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  1. Early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis: distinct molecular signatures identified by gene-expression profiling in synovia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerré, Thierry; Bansard, Carine; Vittecoq, Olivier; Derambure, Céline; Hiron, Martine; Daveau, Maryvonne; Tron, François; Ayral, Xavier; Biga, Norman; Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Chiocchia, Gilles; Le Loët, Xavier; Salier, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease and its underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Because previous microarray studies have only focused on long-standing (LS) RA compared to osteoarthritis, we aimed to compare the molecular profiles of early and LS RA versus control synovia. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained by arthroscopy from 15 patients (4 early untreated RA, 4 treated LS RA and 7 controls, who had traumatic or mechanical lesions). Extracted mRNAs were used for large-scale gene-expression profiling. The different gene-expression combinations identified by comparison of profiles of early, LS RA and healthy synovia were linked to the biological processes involved in each situation. Results Three combinations of 719, 116 and 52 transcripts discriminated, respectively, early from LS RA, and early or LS RA from healthy synovia. We identified several gene clusters and distinct molecular signatures specifically expressed during early or LS RA, thereby suggesting the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms during the course of RA. Conclusions Early and LS RA have distinct molecular signatures with different biological processes participating at different times during the course of the disease. These results suggest that better knowledge of the main biological processes involved at a given RA stage might help to choose the most appropriate treatment. PMID:19563633

  2. Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

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    Alex Magno Coelho Horimoto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24–97% of patients with SSc. Objectives: To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Methods: Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Results: Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%, mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%, limited form of the disease (47.6%, time of diagnosis between 5 and 10 years (47.6% and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9% had positive rheumatoid factor (RF, while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%, with positivity being observed only in patients with

  3. Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

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    Horimoto, Alex Magno Coelho; da Costa, Izaias Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral) and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24-97% of patients with SSc. To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%), mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%), limited form of the disease (47.6%), time of diagnosis between 5 and 10 years (47.6%) and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9%) had positive rheumatoid factor (RF), while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP) test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%), with positivity being observed only in patients with SSc/RA overlap. Comparing the clinical manifestations among the

  4. [Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Alex Magno Coelho; Costa, Izaias Pereira da

    2015-03-04

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral) and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24 to 97% of patients with SSc. To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%), mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%), limited form of the disease (47.6%), time of diagnosis between 5 to 10 years (47.6%) and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9%) had positive rheumatoid factor (RF), while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP) test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%), with positivity being observed only in patients with SSc/RA overlap. Comparing the clinical manifestations among

  5. Cellular and molecular perspectives in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Veale, Douglas J; Orr, Carl; Fearon, Ursula

    2017-06-01

    Synovial immunopathology in rheumatoid arthritis is complex involving both resident and infiltrating cells. The synovial tissue undergoes significant neovascularization, facilitating an influx of lymphocytes and monocytes that transform a typically acellular loose areolar membrane into an invasive tumour-like pannus. The microvasculature proliferates to form straight regularly-branching vessels; however, they are highly dysfunctional resulting in reduced oxygen supply and a hypoxic microenvironment. Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are found at an early stage, often before arthritis has developed, and they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA. Abnormal cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction thus ensue and, in turn, through the increased production of reactive oxygen species actively induce inflammation. Key pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors and their signalling pathways, including nuclear factor κB, Janus kinase-signal transducer, are highly activated when immune cells are exposed to hypoxia in the inflamed rheumatoid joint show adaptive survival reactions by activating. This review attempts to highlight those aberrations in the innate and adaptive immune systems including the role of genetic and environmental factors, autoantibodies, cellular alterations, signalling pathways and metabolism that are implicated in the pathogenesis of RA and may therefore provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Heterogeneity of synovial molecular patterns in patients with arthritis.

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    Bernard R Lauwerys

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an unmet medical need in the field of rheumatology. Previously, we performed high-density transcriptomic studies on synovial biopsies from patients with arthritis, and found that synovial gene expression profiles were significantly different according to the underlying disorder. Here, we wanted to further explore the consistency of the gene expression signals in synovial biopsies of patients with arthritis, using low-density platforms.Low-density assays (cDNA microarray and microfluidics qPCR were designed, based on the results of the high-density microarray data. Knee synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with RA, spondyloarthropathies (SA or osteoarthritis (OA (n = 39, and also from patients with initial undifferentiated arthritis (UA (n = 49.According to high-density microarray data, several molecular pathways are differentially expressed in patients with RA, SA and OA: T and B cell activation, chromatin remodelling, RAS GTPase activation and extracellular matrix regulation. Strikingly, disease activity (DAS28-CRP has a significant influence on gene expression patterns in RA samples. Using the low-density assays, samples from patients with OA are easily discriminated from RA and SA samples. However, overlapping molecular patterns are found, in particular between RA and SA biopsies. Therefore, prediction of the clinical diagnosis based on gene expression data results in a diagnostic accuracy of 56.8%, which is increased up to 98.6% by the addition of specific clinical symptoms in the prediction algorithm. Similar observations are made in initial UA samples, in which overlapping molecular patterns also impact the accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm. When clinical symptoms are added, the diagnostic accuracy is strongly improved.Gene expression signatures are overall different in patients with OA, RA and SA, but overlapping molecular signatures are found in patients with these conditions

  7. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common type of arthritis. It's often related to aging or to an injury. Autoimmune arthritis happens when your body's immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  8. Arthritis

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    ... prevent joint damage. If you have a family history of arthritis, tell your provider, even if you do not have joint pain. Avoiding ... in hip Rheumatoid arthritis Knee joint replacement - series Hip joint ...

  9. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from the United Kingdom shows two genetically distinct clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAuliffe, Laura; Kokotovic, Branko; Ayling, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    polymorphism (AFLP), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. In addition, the influence of variable surface protein (Vsp) profiles on the profiles generated with molecular typing techniques was studied. Both AFLP and RAPD separated the isolates into two distinct groups, but PFGE showed less......Mycoplasma bovis is an important veterinary pathogen causing pneumonia, arthritis, and mastitis in infected cattle. We investigated the genetic diversity of 53 isolates collected in the United Kingdom between 1996 and 2002 with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment length...... congruence with the other techniques. There was no clear relationship between the geographic origin or year of isolation of the isolates and the profiles produced. No correlation between Vsp profiles and any of the molecular typing techniques was observed. We propose that RAPD and AFLP provide valuable tools...

  10. Distinct classical and molecular cytogenetics of Astyanax marionae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DIOVANI PISCOR

    2017-08-24

    Aug 24, 2017 ... DOI 10.1007/s12041-017-0813-8. RESEARCH ARTICLE. Distinct classical and molecular cytogenetics of Astyanax marionae ... 1Laboratório de Citogenética, Departamento de Biologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Júlio de Mesquita Filho' (UNESP), Av. 24A, 1515, 13506-900, ...

  11. Arthritis

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    ... Psoriatic Arthritis can occur in people who have psoriasis (scaly red and white skin patches). It affects ... Cómo vivir con artritis: Información básica de salud para usted y su familia Rheumatoid Arthritis: Handout on ...

  12. Circadian timekeeping is disturbed in rheumatoid arthritis at molecular level.

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    Vesa-Petteri Kouri

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. These are reflected in altered circadian rhythm of circulating serum cortisol, melatonin and IL-6 levels and in chronic fatigue. We hypothesized that the molecular machinery responsible for the circadian timekeeping is perturbed in RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of circadian clock in RA. METHODS: Gene expression of thirteen clock genes was analyzed in the synovial membrane of RA and control osteoarthritis (OA patients. BMAL1 protein was detected using immunohistochemistry. Cell autonomous clock oscillation was started in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts using serum shock. The effect of pro-inflammatory stimulus on clock gene expression in synovial fibroblasts was studied using IL-6 and TNF-α. RESULTS: Gene expression analysis disclosed disconcerted circadian timekeeping and immunohistochemistry revealed strong cytoplasmic localization of BMAL1 in RA patients. Perturbed circadian timekeeping is at least in part inflammation independent and cell autonomous, because RA synovial fibroblasts display altered circadian expression of several clock components, and perturbed circadian production of IL-6 and IL-1β after clock resetting. However, inflammatory stimulus disturbs the rhythm in cultured fibroblasts. Throughout the experiments ARNTL2 and NPAS2 appeared to be the most affected clock genes in human immune-inflammatory conditions. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the molecular machinery controlling the circadian rhythm is disturbed in RA patients.

  13. Identification of distinct molecular subtypes of uterine carcinosarcoma.

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    An, Yang; Wang, Haojie; Jie, Jingyao; Tang, Yitai; Zhang, Weijuan; Ji, Shaoping; Guo, Xiangqian

    2017-02-28

    Uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS) is a rare but lethal neoplasm with high metastasis and recurrence rate, and to date, no molecular classification of UCS has been defined to achieve targeted therapies. In this study, we identified two distinct molecular subtypes of UCS with distinct gene expression patterns and clinicopathologic characteristics. Subtype I UCS recapitulates low-grade UCS, in contrast subtype II UCS represents high-grade UCS with higher tumor invasion rate and tumor weight. Interestingly, subtype I UCS is characterized by cell adhesion and apoptosis pathways, whereas genes over-expressed in subtype II UCS are more involved in myogenesis/muscle development. We also proposed certain potential subtype specific therapeutic targets, such as SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) for subtype I and cell-cycle proteins for subtype II. Our findings provide a better recognition of UCS molecular subtypes and subtype specific oncogenesis mechanisms, and can help develop more specific targeted treatment options for these tumors.

  14. A comprehensive molecular interaction map for rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Wu, Gang; Zhu, Lisha; Dent, Jennifer E; Nardini, Christine

    2010-04-16

    Computational biology contributes to a variety of areas related to life sciences and, due to the growing impact of translational medicine--the scientific approach to medicine in tight relation with basic science--, it is becoming an important player in clinical-related areas. In this study, we use computation methods in order to improve our understanding of the complex interactions that occur between molecules related to Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Due to the complexity of the disease and the numerous molecular players involved, we devised a method to construct a systemic network of interactions of the processes ongoing in patients affected by RA. The network is based on high-throughput data, refined semi-automatically with carefully curated literature-based information. This global network has then been topologically analysed, as a whole and tissue-specifically, in order to translate the experimental molecular connections into topological motifs meaningful in the identification of tissue-specific markers and targets in the diagnosis, and possibly in the therapy, of RA. We find that some nodes in the network that prove to be topologically important, in particular AKT2, IL6, MAPK1 and TP53, are also known to be associated with drugs used for the treatment of RA. Importantly, based on topological consideration, we are also able to suggest CRKL as a novel potentially relevant molecule for the diagnosis or treatment of RA. This type of finding proves the potential of in silico analyses able to produce highly refined hypotheses, based on vast experimental data, to be tested further and more efficiently. As research on RA is ongoing, the present map is in fieri, despite being--at the moment--a reflection of the state of the art. For this reason we make the network freely available in the standardised and easily exportable .xml CellDesigner format at 'www.picb.ac.cn/ClinicalGenomicNTW/temp.html' and 'www.celldesigner.org'.

  15. A comprehensive molecular interaction map for rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Gang Wu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational biology contributes to a variety of areas related to life sciences and, due to the growing impact of translational medicine--the scientific approach to medicine in tight relation with basic science--, it is becoming an important player in clinical-related areas. In this study, we use computation methods in order to improve our understanding of the complex interactions that occur between molecules related to Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA.Due to the complexity of the disease and the numerous molecular players involved, we devised a method to construct a systemic network of interactions of the processes ongoing in patients affected by RA. The network is based on high-throughput data, refined semi-automatically with carefully curated literature-based information. This global network has then been topologically analysed, as a whole and tissue-specifically, in order to translate the experimental molecular connections into topological motifs meaningful in the identification of tissue-specific markers and targets in the diagnosis, and possibly in the therapy, of RA.We find that some nodes in the network that prove to be topologically important, in particular AKT2, IL6, MAPK1 and TP53, are also known to be associated with drugs used for the treatment of RA. Importantly, based on topological consideration, we are also able to suggest CRKL as a novel potentially relevant molecule for the diagnosis or treatment of RA. This type of finding proves the potential of in silico analyses able to produce highly refined hypotheses, based on vast experimental data, to be tested further and more efficiently. As research on RA is ongoing, the present map is in fieri, despite being--at the moment--a reflection of the state of the art. For this reason we make the network freely available in the standardised and easily exportable .xml CellDesigner format at 'www.picb.ac.cn/ClinicalGenomicNTW/temp.html' and 'www.celldesigner.org'.

  16. Virus Infection Triggers MAVS Polymers of Distinct Molecular Weight

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    Natalia Zamorano Cuervo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS adaptor protein is a central signaling hub required for cells to mount an antiviral response following virus sensing by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I-like receptors. MAVS localizes in the membrane of mitochondria and peroxisomes and in mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Structural and functional studies have revealed that MAVS activity relies on the formation of functional high molecular weight prion-like aggregates. The formation of protein aggregates typically relies on a dynamic transition between oligomerization and aggregation states. The existence of intermediate state(s of MAVS polymers, other than aggregates, has not yet been documented. Here, we used a combination of non-reducing SDS-PAGE and semi-denaturing detergent agarose gel electrophoresis (SDD-AGE to resolve whole cell extract preparations to distinguish MAVS polymerization states. While SDD-AGE analysis of whole cell extracts revealed the formation of previously described high molecular weight prion-like aggregates upon constitutively active RIG-I ectopic expression and virus infection, non-reducing SDS-PAGE allowed us to demonstrate the induction of lower molecular weight oligomers. Cleavage of MAVS using the NS3/4A protease revealed that anchoring to intracellular membranes is required for the appropriate polymerization into active high molecular weight aggregates. Altogether, our data suggest that RIG-I-dependent MAVS activation involves the coexistence of MAVS polymers with distinct molecular weights.

  17. Streptobacillus moniliformis septic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from rat-bite fever?

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    Wong Samson SY

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptobacillus moniliformis is a zoonotic agent associated with rodent contacts. Although it is more commonly reported to cause rat-bite fever with reactive arthritides, it can also lead to pyogenic infection of the joints. Case presentation We present a lady with past history of osteoarthritis developing streptobacillary septic arthritides of the right knee and left wrist, and required antibiotic and arthrotomy for treatment. We also review 11 previously reported cases of streptobacillary septic arthritis to discuss the characteristics, treatment, prognosis of the infection, and illustrates the differences between streptobacillary rat-bite fever and septic arthritis. Among this patient population, most patients had potential contact with rats (91.6%. The knee is the most commonly affected joint (58.3%, and 83.3% patients having polyarticular involvement. As opposed to rat-bite fever, fever and rash was only present in 58.3% and 16.7% of patients respectively. S. moniliformis bacteremia is uncommon (8.4% and the prognosis is good. Conclusion Arthrocentesis is useful in distinguishing streptobacillary septic arthritis from reactive arthritis of rat-bite fever. The sole use of commercial media containing sodium polyanethol sulfonate may render the bacterial culture negative. A detailed history of possible exposure to rodents should be elicited from patients with arthritis in order to facilitate microbiologic diagnosis.

  18. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-α, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with 99m Tc or 111 In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision-making and

  19. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Watt, I.; Rozman, B.; Kos-Golja, M.; Demsar, F.; Jarh, O.

    1995-01-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter's syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  1. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

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    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs.We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance.S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41.We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  2. Distinct Molecular Features of Different Macroscopic Subtypes of Colorectal Neoplasms

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    Konda, Kenichi; Konishi, Kazuo; Yamochi, Toshiko; Ito, Yoichi M.; Nozawa, Hisako; Tojo, Masayuki; Shinmura, Kensuke; Kogo, Mari; Katagiri, Atsushi; Kubota, Yutaro; Muramoto, Takashi; Yano, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiya; Kihara, Toshihiro; Tagawa, Teppei; Makino, Reiko; Takimoto, Masafumi; Imawari, Michio; Yoshida, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs). Methods We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI]) and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers) alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs), 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs), 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs), 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs) and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs) on the basis of macroscopic appearance. Results S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs) (P<0.001). By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively) (P<0.007). We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively) (P<0.005). Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05). PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41). Conclusion We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  3. Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer.

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    Bongaerts, Brenda W C; de Goeij, Anton F P M; de Vogel, Stefan; van den Brandt, Piet A; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2007-03-01

    High alcohol consumption is related to colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to study associations between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC according to characteristics of aetiological pathways: the chromosomal instability (CIN) and the microsatellite instability (MIN) pathway. We classified CIN+ tumours (tumours with either a truncating APC mutation, an activating K-ras mutation or overexpression of p53), MIN+ tumours (tumours lacking hMLH1 expression) and CIN- /MIN- tumours (tumours without these defects). In the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, 120852 men and women, aged 55-69 years, completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer at baseline (1986). Case-cohort analyses were conducted using 573 CRC cases with complete data after 7 x 3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2 x 3 years. Adjusted incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Compared with abstaining, alcohol consumption of >or=30 g/d was positively associated with the risk of CRC irrespective of genetic or molecular aberrations present, although statistical significance was not reached (RR 1 x 35 (95 % CI 0 x 9-2 x 0) for the CIN+ tumours, RR 1 x 59 (95 % CI 0 x 4-5 x 8) for the MIN+ tumours and RR 1.15 (95 % CI 0 x 5-2 x 7) for the CIN- /MIN- tumours). Beer, wine and liquor consumption were, independent of their alcoholic content, not consistently associated with the risk of CRC within the defined subgroups. In conclusion, our results indicate that a daily alcohol consumption of >or=30 g is associated with an increase in risk of CRC, independent of the presence or absence of the studied characteristics of different aetiological pathways.

  4. Different Achilles Tendon Pathologies Show Distinct Histological and Molecular Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for the development of chronic tendon pathologies are still under debate and more basic knowledge is needed about the different diseases. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize different acute and chronic Achilles tendon disorders. Achilles tendon samples from patients with chronic tendinopathy (n = 7, chronic ruptures (n = 6, acute ruptures (n = 13, and intact tendons (n = 4 were analyzed. The histological score investigating pathological changes was significantly increased in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to acute ruptures. Inflammatory infiltration was detected by immunohistochemistry in all tendon pathology groups, but was significantly lower in tendinopathy compared to chronic ruptures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis revealed significantly altered expression of genes related to collagens and matrix modeling/remodeling (matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to intact tendons and/or acute ruptures. In all three tendon pathology groups markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, IL6, IL10, IL33, soluble ST2, transforming growth factor β1, cyclooxygenase 2, inflammatory cells (cluster of differentaition (CD 3, CD68, CD80, CD206, fat metabolism (fatty acid binding protein 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, adiponectin, and innervation (protein gene product 9.5, growth associated protein 43, macrophage migration inhibitory factor were detectable, but only in acute ruptures significantly regulated compared to intact tendons. The study gives an insight into structural and molecular changes of pathological processes in tendons and might be used to identify targets for future therapy of tendon pathologies.

  5. Positional cloning in mice and its use for molecular dissection of inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koichiro; Yu, Philipp

    2009-02-01

    One of the upcoming next quests in the field of genetics might be molecular dissection of the genetic and environmental components of human complex diseases. In humans, however, there are certain experimental limitations for identification of a single component of the complex interactions by genetic analyses. Experimental animals offer simplified models for genetic and environmental interactions in human complex diseases. In particular, mice are the best mammalian models because of a long history and ample experience for genetic analyses. Forward genetics, which includes genetic screen and subsequent positional cloning of the causative genes, is a powerful strategy to dissect a complex phenomenon without preliminarily molecular knowledge of the process. In this review, first, we describe a general scheme of positional cloning in mice. Next, recent accomplishments on the patho-mechanisms of inflammatory arthritis by forward genetics approaches are introduced; Positional cloning effort for skg, Ali5, Ali18, cmo, and lupo mutants are provided as examples for the application to human complex diseases. As seen in the examples, the identification of genetic factors by positional cloning in the mouse have potential in solving molecular complexity of gene-environment interactions in human complex diseases.

  6. Distinct molecular subtypes of uterine leiomyosarcoma respond differently to chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Wang, Shuzhen; Li, Songlin; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Haojie; Zhu, Shibai; Zhu, Wan; Li, Yongqiang; Chen, Wenwu; Ji, Shaoping; Guo, Xiangqian

    2017-09-11

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) is an aggressive form of soft tissue tumors. The molecular heterogeneity and pathogenesis of ULMS are not well understood. Expression profiling data were used to determine the possibility and optimal number of ULMS molecular subtypes. Next, clinicopathological characters and molecular pathways were analyzed in each subtype to prospect the clinical applications and progression mechanisms of ULMS. Two distinct molecular subtypes of ULMS were defined based on different gene expression signatures. Subtype I ULMS recapitulated low-grade ULMS, the gene expression pattern of which resembled normal smooth muscle cells, characterized by overexpression of smooth muscle function genes such as LMOD1, SLMAP, MYLK, MYH11. In contrast, subtype II ULMS recapitulated high-grade ULMS with higher tumor weight and invasion rate, and was characterized by overexpression of genes involved in the pathway of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and tumorigenesis, such as CDK6, MAPK13 and HOXA1. We identified two distinct molecular subtypes of ULMS responding differently to chemotherapy treatment. Our findings provide a better understanding of ULMS intrinsic molecular subtypes, and will potentially facilitate the development of subtype-specific diagnosis biomarkers and therapy strategies for these tumors.

  7. Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Farshad; Zheng, Siyuan; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Newton, Yulia; Shih, Juliann; Robertson, A Gordon; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine A; Gibb, Ewan A; Roszik, Jason; Covington, Kyle R; Wu, Chia-Chin; Shinbrot, Eve; Stransky, Nicolas; Hegde, Apurva; Yang, Ju Dong; Reznik, Ed; Sadeghi, Sara; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Hess, Julian M; Auman, J Todd; Rhie, Suhn K; Bowlby, Reanne; Borad, Mitesh J; Zhu, Andrew X; Stuart, Josh M; Sander, Chris; Akbani, Rehan; Cherniack, Andrew D; Deshpande, Vikram; Mounajjed, Taofic; Foo, Wai Chin; Torbenson, Michael S; Kleiner, David E; Laird, Peter W; Wheeler, David A; McRee, Autumn J; Bathe, Oliver F; Andersen, Jesper B; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Roberts, Lewis R; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2017-03-14

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Farshidfar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.

  9. Molecular basis for SNX-BAR-mediated assembly of distinct endosomal sorting tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Weering, Jan R.T.; Sessions, Richard B.; Traer, Colin J.

    2012-01-01

    Sorting nexins (SNXs) are regulators of endosomal sorting. For the SNX-BAR subgroup, a Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain is vital for formation/stabilization of tubular subdomains that mediate cargo recycling. Here, by analysing the in vitro membrane remodelling properties of all 12 human SNX......-loop' interactions. Overall, the restricted and selective nature of these interactions provide a molecular explanation for how distinct SNX-BAR-decorated tubules are nucleated from the same endosomal vacuole, as observed in living cells. Our data provide insight into the molecular mechanism that generates...

  10. The Convergent Evolution of Blue Iris Pigmentation in Primates Took Distinct Molecular Paths

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Wynn K; Zhang, Sidi; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Imai, Hiroo; Przeworski, Molly

    2013-01-01

    How many distinct molecular paths lead to the same phenotype? One approach to this question has been to examine the genetic basis of convergent traits, which likely evolved repeatedly under a shared selective pressure. We investigated the convergent phenotype of blue iris pigmentation, which has arisen independently in four primate lineages: humans, blue-eyed black lemurs, Japanese macaques, and spider monkeys. Characterizing the phenotype across these species, we found that the variation wit...

  11. Artrite psoriásica: entidade clínica distinta da psoríase? Psoriatic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from psoriasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Garcia Ruiz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Psoríase e artrite psoriásica são entidades clínicas complexas e heterogêneas que podem apresentar-se por meio de múltiplas combinações entre seus subtipos; há dúvidas, inclusive, se são entidades distintas ou apenas variantes de uma mesma doença. Epidemiologicamente, a psoríase pode ser considerada doença comum, por afetar cerca de 2% da população mundial. Em relação à artrite psoriásica, não há consenso na literatura atual sobre suas reais incidência e prevalência na população geral. Fatores genéticos, imunológicos e ambientais interagem entre si até culminarem nas manifestações clínicas cutâneas e articulares da doença psoriásica. Atualmente, é reconhecido o papel central do linfócito T ativado na patogenia tanto da psoríase quanto da artrite psoriásica. Além disso, citocinas pró-inflamatórias podem ser encontradas em concentrações aumentadas tanto na sinóvia quanto na pele de portadores de artrite psoriásica. Desde 1964, quando a relação entre psoríase e artrite psoriásica foi reconhecida oficialmente, muitos estudos foram conduzidos na tentativa de melhor compreender o mecanismo em comum das duas doenças. O antígeno leucocitário humano já foi considerado o centro da imunopatogenicidade psoriásica - hoje, o fator de necrose tumoral alfa exerce tal papel. Trata-se, portanto, da revisão de variados fatores que associam psoríase e artrite psoriásica e que convergem para a hipótese de se tratar de doença única com múltiplas apresentações, dentre elas a artropatia característica.Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are complex and heterogeneous clinical entities, whose presentations comprise multiple combinations of subtypes. There are doubts even if they are distinct entities or merely variants of the same disease. Epidemiologically, psoriasis can be considered a common disease because it affects about 2% of the world population. Regarding psoriatic arthritis, there is no consensus in

  12. Latent memory facilitates relearning through molecular signaling mechanisms that are distinct from original learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Steven A; Riepe, Joshua R; Philips, Gary T

    2015-09-01

    A highly conserved feature of memory is that it can exist in a latent, non-expressed state which is revealed during subsequent learning by its ability to significantly facilitate (savings) or inhibit (latent inhibition) subsequent memory formation. Despite the ubiquitous nature of latent memory, the mechanistic nature of the latent memory trace and its ability to influence subsequent learning remains unclear. The model organism Aplysia californica provides the unique opportunity to make strong links between behavior and underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Using Aplysia, we have studied the mechanisms of savings due to latent memory for a prior, forgotten experience. We previously reported savings in the induction of three distinct temporal domains of memory: short-term (10min), intermediate-term (2h) and long-term (24h). Here we report that savings memory formation utilizes molecular signaling pathways that are distinct from original learning: whereas the induction of both original intermediate- and long-term memory in naïve animals requires mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and ongoing protein synthesis, 2h savings memory is not disrupted by inhibitors of MAPK or protein synthesis, and 24h savings memory is not dependent on MAPK activation. Collectively, these findings reveal that during forgetting, latent memory for the original experience can facilitate relearning through molecular signaling mechanisms that are distinct from original learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  14. The Src, Syk, and Tec family kinases: distinct types of molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J Michael

    2010-08-01

    The Src, Syk, and Tec family kinases are three of the most well characterized tyrosine kinase families found in the human genome. Members of these kinase families function downstream of antigen and F(c) receptors in hematopoietic cells and transduce signals leading to calcium mobilization, altered gene expression, cytokine production, and cell proliferation. Over the last several years, structural and biochemical studies have begun to uncover the molecular mechanisms regulating activation of these kinases. It appears that each kinase family functions as a distinct type of molecular switch. This review discusses the activation of the Src, Syk, and Tec kinases from the perspective of structure, phosphorylation, allosteric regulation, and kinetics. The multiple factors that regulate the Src, Syk, and Tec families illustrate the important role played by each of these kinases in immune cell signaling.

  15. Distinct cellular and molecular environments support aging-related DNA methylation changes in the substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolino, Maria; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to couple brain region-specific changes in global DNA methylation over aging to underlying cellular and molecular environments. We measured two major forms of DNA methylation and analyzed Dnmt, Tet and metabolite levels in the striatum and substantia nigra (SN) over aging in healthy male mice. The ratio of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine to 5-methylcytosine increases over aging in the SN, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine increases preferentially in dopaminergic neurons. Additionally, this age-dependent alteration in methylation correlates with a reduction in the ratio of α-ketoglutarate to succinate in the SN. Distinct cellular and molecular environments correlate with aging-associated methylation changes in the SN, implicating this epigenetic mechanism in the susceptibility of this brain region to age-related cell loss.

  16. Observation of a distinct surface molecular orientation in films of a high mobility conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettfort, Torben; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R

    2013-01-23

    The molecular orientation and microstructure of films of the high-mobility semiconducting polymer poly(N,N-bis-2-octyldodecylnaphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis-dicarboximide-2,6-diyl-alt-5,5-2,2-bithiophene) (P(NDI2OD-T2)) are probed using a combination of grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In particular a novel approach is used whereby the bulk molecular orientation and surface molecular orientation are simultaneously measured on the same sample using NEXAFS spectroscopy in an angle-resolved transmission experiment. Furthermore, the acquisition of bulk-sensitive NEXAFS data enables a direct comparison of the information provided by GIWAXS and NEXAFS. By comparison of the bulk-sensitive and surface-sensitive NEXAFS data, a distinctly different molecular orientation is observed at the surface of the film compared to the bulk. While a more "face-on" orientation of the conjugated backbone is observed in the bulk of the film, consistent with the lamella orientation observed by GIWAXS, a more "edge-on" orientation is observed at the surface of the film with surface-sensitive NEXAFS spectroscopy. This distinct edge-on surface orientation explains the high in-plane mobility that is achieved in top-gate P(NDI2OD-T2) field-effect transistors (FETs), while the bulk face-on texture explains the high out-of-plane mobilities that are observed in time-of-flight and diode measurements. These results also stress that GIWAXS lacks the surface sensitivity required to probe the microstructure of the accumulation layer that supports charge transport in organic FETs and hence may not necessarily be appropriate for correlating film microstructure and FET charge transport.

  17. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S; Mitchell, Lex A; Loya, Joshua J; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M; Feroze, Abdullah H; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D; Yeom, Kristen W; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-09-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 single-institution patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic "clusters" emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters--pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features--were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from the analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm Using Data Integration on Genomic Models) algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by the image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Angiopoietin-like 4: A molecular link between insulin resistance and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, Kayo

    2017-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that common factor(s) or molecule(s) might regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and bone and cartilage degeneration. These findings may be particularly relevant for cases of rheumatoid arthritis, in which chronic inflammation occurs in an autoimmune context and causes the degradation of articular joints as well as insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications. Candidates for this common regulatory system include signals mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated regulator and its response factor, angiopoietin-like 4. The expression and bioactivity of angiopoietin-like 4, an adipocytokine that was originally reported to have an angiogenic function, have been detected not only in the vascular system and adipose tissue but also in rheumatoid joints. An essential role for angiopoietin-like 4 has been established in dyslipidemia, and recent reports indicate that it may modulate bone and cartilage catabolism in rheumatoid arthritis. The enhanced expression of angiopoietin-like 4 in rheumatoid arthritis may explain the occurrence of insulin resistance, cardiovascular risk, and joint destruction, thereby suggesting that this molecule could be a potential target for anti-rheumatoid arthritis strategies. This review describes recent research on the role of angiopoietin-like 4 in chronic inflammatory conditions and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as potential therapeutic candidates. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:939-943, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis in Cardinal Carlo de' Medici (1595-1666): a confirmed macroscopic, radiologic and molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, G; Fontecchio, G; Ventura, L; Papola, F; Trombetta, I; Giuffra, V

    2012-01-01

    The paleopathological study of the skeletal remains belonging to Cardinal Carlo de' Medici (1595-1666), son of Ferdinando I (1549-1609) and Cristina of Lorena (1565-1637), has been presented previously. A diagnosis of Klippel-Feil syndrome, tuberculosis and a polyarthopathy, interpreted as rheumatoid arthritis, was suggested. A revision of this case based on the analysis of the historical documents and of some radiological images of Carlo's bones has been proposed recently; according to the Authors, the Cardinal was affected by the 'Medici syndrome', a combined Psoriatic-DISH arthropathy. This revision offers us the opportunity to discuss this complex case, comparing different points of view, and to present the results of the molecular analyses carried out on Carlo's bone samples. We looked for the genetic risk factors of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We also searched for the primary candidate genes of RA and PsA, i.e. DR4 or DR1 and Cw6 or DR7 respectively, the latter predisposing also for psoriasis. An original molecular protocol was applied to achieve an aDNA uncontaminated by exogenous sources and almost intact, starting from one of the Cardinal's rib pieces. The allele risk factors for both diseases were identified by PCR-SSP assay as HLA genotyping methodology. Our data assigned Carlo the genotype DRB1*04/*11 for HLA-DRB locus and Cw*04/*12 for HLA-C locus. Since Carlo was infected by M. tuberculosis during infancy and was carrying the DR4 variant but not the Cw6, he surely had a predisposition to RA, not to PsA and/or psoriasis. The diagnosis of RA is thus confirmed.

