12. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study.

    Piero Ruscitti

    Full Text Available Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis.We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis.We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS, at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis.Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors.

  13. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in controls...

  14. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in contro...

  15. Determination of Autoantibody Isotypes Increases the Sensitivity of Serodiagnostics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Daniela Sieghart

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA and rheumatoid factor (RF are the most commonly used diagnostic markers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. These antibodies are predominantly of the immunoglobulin (Ig M (RF or IgG (ACPA isotype. Other subtypes of both antibodies—particularly IgA isotypes and other autoantibodies—such as RA33 antibodies—have been repeatedly reported but their diagnostic value has still not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the prevalence of IgA, IgG, and IgM subtypes of RF, ACPA, and RA33 antibodies in patients with RA. To determine the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity sera from 290 RA patients (165 early and 125 established disease, 261 disease controls and 100 healthy subjects were tested for the presence of IgA, IgG, and IgM isotypes of RF, ACPA, and RA33 by EliA™ platform (Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden. The most specific antibodies were IgG-ACPA, IgA-ACPA, and IgG-RF showing specificities >98%, closely followed by IgG- and IgA-RA33 while IgM subtypes were somewhat less specific, ranging from 95.8% (RA33 to 90% (RF. On the other hand, IgM-RF was the most sensitive subtype (65% followed by IgG-ACPA (59.5% and IgA-RF (50.7%. Other subtypes were less sensitive ranging from 35 (IgA-ACPA to 6% (IgA-RA33. RA33 antibodies as well as IgA-RF and IgA-ACPA were found to increase the diagnostic sensitivity of serological testing since they were detected also in seronegative patients reducing their number from 109 to 85. Moreover, analyzing IgM-RF by EliA™ proved more sensitive than measuring RF by nephelometry and further reduced the number of seronegative patients to 76 individuals. Importantly, among antibody positive individuals, RA patients were found having significantly more antibodies (≥3 than disease controls which generally showed one or two antibody species. Thus, increasing the number of autoantibodies in serological routine testing provides valuable additional information allowing to better

  16. Increased risk of revision for infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients with total hip replacements

    Schrama, Johannes Cornelis; Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose-Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year...... period, and compared it with that in THR patients with osteoarthritis (OA).Patients and methods-We identified 13,384 THRs in RA patients and 377,287 THRs in OA patients from 1995 through 2010 in a dataset from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Kaplan-Meier survival curves......, with revision for infection as the endpoint, were constructed. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the relative risk (RR) of revision for infection adjusted for age, sex, fixation technique, and year of primary surgery.Results-RA patients had a 1.3 times (95% CI 1.0-1.6) higher risk of revision...

  17. Increasing podiatry referrals for patients with inflammatory arthritis at a tertiary hospital in Singapore: A quality improvement project.

    Carter, K; Cheung, P P; Rome, K; Santosa, A; Lahiri, M

    2017-06-01

    Foot disease is highly prevalent in people with inflammatory arthritis and is often under-recognized. Podiatry intervention can significantly reduce foot pain and disability, with timely access being the key factor. The aim of this study was to plan and implement a quality improvement project to identify the barriers to, and improve, uptake of podiatry services among patients with inflammatory arthritis-related foot problems seen at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. A 6-month quality improvement program was conducted by a team of key stakeholders using quality improvement tools to identify, implement and test several interventions designed to improve uptake of podiatry services. The number of patients referred for podiatry assessment was recorded on a weekly basis by an experienced podiatrist. The criterion for appropriate referral to podiatry was those patients with current or previous foot problems such as foot pain, swelling and deformity. Interventions included education initiatives, revised workflow, development of national guidelines for inflammatory arthritis, local podiatry guidelines for the management of foot and ankle problems, routine use of outcome measures, and introduction of a fully integrated rheumatology-podiatry service with reduced cost package. Referral rates increased from 8% to 11%, and were sustained beyond the study period. Complete incorporation of podiatry into the rheumatology consultation as part of the multidisciplinary team package further increased referrals to achieve the target of full uptake of the podiatry service. Through a structured quality improvement program, referrals to podiatry increased and improved the uptake and acceptance of rheumatology-podiatry services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    Gruber Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA. Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9, insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors

  19. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Ghosh, Sriparna; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor progression and metastasis in

  20. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer.

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Ghosh, Sriparna; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-08-22

    Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor progression and metastasis in

  1. Calcium supplementation and inflammation increase mortality in rheumatoid arthritis: A 15-year cohort study in 609 patients from the Oslo Rheumatoid Arthritis Register.

    Provan, Sella A; Olsen, Inge C; Austad, Cathrine; Haugeberg, Glenn; Kvien, Tore K; Uhlig, Till

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether osteoporosis or use of calcium supplementations predict all-cause mortality, or death from CVD, in a longitudinal cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients in the Oslo RA register (ORAR) were examined, and bone mineral density was measured in 1996. The cohort was linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death registry on December 31, 2010. Death from CVD was defined in 3 following different outcomes: (1) primary atherosclerotic death, (2) atherosclerotic death as one of the 5 listed causes of death, and (3) CVD according to World Health Organization (WHO) definition as primary cause of death. Baseline predictors of all-cause mortality and death from CVD were identified in separate Cox regression models, using backwards selection. Sensitivity analyses were performed including analyses of interactions and competing risk. A total of 609 patients were examined in 1996/1997. By December 31, 2010, 162 patients (27%) had died, resulting in 7439 observed patient-years. Of the deceased, 40 (24.7%) had primary atherosclerotic death. In the final model of all-cause mortality increased baseline ESR [hazard ratio (HR) 1.02 per mm/h, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03], calcium supplementation (1.74, 1.07-2.84), and osteoporosis, defined as a T score ≤2.5 SD at any location, (1.58, 1.07-2.32) predicted higher mortality rates, in models adjusted for age, gender, and a propensity score. In the final model of primary atherosclerotic death, increased ESR (1.03 per mm/h, 1.01-1.05) and calcium supplementation (3.39, 1.41-8.08), predicted higher mortality. Increased baseline ESR and use of calcium supplementation were predictors of increased all-cause mortality and risk of death from CVD in this longitudinal study of patients with RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of Increased F4/80high Macrophages With Suppression of Serum-Transfer Arthritis in Mice With Reduced FLIP in Myeloid Cells.

    Huang, Qi-Quan; Birkett, Robert; Doyle, Renee E; Haines, G Kenneth; Perlman, Harris; Shi, Bo; Homan, Philip; Xing, Lianping; Pope, Richard M

    2017-09-01

    Macrophages are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We recently demonstrated that FLIP is necessary for the differentiation and/or survival of macrophages. We also showed that FLIP is highly expressed in RA synovial macrophages. This study was undertaken to determine if a reduction in FLIP in mouse macrophages reduces synovial tissue macrophages and ameliorates serum-transfer arthritis. Mice with Flip deleted in myeloid cells (Flip f/f LysM c/+ mice) and littermate controls were used. Arthritis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of K/BxN serum. Disease severity was evaluated by clinical score and change in ankle thickness, and joints were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. Cells were isolated from the ankles and bone marrow of the mice and examined by flow cytometry, real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, or Western blotting. In contrast to expectations, Flip f/f LysM c/+ mice developed more severe arthritis early in the clinical course, but peak arthritis was attenuated and the resolution phase more complete than in control mice. Prior to the induction of serum-transfer arthritis, the number of tissue-resident macrophages was reduced. On day 9 after arthritis induction, the number of F4/80 high macrophages in the joints of the Flip f/f LysM c/+ mice was not decreased, but increased. FLIP was reduced in the F4/80 high macrophages in the ankles of the Flip f/f LysM c/+ mice, while F4/80 high macrophages expressed an antiinflammatory phenotype in both the Flip f/f LysM c/+ and control mice. Our observations suggest that reducing FLIP in macrophages by increasing the number of antiinflammatory macrophages may be an effective therapeutic approach to suppress inflammation, depending on the disease stage. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Effect of infliximab dose increase in rheumatoid arthritis at different trough concentrations: a cohort study in clinical practice conditions

    Chamaida ePlasencia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence supporting treatment intensification in rheumatoid arthritis is limited and controversial. We explored outcomes of infliximab dose increases and accounted for pre-existing trough levels in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA.MethodsThis study was a retrospective study of 42 RA patients who received increased infliximab following an insufficient response (DAS28 > 3.2. Serum concentrations of infliximab and antibodies to infliximab (ATI and DAS28 and EULAR clinical response parameters were recorded for one year. Analyses were performed in three patient groups that were defined by infliximab serum concentration prior to treatment enhancement: No detectable, Low (< 1.1 µg/mL or High (≥ 1.1 µg/mL drug levels. Results No circulating infliximab was detected in 20 patients (47.6 %, but 13 (30.9 % and 9 (21.4 % patients exhibited Low and High levels, respectively. ATI were only detected in patients with No detectable drug levels because the drug interferes with ELISA. DAS28 disease activity globally showed a modest improvement after dose escalation, but this improvement did not persist after 6 and 12 months. Infliximab serum levels increased significantly in the High group (p=0.016, but no increase was achieved in the Low and No detectable groups. The three study groups exhibited similar disease activity over time, and no improvement was observed in the non-responder EULAR rates. ConclusionsThese results suggest that the efficacy of an infliximab dose increase is limited, and the response is independent of the infliximab trough serum concentration that is achieved prior to escalation.

  4. Patients with newly diagnosed Rheumatoid Arthritis are at increased risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    Emamifar, Amir; Levin, Klaus; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2018-01-01

    -C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) at the time of diagnosis and after 4 months (±1-2 months) of treatment initiation were extracted from Danbio Registry. To reveal the presence of DM, patients' electronic medical records were reviewed. The prevalence of DM in our patients was compared (using an age- and gender......-matched analysis) with that expected from Danish population. RESULTS: of 439 included patients, 60.1% were female, mean of age 64.6±15.0 years and RA disease duration 2.6±1.7 years. Prevalence of DM was 57/439 (12.9%), herein type II DM 52 (91.2%) and type I DM 5 (8.8%). Except for two patients, diagnosis of DM......AIMS: To reveal the prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in patients with newly diagnosed Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and evaluate the association between clinical characteristics of RA and DM as well as treatment response in newly diagnosed RA patients with DM. METHODS: Newly diagnosed, adult, RA...

  5. Increase in neutrophil Fc gamma receptor I expression following interferon gamma treatment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Goulding, N J; Knight, S M; Godolphin, J L; Guyre, P M

    1992-04-01

    The therapeutic potential of interferon gamma (IFN gamma) in a number of disease states is still being explored, but progress is hampered by the lack of a suitable measure of in vivo biological activity. To assess the in vivo biological effects of recombinant human IFN gamma (rhIFN gamma), 14 patients were studied in a randomised, prospective, double blind, placebo controlled trial of this cytokine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The levels of Fc gamma receptors on peripheral blood neutrophils were measured at baseline and after 21 days of once daily, subcutaneous injections of rhIFN gamma or placebo. An induction of neutrophil Fc gamma receptor type I (Fc gamma RI) was seen in the group of patients receiving recombinant human rhIFN gamma but not in those receiving placebo. No change in the expression of Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RIII was detected. The amount of induction of Fc gamma RI detected on the neutrophils of patients receiving rhIFN gamma did not correlate with clinical measures of response at either 21 days or at the end of the study (24 weeks). No significant clinical responses were observed in the rhIFN gamma group at these times. These data confirm that the reported in vitro effect of IFN gamma on human neutrophil Fc receptor expression can be reproduced in vivo.

  6. Gonococcal arthritis

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  7. Children born by women with rheumatoid arthritis have increased susceptibility for selected chronic diseases – a nationwide cohort study

    Jølving, Line Riis; Nielsen, Jan; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fetal exposure to maternal rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might impact the long-term risk of disease in the offspring. We examined a possible association between maternal RA and 15 selected groups of chronic diseases in the offspring. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study was based...... used, taking a large range of confounders into consideration, computing the Hazard Ratios (HR) of child- and adolescence diseases. RESULTS: In children being exposed to maternal RA in utero, the HR's of thyroid diseases was 2.19 (95% CI, 1.14 - 4.21), epilepsy 1.61 (95% CI, 1.16 - 2.25), and RA 2.......89 (95% CI, 2.06 - 4.05). The HR's for anxiety and personality disorders and chronic lung disease including asthma were in the range of 1.15 - 1.16, but these were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in utero exposure to maternal RA is associated with an increased risk...

  8. Features of Clinical and Laboratory Parameters in Children with Arthritis, which Have Increased Antibody Titers to Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide and Modified Citrullinated Vimentin

    I.S. Lebets

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 77 children with inflammatory lesions of the joints have been examined in the study. The characteristics of clinical signs and laboratory parameters in patients with arthritis, who have increased antibody titers to cyclic citrullinated peptide (a-CCP and modified citrullinated vimentin (a-MCV are presented. The patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis which a-CCP positive were adolescents, they had polyarticular lesions, a significant number of active joints, and the trend to more rapid development of radiologic stage III by Steinbrocker. Positivity for a-MCV was often detected from an early age, but not only in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. These patients were seronegative for rheumatoid factor, high frequency of involvement of the knee joints with their swelling. Radiological changes in joints of these patients seldom exceeded II stage by Steinbrocker.

  9. Psoriatic arthritis

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  10. Juvenile Arthritis

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  11. Topical Loperamide-Encapsulated Liposomal Gel Increases the Severity of Inflammation and Accelerates Disease Progression in the Adjuvant-Induced Model of Experimental Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Susan Hua

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the prophylactic effect of the peripherally-selective mu-opioid receptor agonist, loperamide, administered topically in a liposomal gel formulation on pain, inflammation, and disease progression in the adjuvant-induced model of experimental rheumatoid arthritis in female Lewis rats. In a randomized, blinded and controlled animal trial, AIA rats were divided into six groups consisting of eleven rats per group based on the following treatments: loperamide liposomal gel, free loperamide gel, empty liposomal gel, diclofenac gel (Voltaren®, no treatment, and naive control. Topical formulations were applied daily for a maximum of 17 days—starting from day 0 at the same time as immunization. The time course of the effect of the treatments on antinocieption and inflammation was assessed using a paw pressure analgesiometer and plethysmometer, respectively. Arthritis progression was scored daily using an established scoring protocol. At the end of the study, hind paws were processed for histological analysis. Administration of loperamide liposomal gel daily across the duration of the study produced significant peripheral antinociception as expected; however, increased the severity of inflammation and accelerated arthritis progression. This was indicated by an increase in paw volume, behavioral and observational scoring, and histological analysis compared to the control groups. In particular, histology results showed an increase in pannus formation and synovial inflammation, as well as an upregulation of markers of inflammation and angiogenesis. These findings may have implications for the use of loperamide and other opioids in arthritis and potentially other chronic inflammatory diseases.

  12. Common vaccinations among adults do not increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA study.

    Bengtsson, Camilla; Kapetanovic, Meliha C; Källberg, Henrik; Sverdrup, Berit; Nordmark, Birgitta; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the association between vaccinations in adults and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data from the Swedish population-based Epidemiological Investigation of RA case-control study encompassing 1998 incident cases of RA aged 18-70 years and 2252 randomly selected controls matched for age, sex and residency were analysed. Those vaccinated within 5 years before disease onset were compared with those not vaccinated by calculating OR with 95% CI. Vaccinations neither increased the risk of RA overall (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.1) nor the risk of two major subgroups of RA (antibodies to citrullinated peptide-positive (ACPA-positive) and ACPA-negative disease). Furthermore, vaccinations did not increase the risk of RA in smokers or carriers of HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles, two groups with established risk factors for RA. In this case-control study of incident cases of newly diagnosed RA, no increased risk of RA following immunisation was observed for vaccinations overall or for any specific vaccination. This indicates that immunological provocation of adults with commonly used vaccines in their present form carries no risk of RA. These findings should be implemented among public healthcare providers in order to encourage vaccinations according to recommended national vaccination schedules.

  13. Increased serum anti-mycobacterial antibody titers in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Is there any specific antigenic target?

    Cetin, Emel S.; Aksoy, Ali M

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the presence of immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (Ra) and to detect the target of the immune reaction. This study was carried out on 60 patients with RA, and 25 patients with no joint diseases in the laboratory of Clinical Microbiology Department of Ankara University Medical Faculty, Ankara, Turkey between July 2003 to January 2004. Secreted and cellular antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) were isolated and purified by high performance liquid chromatography to antigenic fractions. The immunoreactivity of patient and control sera against these antigens were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in RA patients were significantly higher than controls. Significant difference between patients and controls has been determined with M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) culture fluid and sonicate antigens, but not with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. This suggests that the antigen triggering immune response in patients with RA may belong to or mainly expressed on M. bovis BCG. The ELISA results showed significant difference between RA patients and controls with all antigenic fractions. Presence of increased immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in the sera of patients with RA was detected. When statistical analysis was considered, we cannot put forward any antigenic fraction alone as the one responsible for the increased reactivity. (author)

  14. Increased susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis in female mice carrying congenic Cia40/Pregq2 fragments

    Liljander, Maria; Andersson, Åsa Inga Maria; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is a commonly used experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have previously identified a significant quantitative trait locus denoted Cia40 on chromosome 11 that affects CIA in older female mice. This locus colocalizes...... with another locus, denoted Pregq2, known to affect reproductive success. The present study was performed to evaluate the role of the Cia40 locus in congenic B10.Q mice and to identify possible polymorphic candidate genes, which may also be relevant in the context of RA. METHODS: Congenic B10.Q mice carrying...... an NFR/N fragment surrounding the Cia40/Pregq2 loci were created by 10 generations of backcrossing (N10). The congenic mice were investigated in the CIA model, and the incidence and severity of arthritis as well as the serum levels of anti-collagen II (CII) antibodies were recorded. RESULTS: Significant...

  15. Infectious Arthritis

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  16. Arthritis Foundation

    ... Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Code of Ethics Financials Annual Report Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Donate Press Store Blog Community Local Offices Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  17. Association of STAT4 gene polymorphism with increased susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis in a northern Chinese Han subpopulation.

    Zhao, Yi; Liu, Xu; Liu, Xia; Su, Yin; Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Shiyao; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Quan; Liu, Xiangyuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Cibo; Jia, Rulin; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Jianping; Li, Zhanguo

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have reported STAT4 polymorphism is strongly associated with increased susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a study from China showed no association between STAT4 and RA susceptibility in a Chinese Han subpopulation. Since the northern Hans are known to be genetically different from the southern Hans, the aim of this study was to investigate the association of STAT4 polymorphism with RA in a large cohort of a northern Chinese Han subpopulation. 640 RA patients and 662 healthy controls were enrolled. DNA samples were genotyped for STAT4 rs7574865 by direct sequencing. The association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7574865 with RA susceptibility was calculated and the relationship between rs7574865 polymorphism and RA subgroups stratified by clinical features was estimated. We confirmed a significant association of STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism with RA susceptibility in northern Chinese Han population. The frequency of the minor T allele in RA was significantly higher than in healthy controls (35.2% vs. 31.1%; P = 0.029, OR 1.2 [95% CI 1.02-1.41]). There was also a significant difference in the distribution of the genotypes of SNP rs7574865 between RA patients and healthy controls (P = 0.02). Stratification analyses showed no associations between the genetic risk and clinical/serologic features, but a potential high frequency of TT genotype in a rheumatoid factor-negative subgroup, although it did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.084, OR 2.01 [95% CI 0.91-4.45]). STAT4 rs7574865 is significantly associated with RA susceptibility in northern Chinese Han subpopulations. The genetic differences of Han subpopulations should be considered when genetic susceptibility for diseases is studied. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Drug delivery options to increase patient adherence and satisfaction in the management of rheumatoid arthritis – focus on subcutaneous tocilizumab

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Kondo, Masakazu; Miyahara, Hisaaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Yasuharu Nakashima,1 Masakazu Kondo,2 Hisaaki Miyahara,3 Yukihide Iwamoto11Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Kondo Clinic of Rheumatology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease associated with joint destruction. Tocilizumab ...

  19. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune

  20. Investigation of potential non-HLA rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a European cohort increases the evidence for nine markers

    Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Mbarek, Hamdi; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornelis, François; Arlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Johansen, Julia S; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Klareskog, Lars; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Worthington, Jane

    BACKGROUND: Genetic factors have a substantial role in determining development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and are likely to account for 50-60% of disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies have identified non-human leucocyte antigen RA susceptibility loci which associate with RA with

  1. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  2. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    ... Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder in ... new habits for healthy bones. The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoporosis Studies have found an increased risk ...

  3. Arthritis in Children

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  4. Reactive Arthritis

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  5. Psoriatic arthritis

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  6. Severity of murine collagen-induced arthritis correlates with increased CYP7B activity: enhancement of dehydroepiandrosterone metabolism by interleukin-1beta.

    Dulos, John; Verbraak, Evert; Bagchus, Wilma M; Boots, Annemieke M H; Kaptein, Allard

    2004-10-01

    The endogenous steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been reported to play a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). DHEA is metabolized by the P450 enzyme CYP7B into 7alpha-OH-DHEA, which has immunostimulating properties. This study was undertaken to investigate the putative role of CYP7B in arthritis using murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-dependent model. DBA/1J mice were immunized and administered a booster with type II collagen. The presence of 7alpha-OH-DHEA was determined in both arthritic and nonarthritic joints and the serum of CIA mice by radioimmunoassay. CYP7B messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was analyzed in synovial biopsy samples, and in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) isolated from these synovial biopsy samples, by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, the regulatory role of IL-1beta on CYP7B activity in FLS was determined using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and high-performance liquid chromatography. In knee joint synovial biopsy samples from arthritic mice, 7alpha-OH-DHEA levels were 5-fold higher than in nonarthritic mice. Elevated levels of 7alpha-OH-DHEA were accompanied by an increase in CYP7B mRNA expression and were positively correlated with disease severity. In serum, no differences in 7alpha-OH-DHEA levels were observed between arthritic and nonarthritic mice. Incubation of FLS with IL-1beta resulted in a dose-dependent increase in 7alpha-OH-DHEA formation. In addition, IL-1beta enhanced CYP7B mRNA and CYP7B protein levels in FLS. Disease progression in CIA is correlated with enhanced CYP7B activity, which leads to locally enhanced 7alpha-OH-DHEA levels. Elevated IL-1beta levels within the arthritic joint may regulate this increase in CYP7B activity. Copyright 2004 American College of Rheumatology

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA ...

  8. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    ... Arthritis Program CDC-RFA-DP18-1803 NOFO FAQs Attachment 1 Attachment 2 Key Public Health Messages Policy Resources Partners ... mood and the ability to move. Classes take place at local Ys, parks, and community centers. These ...

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  11. Drug delivery options to increase patient adherence and satisfaction in the management of rheumatoid arthritis – focus on subcutaneous tocilizumab

    Nakashima Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yasuharu Nakashima,1 Masakazu Kondo,2 Hisaaki Miyahara,3 Yukihide Iwamoto11Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Kondo Clinic of Rheumatology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease associated with joint destruction. Tocilizumab (TCZ is a humanized monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody that was initially developed for use as an intravenous (IV infusion. Previous studies have shown that TCZ-IV is an important treatment option in patients with moderate-to-severe RA. A subcutaneous (SC formulation of 162 mg TCZ that was recently developed and approved provides an additional treatment option for RA patients. In the present review, we provide an update on the efficacy and safety of TCZ-SC, compared with TCZ-IV. The TCZ-SC doses of 162 mg every 2 weeks (q2w or weekly (qw were selected based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Both TCZ-SC q2w and qw regimens showed equivalent effects to TCZ-IV in most patients; however, the TCZ-SC qw regimen consistently showed a more rapid effect in terms of C-reactive protein normalization. Randomized controlled studies showed that TCZ-SC monotherapy or combined with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs demonstrated comparable efficacy to TCZ-IV in patients who were both biologic-naïve and refractory to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. TCZ-SC at both qw and q2w were generally well-tolerated for up to 24 weeks. There was a low rate of withdrawal due to adverse events, and their incidence was comparable with that seen with TCZ-IV. An injection site reaction was seen in approximately 10% of patients who received the subcutaneous formulation. In conclusion, although clinical results are still limited, the currently available evidence

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center © 2018 Patient Privacy Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  16. Radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis related to some clinical and laboratory parameters

    Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 188 patients followed for 3 to 12 years, the radiologic course of rheumatoid arthritis was assessed in 20 joint groups. A severe course in most joints was related to the presence of rheumatoid factor and to high values of the ESR. Granulocyte-specific antinuclear antibodies were related to a severe course in most joints. The presence of nodules, the Rose-Waaler titre and the presence of organ non-specific antinuclear antibodies were generally unrelated to the course of the disease. (Auth.)

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  20. In etanercept-treated psoriatic arthritis patients clinical improvement correlated with an increase of serum cortisol relative to other adrenal hormones.

    Atzeni, F; Sarzi-Puttini, P; DePortu, S; Cutolo, M; Carrabba, M; Straub, R H

    2008-01-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), long-term therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies sensitizes the pituitary gland and improves adrenal androgen secretion in prednisolone-naïve patients. However, whether this is similar in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 12 weeks of etanercept treatment upon the function of the HPA axis in patients with PsA. Eleven prednisolone-naïve patients (mean age 47.3+/-8.9 years) with PsA were included. We measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), cortisol, and androstenedione (ASD), at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF therapy (etanercept, 50 mg every week as a single dose by sc. injection). Clinical improvement was assessed using the Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS-28). Mean levels of serum ACTH, serum cortisol, serum 17OHP and serum ASD did not markedly change during 12 weeks of etanercept treatment. Similarly, the ratio of serum cortisol divided by serum ACTH did not change during 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment. However, an increase of serum cortisol relative to serum 17OHP or ASD was related to clinical improvement. This indicates that improvement was linked to higher serum cortisol levels relative to others adrenal hormones. This is the first study to demonstrate baseline serum levels and the course of HPA axis-related hormones in patients with PsA. An increase of serum cortisol relative to others adrenocortical hormones (i.e., androstenedione and ACTH) was accompanied by clinical improvement.