  20. Comprehensive profiling of DNA methylation in colorectal cancer reveals subgroups with distinct clinicopathological and molecular features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Pei Woon; Soong, Richie; Loh, Marie; Liem, Natalia; Lim, Pei Li; Grieu, Fabienne; Vaithilingam, Aparna; Platell, Cameron; Yong, Wei Peng; Iacopetta, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Most previous studies of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer (CRC) have been conducted on a relatively small numbers of CpG sites. In the present study we performed comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of CRC with the aim of characterizing CIMP subgroups. DNA methylation at 1,505 CpG sites in 807 cancer-related genes was evaluated using the Illumina GoldenGate ® methylation array in 28 normal colonic mucosa and 91 consecutive CRC samples. Methylation data was analyzed using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. CIMP subgroups were compared for various clinicopathological and molecular features including patient age, tumor site, microsatellite instability (MSI), methylation at a consensus panel of CpG islands and mutations in BRAF and KRAS. A total of 202 CpG sites were differentially methylated between tumor and normal tissue. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of methylation data from these sites revealed the existence of three CRC subgroups referred to as CIMP-low (CIMP-L, 21% of cases), CIMP-mid (CIMP-M, 14%) and CIMP-high (CIMP-H, 65%). In comparison to CIMP-L tumors, CIMP-H tumors were more often located in the proximal colon and showed more frequent mutation of KRAS and BRAF (P < 0.001). Comprehensive DNA methylation profiling identified three CRC subgroups with distinctive clinicopathological and molecular features. This study suggests that both KRAS and BRAF mutations are involved with the CIMP-H pathway of CRC rather than with distinct CIMP subgroups

  1. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer (UCB); (UCSD)

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  2. Monosodium Urate Crystals Generate Nuclease-Resistant Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via a Distinct Molecular Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Simon M; Grebe, Kathrin; Whitehead, Lachlan W; Rogers, Kelly L; Nebl, Thomas; Murphy, James M; Wicks, Ian P

    2018-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and the cell death associated with it (NETosis) have been implicated in numerous diseases. Mechanistic studies of NETosis have typically relied on nonphysiological stimuli, such as PMA. The human disease of gout is caused by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. We observed that DNA consistent with NETs is present in fluid from acutely inflamed joints of gout patients. NETs also coat the crystals found in uninflamed tophi of chronic gout patients. We developed a quantitative, live cell imaging assay, which measures the key features of NETosis, namely, cell death and chromatin decondensation. We show that MSU and other physiologically relevant crystals induce NETosis through a molecular pathway that is distinct from PMA and Candida hyphae. Crystals interact with lysosomes to induce NADPH oxidase-independent cell death, with postmortem chromatin decondensation mediated by neutrophil elastase. The resulting MSU-induced NETs are enriched for actin and are resistant to serum and DNase degradation. These findings demonstrate a distinct physiological NETosis pathway in response to MSU crystals, which coats MSU crystals in DNA that persists in tissues as gouty tophi. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Figure 4 - Treatment Diagram PDF Arthritis - Base of the Thumb Related Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Osteoarthritis MP Joint Arthritis de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Other Links CME Mission Statement and Disclaimer Policies ...

  4. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  5. Distinct molecular components for thalamic- and cortical-dependent plasticity in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Brandalise, Federico; Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is a form of synaptic plasticity thought to be a cellular substrate for the extinction of fear memory. The LA receives converging inputs from the sensory thalamus and neocortex that are weakened following fear extinction. Combining field and patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that paired-pulse low-frequency stimulation can induce a robust LTD at thalamic and cortical inputs to LA, and we identify different underlying molecular components at these pathways. We show that while LTD depends on NMDARs and activation of the protein phosphatases PP2B and PP1 at both pathways, it requires NR2B-containing NMDARs at the thalamic pathway, but NR2C/D-containing NMDARs at the cortical pathway. LTD appears to be induced post-synaptically at the thalamic input but presynaptically at the cortical input, since post-synaptic calcium chelation and NMDAR blockade prevent thalamic but not cortical LTD. These results highlight distinct molecular features of LTD in LA that may be relevant for traumatic memory and its erasure, and for pathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  6. Distinct molecular components for thalamic- and cortical-dependent plasticity in the lateral amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo eMirante

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-dependent long-term depression (LTD in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA is a form of synaptic plasticity thought to be a cellular substrate for the extinction of fear memory. The LA receives converging inputs from the sensory thalamus and neocortex that are weakened following fear extinction. Combining field and patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that a paired-pulse low-frequency stimulation can induce a robust LTD at thalamic and cortical inputs to LA, and we identify different underlying molecular components at these pathways. We show that while LTD depends on NMDARs and activation of the protein phosphatases PP2B and PP1 at both pathways, it requires NR2B-containing NMDARs at the thalamic pathway, but NR2C/D-containing NMDARs at the cortical pathway. LTD appears to be induced postsynaptically at the thalamic input but presynaptically at the cortical input, since postsynaptic calcium chelation and NMDAR blockade prevent thalamic but not cortical LTD. These results highlight distinct molecular features of LTD in LA that may be relevant for traumatic memory and its erasure, and for pathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD.

  7. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Osteoarthritis and in Other Forms of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yachuan; Wang, Tingyu; Hamilton, John L; Chen, Di

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis defines a large group of diseases primarily affecting the joint. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in adults. Osteoarthritis (OA) affecting the knee or hip is the most common form among over 100 types of arthritis. Other types of arthritis include erosive hand OA, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, facet joint OA, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). However, the specific molecular signals involved in the development and progression of OA and related forms of arthritis remain largely unknown. The canonical wingless/integrated (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway could play a unique role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. In this review article, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of OA and other types of arthritis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Wnts and Wnt-related molecules are involved in arthritis development and progression in human genetic studies and in vitro studies. Also, mouse models have been generated to determine the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling represents a unique signaling pathway regulating arthritis development and progression, and the molecules in this particular pathway may serve as targets for the therapeutic intervention of arthritis. Mediators and downstream effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are increased in OA as well other forms of arthritis, including DISH and SpA. Through extensive investigations, including pre-clinical studies in transgenic mice and translational and human studies, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been proven to play roles in bone and joint pathology by directly affecting bone, cartilage, and synovial tissue; further, these pathologies can be reduced through targeting this pathway. Continued investigation into the distinct molecular signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway will provide additional insights toward the therapeutic

  8. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radić, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 Å in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids. PMID:18477694

  9. Molecular Evolution of Two Distinct dmrt1 Promoters for Germ and Somatic Cells in Vertebrate Gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Musashijima, Masato; Wada, Mikako; Izutsu, Yumi; Kurakata, Erina; Park, Min Kyun; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Ito, Michihiko

    2017-03-01

    The transcription factor DMRT1 has important functions in two distinct processes, somatic-cell masculinization and germ-cell development in mammals. However, it is unknown whether the functions are conserved during evolution, and what mechanism underlies its expression in the two cell lineages. Our analysis of the Xenopus laevis and Silurana tropicalis dmrt1 genes indicated the presence of two distinct promoters: one upstream of the noncoding first exon (ncEx1), and one within the first intron. In contrast, only the ncEx1-upstream promoter was detected in the dmrt1 gene of the agnathan sand lamprey, which expressed dmrt1 exclusively in the germ cells. In X. laevis, the ncEx1- and exon 2-upstream promoters were predominantly used for germ-cell and somatic-cell transcription, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of the ncEx1-containing transcript led to reduced germ-cell numbers in X. laevis gonads. Intriguingly, two genetically female individuals carrying the knockdown construct developed testicles. Analysis of the reptilian leopard gecko dmrt1 revealed the absence of ncEx1. We propose that dmrt1 regulated germ-cell development in the vertebrate ancestor, then acquired another promoter in its first intron to regulate somatic-cell masculinization during gnathostome evolution. In the common ancestor of reptiles and mammals, only one promoter got function for both the two cell lineages, accompanied with the loss of ncEx1. In addition, we found a conserved noncoding sequence (CNS) in the dmrt1 5'-flanking regions only among amniote species, and two CNSs in the introns among most vertebrates except for agnathans. Finally, we discuss relationships between these CNSs and the promoters of dmrt1 during vertebrate evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Drought Tolerance in Pinus halepensis Seed Sources As Identified by Distinctive Physiological and Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Taïbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main constraints determining forest species growth, survival and productivity, and therefore one of the main limitations for reforestation or afforestation. The aim of this study is to characterize the drought response at the physiological and molecular level of different Pinus halepensis (common name Aleppo pine seed sources, previously characterized in field trials as drought-sensitive or drought-tolerant. This approach aims to identify different traits capable of predicting the ability of formerly uncharacterized seedlings to cope with drought stress. Gas-exchange, water potential, photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, free amino acids, glutathione and proteomic analyses were carried out on control and drought-stressed seedlings in greenhouse conditions. Gas-exchange determinations were also assessed in field-planted seedlings in order to validate the greenhouse experimental conditions. Drought-tolerant seed sources presented higher values of photosynthetic rates, water use efficiency, photosynthetic pigments and soluble carbohydrates concentrations. We observed the same pattern of variation of photosynthesis rate and maximal efficiency of PSII in field. Interestingly drought-tolerant seed sources exhibited increased levels of glutathione, methionine and cysteine. The proteomic profile of drought tolerant seedlings identified two heat shock proteins and an enzyme related to methionine biosynthesis that were not present in drought sensitive seedlings, pointing to the synthesis of sulfur amino acids as a limiting factor for drought tolerance in Pinus halepensis. Our results established physiological and molecular traits useful as distinctive markers to predict drought tolerance in Pinus halepensis provenances that could be reliably used in reforestation programs in drought prone areas.

  11. Diverse developmental disorders from The One Ring: distinct molecular pathways underlie the cohesinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHorsfield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit protein complex, cohesin, is responsible for sister chromatid cohesion during cell division. The interaction of cohesin with DNA is controlled by a number of additional regulatory proteins. Mutations in cohesin, or its regulators, cause a spectrum of human developmental syndromes known as the ‘cohesinopathies’. Cohesinopathy disorders include Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Roberts Syndrome. The discovery of novel roles for chromatid cohesion proteins in regulating gene expression led to the idea that cohesinopathies are caused by dysregulation of multiple genes downstream of mutations in cohesion proteins. Consistent with this idea, Drosophila, mouse and zebrafish cohesinopathy models all show altered expression of developmental genes. However, there appears to be incomplete overlap among dysregulated genes downstream of mutations in different components of the cohesion apparatus. This is surprising because mutations in all cohesion proteins would be predicted to affect cohesin’s roles in cell division and gene expression in similar ways. Here we review the differences and similarities between genetic pathways downstream of components of the cohesion apparatus, and discuss how such differences might arise, and contribute to the spectrum of cohesinopathy disorders. We propose that mutations in different elements of the cohesion apparatus have distinct developmental outcomes that can be explained by sometimes subtly different molecular effects.

  12. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Cui

    Full Text Available Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction. This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples.

  13. Ibuprofen and Diclofenac Restrict Migration and Proliferation of Human Glioma Cells by Distinct Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidgens, Verena; Seliger, Corinna; Jachnik, Birgit; Welz, Tobias; Leukel, Petra; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Kreutz, Marina; Grauer, Oliver M.; Hau, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with anti-tumorigenic effects in different tumor entities. For glioma, research has generally focused on diclofenac; however data on other NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, is limited. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive investigation of the cellular, molecular, and metabolic effects of ibuprofen and diclofenac on human glioblastoma cells. Methods Glioma cell lines were treated with ibuprofen or diclofenac to investigate functional effects on proliferation and cell motility. Cell cycle, extracellular lactate levels, lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) expression and activity, as well as inhibition of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT-3) signaling pathway, were determined. Specific effects of diclofenac and ibuprofen on STAT-3 were investigated by comparing their effects with those of the specific STAT-3 inhibitor STATTIC. Results Ibuprofen treatment led to a stronger inhibition of cell growth and migration than treatment with diclofenac. Proliferation was affected by cell cycle arrest at different checkpoints by both agents. In addition, diclofenac, but not ibuprofen, decreased lactate levels in all concentrations used. Both decreased STAT-3 phosphorylation; however, diclofenac led to decreased c-myc expression and subsequent reduction in LDH-A activity, whereas treatment with ibuprofen in higher doses induced c-myc expression and less LDH-A alteration. Conclusions This study indicates that both ibuprofen and diclofenac strongly inhibit glioma cells, but the subsequent metabolic responses of both agents are distinct. We postulate that ibuprofen may inhibit tumor cells also by COX- and lactate-independent mechanisms after long-term treatment in physiological dosages, whereas diclofenac mainly acts by inhibition of STAT-3 signaling and downstream modulation of glycolysis. PMID:26485029

  14. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Dianne M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. Methods A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Results Eighteen (37% of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumours were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n = 5, clear cell (n = 4, or low grade serous (n = 2 carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumours with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. Conclusion High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic, BRCA1 loss (epigenetic, and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  15. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, Joshua Z; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C Blake; Gray, Joe; Huntsman, David G; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E; Blood, Katherine A

    2008-01-01

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumours were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n = 5), clear cell (n = 4), or low grade serous (n = 2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumours with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways

  16. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilks, C. Blake; Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray, Joe; Huntsman, David G.

    2008-05-02

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n=5), clear cell (n=4), or low grade serous (n=2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  18. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  19. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our position statement on health care transparency, patient representation and collaboration in finding shared solutions. The Role ... Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  20. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  1. Targeting IL-17 AND IL-17D receptors of rheumatoid arthritis using phytocompounds: A Molecular Docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabitha, A.; Thoufic Ali, A. M. Mohamed; Shweta Kumari, Singh; Rakhi; Swami, Varsha; Mohana Priya, A.; Sajitha Lulu, S.

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune condition of the connective tissue in synovial joints, characterized by inflammation which can lead to bone and cartilage destruction. IL-17 and IL-17D cytokines produced by a number of cell types, primarily promote pro-inflammatory immune responses and negative regulator in fibroblast growth factor signalling. Thus, the promising therapeutic strategies focus on targeting these cytokines, which has led to the identification of effective inhibitors. However, several studies focused on identifying the anti-arthritic potential of natural compounds. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the anti-inflammatory prospective of phytocompounds by targeting IL-17 and IL-17D cytokines using Patch Dock algorithm. Additionally, IL-17 and IL-17D proteins structure were modelled and validated for molecular docking study. Further, phytocompounds based on anti-inflammatory property were subjected to Lipinski filter and ADMET properties indicated that all of these compounds showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the anti-inflammatory mechanism of phytocompounds by targeting IL-17 and IL-D for effective treatment of RA.

  2. The Crosstalk of Pathways Involved in Immune Response Maybe the Shared Molecular Basis of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyan Niu

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Type 2 diabetes (T2D are both systemic diseases linked with altered immune response, moderate mortality when present together. The treatment for both RA and T2D are not satisfied, partly because of the linkage between them has not yet been appreciated. A comprehensive study for the potential associations between the two disorders is needed. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to explore the differently expressed genes (DEGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 10 RA and 10 T2D patients comparing with 10 healthy volunteers (control. We used bioinformatics analysis and the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA to predict the commonalities on signaling pathways and molecular networks between those two diseases. 212 DEGs in RA and 114 DEGs in T2D patients were identified compared with healthy controls, respectively. 32 DEGs were shared between the two comparisons. The top 10 shared pathways interacted in cross-talking networks, regulated by 5 shared predicted upstream regulators, leading to the activated immune response were explored, which was considered as partly of the association mechanism of this two disorders. These discoveries would be considered as new understanding on the associations between RA and T2D, and provide novel treatment or prevention strategy.

  3. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinct...... receptor isoforms, of which isoforms 1, 2, and 4, encode functional proteins. Detailed pharmacology on isoforms 1 (unspliced receptor), and 2 (which has an 80 amino acid deletion within the third intracellular loop of the protein) revealed that both isoforms displayed robust responses to a series of known...... revealed a rank order of potency at both isoforms of clobenpropit>iodophenpropit>thioperamide, and these drugs are fivefold less potent at isoform 2 than isoform 1. To further explore the pharmacology of H(3) receptor function, we screened 150 clinically relevant neuropsychiatric drugs for H(3) receptor...

  4. Identification of a novel chemokine-dependent molecular mechanism underlying rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibody-mediated bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Joshua, Vijay; Haj Hensvold, Aase; Jin, Tao; Sun, Meng; Vivar, Nancy; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Engström, Marianne; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Amara, Khaled; Magnusson, Malin; Wigerblad, Gustaf; Kato, Jungo; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Tyson, Kerry; Rapecki, Stephen; Lundberg, Karin; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Svensson, Camilla; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Wähämaa, Heidi; Catrina, Anca I

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-specific anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPAs) appear before disease onset and are associated with bone destruction. We aimed to dissect the role of ACPAs in osteoclast (OC) activation and to identify key cellular mediators in this process. Polyclonal ACPA were isolated from the synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood of patients with RA. Monoclonal ACPAs were isolated from single SF B-cells of patients with RA. OCs were developed from blood cell precursors with or without ACPAs. We analysed expression of citrullinated targets and peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD) enzymes by immunohistochemistry and cell supernatants by cytometric bead array. The effect of an anti-interleukin (IL)-8 neutralising antibody and a pan-PAD inhibitor was tested in the OC cultures. Monoclonal ACPAs were injected into mice and bone structure was analysed by micro-CT before and after CXCR1/2 blocking with reparixin. Protein citrullination by PADs is essential for OC differentiation. Polyclonal ACPAs enhance OC differentiation through a PAD-dependent IL-8-mediated autocrine loop that is completely abolished by IL-8 neutralisation. Some, but not all, human monoclonal ACPAs derived from single SF B-cells of patients with RA and exhibiting distinct epitope specificities promote OC differentiation in cell cultures. Transfer of the monoclonal ACPAs into mice induced bone loss that was completely reversed by the IL-8 antagonist reparixin. We provide novel insights into the key role of citrullination and PAD enzymes during OC differentiation and ACPA-induced OC activation. Our findings suggest that IL8-dependent OC activation may constitute an early event in the initiation of the joint specific inflammation in ACPA-positive RA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, shows distinct heterosexual and homosexual networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolader, Marion-Eliëtte; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; van der Bij, Akke K.; Dierdorp, Mirjam; Fennema, Johan S. A.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular typing, added to epidemiological data, can better identify transmission patterns of gonorrhea in Western countries, where the incidence has recently been rising. From September 2002 to September 2003, patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of gonorrhea at the Clinic for Sexually

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, shows distinct heterosexual and homosexual networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolader, Marion-Eliëtte; Dukers, Nicole H T M; Bij, Akke K van der; Dierdorp, Mirjam; Fennema, Johan S A; Coutinho, Roel A; Bruisten, Sylvia M

    2006-01-01

    Molecular typing, added to epidemiological data, can better identify transmission patterns of gonorrhea in Western countries, where the incidence has recently been rising. From September 2002 to September 2003, patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of gonorrhea at the Clinic for Sexually

  7. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  9. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  10. Therapy related-chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML): Molecular, cytogenetic, and clinical distinctions from de novo CMML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Mrinal M; Vallapureddy, Rangit; Yalniz, Fevzi F; Hanson, Curtis A; Ketterling, Rhett P; Lasho, Terra L; Finke, Christy; Al-Kali, Aref; Gangat, Naseema; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2018-01-01

    Therapy related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) including therapy related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) are associated with aggressive disease biologies and poor outcomes. In this large (n = 497) and informative (inclusive of molecular and cytogenetic information) chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patient cohort, we demonstrate key biological insights and an independent prognostic impact for t-CMML. T-CMML was diagnosed in 9% of patients and occurred approximately 7 years after exposure to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. In comparison to de novo CMML, t-CMML patients had higher LDH levels, higher frequency of karyotypic abnormalities and had higher risk cytogenetic stratification. There were no differences in the distribution of gene mutations and unlike t-MDS/AML, balanced chromosomal translocations, abnormalities of chromosome 11q23 (1%) and Tp53 mutations (<2%) were uncommon. Molecularly integrated CMML prognostic models were not effective in risk stratifying t-CMML patients and responses to hypomethylating agents were dismal with no complete responses. Median overall (OS) and leukemia free survival (LFS) was shorter for t-CMML in comparison to d-CMML (Median OS 10.9 vs 26 months and median LFS 50 vs 127 months) and t-CMML independently and adversely impacted OS (P = .0001 HR 2.1 95% CI 1.4-3.0). This prognostic impact was retained in the context of the Mayo Molecular Model (P = .001, HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-3.7) and the GFM prognostic model (P < .0001, HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.5-3.7). In summary, we highlight the unique genetics and independent prognostic impact of t-CMML, warranting its inclusion as a separate entity in the classification schema for both CMML and t-MN. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fine-mapping the MHC locus in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reveals genetic heterogeneity corresponding to distinct adult inflammatory arthritic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, A; Bowes, J; Cobb, J; Ainsworth, H C; Marion, M C; Comeau, M E; Sudman, M; Han, B; Becker, M L; Bohnsack, J F; de Bakker, P I W; Haas, J P; Hazen, M; Lovell, D J; Nigrovic, P A; Nordal, E; Punnaro, M; Rosenberg, A M; Rygg, M; Smith, S L; Wise, C A; Videm, V; Wedderburn, L R; Yarwood, A; Yeung, R S M; Prahalad, S; Langefeld, C D; Raychaudhuri, S; Thompson, S D; Thomson, W

    2017-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, comprising seven categories. Genetic data could potentially be used to help redefine JIA categories and improve the current classification system. The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) region is strongly associated with JIA. Fine-mapping of the region was performed to look for similarities and differences in HLA associations between the JIA categories and define correspondences with adult inflammatory arthritides. Dense genotype data from the HLA region, from the Immunochip array for 5043 JIA cases and 14 390 controls, were used to impute single-nucleotide polymorphisms, HLA classical alleles and amino acids. Bivariate analysis was performed to investigate genetic correlation between the JIA categories. Conditional analysis was used to identify additional effects within the region. Comparison of the findings with those in adult inflammatory arthritic diseases was performed. We identified category-specific associations and have demonstrated for the first time that rheumatoid factor (RF)-negative polyarticular JIA and oligoarticular JIA are genetically similar in their HLA associations. We also observe that each JIA category potentially has an adult counterpart. The RF-positive polyarthritis association at HLA-DRB1 amino acid at position 13 mirrors the association in adult seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, the combined oligoarthritis and RF-negative polyarthritis dataset shares the same association with adult seronegative RA. The findings suggest the value of using genetic data in helping to classify the categories of this heterogeneous disease. Mapping JIA categories to adult counterparts could enable shared knowledge of disease pathogenesis and aetiology and facilitate transition from paediatric to adult services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Distinct Subfamilies of Odorant Binding Proteins in Locust (Orthoptera, Acrididae: Molecular Evolution, Structural Variation, and Sensilla-Specific Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingcong Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins (OBPs play an important role in insect olfaction, facilitating transportation of odorant molecules in the sensillum lymph. While most of the researches are concentrated on Lepidopteran and Dipteran species, our knowledge about Orthopteran species is still very limited. In this study, we have investigated OBPs of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, a representative Orthopteran species. We have identified 14 transcripts from a S. gregaria antennal transcriptome encoding SgreOBPs, and recapitulated the phylogenetic relationship of SgreOBPs together with OBPs from three other locust species. Two conserved subfamilies of classic OBPs have been identified, named I-A and II-A, exhibiting both common and subfamily-specific amino acid motifs. Distinct evolutionary features were observed for subfamily I-A and II-A OBPs. Surface topology and interior cavity were elucidated for OBP members from the two subfamilies. Antennal topographic expression revealed distinct sensilla- and cellular- specific expression patterns for SgreOBPs from subfamily I-A and II-A. These findings give first insight into the repertoire of locust OBPs with respect to their molecular and evolutionary features as well as their expression in the antenna, which may serve as an initial step to unravel specific roles of distinct OBP subfamilies in locust olfaction.

  13. MicroRNAs sequencing unveils distinct molecular subgroups of plasmablastic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mundo, Lucia; Gazaneo, Sara; Picciolini, Matteo; Vara, Prasad Satya; Sayed, Shaheen; Ginori, Alessandro; Lo Bello, Giuseppe; Del Porro, Leonardo; Navari, Mohsen; Ascani, Stefano; Yonis, Amhed; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Lazzi, Stefano

    2017-12-08

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an aggressive lymphoma, often arising in the context of immunodeficiency and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The most frequently detected genetic alteration is the deregulation of MYC gene through the translocation - t(8;14)(q24;q32). The diagnosis of PBL is often challenging because it has an overlap in morphology, immunophenotype, cytogenetics and virus association with other lymphomas and plasma cell neoplasms; further, its molecular basis remains elusive. In the present study we aimed to better define the possible contribution of EBV infection as well as miRNA deregulation in PBL pathogenesis. We studied 23 cases of PBL, 19 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), and 17 extra-medullary plasmacytoma (EMPC). We used qPCR and immunohistochemistry to assess EBV latency patterns, while micro-RNA (miRNA) profiling was performed by next generation sequencing (Illumina) and validated by qPCR. Our analysis revealed a non-canonical EBV latency program with the partial expression of some proteins characterizing latency II and the activation of an abortive lytic cycle. Moreover, we identified miRNA signatures discriminating PBL from BL and EMPC. Interestingly, based on the miRNA profile, PBL appeared constituted by two discrete subgroups more similar to either BL or EMPC, respectively. This pattern was confirmed in an independent set of cases studied by qPCR and corresponded to different clinico-pathological features in the two groups, including HIV infection, MYC rearrangement and disease localization. In conclusion, we uncovered for the first time 1) an atypical EBV latency program in PBL; 2) a miRNA signature distinguishing PBL from the closest malignant counterparts; 3) the molecular basis of PBL heterogeneity.

  14. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  15. Association of Distinct Fine Specificities of Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies With Elevated Immune Responses to Prevotella intermedia in a Subgroup of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Anja; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Marzeda, Anna M; Wong, Alicia; Montgomery, Anna B; Sayles, Harlan R; Eick, Sigrun; Gawron, Katarzyna; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Davis, Simon; Potempa, Jan; Kessler, Benedikt M; Fischer, Roman; Venables, Patrick J; Payne, Jeffrey B; Mikuls, Ted R; Midwood, Kim S

    2017-12-01

    In addition to the long-established link with smoking, periodontitis (PD) is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which PD could induce antibodies to citrullinated peptides (ACPAs), by examining the antibody response to a novel citrullinated peptide of cytokeratin 13 (CK-13) identified in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and comparing the response to 4 other citrullinated peptides in patients with RA who were well-characterized for PD and smoking. The citrullinomes of GCF and periodontal tissue from patients with PD were mapped by mass spectrometry. ACPAs of CK13 (cCK13), tenascin-C (cTNC5), vimentin (cVIM), α-enolase (CEP-1), and fibrinogen β (cFIBβ) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with RA (n = 287) and patients with osteoarthritis (n = 330), and cross-reactivity was assessed by inhibition assays. A novel citrullinated peptide cCK13-1 ( 444 TSNASGR-Cit-TSDV-Cit-RP 458 ) identified in GCF exhibited elevated antibody responses in RA patients (24%). Anti-cCK13-1 antibody levels correlated with anti-cTNC5 antibody levels, and absorption experiments confirmed this was not due to cross-reactivity. Only anti-cCK13-1 and anti-cTNC5 were associated with antibodies to the periodontal pathogen Prevotella intermedia (P = 0.05 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis arginine gingipains. Levels of antibodies to CEP-1, cFIBβ, and cVIM correlated with each other, and with smoking and shared epitope risk factors in RA. This study identifies 2 groups of ACPA fine specificities associated with different RA risk factors. One is predominantly linked to smoking and shared epitope, and the other links anti-cTNC5 and cCK13-1 to infection with the periodontal pathogen P intermedia. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Unraveling the distinctive features of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinases using molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Raoni Almeida; Díaz, Natalia; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Suárez, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases are important toxins that play fundamental roles during envenomation. They share a structurally similar catalytic domain, but with diverse hemorrhagic capabilities. To understand the structural basis for this difference, we build and compare two dynamical models, one for the hemorrhagic atroxlysin-I from Bothrops atrox and the other for the non-hemorraghic leucurolysin-a from Bothrops leucurus. The analysis of the extended molecular dynamics simulations shows some changes in the local structure, flexibility and surface determinants that can contribute to explain the different hemorrhagic activity of the two enzymes. In agreement with previous results, the long Ω-loop (from residue 149 to 177) has a larger mobility in the hemorrhagic protein. In addition, we find some potentially-relevant differences at the base of the S1' pocket, what may be interesting for the structure-based design of new anti-venom agents. However, the sharpest differences in the computational models of atroxlysin-I and leucurolysin-a are observed in the surface electrostatic potential around the active site region, suggesting thus that the hemorrhagic versus non-hemorrhagic activity is probably determined by protein surface determinants.

  17. Molecular Phylogeny and Morphological Distinctions of Two Popular Bivalves, Ctenoides scaber and Ctenoides mitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey F. Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most well-known species in the bivalve family Limidae (d’Orbigny, 1846 is the brightly colored Ctenoides scaber (Born, 1778, commonly known as the rough file clam or flame scallop. Distinguishing this bivalve from its close relative, C. mitis (Lamarck, 1807, can be difficult using only morphological features and has led to much taxonomic confusion throughout the literature. In this study, morphological characters were compared to a molecular phylogeny constructed using three genes (COI, 28S, and H3 in order to differentiate C. scaber and C. mitis. The phylogeny recovered two well-supported clades that differ significantly in shell rib numbers, but not tentacle colors. The two species were then placed in a larger phylogenetic context of the Limidae family, which revealed the need for further systematic revision across genera. As these bivalves are popular in aquaria, cannot be tank-raised, and have been overcollected in the past, proper species identification is important for assessing sustainable collection practices.

  18. Molecular distinction amongst varieties of Mulberry using RAPD and DAMD profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranade Shirish

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mulberry trees are the most important host for rearing mulberry silkworms in sericulture. Improved varieties of mulberry tree have been developed through traditional breeding procedures. Not much work, however, has been carried out on the molecular characterization of these varieties. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD and Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD methods based on Polymerase Chain Reaction are important tools to analyze genetic diversity of mulberries. These have been used to determine variation amongst nine varieties of Morus spp. maintained at Banthra Research Station of National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow. Results and Discussion The varieties were analyzed using 23 arbitrary sequence decamer primers for RAPD, and 3 minisatellite core sequence primers for DAMD reactions. The RAPD and DAMD band data, (a total of 200 bands, were used to determine the pair wise distances according to Jaccard's algorithm. From these distance values Neighbour Joining (NJ analyses were carried out separately for the RAPD and the DAMD data. The triploid varieties were found to be most similar to each other using RAPD analysis, while the varieties S13 and S34 were more similar using DAMD analysis. Nearly 85% of the RAPD bands and 91% of the DAMD bands were polymorphic across the nine varieties. Conclusions The mulberry varieties could be distinguished by their RAPD and DAMD profiles. As many as five RAPD primers and one DAMD primer generated profiles that can together differentiate all the nine varieties in terms of unique bands.

  19. The molecular basis for the effectiveness, toxicity, and resistance to glucocorticoids : focus on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttgereit, F; Saag, KG; Cutolo, M; da Silva, JAP; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have powerful and potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) and many other diseases. These effects are mediated by up to four different mechanisms of action: cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (cGCR)-mediated classical genomic and rapid

  20. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  1. Distinct physiological and molecular responses in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles and ionic aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yujian; Fan, Xiaoji; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Zhenyan; Sun, Liwei; Fu, Zhengwei; Lavoie, Michel; Pan, Xiangliang; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-09-01

    Nano-aluminium oxide (nAl 2 O 3 ) is one of the most widely used nanomaterials. However, nAl 2 O 3 toxicity mechanisms and potential beneficial effects on terrestrial plant physiology remain poorly understood. Such knowledge is essential for the development of robust nAl 2 O 3 risk assessment. In this study, we studied the influence of a 10-d exposure to a total selected concentration of 98 μM nAl 2 O 3 or to the equivalent molar concentration of ionic Al (AlCl 3 ) (196 μM) on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana on the physiology (e.g., growth and photosynthesis, membrane damage) and the transcriptome using a high throughput state-of-the-art technology, RNA-seq. We found no evidence of nAl 2 O 3 toxicity on photosynthesis, growth and lipid peroxidation. Rather the nAl 2 O 3 treatment stimulated root weight and length by 48% and 39%, respectively as well as photosynthesis opening up the door to the use of nAl 2 O 3 in biotechnology and nano agriculture. Transcriptomic analyses indicate that the beneficial effect of nAl 2 O 3 was related to an increase in the transcription of several genes involved in root growth as well as in root nutrient uptake (e.g., up-regulation of the root hair-specific gene family and root development genes, POLARIS protein). By contrast, the ionic Al treatment decreased shoot and root weight of Arabidopsis thaliana by 57.01% and 45.15%, respectively. This toxic effect was coupled to a range of response at the gene transcription level including increase transcription of antioxidant-related genes and transcription of genes involved in plant defense response to pathogens. This work provides an integrated understanding at the molecular and physiological level of the effects of nAl 2 O 3 and ionic Al in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anticitrullinated protein/peptide antibody multiplexing defines an extended group of ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis patients with distinct genetic and environmental determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnelid, Johan; Hansson, Monika; Mathsson-Alm, Linda; Cornillet, Martin; Reed, Evan; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Alfredsson, Lars; Holmdahl, Rikard; Skriner, Karl; Serre, Guy; Lundberg, Karin; Klareskog, Lars

    2018-02-01

    The second generation anticycliccitrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2) assay detects the majority but not all anticitrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA). Anti-CCP2-positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with HLA-DRB1* shared epitope (SE) alleles and smoking. Using a multiplex assay to detect multiple specific ACPA, we have investigated the fine specificity of individual ACPA responses and the biological impact of additional ACPA reactivity among anti-CCP2-negative patients. We investigated 2825 patients with RA and 551 healthy controls with full data on anti-CCP2, HLA-DRB1* alleles and smoking history concerning reactivity against 16 citrullinated peptides and arginine control peptides with a multiplex array. The prevalence of the 16 ACPA specificities ranged from 9% to 58%. When reactivity to arginine peptides was subtracted, the mean diagnostic sensitivity increased by 3.2% with maintained 98% specificity. Of the anti-CCP2-negative patients, 16% were found to be ACPA positive. All ACPA specificities associated with SE, and all but one with smoking. Correction for arginine reactivity also conveyed a stronger association with SE for 13/16 peptides. Importantly, when all ACPA specificities were analysed together, SE and smoking associated with RA in synergy among ACPA positive, but not among ACPA-negative subjects also in the anti-CCP2-negative subset. Multiplexing detects an enlarged group of ACPA-positive but anti-CCP2-negative patients with genetic and environmental attributes previously assigned to anti-CCP2-positive patients. The individual correction for arginine peptide reactivity confers both higher diagnostic sensitivity and stronger association to SE than gross ACPA measurement. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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  5. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Arnor; Graziano, Frank M

    1993-12-01

    Preview Once considered relatively benign, rheumatoid arthritis is now recognized as a disabling systemic disease that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Early, aggressive therapy may be critical for altering the course of disease. Drs Vikings-son and Graziano describe the causes and clinical course of rheumatoid arthritis and discuss diagnostic considerations and prognostic indicators that support optimum management.

  7. The expression pattern of small nucleolar and small Cajal body-specific RNAs characterizes distinct molecular subtypes of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchetti, D; Todoerti, K; Tuana, G; Agnelli, L; Mosca, L; Lionetti, M; Fabris, S; Colapietro, P; Miozzo, M; Ferrarini, M; Tassone, P; Neri, A

    2012-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are non-coding RNAs involved in the maturation of other RNA molecules and generally located in the introns of host genes. It is now emerging that altered sno/scaRNAs expression may have a pathological role in cancer. This study elucidates the patterns of sno/scaRNAs expression in multiple myeloma (MM) by profiling purified malignant plasma cells from 55 MMs, 8 secondary plasma cell leukemias (sPCLs) and 4 normal controls. Overall, a global sno/scaRNAs downregulation was found in MMs and, even more, in sPCLs compared with normal plasma cells. Whereas SCARNA22 resulted the only sno/scaRNA characterizing the translocation/cyclin D4 (TC4) MM, TC2 group displayed a distinct sno/scaRNA signature overexpressing members of SNORD115 and SNORD116 families located in a region finely regulated by an imprinting center at 15q11, which, however, resulted overall hypomethylated in MMs independently of the SNORD115 and SNORD116 expression levels. Finally, integrative analyses with available gene expression and genome-wide data revealed the occurrence of significant sno/scaRNAs/host genes co-expression and the putative influence of allelic imbalances on specific snoRNAs expression. Our data extend the current view of sno/scaRNAs deregulation in cancer and add novel information to the bio-molecular complexity of plasma cell dyscrasias

  8. Zucchini tigré mosaic virus is a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: molecular and biological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay, G; Lecoq, H; Desbiez, C

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, three new potyviruses have been described in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster. In addition, two types of PRSV are recognized, type W, infecting cucurbit plants, and type P, infecting papaya and also cucurbits. A third type, PRSV-T, was also partially described in Guadeloupe. Complete genome sequencing of four PRSV-T isolates showed that this virus is a related virus that is distinct from PRSV, and the name zucchini tigré mosaic virus (ZTMV) is proposed, in reference to the typical symptoms observed in zucchini squash. Eleven other viral isolates from different geographic origins were confirmed as ZTMV isolates using the complete sequence of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) coding region, whereas pairwise sequence similarities in the coat protein (CP) coding region did not unambiguously distinguish ZTMV isolates from PRSV isolates. The use of the CI coding region for species demarcation appears more suitable than the CP coding region for closely related viruses. Principal coordinates analysis based on the biological behavior of the viral isolates studied clustered PRSV-P, PRSV-W and ZTMV isolates into three different groups. Therefore, ZTMV is different from PRSV in its molecular and biological properties.

  9. Two distinct states of the HAMP domain from sensory rhodopsin transducer observed in unbiased molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gushchin

    Full Text Available HAMP domain is a ubiquitous module of bacterial and archaeal two-component signaling systems. Considerable progress has been made recently in studies of its structure and conformational changes. However, the mechanism of signal transduction through the HAMP domain is not clear. It remains a question whether all the HAMPs have the same mechanism of action and what are the differences between the domains from different protein families. Here, we present the results of unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of the HAMP domain from the archaeal phototaxis signal transducer NpHtrII. Two distinct conformational states of the HAMP domain are observed, that differ in relative position of the helices AS1 and AS2. The longitudinal shift is roughly equal to a half of an α-helix turn, although sometimes it reaches one full turn. The states are closely related to the position of bulky hydrophobic aminoacids at the HAMP domain core. The observed features are in good agreement with recent experimental results and allow us to propose that the states detected in the simulations are the resting state and the signaling state of the NpHtrII HAMP domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of the same HAMP domain in different conformations. The simulations also underline the difference between AMBER ff99-SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP forcefields, as the former favors the resting state and the latter favors the signaling state.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α regulates distinct molecular pathways and gene networks in cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shephali Bhatnagar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle wasting is a debilitating consequence of large number of disease states and conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is one of the most important muscle-wasting cytokine, elevated levels of which cause significant muscular abnormalities. However, the underpinning molecular mechanisms by which TNF-α causes skeletal muscle wasting are less well-understood.We have used microarray, quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR, Western blot, and bioinformatics tools to study the effects of TNF-α on various molecular pathways and gene networks in C2C12 cells (a mouse myoblastic cell line. Microarray analyses of C2C12 myotubes treated with TNF-α (10 ng/ml for 18h showed differential expression of a number of genes involved in distinct molecular pathways. The genes involved in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB signaling, 26s proteasome pathway, Notch1 signaling, and chemokine networks are the most important ones affected by TNF-α. The expression of some of the genes in microarray dataset showed good correlation in independent QRT-PCR and Western blot assays. Analysis of TNF-treated myotubes showed that TNF-α augments the activity of both canonical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathways in myotubes. Bioinformatics analyses of microarray dataset revealed that TNF-α affects the activity of several important pathways including those involved in oxidative stress, hepatic fibrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cholesterol biosynthesis, and TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, TNF-α was found to affect the gene networks related to drug metabolism, cell cycle, cancer, neurological disease, organismal injury, and abnormalities in myotubes.TNF-α regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in various toxic pathways which may be responsible for TNF-induced muscle loss in catabolic conditions. Our study suggests that TNF-α activates both canonical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathways in a time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells

  11. Distinct Molecular Regulation of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Isozyme Controlled by Its N-terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:21266584

  12. High nitrogen fertilization and stem leaning have overlapping effects on wood formation in poplar but invoke largely distinct molecular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre, Frederic E; Lafarguette, Florian; Boyle, Brian; Pavy, Nathalie; Caron, Sébastien; Dallaire, Nancy; Poulin, Pier-Luc; Ouellet, Mario; Morency, Marie-Josée; Wiebe, Nicholas; Ly Lim, Emilia; Urbain, Aurélie; Mouille, Gregory; Cooke, Janice E K; Mackay, John J

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies indicated that high nitrogen fertilization may impact secondary xylem development and alter fibre anatomy and composition. The resulting wood shares some resemblance with tension wood, which has much thicker cell walls than normal wood due to the deposition of an additional layer known as the G-layer. This report compares the short-term effects of high nitrogen fertilization and tree leaning to induce tension wood, either alone or in combination, upon wood formation in young trees of Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray) × P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. Fibre anatomy, chemical composition and transcript profiles were examined in newly formed secondary xylem. Each of the treatments resulted in thicker cell walls relative to the controls. High nitrogen and tree leaning had overlapping effects on chemical composition based on Fourier transform infrared analysis, specifically indicating that secondary cell wall composition was shifted in favour of cellulose and hemicelluloses relative to lignin content. In contrast, the high-nitrogen trees had shorter fibres, whilst the leaning trees had longer fibres that the controls. Microarray transcript profiling carried out after 28 days of treatment identified 180 transcripts that accumulated differentially in one or more treatments. Only 10% of differentially expressed transcripts were affected in all treatments relative to the controls. Several of the affected transcripts were related to carbohydrate metabolism, secondary cell wall formation, nitrogen metabolism and osmotic stress. RT-qPCR analyses at 1, 7 and 28 days showed that several transcripts followed very different accumulation profiles in terms of rate and level of accumulation, depending on the treatment. Our findings suggest that high nitrogen fertilization and tension wood induction elicit largely distinct and molecular pathways with partial overlap. When combined, the two types of environmental cue yielded additive effects.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  18. Ultrahigh pyroelectric figures of merit associated with distinct bistable dielectric phase transition in a new molecular compound: di-n-butylaminium trifluoroacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhihua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shuquan; Ji, Chengmin; Chen, Tianliang; Luo, Junhua

    2015-08-26

    Ultrahigh pyroelectric figures of merit are achieved in a new phase-transition material, di-n-butylaminium trifluoroacetate, of which the peak values are an order of magnitude larger than those of their inorganic counterparts. Such an attractive behavior of pyroelectric detectivity is strongly related to its distinct bistable dielectric behavior, which recalls excellent thermoelectric response in organic molecular phase-transition systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Molecular docking and ADME-toxicity studies of potential compounds of medicinal plants grown in Indonesia as an anti-rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaluddin, Rizki; Muhtadi, Wildan Khairi; Chabib, Lutfi; Ikawati, Zullies; Martien, Ronny; Ismail, Hilda

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with recurrent bone destruction around the joints that could lead to permanent joint damage. DMARDs (Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatoid Drugs) and NSAIDs (Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) are the RA therapies with many side effects on long term use. Based on the ethnomedicine, there are many plants that could be found in Indonesia that contain the potential compounds as alternative RA therapies. The aim of this study is to assess the potential of compounds of various medicinal plants against multiple proteins that play an important role on RA through the molecular docking study and pharmacokinetic prediction. Hesperidin, EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate), and mangiferin showed higher activity compared to the other compounds against TACE (TNF-α converting enzyme) which play an important role in the inhibition of TNF-α. Inhibition on it could suppress macrophage cell and T-cell activity by suppressing the regulation of cytokine secretion against inflammation. Furthermore, hesperidin, EGCG, and mangiferin did not show effects on CYP450 (cytochrome P450). Modification of drug delivery system must be done to increase the bioavailability of the compounds. It can be concluded that hesperidin, EGCG, and mangiferin are potential to be developed as an RA therapy with a modification of drug delivery system. This study suggest the encapsulation method using liposome as the drug carrier, which is suitable with the charactheristic of hesperidine, EGCG, and mangiferin.

  20. Molecular insights into the differences in anti-inflammatory activities of green tea catechins on IL-1β signaling in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechtner, Sabrina; Singh, Anil; Chourasia, Mukesh; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2017-08-15

    In this study, we found that catechins found in green tea (EGCG, EGC, and EC) differentially interfere with the IL-1β signaling pathway which regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-6 and IL-8) and Cox-2 in primary human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs). EGCG and EGC inhibited IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-2 production and selectively inhibited Cox-2 expression. EC did not exhibit any inhibitory effects. When we looked at the expression of key signaling proteins in the IL-1β signaling pathway, we found all the tested catechins could inhibit TAK-1 activity. Therefore, the consumption of green tea offers an overall anti-inflammatory effect. Molecular docking analysis confirms that EGCG, EGC, and EC all occupy the active site of the TAK1 kinase domain. However, EGCG occupies the majority of the TAK1 active site. In addition to TAK1 inhibition, EGCG can also inhibit P38 and nuclear NF-κB expression whereas EC and EGC were not effective inhibitors. Our findings suggest one of the main health benefits associated with the consumption of green tea are due to the activity of EGCG and EGC which are both present at higher amounts. Although EGCG is the most effective catechin at inhibiting downstream inflammatory signaling, its effectiveness could be hindered by the presence of EC. Therefore, varying EC content in green tea may reduce the anti-inflammatory effects of other potential catechins in green tea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis News Ankylosing Spondylitis News ...

  3. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Reactive Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Reactive Arthritis Reactive arthritis is pain or swelling in a ...

  5. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. A Novel and Lethal De Novo LQT-3 Mutation in a Newborn with Distinct Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wendy; Spyres, Meghan; Pass, Robert H.; Silver, Eric; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Background SCN5A encodes the α-subunit (Nav1.5) of the principle Na+ channel in the human heart. Genetic lesions in SCN5A can cause congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) variant 3 (LQT-3) in adults by disrupting inactivation of the Nav1.5 channel. Pharmacological targeting of mutation-altered Na+ channels has proven promising in developing a gene-specific therapeutic strategy to manage specifically this LQTS variant. SCN5A mutations that cause similar channel dysfunction may also contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other arrhythmias in newborns, but the prevalence, impact, and therapeutic management of SCN5A mutations may be distinct in infants compared with adults. Methods and Results Here, in a multidisciplinary approach, we report a de novo SCN5A mutation (F1473C) discovered in a newborn presenting with extreme QT prolongation and differential responses to the Na+ channel blockers flecainide and mexiletine. Our goal was to determine the Na+ channel phenotype caused by this severe mutation and to determine whether distinct effects of different Na+ channel blockers on mutant channel activity provide a mechanistic understanding of the distinct therapeutic responsiveness of the mutation carrier. Sequence analysis of the proband revealed the novel missense SCN5A mutation (F1473C) and a common variant in KCNH2 (K897T). Patch clamp analysis of HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with wild-type or mutant Na+ channels revealed significant changes in channel biophysics, all contributing to the proband's phenotype as predicted by in silico modeling. Furthermore, subtle differences in drug action were detected in correcting mutant channel activity that, together with both the known genetic background and age of the patient, contribute to the distinct therapeutic responses observed clinically. Significance The results of our study provide further evidence of the grave vulnerability of newborns to Na+ channel defects and suggest that both genetic background

  7. A novel and lethal de novo LQT-3 mutation in a newborn with distinct molecular pharmacology and therapeutic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Bankston

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available SCN5A encodes the alpha-subunit (Na(v1.5 of the principle Na(+ channel in the human heart. Genetic lesions in SCN5A can cause congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS variant 3 (LQT-3 in adults by disrupting inactivation of the Na(v1.5 channel. Pharmacological targeting of mutation-altered Na(+ channels has proven promising in developing a gene-specific therapeutic strategy to manage specifically this LQTS variant. SCN5A mutations that cause similar channel dysfunction may also contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS and other arrhythmias in newborns, but the prevalence, impact, and therapeutic management of SCN5A mutations may be distinct in infants compared with adults.Here, in a multidisciplinary approach, we report a de novo SCN5A mutation (F1473C discovered in a newborn presenting with extreme QT prolongation and differential responses to the Na(+ channel blockers flecainide and mexiletine. Our goal was to determine the Na(+ channel phenotype caused by this severe mutation and to determine whether distinct effects of different Na(+ channel blockers on mutant channel activity provide a mechanistic understanding of the distinct therapeutic responsiveness of the mutation carrier. Sequence analysis of the proband revealed the novel missense SCN5A mutation (F1473C and a common variant in KCNH2 (K897T. Patch clamp analysis of HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with wild-type or mutant Na(+ channels revealed significant changes in channel biophysics, all contributing to the proband's phenotype as predicted by in silico modeling. Furthermore, subtle differences in drug action were detected in correcting mutant channel activity that, together with both the known genetic background and age of the patient, contribute to the distinct therapeutic responses observed clinically.The results of our study provide further evidence of the grave vulnerability of newborns to Na(+ channel defects and suggest that both genetic background and age are

  8. Distinct molecular patterns based on proximal and distal sporadic colorectal cancer: arguments for different mechanisms in the tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzoni, Cinzia; Bottarelli, Lorena; Campanini, Nicoletta; Di Cola, Gabriella; Bader, Giovanni; Mazzeo, Antonio; Salvemini, Carlo; Morari, Silvia; Di Mauro, Davide; Donadei, Enrico; Roncoroni, Luigi; Bordi, Cesare; Sarli, Leopoldo

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. CRCs that arise proximally or distally to the splenic flexure show differences in epidemiologic incidence, morphology, and molecular alterations, suggesting the existence of two categories of CRC based on the site of origin. The aim of the present work is to investigate the histological and molecular differences between CRCs located proximally and distally to the splenic flexure, and their potential involvement in tumor prognosis and therapeutic strategies. We evaluated 120 patients affected by sporadic CRC for clinicopathologic features, microsatellite instability (MSI), loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 18q, 8p, and 4p; they were also investigated for hMlh1, hMsh2, Fhit, p27, and Cox-2 immunostaining. The mucinous histotype was more frequent in the proximal than in the distal CRCs (pcancer development between the proximal and the distal colon, with potential implications in the therapeutic approach.

  9. Phenotypic and Molecular Evidence Suggest That Decrements in Morning and Evening Energy Are Distinct But Related Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Kober, Kord M.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Little is known about energy levels in oncology patients and their family caregivers (FCs). Objectives This study sought to identify latent classes of participants, based on self-reported energy levels and to evaluate for differences in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics between these classes. Methods Energy subscale scores from the Lee Fatigue Scale were used to determine latent class membership. Morning and evening energy scores were obtained just prior to, during, and for four months following the completion of radiation therapy. Genetic associations were evaluated for fifteen pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes. Results Two latent classes with distinct morning energy trajectories were identified. Participants who were younger, female, not married/partnered, Black, and had more comorbidities, and a lower functional status were more likely to be in the Low Morning Energy class. Two polymorphisms (IL2 rs1479923, NFKB1 rs4648110) were associated with morning energy latent class membership. Two latent classes with distinct evening energy trajectories were identified. Participants who were younger and male and who had more comorbidities, decreased body weight, and a lower functional status were more likely to be in the Moderate Evening Energy class. Five different polymorphisms (IL1R2 rs4141134, IL6 rs4719714, IL17A rs8193036, NFKB2 rs1056890, TNFA rs1800683) were associated with evening energy latent class membership. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that decrements in morning and evening energy are associated with different phenotypic risk factors as well as cytokine gene variations. PMID:26031709

  10. The Dual Edema-Preventing Molecular Mechanism of the Crataegus Extract WS 1442 Can Be Assigned to Distinct Phytochemical Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Simone; Bischoff, Iris; Willer, Elisabeth A; Bräutigam, Jacqueline; Bubik, Martin F; Erdelmeier, Clemens A J; Koch, Egon; Faleschini, Maria T; De Mieri, Maria; Bauhart, Milena; Zahler, Stefan; Hensel, Andreas; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier; Fürst, Robert

    2017-05-01

    The hawthorn ( Crataegus spp.) extract WS 1442 is used against mild forms of chronic heart failure. This disease is associated with endothelial barrier dysfunction and edema formation. We have recently shown that WS 1442 protects against this dysfunction by a dual mechanism: it both promotes endothelial barrier integrity by activation of a barrier-enhancing pathway (cortactin activation) and inhibits endothelial hyperpermeability by blocking a barrier disruptive pathway (calcium signaling). In this study, we aimed to identify the bioactive compounds responsible for these actions by using a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. From the four fractions generated from WS 1442 by successive elution with water, 95 % ethanol, methanol, and 70 % acetone, only the water fraction was inactive, whereas the other three triggered a reduction of endothelial hyperpermeability. Analyses of intracellular calcium levels and cortactin phosphorylation were used as readouts to estimate the bioactivity of subfractions and isolated compounds. Interestingly, only the ethanolic fraction interfered with the calcium signaling, whereas only the methanolic fraction led to an activation of cortactin. Thus, the dual mode of action of WS 1442 could be clearly assigned to two distinct fractions. Although the identification of the calcium-active substance(s) was not successful, we could exclude an involvement of phenolic compounds. Cortactin activation, however, could be clearly attributed to oligomeric procyanidins with a distinct degree of polymerization. Taken together, our study provides the first approach to identify the active constituents of WS 1442 that address different cellular pathways leading to the inhibition of endothelial barrier dysfunction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Distinct roles of molecular chaperones HSP90α and HSP90β in the biogenesis of KCNQ4 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Gao

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ4 channel cause DFNA2, a subtype of autosomal dominant non-syndromic deafness that is characterized by progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Previous studies have demonstrated that the majority of the pathogenic KCNQ4 mutations lead to trafficking deficiency and loss of KCNQ4 currents. Over the last two decades, various strategies have been developed to rescue trafficking deficiency of pathogenic mutants; the most exciting advances have been made by manipulating activities of molecular chaperones involved in the biogenesis and quality control of the target protein. However, such strategies have not been established for KCNQ4 mutants and little is known about the molecular chaperones governing the KCNQ4 biogenesis. To identify KCNQ4-associated molecular chaperones, a proteomic approach was used in this study. As a result, two major molecular chaperones, HSP70 and HSP90, were identified and then confirmed by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation assays, suggesting that the HSP90 chaperone pathway might be involved in the KCNQ4 biogenesis. Manipulating chaperone expression further revealed that two different isoforms of HSP90, the inducible HSP90α and the constitutive HSP90β, had opposite effects on the cellular level of the KCNQ4 channel; that HSP40, HSP70, and HOP, three key components of the HSP90 chaperone pathway, were crucial in facilitating KCNQ4 biogenesis. In contrast, CHIP, a major E3 ubiquitin ligase, had an opposite effect. Collectively, our data suggest that HSP90α and HSP90β play key roles in controlling KCNQ4 homeostasis via the HSP40-HSP70-HOP-HSP90 chaperone pathway and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Most importantly, we found that over-expression of HSP90β significantly improved cell surface expression of the trafficking-deficient, pathogenic KCNQ4 mutants L274H and W276S. KCNQ4 surface expression was restored by HSP90β in cells mimicking heterozygous conditions of the DFNA2 patients

  12. Molecular characterization of HCV in a Swedish county over 8 years (2002–2009 reveals distinct transmission patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Ederth

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major public health concern and data on its molecular epidemiology in Sweden is scarce. We carried out an 8-year population-based study of newly diagnosed HCV cases in one of Sweden's centrally situated counties, Södermanland (D-county. The aim was to characterize the HCV strains circulating, analyze their genetic relatedness to detect networks, and in combination with demographic data learn more about transmission. Methods: Molecular analyses of serum samples from 91% (N=557 of all newly notified cases in D-county, 2002–2009, were performed. Phylogenetic analysis (NS5B gene, 300 bp was linked to demographic data from the national surveillance database, SmiNet, to characterize D-county transmission clusters. The linear-by-linear association test (LBL was used to analyze trends over time. Results: The most prevalent subtypes were 1a (38% and 3a (34%. Subtype 1a was most prevalent among cases transmitted via sexual contact, via contaminated blood, or blood products, while subtype 3a was most prevalent among people who inject drugs (PWIDs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subtype 3a sequences formed more and larger transmission clusters (50% of the sequences clustered, while the 1a sequences formed smaller clusters (19% of the sequences clustered, possibly suggesting different epidemics. Conclusion: We found different transmission patterns in D-county which may, from a public health perspective, have implications for how to control virus infections by targeted interventions.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  14. Distinctive molecular and biochemical characteristics of a glycoside hydrolase family 20 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junpei; Song, Zhifeng; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rui; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Han, Nanyu; Huang, Zunxi

    2017-04-11

    Enzymatic degradation of chitin has attracted substantial attention because chitin is an abundant renewable natural resource, second only to lignocellulose, and because of the promising applications of N-acetylglucosamine in the bioethanol, food and pharmaceutical industries. However, the low activity and poor tolerance to salts and N-acetylglucosamine of most reported β-N-acetylglucosaminidases limit their applications. Mining for novel enzymes from new microorganisms is one way to address this problem. A glycoside hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase) was identified from Microbacterium sp. HJ5 harboured in the saline soil of an abandoned salt mine and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme showed specific activities of 1773.1 ± 1.1 and 481.4 ± 2.3 μmol min -1 mg -1 towards p-nitrophenyl β-N-acetylglucosaminide and N,N'-diacetyl chitobiose, respectively, a V max of 3097 ± 124 μmol min -1 mg -1 towards p-nitrophenyl β-N-acetylglucosaminide and a K i of 14.59 mM for N-acetylglucosamine inhibition. Most metal ions and chemical reagents at final concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mM or 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v) had little or no effect (retaining 84.5 - 131.5% activity) on the enzyme activity. The enzyme can retain more than 53.6% activity and good stability in 3.0-20.0% (w/v) NaCl. Compared with most GlcNAcases, the activity of the enzyme is considerably higher and the tolerance to salts and N-acetylglucosamine is much better. Furthermore, the enzyme had higher proportions of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, glycine, random coils and negatively charged surfaces but lower proportions of cysteine, lysine, α-helices and positively charged surfaces than its homologs. These molecular characteristics were hypothesised as potential factors in the adaptation for salt tolerance and high activity of the GH 20 GlcNAcase. Biochemical characterization revealed that the GlcNAcase had novel salt

  15. Dissecting molecular events in thyroid neoplasia provides evidence for distinct evolution of follicular thyroid adenoma and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kerstin; Prawitt, Susanne; Eszlinger, Markus; Ihling, Christian; Sinz, Andrea; Schierle, Katrin; Gimm, Oliver; Dralle, Henning; Steinert, Frank; Sheu, Sien-Yi; Schmid, Kurt W; Fuhrer, Dagmar

    2011-12-01

    Benign hypofunctional cold thyroid nodules (CTNs) are a frequent scintiscan finding and need to be distinguished from thyroid carcinomas. The origin of CTNs with follicular morphologic features is unresolved. The DNA damage response might act as a physiologic barrier, inhibiting the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. We investigated the following in hypofunctional follicular adenoma (FA) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC): i) the mutation rate of frequently activated oncogenes, ii) the activation of DNA damage response checkpoints, and iii) the differential proteomic pattern between FA and FTC. Both FTC and FA, which did not harbor RAS, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, or PAX/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ mutations, express various proteins in common and others that are more distinctly expressed in FTC rather than in FA or normal thyroid tissue. This finding is in line with the finding of constitutive DNA damage checkpoint activation (p-Chk2, γ-H2AX) and evidence for replicative stress causing genomic instability (increased cyclin E, retinoblastoma, or E2F1 mRNA expression) in FTC but not FA. We discuss the findings of the increased expression of translationally controlled tumor protein, phosphatase 2A inhibitor, and DJ-1 in FTC compared with FA identified by proteomics and their potential implication in follicular thyroid carcinogenesis. Our present findings argue for the definition of FA as a truly benign entity and against progressive development of FA to FTC. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinct high molecular weight organic compound (HMW-OC) types in aerosol particles collected at a coastal urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Healy, R. M.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, D. C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Organic oligomers were discovered in laboratory-generated atmospheric aerosol over a decade ago. However, evidence for the presence of oligomers in ambient aerosols is scarce and mechanisms for their formation have yet to be fully elucidated. In this work, three unique aerosol particle types internally mixed with High molecular weight organic compounds (HMW-OC) species - likely oligomers - were detected in ambient air using single particle Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) in Cork (Ireland) during winter 2009. These particle types can be described as follows: (1) HMW-OCs rich in organic nitrogen - possibly containing nitrocatechols and nitroguaiacols - originating from primary emissions of biomass burning particles during evening times; (2) HMW-OCs internally mixed with nitric acid, occurring in stagnant conditions during night time; and (3) HMW-OCs internally mixed with sea salt, likely formed via photochemical reactions during day time. The study exemplifies the power of methodologies capable of monitoring the simultaneous formation of organic and inorganic particle-phase reaction products. Primary emissions and atmospheric aging of different types of HMW-OC contributes to aerosol with a range of acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties, which can have different impacts on climate and health.

  17. Distinct Molecular Signature of Murine Fetal Liver and Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells Identify Novel Regulators of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesia, Javed K; Franch, Monica; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Nogales-Cadenas, Ruben; Vanwelden, Thomas; Van Den Bosch, Elisa; Xu, Zhuofei; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Khurana, Satish; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2017-04-15

    During ontogeny, fetal liver (FL) acts as a major site for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maturation and expansion, whereas HSCs in the adult bone marrow (ABM) are largely quiescent. HSCs in the FL possess faster repopulation capacity as compared with ABM HSCs. However, the molecular mechanism regulating the greater self-renewal potential of FL HSCs has not yet extensively been assessed. Recently, we published RNA sequencing-based gene expression analysis on FL HSCs from 14.5-day mouse embryo (E14.5) in comparison to the ABM HSCs. We reanalyzed these data to identify key transcriptional regulators that play important roles in the expansion of HSCs during development. The comparison of FL E14.5 with ABM HSCs identified more than 1,400 differentially expressed genes. More than 200 genes were shortlisted based on the gene ontology (GO) annotation term "transcription." By morpholino-based knockdown studies in zebrafish, we assessed the function of 18 of these regulators, previously not associated with HSC proliferation. Our studies identified a previously unknown role for tdg, uhrf1, uchl5, and ncoa1 in the emergence of definitive hematopoiesis in zebrafish. In conclusion, we demonstrate that identification of genes involved in transcriptional regulation differentially expressed between expanding FL HSCs and quiescent ABM HSCs, uncovers novel regulators of HSC function.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  20. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwant; Singh, Nisha; Mishra, Shefali; Tripathi, Kabita; Singh, Bikram P.; Rai, Vandna; Singh, Ashok K.; Singh, Nagendra K.

    2018-01-01

    Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India’s huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon, and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated ‘Pro-Indica,’ ‘Pro-Aus,’ and ‘Mid-Gangetic,’ which showed poor correspondence with the morpho-taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the ‘Pro-Indica’ and ‘Pro-Aus’ sub-populations across agro-climatic zones

  1. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balwant Singh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India’s huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon, and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated ‘Pro-Indica,’ ‘Pro-Aus,’ and ‘Mid-Gangetic,’ which showed poor correspondence with the morpho-taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the ‘Pro-Indica’ and ‘Pro-Aus’ sub-populations across agro

  2. Molecular Basis for the Recognition of Structurally Distinct Autoinducer Mimics by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR Quorum-Sensing Signaling Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yaozhong; Nair, Satish K.; (UIUC)

    2010-01-12

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates the expression of virulence factors using quorum sensing, a signaling cascade triggered by the activation of signal receptors by small-molecule autoinducers. These homoserine lactone autoinducers stabilize their cognate receptors and activate their functions as transcription factors. Because quorum sensing regulates the progression of infection and host immune resistance, significant efforts have been devoted toward the identification of small molecules that disrupt this process. Screening efforts have identified a class of triphenyl compounds that are structurally distinct from the homoserine lactone autoinducer, yet interact specifically and potently with LasR receptor to modulate quorum sensing (Muh et al., 2006a). Here we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the ligand binding domain of LasR in complex with the autoinducer N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (1.4 {angstrom} resolution), and with the triphenyl mimics TP-1, TP-3, and TP-4 (to between 1.8 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution). These crystal structures provide a molecular rationale for understanding how chemically distinct compounds can be accommodated by a highly selective receptor, and provide the framework for the development of novel quorum-sensing regulators, utilizing the triphenyl scaffold.

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsit, C. J.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Nelson, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hyper methylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hyper methylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hyper methylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hyper methylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  4. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  5. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... in your joints. These two substances come in supplement form and can be bought over-the-counter. ...

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  7. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  8. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... important for both pinching and gripping. MP joint arthritis is most common in the thumb and index ...

  9. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ANALYSIS OF IL -1Β, IL -4, AND IL -1Β RA GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN ETHNIC BASHKIR PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS, LIVING IN C HELYABINSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Burmistrova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Common polymorphisms of interleukin-1β, receptor antagonist interleukin-1, and interleukin-4 genes have been studied among the patients with rheumatoid arthritis of Bashkir origin, living in Chelyabinsk Region. As a result of study, an increased frequency of interleukin-1β homozygosity for a high-producer allele was found. An association has been revealed between the homozygosity for 2-repeat allele of interleukin-4, and the age of disease onset.