  1. Increased Frequency of Peripheral B and T Cells Expressing Granulocyte Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Anastasia Makris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesGranulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is currently considered a crucial inflammatory mediator and a novel therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, despite the fact that its precise cellular sources remain uncertain. We studied the expression of GM-CSF in peripheral lymphocytes from RA patients and its change with antirheumatic therapies.MethodsIntracellular GM-CSF expression was assessed by flow cytometry in stimulated peripheral B (CD19+ and T (CD3+ cells from RA patients (n = 40, disease (n = 31 including osteoarthritis n = 15, psoriatic arthritis n = 10, and systemic rheumatic diseases n = 6 and healthy (n = 16 controls. The phenotype of GM-CSF+ B cells was assessed as well as longitudinal changes in GM-CSF+ lymphocytes during methotrexate (MTX, n = 10 or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF, n = 10 therapy.ResultsAmong untreated RA patients with active disease (Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein = 5.6 ± 0.89 an expanded population of peripheral GM-CSF+ B (4.1 ± 2.2% and T (3.4 ± 1.6% cells was detected compared with both disease (1.7 ± 0.9%, p < 0.0001 and 1.7 ± 1.3%, p < 0.0001, respectively and healthy (0.3 ± 0.2%, p < 0.0001 and 0.6 ± 0.6%, p < 0.0001 controls. RA GM-CSF+ B cells displayed more commonly a plasmablast or transitional phenotype (37.12 ± 18.34% vs. 14.26 ± 9.46%, p = 0.001 and 30.49 ± 15.04% vs. 2.45 ± 1.84%, p < 0.0001, respectively and less a memory phenotype (21.46 ± 20.71% vs. 66.99 ± 16.63%, p < 0.0001 compared to GM-CSF− cells. GM-CSF expression in RA patients did not correlate to disease duration, activity or serological status. Anti-TNF treatment led to a statistically significant decrease in GM-CSF+ B and T cells while MTX had no significant effect.DiscussionThis is the first study showing an expanded population of GM-CSF+ B and T lymphocytes

  2. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gouty arthritis

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi. (orig.)

  4. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  5. Thumb Arthritis

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ...

  8. Increased Kappa/Lambda Hybrid Antibody in Serum Is a Novel Biomarker Related to Disease Activity and Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Lang Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The κ/λ hybrid antibodies in normal human serum were reported recently, but their clinical relevance has not yet been explored. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the major joint diseases, and the early diagnosis and treatment of RA remain a challenge. Here, we developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to quantify relative serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels in RA patients, osteoarthritis (OA patients, and healthy controls (HC in order to assess their potential use as a serological biomarker of early disease and clinical activity and to preliminarily investigate their immunomodulatory roles in RA. Surprisingly, we found that κ/λ hybrid antibody was markedly increased in both early and established RA. Serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels were significantly correlated with clinical indexes and inflammatory markers in RA. Further analysis showed a positive correlation between κ/λ hybrid antibody levels and the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28. In conclusion, serum κ/λ hybrid antibodies in RA were identified for the first time. High levels of κ/λ hybrid antibody may be a useful tool in distinguishing early RA from OA and HC. We suggest κ/λ hybrid antibody as a marker for disease activity. The increased κ/λ hybrid antibodies were associated with inflammatory conditions in RA.

  9. Increased Kappa/Lambda Hybrid Antibody in Serum Is a Novel Biomarker Related to Disease Activity and Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Yi, Lang; Hao, Mingju; Lu, Tian; Lin, Guigao; Chen, Lida; Gao, Ming; Fan, Gaowei; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Guojing; Yang, Xin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The κ/λ hybrid antibodies in normal human serum were reported recently, but their clinical relevance has not yet been explored. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major joint diseases, and the early diagnosis and treatment of RA remain a challenge. Here, we developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to quantify relative serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels in RA patients, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and healthy controls (HC) in order to assess their potential use as a serological biomarker of early disease and clinical activity and to preliminarily investigate their immunomodulatory roles in RA. Surprisingly, we found that κ/λ hybrid antibody was markedly increased in both early and established RA. Serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels were significantly correlated with clinical indexes and inflammatory markers in RA. Further analysis showed a positive correlation between κ/λ hybrid antibody levels and the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28). In conclusion, serum κ/λ hybrid antibodies in RA were identified for the first time. High levels of κ/λ hybrid antibody may be a useful tool in distinguishing early RA from OA and HC. We suggest κ/λ hybrid antibody as a marker for disease activity. The increased κ/λ hybrid antibodies were associated with inflammatory conditions in RA.

  10. Increased Numbers of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ T-Cells in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis with Parvovirus B19 Infection.

    Naciute, Milda; Maciunaite, Gabriele; Mieliauskaite, Diana; Rugiene, Rita; Zinkeviciene, Aukse; Mauricas, Mykolas; Murovska, Modra; Girkontaite, Irute

    2017-01-01

    To investigate T-cell subpopulations in peripheral blood of human parvovirus B19 DNA-positive (B19 + ) and -negative (B19 - ) patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy persons. Blood samples were collected from 115 patients with RA and 47 healthy volunteers; 27 patients with RA and nine controls were B19 + Cluster of differentiation (CD) 4, 8, 25 and 45RA were analyzed on blood cells. CD25 expression on CD4 + CD45RA + , CD4 + CD45RA - , CD8 + CD45RA + , CD8 + CD45RA - subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of CD25 low and CD25 hi cells was increased on CD4 + CD45RA + , CD4 + CD45RA - T-cells and the percentage of CD25 + cells was increased on CD8 + CD45RA + , CD8 + CD45RA - T-cells of B19 + patients with RA in comparison with B19 - patients and controls. Raised levels of CD4 and CD8 regulatory T-cells in B19 + RA patients could cause down-regulation of antiviral clearance mechanisms and lead to activation of persistent human parvovirus B19 infection in patients with RA. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Arthritis in America

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  12. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  13. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  14. Switched Memory B Cells Are Increased in Oligoarticular and Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Their Change Over Time Is Related to Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors.

    Marasco, Emiliano; Aquilani, Angela; Cascioli, Simona; Moneta, Gian Marco; Caiello, Ivan; Farroni, Chiara; Giorda, Ezio; D'Oria, Valentina; Marafon, Denise Pires; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Carsetti, Rita; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether abnormalities in B cell subsets in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) correlate with clinical features and response to treatment. A total of 109 patients diagnosed as having oligoarticular JIA or polyarticular JIA were enrolled in the study. B cell subsets in peripheral blood and synovial fluid were analyzed by flow cytometry. Switched memory B cells were significantly increased in patients compared to age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.0001). When patients were divided according to age at onset of JIA, in patients with early-onset disease (presenting before age 6 years) the expansion in switched memory B cells was more pronounced than that in patients with late-onset disease and persisted throughout the disease course. In longitudinal studies, during methotrexate (MTX) treatment, regardless of the presence or absence of active disease, the number of switched memory B cells increased significantly (median change from baseline 36% [interquartile range {IQR} 15, 66]). During treatment with MTX plus tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi), in patients maintaining disease remission, the increase in switched memory B cells was significantly lower than that in patients who experienced active disease (median change from baseline 4% [IQR -6, 32] versus 41% [IQR 11, 73]; P = 0.004). The yearly rate of increases in switched memory B cells was 1.5% in healthy controls, 1.2% in patients who maintained remission during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, 4.7% in patients who experienced active disease during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, and ~4% in patients treated with MTX alone. Switched memory B cells expand during the disease course at a faster rate in JIA patients than in healthy children. This increase is more evident in patients with early-onset JIA. TNFi treatment inhibits this increase in patients who achieve and maintain remission, but not in those with active disease. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. A randomized trial of a motivational interviewing intervention to increase lifestyle physical activity and improve self-reported function in adults with arthritis.

    Gilbert, Abigail L; Lee, Jungwha; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Semanik, Pamela A; Song, Jing; Pellegrini, Christine A; Pinto Pt, Daniel; Dunlop, Dorothy D; Chang, Rowland W

    2018-04-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of chronic pain and functional limitations. Exercise is beneficial for improving strength and function and decreasing pain. We evaluated the effect of a motivational interviewing-based lifestyle physical activity intervention on self-reported physical function in adults with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Participants were randomized to intervention or control. Control participants received a brief physician recommendation to increase physical activity to meet national guidelines. Intervention participants received the same brief baseline physician recommendation in addition to motivational interviewing sessions at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. These sessions focused on facilitating individualized lifestyle physical activity goal setting. The primary outcome was change in self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes were self-reported pain and accelerometer-measured physical activity. Self-reported KOA outcomes were evaluated by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) for KOA (WOMAC scores range from 0 to 68 for function and 0 to 20 for pain) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) for RA. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Multiple regression accounting for repeated measures was used to evaluate the overall intervention effect on outcomes controlling for baseline values. Participants included 155 adults with KOA (76 intervention and 79 control) and 185 adults with RA (93 intervention and 92 control). Among KOA participants, WOMAC physical function improvement was greater in the intervention group compared to the control group [difference = 2.21 (95% CI: 0.01, 4.41)]. WOMAC pain improvement was greater in the intervention group compared to the control group [difference = 0.70 (95% CI: -0.004, 1.41)]. There were no significant changes in physical activity. Among RA participants, no significant intervention effects were found. Participants

  16. Increased amount of phosphorylated proinflammatory osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis synovia is associated to decreased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5B/5A ratio.

    Jani Luukkonen

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is an immunoregulatory protein which production increases in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. Phosphorylated osteopontin (Phospho-OPN is known to increase macrophage and osteoclast activation, this process is controlled by extracellular tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP, also a biomarker for RA. Here, we evaluated the phosphorylation status of OPN in RA and OA synovia, as well as its correlation with TRAcP isoforms.Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from 24 RA (14 seropositive and 10 seronegative and 24 OA patients. Western blotting was used to analyze the extent of OPN phosphorylation. TRAcP isoforms were measured in synovial fluid using ELISA; immunohistochemistry assessed the distribution of OPN and TRAcP expressing cells in the synovial tissue, especially distinguishing between the TRAcP isoforms.Full-length OPN was more phosphorylated in RA than in OA (p<0.05. The thrombin cleaved C-terminal end of OPN was also more phosphorylated in RA (p<0.05. RA patients had a lower concentration of TRAcP 5B and higher concentration of less active 5A in their synovial fluid compared to OA patients. The TRAcP 5B/5A ratio was decreased in RA and correlated negatively with the amount of phospho-OPN (p<0.05. TRAcP positive cells for both isoforms were found all along the synovial lining; OPN antibody staining was localized in the extracellular matrix.Our data suggests that in RA the synovial fluid contains insufficient amounts of TRAcP 5B which increase levels of the proinflammatory phospho-OPN. This may lead to increased macrophage and osteoclast activation, resulting in the increased local inflammation and bone resorption present in RA joints.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  18. Managing Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. As the population ages, the number of people with this condition is expected to increase dramatically. In this podcast, Dr. Jennifer Hootman discusses the importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.

  19. Multicentric osteolysis with nodulosis, arthritis, and cardiac defect syndrome: loss of MMP2 leads to increased apoptosis with alteration of apoptotic regulators and caspases and embryonic lethality

    Mosig RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca A Mosig,1 Richard Schulz,2,3 Zamaneh Kassiri,4 Mitchell B Schaffler,5 John A Martignetti1 1Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology; 3Department of Pediatrics, 4Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Inactivating mutations of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 cause multicentric osteolysis with nodulosis and arthritis, one of a group of inherited osteolytic and arthritic disorders. We have previously shown that mice lacking Mmp2 share similar syndromic features with the human disorder, and at the cellular level, Mmp2-/- mouse osteoblasts and osteoclasts have reduced numbers and proliferation rates at critical developmental time points. While previously hypothesized, the effect of MMP2 loss on apoptosis has not been examined in this system. We therefore sought to clarify its role in mediating the developmental defects in Mmp2-/- mice using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot analysis, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also explored the effects of MMP2 inhibition in the osteogenic sarcoma cell line SaOS2. Loss of MMP2 resulted in increased apoptosis and caspase activation both in vitro and in vivo. MMP2-deficient cells had increased Fas expression and reduced levels of the key survival signals p-FAK, p-ERK, cFLIP, and Bcl-2. Notably, and in marked contrast to their original characterization, there was a significant increase in the in utero demise of homozygous Mmp2-/- embryos. Specifically, litters from heterozygous crosses consistently yielded nearly 85% fewer than expected homozygous Mmp2-/- pups. Taken together, our findings highlight a new role for MMP2 in preventing apoptosis during development and growth. Keywords

  20. Soluble glycoprotein VI, a specific marker of platelet activation is increased in the plasma of subjects with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis.

    John R Stack

    Full Text Available Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA have been shown to cause platelet activation in vitro, through the low-affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG receptor (FcγRIIa on platelets. Platelet activation via engagement of FcγRIIa results in proteolytic cleavage and shedding of platelet specific glycoprotein VI (GPVI which can be detected in the plasma as soluble GPVI (sGPVI. We hypothesized that plasma levels of sGPVI would be increased among patients with seropositive RA as a consequence of antibody-induced platelet activation and GPVI shedding.Samples from 84 patients with RA (65 seropositive and 19 seronegative and 67 healthy controls were collected prospectively and analysed for sGPVI using a standardised ELISA.Patients with seropositive RA had significantly higher levels of sGPVI compared to seronegative RA and controls. Median (IQR sGPVI levels were 4.2 ng/ml (3.2, 8.0 in seropositve RA, 2.2 ng/ml (1.5, 3.5 in seronegative RA and 2.2 ng/ml (1.6, 3.4 in controls (p<0.0001. sGPVI levels correlated with ACPA titres (r = 0.32, p = 0.0026 and with RF titres (r = 0.48, p<0.0001.Plasma sGPVI, a specific marker of platelet activation is increased among patients with seropositive RA.

  1. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is increased in rheumatoid synovium but TGF-β blockade does not modify experimental arthritis.

    Gonzalo-Gil, E; Criado, G; Santiago, B; Dotor, J; Pablos, J L; Galindo, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the distribution of regulatory and inhibitory mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (Smad) proteins as markers of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue and to investigate the effect of TGF-β blockade in the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. The expression of Smad proteins in synovial tissues from RA, osteoarthritic and healthy controls was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Arthritis was induced in DBA/1 mice by immunization with chicken type-II collagen (CII). TGF-β was blocked in vivo with the specific peptide p17 starting at the time of immunization or on the day of arthritis onset. T cell population frequencies and specific responses to CII were analysed. The expression of cytokines and transcription factors was quantified in spleen and joint samples. Statistical differences between groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test or one-way analysis of variance (anova) using the Kruskal-Wallis test. p-Smad-2/3 and inhibitory Smad-7 expression were detected in RA and control tissues. In RA, most lymphoid infiltrating cells showed nuclear p-Smad-2/3 without Smad-7 expression. Treatment with TGF-β antagonist did not affect clinical severity, joint inflammation and cartilage damage in collagen-induced arthritis. Frequency of T cell subsets, mRNA levels of cytokines and transcription factors, specific proliferation to CII, serum interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-CII antibodies were comparable in p17 and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated groups. The pattern of Smad proteins expression demonstrates active TGF-β signalling in RA synovium. However, specific TGF-β blockade does not have a significant effect in the mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors may predispose to significant increase in tuberculosis risk: a multicenter active-surveillance report.

    Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto; Valverde, Vicente Rodríguez; Mola, Emilio Martín; Montero, Maria Dolores

    2003-08-01

    The long-term safety of therapeutic agents that neutralize tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is uncertain. Recent evidence based on spontaneous reporting shows an association with active tuberculosis (TB). We undertook this study to determine and describe the long-term safety of 2 of these agents, infliximab and etanercept, in rheumatic diseases based on a national active-surveillance system following the commercialization of the drugs. We analyzed the safety data actively collected in the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) database, which was launched in February 2000 by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology. For the estimation of TB risk, the annual incidence rate in patients treated with these agents was compared with the background rate and with the rate in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) assembled before the era of anti-TNF treatment. Seventy-one participating centers sent data on 1,578 treatments with infliximab (86%) or etanercept (14%) in 1,540 patients. Drug survival rates (reported as the cumulative percentage of patients still receiving medication) for infliximab and etanercept pooled together were 85% and 81% at 1 year and 2 years, respectively. Instances of discontinuation were essentially due to adverse events. Seventeen cases of TB were found in patients treated with infliximab. The estimated incidence of TB associated with infliximab in RA patients was 1,893 per 100,000 in the year 2000 and 1,113 per 100,000 in the year 2001. These findings represent a significant increased risk compared with background rates. In the first 5 months of 2002, after official guidelines were established for TB prevention in patients treated with biologics, only 1 new TB case was registered (in January). Therapy with infliximab is associated with an increased risk of active TB. Proper measures are needed to prevent and manage this adverse event.

  3. Interleukin-6 blockade raises LDL via reduced catabolism rather than via increased synthesis: a cytokine-specific mechanism for cholesterol changes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Robertson, Jamie; Porter, Duncan; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J; Caslake, Muriel; McInnes, Iain; McCarey, David

    2017-11-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have reduced serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), which increases following therapeutic IL-6 blockade. We aimed to define the metabolic pathways underlying these lipid changes. In the KALIBRA study, lipoprotein kinetic studies were performed on 11 patients with severe active RA at baseline and following three intravenous infusions of the IL-6R blocker tocilizumab. The primary outcome measure was the fractional catabolic rate (FCR) of LDL. Serum total cholesterol (4.8 vs 5.7 mmol/L, p=0.003), LDL-c (2.9 vs 3.4 mmol/L, p=0.014) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.23 vs 1.52 mmol/L, p=0.006) increased following tocilizumab therapy. The LDL FCR fell from a state of hypercatabolism to a value approximating that of the normal population (0.53 vs 0.27 pools/day, p=0.006). Changes in FCR correlated tightly with changes in serum LDL-c and C-reactive protein but not Clinical Disease Activity Index. Patients with RA have low serum LDL-c due to hypercatabolism of LDL particles. IL-6 blockade normalises this catabolism in a manner associating with the acute phase response (and thus hepatic IL-6 signalling) but not with RA disease activity as measured clinically. We demonstrate that IL-6 is one of the key drivers of inflammation-driven dyslipidaemia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Increased serum IL-6 level time-dependently regulates hyperalgesia and spinal mu opioid receptor expression during CFA-induced arthritis.

    Tekieh, E; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, H; Maghsoudi, N; Alani, B; Zardooz, H

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is known to cause pro- and anti-inflammatory effects during different stages of inflammation. Recent therapeutic investigations have focused on treatment of various inflammatory disorders with anti-cytokine substances. As a result, the aim of this study was to further elucidate the influence of IL-6 in hyperalgesia and edema during different stages of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis (AA) in male Wistar rats. AA was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of CFA into the rats' hindpaw. Anti-IL-6 was administered either daily or weekly during the 21 days of study. Spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) expression was detected by Western blotting. Daily and weekly treatment with an anti-IL-6 antibody significantly decreased paw edema in the AA group compared to the AA control group. Additionally, daily and weekly anti-IL-6 administration significantly reduced hyperalgesia on day 7 in the AA group compared to the AA control group; however, there were significant increases in hyperalgesia in the antibody-treated group on days 14 and 21 compared to the AA control group. IL-6 antibody-induced increases in hyperalgesia on the 14 th and 21 st days after CFA injection correlated with a time-dependent, significant reduction in spinal mOR expression during anti-IL-6 treatment. Our study confirmed the important time-dependent relationship between serum IL-6 levels and hyperalgesia during AA. These results suggest that the stages of inflammation in AA must be considered for anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory interventions via anti-IL-6 antibody treatment.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  6. Increased synovial tissue NF-kappa B1 expression at sites adjacent to the cartilage-pannus junction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Benito, M.J.; Murphy, E.P.; Berg, W.B. van den; Fitzgerald, O.; Bresnihan, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression of the Rel/NF-kappa B subunits, NF-kappa B1 (p50) and RelA (p65), in paired synovial tissue samples selected from sites adjacent to and remote from the cartilage-pannus junction (CPJ) in patients with inflammatory arthritis. METHODS: Synovial tissue was selected

  7. The negative effect of decreasing the level of activity in coping with pain in rheumatoid arthritis: An increase in psychological distress and disease impact

    Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Näring, G.W.B.; Pad Bosch, P. van 't; Putte, L.B.A. van de

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of coping with pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on subsequent changes in psychological distress and disease impact. A sample of 109 randomly selected RA patients was asked to participate in a longitudinal study. Patients were measured at

  8. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ...

  12. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    Hoetzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-01-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain β-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  14. Adalimumab added to a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone in early rheumatoid arthritis increased remission rates, function and quality of life. The OPERA Study

    Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund; Junker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An investigator-initiated, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, treat-to-target protocol (Clinical Trials:NCT00660647) studied whether adalimumab added to methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone as first-line treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) increased the frequency......-label biologics after 6-9 months. Efficacy was assessed primarily on the proportion of patients who reached treatment target (DAS28CRP... not increase the proportion of patients who reached the DAS28CRPtarget, but improved DAS28CRP, remission rates, function and quality of life in DMARD-naïve ERA....

  15. Forms of Arthritis

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  17. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  18. Increased chemotaxis and activity of circulatory myeloid progenitor cells may contribute to enhanced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss in the C57BL/6 mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Ikić Matijašević, M; Flegar, D; Kovačić, N; Katavić, V; Kelava, T; Šućur, A; Ivčević, S; Cvija, H; Lazić Mosler, E; Kalajzić, I; Marušić, A; Grčević, D

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to determine the functional activity of different osteoclast progenitor (OCP) subpopulations and signals important for their migration to bone lesions, causing local and systemic bone resorption during the course of collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. Arthritis was induced with chicken type II collagen (CII), and assessed by clinical scoring and detection of anti-CII antibodies. We observed decreased trabecular bone volume of axial and appendicular skeleton by histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography as well as decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption rate in arthritic mice in vivo. In the affected joints, bone loss was accompanied with severe osteitis and bone marrow hypercellularity, coinciding with the areas of active osteoclasts and bone erosions. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased frequency of putative OCP cells (CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b -/lo CD117 + CD115 + for bone marrow and CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b + CD115 + Gr-1 + for peripheral haematopoietic tissues), which exhibited enhanced differentiation potential in vitro. Moreover, the total CD11b + population was expanded in arthritic mice as well as CD11b + F4/80 + macrophage, CD11b + NK1.1 + natural killer cell and CD11b + CD11c + myeloid dendritic cell populations in both bone marrow and peripheral blood. In addition, arthritic mice had increased expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CC chemokine ligand-2 (Ccl2) and Ccl5, with increased migration and differentiation of circulatory OCPs in response to CCL2 and, particularly, CCL5 signals. Our study characterized the frequency and functional properties of OCPs under inflammatory conditions associated with arthritis, which may help to clarify crucial molecular signals provided by immune cells to mediate systemically enhanced osteoresorption. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Psoriatic arthritis

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  20. Aetiology of arthritis in hospitalised children: an observational study.

    Aupiais, Camille; Ilharreborde, Brice; Doit, Catherine; Blachier, Audrey; Desmarest, Marie; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Mazda, Keyvan; Faye, Albert; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Alberti, Corinne; Lorrot, Mathie

    2015-08-01

    Arthritis in children has many causes and includes septic and viral arthritis, reactive arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We aimed to describe the different types of arthritis among children hospitalised for a first episode of arthritis. Retrospective, descriptive case series study. A French tertiary care centre. Children under 16 years of age hospitalised for an arthritis episode between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Demographic and clinical features were compared with χ(2) or Fisher's exact tests and non-parametric tests. 173 children were hospitalised for a first episode of arthritis during the study period, with a male/female ratio of 1.14. The most frequent cause of hospitalisation was septic arthritis (43.4% of cases, 69.3% of which were due to Kingella kingae and 10.7% to Staphylococcus aureus). JIA was responsible for 8.1% of cases and arthritis without any definitive diagnosis for 40.4%. Median age at diagnosis was 2.7 years (IQR 0.3-14.6) and was lower in the septic arthritis group (1.5 years; 1.1-3.4) than in the JIA group (4.7 years; 2.5-10.9) (p<0.01). Septic arthritis involved a single joint in 97.3% of cases, while JIA involved four joints in 14.3% of cases and two to four joints in 28.6% of cases (p<0.01). Septic arthritis was the most frequent cause of arthritis in hospitalised children. Despite the increasing application of microbiological molecular methods to synovial fluid analysis, further measures are required to improve the diagnosis of arthritis of unknown cause. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  2. Atopic dermatitis is associated with an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, and a decreased risk for type 1 diabetes

    Schmitt, Jochen; Schwarz, Kristin; Baurecht, Hansjörg

    2016-01-01

    rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC]) and is inversely related to type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to investigate established RA, IBD, and T1D susceptibility loci in AD. METHODS: This cohort study used data from German National Health Insurance......BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal barrier failure and immune-mediated inflammation. Evidence on AD as a potential risk factor for inflammatory comorbidities is scarce. OBJECTIVES: We sought to test the hypothesis that prevalent AD is a risk factor for incident...... beneficiaries aged 40 years or younger (n = 655,815) from 2005 through 2011. Prevalent AD in the period 2005 to 2006 was defined as primary exposure, and incident RA, IBD, and T1D in the period 2007 to 2011 were defined as primary outcomes. Risk ratios were calculated with generalized linear models. Established...

  3. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... the-counter pain relievers can help with your arthritis symptoms. "Over-the-counter" means you can buy ...

  4. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  5. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition arthritis, rheumatoid RA Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ... and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  16. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  17. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  18. Endogenous IL-22 Plays a Dual Role in Arthritis: Regulation of Established Arthritis via IFN-γ Responses

    Justa, Shivali; Zhou, Xiaoqun; Sarkar, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objective IL-22 is elevated in patients with inflammatory arthritis and correlates with disease activity. IL-22 deficient mice have reduced incidence of arthritis. Recombinant IL-22 restrains progression of arthritis via increase in IL-10 responses when administered prior to onset of arthritis. These findings imply a possible dual role of IL-22 in inflammatory arthritis depending on the phase of arthritis. Experiments outlined here were designed to elucidate the contribution of endogenous IL-22 before and after the onset of arthritis. Methods Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in DBA1 or IFN-γ deficient mice following immunization with collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. Anti-IL-22 antibody or isotype control were administered prior to or after onset of arthritis and disease progression assessed by clinical scoring and histopathology. IL-22, IL-17 and IFN-γ responses were measured by ELISA and flowcytometry. Anti-collagen antibody responses were analyzed by ELISA. Expression of IL-22R1 in CD4+ cells was elucidated by flowcytometry and real time PCR. Results Collagen specific IL-22 responses were expanded during arthritis and IL-22 producing cells were discrete from IL-17 or IFN-γ producing cells. Neutralization of IL-22 after onset of arthritis resulted in significant increase in Th1 responses and significantly reduced severity of arthritis. CD4+ cells from arthritic mice showed increased surface expression of IL-22R1. In vitro, CD4+T cells cultured with antigen presenting cells in the presence or absence of IL-22 suppressed or induced IFN-γ, respectively. The protective effect of anti-IL-22 was reversed in IFN-γ deficient mice. Moreover, administration of anti-IL-22 prior to onset of arthritis augmented arthritis severity. Conclusion We show for the first time that IL-22 plays a dual role: protective prior to the onset of arthritis and pathogenic after onset of arthritis. The pathogenic effect of IL-22 is dependent on suppression of IFN

  19. Arthritis and Veterans

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  20. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    ... lift your mood and make you feel more positive. Learn about physical activity for people with arthritis and CDC-recommended physical ... Top of Page 6. How does being overweight affect arthritis? It’s ... physical activity and diet changes can help you lose weight. ...