  10. Experimentally-derived fibroblast gene signatures identify molecular pathways associated with distinct subsets of systemic sclerosis patients in three independent cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Johnson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc has identified four 'intrinsic' subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like, each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFNα signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGFβ signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-κB. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGFβ and TNFα. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFNα is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGFβ signaling.

  11. Targeting N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties for broad-spectrum virus neutralization: progress in identifying conserved molecular targets in viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Tang, Jin; Tang, Jiulai; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2015-03-12

    Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA), for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9)-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn). These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  12. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  13. Identification of Two Distinct Molecular Subtypes of Non-Invasive Follicular Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features by Digital RNA Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Riccardo; Ugolini, Clara; Poma, Anello Marcello; Urpì, Maria; Niccoli, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella; Chiarugi, Massimo; Vitti, Paolo; Miccoli, Paolo; Basolo, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    The follicular variant (FV) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common variants of PTC. Clinically, non-infiltrative FVPTC is considered a low-risk variant of PTC, and the non-invasive encapsulated forms of FVPTC represent a group of thyroid tumors with a particularly good prognosis. Consequently, these neoplasms have been very recently reclassified as non-invasive follicular neoplasms with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). From a molecular standpoint, NIFTP appears to be similar to follicular neoplasms. However, only limited data are currently available regarding their gene expression profile. The aim of this study was to identify specific molecular signatures of 26 NIFTPs compared to those of 19 follicular adenomas (FAs) and 18 infiltrative FVPTCs (IFVPTCs). A nanoString custom assay was used to perform mRNA expression analysis. All cases were also genotyped for BRAF, N-, H-, and K-RAS mutations. Samples were grouped on the basis of gene expression profiles by Pearson's correlation and non-negative matrix factorization clustering analysis. Finally, the uncorrelated shrunken centroid machine-learning algorithm was used to classify the samples. The results revealed distinct expression profiles of FAs and IFVPTCs. NIFTP samples can exhibit different expression profiles, more similar to FAs (FA-like) or to IFVPTCs (IFVPTC-like), and these different expression profiles largely depend on the presence of different mutations (RAS or BRAF). In conclusion, although further validation of the model is required by using a larger group of prospective cases, these data reinforce the hypothesis that IFVPTC-like NIFTPs might represent precursors of IFVPTC.

  14. Leukocyte Telomere Length and Serum Levels of High-Molecular-Weight Adiponectin and Dehydroepiandrosterone-Sulfate Could Reflect Distinct Aspects of Longevity in Japanese Centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Aoki MD, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of high-molecular-weight adiponectin and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S were assessed in association with nutrition and performance status (PS in Japanese centenarians. Twenty-three centenarians (five men, 18 women were classified according to their PS 1 (nearly fully ambulatory, n = 2, 2 (in bed less than 50% of daytime, n = 10, 3 (in bed greater than 50%, n = 6, and 4 (completely bedridden, n = 5. Leukocyte telomere length was determined by the hybridization protection assay, and the adiponectin and DHEA-S levels were measured by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Among variables of PS, body mass index (BMI, albumin, adiponectin, DHEA-S, and telomere length, there were significant correlations between PS and albumin ( r = −.694, p < .01, between telomere length and BMI ( r = .522, p < .05, between adiponectin and BMI ( r = −.574, p < .01, and between DHEA-S and albumin ( r = .530, p < .01. When excluding two cancer-bearing centenarians with short telomere, telomere length significantly correlated with PS ( r = −.632, p < .01. It was indicated that the short leukocyte telomere was associated with poor PS and cancer development and that the adiponectin or DHEA-S was associated with adiposity or nutritional status. Despite a small number of subjects, these biomarkers seemed to reflect distinct aspects of longevity in Japanese centenarians.

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  2. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus: Recent Emergence of Distinct Sub-lineages of the Dominant Genotype 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Williams

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent increased activity of the mosquito-borne Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV in Australia has renewed concerns regarding its potential to spread and cause disease.To better understand the genetic relationships between earlier and more recent circulating strains, patterns of virus movement, as well as the molecular basis of MVEV evolution, complete pre-membrane (prM and Envelope (Env genes were sequenced from sixty-six MVEV strains from different regions of the Australasian region, isolated over a sixty year period (1951-2011. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that, of the four recognized genotypes, only G1 and G2 are contemporary. G1 viruses were dominant over the sampling period and found across the known geographic range of MVEV. Two distinct sub-lineages of G1 were observed (1A and 1B. Although G1B strains have been isolated from across mainland Australia, Australian G1A strains have not been detected outside northwest Australia. Similarly, G2 is comprised of only Western Australian isolates from mosquitoes, suggesting G1B and G2 viruses have geographic or ecological restrictions. No evidence of recombination was found and a single amino acid substitution in the Env protein (S332G was found to be under positive selection, while several others were found to be under directional evolution. Evolutionary analyses indicated that extant genotypes of MVEV began to diverge from a common ancestor approximately 200 years ago. G2 was the first genotype to diverge, followed by G3 and G4, and finally G1, from which subtypes G1A and G1B diverged between 1964 and 1994.The results of this study provides new insights into the genetic diversity and evolution of MVEV. The demonstration of co-circulation of all contemporary genetic lineages of MVEV in northwestern Australia, supports the contention that this region is the enzootic focus for this virus.

  3. Distinct molecular regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha isozyme controlled by its N-terminal region: functional role in calcium/calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-04-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  4. [Septic arthritis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, M D; Ullot, R; Rigol, S; Pinyot, J; Obiols, P

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of 15 cases of septic arthritis in children. 13 of these cases corresponded to purulent arthritis, one to tuberculous arthritis and one to brucellar arthritis. All of them received diagnostic punction. Five joints received arthrotomy, by a washed-aspiration system. The antibiotic treatment was given approximately during for six weeks. We had two complications, die to a delayed diagnosis: one coxa valga and one capital femoral necrosis. It is important the insist on a early diagnosis and decompressive arthrotomy, specially in those cases in which the hip is the joint affected.

  5. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The endogenous and reactive depression subtypes revisited: integrative animal and human studies implicate multiple distinct molecular mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Keers, Robert; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Carboni, Lucia; Domenici, Enrico; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2014-05-07

    distinct changes in gene-expression. However, they also suggest that the molecular signature of 'reactive' depression caused by early stressors differs considerably from that of 'reactive' depression caused by late stressors. A small set of genes was consistently dysregulated across each paradigm and in post-mortem brain tissue of depressed patients suggesting a final common pathway to the disorder. These genes included the VAMP-2 gene, which has previously been associated with Axis-I disorders including MDD, bipolar depression, schizophrenia and with antidepressant treatment response. We also discuss the implications of our findings for disease classification, personalized medicine and case-control studies of MDD.

  7. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  8. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  9. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  10. Midcarpal and Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Arthritis in Patients with Carpometacarpal Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Bielicka, Dierde; Shakir, Sameer; Fowler, John; Buterbaugh, Glenn A; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-06-01

    Carpometacarpal arthroplasty provides well-documented pain relief with preservation of thenar function in basal joint arthritis treatment. Nevertheless, some patients continue to have pain following surgery. The authors hypothesize that unrecognized midcarpal (capitolunate) arthritis is a contributor to persistent pain after carpometacarpal arthroplasty. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is unknown. This article establishes the radiographic prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with carpometacarpal arthritis. Patients with basal joint arthritis were identified from a search using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 716.94. Hand radiographs were reviewed and graded using the Eaton classification and Sodha classification for carpometacarpal arthritis. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis and midcarpal arthritis were graded using the Sodha classification for arthritis as follows: grade 1, no or nearly no arthrosis; grade 2, definite arthrosis but not severe; and grade 3, severe arthrosis. Eight hundred ninety-six radiographs were reviewed. The prevalence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis in this population was 64 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in this population was 23.5 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with radiologic evidence of carpometacarpal arthritis was 25.4 percent. The prevalence of severe midcarpal arthritis was 7 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is 24 percent. The presence of two locations of arthritis may explain persistent hand and wrist pain in this population despite carpometacarpal arthroplasty. Clinically, these data will allow hand surgeons to better educate patients with basal joint arthritis regarding the possibility of incomplete pain relief following carpometacarpal arthroplasty.

  11. Endogenous inspired biomineral-installed hyaluronan nanoparticles as pH-responsive carrier of methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Mahmudul; Han, Hwa Seung; Sung, Shijin; Kang, Jin Hee; Sa, Keum Hee; Al Faruque, Hasan; Hong, Jungwan; Nam, Eon Jeong; Kim, In San; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Mo

    2017-04-28

    Methotrexate (MTX), an anchor drug for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been suffered from refractoriness and high toxicity limiting effective dosage. To mitigate these challenges, the ability to selectively deliver MTX to arthritis tissue is a much sought-after modality for the treatment of RA. In this study, we prepared mineralized nanoparticles (MP-HANPs), composed of PEGylated hyaluronic acid (P-HA) as the hydrophilic shell, 5β-cholanic acid as the hydrophobic core, and calcium phosphate (CaP) as the pH-responsive mineral. Owing to the presence of CaP as the diffusion barrier, mineralized HANPs revealed the pH-responsiveness of release kinetics of MTX across neutral to acidic conditions. HANPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis in macrophages which involved molecular redundancy among major hyaladherins, including CD44, stabilin-2, and RHAMM. Following endocytosis, MP-HANPs loaded with doxorubicin revealed pH-dependent demineralization followed by dramatic acceleration of drug release into the cytosol compared to other HANPs. Furthermore, an in vivo study showed a significantly high paw-to-liver ratio of fluorescent intensity after systemic administration of MP-HANP-Cy5.5, indicating improved biodistribution of nanoparticles into arthritic paws in collagen-induced arthritis mice. Treatment with MTX-loaded MP-HANPs ameliorated inflammatory arthritis with remarkable safety at high dose of MTX. We highlight the distinct advantages of combining key benefits of biomineralization and PEGylation with HA-based nanoparticles for arthritis-selective targeting, thus suggesting MP-HANPs as a promising carrier of MTX for treatment of RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature...

  13. Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome, revisited: detailed clinical and molecular analyses determine whether patients have neurofibromatosis type 1, coincidental manifestations, or a distinct disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Brems, Hilde; Gomes, Alicia G.; Ruppert, Sarah L.; Callens, Tom; Williams, Jennifer; Claes, Kathleen; Bober, Michael B.; Hachen, Rachel; Kaban, Leonard B.; Li, Hua; Lin, Angela; McDonald, Marie; Melancon, Serge; Ortenberg, June; Radtke, Heather B.; Samson, Ignace; Saul, Robert A.; Shen, Joseph; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Toler, Tomi L.; van Maarle, Merel; Wallace, Margaret; Williams, Misti; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2014-01-01

    "Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome" describes the complex of multiple nonossifying fibromas of the long bones, mandibular giant cell lesions, and café-au-lait macules in individuals without neurofibromas. We sought to determine whether Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome is a distinct genetic entity or a variant of

  14. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Today, Linda Saisselin takes joy in holding her new grandson—pain free. Photo courtesy of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this is a joint disease that mostly affects ...

  15. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SME Issue Briefs Compendium of Interventions ASMP/CDSMP Meta-Analysis Executive Summary Communication Campaigns Physical Activity. The Arthritis Pain Reliever. FAQs Campaign Materials Download General Campaign Materials Buenos días, artritis FAQs ...

  16. Radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in adult-onset still disease: Comparison with juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkengren, A.G.; Pathria, M.N.; Terkeltaub, R.; Esdaile, J.; Weisman, M.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pericapitate involvement of the wrist has been described as characteristic of adult-onset Still disease, a relatively rare disorder that is often diagnosed by exclusion after extensive and frequently invasive tests. To evaluate the diagnostic value of carpal radiography in cases of adult-onset Still disease, a retrospective blinded analysis of 48 patients, 16 each with adult-onset Still disease, juvenile chronic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, was performed. Pericapitate articular alterations without radiocarpal involvement were found to be frequent in the setting of adult-onset Still disease but distinctly unusual among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In juvenile chronic arthritis, severe pericapitate involvement was frequent, but generally occurred in conjunction with radiocarpal joint abnormalities

  17. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP levelseptic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRPseptic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRParthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP10 mg/L during septic arthritis in children, it could be negative in up to 20% of patients in different studies. However, a mild inflammatory syndrome or even a CRPseptic arthritis. Therefore, a first episode of monoarthritis in children has to be considered as septic arthritis and treatment should not be delayed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ...

  2. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E. M.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L. M.; van Schaardenburg, D.; van Kuyk, M. A.; van den Ende, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is

  3. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is

  4. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens ... Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course Connect ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: July 9, 2012 ... in seeking it because of something they may have read on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  11. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Daniel Becraft

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species (putative ecotypes, which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation, exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same putative ecotype formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the putative ecotypes are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. Putative ecotypes responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each putative ecotype was maintained as the relative abundances of putative ecotypes changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to putative ecotypes that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for putative ecotypes that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species

  12. A role for benzo[a]pyrene and Slug in invasive properties of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: a potential molecular link between smoking and radiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Jeong, Hyemin; Park, Eun-Jung; Hwang, Ji Won; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Koh, Eun-Mi; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the effects of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a major toxic component of cigarette smoke, on the expression of Slug and to determine the effect of B[a]P/Slug on the invasive properties of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). The expression of Slug was measured by real-time PCR following the stimulation of FLS with different concentrations of B[a]P or EGF. The phosphorylation of the key enzymes in the signaling pathway was analyzed by western blots. Inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were used to confirm the critical pathway for Slug expression. An in vitro cell invasion assay was performed using RA FLS treated with Slug cDNA, Slug small interference RNA, or control. Slug expression increased significantly following treatment with B[a]P or EGF in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulation of FLS with B[a]P or EGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt kinase, but not in ERK, JNK and p38. The Slug mRNA expression induced by B[a]P and EGF decreased significantly following the treatment with PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors. Slug overexpression using Slug cDNA upregulated the invasive function of FLS, and Slug depletion using siRNA showed the opposite effect compared with the control. In addition, the stimulation with B[a]P increased the invasive function of the control siRNA-treated FLS but not in the Slug siRNA-treated FLS. Our data showed that B[a]P regulates the invasive properties of RA FLS through Slug expression. This mechanism may provide a novel molecular link underlying the association between smoking and increased radiographic progression in RA. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. PO and ID BCG vaccination in humans induce distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses and CD4+T cell transcriptomal molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, D F; Xia, M; Zhang, G L; Blazevic, A; Tennant, J; Kaplan, C; Matuschak, G; Dube, T J; Hill, H; Schlesinger, L S; Andersen, P L; Brusic, V

    2017-08-30

    Protective efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) may be affected by the methods and routes of vaccine administration. We have studied the safety and immunogenicity of oral (PO) and/or intradermal (ID) administration of BCG in healthy human subjects. No major safety concerns were detected in the 68 healthy adults vaccinated with PO and/or ID BCG. Although both PO and ID BCG could induce systemic Th1 responses capable of IFN-γ production, ID BCG more strongly induced systemic Th1 responses. In contrast, stronger mucosal responses (TB-specific secretory IgA and bronchoalveolar lavage T cells) were induced by PO BCG vaccination. To generate preliminary data comparing the early gene signatures induced by mucosal and systemic BCG vaccination, CD4 + memory T cells were isolated from subsets of BCG vaccinated subjects pre- (Day 0) and post-vaccination (Days 7 and 56), rested or stimulated with BCG infected dendritic cells, and then studied by Illumina BeadArray transcriptomal analysis. Notably, distinct gene expression profiles were identified both on Day 7 and Day 56 comparing the PO and ID BCG vaccinated groups by GSEA analysis. Future correlation analyses between specific gene expression patterns and distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses induced will be highly informative for TB vaccine development.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 30 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.67.

  14. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  15. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ray

    2017-09-27

    Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  16. Pasteurella multocida infectious arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, P J

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small gram-negative rod, is a domestic animal saprophyte that occasionally causes disease in humans. Infectious arthritis may develop from a superficial animal bite or scratch. Nine previous cases of infectious arthritis due to this organism have been documented in the literature, and a tenth case is reported here. Most patients had recent animal exposure, and half the patients had underlying chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical signs of inflammation were consistently present; however, systemic infection was infrequent. The lack of positive synovial fluid gram-stain smears may make differentiation from other forms of infectious arthritis difficult. Penicillin in moderate doses is effective therapy, with osteomyelitis developing in only two patients. The tendency for this syndrome to affect patients with rheumatoid arthritis may reflect deficient local defense mechanisms, chronic steroid therapy, or increased ownership of pets. The mechanism of spread of infection to the joint space appears to be through contiguous spread from a skin site rather than by the hematogenous route in most cases.

  17. Exposure of honey bees (Apis mellifera) to different classes of insecticides exhibit distinct molecular effect patterns at concentrations that mimic environmental contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Verena; Fent, Karl

    2017-07-01

    Pesticides are implicated in the decline of honey bee populations. Many insecticides are neurotoxic and act by different modes of actions. Although a link between insecticide exposure and changed behaviour has been made, molecular effects underlying these effects are poorly understood. Here we elucidated molecular effects at environmental realistic concentrations of two organophosphates, chlorpyrifos and malathion, the pyrethroid cypermethrin, and the ryanodine receptor activator, chlorantraniliprole. We assessed transcriptional alterations of selected genes at three exposure times (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) in caged honey bees exposed to different concentrations of these compounds. Our targeted gene expression concept focused on several transcripts, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α 1 and α 2 (nAChRα1, nAChRα2) subunits, the multifunctional gene vitellogenin, immune system related genes of three immune system pathways, genes belonging to the detoxification system and ER stress genes. Our data indicate a dynamic pattern of expressional changes at different exposure times. All four insecticides induced strong alterations in the expression of immune system related genes suggesting negative implications for honey bee health, as well as cytochrome P450 enzyme transcripts suggesting an interference with metabolism. Exposure to neurotoxic chlorpyrifos, malathion and cypermethrin resulted in up-regulation of nAChRα1 and nAChRα2. Moreover, alterations in the expression of vitellogenin occurred, which suggests implications on foraging activity. Chlorantraniliprole induced ER stress which may be related to toxicity. The comparison of all transcriptional changes indicated that the expression pattern is rather compound-specific and related to its mode of action, but clusters of common transcriptional changes between different compounds occurred. As transcriptional alterations occurred at environmental concentrations our data provide a molecular basis for observed

  18. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nicole I; Epps, Howard R

    2017-04-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a condition with the potential for joint destruction, physeal damage, and osteonecrosis, which warrants urgent identification and treatment. The organism most frequently responsible is Staphylococcus aureus; however, our understanding of pathogens continues to evolve as detection methods continue to improve. MRI has improved our ability to detect concurrent infections and is a useful clinical tool where available. The treatment course involves intravenous antibiotics followed by transition to oral antibiotics when clinically appropriate. The recommended surgical treatment of septic arthritis is open arthrotomy with decompression of the joint, irrigation, and debridement and treatment of concurrent infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  1. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  3. Monitoring Therapy Response of Experimental Arthritis with Radiolabeled Tracers Targeting Fibroblasts, Macrophages, or Integrin alphavbeta3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terry, S.Y.; Koenders, M.I.; Franssen, G.M.; Nayak, T.K.; Freimoser-Grundschober, A.; Klein, C.; Oyen, W.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Laverman, P.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease resulting in chronic synovial inflammation. Molecular imaging could be used to monitor therapy response, thus enabling tailored therapy regimens and enhancing therapeutic outcome. Here, we hypothesized that response to etanercept could be monitored by

  4. Molecular and Biological Characterization of Distinct Strains of Jatropha mosaic virus from the Dominican Republic Reveal a Potential to Infect Crop Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Tomas A; Kon, Tatsuya; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    In the Dominican Republic (DO), jatropha plants with yellow mosaic symptoms are commonly observed in and around fields of various crop plants. Complete nucleotide sequences of DNA-A and DNA-B components of four bipartite begomovirus isolates associated with symptomatic jatropha plants collected from three geographical locations in the DO were determined. Sequence comparisons revealed highest identities (91 to 92%) with the DNA-A component of an isolate of Jatropha mosaic virus (JMV) from Jamaica, indicating that the bipartite begomovirus isolates from the DO are strains of JMV. When introduced into jatropha seedlings by particle bombardment, the cloned components of the JMV strains from the DO induced stunting and yellow mosaic, indistinguishable from symptoms observed in the field, thereby fulfilling Koch's postulates for the disease. The JMV strains also induced disease symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco, and several cultivars of common bean from the Andean gene pool, including one locally grown in the DO. Asymmetry in the infectivity and symptomatology of pseudorecombinants provided further support for the strain designation of the JMV isolates from the DO. Thus, JMV in the DO is a complex of genetically distinct strains that have undergone local evolution and have the potential to cause disease in crop plants.

  5. The TNF-alpha transgenic mouse model of inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2003-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects multiple peripheral joints. It is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and is characterized by synovial hyperplasia, immune cell infiltration, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion. To gain insight into the etiology of the disease, a variety of animal models have been established. Twelve years ago George Kollias' laboratory generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse that over-expresses human TNF-alpha, and develops an erosive polyarthritis with many characteristics observed in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The phenotype of this mouse model validated the theory that TNF-alpha is at the apex of the pro-inflammatory cascade in rheumatoid arthritis, and foreshadowed the remarkable success of anti-TNF-alpha therapy that has transformed the effective management of this disease. As such, the TNF-Tg mice are very useful tools for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of the pathogenic process and evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. In this review we (1) provide a brief summary of TNF-alpha biology and the role of this dominant cytokine in rheumatoid arthritis, (2) describe the various TNF-Tg models and their phenotypes, and (3) give examples of how this model has been used experimentally.

  6. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  7. Monitoring rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gvozdenovic, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we focussed on so-called ‘treat to target’ therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treat to target relies on repetitive measurements of disease activity using a composite score that incorporates signs of disease activity such as laboratory results, findings of physical joint

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed in this paper the radiographic characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis, making emphasis in the more common involved joints. We present a select but complete set of film as a result of our practice for many years in the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, HSJD, Bogota

  9. rheumatoid arthritis health outcome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-12-04

    Dec 4, 2004 ... School of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal,. Pietermaritzburg. Girish M Mody, MB ChB, MRCP, FCP, MD, FRCP. Department of Rheumatology, Nelson R Mandela School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder.

  10. Profile of the HIV Epidemic in Cape Verde: Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected Patients from Distinct Islands of the Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M.; Guimarães, Monick L.; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010–2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1–75) and 47 (IQR = 12–84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be

  11. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Inês M de Pina-Araujo

    Full Text Available HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections, 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75 and 47 (IQR = 12-84 for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%, CRF02_AG (30.6%, F1 (9.7%, URFs (10.4%, B (5.2%, CRF05_DF (3.0%, C (2.2%, CRF06_cpx (0.7%, CRF25_cpx (0.7% and CRF49_cpx (0.7%, whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM was observed in 3.4% (2/58 of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI, but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69 of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes and 17.6% (3/17 of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both. This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  12. The Correlation Between Candida Colonization of Distinct Body Sites and Invasive Candidiasis in Emergency Intensive Care Units: Statistical and Molecular Biological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Cen; Dong, Danfeng; Zhang, Lihua; Tian, Yuan; Ni, Qi; Mao, Enqiang; Peng, Yibing

    2016-08-01

    Both statistical and molecular biological methods were used to evaluate the association between Candida colonization of different body sites and invasive candidiasis (IC) and analyse the potential infection sources of IC. Candida surveillance cultures from the urine, sputum, rectum and skin were performed on patients admitted to an emergency intensive care units (EICU) of a tertiary care hospital in Shanghai, China, from February 2014 to January 2015. Specimens were collected once a week at admission and thereafter. The patients' clinical data were collected, and Candida isolates were genotyped using polymorphic microsatellite markers. A total of 111 patients were enrolled. Patients with positive urine (23.3 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.001) and rectal swab (13.6 vs. 0 %, p = 0.010) cultures were more likely to develop IC. However, the risk for IC was not significantly different among patients with and without respiratory (10.0 vs. 5.8 %, p = 0.503) and skin (33.3 vs. 6.5 %, p = 0.056) colonization. Gene microevolution frequently occurred at rectal swab and urine sites, and IC with possible source of infection was caused by rectal isolates (2/7), urine isolates (4/7) and sputum isolate (1/7).The colonization of gut and urinary tract maybe more relevant indicators of IC, which should be taken into consideration when selecting practical body sites for Candida surveillance cultures.

  13. A Molecular Antenna Coordination Polymer from Cadmium(II and 4,4’-Bipyridine Featuring Three Distinct Polymer Strands in the Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris M. Oppel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of cadmium perchlorate and the prototypical linear bridging ligand 4,4’-bipyridine (4,4’-bipy in an ethanol/water mixture affords the one-dimensional coordination polymer, [{Cd(m-4,4’-bipy(4,4’-bipy2(H2O2}(ClO42 × 2 4,4’-bipy × 4.5 H2O]n (1. The Cd2+ ions adopt an octahedral coordination sphere and are joined into linear chains by 4,4’-bipy via two trans coordination sites. The remaining two trans sites in the equatorial plane carry terminally monodentate-bound 4,4’-bipy ligands, resulting in a molecular antenna arrangement. The two axial sites of each Cd2+ ion are occupied by aqua ligands. Compound 1 crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric, monoclinic space group C2 with three similar, crystallographically independent, cationic coordination polymer strands in the unit cell, which essentially differ only in the conformations of the 4,4’-bipyridyl ligands. Consistent with the similarity of the local coordination environments of the three independent Cd atoms in the structure, 113Cd MAS NMR spectroscopy reveals a single resonance line at 89 ppm.

  14. Molecular characterization of coat protein gene of Garlic common latent virus isolates from India: an evidence for distinct phylogeny and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramesh, D; Baranwal, Virendra K

    2013-08-01

    The coat protein (CP) gene of five Indian Garlic common latent virus (GarCLV) isolates was sequenced and it was 960 bp long in all the five isolates, encoding a protein of 319 amino acids. Comparative nucleotide sequence analysis revealed diversity of 4.3% among the Indian isolates and of 11.9% among all isolates worldwide. Amino acid sequence comparison showed a significant variability in the N-terminal of CP of GarCLV. Various protein analysis tools identified thirteen conserved domains and motifs including Carlavirus and Potexvirus-specific Flexi CP and Flexi N CP. Phylogenetic analysis clustered GarCLV isolates in the subgroup II with isolates from Australia, Brazil, Japan, and South Korea. Intraspecies recombination study revealed that only one of the Indian isolates was a recombinant. Interspecies recombination study suggested the absence of genetic exchange from Carlavirus species to GarCLV; conversely, GarCLV was identified as a putative donor for at least two other Carlavirus species. This is the first report of molecular variability and recombination in GarCLV isolates.

  15. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis as a model for human inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Deen Christensen

    2016-06-01

    arthritis. Here we describe the molecular and cellular pathways in the development of K/BxN STA focusing on the recent advances in the understanding of the important mechanisms. Additionally, this review provides a comparison of the K/BxN STA model to some other arthritis models.

  16. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  17. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Moreira-Filho

    Full Text Available Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E or late (L disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE and complete (CO - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less

  18. Distinctly Different Glass Transition Behaviors of Trehalose Mixed with Na2HPO 4 or NaH 2PO 4: Evidence for its Molecular Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2015-07-01

    The present study is aimed at understanding how the interactions between sugar molecules and phosphate ions affect the glass transition temperature of their mixtures, and the implications for pharmaceutical formulations. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the α-relaxation temperature (Tα) of dehydrated trehalose/sodium phosphate mixtures (monobasic or dibasic) were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations were also conducted to investigate the microscopic interactions between sugar molecules and phosphate ions. The hydrogen-bonding characteristics and the self-aggregation features of these mixtures were quantified and compared. Thermal analysis measurements demonstrated that the addition of NaH2PO4 decreased both the glass transition temperature and the α-relaxation temperature of the dehydrated trehalose/NaH2PO4 mixture compared to trehalose alone while both Tg and Tα were increased by adding Na2HPO4 to pure trehalose. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between trehalose and HPO4(2-) were found to be stronger than both the trehalose-trehalose hydrogen bonds and those formed between trehalose and H2PO4(-). The HPO4(2-) ions also aggregated into smaller clusters than H2PO4(-) ions. The trehalose/Na2HPO4 mixture yielded a higher T g than pure trehalose because marginally self-aggregated HPO4(2-) ions established a strengthened hydrogen-bonding network with trehalose molecules. In contrast H2PO4(-) ions served only as plasticizers, resulting in a lower Tg of the mixtures than trehalose alone, creating large-sized ionic pockets, weakening interactions, and disrupting the original hydrogen-bonding network amongst trehalose molecules.

  19. Comparative volumetric analysis of the extent of resection of molecularly and histologically distinct low grade gliomas and its role on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Eguia, Francisco; ReFaey, Karim; Garcia, Oscar; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Chaichana, Kaisorn; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-08-01

    The authors investigate the role of extent of resection (EOR) and genetic markers on patient outcome and survival for LGGs. We conducted a retrospective cohort between 2005 and 2015, of 109 adult patients who underwent surgery for a LGG by a single surgeon. Volumetric computations of MRI studies were conducted to evaluate the EOR, and genetic markers (IDH1, 1p/19q co-deletion, and p53) were assessed and their effects on survival and neurological outcome were evaluated. The median EOR was 88.1%. Permanent postoperative neurological deficits were seen in 4.6% of patients. EOR was a significant predictor for both overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.979, 95% CI 0.961-0.980, p = 0.029) and progression free survival (PFS) (HR = 0.982, 95% CI 0.968-0.997, p = 0.018). Malignant progression free survival (MPFS) was predicted by the 1p/19q co-deletion (HR = 0.148, 95% CI 0.019-1.148, p = 0.048). Patients with EOR of 100% had a significantly better OS than EOR less than 90% (p = 0.038). Patients with an EOR of at least 76% had a better OS than EOR less than 76% (p = 0.025). Patients with an EOR of at least 71% had a better PFS than EOR less than 71% (p = 0.030). Preoperative tumor volume was found to have significant association with EOR (R 2  = 0.049, p = 0.031). Increased EOR is associated with improved OS and PFS survival outcomes, while 1p/19q co-deletion provides improved MPFS. Understanding both surgical resections and molecular markers of the tumor are important for effective management of LGG patients.

  20. Enumeration and phenotypical analysis of distinct dendritic cell subsets in psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, Sarah L.; Lebre, M. Cristina; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Gracie, J. Alastair; Sturrock, Roger D.; Tak, Paul P.; McInnes, Iain B.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise heterogeneous subsets of professional antigen-presenting cells, linking innate and adaptive immunity. Analysis of DC subsets has been hampered by a lack of specific DC markers and reliable quantitation assays. We characterised the immunophenotype and functional

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis, Immunosenescence and the Hallmarks of Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalan, Paulina; van den Berg, Anke; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Brouwer, Liesbeth; Boots, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for the development of infectious diseases, cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The very act of living causes damage to cells. A network of molecular, cellular and physiological maintenance and repair systems creates a

  5. A role for anti-HSP60 antibodies in arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Bennike, Tue; Christiansen, Gunna

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the high sequence similarity between HSP60 proteins, found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, it has been suggested, but never concluded, that anti-HSP60 antibodies could be of importance in the pathology of arthritis diseases explained by a concept named molecular mimicry...

  6. Animal models for arthritis: innovative tools for prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollias, G.; Papadaki, P.; Apparailly, F.; Vervoordeldonk, M.J.; Holmdahl, R.; Baumans, V.; Desaintes, C.; Di Santo, J.; Distler, J.; Garside, P.; Hegen, M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Jüngel, A.; Klareskog, L.; McInnes, I.; Ragoussis, I.; Schett, G.; Hart, B.t.; Tak, P.P.; Toes, R.; van den Berg, W.; Wurst, W.; Gay, S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requires the interplay between clinical observations and studies in animal models. Given the complex molecular pathogenesis and highly heterogeneous clinical picture of RA, there is an urgent need to dissect its multifactorial nature

  7. Osteoprotegerin in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: cross talk between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    cellular and molecular context of this process remain elusive 1. Recent evidence from experimental arthritis and progress in understanding the biology of osteoclasts has shed new light on the pathogenesis of skeletal manifestations 3. Because osteoblast- stromal cell interactions with osteoclast precursors are required for.

  8. - and Cross-Polarization 13C NMR Evidence of Alterations in Molecular Composition of Humic Substances Following Afforestation with Eucalypt in Distinct Brazilian Biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I. R.; Soares, E. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Novais, R.; Barros, N.; Fernandes, S.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of planting fast growing tree species on SOM quality in tropical regions has been overlooked. In the present study 13C-NMR approaches were used to evaluate the impact of eucalypt cultivation on humic and fulvic acids molecular composition. The results indicate that the replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increased the relative contribution of aliphatic groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only). The same trend was observed for FA, except in the Curvelo site. A trend for degradation and smaller contribution of O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) in HA was observed in soils under eucalyptus in Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. For FA such decreases were seen in Cerrado and Grassland biomes after eucalypt planting. In the area cultivated with pasture in the Atlantic Forest biome and in the Grassland soil, the largest contributions of lignin-derived compounds were detected in HA. The HA from the Cerrado at the Curvelo site, where the woody vegetation is virtually devoid of grassy species, showed the lowest intensity of lignin signal then those from the Cerrado sensu stricto in Itacambira, where grass species are more abundant. At our study sites, charred material are most likely derived from burning of the native vegetation, as naturally occurs in the Cerrado region, or anthropogenic fires in the Grassland biome. Burning of harvest residues in eucalypt fields was also a common practice in the early rotations. The replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increases the relative contribution of nonpolar alkyl groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only) biomes. There is evidence of substantial contribution of lignin-derived C to HA and FA, especially in sites planted with Brachiaria sp pastures. Eucalypt introduction decreases the relative contribution of carbohydrates in HA and FA. 13C DP/MAS NMR functional groups in

  9. Chronic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) activation of epididymally derived white adipocyte cultures reveals a population of thermogenically competent, UCP1-containing adipocytes molecularly distinct from classic brown adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovic, Natasa; Walden, Tomas B; Shabalina, Irina G

    2009-01-01

    The recent insight that brown adipocytes and muscle cells share a common origin and in this respect are distinct from white adipocytes has spurred questions concerning the origin and molecular characteristics of the UCP1-expressing cells observed in classic white adipose tissue depots under certain...... physiological or pharmacological conditions. Examining precursors from the purest white adipose tissue depot (epididymal), we report here that chronic treatment with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist rosiglitazone promotes not only the expression of PGC-1alpha and mitochondriogenesis...... associated with classic brown adipocytes (Zic1, Lhx8, Meox2, and characteristically PRDM16) or for myocyte-associated genes (myogenin and myomirs (muscle-specific microRNAs)) and retain white fat characteristics such as Hoxc9 expression. Co-culture experiments verify that the UCP1-expressing cells...

  10. 18 F-Fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography for noninvasive in vivo quantification of pathophysiological bone metabolism in experimental murine arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evaluation of disease severity in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis is inevitably associated with assessment of structural bone damage. A noninvasive imaging technology allowing objective quantification of pathophysiological alterations of bone structure in rodents could substantially extend the methods used to date in preclinical arthritis research for staging of autoimmune disease severity or efficacy of therapeutical intervention. Sodium 18 F-fluoride (18 F-NaF) is a bone-seeking tracer well-suited for molecular imaging. Therefore, we systematically examined the use of 18 F-NaF positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in mice with glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI)–induced arthritis for quantification of pathological bone metabolism. Methods F-fluoride was injected into mice before disease onset and at various time points of progressing experimental arthritis. Radioisotope accumulation in joints in the fore- and hindpaws was analyzed by PET measurements. For validation of bone metabolism quantified by 18 F-fluoride PET, bone surface parameters of high-resolution μCT measurements were used. Results Before clinical arthritis onset, no distinct accumulation of 18 F-fluoride was detectable in the fore- and hindlimbs of mice immunized with G6PI. In the course of experimental autoimmune disease, 18 F-fluoride bone uptake was increased at sites of enhanced bone metabolism caused by pathophysiological processes of autoimmune disease. Moreover, 18 F-fluoride signaling at different stages of G6PI-induced arthritis was significantly correlated with the degree of bone destruction. CT enabled identification of exact localization of 18 F-fluoride signaling in bone and soft tissue. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that small-animal PET/CT using 18 F-fluoride as a tracer is a feasible method for quantitative assessment of pathophysiological bone metabolism in experimental arthritis. Furthermore, the

  11. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and respo...

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  13. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  14. [Sport and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proschek, D; Rehart, S

    2014-06-01

    Sport is becoming increasingly more important in our society. Due to the changing age spectrum with a greater number of elderly and substantially more active people, an increasing number of people with underlying orthopedic diseases are becoming interested in participating in sport. This article deals with the possibilities and effects of sporting activities for people with rheumatoid arthritis within the framework of a conservative therapy. A literature search was carried out using medical search engines, in particular PubMed, and also via the recommendations of specialist societies and patient help groups. The quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis consists of physical, mental and social components. Sport as a means of rehabilitation influences all of these components. Sport should be comprehended as a form of therapy and be adapted to the needs of the individual patient. The willingness to actively participate in sport should always be highly rated and encouraged. Sport is therefore an important pillar of therapy in a conservative total concept. The main aspects of sport therapeutic activities are functional, pedagogical and experience-oriented aspects. The clinical symptoms, extent of damage and physical impairment must, however, be evaluated and taken into consideration for the therapeutic concept. The amount of data on the complex topic of sport and rheumatoid arthritis is low and is mainly dealt with as retrospective reviews. A prospective randomized study basis is lacking. The aim must therefore be to confirm the currently available recommendations for various types of sport in controlled studies.

  15. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Distinct classical and molecular cytogenetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-01-27

    Jan 27, 2017 ... Mogi-Guaçu river (Ouro Fino, Minas Gerais State – MG; Cachoeira de Emas, Pirassununga,. São Paulo State – SP; Barrinha – SP, Brazil) and observed a similar pattern of constitutive heterochromatin organization on the forms with 2n = 46 and 2n = 48 chromosomes (in the telomeric region on long arms of ...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Distinct classical and molecular cytogenetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-01-27

    ,. Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho” (UNESP), Av. 24A, 1515, ZIP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil. 2Instituto de Biociências, Laboratório de Citogenética e Genética Animal, Universidade. Federal de ...

  20. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  1. V2 regions of 16S ribosomal RNA used as a molecular marker for the species identification of streptococci in peripheral blood and synovial fluid from patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Vasey, F B; Mahfood, J P; Valeriano, J; Kanik, K S; Anderson, B E; Bridgeford, P H

    1999-10-01

    To detect the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 3 streptococcal species in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection targets bacterial 16S rRNA, which is present in bacteria at high copy numbers. The 3 species-specific primers for group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes), group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae), and Streptococcus pneumoniae were designed from the fragments of highly variable V2 regions of 16S rRNA. Total RNA was prepared from whole peripheral blood and joint fluid obtained from patients with PsA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All positive PCR reactions were then sequenced with a Pharmacia ALF DNA sequencing system. Our data in 19 PsA patients showed that 7 peripheral blood samples were positive for GAS (P = 0.006 versus GAS-positive RA patients [n = 0], by Fisher's exact test), and 2 were also positive for GBS. One synovial fluid sample from a PsA patient was positive for GAS. S pneumoniae was absent from all specimens. Seventeen patients with RA were PCR negative for the 3 streptococcal species. Peripheral blood from a patient with inflammatory bowel disease was positive for GAS. The presence of GAS 16S rRNA in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with PsA supports the concept that PsA is a reactive arthritis to certain streptococci.

  2. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  3. Skin Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, and Spondyloarthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua-Aguilera, Carolyn Jean; Möller, Burkhard; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2017-12-01

    Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and various spondyloarthritides including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis often involve the skin and may occur before or after diagnosis of these rheumatic diseases. Cutaneous manifestations encompass a wide range of reactions that may have a notable negative impact not only on the physical but especially on the emotional and psychosocial well-being of these patients. Several cutaneous manifestations have been related to rheumatoid arthritis such as subcutaneous nodules including classical rheumatoid nodules, accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, and rheumatoid nodulosis; vascular disorders like rheumatoid vasculitis, livedo racemosa, and Raynaud's phenomenon; and neutrophilic and/or granulomatous diseases like pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis, as well as palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the main cutaneous manifestations include an evanescent rash, rheumatoid nodules, as well as plaque and guttate psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is also the main skin disease involved in spondyloarthritides. Furthermore, other forms of psoriasis including guttate, inverse, erythrodermic, pustular, and particularly nail psoriasis may also occur. In addition, a variety of drug-induced skin reactions may also appear in these diseases. Early recognition and understanding of these different dermatologic manifestations together with an interdisciplinary approach are often needed to optimize management of these diseases.

  4. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  5. [Pyoderma gangrenosum associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beber, André Avelino Costa; Knob, Cristiane Faccin; Shons, Karen Regina Rosso; Neumaier, Walter; da Silva, João Carlos Nunes; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, which is associated with non-infectious systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. It is more common in adults and may present with four distinct clinical forms, all leading to ulceration of the skin affected. Its diagnosis is clinical and demands exclusion of other causes. Treatment should be performed with local care and systemic therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  7. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  8. Selected issues in diagnostic imaging of spondyloarthritides: psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloarthritides (also known as spondyloarthropathies) are a group of rheumatic diseases that consists of diversified entities, i.e. ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis in the course of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and juvenile spondyloarthropathies. In the diagnostics of spondyloarthritides, plain radiography has played a crucial role for years due to its undisputed ability to show distinctive bony changes. Yet as those diseases often manifest themselves by soft tissue pathology and bone marrow inflammation, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are currently a subject of numerous studies in the quest for setting up diagnostic criteria, especially at early stages of inflammatory processes. In our review, we present an up-to-date insight into classifications, etiopathogenesis and imaging of psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis.

  9. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ali, S. R.; Ishaque, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) American Society for Surgery of the Hand Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / ... Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  18. Treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, V.

    1986-01-01

    Current practices in treating severe rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed, including remarks on controlled trials of methotrexate, total lymphatic irradiation trials at Stanford and Harvard, and total body irradiation trials. U.K

  19. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  20. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  1. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  2. Hepatitis C-associated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D

    2000-07-01

    Rheumatologic complications of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are common and include mixed cryoglobulinemia, vasculitis, sicca symptoms, myalgia, arthritis, and fibromyalgia. The prevalence of cryoglobulinemia in Sweden and Germany is much lower compared with data from southern Europe. Viral, genetic, or environmental factors may be responsible for such a difference in prevalence. There is no single clinical picture of arthritis in patients with HCV infection. There is a well-defined picture of arthritis associated with the presence of mixed cryoglobulinemia that consists of an intermittent mono- or oligoarticular, nondestructive arthritis affecting large and medium-size joints. Involvement of salivary and lacrimal glands is common in HCV-infected subjects, but HCV antigens are not detected in affected glands. HCV-infected subjects express a high prevalence of a variety of autoantibodies, usually in low titers. The clinical significance of most of these autoantibodies is not clear. The prevalence and titer of these autoantibodies are unaffected by interferon-alpha therapy. Several studies have attempted to assess whether HCV infection may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. The results of most of these studies do not support the idea that HCV infection may play a pathogenic role in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, or leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Experience treating patients with HCV-associated arthritis is limited and treatment remains controversial. No major therapeutic trials in HCV-associated arthritis were reported in the past 2 years.

  3. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  4. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Computational visual distinctness metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Baena, J.; Toet, A.; Fdez-Vidal, X.R.; Garrido, A.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new computational visual distinctness metric based on principles of the early human visual system is presented. The metric is applied to quantify (1) the visual distinctness of targets in complex natural scenes and (2) the perceptual differences between compressed and uncompressed images. The new

  6. Lapachol, a compound targeting pyrimidine metabolism, ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Raphael S; Santos, Gabriela B; Cecilio, Nerry T; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Niehues, Michael; Torres, Bruna G S; Buqui, Gabriela; Silva, Carlos H T P; Costa, Teresa Dalla; Lopes, Norberto P; Nonato, Maria C; Ramalho, Fernando S; Louzada-Júnior, Paulo; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Emery, Flavio S; Alves-Filho, Jose C

    2017-03-07

    The inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthesis by blocking the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) activity, the prime target of leflunomide (LEF), has been proven to be an effective strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. However, a considerable proportion of RA patients are refractory to LEF. Here, we investigated lapachol (LAP), a natural naphthoquinone, as a potential DHODH inhibitor and addressed its immunosuppressive properties. Molecular flexible docking studies and bioactivity assays were performed to determine the ability of LAP to interact and inhibit DHODH. In vitro studies were conducted to assess the antiproliferative effect of LAP using isolated lymphocytes. Finally, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) models were employed to address the anti-arthritic effects of LAP. We found that LAP is a potent DHODH inhibitor which had a remarkable ability to inhibit both human and murine lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Importantly, uridine supplementation abrogated the antiproliferative effect of LAP, supporting that the pyrimidine metabolic pathway is the target of LAP. In vivo, LAP treatment markedly reduced CIA and AIA progression as evidenced by the reduction in clinical score, articular tissue damage, and inflammation. Our findings propose a binding model of interaction and support the ability of LAP to inhibit DHODH, decreasing lymphocyte proliferation and attenuating the severity of experimental autoimmune arthritis. Therefore, LAP could be considered as a potential immunosuppressive lead candidate with potential therapeutic implications for RA.

  7. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 new ... Edition Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with Us ...

  8. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters November 25, 2013 Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis The presence of a specific type of gut bacteria correlates with rheumatoid arthritis in newly diagnosed, untreated people. The finding suggests ...

  9. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint En español Send us ... joints have unique patterns of chemical tags—called epigenetic markers—that differ between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. ...

  10. Arthritis Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression symptoms but also arthritis pain. It's no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on ... Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy ...

  11. Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinic identifies the following risk factors: family history, age, sex, previous join injury, and obesity (Mayo Clinic, 2011). How is arthritis treated? Treatments for arthritis vary; exercising, medication, natural remedies, nutrition, ...

  12. Long-term outcome in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minden, Kirsten; Niewerth, Martina; Listing, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Bollow, Matthias; Schöntube, Monika; Zink, Angela

    2002-09-01

    To describe the long-term outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). All patients with JIA referred to a pediatric rheumatology center between 1978 and 1988 were identified and invited to undergo an assessment. Patients with JIA from a population-based cohort from East Berlin were included. The outcome assessment considered changes in body function and structure (e.g., mortality, joint abnormalities, disease activity), activities at the individual level (Health Assessment Questionnaire), and participation in society (e.g., mobility, educational and vocational background). Of 260 eligible patients, 215 (83%) were evaluated. Subtypes of JIA at disease onset included oligoarthritis (40%), polyarthritis (14%), systemic arthritis (14%), psoriatic arthritis (1%), enthesitis-related arthritis (15%), and other arthritis (16%). Followup was conducted after a median of 16.5 years. No deaths occurred in this cohort. At followup, approximately half of the patients had active disease and/or changes in body structures to a variable extent. Approximately one-third of patients rated themselves as being functionally limited. Patients demonstrated good social integration: few mobility problems were reported, and the educational achievements of patients were higher and their rate of unemployment was lower compared with the age-matched population. No significant differences in outcome were found between the population-based and the referral-based cohorts. Even though approximately half of the JIA patients had more or less distinctive changes in body function and/or structure after a disease duration of >15 years, fewer than 10% were severely disabled or handicapped. Because JIA often persists into adulthood, long-term followup and care are necessary.

  13. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  14. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  15. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  17. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  18. Native joinPropionibacteriumseptic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas; Coe, Marcus; Mata-Fink, Ana; Zuckerman, Richard

    2017-10-02

    Propionibacterium species are associated with normal skin flora and cultures may be dismissed as contaminants. They are increasingly recognized as a cause of septic arthritis following shoulder arthroplasty and arthrotomy. We identified three cases of Propionibacterium septic arthritis in native joints mimicking atypical osteoarthritis and review the literature, clinical course, and treatment of 18 cases. Two cases of Propionibacterium acne in native knee joints and one in a sternoclavicular joint are described. A literature search for Propionibacterium septic arthritis was performed. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome are reviewed for all cases. Our three cases were combined with 15 cases from the literature. Fourteen cases showed few signs of acute infection, slow culture growth, and delayed diagnosis. In 3 cases an early culture was dismissed as a contaminant. Six cases were reported as caused by recent arthrocentesis. Fifteen cases were cured with antibiotics, although 5 of these 15 also required surgical intervention. Two patients were diagnosed while undergoing surgery for osteoarthritis. Four patients required arthroplasty and two of our patients will require arthroplasty for good functional results. Propionibacterium as a cause of septic arthritis in native joints demonstrates few signs of acute infection, presents with prolonged course, and is often misdiagnosed or unsuspected. Anaerobic growth may be delayed or missed altogether, and outcomes are consequently poor. Consider Propionibacterium septic arthritis in atypical osteoarthritis prior to arthroplasty.

  19. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and response to commonly used anti-arthritic drugs were assessed and compared with DBA/1 mice. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to arthritis induced by immunisation with chicken type II collagen and develop strong and sustained T-cell responses to type II collagen. Arthritis was milder in C57BL/6 mice than DBA/1 mice and more closely resembled rheumatoid arthritis in its response to therapeutic intervention. Our findings show that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis, providing a valuable model for assessing the role of specific genes involved in the induction and/or maintenance of arthritis and for evaluating the efficacy of novel drugs, particularly those targeted at T cells.

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  1. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  2. "Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Lynn Moore

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract for invited review in Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Complex Pathophysiology thematic issue to be published in Frontiers in Immunology. Immune Complexes(ICin Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA Terry L. Moore, MD, FAAP, FACR, MACR Professor of Internal Medicine,Pediatrics, and Molecular Biology and Immunology Director of Adult and Pediatric Rheumatology Saint Louis University School of Medicine Saint Louis, Missouri 631`04,USA Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. ICs have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column,C1q solid phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these IC s have shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF, isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated (CCP peptide antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use for arthritis pain in 2 Chicago community areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinglass, Joe; Lee, Chin; Rogers, Michelle; Temple, Leslie Mendoza; Nelson, Cynthia; Chang, Rowland W

    2007-01-01

    To compare the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for arthritis between 2 ethnically distinct metropolitan Chicago community areas. A telephone interview survey of adults age 45 years or above living in North (88.9% white) or South (79.7% African American) areas. Of 763 respondents, 405 reported arthritis or chronic joint symptoms and were asked about use and satisfaction with 7 CAM therapies. Differences between areas were compared with population-weighted tests; multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the likelihood of CAM use controlled for demographics, behavioral risk factors, and arthritis severity. South Chicago respondents had a higher prevalence and more severe arthritis symptoms such as mean joint pain and more functional limitations. Use of CAM therapy by South Chicago respondents, most commonly massage and relaxation techniques, was 10% greater than North Chicago respondents (61.5% to 51%) but this was not significantly different. Among CAM users, South Chicago respondents reported higher satisfaction with 6 of the 7 CAM therapies and greater future interest in CAM therapies. Poor overall health status (P=0.03), arthritis pain (P=0.005), and concomitant use of prescription medications (P=0.03) were the only significant predictors of CAM use. Although there were only small differences in overall CAM use by area, older residents of largely African American communities were enthusiastic users of relaxation, massage, and nutritional and dietary techniques. CAM modalities could be important adjuncts to traditional medical treatment of arthritis pain for minority communities.

  4. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John J

    2017-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  6. Insufficiency fractures in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, L.; Ausejo de Pomar, E.; Cruzalegui, L.; Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Ara, P.

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of insufficiency fractures in patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis has not been sufficiently emphasized. Osteoporosis due to rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid therapy, contracture and angular deformity of the extremity, combine to predispose to the occurrence of the insufficiency fractures in these patients. Additionally, the pain and disability caused by the fracture is often attributed to rheumatoid joint involvement, masking the diagnosis of insufficiency fracture. The fracture may not be visible on radiographs near the onset of symptoms and the bone scanning can help in making an early diagnosis. (Author). 18 refs., 2 fig

  7. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  8. [Identification of Zaocys type II collagen and its effect on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Feng, Zhi-tao; Zhu, Jun-qing; Wu, Xiang-hui; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the homology of Zaocys type 1I collagen ( ZC II ) with the C II collagen from other species, and to investigate the effect of ZC II on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). ZC II was purified with restriction pepsin digestion. Then SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and UV spectrophotometry were used to identify the protein,the homology of the ZC II peptide was analyzed with Mass Spectrometry. The model of CIA mice were induced by subcutaneous injection of Chicken C II into male C57BL/6 mice from the base of the tails. After immunization,ZC II [H,M,L:40,20 and 10 μg/(kgd) ]was administered orally to mice from day 21 to 28 accordingly. The severity of the arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and his- topathological change of joint was observed by light microscope with HE staining. The molecular weight of ZC II protein deter- mined by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was between 110 kD and 140 kD, and UV absorption peak appeared at around 230 nm in wave- length. The peptide mass fingerprinting(PMF) of the purified protein by Mass Spectrometry analysis showed that it had at least 4 peptides matched with other species,and the protein score was greater than 95%. Compared with normal group,the CIA model group had significantly higher scores for arthritis and histopathological changes (P II peptide-treated mice with CIA were significantly lower than the mice from CIA model group(P II has high homology with the C II from other species. Oral administration of ZC II can suppress arthritis in mice with CIA and ameliorate the histopathological changes of the joint.

  9. Golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α holds a central position in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases of the locomotor apparatus. A separate class of drugs, namely, TNF-α inhibitors, that are effective against multicomponent diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, is now available to physicians. The paper reviews the results of clinical trials of the TNF-α inhibitor golimumab, a human TNF-α monoclonal antibody. Golimumab exerts a positive effect on all manifestations of PsA: arthritis, psoriatic skin and nail lesions, dactylitis, enthesitis, and quality of life. The drug is noted for its convenient route of administration – its standard dose is 50 mg injected subcutaneously once a month and for its low molecular immunogenicity. Recent data suggest that golimumab is an effective drug with a safety profile similar to that of the entire class of TNF-α inhibitors.

  10. Shining light on the differences in molecular structural chemical makeup and the cause of distinct degradation behavior between malting- and feed-type barley using synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Doiron, Kevin; Liu, Dasen

    2008-05-14

    The objective of this study was to use advanced synchrotron-sourced FTIR microspectroscopy (SFTIRM) as a novel approach to identify the differences in protein and carbohydrate molecular structure (chemical makeup) between these two varieties of barley and illustrate the exact causes for their significantly different degradation kinetics. Items assessed included (1) molecular structural differences in protein amide I to amide II intensities and their ratio within cellular dimensions, (2) molecular structural differences in protein secondary structure profile and their ratios, and (3) molecular structural differences in carbohydrate component peak profile. Our hypothesis was that molecular structure (chemical makeup) affects barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals. Using SFTIRM, the protein and carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup of barley was revealed and identified. The protein molecular structural chemical makeup differed significantly between the two varieties of barleys. No difference in carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup was detected. Harrington was lower than Valier in protein amide I, amide II, and protein amide I to amide II ratio, while Harrington was relatively higher in model-fitted protein alpha-helix and beta-sheet, but lower in the others (beta-turn and random coil). These results indicated that it is the molecular structure of protein (chemical makeup) that may play a major role in the different degradation kinetics between the two varieties of barleys (not the molecular structure of carbohydrate). It is believed that use of the advanced synchrotron technology will make a significant step and an important contribution to research in examining the molecular structure (chemical makeup) of plant, feed, and seeds.

  11. Shining Light on the Differences in Molecular Structural Chemical Makeup and the Cause of Distinct Degradation Behavior Between Malting- and Feed- Type Barley Using Synchrotorn FTIR Microspectroscopy: A Novel Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.; Doiron, K.; Liu, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use advanced synchrotron-sourced FTIR microspectroscopy (SFTIRM) as a novel approach to identify the differences in protein and carbohydrate molecular structure (chemical makeup) between these two varieties of barley and illustrate the exact causes for their significantly different degradation kinetics. Items assessed included (1) molecular structural differences in protein amide I to amide II intensities and their ratio within cellular dimensions, (2) molecular structural differences in protein secondary structure profile and their ratios, and (3) molecular structural differences in carbohydrate component peak profile. Our hypothesis was that molecular structure (chemical makeup) affects barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals. Using SFTIRM, the protein and carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup of barley was revealed and identified. The protein molecular structural chemical makeup differed significantly between the two varieties of barleys. No difference in carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup was detected. Harrington was lower than Valier in protein amide I, amide II, and protein amide I to amide II ratio, while Harrington was relatively higher in model-fitted protein a-helix and β-sheet, but lower in the others (β-turn and random coil). These results indicated that it is the molecular structure of protein (chemical makeup) that may play a major role in the different degradation kinetics between the two varieties of barleys (not the molecular structure of carbohydrate). It is believed that use of the advanced synchrotron technology will make a significant step and an important contribution to research in examining the molecular structure (chemical makeup) of plant, feed, and seeds.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ...

  13. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  14. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  15. Organising pneumonia - the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Desislava; Kolarov, Zlatimir; Rashkov, Rasho

    2017-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is a distinct type of interstitial lung disease, because it can also be seen in association with several conditions such as infections, drugs, and connective tissue diseases. An association of OP with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has also been described. Joint manifestations of RA usually precede lung involvements by several years; however, in less than 10% of cases of RA, interstitial lung disease may be the initial feature of RA. Organising pneumonia as the initial manifestation or developed simultaneously of RA is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain unknown. We present a 56-year-old woman with OP as the first manifestation of RA.

  16. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  17. Arthritis and cognitive impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Zack, Matthew; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-06-01

    Adults aged 65 or older with arthritis may be at increased risk for cognitive impairment [cognitive impairment but not dementia (CIND) or dementia]. Studies have found associations between arthritis and cognition impairments; however, none have examined whether persons with arthritis develop cognitive impairments at higher rates than those without arthritis. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we estimated the prevalence of cognitive impairments in older adults with and without arthritis, and examined associations between arthritis status and cognitive impairments. We calculated incidence density ratios (IDRs) using generalized estimating equations to estimate associations between arthritis and cognitive impairments adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, income, depression, obesity, smoking, the number of chronic conditions, physical activity, and birth cohort. The prevalence of CIND and dementia did not significantly differ between those with and without arthritis (CIND: 20.8%, 95% CI 19.7-21.9 vs. 18.3%, 95% CI 16.8-19.8; dementia: 5.2% 95% CI 4.6-5.8 vs. 5.1% 95% CI 4.3-5.9). After covariate control, older adults with arthritis did not differ significantly from those without arthritis for either cognitive outcome (CIND IDR: 1.6, 95% CI = 0.9-2.9; dementia IDR: 1.1, 95% CI = 0.4-3.3) and developed cognitive impairments at a similar rate to those without arthritis. Older adults with arthritis were not significantly more at risk to develop cognitive impairments and developed cognitive impairments at a similar rate as older adults without arthritis over 6 years.

  18. Short-term effect of ultrasound-guided low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid injection on clinical outcomes and imaging changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle and foot joints. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Lee, Si-Huei; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Liu, Fu-Wei; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chan, Rai-Chi; Chou, Chen-Liang

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into rheumatoid arthritis ankles and feet can achieve improvement in foot function and reduce synovial hyper-vascularization. Forty-four patients with RA having unilateral or bilateral painful ankle and foot involvement (N = 75) were studied. All the patients were randomized to receive HA (N = 40) or lidocaine (LI) (N = 35) injection at 2-week intervals; Clinical assessments were performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and foot function index (FFI total ) including subscales of pain (FFI pain) before injection at baseline, 4 weeks (first evaluation) and 12 weeks (secondary evaluation). Imaging evaluation based on color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and synovitis scores was performed simultaneously. HA injection improved the VAS score (p = .009), FFI pain (p = .041), and FFI total (p = .032) considerably more than LI injections did at the first evaluation. The CDUS values at first evaluation (p = .005) and secondary evaluation (p injections reduced the CDUS values of more than half of the joints (54%, p = .042) while the control group exhibited no change (20%, p = .56). However, HA injection did not reduce the CDUS values more than LI injection did. Regarding the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy, no significant difference was observed between or within the groups in the synovitis scores. HA injection improved short-term foot function and pain reduction. HA injection may have a modest effect in reducing synovial hyper-vascularization. Further large-scale study is warranted to confirm this result.

  19. Important role of IL-3 during intiation of collagen induced arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brühl, E.; Cihak, J.; Niedermeier, M.; Denzel, A.; Gomez, M.R.; Talke, Y.; Goebel, N.; Plachý, Jiří; Stangassinger, M.; Mack, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 5 (2009), s. 1352-1361 ISSN 0004-3591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : experimental arthritis * interleukin-3 * basophils Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.332, year: 2009

  20. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    rat adjuvant- induced arthritis (AIA) model by all outcome parameters(Clinical assessment and relevant laboratory/ immunological /Molecular analyses...treatment alone or combined with MTX was coupled with significant "positive" attenuation of multiple relevant immunological and laboratory markers - all...molecule does not belong to the class of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) that failed in clinical trials . It interferes with the interactions

  1. Active MMPs captured by alpha2Macroglobulin as a marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tchetverikov, I.; Verzijl, N.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Groot, J. de

    2003-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to analyze α2Macroglobulin/MMP (α2M/MMP) complex formation and to investigate whether MMP activity in α2M/MMP complexes in serum can be used as a disease marker in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. High and low molecular weight (H/LMW) substrates and

  2. Targeting of Gr-1+,CCR2+ monocytes in collagen-induced arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brühl, H.; Cihak, J.; Plachý, Jiří; Kunz-Schughart, L.; Niedermeier, M.; Denzel, A.; Gomez, M.R.; Talke, Y.; Luckow, B.; Stangassinger, M.; Mack, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2007), s. 2975-2985 ISSN 0004-3591 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemenschaft(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : arthritis * CCR2 * monocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.677, year: 2007

  3. Acute Rheumatic Fever versus Post-Streptococcal Reactive Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after a Group A streptococcal infection and can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. A migrating polyarthritis after throat infection with group A β-haemolytic streptococci is classically attributed to acute rheumatic fever (ARF). Sterile non-migratory arthritis may occur as a separate entity, the so called post streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA). This study aimed to identify clinical and serological differences of patients with reactive arthritis after infection with Lance field group Aβ-haemolytic streptococci, compared with acute rheumatic fever. Hundred and twenty patients were recruited for the study , they were classified into two groups according to the diagnosis of ARF and PSRA patients consecutively seen in the Rheumatology and the Pediatric wards. Clinical and laboratory data were assessed through a questionnaire. The diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made based on revised modified Jones' criteria, while the diagnosis of post streptococcal reactive arthritis was made based on Deighton criteria; these associated with laboratory data, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, and bi-dimensional echocardiography. Results revealed no significant differences between both groups as regard age where ρ>0.05, while there were a significant difference regarding the date of antecedent upper respiratory tract infection (ρ 0.05). Regarding the cardio logical changes P-R interval by ECG was prolonged in 19 patients (31.67%)and Echo study showed changes in 12 patient (20%) of cases of ARF patient only. On the basis of simple laboratory variables and management, it ws possible to differentiate ARF from PSRA patients. So it could be concluded that these two conditions are actually distinct identities

  4. A systems approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyong You

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that primarily attacks synovial joints. Despite the advances in diagnosis and treatment of RA, novel molecular targets are still needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and the therapeutic outcomes. Here, we present a systems approach that can effectively 1 identify core RA-associated genes (RAGs, 2 reconstruct RA-perturbed networks, and 3 select potential targets for diagnosis and treatments of RA. By integrating multiple gene expression datasets previously reported, we first identified 983 core RAGs that show RA dominant differential expression, compared to osteoarthritis (OA, in the multiple datasets. Using the core RAGs, we then reconstructed RA-perturbed networks that delineate key RA associated cellular processes and transcriptional regulation. The networks revealed that synovial fibroblasts play major roles in defining RA-perturbed processes, anti-TNF-α therapy restored many RA-perturbed processes, and 19 transcription factors (TFs have major contribution to deregulation of the core RAGs in the RA-perturbed networks. Finally, we selected a list of potential molecular targets that can act as metrics or modulators of the RA-perturbed networks. Therefore, these network models identify a panel of potential targets that will serve as an important resource for the discovery of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers, as well as providing novel insights into RA pathogenesis.

  5. A feasibility study of valerian extract for sleep disturbance in person with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, Diana M; Bourguignon, Cheryl; Gill Taylor, Ann

    2009-04-01

    To present a pilot study of valerian to explore issues of feasibility and efficacy in studies of sedative herbs for arthritis-related sleep disturbance. Fifteen persons with arthritis and mild sleep disturbance were randomized to receive 600 mg valerian (Valeriana officinalis, n = 7) or placebo (n = 8) for five nights. Protocol adherence (dosing and data collection) was high. Allocation concealment was successful using a novel approach for matching the placebo on the distinctive odor of valerian. Nonsignificant differences between the groups were found on all sleep outcomes, measured by daily diaries and wrist actigraphy. The study methods were feasible, except for recruitment issues (addressed in the discussion), and may guide the testing of other sedative herbs for persons with arthritis. Although efficacy outcomes were inconclusive due to the small sample size of this study, recent evidence from larger trials of valerian also does not support its efficacy.