  1. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  2. [Bone structure in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Ono, Kumiko; Ohashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , the osteoclast pathway is activated by abnormal immune conditions accompanied by chronic inflammation, resulting in periarticular osteoporosis and local bone destruction around joints. In addition, multiple factors, including reduced physical activity and pharmacotherapies such as steroids, lead to systemic osteoporosis. These conditions cause decreasing bone mineral density and deterioration of bone quality, and expose patients to increased risk of fracture. Understanding the bone structures of RA and evaluating fracture risk are central to the treatment of RA.

  3. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    T. V. Korotaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available soriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine and entheses from a group of spondyloarthritis (SpA, which is usually observed in patients with psoriasis (Ps. The diagnosis of PsA is based on the CASPAR criteria for psoriatic arthritis. The disease results from interactions between genetic, immunological and environmental factors. The main clinical manifestations of PsA include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. PsA must be differentiated from rheumatoid arthritis, gout, reactive arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Due to the fact that PsA is a clinically heterogeneous disease, its activity is assessed using complex indices, by taking into account that the patient has arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The goal of treatment for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of the main clinical manifestations of the disease, to slow down or prevent radiographic progression, to increase life expectancy and quality of life in the patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities, which is achieved through a wide range of drugs of different classes. Therapy should be chosen based on the clinical manifestations of PsA and comorbidities in the patients. 

  4. Arthritis Glossary

    ... mass and strength, becoming “deconditioned” due to inactivity. Self-efficacy  A person’s belief that with self-management, smart ... test result useful when making a diagnosis. Strengthening exercises  Exercises that help maintain or increase muscle strength. ...

  5. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  6. Arthritis in the buff

    Rothschild, B.; Williams, E.M.; Poteat, G.B.; Woods, R.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  7. Neonatal and infantile candidal arthritis with or without osteomyelitis

    Yousefzadeh, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Four cases of candidal arthritis and osteomyelitis are presented and 17 others are reviewed from the literature. The clinical and radiographic aspects of the entity are discussed in detail and compared with those of bacterial septic arthritis. The role of predisposing factors are elaborated. An increase in the incidence of the disease is anticipated and the diagnostic difficulties are enumerated. (orig.) [de

  8. Managing Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. As the population ages, the number of people with this condition is expected to increase dramatically. In this podcast, Dr. Jennifer Hootman discusses the importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Handouts Psoriatic arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Psoriatic Arthritis updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Psoriatic arthritis Related Health Topics Arthritis Psoriasis National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  10. Arthritis and IBD

    ... pain and stiffness in the lower spine and sacroiliac joints (at the bottom of the back). Interestingly, ... addition to causing arthritis of the spine and sacroiliac joints, ankylosing spondylitis can cause inflammation of the ...

  11. Tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis.

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous disease that has been difficult to manage until the recent advent of biologics. However, there are still unmet medical needs for newer agents. Tofacitinib is a Janus family of kinases inhibitor approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis in many countries and psoriasis in Russia. We reviewed the evidences of tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis treatment. The efficacy and safety profiles result from Phase III clinical trials (OPAL BROADEN and OPAL BEYOND) and one open-label extension study (OPAL BALANCE). Both tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice a day were superior to placebo for American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria response at 3 months and showed significant improvement of skin, enthesitis and dactylitis. Tofacitinib is a promising treatment option for psoriatic arthritis.

  12. Arthritis and the Feet

    ... RAC) Information OIG Opioid and Chronic Pain Management OSHA Off-Label Use Physician Payment Sunshine Act (Open ... perhaps only five percent of the most serious cases, usually of rheumatoid arthritis, result in such severe ...

  13. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  18. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  3. Leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis represents a complex of diseases with an important clinical and epidemiological diversity. Visceral leishmaniasis is of higher priority than cutaneous leishmaniasis as it is a fatal disease in the absence of treatment. The clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis and control of the infection are influenced by the parasite-host relationship. The role of cellular immune responses of the Th1 type in the protection against disease in experimental and human leishmaniasis is well established. TNF-α has been implicated in cytokine-induced macrophage activation and tissue granuloma formation, two activities linked to control of intracellular visceral infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Anti- tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α strategies have had a marked and substantial impact in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, however the clinical use of TNF-α antagonists has been accompanied by increased reporting of infections. Here we report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient treated for a long period of time with human anti TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab. Due to the low incidence rate of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, a systematic screening for leishmaniasis in all patients treated with biologics may be not recommended. However, for those patients living at high risk of leishmaniasis exposure, a periodical serological monitoring should be performed during therapy with anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies.

  4. Clinical and structural remission rates increased annually and radiographic progression was continuously inhibited during a 3-year administration of tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A multi-center, prospective cohort study by the Michinoku Tocilizumab Study Group.

    Hirabayashi, Yasuhiko; Munakata, Yasuhiko; Miyata, Masayuki; Urata, Yukitomo; Saito, Koichi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaaki; Kodera, Takao; Watanabe, Ryu; Miyamoto, Seiya; Ishii, Tomonori; Nakazawa, Shigeshi; Takemori, Hiromitsu; Ando, Takanobu; Kanno, Takashi; Komagamine, Masataka; Kato, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yuichi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Endo, Kojiro; Murai, Chihiro; Takakubo, Yuya; Miura, Takao; Sato, Yukio; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Konta, Tsuneo; Chiba, Noriyuki; Muryoi, Tai; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Hatakeyama, Akira; Ogura, Ken; Sakuraba, Hirotake; Asano, Tomoyuki; Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Eiji; Takasaki, Satoshi; Asakura, Kenichi; Sugisaki, Kota; Suzuki, Yoko; Takagi, Michiaki; Nakayama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Miura, Keiki; Mori, Yu

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical and structural efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ) during its long-term administration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In total, 693 patients with RA who started TCZ therapy were followed for 3 years. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by DAS28-ESR and Boolean remission rates in 544 patients. Joint damage was assessed by calculating the modified total Sharp score (mTSS) in 50 patients. When the reason for discontinuation was limited to inadequate response or adverse events, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year continuation rates were 84.0%, 76.8%, and 72.2%, respectively. The mean DAS28-ESR was initially 5.1 and decreased to 2.5 at 6 months and to 2.2 at 36 months. The Boolean remission rate was initially 0.9% and increased to 21.7% at 6 months and to 32.2% at 36 months. The structural remission rates (ΔmTSS/year ≤ 0.5) were 68.8%, 78.6%, and 88.9% within the first, second, and third years, respectively. The structural remission rate at 3 years (ΔmTSS ≤ 1.5) was 66.0%, and earlier achievement of swollen joint count (SJC) of 1 or less resulted in better outcomes. TCZ was highly efficacious, and bone destruction was strongly prevented. SJC was an easy-to-use indicator of joint destruction.

  5. Increased Fas and Bcl-2 Expression on Peripheral Blood T and B Lymphocytes from Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, but not from Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    Bernadete L. Liphaus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Defective regulation of apoptosis may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Fas and Bcl-2 proteins are involved in the control of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Fas antigen and Bcl-2 protein on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Thirty-eight patients with JSLE, 19 patients with JRA, 10 patients with JDM and 25 healthy controls entered the study. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were stained for lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and for Fas and Bcl-2 molecules. Expressions were measured by three-color flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test. Percentages of freshly isolated T lymphocytes positively stained for Fas protein from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls, patients with JRA and patients with JDM. Percentages of B lymphocytes positive for Fas from JSLE patients were higher than healthy controls and JRA patients. In addition, Fas expression on T cells from patients with JRA was increased compared to JDM patients. Otherwise, Fas expression on T and B cells from JRA and JDM patients were similar to healthy controls. MFI of Bcl-2 positive T lymphocytes from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls and JRA patients. MFI of Bcl-2 protein on B lymphocytes from JSLE patients was similar to healthy controls and patients with JRA and JDM. Bcl-2 expression did not differ between JRA and JDM patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, increased expression of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins observed in circulating T and B lymphocytes from patients with JSLE, but not from patients with JRA and JDM, suggests that abnormalities of apoptosis may be related to the pathogenesis of JSLE and probably are not a result of chronic inflammation.

  6. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  7. Th17 Inhibitors in Active Psoriatic Arthritis

    Naik, Girish S; Ming, Wai K; Magodoro, Itai M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several biologics targeting the Th17 pathway have been developed for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a disabling disease with moderate response and an increased incidence of serious infections to first-line biologics (TNF-α antagonists). Th17 inhibitors could replace TNF-α...

  8. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  9. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  10. Smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing ACPA-positive but not ACPA-negative rheumatoid arthritis in Asian populations: evidence from the Malaysian MyEIRA case-control study.

    Yahya, Abqariyah; Bengtsson, Camilla; Lai, Too Chun; Larsson, Per T; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Abdullah, Nor Aini; Muhamad, Norasiah; Hussein, Heselynn; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; Murad, Shahnaz

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Malaysian population. A total of 1,056 RA patients and 1,416 matched controls aged 18-70 years within a defined area of Peninsular Malaysia were evaluated in a case-control study between August 2005 and December 2009. A case was defined as a person with early diagnosed RA using the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA. Controls were randomly selected matched for sex, age, and residential area. Cases and controls answered a questionnaire on a broad range of issues, including lifestyle factors and smoking habits wherein current and former smoking was classified as ever-smoking. The presence of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) was determined for cases and controls. We found that ever-smokers had an increased risk of developing ACPA-positive RA [odds ratio (OR) = 4.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-9.2] but not ACPA-negative RA (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-2.0), compared with never-smokers. A significant dose-response relationship between cumulative dose of smoking and risk of ACPA-positive RA was observed (<20 pack-years OR = 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-9.8; at least 20 pack-years OR = 5.2, 95% CI 1.6-17.6). Hence, smoking is associated with an increased risk of ACPA-positive RA in the Malaysian population, in which the genetic context is similar to several other Asian countries.

  11. Increased baseline RUNX2, caspase 3 and p21 gene expressions in the peripheral blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients are associated with improved clinical response to methotrexate therapy.

    Tchetina, Elena V; Demidova, Natalia V; Markova, Galina A; Taskina, Elena A; Glukhova, Svetlana I; Karateev, Dmitry E

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the potential of the baseline gene expression in the whole blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients for predicting the response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Twenty-six control subjects and 40 RA patients were examined. Clinical, immunological and radiographic parameters were assessed before and after 24 months of follow-up. The gene expressions in the whole blood were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The protein concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to suggest thresholds that were associated with the prediction of the response. Decreases in the disease activity at the end of the study were accompanied by significant increases in joint space narrowing score (JSN). Positive correlations between the expressions of the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) genes with the level of C-reactive protein and MMP-9 expression with Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) and swollen joint count were noted at baseline. The baseline tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α gene expression was positively correlated with JSN at the end of the follow-up, whereas p21, caspase 3, and runt-related transcription factor (RUNX)2 were correlated with the ΔDAS28 values. Our results suggest that the expressions of MMP-9 and ULK1 might be associated with disease activity. Increased baseline gene expressions of RUNX2, p21 and caspase 3 in the peripheral blood might predict better responses to MTX therapy. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Psoriatic Arthritis and Diabetes: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Dreiher, Jacob; Freud, Tamar; Cohen, Arnon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Diabetes has been associated with psoriasis, but little is known about the association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes. Methods. Patients diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis by a rheumatologist were compared to age- and sex-matched patients without psoriatic arthritis regarding the prevalence of diabetes in a population-based cross-sectional study using logistic multivariate models. The study was performed utilizing the medical database of Clalit, the largest healthcare provider organization in Israel. Results. The study included 549 patients with psoriatic arthritis ≥21 years and 1,098 patients without psoriatic arthritis. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with psoriatic arthritis was increased as compared to the prevalence in patients without psoriatic arthritis (15.3% versus 10.7%, P value = 0.008). The difference was prominent among females (18.7% versus 10.3%, P < 0.001) but not among males (11.2% in patients with and without psoriatic arthritis, P = 1.000). In a multivariate analysis, psoriatic arthritis was associated with diabetes among females (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.02–2.52, P = 0.040) but not among males (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.42–1.22, P = 0.213). Conclusion. Our study suggests a possible association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes in women. Women with psoriatic arthritis might be candidates for diabetes screening. PMID:23843781

  13. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  14. MP Joint Arthritis

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required ...

  15. A sonographic spectrum of psoriatic arthritis: "the five targets".

    Gutierrez, Marwin

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis. Most of the studies have been aimed at investigating its ability in the assessment of joints, tendons, and entheses in psoriatic arthritis patients. Less attention has been paid to demonstrate the potential of ultrasound in the evaluation of skin and nail. The aim of this pictorial essay was to show the main high-frequency grayscale and power Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis at joint, tendon, enthesis, skin, and nail level.

  16. Candidal Arthritis After Complete Treatment of Systemic Candidiasis

    Wen-Bin Hsieh

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, the incidence of invasive candidal infections in neonatal intensive care units has increased dramatically. Various complications, such as arthritis, endocarditis, meningitis, and endophthalmitis, have been reviewed. We present the case of a premature infant with systemic candidemia. Arthritis was discovered 6 months after completion of amphotericin B therapy, and was successfully treated with oral fluconazole for 6 weeks. We conclude that long-term follow-up is particularly important in patients with treated candidemia. To prevent complications, prolonged treatment with high-dose amphotericin B is suggested for systemic fungal infection, and oral fluconazole is an effective alternative for candidal arthritis.

  17. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  18. Different duration of Colchicine for preventing recurrence of Gouty arthritis

    H Karimzadeh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gout is a Common recurrent clinical syndrome characterized by increased serum uric acid and recurrent attacks of acute arthritis. Colchicine is used for Prophylaxis against recurrence of arthritis, but the duration of its administration has mentioned variable. In this study, optimal duration of prophylactic colchicine for prevention of gouty arthritis was assessed. Methods : In a clinical trial 190 patients with gouty arthritis divided randomly to group 1,2and 3 and received colchicine for 3 to 6, 7 to 9 and 10 to 12 months then colchicine discontinued and the patients followed one year for recurrence of arthritis. Result assessed by survival analysis with Kaplan –Meier method. Results: The probability of recurrence of arthritis (in order of duration of colchicine prophylaxis was 54%, 27.5% and 23%, respectively. The difference between group one and others was statistically significant, but between group 2 and 3 was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The most suitable duration of colchicine prophylaxis that accompanied with lower recurrence rate was 7-9 months, which seems more cost -effective than 10-12 months regimen. Key words: Gout, Colchicine, Arthritis, Recurrence

  19. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup

    2016-01-01

    in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice...... associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above...

  20. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Alternative Medicine http://nccam.nih.gov NIHSeniorHealth.gov—Rheumatoid Arthritis ... ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the ...

  3. (99) Tc-methylene diphosphonate improves rheumatoid arthritis disease activity by increasing the frequency of peripheral γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs.

    Su, Dinglei; Shen, Minning; Gu, Bingjie; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wang, Dandan; Li, Xia; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-06-01

    γδ T cells exhibit important functions in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In recent years, numerous studies harnessed the γδ T cell-activating capacity of aminobiphosphonates for the treatment of malignant tumors. As (99) Tc-methylene diphosphonate ((99) Tc-MDP) has long been widely used for the treatment of RA in China with good efficacy, we are interested in whether this drug exerts its therapeutic effect on RA by modulating peripheral γδ T cells of RA patients. To investigate the effect of (99) Tc-MDP on the frequency of γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of patients with active RA. Nineteen patients with active RA were treated with (99) Tc-MDP intravenously at a dose of 20 μg/day consecutively for 10-14 days. Before and after treatment, the main clinical and laboratory parameters for each patient were evaluated. The frequency of CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs was detected by flow cytometry. Serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After intravenous (99) Tc-MDP therapy, the frequency of peripheral CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs were significantly elevated, paralleled with decreased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased level of serum TGF-β. The elevation of peripheral CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells was positively correlated with increased serum TGF-β and decreased disease activity. (99) Tc-MDP may improve the activity of RA through upregulating the frequency of peripheral γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs as well as affecting the serum cytokine environment by increasing TGF-β and decreasing TNF-α and IL-6. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Link between Gut Microbiota and the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Gabriel Horta-Baas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization and understanding of gut microbiota has recently increased representing a wide research field, especially in autoimmune diseases. Gut microbiota is the major source of microbes which might exert beneficial as well as pathogenic effects on human health. Intestinal microbiome’s role as mediator of inflammation has only recently emerged. Microbiota has been observed to differ in subjects with early rheumatoid arthritis compared to controls, and this finding has commanded this study as a possible autoimmune process. Studies with intestinal microbiota have shown that rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by an expansion and/or decrease of bacterial groups as compared to controls. In this review, we present evidence linking intestinal dysbiosis with the autoimmune mechanisms involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Brucella Septic Arthritis: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Fatehi Elnour Elzein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is one of the commonest zoonotic infections worldwide. The disease is endemic in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean area. Osteoarticular involvement is a frequent manifestation of brucellosis. It tends to involve the sacroiliac joints more commonly; however, spondylitis and peripheral arthritis are increasingly reported. Brucellosis can be overlooked especially in the presence of companion bacteria. Hence, it should be suspected in all patients with septic arthritis in endemic areas or in patients visiting such areas.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact ...

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  8. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  9. Tracheobronchomegaly and rheumatoid arthritis

    Rua Marin, Catalina; Diaz Betancur, James Samir; Cardona, Alejandro; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition of unknown etiology that has been described in association with connective tissue diseases. We present a case of tracheomegaly in a patient with a long evolution rheumatoid arthritis. This is the second case reported in the medical literature until now. Association between these pathologies is uncertain and we can not establish a clear pathophysiological link due to the rarity of its occurrence and the late onset of symptoms

  10. Arthritis and the Risk of Falling Into Poverty: A Survival Analysis Using Australian Data.

    Callander, Emily J; Schofield, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Low income is known to be associated with having arthritis. However, no longitudinal studies have documented the relationship between developing arthritis and falling into poverty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Australians who developed arthritis to determine if they had an elevated risk of falling into poverty. Survival analysis using Cox regression models was applied to nationally representative, longitudinal survey data obtained between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from Australian adults who were ages 21 years and older in 2007. The hazard ratio for falling into income poverty was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-1.09) in women who were diagnosed as having arthritis and 1.15 (95% CI 1.13-1.16) in men who were diagnosed as having arthritis, as compared to those who were never diagnosed as having arthritis. The hazard ratio for falling into multidimensional poverty was 1.15 (95% CI 1.14-1.17) in women who were diagnosed as having arthritis and 1.88 (95% CI 1.85-1.91) in men who were diagnosed as having arthritis. Developing arthritis increases the risk of falling into income poverty and multidimensional poverty. The risk of multidimensional poverty is greater than the risk of income poverty. Given the high prevalence of arthritis, the condition is likely an overlooked driver of poverty. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  12. Collagen-induced arthritis in common marmosets: A new nonhuman primate model for chronic arthritis

    M.P.M. Vierboom (Michel); E. Breedveld (Elly); I. Kondova (Ivanela); B.A. 't Hart (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: There is an ever-increasing need for animal models to evaluate efficacy and safety of new therapeutics in the field of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly for the early preclinical evaluation of human-specific biologicals targeting the progressive phase of the disease,

  13. Mental health, fatigue and function are associated with increased risk of disease flare following TNF inhibitor tapering in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: an exploratory analysis of data from the Optimizing TNF Tapering in RA (OPTTIRA) trial.

    Bechman, Katie; Sin, Fang En; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Norton, Sam; Matcham, Faith; Scott, David Lloyd; Cope, Andrew; Galloway, James

    2018-01-01

    Tapering of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy appears feasible, safe and effective in selected patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Depression is highly prevalent in RA and may impact on flare incidence through various mechanisms. This study aims to investigate if psychological states predict flare in patients' dose tapering their anti-TNF therapy. This study is a post-hoc analysis of the Optimizing TNF Tapering in RA trial, a multicentre, randomised, open-label study investigating anti-TNF tapering in RA patients with sustained low disease activity. Patient-reported outcomes (Health Assessment Questionnaire, EuroQol 5-dimension scale, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy fatigue scale (FACIT-F), 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36)) were collected at baseline. The primary outcome was flare, defined as an increase in 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28) ≥0.6 and ≥1 swollen joint. Discrete-time survival models were used to identify patient-reported outcomes that predict flare. Ninety-seven patients were randomised to taper their anti-TNF dose by either 33% or 66%. Forty-one patients flared. Higher baseline DAS28 score was associated with flare (adjusted HR 1.96 (95% CI 1.18 to 3.24), p=0.01). Disability (SF-36 physical component score), fatigue (FACIT-F) and mental health (SF-36 mental health subscale (MH)) predicted flare in unadjusted models. In multivariate analyses, only SF-36 MH remained a statistically significant predictor of flare (adjusted HR per 10 units 0.74 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.93), p=0.01). Baseline DAS28 and mental health status are independently associated with flare in patients who taper their anti-TNF therapy. Fatigue and function also associate with flare but the effect disappears when adjusting for confounders. Given these findings, mental health and functional status should be considered in anti-TNF tapering decisions in order to optimise the likelihood of success. EudraCT Number: 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN: 28955701

  14. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis and the challenge of using nanoparticles for its treatment

    Chabib Lutfi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common autoimmune disease that affects the joints. The cause of the disease is unknown, many studies proposed hypothesis about the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical manifestations of arthritis are different in each patients. In addition, the development of the medication is still continue to achieve the most effective role with less side effect. Nanoparticles may be the answer to this problem, since they have been widely used to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of rheumatoid arthritis drugs. Using nanoparticles-tagged folate or PEG to deliver rheumatoid arthritis drugs may increase the specificity of the drugs to the target and consequently, may decrease the side effects of the drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the etiology, clinical manifestation and highlighting the use of nanoparticles in rheumatoid arthritis treatment.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  17. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  18. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of children with Lyme arthritis in Nova Scotia.

    Glaude, Pier Diane; Huber, Adam M; Mailman, Timothy; Ramsey, Suzanne; Lang, Bianca; Stringer, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging problem in Nova Scotia. Lyme arthritis is a late manifestation of Lyme disease. To describe the demographic characteristics, referral patterns and clinical course of children diagnosed with Lyme arthritis in a tertiary care pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. In the present retrospective chart review, subjects diagnosed with Lyme arthritis between 2006 and 2013 were identified through the clinic database. Demographic variables, referral patterns, clinical presentation and information regarding treatment course and outcome were collected. Seventeen patients were identified; 76% presented in 2012 and 2013. In 37.5% of cases, the referring physician suspected Lyme disease. Most patients presented with one or more painful and/or swollen joints; 94% had knee involvement. Only three of 17 patients had a history of erythema migrans and four of 17 recalled a tick bite. Five patients had a history of neurological manifestations consistent with Lyme disease, although, none had a diagnosis made at the time. Arthritis usually resolved after treatment with standard antibiotics; however, at last follow-up, two patients had antibiotic refractory Lyme arthritis, with one having joint damage despite aggressive arthritis treatment. A significant increase in cases of Lyme arthritis has recently been recognized in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. A history of a tick bite or erythema migrans were not sensitive markers of Lyme arthritis, and this diagnosis was often not considered by the referring physician. Educational initiatives should be undertaken to increase local awareness of this treatable cause of arthritis in children.

  19. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  20. Involvement of 15-lipoxygenase in the inflammatory arthritis.

    Wu, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Liou, Houng-Chi; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2012-07-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) is involved in many pathological processes. The aim of this study is to examine the role of 15-LOX in the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and inflammatory arthritis. It was found that treatment of 15-LOX downstream product of 15-(S)-HETE (15-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) increased the mRNA and protein levels of MMP-2 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast (RASF) derived from rheumatoid arthritis patients. The enhancement effect of 15-(S)-HETE was antagonized by the addition of LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) and PDTC (NF-κB inhibitor). Treatment of 15-(S)-HETE increased the phosphorylation of AKT, nuclear translocation of p65 and the breakdown of IκBα. TNF-α and IL-1β are the key cytokines involved in arthritis and also increase the activity of MMP-2 in RASF, which was antagonized by pretreatment with 15-LOX inhibitor PD146176 or knockdown of 15-LOX. It was also found that these two cytokines increased the expression of 15-LOX in RASF. Treatment of glucocorticoid but not NSAIDs inhibited 15-(S)-HETE-induced expression of MMP-2. In comparison with wild-type mice, adjuvant-induced arthritis and MMP-2 expression in synovial membrane were markedly inhibited in 15-LOX knockout (KO) mice. These results indicate that 15-LOX plays an important role in the disease progression of arthritis and may be involved in the inflammatory action induced by TNF-α and IL-1β. 15-LOX is thus a good target for developing drugs in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Osteoarthritis and in Other Forms of Arthritis.

    Zhou, Yachuan; Wang, Tingyu; Hamilton, John L; Chen, Di

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis defines a large group of diseases primarily affecting the joint. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in adults. Osteoarthritis (OA) affecting the knee or hip is the most common form among over 100 types of arthritis. Other types of arthritis include erosive hand OA, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, facet joint OA, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). However, the specific molecular signals involved in the development and progression of OA and related forms of arthritis remain largely unknown. The canonical wingless/integrated (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway could play a unique role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. In this review article, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of OA and other types of arthritis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Wnts and Wnt-related molecules are involved in arthritis development and progression in human genetic studies and in vitro studies. Also, mouse models have been generated to determine the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling represents a unique signaling pathway regulating arthritis development and progression, and the molecules in this particular pathway may serve as targets for the therapeutic intervention of arthritis. Mediators and downstream effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are increased in OA as well other forms of arthritis, including DISH and SpA. Through extensive investigations, including pre-clinical studies in transgenic mice and translational and human studies, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been proven to play roles in bone and joint pathology by directly affecting bone, cartilage, and synovial tissue; further, these pathologies can be reduced through targeting this pathway. Continued investigation into the distinct molecular signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway will provide additional insights toward the therapeutic

  2. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  3. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    Schacherl, M.

    1985-01-01

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.) [de

  4. Cervical Myelopathy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    N. Mukerji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the cervical spine is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical presentation can be variable, and symptoms may be due to neck pain or compressive myeloradiculopathy. We discuss the pathology, grading systems, clinical presentation, indications for surgery and surgical management of cervical myelopathy related to rheumatoid arthritis in this paper. We describe our surgical technique and results. We recommend early consultation for surgical management when involvement of the cervical spine is suspected in rheumatoid arthritis. Even patients with advanced cervical myelopathy should be discussed for surgical treatment, since in our experience improvement in function after surgery is common.

  5. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: recent advances

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Døhn, Uffe M; Ejbjerg, Bo J

    2006-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis. Data on the value of ultrasonography and MRI are accumulating rapidly, fueling their increasing use in early rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on recent advances in the clinical...

  6. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis

    Choi, Ivy Y.; Karpus, Olga N.; Turner, Jason D.; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Maijer, Karen I.; Tak, Paul P.; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included

  7. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    Shivaprasad H. Venkatesha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities.