  6. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technetium scintigraphy in experimental hyperergic arthritis and by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanheide, M.; Dreher, R.; Grebe, S.F.; Virian, M.; Federlin, K.; Sattler, E.L.; Altaras, J.; Mueller, H.; Giessen Univ.; Giessen Univ.; Giessen Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Guinea pigs showed an increased uptake of 99m-TC-04 in the inflamed joints during the first days of experimental arthritis. Tc-04 was found in the joint fluid and inflamed synovia. The uptake of Tc-04 and Tc-MDP was reduced by therapy in 13 patients with RA. Classical RA showed an increased uptake of Tc-MDP compared with probable RA. Scintigraphy offers the possibility of early diagnosis and study of progression. (orig.) [de

  8. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idi...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  9. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  10. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  11. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos; Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.). Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material:...

  12. Air Pollution as a Determinant of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaux, Johanna; Biton, Jérôme; André, Emma; Semerano, Luca; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2018-03-07

    Pollution has long been incriminated in many cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. More recently, studies evaluated the potential role for particulate pollutants in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The incidence of RA was found to be higher in urban areas. Living near air pollution emitters was associated with higher risks of developing RA and of producing RA-specific autoantibodies. Nevertheless, no strong epidemiological evidence exists to link one or more specific air pollution particles to RA. The presence in the bronchi of lymphoid satellite islands (inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue, iBALT) is strongly associated with both inflammatory lung disease and RA-associated lung disease. Diesel exhaust particles can stimulate iBALT formation. The induction by air pollution of an inflammatory environment with high citrullination levels in the lung may induce iBALT formation, thereby causing a transition toward a more specific immune response via the production of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. Air pollution not only triggers innate immune responses at the molecular level, increasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, but is also involved in adaptive immune responses. Thus, via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), diesel exhaust particles can trigger a T-cell switch to the Th17 profile. Finally, in the murine collagen-induced arthritis model, animals whose lymphocytes lack the AHR develop milder arthritis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Cutaneous panarteritis nodosa with destructive arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Ruiz, A; Calabozo Raluy, M; Manrique Martínez, P; Rossell Cerro, M; Múgica Sanperio, C; Goicoechea Marcaida, A

    1990-01-27

    The existence of arthritis in cutaneous panarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is controversial. We report a 52-year-old male with chronic destructive arthritis of both knees and palpable purpura in the feet, where the underlying histological finding was necrotizing arteritis. Systemic involvement was not demonstrated. AntiHBc and antiHBs antibodies were positive. Four of the 11 cases of CPAN with arthritis that we have found reported in the literature were well documented, and only one developed erosions of the joints. Our patient is the first reported case of CPAN with destructive arthritis and evidence of previous hepatitis B virus infection.

  15. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  16. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  17. Arthritis dermatitis syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez Mendez, Monica Patricia; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The pediatric rheumatology is a medical specialization with many areas under developed. The prevalence, pathophysiology and form of presentation of the pediatric rheumatic disease are different of adults. The skin compromise in many pediatric rheumatic diseases is a helping sing for diagnosis. The arthritis-dermatitis syndrome can be the first manifestation of many diseases as infections, tumors and endocrine diseases, but in pediatric age the immunologic and infections diseases are really important. Among infections diseases, virus (parvovirus, rubella, HIV) and bacteria (gonococcus, meningoccus) are the most Important. Within the group of autoimmune diseases the vasculitis such as Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are among the more prevalent autoimmune disease. This is a general review about arthritis-dermatitis syndrome in pediatric age

  18. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Kunze, V.; Koch, W.; Bruening, R.; Seelos, K.; Stroehmann, I.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M.

    1993-01-01

    21 patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist diagnosed according to the criteria of the American Rheumatism Association were examined by dynamic MRT before and after the i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The results were correlated with the clinical and radiological findings. The increased signal intensity of the pannus was 1.17±0.45%/sec and this differed significantly (p [de

  20. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Piotr; Walecka, Irena; Dopytalska, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established - the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score) are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D 3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  3. Influence of various forms of dialyzable leukocyte extracts on rat adjuvant arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancikova, Maria; Rovensky, Jozef; Blazickova, Stanislava; Pekarek, J.; Cech, Karel

    1994-01-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats is a chronic inflammatory disease, widely as an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In our study the effect of various fractions of dialyzable leukocyte extract (DLE): DLE I-molecular weight below 10 kDa (commercial preparation), DLE II-molecular weight below 5 kDa (suppressor fraction), DLE III-molecular weight 5-10 kDa on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis was studied. The adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats were treated with DLE fractions i.p. in solutions containing an active substance isolated from 12.5 x 10 6 and 6.25 x 10 6 leukocytes from day 1 (adjuvant injected) through day 18, every second day (total 9 times). Various markers in inflammation, immune function and joint destruction were evaluated: hind paw volume, serum hyaluronic acid, serum albumin and biopterin in urine. All these markers showed a significant improvement after using fraction DLE II in comparison with AA controls. Fractions DLE I and DLE III influenced only some markers of inflammation and immune function. Our results demonstrated a therapeutical effect of fraction DLE II on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis. (author). 22 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Septic arthritis due to Clostridium ramosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jiménez, Antonio; Prim, Núria; Crusi, Xavier; Benito, Natividad

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic bacilli that are rarely reported as etiologic agents of infectious arthritis. Previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium ramosum have not been reported. We describe the first 2 cases of C. ramosum arthritis. We reviewed the etiology of arthritis in our hospital during the previous 15 years. Both patients had underlying immunocompromising conditions and their infections involved a joint with preexisting disease: patient 1 had rheumatic arthritis and a prosthetic joint; patient 2, chronic renal failure on dialysis and hip osteoarthritis. The infection was hematogenously acquired and the course was indolent but destructive in both the cases. Management included open arthrotomy and resection arthroplasty. The infection had a persisting and relapsing course, and prolonged antibiotic treatment was required. In the literature review, we found 55 previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium species between 1966 and 2014; Clostridium perfringens was the most common infecting species; the infection was traumatically acquired in most of the cases. A total of 15 patients have been described with infections caused by C. ramosum; none had septic arthritis. The majority were elderly or immunocompromised adults. Proper collection, transportation and processing of clinical specimens is essential for diagnosing clostridial infections. More information about the best management of clostridial arthritis are needed. We describe the first 2 cases of septic arthritis caused by C. ramosum. They shared several pathogenic and clinical features. The possibility of anaerobic arthritis should always be considered when collecting diagnostic specimens. An increasing number of clostridial arthritis cases are likely to be diagnosed in future years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  6. Role of human microbiome and selected bacterial infections in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszyk, Ewa; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms inhabiting human body form a complex ecosystem. The mutual influence of the microbiome and the immune system of the host constitute the basis for numerous diseases, e.g. pseudomembranous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, atopic diseases, obesity, reactive arthritis. New molecular diagnostic methods and multi-center studies may help in understanding of the role of microbiota in health and disease. Rheumatoid arthritis has a multi-faceted etiology, and its causes are not entirely understood. There are indications for the influence of microbiomes of oral cavity, intestines, lungs and urinary tract on the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Interactions between microorganisms and human immune system play role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans contains two distinct acid sphingomyelinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, X; Hengartner, M O; Kolesnick, R N

    1998-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports a role for acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) in cellular stress signaling. Only murine and human sphingomyelinases have been defined at the molecular level. These enzymes are the products of a conserved gene and at the amino acid level share 82% identity. In this study, we show that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two ASMs, termed ASM-1 and ASM-2 encoded by two distinct genes, but lacks detectable neutral sphingomyelinase activity. The C. elegans ASMs are ab...

  8. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  9. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  10. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  11. Arthritis and X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro; Santos, Alexandra; Faria, Emília; Silva, Jorge; Malcata, Armando; Chieira, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are defined as genetically determined functional and/or quantitative abnormalities in one or more of the components of the immune system. Immunodeficiency and arthritis can be related, although the mechanisms are not always clear. Different causes for immunodeficiency can secondarily be found in patients with arthritis; on the other hand, arthritis can be a manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Arthritis occurs chiefly in humoral primary immunodeficiencies, namely in X-linked agammaglobulinemia and common variable immunodeficiency, and may be one of the warning signs for primary immunodeficiency. We report a case of arthritis as the presenting feature of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. In X-linked agammaglobulinemia, arthritis may be a consequence of infection, most notably by Mycoplasma, or of immune dysfunction itself. In children, and occasionally in young adults, a combination of arthritis and hypogammaglobulinemia should suggest primary immunodeficiency, although other causes of hypogammaglobulinemia must be excluded. Physicians evaluating patients with arthritis should be aware of this fact so that an early diagnosis can be pursued as it is of extreme importance in the optimal management and prognosis of these patients.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Chapter 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is primarily a disease of the synovial membrane. To demonstrate synovial changes it is necessary to show adequate detail of the soft tissue. This is best obtained by using industrial film and by hand-processing. The anatomy of the hand and the radiological appearance of rheumatoid arthritis are described. (author)

  13. Microbiota and arthritis: correlations or cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Blas, Alberto; Wessel, Hannah; Milling, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The microorganisms that colonise our bodies, the commensal 'microbiota', respond to changes in our behaviour and environment, and can also profoundly affect our health. We can now investigate these organisms with unprecedented depth and precision, revealing that they may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases including arthritis. Here we discuss the changes occurring in the microbiota in people with arthritis, and how manipulation of the microbiota may provide an additional pathway for therapy. We highlight two important aspects of the recent literature. First we describe changes in the microbiota identified in people with arthritis; these correlations give insights into the microbial changes that may contribute to symptoms of arthritis. We then discuss attempts to ameliorate arthritis by manipulating the microbiota. This is a rapidly developing area of research. There are tantalising hints that interventions targeting the microbiota may become therapeutically viable for some types of inflammatory arthritis. Our commensal microbial communities respond to changes in our health, and are altered in people with arthritis. Understanding the complex relationships between the microbiota and the body may enable us to deliberately manipulate these organisms and provide additional therapeutic options for people with arthritis.

  14. Immune modulation by vaccination in chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld - Huijssoon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination in autoimmunity can have beneficial, but also detrimental effects. In this thesis, we tried to identify factors that contribute to a favourable or an unfavourable outcome of vaccination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and experimental arthritis. In the first part, we focused on

  15. Proinflammatory cytokines increase iron uptake into human monocytes and synovial fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Joan F; Brock, Jeremy H

    2004-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that iron is stored in the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis which perpetuates inflamation by aiding the production of oxygen free radicals. Proinflammatory cytokines are produced by macrophages and lymphocytes present within synovium and by mononuclear cells of in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. There are two known systems for iron uptake. The first involves binding of iron to transferrin and uptake via transferrin receptors. The second involves uptake by low molecular weight organic anions such as ascorbate and citrate (non-transferrin bound uptake). Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNFalpha and interferon gamma) were added to fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and human monocytes in culture and their effect on 59Fe-transferrin and citrate uptake was determined. Proinflammatory cytokines increase transferrin and non-transferrin bound iron uptake into human monocytes and increase transferrin-bound iron uptake by synovial fibroblasts, but have no effect on non-transferrin bound uptake into fibroblasts. Proinflammatory cytokines produced in human rheumatoid arthritis synovium and synovial fluid may contribute to the accumulation of iron that occurs in rheumatoid arthritis synovium which may lead to damage to synovial fibroblasts, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  16. In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Cathepsin and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity Discriminates between Arthritic and Osteoarthritic Processes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline A. Vermeij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA are serologically and clinically distinctive, but at the local level, both diseases have many molecular pathways in common. In vivo molecular imaging can unravel the local pathologic processes involved in both diseases. In this study, we investigated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP and cathepsin activity during cartilage destruction, in an RA and an OA mouse model, using biophotonic imaging of substrate-based probes. Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA or destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM were imaged using near-infrared fluorescent probes, activated by several cathepsins or MMPs. Fluorescence signal intensity was compared to synovial gene expression, histology, and cartilage staining of a neoepitope of aggrecan cleaved by MMPs with the amino acids DIPEN. Increased cathepsin and MMP activity was seen during CIA, whereas the DMM model only showed increased MMP activity. DIPEN expression was seen only during CIA. A possible explanation can be differences in gene expressions; MMP3 and -13, known to produce DIPEN neoepitopes, were upregulated in the CIA model, whereas MMP12, known to be involved in elastin degradation and chemokine inhibition, was upregulated in the DMM model. Thus, molecular imaging showed no cathepsin activity at the time of cartilage damage in the DMM model, whereas both cathepsins and MMPs are active in the CIA model during disease progression.

  17. "Four legs instead of two"--perspectives on a Nordic walking-based walking programme among people with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Rhona; Kennedy, Norelee

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) is growing in popularity among people with arthritis. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of participants with arthritis on a NW-based walking programme including factors contributing to sustained participation in the programme. Three semi-structured focus groups were conducted with a total of 27 participants with various types of arthritis. The groups consisted of participants who completed a NW-based walking programme in the previous 4 years. Only participants who had sustained involvement in the walking group were included. Groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was performed. Participants reported that the walking programme offered numerous benefits. Two distinct themes emerged: (1) "four legs instead of two legs" and (2) "a support group". Theme 1 incorporates the physical, psychological and educational benefits that stem from involvement in a walking group while Theme 2 incorporates the benefits of social support in group-based activity. Several benefits of a NW-based walking programme from the perspectives of individuals with arthritis who engage in group-based walking programmes were identified. The benefits may encourage sustained participation and justify the promotion of NW as an intervention for people with arthritis. Considering how to sustain exercise participation is important to ensure continued benefits from physical activity participation. A community-based Nordic walking-based walking programme for people with arthritis improved exercise knowledge and confidence to exercise. Group exercise is valuable in providing support and motivation to continue exercising.

  18. LIPID PROFILE IN CHILDREN WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Gudkova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid composition in children with different types of juvenile arthritis was investigated in this trial. Significant decrease of plasma concentration of cholesterol in high density lipoproteins in patients with high activity of rheumatoid arthritis was discovered. «Atherogenic» shift of lipid composition and increase of atherogenity index was shown in most of pediatric patients with different types of juvenile arthritis. The number of children with increased atherogenity index grows according to the increase of disease activity. pediatric patients with high activity of juvenile arthritis and juvenile ankylosing spondylitis are the risk group of early atherosclerosis development.Key words: juvenile arthritis, atherosclerosis, high density lipoproteins, triglyceride, atherogenity index.

  19. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  20. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  1. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  2. Managing Rheumatoid Arthritis with Dietary Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Khanna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-help by means of dietary interventions can help in management of various disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a debilitating autoimmune disease. Dietary interventions necessitate a widespread appeal for both patients as well as clinicians due to factors including affordability, accessibility, and presence of scientific evidences that demonstrate substantial benefits in reducing disease symptoms such as pain, joint stiffness, swelling, tenderness and associated disability with disease progression. However, there is still an uncertainty among the community about the therapeutic benefits of dietary manipulations for RA. In the present review, we provide an account of different diets and their possible molecular mechanism of actions inducing observed therapeutic benefits for remission and management of RA. We further indicate food that can be a potential aggravating factor for the disease or may help in symptomatic relief. We thereafter summarize and thereby discuss various diets and food which help in reducing levels of inflammatory cytokines in RA patients that may play an effective role in management of RA following proper patient awareness. We thus would like to promote diet management as a tool that can both supplement and complement present treatment strategies for a better patient health and recovery.

  3. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever in Brazil: its hidden role in seronegative arthritis and the importance of molecular diagnosis based on the repetitive element IS1111 associated with the transposase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Rozental

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the agent of Q fever , an emergent worldwide zoonosis of wide clinical spectrum. Although C. burnetii infection is typically associated with acute infection, atypical pneumonia and flu-like symptoms, endocarditis, osteoarticular manifestations and severe disease are possible, especially when the patient has a suppressed immune system; however, these severe complications are typically neglected. This study reports the sequencing of the repetitive element IS1111 of the transposase gene of C. burnetii from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples from a patient with severe pneumonia following methotrexate therapy, resulting in the molecular diagnosis of Q fever in a patient who had been diagnosed with active seronegative polyarthritis two years earlier. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first documented case of the isolation of C. burnetii DNA from a BAL sample.

  4. Molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The richly illustrated book comprehensively explains the important principles of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and their spectra in two separate, distinct parts. The first part concentrates on the theoretical aspects of molecular physics, such as the vibration, rotation, electronic states, potential curves, and spectra of molecules. The different methods of approximation for the calculation of electronic wave functions and their energy are also covered. The introduction of basics terms used in group theory and their meaning in molecular physics enables an elegant description of polyatomic

  5. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  6. Therapeutical approach to rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Paraskevi Gourni; Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial joints, and loss of the function leading to disability. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Although, οver the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of the factors that are crucial in regulating this disease, still the managment of the disease remains difficult.Aim : Τhe aim of the present study was the evaluation ...

  7. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  9. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  10. Thumb troubles in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garofalo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thumb involvement may play a relevant role in inducing a severe functional impairment in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this sonographic vignette is to show the value of sonography in detailing anatomic changes involving the thumb during a phase of active synovitis. The patient was a 50-year old man who presented with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis. He complained of a 4-week history of a marked recrudescence inflammatory thumb involvement associated with clinical signs of carpal tunnel syndrome. Sonographic images were obtained with a real-time ultrasound system equipped with a 13 MHz linear transducer. Sonographic examination on longitudinal dorsal scan of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb showed a moderate joint cavity widening with two evident bone erosions, one at the metacarpal head and the other one at the basis of the proximal phalanx. The longitudinal volar scan of the first metacarpophalangeal joint confirmed the presence of synovitis detecting a marked joint cavity widening, with aspect of synovial proliferation. The flexor pollicis longus tendon was severely involved (marked tendon sheath widening, synovial proliferation, loss of the normal homogeneous fibrillar echotexture, and a large intratendinous tear. Sonography allowed the depiction of a wide range of otherwise undetectable pathologic changes in the standard clinical setting.

  11. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  12. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  13. Comparative proteomics of a model MCF10A-KRasG12V cell line reveals a distinct molecular signature of the KRasG12V cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Waters, Andrew M; Bess, Matthew; Harned, Adam; Wei, Bih-Rong; Loncarek, Jadranka; Luke, Brian T; Orsburn, Benjamin C; Hollinger, Bradley D; Stephens, Robert M; Bagni, Rachel; Martinko, Alex; Wells, James A; Nissley, Dwight V; McCormick, Frank; Whiteley, Gordon; Blonder, Josip

    2016-12-27

    Oncogenic Ras mutants play a major role in the etiology of most aggressive and deadly carcinomas in humans. In spite of continuous efforts, effective pharmacological treatments targeting oncogenic Ras isoforms have not been developed. Cell-surface proteins represent top therapeutic targets primarily due to their accessibility and susceptibility to different modes of cancer therapy. To expand the treatment options of cancers driven by oncogenic Ras, new targets need to be identified and characterized at the surface of cancer cells expressing oncogenic Ras mutants. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based method for molecular profiling of the cell surface using KRasG12V transfected MCF10A (MCF10A-KRasG12V) as a model cell line of constitutively activated KRas and native MCF10A cells transduced with an empty vector (EV) as control. An extensive molecular map of the KRas surface was achieved by applying, in parallel, targeted hydrazide-based cell-surface capturing technology and global shotgun membrane proteomics to identify the proteins on the KRasG12V surface. This method allowed for integrated proteomic analysis that identified more than 500 cell-surface proteins found unique or upregulated on the surface of MCF10A-KRasG12V cells. Multistep bioinformatic processing was employed to elucidate and prioritize targets for cross-validation. Scanning electron microscopy and phenotypic cancer cell assays revealed changes at the cell surface consistent with malignant epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation secondary to KRasG12V activation. Taken together, this dataset significantly expands the map of the KRasG12V surface and uncovers potential targets involved primarily in cell motility, cellular protrusion formation, and metastasis.

  14. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  15. Temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Tveito, L.; Dale, K.; Ruud, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Transantral (infraorbital, transmaxillary) examination of the temporomandibular joint was compared with conventional transcranial examination and lateral tomography of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 23 to 83. Abnormalities were most frequently found at tomography, and equally frequent at transantral and transcranial examinations. The various examinations appeared to be rather supplementary. Bone erosion was frequently observed at transantral examination, which appeared to be the preferable radiographic method for detecting arthritis of this joint. Combined with transcranial examination, the method is recommended for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis if tomographic equipment is not available. (Auth.)

  16. Babesia divergens-like organisms from free-ranging chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) and roe deer (Capreolus c. capreolus) are distinct from B. divergens of cattle origin - an epidemiological and molecular genetic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Nicole; Deplazes, Peter; Hoby, Stefan; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Edelhofer, Renate; Mathis, Alexander

    2008-06-14

    In 2005 and 2006, three adult female chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) were found dead with signs of acute babesial infection in the eastern Swiss Alps. PCR on DNA extracted from blood or spleen of the carcasses revealed sequence identity of the amplified part of the 18S rRNA gene with GenBank entries attributed to Babesia divergens of cattle origin or B. capreoli of wild ruminant origin which have never been described before in this region. Examination of 424 blood samples from 314 head of cattle from this area by IFAT, microscopy and PCR provided no evidence for babesial infection. Six of 887 ticks collected from cattle were PCR-positive, and sequencing revealed Babesia sp. genotype EU1 in five and B. divergens/B. capreoli in one of them. A Babesia isolate of chamois, two isolates of roe deer from the same region and one isolate of a roe deer from the north-western Swiss Alps were genetically compared with two Swiss B. divergens isolates of cattle origin by analysing the genomic rDNA locus. Whereas the near full length sequences of the 18S rRNA gene were virtually identical among all six isolates (>99.4% identity), distinct differences between the two isolates from cattle on the one hand and the four isolates from free-ranging ruminants on the other hand were observed in the sequences of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1, ITS2) and part of the 28S rRNA gene. These results indicate that, albeit genetically very closely related, these babesial organisms from cattle and from free-ranging ruminants indeed are distinguishable organisms with different host specificities, and they support the use of the discrete species name B. capreoli for the B. divergens-like organisms from chamois and roe deer.

  17. Development of a new humanized mouse model to study acute inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misharin Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial advances have been generated in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Current murine models of RA-like disease have provided great insights into the molecular mechanism of inflammatory arthritis due to the use of genetically deficient or transgenic mice. However, these studies are limited by differences that exist between human and murine immune systems. Thus, the development of an animal model that utilizes human immune cells, will afford the opportunity to study their function in the initiation and propagation of inflammatory arthritis. Methods One to two-day old irradiated NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were reconstituted with human CD34+ cord blood stem cells. Leukocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and circulating antibodies were determined by ELISA. Arthritis was induced by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant into knee or ankle joints. Mice were also treated with the TNF inhibitor, Etanercept, or PBS and joints were analyzed histologically. Results Humanized mice were established with high reconstitution rates and were able to spontaneously produce human immunoglobulins as well as specific IgG in response to immunization. Intraperitoneal injection of thioglycolate or injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into joints resulted in migration of human immune cells to the injected sites. Arthritic humanized mice treated with Etanercept had markedly less inflammation, which was associated with decreased total numbers of human CD45+ cells, including human lymphocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The humanized mouse model is a new model to study inflammatory arthritis disease using human leukocytes without rejection of engrafted tissue. Future studies may adapt this system to incorporate RA patient cord blood and develop a chimeric animal model of inflammatory arthritis using genetically predisposed immune cells.

  18. Exercise Helps Ease Arthritis Pain and Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mowing the lawn, raking leaves and walking the dog count. Body awareness exercises, such as gentle forms ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 16, 2015. Benefits of exercise for osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation. http://www. ...

  19. Role of Gut Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2017-06-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Recently, investigators have focused on the gut microbiota, which is thought to be an environmental agent affecting the development of RA. Here we review the evidence from animal and human studies that supports the role of the gut microbiota in RA. We and others have demonstrated that the abundance of Prevotella copri is increased in some early RA. We have also used gnotobiotic experiments to show that dysbiosis in RA patients contributed to the development of Th17 cell-dependent arthritis in intestinal microbiota-humanized SKG mice. On the other hand, Prevotella histicola from human gut microbiota suppressed the development of arthritis. In summary, Prevotella species are involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  20. Role of Gut Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Maeda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Recently, investigators have focused on the gut microbiota, which is thought to be an environmental agent affecting the development of RA. Here we review the evidence from animal and human studies that supports the role of the gut microbiota in RA. We and others have demonstrated that the abundance of Prevotella copri is increased in some early RA. We have also used gnotobiotic experiments to show that dysbiosis in RA patients contributed to the development of Th17 cell-dependent arthritis in intestinal microbiota-humanized SKG mice. On the other hand, Prevotella histicola from human gut microbiota suppressed the development of arthritis. In summary, Prevotella species are involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  2. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched......-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (-0.24; 95% confidence.......57–0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients....

  3. Atlantooccipital septic arthritis complicating recurrent otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Zoe; Cranswick, Noel; Rao, Padma; Steer, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Otitis media is known to have a number of complications. We present the first reported case of atlantooccipital septic arthritis as a complication of Streptococcus pneumoniae otitis media in an 8-month-old boy.

  4. Septic arthritis: immunopathogenesis, experimental models and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis is an inflammatory disease of the joints that is started by an infection whose most common agent is Staphylococcus aureus. In this review we discuss some of the most arthritogenic bacterial factors and the contribution of innate and specific immune mechanisms to joint destruction. Special emphasis is given to the induction of experimental arthritis by S. aureus in mice. The improvement of therapy by association of antibiotics with down-modulation of immunity is also included. PMID:24822058

  5. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadali Nazarinia; Reza Jalli; Eskandar Kamali Sarvestani; Siamak Farahangiz; Maryam Ataollahi

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female) were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, an...

  6. Interplay between genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Klein, Kerstin; Gay, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with epigenetics serving as a possible interface through which risk factors contribute to RA. High-throughput technologies for interrogating genome and epigenome, and the availability of genetic and epigenetic datasets across a diversity of cell types, enable the identification of candidate causal genetic variants for RA to study their function in core RA processes. To date, RA risk variants were studied in the immune cells but not joint resident cells, for example, synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fibroblasts from different joints are distinct, anatomically specialized cells, defined by joint-specific transcriptomes, epigenomes and phenotypes. Cell type-specific analysis of epigenetic changes, together with genetic fine mapping and interrogation of chromatin 3D interactions may identify new disease relevant pathways, potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers for RA progression or therapy response.

  7. [Cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular joint disease. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone. The Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases. It had been well recognized that MMP play major roles in the cartilage breakdown in RA and OA. Moreover ADAM-TS-1, -4, -5 have aggrecanase activity, and also involve the cartilage degradation in RA and OA. Of course they contribute the cartilage homeostasis in healthy subjects. Failure to regulate the synthesis, activation and inhibition of the proteinases finally leads to cartilage destruction. Aggrecan and type II collagen are major components in cartilage matrix. Cleavage of aggrecan by aggrecanase and that of collagen by collagenase are critical steps for degradation of articular cartilage in RA. To prevent the cartilage damage, inflammatory synovitis should be suppressed in early stage.

  8. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, S.M.

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was investigated clinically and by orthopantomography in 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 73 control subjects. Clinical symptoms in the TMJ were established in 34% of the RA patients and in 18% of the controls. Radiographic abnormalities were found in 60% of the RA patients compared with 15% in the controls. No single radiographic abnormality was characteristic of joint involvement by RA. The most common radiologic features in RA patients were changes in the morphology of the condylar head and articular eminentia, marginal irregularities, reduced mobility, and an anterior position of the condylar head. No abnormalities were encountered in the early stage of the disease, which at least in part could be attributed to the inherent limitations of orthopantomography. The incidence of joint lesions increased with duration of the RA. (orig.).

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  11. Cerebral biochemical pathways in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis: a comparative metabolomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert W Lutz

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including brain disorders, are associated with perturbations of tissue metabolism. However, an often overlooked issue is the impact that inflammations outside the brain may have on brain metabolism. Our main goal was to study similarities and differences between brain metabolite profiles of animals suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and adjuvant arthritis (AA in Lewis rat models. Our principal objective was the determination of molecular protagonists involved in the metabolism underlying these diseases. EAE was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA and spinal-cord homogenate (SC-H, whereas AA was induced by CFA only. Naive rats served as controls (n = 9 for each group. Two weeks after inoculation, animals were sacrificed, and brains were removed and processed for metabolomic analysis by NMR spectroscopy or for immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, both inflammatory diseases caused similar, though not identical, changes in metabolites involved in regulation of brain cell size and membrane production: among the osmolytes, taurine and the neuronal marker, N-acetylaspartate, were decreased, and the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, slightly increased in both inoculated groups compared with controls. Also ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, sources of inflammatory agents, and several glycolytic metabolites were increased in both inoculated groups. By contrast, the amino acids, aspartate and isoleucine, were less concentrated in CFA/SC-H and control vs. CFA rats. Our results suggest that inflammatory brain metabolite profiles may indicate the existence of either cerebral (EAE or extra-cerebral (AA inflammation. These inflammatory processes may act through distinct pathways that converge toward similar brain metabolic profiles. Our findings open new avenues for future studies aimed at demonstrating whether brain metabolic effects provoked by AA are pain/stress-mediated and

  12. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  13. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  14. Two UV-Sensitive Photoreceptor Proteins, Opn5m and Opn5m2 in Ray-Finned Fish with Distinct Molecular Properties and Broad Distribution in the Retina and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keita; Yamashita, Takahiro; Haruki, Yoshihiro; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Kinoshita, Masato; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Opn5 is a group within the opsin family of proteins that is responsible for visual and non-visual photoreception in animals. It consists of several subgroups, including Opn5m, the only subgroup containing members found in most vertebrates, including mammals. In addition, recent genomic information has revealed that some ray-finned fishes carry paralogous genes of Opn5m while other fishes have no such genes. Here, we report the molecular properties of the opsin now called Opn5m2 and its distributions in both the retina and brain. Like Opn5m, Opn5m2 exhibits UV light-sensitivity when binding to 11-cis-retinal and forms a stable active state that couples with Gi subtype of G protein. However, Opn5m2 does not bind all-trans-retinal and exhibits exclusive binding to 11-cis-retinal, whereas many bistable opsins, including fish Opn5m, can bind directly to all-trans-retinal as well as 11-cis-retinal. Because medaka fish has lost the Opn5m2 gene from its genome, we compared the tissue distribution patterns of Opn5m in medaka fish, zebrafish, and spotted gar, in addition to the distribution patterns of Opn5m2 in zebrafish and spotted gar. Opn5m expression levels showed a gradient along the dorsal-ventral axis of the retina, and preferential expression was observed in the ventral retina in the three fishes. The levels of Opn5m2 showed a similar gradient with preferential expression observed in the dorsal retina. Opn5m expression was relatively abundant in the inner region of the inner nuclear layer, while Opn5m2 was expressed in the outer edge of the inner nuclear layer. Additionally, we could detect Opn5m expression in several brain regions, including the hypothalamus, of these fish species. Opn5m2 expression could not be detected in zebrafish brain, but was clearly observed in limited brain regions of spotted gar. These results suggest that ray-finned fishes can generally utilize UV light information for non-image-forming photoreception in a wide range of cells in the

  15. Osteoprotegerin Polymorphisms in a Mexican Population with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Generalized Osteoporosis: A Preliminary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala-Cerna, Maria Guadalupe; Moran-Moguel, Maria Cristina; Cornejo-Toledo, Jesus Alejandro; Gonzalez-Montoya, Norma Guadalupe; Sanchez-Corona, Jose; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Aguilar-Chavez, Erika Anita; Alcaraz-Lopez, Miriam Fabiola; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Alicia Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex phenomenon where genetic risk factors have been partially evaluated. The system formed by receptor activator for nuclear factor-?B (RANK), receptor activator for nuclear factor-?B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG): RANK/RANKL/OPG is a crucial molecular pathway for coupling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts, since OPG is able to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and activation. We aim to evaluate the association between SNPs C95...

  16. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    arthritis (AIA) model by all outcome parameters(Clinical assessment and relevant laboratory/ immunological /Molecular analyses). (II) Prophylactic dosing of...with MTX was coupled with significant "positive" attenuation of multiple relevant immunological and laboratory markers - all strongly implying that the...Farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS). This small molecule does not belong to the class of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) that failed in clinical trials . It

  17. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  19. The multiple facets of glucocorticoid action in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschant, Ulrike; Lane, Nancy E; Tuckermann, Jan

    2012-11-01

    Glucocorticoids have potent anti-inflammatory effects and have been used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis for more than 60 years. However, severe adverse effects of glucocorticoid treatment, including loss of bone mass and increased risk of fractures, are common. Data from studies of glucocorticoid-mediated gene regulation, which utilized conditional knockout mice in animal models of arthritis or glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, have substantially increased our understanding of the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids act via the glucocorticoid receptor. Following glucocorticoid binding, the receptor regulates gene expression either by interacting with DNA-bound transcription factors as a monomer or by binding directly to DNA as a dimer. In contrast to the old hypothesis that transrepression mechanisms involving monomeric glucocorticoid receptor actions were responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids, whereas dimeric glucocorticoid receptor binding resulted in adverse effects, data from animal models have shown that the anti-inflammatory and adverse effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by both monomeric and dimeric glucocorticoid receptor binding. This improved knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the beneficial and adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy might lead to the development of rationales for novel glucocorticoid receptor ligands that could potentially have anti-inflammatory efficacy without adverse effects on bone.