  8. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

    Maxfield, W. S. [Dept, of Radiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Weiss, T. E.; Tutton, R. H.; Hidalgo, J. U. [Ochsner Clinic and Ochsner Foundation Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1969-05-15

    Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, {sup 131}I human serum albumin (25 {mu}Ci/10 lb), {sup 99m}Tc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), {sup 131}I iodipamide (40 {mu}Ci/10 lb), and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in the immune ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, ... associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to take a more active role ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  14. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    ... around your spine and legs stronger. Ask your health care provider if you can use a stationary bike. Be aware that if you have arthritis of the hip or knee cap, biking can worsen your symptoms. If you are not ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / ... Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient ...

  17. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  19. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  20. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    2016-12-01

    inflammation, thick- ness of the synovial lining layer, and vascularity (16). These observations support the hypothesis that citrulli- nated chemokines may...Gerszten RE, Garcia-Zepeda EA, Lim YC, Yoshida M, Ding HA, Gimbrone MA, et al. MCP-1 and IL-8 trigger firm adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium...arthritis: regulation of its production in synovial cells by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:762–71. 35. Hatano Y

  1. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  2. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  3. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Petkova, Valentina B

    2009-04-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients' disease management, medication compliance and from there patients' quality of life. To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner's visits and hospitalizations are expected. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71), attending pharmacies - intervention group; and 43 individuals - control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. PARAMETERS ASSESSED DURING THE FOUR STAGES OF THE PROGRAM WERE: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner's visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients' health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients' pain, decrease in the physician's visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care. Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient's quality of life.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF CYTOKINE PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH REACTIVE ARTHRITIS

    T. V. Gaponova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pathogenesis of reactive arthritis (ReA is not clear yet. Several trials suggest that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines is responsible for development of arthritis in ReA, while other studies report that Th1 cytokine response in ReA is impaired in favor of Th2 response. The aim of our study was to investigate serum levels of cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ and IL-1Ra in the patients with ReA of different etiology, as compared with infection-related arthritis. The results of our study had demonstrated that serum levels of IL-1β and TNFα in the patients with ReA were significantly higher, whereas IL-1Ra, IL-4, IL-6 proved to be significantly lower than in healthy controls. Serum levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in patients with chronic ReA, as compared to the cases of acute and recurrent ReA. No significant differences in cytokine profiles were found between the patients with ReA, and the persons with infection-related arthritis. The data obtained are, generally, suggestive for proinflammatory Th1 cytokine profile in ReA patients studied, this confirming the mostly assumed pathogenetic hypothesis for reactive arthritis where an underlying cytokine imbalance is suggested. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 167-172.

  5. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  6. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    ... NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 new ... Edition Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with Us ...

  7. IJMBR ARTHRITIS edited 4.3.1

    MJP

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Findings: Septic arthritis in the index patient developed insidiously and was diagnosed after ... mellitus, malignancy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Others include ... intravenous drug use, anemia, hemodialysis and the extremes of ...

  8. Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis

    Gotfredsen, A.; Als, O.S.; Hassager, C.; Christiansen, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors studied 159 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with a variety of drugs. Stratification of the patients was done according to treatment, sex, menopausal state, duration of the disease, and functional impairment. Forearm bone mineral content (BMC) and total body bone mineral (TBBM) were measured by single and dual photon absorptiometry. Bone turnover was estimated by biochemical markers. All patients had significantly decreased BMC and TBBM compared to normals. Comparing glucocorticoid and penicillamine treatment in premenopausal patients, they found significantly lower BMC and TBBM values in the glucocorticoid treated group. However, no differences in BMC and TBBM values were found in the corresponding postmenopausal groups. In the premenopausal glucocorticoid group with the duration of treatment and cumulated dose correlated with BMC, whereas no such correlations were found in the postmenopausal women. In the patients who did not receive glucocorticoids they found significant relationships between BMC and functional impairment as well as duration of the disease. Indices of bone turnover rose with increasing functional, impairment, particularly those of bone resorption

  9. Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    Váňová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Title of bachelors thesis: Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Summary: The work is focused on diseases rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. Part of the general anatomy of the joint contains a general, deals with the disease rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment. Part has its own special case report physiotherapy sessions on this topic. Key words: rheumatoid arthritis, comprehensive ...

  10. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  11. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  12. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  13. Imaging the spine in arthritis-a pictorial review

    Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2011-01-01

    Spinal involvement is frequent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthritides (SpA), and its diagnosis is important. Thus, MRI and CT are increasingly used, although radiography is the recommended initial examination. The purpose of this review is to present the typical...... by vertebral squaring and condensation of vertebral corners, in later stages by slim ossifications between vertebral bodies, vertebral fusion, arthritis/ankylosis of apophyseal joints and ligamentous ossification causing spinal stiffness. The imaging features of the other forms of SpA can vary, but voluminous...

  14. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M.

    1989-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities

  15. Oral Health and Risk of Arthritis in the Scottish Population: Results from the Scottish Health Survey.

    Abbood, Hadeel Mohammed; Cherukara, George; Pathan, Ejaz; Macfarlane, Tatiana V

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the link between self-reported oral health and arthritis in the Scottish population using data from the Scottish Health Survey. Data were available from 2008 to 2013 on self-reported arthritis, oral health conditions and oral hygiene habits from the Scottish Health Survey. Arthritis was defined in this survey by self-reported long standing illness, those who reported having arthritis, rheumatism and/or fibrositis. Oral conditions were defined by self-reported bleeding gums, toothache, biting difficulties and/or edentulousness. Oral hygiene habits were defined by self-reported brushing teeth and/or using dental floss on daily basis. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis adjusted for age, gender, qualification, smoking and body mass index. Prevalence of self-reported arthritis was 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.03 to 9.57). Those who reported having bleeding gums (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.35 to 1.96), toothache (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.5), biting difficulties (OR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.62 to 2.34), and being edentulous (OR = 1.22; 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.37) had an increased risk of arthritis. Brushing teeth (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 0.74 to 2.12), and using dental floss (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.89 to 1.39) were not associated with arthritis. Self-reported oral conditions were associated with increased risk of self-reported arthritis. Oral hygiene habits were not associated with self-reported arthritis. Further investigation is required to assess the causal association between oral hygiene, oral disease and arthritis.

  16. The effects of the Mediterranean diet on rheumatoid arthritis prevention and treatment: a systematic review of human prospective studies.

    Forsyth, Casuarina; Kouvari, Matina; D'Cunha, Nathan M; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Mellor, Duane D; Kellett, Jane; Naumovski, Nenad

    2018-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive autoimmune disease characterised by severely swollen and painful joints. To compliment pharmacotherapy, people living with rheumatoid arthritis often turn to dietary interventions such as the Mediterranean diet. The aim of the present systematic review is to discuss the effects of the Mediterranean diet on the management and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis in human prospective studies. Four studies met the inclusion criteria, including two intervention studies reporting improvement in the pain visual analogue scale (p Mediterranean diet groups. Only one study reported a reduction in the 28 joint count disease activity score for rheumatoid arthritis for the Mediterranean diet group (p Mediterranean diet in reducing pain and increasing physical function in people living with rheumatoid arthritis. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to support widespread recommendation of the Mediterranean diet for prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  18. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  19. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  20. Effects by periodontitis on pristane-induced arthritis in rats.

    Eriksson, Kaja; Lönnblom, Erik; Tour, Gregory; Kats, Anna; Mydel, Piotr; Georgsson, Pierre; Hultgren, Catharina; Kharlamova, Nastya; Norin, Ulrika; Jönsson, Jörgen; Lundmark, Anna; Hellvard, Annelie; Lundberg, Karin; Jansson, Leif; Holmdahl, Rikard; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2016-11-03

    An infection-immune association of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pre-existing periodontitis on the development and the immune/inflammatory response of pristane-induced arthritis. We investigated the effect of periodontitis induced by ligature placement and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infection, in combination with Fusobacterium nucleatum to promote its colonization, on the development of pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rats (Dark Agouti). Disease progression and severity of periodontitis and arthritis was monitored using clinical assessment, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)/intraoral radiographs, antibody response, the inflammatory markers such as α-1-acid glycoprotein (α-1-AGP) and c-reactive protein (CRP) as well as cytokine multiplex profiling at different time intervals after induction. Experimentally induced periodontitis manifested clinically (P periodontitis-induction led to severe arthritis in all rats demonstrating that the severity of arthritis was not affected by the pre-existence of periodontitis. Endpoint analysis showed that 89% of the periodontitis-affected animals were positive for antibodies against arginine gingipain B and furthermore, the plasma antibody levels to a citrullinated P. gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) peptide (denoted CPP3) were significantly (P periodontitis rats with PIA. Additionally, there was a trend towards increased pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, and increased α-1-AGP levels in plasma from periodontitis-challenged PIA rats. Pre-existence of periodontitis induced antibodies against citrullinated peptide derived from PPAD in rats with PIA. However, there were no differences in the development or severity of PIA between periodontitis challenged and periodontitis free rats.

  1. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  2. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  3. Gouty arthritis: An approach for general practice | Tikly | South ...

    Gout is a common crystal-induced inflammatory arthritis, the prevalence and clinical complexity of which is increasing in the face of a growing aged population with multiple co-morbidities. Recent epidemiological studies emphasise that lifestyle factors strongly influence the development of hyperuricaemia and gout.

  4. Parental Rheumatoid Arthritis, Child Mortality, and Case Fatality

    Rom, Ane L; Wu, Chun S; Olsen, Jørn

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We have reported increased long term morbidity in children of parents with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we assess child mortality and case fatality in the same cohort. METHODS: All singletons born in Denmark from 1977 to 2008 were identified through linkage of Danish National...

  5. Evaluate the Mechanism of Enhanced Metastasis Induced by Arthritis

    2012-09-01

    Genes that mediate breast ca ncer metastasis to lung . Nature 2005, 436(7050):518-524. 6. Das Roy L, Pathangey L, Tinder T, Schettini J, Gruber H...7. Das Roy L, Ghosh S, Pathangey LB, Tinder TL, Gruber HE, Mukherjee P: Collagen induced arthritis increases s econdary metastasis in MMTV-PyV

  6. Parental Rheumatoid Arthritis and Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chunsen; Olsen, Jørn

    2018-01-01

    Objective Maternal rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring. We assessed the potential influence of both maternal and paternal RA on the risk of ASD in offspring to disentangle the influence of genetic inheritance from...

  7. Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain,

  8. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  9. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  10. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Naz, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Bari, A.; Maqsud, A.; Khan, M. Z.; Ahmad, T. M.; Saira Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  11. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Sujani Yadlapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren’s syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  12. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  13. Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Ilaria Ruffilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis (PsO is a chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune skin disease, associated with an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthritis occurring approximately in 30% of PsO patients. Sporadic cases of association between PsO and autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs have been reported. However, two different recent studies did not find any association between them. In patients with PsO and PsA, an association with AITD has been shown by most of the studies in adults, but not in the juvenile form. In PsA women and men, thyroid autoimmunity [positive antithyroid peroxidase (AbTPO antibodies, hypoechoic thyroid pattern] and subclinical hypothyroidism were more prevalent than in the general population. An association has been shown also in patients with PsO, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, who have more frequently AITD. A Th1 immune predominance has been shown in early PsO, and PsA, with high serum CXCL10 (Th1 prototype chemokine, overall in the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis. This Th1 immune predominance might be the immunopathogenetic base of the association of these disorders. A raised incidence of new cases of hypothyroidism, thyroid dysfunction, positive AbTPO, and appearance of a hypoechoic thyroid pattern in PsA patients, especially in women, has been shown recently, suggesting to evaluate AbTPO levels, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound, especially in PsA women. Thyroid function follow-up and suitable treatments should be performed regularly in PsA female patients at high risk (thyroid-stimulating hormone within the normal range but at the higher limit, positive AbTPO, hypoechoic, and small thyroid.

  14. Self-Management Education Participation Among US Adults With Arthritis: Who's Attending?

    Murphy, Louise B; Brady, Teresa J; Boring, Michael A; Theis, Kristina A; Barbour, Kamil E; Qin, Jin; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    Self-management education (SME) programs teach people with chronic conditions skills to manage their health conditions. We examined patterns in SME program participation among US adults with arthritis ages ≥18 years. Respondents with arthritis were those who reported ever being diagnosed with arthritis by a doctor or health care provider. We analyzed 2014 National Health Interview Survey data to estimate the percentage (unadjusted and age-standardized) who ever attended an SME program overall and for selected subgroups, representativeness of SME participants relative to all adults with arthritis, and trends in SME course participation. In 2014, 1 in 9 US adults with arthritis (11.3% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 10.4-12.3]; age-standardized 11.4% [95% CI 10.0-12.9]) had ever participated in an SME program. SME participation (age-standardized) was highest among those with ≥8 health care provider visits in the past 12 months (16.0% [95% CI 13.1-19.4]). Since 2002, the number of adults with arthritis who have ever participated in SME has increased by 1.7 million, but the percentage has remained constant. Despite its many benefits, SME participation among US adults with arthritis remains persistently low. By recommending that their patients attend SME programs, health care providers can increase the likelihood that their patients experience SME program benefits. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Role of age, sex, and obesity in the higher prevalence of arthritis among lower socioeconomic groups: a population-based survey.

    Busija, Lucy; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H

    2007-05-15

    To compare the prevalence of arthritis among population groups based on demographic, socioeconomic, and body mass index (BMI) characteristics; to investigate the combined influence of these factors on arthritis; and to assess the relationship between self-reported health and psychological distress and arthritis. Data from the Victorian Population Health Survey (n = 7,500) were used in the study. Psychological distress was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress scale, and self-reported health was assessed by a single item. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the combined influence of demographic and socioeconomic factors and BMI on arthritis. Overall, 23% of Victorian adults (20% men and 26% women) reported having arthritis. The presence of arthritis was associated with high psychological distress (odds ratio [OR] 1.2; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.1-1.4) and poor self-reported health (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.7-2.1). Increased prevalence of arthritis was found in older age groups, lower education and income groups, and in people who were overweight or obese. Women had higher risk of arthritis, even after adjustment for age, residence, education, occupation, income, and BMI. Age and BMI independently predicted arthritis for men and women. For men, higher risk of arthritis was also associated with lower income. Arthritis is a highly prevalent condition associated with poor health and high psychological distress. Prevalence of arthritis is disproportionately high among women and individuals from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. As the prevalence of arthritis is predicted to increase, careful consideration of causal factors, and setting priorities for resource allocation for the treatment and prevention of arthritis are required.

  16. Evidence-based diagnostics: adult septic arthritis.

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Everett, Worth W; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-08-01

    % to 38%). With the exception of joint surgery (positive likelihood ratio [+LR] = 6.9) or skin infection overlying a prosthetic joint (+LR = 15.0), history, physical examination, and serum tests do not significantly alter posttest probability. Serum inflammatory markers such as white blood cell (WBC) counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are not useful acutely. The interval LR for synovial white blood cell (sWBC) counts of 0 × 10(9)-25 × 10(9)/L was 0.33; for 25 × 10(9)-50 × 10(9)/L, 1.06; for 50 × 10(9)-100 × 10(9)/L, 3.59; and exceeding 100 × 10(9)/L, infinity. Synovial lactate may be useful to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of septic arthritis with a +LR ranging from 2.4 to infinity, and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) ranging from 0 to 0.46. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of synovial fluid may identify the causative organism within 3 hours. Based on 56% sensitivity and 90% specificity for sWBC counts of >50 × 10(9)/L in conjunction with best-evidence estimates for diagnosis-related risk and treatment-related risk/benefit, the arthrocentesis test threshold is 5%, with a treatment threshold of 39%. Recent joint surgery or cellulitis overlying a prosthetic hip or knee were the only findings on history or physical examination that significantly alter the probability of nongonococcal septic arthritis. Extreme values of sWBC (>50 × 10(9)/L) can increase, but not decrease, the probability of septic arthritis. Future ED-based diagnostic trials are needed to evaluate the role of clinical gestalt and the efficacy of nontraditional synovial markers such as lactate. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. The role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Brady, Sharmayne R E; de Courten, Barbora; Reid, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. We investigated the relative contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to this elevated risk.......People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. We investigated the relative contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to this elevated risk....

  18. Ultrasonographic examination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is better than clinical examination for identification of intraarticular disease

    Nielsen, Hans Erik; Strandberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA.......The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA....

  19. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytok...

  20. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  1. Radiographic progession of rheumatoid arthritis

    Siozos, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be graded on a 0-IV scala. For this purpose five objective criteria are used: a) destruction, b) osteoporosis, c) narrowing of joint space, d) luxation and e) ankylosis. The grading of the radiographic progression is defined by the extent and the number of the measured alterations. The radiographic progression can be registered yearly. (orig.) [de

  2. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  3. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  4. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  5. Glucocorticoid Sensitivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    R.A.M. Quax

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccumulating observations of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who ‘spontaneously’ experienced less active disease during pregnancy led to the growing belief by Philip Hench that a hormonal substance had to be involved in the improving clinical conditions of pregnant patients with RA.

  6. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  7. Distinguishing Pediatric Lyme Arthritis of the Hip from Transient Synovitis and Acute Bacterial Septic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Cruz, Aristides I; Anari, Jason B; Ramirez, Jose M; Sankar, Wudbhav N; Baldwin, Keith D

    2018-01-25

    Objective Lyme arthritis is an increasingly recognized clinical entity that often prompts orthopaedic evaluation in pediatric patients. While Lyme arthritis is most common in the knee, the clinical presentation of Lyme arthritis of the hip can be similar to both acute bacterial septic arthritis and transient synovitis. Accurately distinguishing these clinical entities is important since the definitive treatment of each is distinct. Because there is limited literature on monoarticular Lyme arthritis of the hip, the purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters associated with Lyme arthritis (LA) of the hip and compare them to septic arthritis (SA) and transient synovitis (TS).  Study design A systematic review of the literature was performed using the following search terms, including the variants and plural counterparts "hip" and "Lyme arthritis." A final database of individual patients was assembled from the published literature and direct author correspondence, when available. A previously published cohort of patients with hip transient synovitis or septic arthritis was used for comparative analysis. A comparative statistical analysis was performed to the assembled database to assess differences in laboratory and clinical variables between the three diagnoses.  Results Data on 88 patients diagnosed with Lyme arthritis of the hip was collected and consolidated from the 12 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The average age of patients presenting with Lyme arthritis was 7.5 years (± 3.5 years), the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and the C-reactive protein (CRP) was 41 mm/hr and 3.9 mg/L, respectively. Peripheral white blood cell (WBC) count averaged 10.6 x 10 9 cells/L with the synovial WBC count averaging 55,888 cells/mm 3 . Compared to a previous cohort of patients with confirmed transient synovitis or septic arthritis, the 95% confidence interval for ESR was 21 - 33 mm

  8. A Qualitative Study of Fitness Instructors' Experiences Leading an Exercise Program for Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Hutzal, Carolyn E.; Wright, F. Virginia; Stephens, Samantha; Schneiderman-Walker, Jane; Feldman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Children with arthritis face challenges when they try to increase their physical activity. The study's objective was to identify elements of a successful community-based exercise program for children with arthritis by investigating the perspectives of fitness instructors who led the program. This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach.…

  9. Thyroid Autoimmunity and Function after Treatment with Biological Antirheumatic Agents in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Bliddal, Sofie; Borresen, Stina Willemoes; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    With the increased pro-inflammatory response in both rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid autoimmune diseases, treatment with biological antirheumatic agents (BAAs) of the former may affect the course of the latter. In hepatitis C and cancer patients, treatment with biological agents substantially...... increases the risk of developing thyroid autoimmunity. As the use of BAAs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is increasing, this review aimed to investigate if such use affected thyroid status in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We conducted a systematic literature search and included six studies...... status: a reduction of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody concentrations, and a reduction of thyrotropin levels in hypothyroid patients. Despite the small number of studies, they presented compliant data. The BAAs used in rheumatoid arthritis thus did not seem to negatively affect thyroid...

  10. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. [Analysis of clinical and imaging characteristics of infectious sacroiliac arthritis and review of literatures].

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yanyan; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Jingyu; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jianglin; Huang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    To study the clinical and imaging characteristics of patients with infectious sacroiliac arthritis. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with infectious sacroiliac arthritis were analyzed retrospectively between 2000 and 2014. The chief complaint was pain in hip and lumbosacral area. Their clinical features, laboratory tests and pathological examination results as well as CT/MRI/PET-CT images were evaluated. There were nine males and thirteen females eighteen (85.7%) patients had unilateral sacroiliac joint involvement. Among these patients, three were diagnosed with brucellosis sacroiliac arthritis (BSI), eight patients with tuberculosis sacroiliac arthritis (TSI), and ten patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis (ISI). For those patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were dramatically increased. Twelve patients were diagnosed pathologically including 6 ISI, 2 BSI and 4 TSI. Twelve patients and seventeen patients were scanned by CT and MRI respectively. Two patients undertook PET-CT examination. Antibiotic therapy showed significant therapeutic effects in all patients. Infectious sacroiliac arthritis patients with hip or lumbosacral pain as the chief complaint can be easily misdiagnosed as spondyloarthritis. Comprehensive analysis of clinical features, imaging and laboratory findings is essential for accurate diagnosis.

  13. The effect of X-rays on the experimental arthritis in rats

    Trott, K.R.; Parker, R.; Seed, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of low doses of X-rays on different in-vivo models of monoarticular arthritis which have been developed for the investigation of anti-inflammatory drugs. Zymosan or heat-inactivated mycobacterium tuberculosis was injected into 1 knee joint of Wistar rats to produce, via different pathogenetic mechanisms, an acute monoarticular arthritis. Five days later, the amount of joint swelling, bone destruction and cartilage catabolism were measured. Immediately after arthritis induction, the knees were irradiated with a single dose of 5 Gy or with 4 daily fractions of 1 Gy. X-irradiation with daily doses of 1 Gy significantly reduced bone loss and cartilage degradation in Zymosan-induced arthritis and joint swelling in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. However, a single high radiation dose significantly increased bone loss in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. These data confirm the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of low radiation doses which so far has been based only on clinical experience. By using an established model of monoarticular arthritis we have now the opportunity to study the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory radiation effect in comparison to that of anti-inflammatory drugs. This way, we hope to provide a scientific basis for the use of radiotherapy in various painful degenerative joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  14. Comparing cardiovascular risk factors, disease and treatment in participants with rheumatoid arthritis and without arthritis in a population based study

    O’Driscoll, N

    2017-05-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is associated with a significant increase in mortality compared to the general population, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) the leading cause of death. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence and treatment of modifiable CV risk factors and history of CVD in those with RA and those without arthritis in Ireland. Data from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), a population-representative cohort study of people in Ireland aged 50 or over, was used. Participants with RA (n=457) were twice as likely to be obese (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.99 to 2.06) compared to those without arthritis (n=4,063). Participants with RA were also more likely to be physically inactive (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.69 to 1.76) and taking antihypertensive medication than those without arthritis. Exercise can have a beneficial impact on CVD and specific interventions to increase physical activity in those with RA may be warranted

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    Ascoli, G.; Cinti, P.; Nonni, M.; Rossi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  16. Coexistence of bronchiectasis and rheumatoid arthritis: revisited.

    Wilczynska, Maria M; Condliffe, Alison M; McKeon, Damian J

    2013-04-01

    The presence of bronchiectasis (BR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many decades; nevertheless, little research has been undertaken in this area. It is important to recognize that BR coexistent with RA differs from the other types of BR. The purpose of this descriptive review was to delineate the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, pulmonary function testing, imaging, prognosis and management of concomitant BR and RA. To inform our study we searched the PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases, using combinations of the following key words: computed tomography, lung function tests, rheumatoid arthritis, bronchiectasis, biological agents, and interstitial lung disease. The number of published papers covering this topic is limited, but several relevant conclusions can be drawn. Patients with concomitant RA and BR have worse obstructive airways disease, increased susceptibility to recurrent pulmonary infections, faster lung function decline, and higher mortality, compared with subjects with either RA or BR alone. The use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (both biological and non-biological) for RA in RA-BR patients imparts a further challenge in managing these patients. Although there are not any published guidelines on the management of coexisting RA-BR, we have attempted to provide such recommendations, based on the literature review and our experience.

  17. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most ... A swollen knee and uveitis in a young girl, for instance, is ..... Methotrexate for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  19. Shared epitope alleles remain a risk factor for anti-citrullinated proteins antibody (ACPA--positive rheumatoid arthritis in three Asian ethnic groups.

    Too Chun-Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the associations between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles and rheumatoid arthritis in subsets of rheumatoid arthritis defined by autoantibodies in three Asian populations from Malaysia. METHODS: 1,079 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 1,470 healthy controls were included in the study. Levels of antibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA and rheumatoid factors were assessed and the PCR-SSO method was used for HLA-DRB1 genotyping. RESULTS: The proportion of ACPA positivity among Malay, Chinese and Indian rheumatoid arthritis patients were 62.9%, 65.2% and 68.6%, respectively. An increased frequency of SE alleles was observed in ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis among the three Asian ethnic groups. HLA-DRB1*10 was highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility in these Asian populations. HLA-DRB1*0405 was significantly associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis in Malays and Chinese, but not in Indians. HLA-DRB1*01 did not show any independent effect as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis in this study and HLA-DRB1*1202 was protective in Malays and Chinese. There was no association between SE alleles and ACPA- negative rheumatoid arthritis in any of the three Asian ethnic groups. CONCLUSION: The HLA-DRB1 SE alleles increase the risk of ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis in all three Asian populations from Malaysia.

  20. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  1. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Petkova VB

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients’ disease management, medication compliance and from there patients’ quality of life.Objective: To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner’s visits and hospitalizations are expected.Methods: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71, attending pharmacies – intervention group; and 43 individuals – control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. Results: Parameters assessed during the four stages of the program were: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner’s visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients’ health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients’ pain, decrease in the physician’s visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care.Conclusions: Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient’s quality of life.

  3. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p arthritis patients.

  4. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  5. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  6. TNFα blockers and infectious risk in rheumatoid arthritis

    S. Todesco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of infections when compared with general population. The risk depends directly from disease activity and severity. Furthermore, risk increases with aging, immunosuppressive agents and comorbidities such as diabetes, pulmonary and cardiac diseases. In particular corticosteroids, even at low doses, are a major risk factor. Due to disease related risk it is difficult to separate the risk deriving from the use of TNF alpha blockers. Data from clinical trials, meta-analysis and national registers are somewhat contradictory. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis on routine follow-up, treatment with TNF alpha blockers seems to carry an increased risk of infections compared to traditional DMARDs but not associated with increased risk of overall serious infection. Physicians should carefully monitor for signs of infection when using TNF alpha blockers, particularly shortly after treatment initiation.

  7. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  8. The visualization of pannus in rheumatoid arthritis using NMR imaging. Pannusdarstellung bei rheumatoider Arthritis mittels Kernspintomographie

    Schnarkowski, P. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Bader, C. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Goldmann, A. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Friedrich, J.M. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    The knee joints of 15 patients afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated using the method of nmr imaging. Parameters of investigation were the spin-echo and fast-field-echo sequences as well as the MR signal behaviour of proliferative synovial changes following intravenous administration of gadolinium dtpa. Pannus having formed on the articular surfaces or beneath the articular cartilages was distinguishable from other changes on the basis of the increased signal intensities to be observed after gadolinium dtpa had been given. (orig./GD)

  9. Parental rheumatoid arthritis and childhood epilepsy

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chunsen; Olsen, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of parental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on risk of epilepsy. METHODS: We performed a nationwide cohort study including all singletons born in Denmark from 1977 to 2008 (n = 1,917,723) through individual linkage to nationwide Danish registries. The children were...... followed for an average of 16 years. Main outcome measures were adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for epilepsy with onset in early childhood (29 days-4 years), late childhood (5-15 years), adolescence/adulthood (≥15 years), and at any age until the end of follow-up (December 31, 2010). RESULTS: Compared...... to unexposed children, children exposed to maternal RA had an increased risk of early and late childhood epilepsy (adjusted HRs 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.60] and 1.26 [95% CI 1.13-1.41]), while children exposed to maternal RA had no increased risk of epilepsy in adolescence/adulthood (HR 1...

  10. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  11. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  12. Cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-10-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity.

  13. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  14. Arthritis dermatitis syndrome in children

    Velasquez Mendez, Monica Patricia; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The pediatric rheumatology is a medical specialization with many areas under developed. The prevalence, pathophysiology and form of presentation of the pediatric rheumatic disease are different of adults. The skin compromise in many pediatric rheumatic diseases is a helping sing for diagnosis. The arthritis-dermatitis syndrome can be the first manifestation of many diseases as infections, tumors and endocrine diseases, but in pediatric age the immunologic and infections diseases are really important. Among infections diseases, virus (parvovirus, rubella, HIV) and bacteria (gonococcus, meningoccus) are the most Important. Within the group of autoimmune diseases the vasculitis such as Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are among the more prevalent autoimmune disease. This is a general review about arthritis-dermatitis syndrome in pediatric age

  15. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  16. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    2015-10-01

    goat anti-rat IgG (Life Technologies) at a dilution of 1:200 as secondary anti- body . The method of immunofluorescence staining has been described...Immunohistochemisty (IHC): RA, OA, and NL (not arthritis) ST cryo -sections as well as ankle sections of Wt mice induced with K/BxN serum were fixed in...The fractions containing exosomes were then isolated. The original whole supernatant, exosome and cellular debris depleted fraction, exosome

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  19. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Piotr Sobolewski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established – the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  20. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  1. Septic arthritis as the first sign of Candida tropicalis fungaemia in an acute lymphoid leukemia patient

    Vicari Perla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections caused by Candida species have increased in incidence during the past two decades in England, North America and Europe. Candidal arthritis is rare in patients who are not intravenous drug users or are who not using a prostheses. We report the case of a 24-year-old man with acute lymphoid leukemia, who developed Candida tropicalis arthritis during an aplastic period after chemotherapy. This is the eighth case described in the literature of C. tropicalis causing arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. We call attention to an unusual first sign of fungal infection: septic arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. However, this case differs from the other seven, since despite therapy a fast and lethal evolution was observed. We reviewed reported cases, incidence, risk factors, mortality and treatment of neutropenic patients with fungal infections.

  2. The TT Genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 Polymorphism Is Associated with High Disease Activity and Disability in Patients with Early Arthritis

    Lamana, Amalia; Balsa, Alejandro; Rueda, Blanca; Ortiz, Ana M.; Nuño, Laura; Miranda-Carus, Maria Eugenia; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel A.; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Martin, Javier; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. Methodology and Results: We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years), recording disease-...

  3. Chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis: current perspectives

    To H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideto To Department of Medical Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Morning stiffness, a characteristic feature of RA, shows a 24-hour rhythm. Cytokines, which are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, also exhibit a 24-hour rhythm, with a peak in the early morning. These rhythms have been attributed to the endogenous hormone balance and changes in expression levels of clock-related genes. Chronotherapy based on the 24-hour rhythm of RA has been performed using glucocorticoids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In a previous study, it was reported that modified-release prednisone tablets were administered to patients with RA at night, which demonstrated that the severity of morning stiffness was markedly less than that in patients receiving the standard treatment. Methotrexate (MTX is the most frequently used RA drug worldwide. In a basic study, cytokines and inflammatory responses in RA model animals showed 24-hour rhythms, based on which MTX was administered and exerted dosing time-dependent antirheumatic effects. Plasma C-reactive protein and cytokine levels also exhibit 24-hour rhythms in patients with RA, with peaks occurring in the early morning. MTX has been shown to markedly inhibit the exacerbation of arthritis in patients with RA when it is administered as inflammatory responses and tumor necrosis factor-α levels begin to increase. Tacrolimus (TAC is an immunosuppressive agent that is administered to patients who undergo organ transplants. Since one of the mechanisms of action of TAC is the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, it is used as an RA therapeutic drug. When TAC was previously administered in the early light or early dark phase to RA model animals, the group treated in the early light phase had notably inhibited

  4. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of arthritis

    Hosain, F.; Haddon, M.J.; Hosain, H.; Drost, J.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is given of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. Topics covered include the pathophysiology of arthritis and the basis for the use of radiotracers, diagnostic procedures and radiotracer applications and therapeutic approaches and radionuclide applications. (UK)

  6. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Chapter 9

    Weston, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is primarily a disease of the synovial membrane. To demonstrate synovial changes it is necessary to show adequate detail of the soft tissue. This is best obtained by using industrial film and by hand-processing. The anatomy of the hand and the radiological appearance of rheumatoid arthritis are described. (author)

  8. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  9. Targeted treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Klarenbeek, Naomi Bertine

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of new treatment options, including biologicals and the early, agressive start of target-steered treatment the outlook for rheumatoid arthritis patients improved considerably the past decades. This thesis describes several aspects of modern rheumatoid arthritis treatment from

  10. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  11. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  12. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and ly...

  13. Effect of Education on Perceived Self-Efficacy for Individuals with Arthritis

    Magfiret Kara Kasikci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis self-efficacy characterizes individuals’ confidence in managing their arthritis. Patienteducation in arthritis aims to improve health outcomes by prompting people to adopt self-managementbehaviours. Therefore, perceived self-efficacy and patient education in arthritis is of great importance.Aims: This study was performed to determine the effects of education on self-efficacy perception in arthritisindividuals.Methodology: This study was a semi-experimental of pre-test and post test design in an equivalent controlgroup. The research was conducted in a physiotherapy and immunology clinics in Erzurum, Turkey. The datawere obtained from 80 individuals with arthritis. These eighty arthritis individuals were composed 40 of whomwere in the experimental and 40 of whom were in control group. As the data gathering tools, a questionnaireform and arthritis self-efficacy scale (ASES were used. ASES developed by Lorig et al. and adjusted fromEnglish to Turkish by Ünsal&Kaşıkçı was used to measure individuals’ self-efficacy. Questionnaire form andscale were completed by the individuals in both groups. Patients in the experimental group were educated withthe booklet. The education program was applied 4 times, once in 3 weeks. The time required for each stage was45~60 minutes. In the control group, care was provided according to the usual routine.Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the pre-test ASES scores of the individuals inboth groups. Self-efficacy levels after education were significantly improved in the experimental groupcompared to the control group.Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the planned education can be considered an effectiveintervention for increasing self-efficacy perception in arthritis individuals.

  14. YouTube provides irrelevant information for the diagnosis and treatment of hip arthritis.

    Koller, Ulrich; Waldstein, Wenzel; Schatz, Klaus-Dieter; Windhager, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    YouTube is increasingly becoming a key source for people to satisfy the need for additional information concerning their medical condition. This study analyses the completeness of accurate information found on YouTube pertaining to hip arthritis. The present study analyzed 133 YouTube videos using the search terms: hip arthritis, hip arthritis symptoms, hip arthritis diagnosis, hip arthritis treatment and hip replacement. Two quality assessment checklists with a scale of 0 to 12 points were developed to evaluate available video content for the diagnosis and the treatment of hip arthritis. Videos were grouped into poor quality (grade 0-3), moderate quality (grade 4-7) and excellent quality (grade 8-12), respectively. Three independent observers assessed all videos using the new grading system and independently scored all videos. Discrepancies regarding the categories were clarified by consensus discussion. For intra-observer reliabilities, grading was performed at two occasions separated by four weeks. Eighty-four percent (n = 112) had a poor diagnostic information quality, 14% (n = 19) a moderate quality and only 2% (n = 2) an excellent quality, respectively. In 86% (n = 114), videos provided poor treatment information quality. Eleven percent (n = 15) of videos had a moderate quality and only 3% (n = 4) an excellent quality, respectively. The present study demonstrates that YouTube is a poor source for accurate information pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of hip arthritis. These finding are of high relevance for clinicians as videos are going to become the primary source of information for patients. Therefore, high quality educational videos are needed to further guide patients on the way from the diagnosis of hip arthritis to its proper treatment.

  15. Arthritis self-efficacy scale scores in knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing arthritis self-management education with or without exercise.

    Brand, Emily; Nyland, John; Henzman, Cameron; McGinnis, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. To evaluate studies that used arthritis self-management education alone or with exercise to improve Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale scores of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Increasing self-efficacy may improve patient knee osteoarthritis symptom management and function. MEDLINE (1946-March 2013), CINAHL (1981-March 2013), and PsycINFO (1967-March 2013) databases were searched. Twenty-four studies, including 3163 subjects (women, n = 2547 [80.5%]; mean ± SD age, 65.3 ± 6.5 years), met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the standardized mean difference effect sizes (Cohen d) of randomized controlled studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (13 studies, n = 1906), other symptoms (13 studies, n = 1957), and function (5 studies, n = 399) subscales. Cohen d effect sizes were also calculated for cohort studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (10 studies, n = 1035), other symptoms (9 studies, n = 913), and function (3 studies, n = 141) subscales. Both randomized controlled studies and cohort studies were grouped by intervention type (intervention 1, arthritis self-management education alone; intervention 2, arthritis self-management education with exercise), and effect sizes were compared (Mann-Whitney U tests, Pmanagement education with exercise displayed higher methodological quality scale scores (76.8 ± 13.1 versus 61.6 ± 19.6, P = .03). Statistically significant standardized effect-size differences between intervention 1 and intervention 2 were not observed. Small to moderate effect sizes were observed regardless of whether the intervention included exercise. Exercise interventions used in conjunction with arthritis self-management education programs need to be developed to better enhance the self-efficacy of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Therapy, level 2b-.

  16. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Macias-Reyes, Héctor; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Nuñez-Atahualpa, María Alejandra; Andrade-Garduño, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC) were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP), and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P < 0.001). Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P < 0.01), and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 0.02). The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r = 0.513, P = 0.001), CRP (r = 0.799, P < 0.001), TNFα (r = 0.642, P = 0.001), and IL-6 (r = 0.751, P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P < 0.001) and anti-CCP levels (P = 0.03). Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:25821796

  17. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP, and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P<0.001. Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P<0.01, and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c (P=0.02. The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r=0.513, P=0.001, CRP (r=0.799, P<0.001, TNFα (r=0.642, P=0.001, and IL-6 (r=0.751, P<0.001. In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P<0.001 and anti-CCP levels (P=0.03. Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events.

  18. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  19. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS....... Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. RESULTS: The treat-to-target activity resulted in 10 recommendations. The treatment aim was defined as remission with low disease activity being an alternative goal in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow...

  20. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  1. The joint in psoriatic arthritis.

    Mortezavi, Mahta; Thiele, Ralph; Ritchlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, is notable for diversity in disease presentation, course and response to treatment. Equally varied are the types of musculoskeletal involvement which include peripheral and axial joint disease, dactylitis and enthesitis. In this review, we focus on the psoriatic joint and discuss pathways that underlie synovial, cartilage and bone inflammation and highlight key histopathologic features. The pivotal inflammatory mechanisms and pathobiology of PsA parallel findings in other forms of spondyloarthritis but are distinct from disease pathways described in rheumatoid synovitis and bone disease. The diagnosis of PsA from both a clinical and imaging perspective is also discussed.

  2. Treatment-specific changes in circulating adipocytokines: a comparison between tumour necrosis factor blockade and glucocorticoid treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

    Klaasen, R.; Herenius, M. M. J.; Wijbrandts, C. A.; de Jager, W.; van Tuyl, L. H.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; Prakken, B. J.; Gerlag, D. M.; Tak, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence that adipocytokines may exert proinflammatory and destructive effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Hence, the authors investigated the relationship between adipocytokines and several features associated with RA (inflammation, joint destruction and

  3. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  4. Radiosynoviorthesis: Radiochemical synovectomy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Bandilla, K.

    1981-01-01

    Radioactive substances are used increasingly in the local treatment of chronic arthritis. Yttrium-90, beta-emitter, is used mainly for the knee joints, rhenium-186 for shoulder, elbows, hips and ankle joints and erbium-169 for the small joints of the hands. It is mandatory that the radioactive material is injected stricly interarticulary and the joint should be splinted for 4 days without weight bearing to avoid leakage. The success rate for knee joints is 55%. Patients with an early state of arthritis have a higher chance of improvement. Complications are reported as 2%, one third of the cases develop a symphatic effusion for 3 days after the injection. The use of radionuclides can lead to chromosome aberrations and the use of such materials should be limited to patients not younger than 40 years of age. Based on the current experience radiosynoviorthesis seems to be a true alternative for surgical synovectomy especially for the knee joints. (orig.) [de

  5. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  6. PREMs in inflammatory arthritis: from guidelines to standard practice.

    Palmer, Deborah; Miedany, Y El

    There is now a widespread realisation that patients' views are not incidental to, but essential to, achieving high-quality care. However, despite increasing awareness of its potential value, patient experience is not routinely assessed in inflammatory arthritis patients at present. In fact, use of patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) to evaluate the patients' management and the quality of services remains a challenge. In contrast with cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adopting a PREMs approach in inflammatory arthritis patients is difficult because of a lack of tools and approach. This article discusses how the guidelines can be translated into standard clinical practice, creating a 'therapeutic alliance' between the health professional and patients. It will also present a novel tool for use of PREMs, which can be used in routine clinical care.

  7. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  8. Long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab

    Murdaca G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Spanò, Francesco PuppoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with joint damage and progressive disability, an increased risk of morbidity related to comorbid conditions and substantial socioeconomic costs. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine known to have a central role in the initial host response to infection and in the pathogenesis of various immune-mediated diseases, such as RA, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Five TNF-α inhibitors are available for the clinical use: infliximab; adalimumab; etanercept; golimumab; and certolizumab pegol. Infliximab is a chimeric human/murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb; adalimumab, and golimumab are human mAbs; certolizumab pegol is composed of the fragment antigen-binding anti-binding domain of a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb, combined with polyethylene glycol to increase its half-life in the body; etanercept is a fusion protein that acts as a “decoy receptor” for TNF-α. In this paper, we will briefly review the current data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA, its potential beneficial effects upon comorbid conditions, such as endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in RA, and the immunogenicity.Keywords: adalimumab, efficacy, safety, rheumatoid arthritis, VEGF, immunogenicity, infections

  9. 99mTc-DPD uptake in juvenile arthritis

    Stender Hansen, E.; Holm, I.E.; Buenger, C.; Knudsen, V.; Noer, I.; Bach Christensen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Unilateral arthritis of the knee was induced in mongrel puppies by intraarticular injections of 1% Carragheenan. Bone metabolism was studied by a scintimetric technique on static 99m Tc-diphosphonate bone scans every 2nd week during the induction of arthritis for 3 months and monthly in a postarthritic phase of another 3 months. Changes in uptake of radionuclide were present after 2 weeks. The induction phase was characterized by a decreased uptake in the calcification layer of the juxta-articular growth plates and a moderately increased epiphyseal uptake. The postarthritic phase was characterized by normalization of growth plate uptake and a marked increase in epiphyseal uptake. Using contact autoradiography, the epiphyseal uptake was seen mainly in a narrow subchondral and subsynovial bone layer, around bone cysts and osteophytes, whereas central epiphyseal bone was osteopenic with decreased uptake of tracer. The study suggests that the early scintigraphic appearance of juvenile non-suppurative arthritis may be an overall decrease in uptake of 99m Tc-diphosphonate due to a depression of growth plate metabolism. (author)

  10. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  11. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  13. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  14. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  15. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  16. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    Mingxin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P<0.05. High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet.

  17. Esculetin reduces leukotriene B4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    Przemysław Rzodkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin is a natural coumarin with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity. It acts as a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenases (5-LOX and 12-LOX and decreases the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Because both inhibition of lipoxygenases and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases are effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated whether esculetin may be effective in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Material and methods : The study was performed on male Lewis rats, in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Rats were divided into two groups: control (treated with 1% methylcellulose and experimental (treated with esculetin – 10 mg/kg ip.. The tested compound was administered for 5 consecutive days starting on the 21st day after induction of arthritis. Each group consisted of 7 animals. After 5 days of treatment, rats were anesthetized. The concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4 in plasma was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results : The LTB4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis is increased in comparison to rats without inflammation (362 ±34 vs. 274 ±15 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively. Five-day treatment with esculetin in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats decreases the LTB4 level to a level comparable with rats without inflammation (284 ±23 pg/ml, p < 0.01. Conclusions : LTB4 is the most potent chemotactic agent influencing neutrophil migration into the joint. It is known that its level in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis is increased and correlates with disease severity. Some other lipoxygenase inhibitors have already been tested as potential drug candidates in clinical and preclinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (Zileuton, PF-4191834. Because esculetin decreases the LTB4 level in plasma of rats in adjuvant-induced arthritis, it may also be considered as an attractive

  18. Coexistence of Sarcoidosis and Gouty Arthritis.

    Semiz, Hüseyin; Kobak, Senol

    2017-08-21

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It may present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, the involvement of eye and symptoms on the locomotor system. Gouty arthritis is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by hyperuricemia, recurrent arthritis attacks and the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints and the surrounding tissues. We reported the coexistence of sarcoidosis and gouty arthritis in this paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  20. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  1. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 2: Erosions

    Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Grainger, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis late after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quanitification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists to this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. This first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  2. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 1: Synovitis

    Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Grainger, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis long after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs, there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and a need to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques, and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  3. Radiographic estimation in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis.

    Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Rexhepi, Mjellma

    2011-08-01

    Long since it have been suggested that a subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed with negative rheumatoid factor tests, represents a clinical entity quite distinct from that of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, regarding some radiological and clinical parameters, applied for the first time on patients from Kosovo. Two hundred fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively studied by analysis the radiographic damage and clinical parameters of the disease, using a data base. All examinees were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49.96, SD=10.37) with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb = 6.41, SD=6.47). All patients underwent a standardised evaluation radiographs. Baseline standardised poster anterior radiographs of hands and feet and radiographs of other joints, depending on indications, were assessed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values correlated with the radiological damages and statistical difference was found for seronegative subset (r=0.24, p<0.01). Longer duration of the disease resulted in the increase of radiological changes in both subsets (r=0.66, p<0.01) seronegative, (r=0.49, p<0.01) seropositive. Anatomic changes of IInd and IIIrd level were nearly equally distributed in both subsets, 76 (60.8%) seronegative, 75 (60%) seropositive. Radiological damages are nearly equal in both subsets, elevate in relation to the duration of the disease and correlate with ESR values. Regarding the sero-status, differences within sex, with some exceptions, are not relevant. Although there are some definite quantitative and qualitative differences regarding sero-status, obviously there is a great deal of overlap between the two groups.

  4. Radiographic estimation in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    Vjollca Sahatçiu-Meka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Long since it have been suggested that a subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed with negative rheumatoid factor tests, represents a clinical entity quite distinct from that of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, regarding some radiological and clinical parameters, applied for the first time on patients from Kosovo. Two hundred fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively studied by analysis the radiographic damage and clinical parameters of the disease, using a data base. All examinees were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49.96, SD=10.37 with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb = 6.41, SD=6.47. All patients underwent a standardised evaluation radiographs. Baseline standardised poster anterior radiographs of hands and feet and radiographs of other joints, depending on indications, were assessed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values correlated with the radiological damages and statistical difference was found for seronegative subset (r=0.24, p<0.01. Longer duration of the disease resulted in the increase of radiological changes in both subsets (r=0.66, p<0.01 seronegative, (r=0.49, p<0.01 seropositive. Anatomic changes of IInd and IIIrd level were nearly equally distributed in both subsets, 76 (60.8% seronegative, 75 (60% seropositive. Radiological damages are nearly equal in both subsets, elevate in relation to the duration of the disease and correlate with ESR values. Regarding the sero-status, differences within sex, with some exceptions, are not relevant. Although there are some definite quantitative and qualitative differences regarding sero-status, obviously there is a great deal of overlap between the two groups.

  5. Streptococcus agalactiae: an emerging cause of septic arthritis.

    Louthrenoo, Worawit; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Hongsongkiat, Sith; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Wichainun, Ramjai

    2014-03-01

    Invasive Streptococcus agalactiae infection in nonpregnant women has been reported increasingly worldwide. This study reports the clinical features and outcome of S. agalactiae septic arthritis in Thai patients. The medical records of cases with septic arthritis seen between July 1990 and December 2010 were reviewed. Only those with S. agalactiae were included in this study. From 244 cases of septic arthritis, 38 (15.57%, 13 men and 25 women) were caused by S. agalactiae, with 34 of them (89.48%) occurring between 2008 and 2010. Their mean age was 52.89 (SD, 18.95) years. Twenty-four of the 38 patients (63.16%) had 1 or more underlying disease that might predispose to joint infection. Fever and joint pain were the most common symptoms presented. Eleven cases (28.95%) presented monoarthritis, 15 (39.47%) oligoarthritis, and 12 (31.58%) polyarthritis, with a mean joint involvement of 3.34 (SD, 2.35) joints (range, 1-8). Cellulitis was seen in 27 cases (71.05%). Blood cultures were positive in 31 patients (81.58%). Thirty-five of the 38 synovial fluid specimens obtained were enough for cultures and stain smears, with 24 (68.57%) growing S. agalactiae and 19 (54.29%) showing gram-positive cocci. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin. Ten patients (26.31%) received arthroscopic drainage. The articular outcome was good in 11 patients, fair in 24, and poor in 3. There were no deaths. Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging cause of septic arthritis in Thai patients. Physicians should be especially aware of this condition in patients presenting with acute oligopolyarthritis and prominent cellulitis.

  6. HETEROGENEITY OF POLYCLONAL IMMUNOGLOBULINS NUCLEASE ACTIVITY IN RHEUMATOID AND REACTIVE ARTHRITIS

    M. V. Volkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic properties of immunoglobulins are widely studied within recent years. It was found that nuclease activity of immunoglobulins is increased in systemic autoimmune diseases. Given some pathogenetic features of rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis, it is appropriate to clarify the nature of nuclease activity in these diseases. Determination of DNAse activity of immunoglobulins with different DNA substrates, and search for specific substrates for distinct clinical entities could serve these purposes. The aim of present work is to determine DNase activity of the polyclonal class G immunoglobulins in rheumatoid and reactive arthritis using various methods.Different methods are used to evaluate nuclease activity. In this paper we present newly developed and modified techniques for determination of DNAse activity of polyclonal IgGs. Particular attention was paid to the electrophoretic method of DNase activity assessment. Polyclonal IgG isolated from blood serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis were used for assays. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of an inhomogeneous DNase activity of immunoglobulins in relation to different substrates.Along with calf thymus DNA, we used bacterial plasmid DNA and PCR products based on bacterial gene sequences. Levels of DNase activity by rivanol clot method with calf thymus DNA as substrate proved to be higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than the control values (p < 0.01. DNase abzyme activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was elevated, as compared to the patients with reactive arthritis (p < 0.01.When examining ability of the IgG to hydrolyze procaryotic DNA (bacterial plasmid DNA and PCR products, based on bacterial genes, we obtained heterogeneous results. Different Ig samples showed varying degrees of DNA hydrolysis. Abzyme hydrolysis of DNA substrates longer than 700 bp was more pronounced, as compared to short DNA substrates (100 base pairs

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Medicine: In Depth

    ... unproven. Many factors—including differences in tai chi styles, number of movements, length of the practice, and ... JY, Kim YJ, et al. Acupuncture for symptom management of rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study. Clinical Rheumatology. ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. Normally, the body stops the inflammatory response after healing is complete to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. In people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis , the inflammatory ...

  9. Balneotherapy (or spa therapy) for rheumatoid arthritis

    Verhagen, A.P.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Boers, M.; Cardoso, J.R.; Lambeck, J.; de Bie, R.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No cure for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is known at present, so treatment often focuses on management of symptoms such as pain, stiffness and mobility. Treatment options include pharmacological interventions, physical therapy treatments and balneotherapy. Balneotherapy is defined as

  10. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    Celenk, C.; Selcuk, M.B.; Oezyazici, B.; Celenk, P.; Kuru, Oe.

    2000-01-01

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  12. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  13. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  15. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    Kapp, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ) [de

  16. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Pradeep Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs. Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    Almoallim, Hani M.; Alharbi, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    The status of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saudi Arabia (SA) was examined from various perspectives based on a systematic literature review and the authors’ personal experiences. In this regard, database and journal search were conducted to identify studies on RA in SA, yielding a total of 43 articles. Although efforts have been made to promote RA research in SA, current studies mostly represent only a few centers and may not accurately portray the national status of RA care. Notably, biological therapies were introduced early for almost all practicing rheumatologists in SA (government and private). However, no national guidelines regarding the management of RA have been developed based on local needs and regulations. Also, while efforts were made to establish RA data registries, they have not been successful. Taken together, this analysis can contribute to the planning of future guidelines and directives for RA care in SA. PMID:25491208

  19. Prevalence and concomitants of arthritis in the elderly in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Sergio L Blay

    Full Text Available Information on the prevalence and concomitants of arthritis in developing countries is sparse. It is unclear whether they are comparable to findings in developed countries. To ascertain the prevalence, demographic characteristics, and health-related concomitants of arthritis in older persons in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, a middle income country.The state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, was subdivided into nine regions. Stratified random sampling was used to identify 880 community residents age ≥60 years in each region. One region with suspect data was excluded. Of 7040 community residents contacted in eight regions, 6963 participated (1.1% refusal rate. In 1995, trained, monitored interviewers, using structured questionnaires, conducted in-home interviews gathering information on demographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, living arrangements, employment status, health behaviors (physical activity, tobacco use, social activity, functional limitations, depression, and 15 self-reported health conditions, including arthritis. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression.Arthritis, reported by 43% of the sample, was more prevalent in women, among the less educated, those with lower income, and higher age. Severity, but not prevalence, differed by race/ethnicity. Controlled analyses indicated significant association with female gender, lower education, and less social activity. Arthritis was associated with reduced odds of stroke, but increased odds of hypertension, varicosities, bronchitis, renal problems, headache, gastrointestinal disorders, and depression. Arthritis was not significantly associated with age or functional limitations, and associations did not differ by gender.The prevalence, demographic and health characteristics associated with self-reported arthritis in this southern state in Brazil are similar to findings elsewhere in Brazil, and in developed

  20. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  1. Application physiotherapy in rehabilitation rheumatoid arthritis

    Angela Nogas

    2017-02-01

    National University of Water and Environmental Engineering   Abstract Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of inflammatory diseases of the joints. The disease leads to deformation, then to destruction of the diseased joint and to disability. Physiotherapy is used for the treatment and rehabilitation of rheumatoid arthritis. It is assumed that physiotherapy treatments that promote remission of the disease, improve the quality of patients’ life, create the necessary conditions for comprehensive rehabilitation programs. Objective: Systematic’s review conducting of studies that assess the effect of physiotherapy in the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Theoretical analysis of scientific and methodical literature, methods of analysis, synthesis, generalization. Results: To reduce inflammation in the joints is performed UV of affected joints weak or medium erythermal or middle erythermal doses used UHF therapy. UHF-therapy prescribed to the area of joint in I or II dose, duration 10 min., the course – 5-8 treatments. For patients with minimal activity is added electrophoresis NSAIDs. Electrophoresis aspirin is applied on the affected joints (every day, the course – 10-12 procedures, which favorably affect the course of rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions: Physical therapy can reduce pain and stiffness in the joints, prevent deformity and restore function, improve independence and quality of life. State of the art is a major incentive to develop new activities in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis to improve joint functional activity and their physical health.   Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, hydrotherapy.