  20. Dietary recommendations for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitetta L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Luis Vitetta,1 Samantha Coulson,1 Janet Schloss,1 Shoshannah L Beck,1 Robert Allen,2 Avni Sali21Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, 2National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Dietary interventions can assist with the management of disease symptoms that accompany rheumatoid arthritis (RA, such as pain, tender swollen joints, stiffness, and associated disability and disease progression. Dietary interventions have gained widespread appeal for both clinicians and RA patients. Interventions that promote self-help through education can have significant benefits for patients as they negotiate pain and musculoskeletal disability. There is substantial scientific evidence that demonstrates patients diagnosed with RA may benefit from dietary interventions; however, recent systematic reviews remain uncertain about the therapeutic efficacy of dietary manipulation for RA due to clinical trials with a high risk of bias. However, dietary interventions with plausible therapeutic activity may be indicated for reducing RA-associated symptoms, including elimination of foods that may trigger an allergic or intolerant response, introduction of known anti-inflammatory dietary compounds and correction of food, or drug-induced gastrointestinal tract microbiota abnormalities and permeability.Keywords: diet, rheumatoid arthritis, vegetarian, vegan, Mediterranean, fish oils, probiotics

  1. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  2. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understand...

  3. Glutaminyl Cyclases as Novel Targets for the Treatment of Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellvard, Annelie; Maresz, Katarzyna; Schilling, Stephan; Graubner, Sigrid; Heiser, Ulrich; Jonsson, Roland; Cynis, Holger; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Potempa, Jan; Mydel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis is a severe and rapidly debilitating disease mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we assess the antiarthritic efficiency of glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitors. Methods. Mice were inoculated with an arthritogenic amount of S. aureus intravenously or by local administration into the knee joint. Animals were treated with QC inhibitors (PBD155 and PQ529) via chow during the experiment. QC and isoQC knockout mice were also analyzed for arthritis symptoms after local administration of bacteria. Results. Both QC inhibitors significantly delayed the onset of clinical signs of arthritis, and inhibitors significantly decreased weight loss in treated animals. Following intraarticular injection of S. aureus, PBD155-treated mice had lower levels of synovitis and bone erosion, as well as less myeloperoxidase in synovial tissue. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that PBD155 treatment affected the expression pattern of adhesion molecules, preventing the upregulation of cells expressing CD11b/CD18. Conclusion. The compounds investigated here represent a novel class of small molecular antiarthritic inhibitors. In our studies, they exerted strong antiinflammatory actions, and therefore they might be suited for disease-modifying treatment of infectious arthritis. PMID:23204180

  4. Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup; Just, Søren Andreas

    Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287......Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287...

  5. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  6. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... swelling, and stiffness. How Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis Different? Osteoporosis and osteoarthritis are sometimes confused because their ...

  7. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  8. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  9. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain: Tips for Protecting Your Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis pain: Tips for protecting your joints Use these joint protection techniques to help you stay in control of your rheumatoid arthritis pain. By Mayo Clinic Staff Joint protection is ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated fats, sodium and processed foods might help reduce symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. But the research ... often results in weight loss, which can independently reduce stress on joints and improve arthritis symptoms. Some ...

  12. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Yes. ... spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Doctors may also refer to it as degenerative ...

  13. urea as a host for distinction of phthalic acid and terephthalic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1-Phenyl-3-(quinolin-5-yl)urea; hydrogen bond; co-crystal; salt; visual distinction. 1. Introduction. The anion recognition property ... carboxylic acids (scheme 1) and about visual distinction. ∗. For correspondence of two positional ..... vided on support of strong intra-molecular hydrogen bond interactions in visual distinction of ...

  14. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome in an adolescent with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ester; Estanqueiro, Paula; Almeida, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Oscar; Salgado, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is a neutrophilic dermatosis, characterized by the occurrence of arthritis and skin lesions related to bowel disease with or without bowel bypass. We report an unusual case of BADAS in a 15-year-old white male with congenital aganglionosis of the colon and hypoganglionosis of the small intestine and multiple bowel surgeries in childhood complicated by short bowel syndrome. He presented with recurrent peripheral polyarthritis, tenosynovitis, and painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules located on the dorsolateral regions of the legs and on the dorsa of the feet. Histological examination disclosed a neutrophilic dermatosis confirming the diagnosis of BADAS.Although an uncommon disease, especially at pediatric age, it is important to evoke the diagnosis of BADAS in children and adolescents with bowel disease, because treatment options and prognosis are distinct from other rheumatologic conditions.

  15. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  16. Septic arthritis associated with systemic sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Weon; Kim, Dong-Hee; Shin, Sung-Jin; Kang, Byoung-Youl; Eho, Yil-Ju; Yang, Seong-Wook

    2018-01-01

    Septic arthritis presents with good joint function, but sometimes leads to poor outcomes. Concurrent systemic sepsis has been regarded as the poor outcome, and the exact cause remains unclear. This paper was performed to identify factors associated with concurrent systemic sepsis and to research results to predict poor outcomes in patients with septic arthritis. Laboratory and medical data were reviewed for 137 adults with acute septic arthritis who underwent open or arthroscopic surgical debridement at our institution between January 2005 and December 2014. The patients were divided according to whether they had septic arthritis alone (Group A) or in combination with systemic sepsis (Group B). Systemic sepsis was defined as two more systemic inflammatory signs in response to an infectious process. Patient characteristics, laboratory findings, synovial fluid findings and cultures, and surgical results were compared between two groups. Of the 137 patients, 41 (29.9%) had initial systemic sepsis at the diagnosis of septic arthritis. Independent t test revealed that duration of prodromal symptom (p = 0.012), serum neutrophil percent (p = 0.008), C-reactive protein (p = 0.001), Charlson comorbidity index (p = 0.001), positive culture in synovial fluid (p = 0.001), and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolate in synovial fluid (p = 0.001) had significant correlations with the group B. Repeated debridement was performed for those who had recurrence of infection, and this procedure was more often in group B (23 versus 21 joints, 23.9 versus 51.2%, p = 0.012). Progression of arthritis occurred more often in group B (16 versus 17 joints, 16.7 versus 41.5%, p = 0.001). Septic arthritis combined with systemic sepsis was related to duration of prodromal symptom, serum neutrophil percent, C-reactive protein, Charlson comorbidity index, positive culture in synovial fluid, and a MSSA isolate in synovial fluid. Concurrent systemic sepsis led to

  17. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  18. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  19. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  20. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.; Fleischmann, D.; Kiener, H.P.; Wiesmayr, M.N.; Herold, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  2. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also been shown to extend the time to the next attack and reduce the frequency...

  3. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more disease...

  4. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... meeting. Agenda: On July 22, 2013, the committee will discuss the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis...

  5. A Study of Intima Media Thickness and Their Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanah Aqashiah Mazlan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with Psoriasis. Its recognition as an inflammatory disease distinct from Rheumatoid Arthritis has put forward for consideration several questions regarding its specific CVS mortality and morbidity (9, 11, 16, 26. Carotid intima media thickness is a useful surrogate and sensitive marker to determine atherosclerosis even in its subclinical stages (6, 14, 22, 27, 32. Objective: Prevalence of carotid intima media thickness in patients with Psoriatic arthritis is unknown in Asian population. We aim to identify the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis and disease activity association and its predictors in a series of patients with PsA attended to the rheumatology clinic, tertiary hospitals. Methods: A total of 63 patients with PsA who fulfilled the CASPAR criteria were recruited from UKM Medical Centre and Hospital Putrajaya. Common carotid intima media thickness (IMT was measured in both right and left carotid artery by using high resolution B-mode ultrasound. This was a cross sectional study first done in Malaysia for PsA patients. Results: The positive IMT (IMT >1.00 mm among PsA was observed in 10 out of 63 patients (15.9 % regardless of background cardiovascular risk. The mean±SD of IMT was 0.725 ±0.260 mm for this study. Variables significantly associated with positive IMT (p<0.05 included age at the time of study (p=0.005, waist circumference (p=0.001, Hypertension (p=0.007, Diabetes (p=0.002 and Metabolic syndrome (p=0.001 and not associated with gender, ethnicity, duration of PsA disease, pattern of PsA, disease activity and severity. Above all, only age had positive IMT independent predictor (p=0.032, with OR 1.116; 95 % CI (1.010–1.234. Conclusions: There was a significant association between CVS risk and positive Intima Media Thickness in Psoriatic Arthritis patients. Otherwise, there was no association in disease

  6. Management of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Murray, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) comprises a group of heterogeneous disorders of chronic arthritis in childhood and remains the commonest pediatric rheumatic disease associated with significant long-term morbidity. Advances in understanding of the pathogenesis, better definition of disease control/remission measures, and the arrival of biological agents have improved the outcomes remarkably. Methotrexate (Mtx) remains the first-line disease modifying (DMARD) therapy for most children with JIA due to its proven efficacy and safety. Sulphosalazine (SSz) (especially for enthesitis) and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNF-I), alone or in combination with Mtx have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA, enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) and psoriatic arthritis. Tocilizumab appears very efficacious in systemic arthritis and abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear, though clearly beneficial in adult RA. TNF-I with Mtx is also effective in uveitis associated with JIA. Biologicals have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although close monitoring for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of cancers is warranted.

  7. Pemetrexed ameliorates experimental arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ahmet; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Ozgen, Metin; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Erman, Fazilet; Sahin, Nuran; Sahin, Kazim; Isik, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Pemetrexed (PMTX) is an anti-folate drug as methotrexate. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of PMTX on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Forty Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of chicken type II collagen combined with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Animals were sacrificed at the 15th day after the onset of arthritis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-17, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and the expressions of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were decreased in the arthritis group. In the PMTX-treated (0.2 and 1 mg/kg/week i.p.) groups, the levels of TNF-α, IL-17, and MDA were decreased; the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 were restored, and perisynovial inflammation and cartilage-bone destruction were decreased. PMTX has anti-arthritic potential in the CIA model and may be a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. INFLIXIMAB IN TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Nikishina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion to the clinical practice of genetically engineered biological medications opens new opportunities in treatment of juvenile arthritis. The article summarizes an experience of treatment of juvenile arthritis with infliximab in children’s department of Scientific Center of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The analysis included 55 patients (16 children had systemic type, 23 — polyarticular type of juvenile arthritis, and 16 patients had juvenile spondylarthritis, treated with infliximab in 2002–2009 years. Infliximab was administrated in patients with high activity of the disease refractory to the modern basic therapy. Patients received intravenous infliximab 3–5 mg/kg daily according to the standard scheme (on 0, 2, 6 weeks and further every 8 weeks. Therapy with this drug was estimated as effective (improvement on 30% and more according ACRpedi in 80% of patients: 16% achieved ACR30, 29% — ACR50, 26% — ACR70, and 9% — ACR90. Unfavorable effects (infusion reactions were detected in 16% of cases. Infections, including one case of disseminated tuberculosis, developed in 20% of patients. Thus, treatment with infliximab is effective and has good «risk–benefit» ratio in treatment of patients with refractory juvenile arthritis. Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:142-149

  9. Distinction

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Pr Serge Haroche La Médaille d’or 2009 du CNRS est décernée au Pr Serge Haroche, titulaire de la chaire de Physique quantique depuis 2001. Serge Haroche est spécialiste de physique atomique et d’optique quantique. Il est l’un des fondateurs de l’électrodynamique quantique en cavité, domaine qui permet, par des expériences conceptuellement simples, d’éclairer les fondements de la théorie quantique et de réaliser des prototypes de systèmes de traitement quantique de l’information. Serge Haroche...

  10. Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubrier, Martin; Barber Chamoux, Nicolas; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNFα antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Ana Claudia Janiszewski; Reis, Larissa Aparecida Busatto; Silva, Marilia Barreto G; Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Skare, Thelma L

    Sleep disturbances are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and contribute to loss of life quality. To study associations of sleep quality with pain, depression and disease activity in RA. This is a transversal observational study of 112 RA patients submitted to measurement of DAS-28, Epworth scale for daily sleepiness, index of sleep quality by Pittsburg index, risk of sleep apnea by the Berlin questionnaire and degree of depression by the CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) questionnaire. We also collected epidemiological, clinical, serological and treatment data. Only 18.5% of RA patients had sleep of good quality. In univariate analysis a bad sleep measured by Pittsburg index was associated with daily doses of prednisone (p=0.03), DAS-28 (p=0.01), CES-D (p=0.0005) and showed a tendency to be associated with Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.06). In multivariate analysis only depression (p=0.008) and Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.004) kept this association. Most of RA patients do not have a good sleep quality. Depression and risk of sleep apnea are independently associated with sleep impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I: Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Tuncel

    Full Text Available To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data.We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies.Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment.PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics.

  13. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  14. Radiosynovectomy in the Therapeutic Management of Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knut, Liepe

    2015-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a well-established therapy in arthritis and involves an intra-articular injection of small radioactive particles to treat a synovitis. In Europe, frequent indications are rheumatoid and poly-arthritis. Especially in Germany radiosynovectomy is the second common therapy in Nuclear Medicine with about 40,000–60,000 treated joints per year. In Spain, USA, Turkey, Argentines and Philippines the therapy is more use in hemophilic arthritis with excellent results. Especially in developing countries with low availability of clotting factors, the radiosynovectomy represent a cost effective therapeutic option for repeated bleedings in hemophilic arthropathy. The special focus in these countries is maintaining of mobility and work ability. Often only the knee and medium joints (ankle, elbow and shoulder) are treated using yttrium-90, rhenium-186 or phosphorus-32. However, in rheumatoid arthritis most common affected joints are the fingers. For the treatment in these small joints, erbium-169 is necessary. Unfortunately, erbium-169 is only available in Europe. Further indications for radiosynovectomy are osteoarthritis and the articular effusion after joint replacement. The reported response rates in rheumatoid and poly-arthritis range from 60% to 80% depends from the stage of previous arthrosis. The best effectiveness of therapy was observed in hemophilic arthritis with response rate of 90% and significant reducing of bleeding frequency. The therapy is well-tolerated with low rate of side effects. In respect of the specific uptake of particles in the synovia and short range of beta radiation, the radiation exposure outside the joint is very low. The radiosynovectomy has efforts in comparison to surgical synovectomy: it's a minor intervention with low costs; and simultaneous treatments of multiple joints or treatment in short intervals are possible. The presented paper summarized the published papers and reports our own experiences in >15,000 treated

  15. Distinct classical and molecular cytogenetics of Astyanax marionae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genus Astyanax is well distributed in Neotropical freshwater environments and its taxonomic position is uncertain, as is the case with other Characidae genera allocated in the group incertae sedis. This study aimed to analyse the karyotype of different populations of Astyanax fasciatus (Corumbataí River basin) using ...

  16. Distinct molecular signatures of mild extrinsic and intrinsic atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta Cathrina; Litman, Thomas; Hald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with underlying defects in epidermal function and immune responses. In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate differences in gene expression in lesional skin from patients with mild extrinsic or intrinsic AD compared...

  17. Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, B.W.C.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Vogel, S. de; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    High alcohol consumption is related to colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to study associations between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC according to characteristics of aetiological pathways: the chromosomal instability (CIN) and the microsatellite instability (MIN) pathway. We classified

  18. Characterization of two types of prostasomes with distinct molecular compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313888515

    2012-01-01

    During the last years it has become evident that many different cell types can communicate with each other through intercellular transfer of extracellular vesicles. Such cell-derived membrane vesicles function in several physiological processes and also in disease. This thesis describes two

  19. Molecular and immunohistochemical distinction of equine sarcoid from schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, L; Heerden, M Van; Cock, H E V De; Martens, A; Chiers, K

    2011-05-01

    Ten equine skin tumors that had been classified as schwannomas on routine histological examination were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for bovine papillomavirus DNA. All 10 were positive for bovine papillomavirus 1 or 2, and all 10 were immunohistochemically negative for S-100 protein and strongly positive for vimentin. Nine tumors were moderately positive for laminin and 8, for smooth muscle actin. Five tumors were variably and weakly positive for type IV collagen. The lack of S-100 protein expression made Schwann cells an unlikely cell of origin, as opposed to peripheral nerve sheath tumors, which typically express S-100 protein, at least in some neoplastic cells. The immunohistochemical reactivity is consistent with myofibroblastic origin of the neoplastic cells, although smooth muscle cell or pericyte origin cannot be ruled out. These tumors represent an atypical form of equine sarcoid. Polymerase chain reaction for bovine papillomavirus and S-100 immunohistochemistry are strongly recommended for all equine skin tumors with histological characteristics typical of schwannoma or peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  20. Ameloblastoma Phenotypes Reflected in Distinct Transcriptome Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shijia; Parker, Joel; Divaris, Kimon; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally invasive benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium and presents with diverse phenotypes yet to be characterized molecularly. High recurrence rates of 50–80% with conservative treatment in some sub-types warrants radical surgical resections resulting in high morbidity. The objective of the study was to characterize the transcriptome of ameloblastoma and identify relevant genes and molecular pathways using normal odontogenic tissue (human “dentome”) for comparison. Laser capture microdissection was used to obtain neoplastic epithelial tissue from 17 tumors which were examined using the Agilent 44 k whole genome microarray. Ameloblastoma separated into 2 distinct molecular clusters that were associated with pre-secretory ameloblast and odontoblast. Within the pre-secretory cluster, 9/10 of samples were of the follicular type while 6/7 of the samples in the odontoblast cluster were of the plexiform type (p ameloblastoma sub-types and have implications for the use of tailored treatment. PMID:27491308

  1. Septic arthritis caused by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptostreptococcus spp are commensal organisms, usually involved in periodontal disease. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus is an anaerobic gram-negative cocci, difficult to isolate due to its slow growth. Septic arthritis by this microorganism is a rare entity, but it can occur by hematogenous dissemination from a distant focus. Colonization and growth are more likely to occur in an already damaged articulation. We report the case of a 57 year-old woman with peripheral spondyloarthritis who developed knee septic arthritis by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus.

  2. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered.......A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  3. Septic arthritis caused by Enterobacter agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatauer, F E; Khan, M A

    1978-05-01

    A case of septic arthritis was caused by Enterobacter agglomerans, an association that to our knowledge has not been described previously. The right knee joint of a previously healthy 11-year-old boy became infected when the organism was introduced through the overlying skin by a contaminated wooden splinter. Conservative management with antibiotic therapy and repeated arthrocenteses was successful. Enterobacter agglomerans is a known plant pathogen, and a relationship between human infections caused by this organism and contact with plants is well recognized. The patient described here demonstrates that, when given a suitable set of environmental circumstances, E agglomerans can cause infection in man, including septic arthritis.

  4. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mruck, S.; Feistel, H.; Kat, S.; Kuwert, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.) [de

  5. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... of rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  6. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); P. Solaimani Kartalaei (Parham); C.S. Vink (Chris); T. Yamada-Inagawa (Tomoko); K. Bollerot (Karine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R. Van Der Linden (Reinier); S.C. de Sousa Lopes (Susana Chuva); R. Monteiro (Rui); C.L. Mummery (Christine); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAdult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they

  7. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  8. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  9. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  10. Rolie-Poly fluid flowing through constrictions: Two distinct instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic instabilities of entangled polymer melts are common in industrial processes but the physics responsible is not well understood. We present a numerical linear stability study of a molecular based constitutive model which grants us physical insight into the underlying mechanics involved. Two constriction flows are considered - one shear dominated, the other extension dominated - and two distinct instabilities are found. The influence of the molecular structure and the behaviour of the polymer dynamics are investigated and in both cases chain relaxation and orientation play a crucial role. This suggests a molecular-based physical interpretation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for flow instabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  12. Kinetics of gene expression and bone remodelling in the clinical phase of collagen induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja Caroline Marie; Litman, Thomas; Marstrand, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological bone changes differ considerably between inflammatory arthritic diseases and most studies have focused on bone erosion. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a model for rheumatoid arthritis, which, in addition to bone erosion, demonstrates bone formation at the time...... of clinical manifestations. The objective of this study was to use this model to characterise the histological and molecular changes in bone remodelling, and relate these to the clinical disease development. Methods: A histological and gene expression profiling time-course study on bone remodelling in CIA......), and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1). Pregnancy-associated protein A (Pappa) and periostin (Postn), differentially expressed in the early disease phase, are proposed to participate in bone formation, and we suggest that they play a role in early bone formation in the CIA model. Comparison to human genome...

  13. Defining poverty as distinctively human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P.P. Lötter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available While it is relatively easy for most people to identify human beings suffering from poverty, it is rather more difficult to come to a proper understanding of poverty. In this article the author wants to deepen our understanding of poverty by interpreting the conventional definitions of poverty in a new light. The article starts with a defence of a claim that poverty is a concept uniquely applicable to humans. It then present a critical discussion of the distinction between absolute and relative poverty and it is then argued that a revision of this distinction can provide general standards applicable to humans everywhere.

  14. Defining immunological impact and therapeutic benefit of mild heating in a murine model of arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Traditional treatments, including a variety of thermal therapies have been known since ancient times to provide relief from rheumatoid arthritis (RA symptoms. However, a general absence of information on how heating affects molecular or immunological targets relevant to RA has limited heat treatment (HT to the category of treatments known as "alternative therapies". In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of mild HT in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model which has been used in many previous studies to evaluate newer pharmacological approaches for the treatment of RA, and tested whether inflammatory immune activity was altered. We also compared the effect of HT to methotrexate, a well characterized pharmacological treatment for RA. CIA mice were treated with either a single HT for several hours or daily 30 minute HT. Disease progression and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. We found that both HT regimens significantly reduced arthritis disease severity and macrophage infiltration into inflamed joints. Surprisingly, HT was as efficient as methotrexate in controlling disease progression. At the molecular level, HT suppressed TNF-α while increasing production of IL-10. We also observed an induction of HSP70 and a reduction in both NF-κB and HIF-1α in inflamed tissues. Additionally, using activated macrophages in vitro, we found that HT reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an effect which is correlated to induction of HSF-1 and HSP70 and inhibition of NF-κB and STAT activation. Our findings demonstrate a significant therapeutic benefit of HT in controlling arthritis progression in a clinically relevant mouse model, with an efficacy similar to methotrexate. Mechanistically, HT targets highly relevant anti-inflammatory pathways which strongly support its increased study for use in clinical trials for RA.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis in the United Arab Emirates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badsha, Humeira; Kong, Kok Ooi; Tak, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Middle East have delayed diagnosis and low disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) utilization. We describe the characteristics and treatments of consecutive RA patients presenting to a new musculoskeletal clinic in Dubai,

  16. IJMBR ARTHRITIS edited 4.3.1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... various pathogens most commonly caused by a variety of bacteria. However, viruses, mycobacteria, ... [3] Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella spp are also implicated especially in sickle cell disease. ... The signs and symptoms of septic arthritis include joint pain, swelling and soreness with joint immobility; fever ...

  17. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  18. Wrist Septic Arthritis: An 11 Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Robert Tze Jin; Tay, Shian Chao

    2015-10-01

    This report utilizes 11 years (2003-2013) of clinical records of patients for a retrospective evaluation of the effectiveness of various combinations of diagnostic methods, treatment options and surgical procedures to try to determine the optimal combinations to improve the rate of success for the treatment of septic wrist arthritis. Analysis of records of 40 patients treated for septic wrist arthritis in our hospital involving records of physical examination, full blood analysis, biochemical, microbial profiles, type of surgical intervention, length of stay, number of surgical interventions to resolution and the rate of morbidity and mortality. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups, consisting of 6 (mortality) in one group and 34 (non-mortality) in the other. The various parameters as listed above were compared for differences. The patient records included those from immunocompromised elderly patients, with other existing medical complications such as gout, pseudogout, cellulitis and arthritic flare that made accurate diagnosis of septic wrist arthritis challenging. There is a trend showing better success in the treatment of septic wrist arthritis among patients without co-morbid medical problems. Due to the unavoidable delays in microbial identification, it was noted that escalation of antibiotics should be adopted especially for the immunocompromised patients. Staphylococcus aureus, the most common microbial pathogen in our findings, point to the need to adopt a lower threshold for escalation of antibiotics for immunocompromised patients with slow reversal of infection in order to reduce morbidity, mortality, number of surgeries and length of post-operative stay.

  19. [The golden age of rheumatoid arthritis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Today, we enjoy the golden age of rheumatology. In the 1970s, the paradigm for treating rheumatoid arthritis consisted in a pyramid. In the decade of the 1980s, and shortly after began a revolution in the understanding and treatment of rheumatic diseases. Methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-blockers came on the scene.

  20. Fecal microbiota in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaahtovuo, Jussi; Munukka, Eveliina; Korkeamäki, Mika; Luukkainen, Reijo; Toivanen, Paavo

    2008-08-01

    To compare the composition of intestinal microbiota of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or fibromyalgia (FM), fecal samples were collected from 51 patients with RA and 50 with FM. RA patients fulfilled the RA criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, and duration of their disease was etiopathogenesis of RA.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective-tissue disease are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic inflammation. This review will focus on immunopathogenic mechanisms, aspects of early disease, co-morbidity and therapy in RA ...

  2. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  3. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  4. immunological arthritis Prevalence of biochemical and abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormali- ties was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39 ...

  5. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal migra...

  6. Septic arthritis due to Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandac, Inga; Prkacin, Ingrid; Matovinović, Mirjana Sabljar; Sustercić, Dunja

    2010-06-01

    Septic arthritis may represent a direct invasion of joint space by various microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. Although any infectious agent may cause bacterial arthritis, bacterial pathogens are the most significant because of their rapidly destructive nature. We present a case of septic arthritis in a 56-year old male patient due to Streptococcus viridans which is member of the viridans group streptococci. Patient was admitted to Our Hospital presented as fever of unknown origin, losing more than 30 kg of body weight during couple of months, and anemia of chronic disease as paraneoplastic process. He had long history of arterial hypertension and stroke. There was swelling and pain of the right sternoclavicular joint and precordial systolic murmur in physical status. A large diagnostic panel has been made, computerized tomography (CT) of right sternoclavicular joint showed widening of periarticular soft tissue and loss of clavicular corticalis. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid showed more than 90% of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. There were no crystals on microscopic examination and Gram stain of fluid was negative. Blood cultures were positive for S. sanguis and there was a consideration about possible periodontal disease. Stomatologic examination verified periapical ostitis and extraction of potential cause of infection has been done. Therapy with benzilpenicilline was followed by the gradual improvement of clinical and laboratory parameters. Although viridans group streptococci and Streptococcus sanguis in particular are rare causes of septic arthritis in native joints, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of periodontal disease.

  7. Management of arthritis patients after functional deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulthuis, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Hospitalization in arthritis patients is indicated when the disease flares or when joint replacements are to be placed. Conservative treatment aims to control disease activity and to reduce pain. Joint replacement is indicated when pain or functional limitations due to a destroyed joint impair the

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo Estrada, Horacio

    2002-01-01

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  9. Bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Two different entities are recognised: 1) a localised periarticular bone loss, due to inflammatory processes and 2) a generalised increased bone turnover, ultimately leading to a loss of axial bone mass. The mechanism of this loss of

  10. Computed tomographic feature of tuberculous arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Cha, Eun Suk; Kang, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Jeong Su; Park, Young Ha; Yim, Jung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1992-01-01

    The sparsity of publication concerning CT findings of tuberculous arthritis prompted authors to retrospectively evaluate 12 patients with tuberculous arthritis for characteristic CT findings. In each patients, the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis was confirmed by surgery or biopsy. The CT examinations were evaluated by two radiologists retrospectively. Involved joints were the hip joint in seven patients, the sacroiliac joint in three patients, and the shoulder and ankle joint in one patient each. CT features included subchondral bony erosion(12 patients), soft tissue mass in the joint space(nine), widening of the joint space(eight), ipsilateral music atrophy(eight), thickening of the joint capsule(seven), intra-articular effusion(six), soft tissue abscess(five), and bony sclerosis(four). In seven patients with the duration of symptoms less than 1 year, thickening of joint capsule and intra-articular effusion were the predominant findings, while bony sclerosis, gross bone destruction, and soft tissue mass in joint space were seen in five patients with the duration of symptoms longer than 1 year. Our results indicate that CT is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis by demonstrating characteristic pathologic changes of the joint space, soft tissue abnormality and bony involvement

  11. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With

  12. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  13. Parental rheumatoid arthritis and childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chun Sen; Olsen, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of parental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on risk of epilepsy. Methods: We performed a nationwide cohort study including all singletons born in Denmark from 1977 to 2008 (n = 1,917,723) through individual linkage to nationwide Danish registries. The children were...

  14. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  15. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg Bennike, Tue; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...

  16. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  17. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  18. Mitochondrial haplogroups in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Pernille Hurup; Sode, Jacob; Hagen, Christian Munch

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (hgs) in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Two-hundred nineteen consecutive patients with RA had mtDNA isolated from their blood, sequenced and haplotyped. Patients were diagnosed...

  19. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis | Gotlieb | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 4 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis. D Gotlieb. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  20. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis | Gotlieb | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 4 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis. D Gotlieb. Abstract.

  1. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  2. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  3. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, Esperanza; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability of new ultrasound (US) definitions and quantification of synovial hypertrophy (SH) and power Doppler (PD) signal, separately and in combination, in a range of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the European League Against Rheumatisms...

  4. Corticosteroid pulse therapy in active rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The infusion of high doses of corticosteroids (corticosteroid pulse therapy, CPT) is used to treat refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the first part of this article, literature on the efficacy of CPT is reviewed, and different CPT regimens (high-dose, low-dose, oral CPT) are compared. Several

  5. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  6. Voltaren in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hours the excretion is almost complete.-. A short pilot study by one of us (L.S.) showed that the drug was effective in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (RA), and suggested that a full clinical trial was warranted. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School,. University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. L. SOLOMO.

  7. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and...

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most underdiagnosed and undertreated conditions of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) because its involvement is often asymptomatic and the joint is difficult to examine. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate clinical as well as magnetic resonance ...

  9. [Biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.; Bendtzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The current status on the use of biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Blocking of TNF-alpha, co-stimulation of CD28+ T-cells and depletion of CD20+ B-cells are all effective ways to diminish inflammation and joint damage. However, not all patients react...

  10. Management of osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, J.N.; Bultink, I.E.; Lems, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is roughly doubled, which is for an important part caused by inflammation-mediated amplification of bone loss and by immobilization. New treatments have become available in the last two

  11. [Cystic Rheumatoid Arthritis--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Fernando Pimentel; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Barros, Rita; de Matos, António Alves; Branco, Jaime Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Among the many radiological findings seen in Rheumatoid Arthritis RA small subchondral geodes and erosions are typical. Large geodes are far less common abnormalities and their presence may indicate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case report of a 55-year old woman with seronegative RA that developed a large geode in the knee with extensive joint destruction.

  12. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help my RA? What You Can Do: The Importance of Self-Care Although healthcare professionals can prescribe or recommend treatments to help patients manage their rheumatoid arthritis, the real key to living well with the disease lies with the patients ...

  13. Relation Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Doosti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the studies have shown that RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis may cause hearing disorders. These disorders can result in problems later in life, so survey of correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing disorders is important . Methods: This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006 at Shaheed Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. In this study, 50 Rheumatoid arthritis patients as case group (100 ears with 50 persons as control group who were of the same age, sex and job (100 ears were compared. Results: Patients were 21-67 years old and the mean age was 47.58 years(It was the same as the control group.From 50 cases (controls 42 were women and 8 were men . Audiometric tests in different frequencies showed that hearing loss in high frequencies, especially in 8000 Hz was significantly different in the two groups. Also, acoustic reflex was absent in case group and this too was significantly different.The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss was sensory, not neural . Conclusion: In Rheumatoid arthritis, middle and inner ear disorders have been shown. But some patients aren't aware of their hearing loss and they have no clinical complains, so frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended. Hearing disorders can be controlled by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in these patients.