  2. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  3. Septic arthritis: a 12 years retrospective study in a rheumatological university clinic

    L. Riato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Septic arthritis is a disabling and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. The most important risk factors are joint prosthesis, pre-existing joint disease and immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of our study therefore was to revaluate all septic arthritis cases discharged from our Rheumatologic Unit in the last 12 years, to assess the risk factors, the clinical and laboratory characteristics, the causative microorganisms and its possible increase in frequency. Methods: The medical records of 42 consecutive patients with septic arthritis discharged from our Rheumatology Unit between January 1995 and December 2006 were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 23 to 90 and there isn’t gender predominance. Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on the finding of purulent material in the joint space and/or the isolation of a bacterial pathogen from joint fluid. Demographic data, risk factors, co-morbidity, clinical manifestations, time interval between symptoms onset and diagnosis, treatment and laboratory data including serum white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, synovial white blood cells and culture results were analysed. We considered these parameters in the whole population and in two different age groups (≤60, >60 and tried to determine if there was a change of microorganisms involved in septic arthritis during the years. Results: Of 42 patients, 47% were aged 60 and younger. Only 10 patients were admitted to our unit before 2001. A predisposing factor was recorded in 90,5% of cases: 15 patients had rheumatoid arthritis, 8 were diabetic, 6 had seronegative arthritis, 4 had a connective tissue disease, 8 patients had a prosthetic infection and 3 were subjected recently to arthrocentesis. We found that patients aged 60 and younger were more frequently affected by joint disease and had a synovial white blood cell count lower than patients

  4. Insight into the Endocrine System and the Immune System: A Review of the Inflammatory Role of Prolactin in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Tang, Man W.; Garcia, Samuel; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects females three times more frequently than males. A potential role for hormones, such as prolactin (PRL), may in part explain this phenomenon. The risk of developing RA is increased in women who are lactating after the first

  5. Arthritis

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  6. Chondrocyte activity is increased in psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis

    Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Munk, Heidi Lausten; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    . There is a need for biomarkers reflecting core disease pathways for diagnosis and disease mapping. Pro-C2 reflects mature cartilage collagen type IIB formation, while C-Col10 represents turnover of type X collagen, which is exclusively expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes. The objectives of this study were......SpA undergoing TNFi treatment may reflect that hypertrophic chondrocytes in axSpA are targeted by TNFi. ROC curve analysis showed a diagnostic potential for Pro-C2 in axSpA and PsA....

  7. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  9. Obstacle avoidance in persons with rheumatoid arthritis walking on a treadmill.

    Smulders, E.; Schreven, C.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Duysens, J.E.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of falling. In healthy elderly persons with a history of falling, a reduced ability to avoid obstacles while walking has been shown to relate to increased fall risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether this potential

  10. STAT4 and the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Remmers, Elaine F.; Plenge, Robert M.; Lee, Annette T.; Graham, Robert R.; Hom, Geoffrey; Behrens, Timothy W.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Le, Julie M.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Batliwalla, Franak; Li, Wentian; Masters, Seth L.; Booty, Matthew G.; Carulli, John P.; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Chen, Wei V.; Amos, Christopher I.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Seldin, Michael F.; Kastner, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a substantial genetic component. Susceptibility to disease has been linked with a region on chromosome 2q. METHODS We tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in and around 13 candidate genes within the previously linked chromosome 2q region for association with rheumatoid arthritis. We then performed fine mapping of the STAT1-STAT4 region in a total of 1620 case patients with established rheumatoid arthritis and 2635 controls, all from North America. Implicated SNPs were further tested in an independent case-control series of 1529 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and 881 controls, all from Sweden, and in a total of 1039 case patients and 1248 controls from three series of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. RESULTS A SNP haplotype in the third intron of STAT4 was associated with susceptibility to both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. The minor alleles of the haplotype-defining SNPs were present in 27% of chromosomes of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis, as compared with 22% of those of controls (for the SNP rs7574865, P = 2.81×10-7; odds ratio for having the risk allele in chromosomes of patients vs. those of controls, 1.32). The association was replicated in Swedish patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (P = 0.02) and matched controls. The haplotype marked by rs7574865 was strongly associated with lupus, being present on 31% of chromosomes of case patients and 22% of those of controls (P = 1.87×10-9; odds ratio for having the risk allele in chromosomes of patients vs. those of controls, 1.55). Homozygosity of the risk allele, as compared with absence of the allele, was associated with a more than doubled risk for lupus and a 60% increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSIONS A haplotype of STAT4 is associated with increased risk for both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, suggesting a shared pathway

  11. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture gives basic information about psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine, and enthesises from a group of spondyloarthritis. It describes the epidemiology of the disease and considers current ideas on its pathogenesis and factors influencing the development of PsA in psoriatic patients. The classification and clinical forms of PsA are presented. The major clinical manifestations of the disease are indicated to include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The diagnosis of the disease is noted to be established on the basis of its detected typical clinical and radiological signs, by applying the CASPAR criteria. A dermatologist, rheumatologist, and general practitioner screen PsA, by actively detecting complaints, characteristic clinical and radiological signs of damage to the joints, and/or spine, and/or enthesises and by using screening questionnaires. There are data that patients with PsA are observed to be at higher risk for a number of diseases type 2 diabetes mellitus hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, etc. The aim of current pharmacotherapy for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of clinical manifestations of the disease, to delay or prevent its X-ray progression, to increase survival, to improve quality of life in patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities. The paper considers groups of medicines used to treat the disease, among other issues, information about biological agents (BA registered in the Russian Federation for the treatment of PsA. Most patients are mentioned to show a good response to this therapy option just 3–6 months after treatment initiation; however, some of them develop primary inefficiency. In this case, switching one BA to another is recommended. Some patients using a BA develop secondary treatment inefficiency, which is firstly due to the appearance of

  12. Association of Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations with Physical Activity in Adults with Arthritis

    Thelma J. Mielenz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. The purpose of this study is to determine whether higher baseline levels of (a self-efficacy for physical activity, (b self-efficacy for arthritis self-management, and (c outcome expectations for exercise are associated with higher physical activity levels following an exercise intervention for adults with arthritis. Methods. A secondary analysis of the intervention cohort (n=130 within a randomized controlled trial of the People with Arthritis Can Exercise program was performed. Multiple linear regression evaluated the relationship between physical activity at a time point three months after the completion of an exercise intervention and three main explanatory variables. Results. After controlling for baseline physical activity, neither self-efficacy for arthritis self-management nor outcome expectations for exercise related to three-month physical activity levels. There was a relationship between three-month physical activity and self-efficacy for physical activity. Conclusions. Future research is needed to evaluate the ability of self-efficacy-enhancing programs to increase physical activity in adults with arthritis.

  13. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  14. Arthritis Awareness (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Roughly 52.5 million adults in the United States have arthritis. This podcast discusses the importance of physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight in order to prevent arthritis and/or lessen symptoms.

  15. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    van de Laar, Mart A F J; Pergolizzi Jr., Joseph V.; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely

  16. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    ... in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Yes. ... spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Doctors may also refer to it as degenerative ...

  17. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  18. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  19. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  20. Inter- relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    Rajkarnikar, J; Thomas, B S; Rao, S K

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal medicine defines a rapidly emerging branch of Periodontology focusing on establishing a strong relationship between periodontal health and systemic health. It is speculated that the major common dysregulation which links Periodontitis with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is being played by the mediators of immune inflammatory response. To determine whether there is any relationship between periodontal disease and Rheumatoid arthritis. A total of 100 patients were included for the present study which was divided into two groups: one group (cases) included 50 patients attending the Department of Orthopedics, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal who were diagnosed of Rheumatoid arthritis. Another subject population included 50 patients as controls attending the Department of Oral Medicine, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal with age and gender matched with those of rheumatoid arthritis group. Specific measures for periodontitis included plaque index, gingival index, number of missing teeth, and radiographic alveolar bone loss scores. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis included health assessment questionaires, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Various periodontal parameters were compared between the cases and controls. The average alveolar bone loss was statistically more severe in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) group than in the controls although there were similar plaque index in both the groups. The gingival index was statistically higher in the RA group. The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and C- Reactive Protein (CRP) levels of RA patients were also significantly associated with the severity of periodontal disease. There was a significant association between Rheumatoid arthritis and Periodontitis which may be due to a common underlying deregulation of the inflammatory response in these individuals.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Balandraud, Nathalie; Roudier, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, with a 0.5% worldwide prevalence. The cause of RA remains unknown, however both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its development. Among these is the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Here, we discuss several aspects of the close relationship between EBV and RA. Patients with RA have impaired control of EBV infection. Indeed, they have high titres of antibodies against EBV antigens. Their peripheral blood T lymphocytes are less efficient at controlling the outgrowth of EBV-infected B cells. RA patients have more EBV-infected B cells than normal controls, leading to a 10-fold systemic EBV overload. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLPD) is a polyclonal EBV-positive B lymphocyte proliferation, which can evolve into an EBV-positive B cell lymphoma. RA patients also have an increased risk of developing EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). Hence the need to monitor EBV load when treating RA patients with immunosuppressors. EBV, a widespread virus, highly recognized by antibodies but never eliminated, is an ideal candidate to trigger chronic immune complex disease. Anti-EBV antibody responses should be considered as one of the chronic autoantibody responses linked to the development of RA, in the same way as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Citrullinome.

    Tilvawala, Ronak; Nguyen, Son Hong; Maurais, Aaron J; Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nagar, Mitesh; Salinger, Ari J; Nagpal, Sunil; Weerapana, Eranthie; Thompson, Paul R

    2018-03-21

    Increased protein citrullination is linked to various diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus, and cancer. Citrullinated autoantigens, a hallmark of RA, are recognized by anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) which are used to diagnose RA. ACPA-recognizing citrullinated enolase, vimentin, keratin, and filaggrin are also pathogenic. Here, we used a chemoproteomic approach to define the RA-associated citrullinome. The identified proteins include numerous serine protease inhibitors (Serpins), proteases and metabolic enzymes. We demonstrate that citrullination of antiplasmin, antithrombin, t-PAI, and C1 inhibitor (P1-Arg-containing Serpins) abolishes their ability to inhibit their cognate proteases. Citrullination of nicotinamide N-methyl transferase (NNMT) also abolished its methyltransferase activity. Overall, these data advance our understanding of the roles of citrullination in RA and suggest that extracellular protein arginine deiminase (PAD) activity can modulate protease activity with consequent effects on Serpin-regulated pathways. Moreover, our data suggest that inhibition of extracellular PAD activity will be therapeutically relevant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding emerging treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Combe, Bernard

    2011-05-25

    Treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) will continue to evolve as new drugs are developed, as new data become available, and as our potential to achieve greater and more consistent outcomes becomes more routine. Many patients will find both symptom relief and modest control of their disease with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), yet this course of therapy is clearly not effective in all patients. In fact, despite strong evidence that intensive treatment in the early stages of RA can slow or stop disease progression and may prevent disability, many patients continue to be managed in a stepwise manner and are treated with an ongoing monotherapy regimen with DMARDs. There is now a large body of evidence demonstrating the success of treating RA patients with anti-TNF therapy, usually in combination with methotrexate. As a result of the increased use of anti-TNF therapy, treatment paradigms have changed - and our practice is beginning to reflect this change. In the present review, we summarize the salient points of several recently proposed and emerging treatment paradigms with an emphasis on how these strategies may impact future practice.

  4. Case of physiotherapy care for patient with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed

    Koukalová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case of physiotherapy care for patient with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed Objectives: The aim of this thesis is to show using of physiotherapeutistic methods on patient with rheumatoid arthritis. One part of this thesis is casuistry of patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The summary: The thesis is divided into two parts, the theoretical part and the special part. The theoretical part is focused on issue of rheumatoid arthritis, its characteristic, division, diagnos...

  5. Case of physiotherapy care for patient diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    Šedková, Štěpánka

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case of physiotherapy care for patient diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Objectives: The aim is to emphasize the use of physiotherapy as a part of comprehensive treatment of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The thesis includes a detailed casuistry of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: The thesis is divided into a general part and a special part. The general part is focused on description of rheumatoid arthritis. It discusses characteristics of the ...

  6. Tocilizumab: A Review of Its Safety and Efficacy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Graeme Jones

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen many exciting developments in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Tocilizumab (TCZ is a monoclonal antibody which inhibits the interleukin-6 receptor. After initial studies in Japan, it has been extensively studied in five multicentre clinical trials. This report summarises the key efficacy and toxicity findings from the major clinical trials. TCZ works quickly and effectively in rheumatoid arthritis either as monotherapy or in combination with other agents in early disease, DMARD inadequate responders, seronegative disease and after anti-TNF failure. The toxicity profile is manageable but includes infections (most notably skin and soft tissue, increases in serum cholesterol, transient decreases in neutrophil count and abnormal liver function tests (especially in combination with methotrexate. In summary, there is sufficient evidence to make TCZ a first line biologic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis especially for those who are unable to take methotrexate or who fail anti-TNF therapy.

  7. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    Luca Castellazzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients.

  8. A Case of Disseminated Histoplasmosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis on Abatacept.

    Jain, Nina; Doyon, Jeffrey B; Lazarus, Jacob E; Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Johncilla, Melanie E; Agoston, Agoston T; Dalal, Anuj K; Velásquez, Gustavo E

    2018-05-01

    Biologic agents are effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis but are associated with important risks, including severe infections. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) α inhibitors are known to increase the risk of systemic fungal infections such as disseminated histoplasmosis. Abatacept is a biologic agent with a mechanism different from that of TNFα inhibitors: It suppresses cellular immunity by competing for the costimulatory signal on antigen-presenting cells. The risk of disseminated histoplasmosis for patients on abatacept is not known. We report a case of abatacept-associated disseminated histoplasmosis and review the known infectious complications of abatacept. While the safety of resuming biologic agents following treatment for disseminated histoplasmosis is also not known, abatacept is recommended over TNFα inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a prior serious infection. We discuss the evidence supporting this recommendation and discuss alternative treatments for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a history of a serious infection.

  9. ROLE OF IL-6 IN EXPERIMENTAL ARTHRITIS CAUSED BY TRANSFER OF ARTHRITOGENIC ANTIBODIES

    M. S. Drutskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 exerts important functions on immune regulation. In case of high expression, IL-6 may promote autoimmune disorders, e.g., arthritis. Systemic IL-6 blockers based on monoclonal antibodies against IL-6, or its specific receptor subunit, are already used in clinical settings, adding to a range of known biological drugs, such as, TNF blockers. Rheumatic disorders and their experimental therapy are reproducible in mice. This study revealed systemically increased levels of IL-6 in developing arthritis caused by transfer of pathogenic antibodies, as well as the effects of IL-6 neutralization by monoclonal antibodies against murine IL-6. Our results suggest a pathogenic role of the two cytokines, TNF and IL-6, in experimental arthritis induced by passive transfer of anti-collagen antibodies.

  10. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    2011-05-23

    ...] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee... indication: ``ILARIS is indicated for the treatment of gouty arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also been shown to...

  11. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing in...

  12. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    2013-05-30

    ...] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee..., the committee will discuss the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification...

  13. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    2012-03-12

    ...] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee... the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had...

  14. Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key

    ... Print this issue Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key En español Send us your comments ... type of arthritis. It’s far more common than rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on ...

  15. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    Bankier, A.A.; Fleischmann, D.; Kiener, H.P.; Wiesmayr, M.N.; Herold, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    ... Can diet affect symptoms? Can certain diets affect rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/expert-answers/rheumatoid-arthritis/FAQ-20058041 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  17. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  18. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  19. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  20. Experimental arthritis : in vitro and in vivo models

    Wang, Xuanhui

    2008-01-01

    As the primary cause of disability for people over the age of 45, arthritis actually consists of more than hundred different conditions. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis followed by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OA is characterized by progressive articular cartilage loss and

  1. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Cochrane Review

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  2. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ALENDRONIC ACID IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND OSTEOPOROSIS

    A.O. Lisitsin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for and practical application of new medications to treat of osteoporosis is one of the critical issues in pediatric rheumatology. The article reviews the efficacy and safety of alendronic acid in 64 subjects with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and systemic osteoporosis. It is demonstrated that alendronate-based therapy in weekly 1 mg/kg doses over 12 months facilitated reliably increased bonedensity, decreased intensity of pain syndrome, and lowered C-terminal telopeptide serum concentration, which indicates improved bone metabolism processes.Key words: juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, children, treatment, bisphosphonates, alendronic acid. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:48-54

  3. Association between HLA-DR antigens and rheumatoid arthritis in Arabs.

    Sattar, M A; al-Saffar, M; Guindi, R T; Sugathan, T N; Behbehani, K

    1990-01-01

    Eighty five Arab patients with classical and definite rheumatoid arthritis were typed to determine the prevalence of HLA A, B, C, and DR antigens. A significant increase in the prevalence of HLA-A10, B8, B21, and DR3 was found in comparison with a control population matched for age and sex. HLA-DR5 was significantly decreased in the patient group. The classical association of HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis could not be confirmed in the Arab patients resident in Kuwait, supporting reported ...

  4. Successful lipid-complexed amphotericin B treatment of Candida arthritis in a lymphoma patient.

    Azaceta, G; Olave, T; de los Martires, L D; Delgado, C; Gutierrez, M; Palomera, L

    1999-01-01

    Fungal arthritis is uncommon but has been increasingly diagnosed over recent years, particularly in patients with immunodeficiency due for instance to hematological malignancies. Candida albicans is the most frequent causative agent, and the knee is the joint most often involved. Amphotericin B is the drug of choice, but is associated with significant toxicity. Recently developed lipid formulations of amphotericin B have been found as effective and less toxic than the conventional formulation. We report a new case of Candida arthritis that occurred after chemotherapy for nonHodgkin's lymphoma and was successfully treated with lipid-complexed amphotericin B.

  5. Osteoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    Milevskaya, S.G.; Borodulin, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors presented the results of clinical, X-ray and osteoscintigraphic investigations of 133 psoriasic arthritis patients and 72 patients with common psoriasis. Osteoscintigraphy was performed using a routine method with 99m Tc-pyrophos (USSR) and 99m Tc-phosphone (Hungary) on gamma-camera LFOV (Nuclear-Chicago, USA). X-ray signs of the involvement of the osteoarticular system were noted in 69 (51%) patients with psoriasic arthritis and in 16 (22%) patients with common psoriasis. The method permitted the detection of the foci of RP hyperfixation in 129 (97%) potients with psoriasic arthritis and in 51 (70.8%) patients with common psoriasis. They were observed mostly in large and small limb joints, less frequently-in the vertebral column, cranial bones, thorax, and ribs. Thus, osteoscintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for the detection of active inflammatory foci of the osteoarticular system in psoriasis at all stages of arthritis development. It makes it possible to detect the spreading of arthritis and its preclinical forms

  6. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease.......Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  7. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  8. The visualization of pannus in rheumatoid arthritis using NMR imaging

    Schnarkowski, P.; Bader, C.; Goldmann, A.; Friedrich, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The knee joints of 15 patients afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated using the method of nmr imaging. Parameters of investigation were the spin-echo and fast-field-echo sequences as well as the MR signal behaviour of proliferative synovial changes following intravenous administration of gadolinium dtpa. Pannus having formed on the articular surfaces or beneath the articular cartilages was distinguishable from other changes on the basis of the increased signal intensities to be observed after gadolinium dtpa had been given. (orig./GD) [de

  9. Organising pneumonia as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis

    Hoshino, Chisho; Satoh, Noriyuki; Narita, Masashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Inoue, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is an inflammatory lung disease with distinctive clinicopathological features. OP can be evident during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with increased disease activity. The authors report an OP associated with RA case in which pulmonary symptoms preceded the onset of joint symptoms. An OP patient with elevated serum anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody is likely to manifest RA in the near future, reflecting its high disease activity. Thus, an early rheumatologic consultation should be taken into consideration to make an early decision to initiate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. PMID:22699479

  10. CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL FEATURES OF PANCREAS STATE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    O. O. Basieva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: complex pancreas study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: 120 RA pts were examined clinically Pancreas US-and biochemical study (level of a-amylase and lipase of blood serum by kinetic-calorimetric method was performed in this grouh. Results: 50.8% of pts demonstrated increase of pancreas echo, in 23.3%- widened Wirsung s duct, in 45%- single small focal indurations, more often in the body and cauda pancreatis. Decrease of lipolitic and amylolytic pancreas activity is characteristic for RA, especially in systemic process and long-term disease. Clinical and functional disturbances are connected with morphological changes.

  11. MINERAL WATERS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    BORGES, TIAGO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 1% of adult population. First-line therapies include disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, but creno-balneotherapyis often prescribed in rheumatic disorders and RA is no exception. Objectives: To know the efficacy of creno-balneotherapy in RA. Methods: A Medline based search was made using MeSH terms “balneology” and “rheumatoid arthritis”. Articles concerning the use of mineral waters in RA treatment were included. Results: In RA, two traditional ways of employing mineral waters are commonly used: immersion and peliotherapy. Each owns their benefits to non-specific or hydrotherapeutic effects and specific or crenotherapeutic effects. Mineral waters must be regarded as an adjuvant therapy in quiescent, stable or non-progressive RA. Significant benefits have been accomplished with radonenriched and sulphurous waters. Isothermal or hyperthermal waters should be preferred. Conclusions: Although there is a global lack of evidence, mineral waters are a safe and effective therapy to be considered in RA.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and sleep quality.

    Goes, Ana Claudia Janiszewski; Reis, Larissa Aparecida Busatto; Silva, Marilia Barreto G; Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Skare, Thelma L

    Sleep disturbances are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and contribute to loss of life quality. To study associations of sleep quality with pain, depression and disease activity in RA. This is a transversal observational study of 112 RA patients submitted to measurement of DAS-28, Epworth scale for daily sleepiness, index of sleep quality by Pittsburg index, risk of sleep apnea by the Berlin questionnaire and degree of depression by the CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) questionnaire. We also collected epidemiological, clinical, serological and treatment data. Only 18.5% of RA patients had sleep of good quality. In univariate analysis a bad sleep measured by Pittsburg index was associated with daily doses of prednisone (p=0.03), DAS-28 (p=0.01), CES-D (p=0.0005) and showed a tendency to be associated with Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.06). In multivariate analysis only depression (p=0.008) and Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.004) kept this association. Most of RA patients do not have a good sleep quality. Depression and risk of sleep apnea are independently associated with sleep impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  16. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted

  17. Septic arthritis of the sacroiliac joint

    Sebastian, Agata; Błach, Katarzyna; Silicki, Jurand; Wiland, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Septic arthritis is an inflammation of a joint caused directly by various microorganisms. It is often characterized by many unspecific symptoms. Bacteria is the most often etiological factor. We present a case report of a 76-years old woman with a unilateral septic arthritis of the sacroiliac joint. Bacterial sacroiliitis should be taken into account in patients with sacroiliitis and fever onset. Proper diagnosis can be very often difficult and delayed but fast implementation of antibiotic therapy is extremely important in the treatment process. Diagnostic imaging is crucial to the diagnosis and monitoring of septic arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most relevant tool for the detection of sacroiliitis, allowing the institution of therapeutic strategies to impede the progression of the disease. PMID:29686444

  18. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with no accepted evidence-based management guidelines. Evidence suggests that biologic interventions improve symptoms and signs in RA as well as reducing joint damage. OBJECTIVES......: To evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... and contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  19. Relationship of Psoriatic Arthritis to Other Spondyloarthritides.

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Palazzi, Carlo; Lubrano, Ennio; Padula, Angela

    2015-11-01

    In the early 1970s, Moll and co-workers formulated the unified concept of spondyloarthritides, a group of conditions sharing similar clinical features. Subsequently, criteria for their classification have been proposed by Amor and coworkers, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group, and the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society. Opinion, however, is divided between those who believe that the different entities of the complex represent the variable expression of the same disease ("lumpers") and those who think that these should be considered separately but under the same umbrella ("splitters"). Several sets of criteria have been proposed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the most recent being the ClASsification for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. According to some authors, there are persuasive arguments to support the view of PsA as a distinct entity.

  20. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species in Arthritis

    Wei-Tsung Chen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  1. Gender Peculiarities of Rheumatoid Arthritis Course

    G.A. Gonchar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis in women differs by more clinical course of pathologic process, and injury of certain joints depends on patient’s gender (changes of sacroiliac joints, development of tendovaginitis, intraarticular Hoffa bodies are more often being detected in men, whereas in women — proximal interphalangeal joints of fingers and toes, supramaxillary and knee joints. There is sexual dimorphism of the integral extraarticular (systemic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, is this case more frequent damage of lungs and peripheral nervous system is attributable to men, and Sjogren syndrome and changes in central nervous system are observed only in women’s group. Indicators of bone metabolism change in blood serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, besides patients with osteoporosis have the commonality and gender differences in concentrations of osteoassociated hormones and chemical elements.

  2. Evaluation of four radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation in a rabbit model of arthritis

    Chinol, M.; Paganelli, G.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    We compared the utility of four radiopharmaceuticals; 111 In-chloride, 67 Ga-citrate, 111 In labeled leukocytes (WBCs) and 99m Tc-MDP for assessing the inflammatory response in antigen induced arthritis in a rabbit model. A total of 20 rabbits, divided into four equal groups, were included in this study-Each group was studied twice with a single radiotracer: a baseline study and a follow-up study after induction of the arthritis. Knee to knee, knee to whole body, and knee to liver (except for the group studied with 99m Tc-MDP) ratios were generated. Knee to knee ratios showed no significant change from baseline to arthritis studies in any of the four groups. Significantly increased knee to total body ratios were seen in all of the groups, except for the group studied with 99m Tc-MDP. The greatest increase was seen in the group studied with 111 In-chloride. Significantly increased knee to liver ratios were observed in all three groups for which these ratios were generated and again the greatest increase was observed in the group studied with 111 In-chloride. Based on the higher uptake observed in this group, of the four radiotracers evaluated, 111 In-chloride is probably the most useful for monitoring the inflammatory response in antigen induced arthritis. The symmetry of the response suggests that it may also be useful in monitoring the response to therapy. (author)

  3. Cardiovascular diseases-related hospital admissions of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    Ursum, J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), suggesting a high rate of CVD-related hospitalizations, but data on this topic are limited. Our study addressed hospital admissions for CVD in a primary care-based population of patients

  4. [Serious infection due to biologicals: risk only mildly elevated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Broeder, A.A. den; Schers, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Biologicals are often thought to increase the risk of infection. A recent review shows that the risk of serious infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis being treated with biologicals (standard dose) is only mildly elevated compared with those who are treated with conventional DMARDs only

  5. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  6. Spectrum of lymphomas across different drug treatment groups in rheumatoid arthritis

    Mercer, Louise K; Regierer, Anne C; Mariette, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases with highly variable prognosis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a twofold increased risk of both Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). It is unknown whether treatment with biologic disease-...

  7. Work and health in early arthritis [werk en gerzondheid bij vroege inflammatoire gewrichtsklachten

    Geuskens, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints, which may result in joint damage. Any joint may be affected, but most commonly small joints in the hands and feet, wrists, elbows, and knees are involved. The onset of RA increases with age, and

  8. Prevalence and Severity of Periodontitis in Indonesian Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Kertia, Nyoman; Soeroso, Juwono; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Hoedemaker, Eveliene; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Soeroso§, Juwono

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have more prevalent and severe periodontitis than healthy controls. Periodontitis may increase the systemic inflammation in RA. The aim of this study is to assess periodontitis prevalence and severity and its potential association with systemic

  9. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    B S Narayana Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley′s compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN talus (n=6, malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4, distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3, medial malleoli nonunion (n=2. All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1-5.7 years. Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis.

  10. "I know I have arthritis but I don't know what type". Understanding and knowledge of this chronic condition

    Broderick Danny

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Arthritis" is a common musculoskeletal condition but the knowledge of what type of arthritis people have, may be limited but may have changed over time in response to campaigns, increased awareness and improved health literacy. This paper describes people who did not know what type of arthritis they had, by a range of relevant demographic and socioeconomic variables, and assesses changes over time in the proportion of people who report having arthritis but do not know what type, using representative population surveillance data. Methods Data were collected using the South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System (SAMSS, a risk factor surveillance system where each month, a representative random sample of South Australians is selected from the Electronic White Pages, with interviews conducted using computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI. Data were used for the period January 2006 to December 2008 (n = 16465 for respondents aged 18 years and over. Results Overall, the proportion of respondents who did not know what type of arthritis they had, among people aged 18 years and over, for 2006 to 2008 was 6.5% (95% CI 6.1-6.9. When considering only those respondents reporting that they had been told by a doctor that they had arthritis, 30.1% did not know what type of arthritis they had. Multivariate analysis indicated that males, those with have a trade, certificate or diploma or secondary level of education, who spoke a language other than English at home, were widowed and earned $20,001 to $60,000, more than $80,000 or did not state their income were more likely to maintain that they did not know what type of arthritis they had. Conclusions Population ageing and an increase in arthritis prevalence in the future will further increase the burden of arthritis. These increases in prevalence are not inevitable, especially if investments are made in public health prevention programs, particularly those addressing cultural

  11. Exposure to Candida albicans polarizes a T-cell driven arthritis model towards Th17 responses, resulting in a more destructive arthritis.

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Koenders, Marije I; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Dulos, John; Netea, Mihai G; Boots, Annemieke M H; Joosten, Leo A B; van den Berg, Wim B

    2012-01-01

    Fungal components have been shown very effective in generating Th17 responses. We investigated whether exposure to a minute amount of C. albicans in the arthritic joint altered the local cytokine environment, leading to enhanced Th17 expansion and resulting in a more destructive arthritis. Chronic SCW arthritis was induced by repeated injection with Streptococcus pyogenes (SCW) cell wall fragments into the knee joint of C57Bl/6 mice, alone or in combination with the yeast of C. albicans or Zymosan A. During the chronic phase of the arthritis, the cytokine levels, mRNA expression and histopathological analysis of the joints were performed. To investigate the phenotype of the IL-17 producing T-cells, synovial cells were isolated and analyzed by flowcytometry. Intra-articular injection of either Zymosan A or C. albicans on top of the SCW injection both resulted in enhanced joint swelling and inflammation compared to the normal SCW group. However, only the addition of C. albicans during SCW arthritis resulted in severe chondrocyte death and enhanced destruction of cartilage and bone. Additionally, exposure to C. albicans led to increased IL-17 in the arthritic joint, which was accompanied by an increased synovial mRNA expression of T-bet and RORγT. Moreover, the C. albicans-injected mice had significantly more Th17 cells in the synovium, of which a large population also produced IFN-γ. This study clearly shows that minute amounts of fungal components, like C. albicans, are very potent in interfering with the local cytokine environment in an arthritic joint, thereby polarizing arthritis towards a more destructive phenotype.

  12. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... of rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  13. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    Mruck, S.; Feistel, H.; Kat, S.; Kuwert, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.) [de

  14. Septic arthritis caused by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus

    Carlos Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptostreptococcus spp are commensal organisms, usually involved in periodontal disease. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus is an anaerobic gram-negative cocci, difficult to isolate due to its slow growth. Septic arthritis by this microorganism is a rare entity, but it can occur by hematogenous dissemination from a distant focus. Colonization and growth are more likely to occur in an already damaged articulation. We report the case of a 57 year-old woman with peripheral spondyloarthritis who developed knee septic arthritis by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus.

  15. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Low bone mineral density among patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis

    Arain, S.R.; Riaz, A.; Nazir, L.; Umer, T.P.; Rasool, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is an early and common feature in rheumatoid arthritis. Apart from other manifestations, Osteoporosis is an extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may result in increased risk of fractures, morbidity, mortality, and associated healthcare costs. This study evaluates bone mineral density changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of recent-onset. Methods: This descriptive case series was conducted in the Rheumatology Department of a tertiary care hospital in Karachi. Data was prospectively collected from 76 patients presenting with seropositive or seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. Bone mineral density of these patients measured at lumbar spine and hip by using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scan. Variables like age, gender, BMI, menstrual status, disease duration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, vitamin D level, clinical disease activity index and seropositivity for rheumatoid arthritis were measured along with outcome variables. Results: A total of 104 patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were registered with 28 excluded from study. Among the remaining 76 patients, 68 (89.50 percentage) were female, with mean age of patients (with low bone mineral density) as 50.95±7.87 years. Nineteen (25 percentage) patients had low bone mineral density, 68.52 percentage had low BMD at spine while 10.52 percentage at hip and 21.05 percentage at spine and hip both. Low bone mineral density was found higher in patients with seronegative 7 (50 percentage) as compared to seropositive patients 12 (19.4 percentage) (p-value 0.017), whereas low bone mineral density was found higher 12 (70.6 percentage) among post-menopausal women. Conclusion: Low BMD was found in 25 percentage of patients at earlier stage of the rheumatoid arthritis with seropositivity, age and menopausal status as significant risk factors. (author)

  17. Generation mechanism of RANKL(+) effector memory B cells: relevance to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Ota, Yuri; Niiro, Hiroaki; Ota, Shun-Ichiro; Ueki, Naoko; Tsuzuki, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Mishima, Koji; Higashioka, Kazuhiko; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Mitoma, Hiroki; Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Arinobu, Yojiro; Kukita, Akiko; Yamada, Hisakata; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-03-16

    The efficacy of B cell-depleting therapies for rheumatoid arthritis underscores antibody-independent functions of effector B cells such as cognate T-B interactions and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is a key cytokine involved in bone destruction and is highly expressed in synovial fluid B cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In this study we sought to clarify the generation mechanism of RANKL(+) effector B cells and their impacts on osteoclast differentiation. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid B cells from healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis were isolated using cell sorter. mRNA expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and Blimp-1 was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Levels of RANKL, CD80, CD86, and CXCR3 were analyzed using flow cytometry. Functional analysis of osteoclastogenesis was carried out in the co-culture system using macrophage RAW264 reporter cells. RANKL expression was accentuated in CD80(+)CD86(+) B cells, a highly activated B-cell subset more abundantly observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Upon activation via B-cell receptor and CD40, switched-memory B cells predominantly expressed RANKL, which was further augmented by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) but suppressed by interleukin-21. Strikingly, IFN-γ also enhanced TNF-α expression, while it strongly suppressed osteoprotegerin expression in B cells. IFN-γ increased the generation of CXCR3(+)RANKL(+) effector B cells, mimicking the synovial B cell phenotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, RANKL(+) effector B cells in concert with TNF-α facilitated osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Our current findings have shed light on the generation mechanism of pathogenic RANKL(+) effector B cells that would be an ideal therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis in the future.

  18. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  19. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  20. Spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission in correlation to inflammatory metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis

    He, M.; Wijk, E. van; Wietmarschen, H. van; Wang, M.; Sun, M.; Koval, S.; Wijk, R. van; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis has driven the development of new approaches and technologies for investigating the pathophysiology of this devastating, chronic disease. From the perspective of systems biology, combining comprehensive personal data such as metabolomics profiling

  1. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    Liepe, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  2. The Role of Smoking in the Development of Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis

    I.Yu. Golovach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the new data on smoking effects on the development of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. It was found that smoking aggravates the severity of psoriasis, worsens the prognosis, and makes the smoking patients less sensitive to treatment. Pathogenic links indicate that smoke induces oxidative damage, promotes inflammatory chan­ges and increases the expression of genes associated with psoriasis. In addition, nicotine binds acetylcholine receptors on dendritic cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes. This leads to inflammation and immune stimulation of Th1-cells and later severe leukocyte migration to skin due to the increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 and vascular adhesion molecule‑1 on endothelial cells; to the increased angiogenesis and uncontrolled keratinocyte proli­feration as well. Information about the genetic predisposition to the development of arthritis and psoriasis, and the role of smoking in the modification of genetic factors is provi­ded. Smoking causes a specific metabolic and genetic psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comorbidity, which determines the frequency of diseases flare, its severity and complications. Currently, physicians can prevent exacerbation of smoking-related di­seases such as psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis by persuading their patients to quit smoking.

  3. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  4. Consumer cost sharing and use of biopharmaceuticals for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Robinson, James C

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of consumer cost sharing on use of physician-administered and patient self-administered specialty drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. Multivariate statistical analysis of probability and use of physician-administered specialty drugs, patient self-injected specialty drugs, non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and symptom relief drugs. Analyses were conducted for patients enrolling in preferred provider organization (PPO) plans and health maintenance organization (HMO) plans with different cost-sharing requirements, adjusted for patient demographics, health status, and geographical location. Professional, facility, and pharmaceutical claims for beneficiaries of CalPERS, the public employee insurance purchasing alliance in California, for 2008-2009. Consumer cost-sharing requirements were obtained for each type of drug and service for each type of insurance plan. PPO insurance enrollees face substantially higher cost sharing for physician-administered specialty drugs, compared with HMO enrollees in CalPERS. PPO patients with rheumatoid arthritis are only half as likely as HMO enrollees to choose a physician-administered specialty drug (4.2% vs 9.3%) (P ≤.05), and use 25% less of the drugs if they use any ($10,356 vs $13,678) (P ≤.05). They are 30% more likely to use a self-administered specialty drug than are HMO enrollees (29.3% vs 22.1%) (P ≤.05), and use 35% more of the drugs if any ($16,015 vs $12,378) (P ≤.05). Consumer cost sharing reduces the use of physician-administered specialty drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. The higher use of patient self-administered specialty drugs suggests that the disincentives for use of physician-administered drugs were offset by an increased incentive to use self-administered drugs.

  5. Effect of self-efficacy and physical activity goal achievement on arthritis pain and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Knittle, Keegan P; De Gucht, Véronique; Hurkmans, Emalie J; Vlieland, Thea P M Vliet; Peeters, André J; Ronday, H Karel; Maes, Stan

    2011-11-01

    To examine physical activity and achievement of physical activity goals in relation to self-reported pain and quality of life among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At baseline, 271 patients with RA were asked to specify a physical activity goal, and filled in questionnaires assessing physical activity, motivation, and self-efficacy for physical activity, arthritis pain, and quality of life. Six months later, patients indicated to what extent they had achieved their baseline physical activity goal and completed the same set of questionnaires. These data were used to construct multiple mediation models that placed physical activity and physical activity goal achievement as mediators between self-efficacy and motivation on one hand, and arthritis pain and quality of life on the other. A total of 106 patients with RA completed both questionnaires. Self-efficacy at baseline predicted subsequent level of physical activity and achievement of physical activity goals. Goal achievement had a direct effect upon quality of life outcomes. Bootstrapping confidence intervals revealed indirect effects of self-efficacy upon arthritis pain and quality of life through goal achievement, but not through physical activity. Higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity increase the likelihood that patients will achieve their physical activity goals. Achievement of physical activity goals seems to be related to lower self-reported arthritis pain, and higher levels of quality of life. In practice, clinicians can foster self-efficacy and goal achievement by assisting patients in setting realistic and attainable exercise goals, developing action plans, and by providing feedback on goal progress. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Long-term efficacy of adalimumab in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Kotaniemi K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaisu Kotaniemi1,2, Hanna Säilä2, Hannu Kautiainen31Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 2Orton Orthopaedic Hospital and Rehabilitation Unit, Helsinki, Finland; 3Unit of Primary Health Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, FinlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of adalimumab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist, in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: Adalimumab was initiated in 94 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis to treat active arthritis and/or active associated uveitis. In 18 patients, therapy was discontinued after a short period because of inefficacy or side effects. The activity of uveitis (using Standardized Uveitis Nomenclature [SUN] criteria and clinical examination and arthritis (number of swollen or active joints was evaluated at the start and at end of the study.Results: At the end of the study, uveitis was under good clinical control in two thirds of 54 patients (31% did not need any local treatment and 35% used only 1–2 corticosteroid drops a day, and one third had active uveitis (at least three corticosteroid drops a day. According to SUN criteria, adalimumab treatment for uveitis showed improved activity (a two-fold decrease in uveitis activity in 28% of patients, with a moderate response in 16 patients, no change in a further 16 patients, and worsening activity (a two-fold increase in uveitis activity in 13% of patients. The overall proportion of patients with active arthritis decreased. At the beginning of the study, 69% of patients with uveitis had more than two active joints, and at the end of the study only 27% had active joint disease. In 27 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without uveitis on adalimumab, the number of active joints decreased from 93% to 59%. Systemic corticosteroid treatment could be stopped in 22% of patients with uveitis and in 11% of those without uveitis. Most of the

  7. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative study

    Tanja Thomsen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA describe their daily SB. Methods: Fifteen patients with RA (10 women and 5 men from 23 to 73 years of age and with a disease duration ranging from 4 to 27 years were interviewed following a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed using the content analysis method described by Graneheim. Results: SB appeared in three categories covering: 1 A constant battle between good and bad days; SB could be a consequence of RA in terms of days with pronounced pain and fatigue resulting in many hours of SB. 2 Adaptation to everyday life; living with the unpredictability of RA included constant modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3 It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way of living independent of the disease. Conclusions: SB is perceived, motivated, and performed differently in patients with RA. An individually tailored approach may be essential in understanding and encouraging patients’ motivation towards sustainable change in SB and activity patterns.

  8. Thyroid Gland in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    B T Turumhambetova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate the main parameters of thyroid status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, as well as particularities of course of this disease depending on of thyroid gland function disorder. Materials and methods. 52 women with RA were examined. The first group consisted of 11 women with subclinical and manifestive hypothyroidism the second one 41 women without thyroid gland function disorder. The group comparison was conducted on main indexes of thyroid gland condition the hormon level, AT-TPO, ultrasonic data, as well as clinical and laboratory RA data. Results. In women with hypothyroidism the systemic manifestations of RA were more often truely diagnosed; DAS28 indexes, ESR, the number ot swollen joints were higher. The high level ot AT-TPO was diagnosed in 54,55% – I group and in 31,7% – II group TTG level was really less in patients receiving synthetic glycocorticoids. Small thyroid gland volume was diagnosed in 23,07% of examined patients. The thyroid gland status indexes in them did not differ from patients with normal thyroid gland volume. Reliable increasing of the peripheral resistance index was revealed in lower thyroid artery according to the ultrasonic study data under the reduced thyroid gland size. Conclusions. High incidence of hypothyroidism and AT-TPO carriage in RA was revealed. Hypothyroidism development is accompanied by high clinic-laboratory RA activity. The reduction of the thyroid gland volumes in RA is possibly stipulated not only by autoimmunal pathology, but also chronic ischemia of the organ in the conditions of immune-complex vasculitis and early atherosclerosis. The TTG level in patients with RA is defined not only by pathology of the thyroid gland, but glycocorticoid therapy as well.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  10. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, Esperanza; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability of new ultrasound (US) definitions and quantification of synovial hypertrophy (SH) and power Doppler (PD) signal, separately and in combination, in a range of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the European League Against Rheumatisms...

  11. THE CYSTIC FORM OF RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS

    Dijkstra, P. F.; Gubler, F. M.; Maas, M.

    1988-01-01

    A non-erosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained

  12. IJMBR ARTHRITIS edited 4.3.1

    MJP

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Findings: Septic arthritis in the index patient developed insidiously and was diagnosed after ... cell disease, joint surgery, bacteremia, diabetes mellitus ... month history of bilateral knee joint pain which were swollen and warm. .... arthrotomy.[1] In the paediatric setting, the knee and shoulder joints are often.

  13. Uveitis and Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis or Psoriasis.

    Salek, Sherveen S; Pradeep, Archana; Guly, Catherine; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Rosenbaum, James T

    2018-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis. Observational case series. Setting: Two university-based referral clinics: 1 in England, 1 in the United States. Five children with uveitis and psoriatic arthritis and 1 with uveitis and psoriasis Observational Procedure: Retrospective chart review. Demographics of subjects such as age and sex; description of ocular and joint disease; surgical and other complications; medical treatment. Five of the 6 children in this series had the onset of disease at or before age 6 (P = .0008 compared to expected age of onset for psoriatic arthritis in childhood). All children in this series had an inadequate response to topical corticosteroids. Most of the children were treated with systemic corticosteroids for many months, yet all of them went on to require methotrexate. Therapy with systemic methotrexate did not suffice, as all the patients also required some form of biologic therapy. Five of 6 had surgeries such as vitrectomy, cataract extraction, or a procedure for glaucoma control. The observations suggest that the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis might be a distinct disease that is particularly severe when its onset affects children aged 6 years or younger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered....

  15. X-ray diagnosis of gouty arthritis

    Quan Gaorong; Luo Jianyun; Huang Shaoying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The X-ray findings of 38 cases with gouty arthritis were summarized. The X-ray diagnosis and differential diagnosis were discussed to improve the understanding and diagnostic accuracy of this disease. Methods: Combined with literatures, the X-ray findings, pathological and clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations of 38 cases pathologically proved with gouty arthritis were analyzed. Results: The gouty arthritis usually occurred in the small joints of limbs, especially in the first metatarsophalangeal joint. The X-ray findings were dissymmetric swellings of soft tissue, scattered calcified shadow; bony erosion in form of scuttling and honeycomb defect with sharp and hard edge, narrowed joint space and irregular articular surface, emergence of fiber stiffness, even joint malformations and subluxation or dislocation, associated with hyperosteogeny and nearby osteoporosis. Conclusion: Diversification was presented in X-ray findings of gouty arthritis, which can be easily confused with other single or multiple bone joint diseases. As a result, accurate diagnosis should be based on careful analysis about X-ray findings combined with clinical manifestations and laboratory examination. (authors)

  16. Biological agents in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Amarilyo, Gil; Tarp, Simon; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although various biological agents are in use for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA), head-to-head trials comparing the efficacy and safety among them are lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of biological agents in pJIA using all currently...

  17. Mitochondrial haplogroups in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Duhn, Pernille Hurup; Sode, Jacob; Hagen, Christian Munch

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (hgs) in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Two-hundred nineteen consecutive patients with RA had mtDNA isolated from their blood, sequenced and haplotyped. Patients were diagnosed...

  18. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  19. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...

  20. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  1. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  2. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use...

  3. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  4. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  5. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Bois, M.H.W. de; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Breedveld, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding 99m Tc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis in the United Arab Emirates

    Badsha, Humeira; Kong, Kok Ooi; Tak, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Middle East have delayed diagnosis and low disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) utilization. We describe the characteristics and treatments of consecutive RA patients presenting to a new musculoskeletal clinic in Dubai,

  7. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2017-01-01

    systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    Giraldo Estrada, Horacio

    2002-01-01

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  9. Management of osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Hoes, J.N.; Bultink, I.E.; Lems, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is roughly doubled, which is for an important part caused by inflammation-mediated amplification of bone loss and by immobilization. New treatments have become available in the last two

  10. Computed tomographic feature of tuberculous arthritis

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Cha, Eun Suk; Kang, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Jeong Su; Park, Young Ha; Yim, Jung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1992-01-01

    The sparsity of publication concerning CT findings of tuberculous arthritis prompted authors to retrospectively evaluate 12 patients with tuberculous arthritis for characteristic CT findings. In each patients, the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis was confirmed by surgery or biopsy. The CT examinations were evaluated by two radiologists retrospectively. Involved joints were the hip joint in seven patients, the sacroiliac joint in three patients, and the shoulder and ankle joint in one patient each. CT features included subchondral bony erosion(12 patients), soft tissue mass in the joint space(nine), widening of the joint space(eight), ipsilateral music atrophy(eight), thickening of the joint capsule(seven), intra-articular effusion(six), soft tissue abscess(five), and bony sclerosis(four). In seven patients with the duration of symptoms less than 1 year, thickening of joint capsule and intra-articular effusion were the predominant findings, while bony sclerosis, gross bone destruction, and soft tissue mass in joint space were seen in five patients with the duration of symptoms longer than 1 year. Our results indicate that CT is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis by demonstrating characteristic pathologic changes of the joint space, soft tissue abnormality and bony involvement

  11. A Renaissance Pope with arthritis following frostbite.

    Pinals, Robert S

    2013-09-01

    Pius II, a 15th century Pope, developed chronic foot pain following frostbite at age 30. Later in life he was progressively disabled by arthritis elsewhere and by colic, which may have been due to kidney stones. The differential diagnosis of his rheumatic disease and its effect on his career are discussed.

  12. Arthritis Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    ... aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight. What to avoid ... muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise. ... your arthritis affects you. What to avoid Smoking. If you're ...

  13. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  14. Serodiagnosis and immune profile in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Chakraborty, P; Bhattacharya, S; Chakraborty, M; Pal, B

    1997-11-01

    One hundred and seventy-five cases of clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis, 82 non-rheumatoid cases suffering from various other diseases and 40 healthy normal controls were investigated for detection of rheumatoid factor, quantitation of serum immunoglobulin, demonstration of antinuclear antibody (ANA) and LE cell phenomenon. Microlatex agglutination test of serum for rheumatoid factor (RF) showed 64% positivity in rheumatoid group and 1.2% positivity in non-rheumatoid group. All three immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) were found to be raised in serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, whereas only IgA level was elevated in serum of patients with non-rheumatoid diseases. ANA and LE cell phenomenon were observed in 3.4% and 2.8% cases respectively in cases of clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had been suffering from severe active rheumatoid arthritis. In non-rheumatoid group RF was positive in significant titre in only one case of leprosy. Synovial fluid and synovium were found to be heavily infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. RF appears first in synovial fluid and then in serum. Hence RF titre in blood may not attain significant level for the first several months.

  15. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  16. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With

  17. The Cost of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in 5 European Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Burgos-Pol, R; Martínez-Sesmero, J M; Ventura-Cerdá, J M; Elías, I; Caloto, M T; Casado, M Á

    2016-09-01

    While the introduction of biologics has improved the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, it may have increased the economic burden of these diseases. To perform a systematic review of studies on the costs associated with managing and treating psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in 5 European countries: Germany, Spain, France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. We undertook a systematic review of the literature (up to May 2015) using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The methodological quality of the studies identified was evaluated using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. We considered both direct costs (medical and nonmedical) and indirect costs, adjusted for country-specific inflation and converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity exchange rates for 2015 ($US PPP). The search retrieved 775 studies; 68.3% analyzed psoriasis and 31.7% analyzed psoriatic arthritis. The total annual cost per patient ranged from US $2,077 to US $13,132 PPP for psoriasis and from US $10,924 to US $17,050 PPP for psoriatic arthritis. Direct costs were the largest component of total expenditure in both diseases. The severity of these diseases was associated with higher costs. The introduction of biologics led to a 3-fold to 5-fold increase in direct costs, and consequently to an increase in total costs. We have analyzed the economic burden of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and shown that costs increase with the treatment and management of more severe disease and the use of biologics. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Does Not Drive New Bone Formation in Experimental Arthritis.

    Melissa N van Tok

    Full Text Available Insulin like growth factor (IGF-I can act on a variety of cells involved in cartilage and bone repair, yet IGF-I has not been studied extensively in the context of inflammatory arthritis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether IGF-I overexpression in the osteoblast lineage could lead to increased reparative or pathological bone formation in rheumatoid arthritis and/or spondyloarthritis respectively.Mice overexpressing IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage (Ob-IGF-I+/- line 324-7 were studied during collagen induced arthritis and in the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis. Mice were scored clinically and peripheral joints were analysed histologically for the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts.90-100% of the mice developed CIA with no differences between the Ob-IGF-I+/- and non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis revealed similar levels of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the ankle joints. In the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis 60% of the mice in both groups had a clinical score 1<. Severity was similar between both groups. Histological analysis revealed the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the toes in equal levels.Overexpression of IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage does not contribute to an increase in repair of erosions or syndesmophyte formation in mouse models for destructive and remodeling arthritis.