  14. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  15. Caracterização molecular parcial do gene gag de amostras do vírus da artrite-encefalite caprina (CAEV isoladas de animais naturalmente infectados no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Molecular characterization of part of the gag gene of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus isolated from naturally infected goats from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M. Marchesin

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se a análise de parte do gene gag, que codifica para as proteínas do capsídeo viral, de 5 amostras de CAEV isolados de animais naturalmente infectados do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. As amostras foram analisadas por PCR e clivagem com enzimas de restrição (DdeI, HaeIII e NdeI. Fragmentos de aproximadamente 600 pb foram amplificados na PCR e submetidos à digestão enzimática. Os perfis obtidos foram comparados com as seqüências gag de 6 lentivírus de pequenos ruminantes.Os resultados obtidos permitiram separar as amostras em 3 grupos distintos. Os fragmentos observados foram diferentes dos descritos previamente.The gag gene of 5 CAEV samples, isolated from naturally infected goats from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were analised by PCR and restriction endonuclease (DdeI, HaeIII e NdeI digestion. Fragments of about 600 bp were amplified by PCR and submitted to enzymatic digestion. The patterns observed were compared with the corresponding gag sequences from 6 small ruminant lentiviruses. The results obtained allowed the separation of 3 distinct groups. The restriction fragment profiles observed were different from those previously described.

  16. Nonclassical Ly6C− Monocytes Drive the Development of Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Misharin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Different subsets and/or polarized phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages may play distinct roles during the development and resolution of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis that nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes are required for the initiation and progression of sterile joint inflammation. Moreover, nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes differentiate into inflammatory macrophages (M1, which drive disease pathogenesis and display plasticity during the resolution phase. During the development of arthritis, these cells polarize toward an alternatively activated phenotype (M2, promoting the resolution of joint inflammation. The influx of Ly6C− monocytes and their subsequent classical and then alternative activation occurs without changes in synovial tissue-resident macrophages, which express markers of M2 polarization throughout the course of the arthritis and attenuate joint inflammation during the initiation phase. These data suggest that circulating Ly6C− monocytes recruited to the joint upon injury orchestrate the development and resolution of autoimmune joint inflammation.

  17. Thermotherapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, V; Brosseau, L; Casimiro, L; Judd, M; Shea, B; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2002-01-01

    Thermotherapy is often used as adjunct in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by rehabilitation specialists. To evaluate the effectiveness of different thermotherapy applications on objective and subjective measures of disease activity in patients with RA. We searched Medline, EMBASE, Pedro, Current Contents, Sports Discus and CINAHL up to and including September 2001. The Cochrane Field of Rehabilitation and related therapies and the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group were also contacted for a search of their specialized registers. Hand searching was conducted on all retrieved articles for additional articles. Comparative controlled studies, such as randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies or case/control studies, of thermotherapy compared to control or active interventions in patients with RA were eligible. No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were accepted. Two independent reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search (VR, LB). These reviewers extracted data using pre-defined extraction forms. Consensus was reached on all data extraction. Quality was assessed by two reviewers using a 5 point scale that measured the quality of randomization, double-blinding and description of withdrawals. Seven studies (n=328 subjects) met the inclusion criteria. The results of this systematic review of thermotherapy for RA found that there was no significant effect of hot and ice packs applications (Ivey 1994), cryotherapy (Rembe 1970) and faradic baths (Hawkes 1986) on objective measures of disease activity including joint swelling, pain, medication intake, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, hand function compared to a control (no treatment) or active therapy. There is no significant difference between wax and therapeutic ultrasound as well as between wax and faradic bath combined to ultrasound for all the outcomes measured after 1, 2 or 3 week(s) of treatment (Hawkes 1986). There was no difference in

  18. Bone density in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorwali, Abdulsalam A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the bone mineral density (B/d) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to study the effect of disease activity and steroid therapy on BMD. Thirty Saudi female patients with RA and 10 Saudi healthy females matched for age as controls were the material of this work. Patients were attending the out-patient clinic of Makkah Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Center, Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between November 2002 and July 2003. All patients were subjected to clinical assessment and laboratory investigations. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy x-ray (DXA) in the lumbar spine at L2-4 and in the femoral bone (femoral neck, wards triangle and trochanteric). The results of our study showed a significant decrease in BMD in RA patients compared with healthy controls (spine = 0.863 +/-2.29 versus 1.289 +/- 0.54 g/cm2, p<0.05; total femoral = 0.755 +/-0.27 versus 1.06 +/-0.49 g/cm2, p<0.05; femoral neck = 0.725 +/-0.25 versus 1.008 +/-0.482 g/cm2, p<0.05; ward s triangle = 0.586 +/-0.21 versus 0.909 +/-0.43 g/cm2, p<0.05 and trochanteric = 0.607 +/-0.225 versus 0.898 +/-0.419 g/cm2, p<0.05). The decreased BMD correlated significantly with the impairment of functional activity, increased disease activity and with the use of steroids. There was no correlation between the decreased BMD and the body weight, height, age and the duration of the disease. We conclude that the impairment functional activity, increased disease activity and the use of steroids for long periods are the major determinants of BMD of both spinal and femoral bone in rheumatoid patients. (author)

  19. Affect and pain in rheumatoid arthritis: do individual differences in affective regulation and affective intensity predict emotional recovery from pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy A; Zautra, Alex J; Reich, John W

    2005-06-01

    Individual differences in adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis are not fully accounted for by illness severity or duration of symptoms. In this study, we assessed differences in affect regulation and affect intensity as variables that might be important for identifying women with rheumatoid arthritis who are resilient versus those who have disrupted moods following pain exacerbations. Specifically, affective regulation, affect intensity, active coping, neuroticism and weekly reports of pain, positive affect, and negative affect were assessed in a sample of 81 women diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicated that affective regulation, affect intensity, and active coping played important but distinct roles in the ebb and flow of negative and positive affect. In particular, active coping was related to positive affect, whereas affective regulation and affect intensity showed interactive effects, moderating the prospective relationship between pain and negative affect and pain and positive affect. Overall, this study suggests that recovery from rheumatoid arthritis pain can be swift, except for those women who have difficulty regulating strong unpleasant affect.

  20. Relationship among nitric oxide, leptin, ACTH, corticosterone, and IL-1β, in the early and late phases of adjuvant arthritis in male Long Evans rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stofková, A.; Skurlová, M.; Tybitanclová, K.; Veselský, Leopold; Železná, Blanka; Jurčovičová, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 26 (2006), s. 2486-2491 ISSN 0024-3205 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/06/0427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : adjuvant arthritis * nitric oxide * IL-1beta Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.389, year: 2006

  1. Dual role of CCR2 during initiation and progression of collagen-induced arthritis: Evidence for regulatory activity of CCR2(+) T cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brühl, H.; Čihák, J.; Schneider, M. A.; Plachý, Jiří; Rupp, T.; Wenzel, I.; Shakaremi, M.; Milz, J. W.; Stangassinger, M.; Schlöndorf, D.; Mack, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2004, č. 172 (2004), s. 890-898 ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Chemokine receptor 2 * monocyte chemoattractant protein * adjuvant-induced arthritis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.486, year: 2004

  2. Autoimmune Arthritides, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, or Peripheral Spondyloarthropathy, Following Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Crowley, Jameson T.; Sulka, Katherine B.; Steere, Allen C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe systemic autoimmune joint diseases following Lyme disease and to compare their clinical features with Lyme arthritis. Methods Records of all adult patients referred to our Lyme arthritis clinic over a 13-year period in whom we diagnosed a systemic autoimmune joint disease following Lyme disease were reviewed. For comparison, records of patients enrolled in our Lyme arthritis (LA) cohort over the most recent 2-year period were analyzed. IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and to 3 Lyme disease-associated autoantigens were measured. Results We identified 30 patients who developed a new-onset systemic autoimmune joint disorder a median of 4 months after Lyme disease, usually erythema migrans (EM). Fifteen had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and 2 had peripheral spondyloarthropathy (SpA). The 30 patients typically had polyarthritis; and those with PsA/SpA often had previous psoriasis, axial involvement, or enthesitis. In the comparison group of 43 LA patients, monoarticular knee arthritis, without prior EM, was the usual clinical picture. Most systemic autoimmune patients had positive tests for B. burgdorferi IgG antibodies by ELISA, but they had significantly lower titers and lower frequencies of Lyme-associated autoantibodies than LA patients. Prior to our evaluation, the patients often received additional antibiotics for presumed Lyme arthritis without benefit. We prescribed anti-inflammatory therapies, most commonly disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), resulting in improvement. Conclusion Systemic autoimmune joint diseases, RA, PsA/SpA, may follow Lyme disease. Development of polyarthritis after antibiotic-treated erythema migrans, previous psoriasis, or low-titer B. burgdorferi antibodies are clues to the correct diagnosis. PMID:27636905

  3. Identification of a transitional fibroblast function in very early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, Andrew; Ward, Lewis S C; Kemble, Samuel; Davies, Christopher S; Munir, Hafsa; Rogers, Rebekah; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher Dominic; Nash, Gerard B; McGettrick, Helen M

    2017-12-01

    Synovial fibroblasts actively regulate the inflammatory infiltrate by communicating with neighbouring endothelial cells (EC). Surprisingly, little is known about how the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) alters these immunomodulatory properties. We examined the effects of phase of RA and disease outcome (resolving vs persistence) on fibroblast crosstalk with EC and regulation of lymphocyte recruitment. Fibroblasts were isolated from patients without synovitis, with resolving arthritis, very early RA (VeRA; symptom ≤12 weeks) and established RA undergoing joint replacement (JRep) surgery. Endothelial-fibroblast cocultures were formed on opposite sides of porous filters. Lymphocyte adhesion from flow, secretion of soluble mediators and interleukin 6 (IL-6) signalling were assessed. Fibroblasts from non-inflamed and resolving arthritis were immunosuppressive, inhibiting lymphocyte recruitment to cytokine-treated endothelium. This effect was lost very early in the development of RA, such that fibroblasts no longer suppressed recruitment. Changes in IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) signalling appeared critical for the loss of the immunosuppressive phenotype. In the absence of exogenous cytokines, JRep, but not VeRA, fibroblasts activated endothelium to support lymphocyte. In RA, fibroblasts undergo two distinct changes in function: first a loss of immunosuppressive responses early in disease development, followed by the later acquisition of a stimulatory phenotype. Fibroblasts exhibit a transitional functional phenotype during the first 3 months of symptoms that contributes to the accumulation of persistent infiltrates. Finally, the role of IL-6 and TGF-β 1 changes from immunosuppressive in resolving arthritis to stimulatory very early in the development of RA. Early interventions targeting 'pathogenic' fibroblasts may be required in order to restore protective regulatory processes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  4. Grima: A Distinct Emotion Concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Fernández-Dols, José-Miguel; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    People experience an unpleasant sensation when hearing a scratch on a board or plate. The present research focuses on this aversive experience known in Spanish as 'grima' with no equivalent term in English and German. We hypothesized that this aversive experience constitutes a distinctive, separate emotional concept. In Study 1, we found that the affective meaning of 'grima' was closer to disgust than to other emotion concepts. Thus, in Study 2 we explored the features of grima and compared them with disgust . As grima was reported to be predominantly elicited by certain auditory stimuli and associated with a distinctive physiological pattern, Study 3 used direct measures of physiological arousal to test the assumption of a distinctive pattern of physiological responses elicited by auditory stimuli of grima and disgust, and found different effects on heart rate but not on skin conductance. In Study 4, we hypothesized that only participants with an implementation intention geared toward down-regulating grima would be able to successfully weaken the grima- but not disgust- experience. Importantly, this effect was specific as it held true for the grima-eliciting sounds only, but did not affect disgust-related sounds. Finally, Study 5 found that English and German speakers lack a single accessible linguistic label for the pattern of aversive reactions termed by Spanish speaking individuals as 'grima', whereas the elicitors of other emotions were accessible and accurately identified by German, English, as well as Spanish speakers.

  5. The role of eicosanoids in experimental Lyme arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Robert Brown

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Lyme arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis caused by infection of mice with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. It recapitulates many of the disease parameters seen in human patients with Lyme arthritis, and thus serves as a model system for the investigation of disease pathogenesis. While much progress has been made in defining components of the immune response to Borrelia infection, an overall understanding of the host response leading to arthritis resistance or susceptibility remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent advancements of our understanding of the roles of eicosanoids as inflammatory mediators in the regulation of experimental Lyme arthritis. Eicosanoids, such as PGE2 and LTB4, are powerful regulators of inflammatory responses and thus may be important mediators of Lyme arthritis.

  6. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimabukuro, Kunisada; Sakata, Hiromichi; Shirono, Kazuo; Nakajo, Masataka; Shinohara, Shinji

    1983-01-01

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  7. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  8. Genetic deficiency of Wnt5a diminishes disease severity in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Zuriaga, Maria A; Fuster, José J; Cuda, Carla M; Jonason, Jennifer; Behzadi, Fernanda; Duffen, Jennifer Parker; Haines, G Kenneth; Aprahamian, Tamar; Perlman, Harris; Walsh, Kenneth

    2017-07-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints, leading to bone erosion and joint dysfunction. Despite the recent successes of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there is still clinical need for understanding the development and molecular etiology of RA. Wnts are developmental morphogens whose roles in adult pathology are poorly characterized. Wnt5a is a member of the non-canonical family of Wnts that modulates a wide range of cell processes, including differentiation, migration, and inflammation. Wnt5a has been implicated as a possible contributor to arthritis and it is upregulated in synovial fibroblasts from RA patients. We investigated the role of endogenous Wnt5a in RA. Tamoxifen-inducible, Wnt5a knockout (Wnt5a cKO) mice and littermate controls were monitored for arthritis development and joint pathology using the K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis (STIA) model. To explore a role of Wnt5a in osteoclast fusion, bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) were differentiated in vitro. Wnt5a cKO mice were resistant to arthritis development compared to control littermates as assessed by ankle thickness and histologic measurements. Some parameters of inflammation were reduced in the Wnt5a cKO mice, including the extent of polymononuclear cell infiltration and extra-articular inflammation. Wnt5a cKO mice also exhibited less cartilage destruction and a reduction in osteoclast activity with concomitant reduction in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CTSK), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in the arthritic joints. Treatment of BMDMs with Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast fusion and increased the expression of dendrocyte-expressed seven transmembrane protein (DCSTAMP) and MMP9, that are necessary for osteoclast formation and activity. These data suggest that Wnt5a modulates the development of arthritis by promoting

  9. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

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    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  10. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Telles, Shirley; Singh, Nilkamal

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Telles, Nilkamal SinghPatanjali Research Foundation, Haridwar, IndiaAbstract: We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggest...

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

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    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  12. What are the immunological consequences of long-term use of biological therapies for juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Swart, Joost F; de Roock, Sytze; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the immunological consequences of biological therapies used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). For every frequently used biological agent the characteristics are clearly specified (molecular target, isotype, registered indication for JIA, route of administration, half-life, contraindication, very common side effects, expected time of response and average cost in the first year). The emphasis of this review is on the immunological side effects that have been encount...

  13. Structural Biology of the TNFα Antagonists Used in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Heejin Lim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The binding of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα to its cognate receptor initiates many immune and inflammatory processes. The drugs, etanercept (Enbrel®, infliximab (Remicade®, adalimumab (Humira®, certolizumab-pegol (Cimzia®, and golimumab (Simponi®, are anti-TNFα agents. These drugs block TNFα from interacting with its receptors and have enabled the development of breakthrough therapies for the treatment of several autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and psoriatic arthritis. In this review, we describe the latest works on the structural characterization of TNFα–TNFα antagonist interactions related to their therapeutic efficacy at the atomic level. A comprehensive comparison of the interactions of the TNFα blockers would provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which they neutralize TNFα. In addition, an enhanced understanding of the higher order complex structures and quinary structures of the TNFα antagonists can support the development of better biologics with the improved pharmacokinetic properties. Accumulation of these structural studies can provide a basis for the improvement of therapeutic agents against TNFα for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which TNFα plays an important role in pathogenesis.

  14. Electroacupuncture Inhibits Inflammation Reaction by Upregulating Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

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    Tian-Feng He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is emerging as an alternative therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this beneficial effect of acupuncture has not been fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at acupoints Zusanli (ST36, Xuanzhong (GB39; and Shenshu (BL23 markedly decreased the paw swelling and the histologic scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue, and reduced the body weight loss in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. However, the electrical stimulation at nonacupoint did not produce any beneficial effects against the experimental arthritis. Most interestingly, the electroacupuncture treatment resulted in an enhanced immunostaining for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, a potent anti-inflammatory neuropeptide, in the synovial tissue. Moreover, the VIP-immunostaining intensity was significantly negatively correlated with the scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue (r=−0.483, P=.0026. In conclusion, these findings suggest that electroacupuncture may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment of RA, at least partially through the induction of VIP expression.

  15. Structural Biology of the TNFα Antagonists Used in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Heejin; Lee, Sang Hyung; Lee, Hyun Tae; Lee, Jee Un; Son, Ji Young; Shin, Woori; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2018-03-07

    The binding of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to its cognate receptor initiates many immune and inflammatory processes. The drugs, etanercept (Enbrel ® ), infliximab (Remicade ® ), adalimumab (Humira ® ), certolizumab-pegol (Cimzia ® ), and golimumab (Simponi ® ), are anti-TNFα agents. These drugs block TNFα from interacting with its receptors and have enabled the development of breakthrough therapies for the treatment of several autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriatic arthritis. In this review, we describe the latest works on the structural characterization of TNFα-TNFα antagonist interactions related to their therapeutic efficacy at the atomic level. A comprehensive comparison of the interactions of the TNFα blockers would provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which they neutralize TNFα. In addition, an enhanced understanding of the higher order complex structures and quinary structures of the TNFα antagonists can support the development of better biologics with the improved pharmacokinetic properties. Accumulation of these structural studies can provide a basis for the improvement of therapeutic agents against TNFα for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which TNFα plays an important role in pathogenesis.

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcomes in polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Sarah B; Fowler, Mary Louise; Zhu, Clara; Moore, Andrew; Shmerling, Robert H; Paz, Ziv

    2017-09-14

    Septic polyarthritis is rarer than septic monoarthritis, but associated with higher mortality. Septic polyarthritis may be difficult to distinguish clinically from noninfectious inflammatory arthritis. We describe one of the largest samples of septic polyarthritis with the aim of distinguishing septic monoarthritis from polyarthritis. We conducted a retrospective study of adults admitted to tertiary care with septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis. Baseline characteristics, microbial profiles, joint involvement, length of stay, and 60-day readmission rates were determined. We identified 464 and 42 cases of septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis, respectively, including 7 cases of septic polyarthritis with comorbid rheumatoid arthritis. Compared to those with septic monoarthritis, patients with septic polyarthritis were more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis (Pseptic arthritis (Pseptic polyarthritis with/without underlying rheumatoid arthritis were similar in terms of presenting features and outcomes, except for more frequent immunosuppressive therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (Pseptic arthritis, patients with septic polyarthritis were more likely to have systemic infection at presentation than those with septic monoarthritis. Despite this difference, patients with septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis tended to have similar outcomes. While rheumatoid arthritis was observed more frequently among patients with septic polyarthritis, those with/without underlying rheumatoid arthritis had similar presenting features and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ikonnikov, A.I.; Krylov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  18. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  19. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  20. Suffering in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dildy, S P

    1996-11-01

    Knowledge of the nature, meaning, and impact of suffering from the perspective of people with rheumatoid arthritis is needed to determine what nursing interventions are most helpful in reducing suffering. Grounded theory was used to identify the nature of suffering in 14 people with rheumatoid arthritis. Suffering was found to be a process directed toward regaining normalcy and consisted of three phases: disintegration of self; the shattered self; and reconstruction of self. Experiencing suffering resulted in struggling, lose of dreams, restructuring a future orientation, and withdrawing. Finding meaning through positive life changes was an outcome of suffering. The informants' differentiation between pain and suffering also was examined. The provision of comfort measures along with a caring and empathetic attitude were identified as helpful nursing interventions in reducing suffering.

  1. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-01-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.) [de

  2. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  3. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica Enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kazuya; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Tsuji, Yoshika; Kawahara, Chieko; Michitsuji, Toru; Higashi, Shuntaro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of reactive arthritis (ReA) triggered by Yersinia enterocolitica enteritis. A 24-year-old Japanese man developed polyarthritis in the lower limbs. Two weeks prior to these symptoms, he noted diarrhea, right lower abdominal pain and a fever. Y. enterocolitica was not isolated from a stool culture; however, he was diagnosed with ReA based on the colonoscopic findings of a high anti-Y. enterocolitica antibody titer and HLA-B27 antigen positivity. Following treatment with methotrexate and steroids, his arthritis improved. This is the first reported Japanese case of ReA in the English literature after a gastrointestinal infection caused by Y. enterocolitica.

  4. Prevalence of Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitation by Urban-Rural County Classification - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boring, Michael A; Hootman, Jennifer M; Liu, Yong; Theis, Kristina A; Murphy, Louise B; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Brady, Terry J; Croft, Janet B

    2017-05-26

    Rural populations in the United States have well documented health disparities, including higher prevalences of chronic health conditions (1,2). Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is one of the most prevalent health conditions (22.7%) in the United States, affecting approximately 54.4 million adults (3). The impact of arthritis is considerable: an estimated 23.7 million adults have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). The age-standardized prevalence of AAAL increased nearly 20% from 2002 to 2015 (3). Arthritis prevalence varies widely by state (range = 19%-36%) and county (range = 16%-39%) (4). Despite what is known about arthritis prevalence at the national, state, and county levels and the substantial impact of arthritis, little is known about the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL across urban-rural areas overall and among selected subgroups. To estimate the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL by urban-rural categories CDC analyzed data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The unadjusted prevalence of arthritis in the most rural areas was 31.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 31.0%-32.5%) and in the most urban, was 20.5% (95% CI = 20.1%-21.0%). The unadjusted AAAL prevalence among adults with arthritis was 55.3% in the most rural areas and 49.7% in the most urban. Approximately 1 in 3 adults in the most rural areas have arthritis and over half of these adults have AAAL. Wider use of evidence-based interventions including physical activity and self-management education in rural areas might help reduce the impact of arthritis and AAAL.

  5. Efficacy of roentgenotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, R.L.; Andreyashchenko, N.F.; Benenson, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of radiotherapeutic small doses in rheumatoid arthritis (single doses - 0.266-0.4435 Gy, summary - 2.66-4.435 Gy) has been analyzed. An analysis has been made of isolated radiotherapy with the ALG effect, and concomitant ALG therapy plus radiotherapy. A conclusion has been made as to the comparability of a radiotherapeutic effect with an ALG anti-inflammatory effect, nonsteroid drugs, and with the intraarticular administration of hydrocortisone [ru

  6. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrendik, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    Mesut OgrendikDivision Physical Therapy and Rheumatology, Nazilli State Hospital, Nazilli, TurkeyAbstract: Antibiotic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) commenced in the 1930s with the use of sulfasalazine. Later, tetracyclines were successfully used for the treatment of RA. In double-blind and randomized studies, levofloxacin and macrolide antibiotics (including clarithromycin and roxithromycin) were also shown to be effective in the treatment of RA. There have been several reports in t...

  8. Role of Gut Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi Maeda; Kiyoshi Takeda

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Recently, investigators have focused on the gut microbiota, which is thought to be an environmental agent affecting the development of RA. Here we review the evidence from animal and human studies that supports the role of the gut microbiota in RA. We and others have demonstrated that the abundance of Prevotella copri is increased in some early RA. We have also used gnotobiotic experi...

  9. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Link between Gut Microbiota and the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Gabriel Horta-Baas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization and understanding of gut microbiota has recently increased representing a wide research field, especially in autoimmune diseases. Gut microbiota is the major source of microbes which might exert beneficial as well as pathogenic effects on human health. Intestinal microbiome’s role as mediator of inflammation has only recently emerged. Microbiota has been observed to differ in subjects with early rheumatoid arthritis compared to controls, and this finding has commanded this study as a possible autoimmune process. Studies with intestinal microbiota have shown that rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by an expansion and/or decrease of bacterial groups as compared to controls. In this review, we present evidence linking intestinal dysbiosis with the autoimmune mechanisms involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Study of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, S.; Yousaf, J.; Rashid, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients on disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Centre for Research in Experimental and Applied Medicine (CREAM-I), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Reumatology Department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Jan 2016 to Jun 2016. Material and Methods: Study sample was seventy in number and was divided into two groups. Group I consisted of thirty five patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, while group II consisted of thirty five healthy individuals who were not suffering from any chronic illness. Non probability purposive sampling was done. ESR was measured using Westergren method, while anti-CCP was estimated by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Data were analyzed using SPSS 22 version. Mean age of patients of rheumatoid arthritis was 49.69 +- 11.5 years and that of control group was 47.4 +- 10.4 years. Among the study population 30 (43%) individuals were males and 40 (57%) were females. In patient category, there were 10 (29%) males and 25 (71%) females. In control group 20 (57%) males and 15 (43%) females were present. Independent t-test was applied between the two variables i.e. ESR and anti-CCP, with showed significant p-value of less than 0.001. Conclusion: There was significant increase in both ESR and anti-CCP levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients on disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs as compared with control group. (author)

  11. Chronic arthritis in chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Lourdes; Roure, Silvia

    2017-07-24

    Chikungunya virus infection causes arthralgia and arthritis in the acute phase of the disease but, in more than half of the cases, musculoskeletal manifestations can be prolonged over time and, in some cases, become chronic. Although polyarthralgia is the most frequent chronic manifestation, forms with polyarthritis, tenosynovitis and enthesopathy are also common. To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent articular manifestations after infection with the Chikungunya virus. Report of 3 cases of chronic arthritis after infection with chikungunya virus diagnosed at outpatient care in a university hospital of Catalonia, all of them imported after exposure in areas of epidemic infection between 2013-2015. All three patients had inflammatory joint pain for more than one year after acute disease (3, 2 and 1 years, respectively). In all cases, it appeared as polyarthritis with involvement of small joints of hands and feet (pseudorheumatoid arthritis-like). Laboratory tests showed a slight elevation of acute phase reactants, and analyses for immune markers were negative. Two of the patients required treatment with glucocorticoids and hydroxychloroquine. The course led to slow clinical improvement, but only one of them came to be completely asymptomatic. In the differential diagnosis of chronic polyarthritis, Chikungunya virus disease should also be considered in areas in which it is not endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Canine rheumatoid arthritis characterized by hyperprolactinemia

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    Tohru Kimura

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The senile female dog suffering from rheumatoid arthritis was clinically and clinicopathologically examined. The articular lesions localized in the elbows, stifles, and the carpal and tarsal joints. The dog with clinical signs of arthritis developed draining nodular lesions in the involved joints. The affected joints became swollen, and then serous exudates were observed in their ulcerative lesions. In addition, the dog developed leaks of milk (lactorrhea in response to suckling stimuli. There were no abnormal values in hematological and blood coagulation profiles. Serum biochemical examinations showed an increase in total protein concentrations. Serum protein electrophoresis confirmed a prominent decrease in albumin and moderate increases in β1, β2 and γ-globurin. The serum prolactin concentration was apparently higher than that of normal dogs. This affected dog had raised rheumatoid factors and immune complexes. Both antinuclear antibodies and direct Coombs test were positive and serum complement titers and anti DNA antibodies were increased in this dog. In conclusion, the present results revealed that lactorrhea characterized by hyperprolactinemia and autoimmunological profiles was one of important clinical predictors associated with an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored. (author)

  14. Fibromyalgia Complicating Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, L.; Haidri, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate frequency of fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis and its effect on disease activity score. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Indus Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: All adult patients of either gender diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of clinical, laboratory and X-ray criteria were included in the study. The sample data was separated into two groups depending on presence or absence of fibromyalgia and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) value was evaluated. Results: There were 31 (25.83%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia (RAFM) out of the total 120. The median (IQR) age of patients was 40 (32 - 51) years. All were females. The overall female frequency was 79 (88.8%). The median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RA group was 4.9 (3.66 - 5.71), while the median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RAFM was 7.04 (6.62 - 7.64) [p < 0.0001]. The number of patient getting combination therapy of DMARD in RAFM group was 61.3% while in RA group was 42.7%. Conclusion: DAS-28 was found to be significantly higher in RAFM patients probably because of higher perception of pain. (author)

  15. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  16. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarinia, Mohammadali; Jalli, Reza; Kamali Sarvestani, Eskandar; Farahangiz, Siamak; Ataollahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female) were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%). The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%), 5(5%) and 6(6%), respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036). Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  17. Pattern of peripheral arthritis in 15 patients with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref Hosseinian Amiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD including ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn′s disease is an immune-mediated chronic intestinal condition. The arthritis accompanying the IBDs are included in the family of spondyloarthritis. Peripheral arthritis develops in about 15-20% of IBD patients. Asymmetric oligoarthicular large joint involvements have inflammatory characteristics at these patients and occur in upper and lower extremities. Aim: The aim of the study was to analyze the pattern of joint involvement in 15 patients with UC during 2 years from January 2011 to December 2013. Subjects and Methods: This is a retrospective study of UC patients with acute and chronic arthritis during 2 years from January 2011 to December 2013 that refers to rheumatologic Clinic of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Data were analyzed using the SPSS version 20. Variables analyzed include age, sex, presence of arthritis/periarthritis, the number of involved joints, kind and pattern of arthritis. Results: In these study 15 patients with UC and acute arthritis refers to BAGHBAN rheumatologic clinic. All of the patients were adults between 18 and 42-year-old with median age of 31.5 years old. Ten patients (66% were female, and five patients (33% were male. The media duration of UC was 3.9 years. Periarthrtis occurred in 7 (46% patients in association with arthritis. The most commonly involved join was ankle in 11 (73% cases. Another involved joints were knee in 5 (33%, wrist in 2 (12%, MTPs in 3 (20%, MCPs in 1 (6% and hip in 1 (6% of cases. In 4 (27% patients arthritis were monoarthicular, and eight (53% of patient′s arthritis were oligoathicular in 3 (20% cases, arthritis was polyarthicular. All of the arthritis were inflammatory. In 2 (13% of patients, arthritis were symmetric and in 9 (60% of cases were asymmetric. Conclusion: Inflammatory joint disease including arthritis and periarthrtis are important findings in UC. Asymmetric lower extremity

  18. Global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid for the specific diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from other inflammatory arthritis.

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    Sooah Kim

    Full Text Available Currently, reliable biomarkers that can be used to distinguish rheumatoid arthritis (RA from other inflammatory diseases are unavailable. To find possible distinctive metabolic patterns and biomarker candidates for RA, we performed global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid samples. Synovial fluid samples from 38 patients with RA, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet's disease, and gout were analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant and hierarchical clustering analyses were performed for the discrimination of RA and non-RA groups. Variable importance for projection values were determined, and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and the breakdown and one-way analysis of variance were conducted to identify potential biomarkers for RA. A total of 105 metabolites were identified from synovial fluid samples. The score plot of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis showed significant discrimination between the RA and non-RA groups. The 20 metabolites, including citrulline, succinate, glutamine, octadecanol, isopalmitic acid, and glycerol, were identified as potential biomarkers for RA. These metabolites were found to be associated with the urea and TCA cycles as well as fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. The metabolomic analysis results demonstrated that global metabolite profiling by GC/TOF MS might be a useful tool for the effective diagnosis and further understanding of RA.

  19. The radiographic distinction of degenerative slippage (spondylolisthesis and retrolisthesis) from traumatic slippage of the cervical spine

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    Lee, C.; Woodring, J.H.; Rogers, L.F.; Kim, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    In a review of 42 cases of degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and 22 cases of cervical spine trauma with an observed anterior slip-page (spondylolisthesis) or posterior slippage (retrolisthesis) of the vertebral bodies of 2 mm or more, characteristic features were observed which allowed distinction between degenerative and traumatic slippage of the cervical spine. In degenerative slippage the shape of the articular facets and width of the facet joint space may remain normal; however, in most cases the articular facets become 'ground-down' with narrowing of the facet joint space and the articular facets themselves becoming thinned or ribbon-like. In traumatic slippage the articular facets will either be normally shaped or fractured and the facet joint space will be abnormally widened. Plain radiographs will usually allow this distinction to be made; however, in difficult cases polytomography may be required. (orig.)

  20. Radiographic distinction of degenerative slippage (spondylolisthesis and retrolisthesis) from traumatic slippage of the cervical spine

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    Lee, C.; Woodring, J.H.; Rogers, L.F.; Kim, K.S.

    1986-08-01

    In a review of 42 cases of degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and 22 cases of cervical spine trauma with an observed anterior slip-page (spondylolisthesis) or posterior slippage (retrolisthesis) of the vertebral bodies of 2 mm or more, characteristic features were observed which allowed distinction between degenerative and traumatic slippage of the cervical spine. In degenerative slippage the shape of the articular facets and width of the facet joint space may remain normal; however, in most cases the articular facets become 'ground-down' with narrowing of the facet joint space and the articular facets themselves becoming thinned or ribbon-like. In traumatic slippage the articular facets will either be normally shaped or fractured and the facet joint space will be abnormally widened. Plain radiographs will usually allow this distinction to be made; however, in difficult cases polytomography may be required.