  19. Thermotherapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    Robinson, V; Brosseau, L; Casimiro, L; Judd, M; Shea, B; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2002-01-01

    Thermotherapy is often used as adjunct in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by rehabilitation specialists. To evaluate the effectiveness of different thermotherapy applications on objective and subjective measures of disease activity in patients with RA. We searched Medline, EMBASE, Pedro, Current Contents, Sports Discus and CINAHL up to and including September 2001. The Cochrane Field of Rehabilitation and related therapies and the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group were also contacted for a search of their specialized registers. Hand searching was conducted on all retrieved articles for additional articles. Comparative controlled studies, such as randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies or case/control studies, of thermotherapy compared to control or active interventions in patients with RA were eligible. No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were accepted. Two independent reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search (VR, LB). These reviewers extracted data using pre-defined extraction forms. Consensus was reached on all data extraction. Quality was assessed by two reviewers using a 5 point scale that measured the quality of randomization, double-blinding and description of withdrawals. Seven studies (n=328 subjects) met the inclusion criteria. The results of this systematic review of thermotherapy for RA found that there was no significant effect of hot and ice packs applications (Ivey 1994), cryotherapy (Rembe 1970) and faradic baths (Hawkes 1986) on objective measures of disease activity including joint swelling, pain, medication intake, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, hand function compared to a control (no treatment) or active therapy. There is no significant difference between wax and therapeutic ultrasound as well as between wax and faradic bath combined to ultrasound for all the outcomes measured after 1, 2 or 3 week(s) of treatment (Hawkes 1986). There was no difference in

  20. Psychological well-being among US adults with arthritis and the unmet need for mental health care.

    Straub, Laura E; Cisternas, Miriam G

    2017-01-01

    Mental health conditions can increase the risk of disability among adults with arthritis. The objective of this analysis was to compare the prevalence of serious psychological distress (SPD), depression, and anxiety among US adults with arthritis vs. those without; characterize adults with arthritis with and without SPD; and determine correlates of seeing a mental health professional during the year for adults with arthritis and SPD. Cross-sectional analysis of adults in the 2011-2013 National Health Interview Survey. Higher proportions of adults with arthritis had SPD (6.8% vs. 2.4%), depression (19.4% vs. 7.3%), and anxiety (29.3% vs. 16.3%) compared to those without. Of the estimated 3.5 million adults with arthritis and SPD, only 39% saw a mental health professional during the year. Adjusted analyses identified the following statistically significant relationships: those who were older (45-64 and ≥65 [vs.18-44], prevalence ratio [PR]=0.8 and 0.4, respectively), less educated (PR=0.5 and 0.7 for high school or less vs. college degree, respectively), and without health insurance coverage (vs. any private, PR=0.7), were less likely to see a mental health professional, whereas the disabled or unemployed (vs. employed, PR=1.6 and 1.5, respectively), and those unable to afford mental health care throughout the year (PR=1.3) were more likely. The high prevalence of SPD, anxiety, and depression in adults with arthritis suggests the need for increased mental health screening, with subsequent referral to mental health professionals or other treatment programs, in that population.

  1. Efficacy of inhibition of IL-1 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes mellitus: two case reports and review of the literature.

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Cantarini, Luca; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Vitale, Antonio; Carubbi, Francesco; Berardicurti, Onorina; Galeazzi, Mauro; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2015-06-02

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune arthritis in which two inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, play a critical role in the induction and progression of the disease. Several reports and data from registries have discussed the association between chronic inflammatory diseases and disorders in intermediary metabolism, pointing out that prevalence of peripheral insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus is increased among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, several studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus may be considered an interleukin-1β inflammatory-mediated process, and both preclinical and clinical observations have reported the usefulness of interleukin-1 antagonism therapy in this disease. We describe the case of a 58-year-old Caucasian woman and a 74-year-old Caucasian man with rheumatoid arthritis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In these patients, the inhibition of interleukin-1β not only induced remission for rheumatoid arthritis, but successfully controlled their metabolic status. We report the positive effects of the inhibition of interleukin-1 in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with both reaching the therapeutic targets of their diseases by using a single biological agent and tapering or discontinuing their antidiabetic therapies. These findings suggest that targeting interleukin-1 might be considered a good therapeutic option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  3. Evaluation of active living every day in adults with arthritis.

    Callahan, Leigh F; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Shreffler, Jack; Hootman, Jennifer M; Mielenz, Thelma J; Schoster, Britta; Brady, Teresa; Schwartz, Todd

    2014-02-01

    Adults with arthritis can benefit from participation in physical activity and may be assisted by organized programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 20-week behavioral lifestyle intervention, Active Living Every Day (ALED), for improvements in primary outcomes (physical activity levels, aerobic endurance, function, symptoms). A 20-week randomized controlled community trial was conducted in 354 adults. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 20 weeks in the intervention and wait-list control groups. The intervention group was also assessed at 6 and 12 months. Mean outcomes were determined by multilevel regression models in the intervention and control groups at follow-up points. At 20 weeks, the intervention group significantly increased participation in physical activity, and improved aerobic endurance, and select measures of function while pain, fatigue and stiffness remained status quo. In the intervention group, significant improvements in physical activity at 20 weeks were maintained at 6 and 12 months, and stiffness decreased. ALED appears to improve participation in physical activity, aerobic endurance, and function without exacerbating disease symptoms in adults with arthritis.

  4. Application of Liposomes in Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Quo Vadis

    Bhupinder Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, corticosteroids, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, and some biological agents. However, none of the treatments available is able to achieve the ultimate goal of treatment, that is, drug-free remission. This limitation has shifted the focus of treatment to delivery strategies with an ability to deliver the drugs into the synovial cavity in the proper dosage while mitigating side effects to other tissues. A number of approaches like microemulsions, microspheres, liposomes, microballoons, cocrystals, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, microsponges, and so forth, have been used for intrasynovial delivery of these drugs. Amongst these, liposomes have proven to be very effective for retaining the drug in the synovial cavity by virtue of their size and chemical composition. The fast clearance of intra-synovially administered drugs can be overcome by use of liposomes leading to increased uptake of drugs by the target synovial cells, which in turn reduces the exposure of nontarget sites and eliminates most of the undesirable effects associated with therapy. This review focuses on the use of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes data relating to the liposome formulations of various drugs. It also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology.

  5. Direct immunofluorescence of normal skin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Fitzgerald, O M; Barnes, L; Woods, R; McHugh, L; Barry, C; O'Loughlin, S

    1985-11-01

    The clinical significance of previously described immunoglobulin and complement deposition in the superficial dermal vessel walls of patients with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. In the present study, skin biopsies were obtained from the normal forearm and buttock of 48 unselected patients with rheumatoid arthritis and were examined by direct immunofluorescence (IF) for the presence of immunoglobulin (IgG,A,M) and complement (C3) in the vessel walls. Deposits of C3, IgM or IgG were detected in 10 patients. Five patients had deposits at the forearm sample alone, four patients had deposits at both biopsy sites, while one patient was positive at the buttock alone. Clinical features were similar in patients with and without vessel IF. However, patients with IF were significantly more seropositive with lower levels of complement and raised levels of serum IgA and IgM. There was also an increased level of circulating IgG immune complexes in these patients. Further analysis following exclusion of seronegative patients revealed similar results. This study suggests that the presence of vessel IF identifies a subgroup of patients who have evidence of more severe immunological disturbance.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis and work: The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on absenteeism and presenteeism.

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2015-06-01

    For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), being in paid work is very important, and it increases self-esteem and financial independence. Although the management of RA has changed in the last 15 years to early aggressive treatment and the introduction of biologic treatments, many patients still have to take sick leave or even stop working because of their RA (i.e., absenteeism). For those remaining in paid work, patients may experience problems due to RA resulting in productivity loss while at work (i.e., presenteeism). The costs attributed to absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e., indirect costs) have been estimated to be very high, and they even exceed direct costs. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate these costs. This manuscript examines the relationship between the use of biologic therapy and absenteeism, with a focus on sick leave, and on presenteeism, and it provides an overview of indirect costs of absenteeism and presenteeism in those treated with biologic therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis: the evidence accumulates for complex pathobiologic interactions

    Bingham, Clifton O.; Moni, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review was conducted to focus on the recent clinical and translational research related to the associations between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Recent findings There is a growing interest in the associations between oral health and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. A number of epidemiologic studies have described associations between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. Recent clinical studies continue to support these reports, and are increasingly linked with biological assessments to better understand the nature of these relationships. A number of recent studies have evaluated the periopathogenic roles of Porphyromonas gingivalis, the oral microbiome, and mechanisms of site-specific and substrate-specific citrullination. These are helping to further elucidate the interactions between these two inflammatory disease processes. Summary Studies of clinical oral health parameters, the gingival microenvironment, autoantibodies and biomarkers, and rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures are providing a better understanding of the potential mechanisms responsible for rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease associations. The cumulative results and ongoing studies have the promise to identify novel mechanisms and interventional strategies to improve patient outcomes for both conditions. PMID:23455329

  8. Correlation between chronic arthritis patients confirmed with questionnaire and serologic test of Lyme disease

    Rotan, H.; Ginting, Y.; Loesnihari, R.; Kembaren, T.; Marpaung, B.

    2018-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the most common tick-borne disease, and frequency of arthritis complication later. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Lyme disease and to evaluate its correlation with chronic arthritis. This epidemiologic cross sectional study included 41 healthy individuals who had chronic arthritis and bitten by ticks underwent questionnaires, and laboratory tests consisted of a routine blood sample, serum uric acid, and IgG ELISA for Lyme. There was 7.32% presence of positive IgG for Lyme. Samples with positive IgG for Lyme were further evaluated for rheumatology marker. We found three samples with a positive rheumatoid factor, two samples had positive anti-MCV, and 1 sample had slightly increased CRP. Three Lyme positive samples had normal EULAR scoring. It was the first Lyme disease case found in Indonesia, particularly in 4 villages of Sibolangit, Deli Serdang, North Sumatera. The assessment made by analysis the questionnaire, evaluation the blood test, and confirmed positive Lyme disease, and at last, we found the correlation between chronic arthritis with positive test Lyme.

  9. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  10. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Mur, Erich; Schirmer, Michael; Klauser, Andrea S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  11. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  12. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Shimabukuro, Kunisada; Sakata, Hiromichi; Shirono, Kazuo; Nakajo, Masataka; Shinohara, Shinji

    1983-01-01

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  13. AUTOANTIBODIES TO CIRTULLINATED ANTIGENS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF CLINICAL COURSE IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    I. B. Belyaeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To study the value of antibodies to cirtullinated antigens in diagnosis and their significance in prediction of erosion formation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, we examined serological status in 129 patients with early RA (ERA and 55 cases of undifferentiated arthritis, lasting less than 12 months. Another group consisted of 39 patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis, in whom the disease persisted for > 2 years. Control group included 39 patients with osteoarthrosis and 29 patients with reactive arthritis. The titers of rheumatoid factor (RF, antikeratin antibodies (AKA, antiperinuclear factor (APF and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP were studied during initial examination and 12 months later. Serial cryosections of rat esophagus and normal human buccal epithelial cells served as substrates for AKA and APF detection. AntiCCPs were revealed by means of DIASTAT technique (Axis Shield, UK.Upon initial observation of the patients with ERA, sensitivity and specificity of anti-CCP was, resp., 63.5% and 97,8%, thus exceeding both parameters for RF (48,8% и 86,7%. Sensitivity of AKA and APF for the same group was 17% and 24 %, with specificity of 97.7%. In RF-seronegative cases of early RA, anti-CCP were detected in 37% with ERA and 42% long-standing RA. In patients with non-differentiated arthritis who developed RA within one year, RF and anti-CCP were found in 12,2% and 45,5%. Following a one-year observation, a statistically significant increase was found in incidence of RF and anti-CCP in ERA patients.Positivity for anti-citrulline antibodies (AKA, APF and anti-CCP in ERA patients were associated with higher levels of CRP, increased HAQ, DAS4, Sharp scores, as compared to the patients who were seronegative. In ERA patients positive for anti-citrulline antibodies, higher frequencies of synovitis and erosive arthritis were detected by means of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. In the patients with ERA

  14. Diabetes mellitus and arthritis: is it a risk factor or comorbidity?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Dong, Qing; Liu, Hua; Yang, Daren; Zhang, Yunyan

    2017-05-01

    Investigators have explored the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis for a long time; however, there are uncertainties and inconsistencies among various studies. In this study, we tried to explore the relationship between diabetes mellitus and the overall risk of arthritis, as well as the potential modifiers for this relationship. We conducted a comprehensive literature search through PubMed and identified 36 eligible studies. The overall analyses, subgroup analyses, as well as sensitivity analyses, were conducted to illustrate the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. All statistical analyses were conducted using STATA SE version 13.0. In our study, 36 eligible studies were identified and involved in the meta-analysis. The overall association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis is 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.28, P = .007). The association exists only in nongouty arthritis, where we observed the estimated odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI: 1.05-1.67, P 1). The opposite point estimates from different types of diabetes may indicate possible different associations for type I (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.18-5.39, P = .985) or type II diabetes (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.88-1.84, P = .194). Diabetes mellitus performs more likely as a comorbidity of arthritis rather than a risk factor; however, more studies will be helpful to increase the confidence of identifying the association between diabetes and arthritis.

  15. Health Care Provider Counseling for Weight Loss Among Adults with Arthritis and Overweight or Obesity - United States, 2002-2014.

    Guglielmo, Dana; Hootman, Jennifer M; Murphy, Louise B; Boring, Michael A; Theis, Kristina A; Belay, Brook; Barbour, Kamil E; Cisternas, Miriam G; Helmick, Charles G

    2018-05-04

    In the United States, 54.4 million adults report having doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1). Among adults with arthritis, 32.7% and 38.1% also have overweight and obesity, respectively (1), with obesity being more prevalent among persons with arthritis than among those who do not have arthritis (2). Furthermore, severe joint pain among adults with arthritis in 2014 was reported by 23.5% of adults with overweight and 31.7% of adults with obesity (3). The American College of Rheumatology recommends weight loss for adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity,* which can improve function and mobility while reducing pain and disability (4,5). The Healthy People 2020 target for health care provider (hereafter provider) counseling for weight loss among persons with arthritis and overweight or obesity is 45.3%. † Adults with overweight or obesity who receive weight-loss counseling from a provider are approximately four times more likely to attempt to lose weight than are those who do not receive counseling (6). To estimate changes in the prevalence of provider counseling for weight loss reported by adults with arthritis and overweight or obesity, CDC analyzed National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. § Overall, age-standardized estimates of provider counseling for weight loss increased by 10.4 percentage points from 2002 (35.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 33.0-37.3) to 2014 (45.5%; 95% CI = 42.9-48.1) (phealth benefits for this population.

  16. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  17. Artrite crônica e periodontite Chronic arthritis and periodontitis

    Flávia Silva Farah Ferreira Braga

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Como parecem existir similaridades entre os mecanismos patogenéticos de doenças reumatológicas, como a artrite reumatóide e a artrite idiopática juvenil com a periodontite, alguns estudos têm sido publicados com o objetivo de levantar evidências de uma possível inter-relação entre essas condições. A artrite reumatóide parece modular a resposta imune do hospedeiro, podendo aumentar a suscetibilidade à doença periodontal destrutiva em adultos. Recentemente, evidenciou-se que também pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil possuíam maior suscetibilidade à doença periodontal destrutiva comparados a indivíduos saudáveis da mesma idade. No entanto, ainda se desconhecem os mecanismos que justificariam uma hipótese de associação entre essas condições crônicas inflamatórias. Sendo assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi promover uma revisão da literatura sobre uma possível relação entre artrite crônica e periodontite.As similarities between pathogenetic mechanisms concerning rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with periodontitis may exhist, some studies have been published with the objective of showing evidences of a possible relationship between these conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis seems to modulate the host's immune mechanisms and may increase the susceptibility of adults to destructive periodontal disease. Recently evidences showed that also patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis had an increased susceptibility to destructive periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals of the same age. Nevertheless the mechanisms of association of these chronic inflammatory conditions remain unclear. So, this study aims to review literature concerning a possible relationship between chronic arthritis and periodontitis.

  18. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    Liepe, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with 74 MBq) and erbium- 169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc- HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovectomy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra-articular fraction or intraarticular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilization (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymph edema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee, a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for pulmonary embolism. The radiation absorbed dose to the patients are low because a low leakage rate from the treated joint (lymphogenic uptake of 1.8%ID (0.45 to 4.78). These leads to a radiation exposure to the testis of 0.1mSv (0.05 to 0.18) and to the ovary of 0.2 mSv (0.1 to 0.38). Significantly is the radiation exposure of the physician, here especially at the finger pulp. A high beta dose of 22.1 μSv/MBq for the forefinger was observed using only a syringe protection in treatments of knees ( 90 Y), this resulted in a annual

  19. Angiogenesis and blood vessel stability in inflammatory arthritis.

    Kennedy, Aisling

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess blood vessel stability in inflammatory synovial tissue (ST) and to examine neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), oxidative DNA damage, and hypoxia in vivo. METHODS: Macroscopic vascularity and ST oxygen levels were determined in vivo in patients with inflammatory arthritis who were undergoing arthroscopy. Vessel maturity\\/stability was quantified in matched ST samples by dual immunofluorescence staining for factor VIII (FVIII)\\/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). NCAM and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Angiogenesis was assessed in vitro, using human dermal endothelial cells (HDECs) in a Matrigel tube formation assay. RESULTS: A significant number of immature vessels (showing no pericyte recruitment) was observed in tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis (P < 0.001), in contrast to osteoarthritic and normal tissue, which showed complete recruitment of pericytes. Low in vivo PO(2) levels in the inflamed joint (median [range] 22.8 [3.2-54.1] mm Hg) were inversely related to increased macroscopic vascularity (P < 0.04) and increased microscopic expression of FVIII and alpha-SMA (P < 0.04 and P < 0.03, respectively). A significant proportion of vessels showed focal expression of NCAM and strong nuclear 8-oxodG expression, implicating a loss of EC-pericyte contact and increased DNA damage, levels of which were inversely associated with low in vivo PO(2) (P = 0.04 for each comparison). Circulating cells were completely negative for 8-oxodG. Exposure of HDEC to 3% O(2) (reflecting mean ST in vivo measurements) significantly increased EC tube formation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate the presence of unstable vessels in inflamed joints associated with hypoxia, incomplete EC-pericyte interactions, and increased DNA damage. These changes may further contribute to persistent hypoxia in the inflamed joint to further drive this unstable microenvironment.

  20. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  2. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease

  3. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  4. Epidemiology of comorbidities in early rheumatoid arthritis: with emphasis on cardiovascular disease

    Kerola, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a substantially increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Along with their CV burden, RA patients are at increased risk for other comorbidities such as hypothyroidism and depressive symptoms. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of CV comorbidities and hypothyroidism among RA patients in comparison to those of the general population at the time of RA diagnosis. We also aimed to determine, among patients wit...

  5. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    Boutry, Nathalie; Carmo, Clarissa Canella Moraes do; Flipo, Rene-Marc; Cotten, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  6. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ikonnikov, A.I.; Krylov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  7. [Active psoriatic arthritis during pregnancy: challenges and limitations of pharmacotherapy].

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Misterska-Skóra, Maria; Wiland, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cases of psoriatic arthritis coexisting with pregnancy are sparse and therefore little is known about the fetal effect of medication in women with psoriatic arthritis. As a rule, drugs and dosages are minimized in these patients. Among disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, cyclosporine and sulphasalazine are preferred. Methotrexate and leflunomide are strictly contraindicated and must be withdrawn 3 months or 2 years, respectively, before a pregnancy is planned. Psoriatic arthritis may be treated during pregnancy with glucocorticosteroids, especially with prednisone or prednisolone. We present the case ofa 40-year-old gravida with psoriatic arthritis which exacerbated during the first trimester of pregnancy. Therapeutic implications in such cases are discussed.

  8. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-01-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.) [de

  9. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-01-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis

  10. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis

  11. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on schooling

    Bouaddi Ilham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common arthropathy of childhood. Different diseases affect school attendance to varying degrees. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA on Moroccan children’s schooling. Methods Thirty-three children with JIA were included in this study, having been previously diagnosed according to the classification criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR. Seventy-four healthy children were recruited to serve as controls. Data was obtained for all children on their school level, educational performance, and attendance. The rate of absenteeism due to health complications was noted. Results All healthy children were able to attend school (p Conclusions Our study suggested that the schooling of children with JIA was negatively impacted due to the disorder. More studies, with a larger sample of children, are needed to confirm our findings.

  12. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica Enteritis.

    Honda, Kazuya; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Tsuji, Yoshika; Kawahara, Chieko; Michitsuji, Toru; Higashi, Shuntaro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of reactive arthritis (ReA) triggered by Yersinia enterocolitica enteritis. A 24-year-old Japanese man developed polyarthritis in the lower limbs. Two weeks prior to these symptoms, he noted diarrhea, right lower abdominal pain and a fever. Y. enterocolitica was not isolated from a stool culture; however, he was diagnosed with ReA based on the colonoscopic findings of a high anti-Y. enterocolitica antibody titer and HLA-B27 antigen positivity. Following treatment with methotrexate and steroids, his arthritis improved. This is the first reported Japanese case of ReA in the English literature after a gastrointestinal infection caused by Y. enterocolitica.

  13. Genetic architecture distinguishes systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis from otherforms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical and therapeutic implications

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Arthur, Victoria L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Hinks, Anne; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei A.; Foell, Dirk; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterized by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, longstanding arthritis that...

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    Clarke, Sarah; Sen, Ethan; Ramanan, Athimalaipet

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between geneti...

  15. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding emerging treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis

    Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Combe, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) will continue to evolve as new drugs are developed, as new data become available, and as our potential to achieve greater and more consistent outcomes becomes more routine. Many patients will find both symptom relief and modest control of their disease with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), yet this course of therapy is clearly not effective in all patients. In fact, despite strong evidence that intensive treatment in the early ...

  17. Patient Disease Perceptions and Coping Strategies for Arthritis in a Developing Nation: A Qualitative Study

    Bogart Laura M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little prior research on the burden of arthritis in the developing world. We sought to document how patients with advanced arthritis living in the Dominican Republic are affected by and cope with their disease. Methods We conducted semi-structured, one-to-one interviews with economically disadvantaged Dominican patients with advanced knee and/or hip arthritis in the Dominican Republic. The interviews, conducted in Spanish, followed a moderator's guide that included topics such as the patients' understanding of disease etiology, their support networks, and their coping mechanisms. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim in Spanish, and systematically analyzed using content analysis. We assessed agreement in coding between two investigators. Results 18 patients were interviewed (mean age 60 years, median age 62 years, 72% women, 100% response rate. Patients invoked religious and environmental theories of disease etiology, stating that their illness had been caused by God's will or through contact with water. While all patients experienced pain and functional limitation, the social effects of arthritis were gender-specific: women noted interference with homemaking and churchgoing activities, while men experienced disruption with occupational roles. The coping strategies used by patients appeared to reflect their beliefs about disease causation and included prayer and avoidance of water. Conclusions Patients' explanatory models of arthritis influenced the psychosocial effects of the disease and coping mechanisms used. Given the increasing reach of global health programs, understanding these culturally influenced perceptions of disease will be crucial in successfully treating chronic diseases in the developing world.

  18. Osteoprotegerin CGA haplotype protection against cerebrovascular complications in anti-CCP negative patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Fernanda Genre

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease with high incidence of cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic disease in the general population. Several polymorphisms in the OPG gene with functional effects on cardiovascular disease in non-rheumatic individuals have been described. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of three of these functional OPG polymorphisms on the risk of cardiovascular disease in a large and well-characterized cohort of Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis.Three OPG gene variants (rs3134063, rs2073618 and rs3134069 were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 2027 Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibody testing was positive in 997 of 1714 tested. Also, 18.3% of the whole series had experienced cardiovascular events, including 5.4% with cerebrovascular accidents. The relationship between OPG variants and cardiovascular events was assessed using Cox regression.No association between OPG gene variants and cardiovascular disease was observed in the whole group of rheumatoid arthritis patients or in anti-CCP positive patients. Nevertheless, a protective effect of CGA haplotype on the risk of cardiovascular disease in general, and specifically in the risk of cerebrovascular complications after adjusting for sex, age at disease diagnosis and traditional cardiovascular risk factors was disclosed in anti-CCP negative patients (HR = 0.54; 95%CI: 0.31-0.95; p = 0.032 and HR = 0.17; 95%CI: 0.04-0.78; p = 0.022, respectively.Our results indicate a protective effect of the OPG CGA haplotype on cardiovascular risk, mainly due to a protective effect against cerebrovascular events in anti-CCP negative rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  19. Bile salt-stimulated lipase plays an unexpected role in arthritis development in rodents.

    Susanne Lindquist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis that bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL, in addition to being a key enzyme in dietary fat digestion during early infancy, plays an important role in inflammation, notably arthritis. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA in rodents are commonly used experimental models that reproduce many of the pathogenic mechanisms of human rheumatoid arthritis, i.e. increased cellular infiltration, synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, and erosion of cartilage and bone in the distal joints. We used the CIA model to compare the response in BSSL wild type (BSSL-WT mice with BSSL-deficient 'knock-out' (BSSL-KO and BSSL-heterozygous (BSSL-HET littermates. We also investigated if intraperitoneal injection of BSSL-neutralizing antibodies affected the development or severity of CIA and PIA in mice and rats, respectively. RESULTS: In two consecutive studies, we found that BSSL-KO male mice, in contrast to BSSL-WT littermates, were significantly protected from developing arthritis. We also found that BSSL-HET mice were less prone to develop disease compared to BSSL-WT mice, but not as resistant as BSSL-KO mice, suggesting a gene-dose effect. Moreover, we found that BSSL-neutralizing antibody injection reduced both the incidence and severity of CIA and PIA in rodents. CONCLUSION: Our data strongly support BSSL as a key player in the inflammatory process, at least in rodents. It also suggests the possibility that BSSL-neutralizing agents could serve as a therapeutic model to reduce the inflammatory response in humans.

  20. Secukinumab in the Treatment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature.

    Abrouk, M; Gandy, J; Nakamura, M; Lee, K; Brodsky, M; Singh, R; Zhu, H; Farahnik, B; Bhutani, T; Koo, J

    2017-07-01

    While there are several commercially available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, there remains a large number of individuals who are refractory to current modalities. In the recent past, there has been increasing evidence that interleukin (IL)-17 plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Preclinical, phase II, and phase III studies of secukinumab (Cosentyx®) targeting IL-17 and its receptor have thus far proved to be promising. We reviewed the results of phase II and phase III clinical trials for secukinumab in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Only published studies were considered in the present review. We also performed an English language literature search from January 2003 to September 2015 using PubMed with any of the following key words: (secukinumab OR AIN457) AND (psoriasis OR psoriatic arthritis). In our review of the literature, seven phase III and five phase II clinical trials, as well as open-label extension studies with unpublished findings were found. Results from phase III clinical trials indicated secukinumab to be efficacious and safe for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) scores. The safety profile of this agent was similar across all studies, with the most frequently reported adverse events of nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory infections, headache, and injection site reaction. Secukinumab demonstrates rapid and robust clinical improvement accompanied by a favorable short- term safety profile. The results of the phase III trials continue to reinforce the theory that the IL-17 pathway is an essential target in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treatment. Additional extension studies of lower level evidence are needed to further understand the safety profile of the drug.