WorldWideScience

Sample records for arthritis clinical trials

  1. The impact of endpoint measures in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Dinant, H. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    In clinical trials on the effectiveness of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is common to apply a large number of endpoint measures. This practice has several disadvantages. To determine which endpoint measures are most valuable, reports of

  2. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J.; Kvien, Tore K.; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Abadie, Eric C.; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for

  3. International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify a core set of domains (outcomes) to be measured in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials that represent both patients' and physicians' priorities. METHODS: We conducted (1) a systematic literature review (SLR) of domains assessed in PsA; (2) international focus groups t...

  4. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  5. Randomized clinical trials as reflexive-interpretative process in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jorge, Mercedes; Parra, Sonia; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2015-08-01

    Patients in randomized clinical trials have to adapt themselves to a restricted language to capture the necessary information to determine the safety and efficacy of a new treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of patients with rheumatoid arthritis after completing their participation in a biologic therapy randomized clinical trial for a period of 3 years. A qualitative approach was used. The information was collected using 15 semi-structured interviews of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data collection was guided by the emergent analysis until no more relevant variations in the categories were found. The data were analysed using the grounded theory method. The objective of the patients when entering the study was to improve their quality of life by initiating the treatment. However, the experience changed the significance of the illness as they acquired skills and practical knowledge related to the management of their disease. The category "Interactional Empowerment" emerged as core category, as it represented the participative experience in a clinical trial. The process integrates the follow categories: "weight of systematisation", "working together", and the significance of the experience: "the duties". Simultaneously these categories evolved. The clinical trial monitoring activities enabled patients to engage in a reflexive-interpretative mechanism that transformed the emotional and symbolic significance of their disease and improved the empowerment of the patient. A better communicative strategy with the health professionals, the relatives of the patients, and the community was also achieved.

  6. Proposed outcome measures for prospective clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Edelsten, Clive

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis.......To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis....

  7. Bee venom acupuncture for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Ah; Son, Mi Ju; Choi, Jiae; Jun, Ji Hee; Kim, Jong-In; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2014-11-07

    To assess the clinical evidence for bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We searched 14 databases up to March 2014 without a language restriction. Patients with RA. BVA involved injecting purified, diluted BV into acupoints. We included trials on BVA used alone or in combination with a conventional therapy versus the conventional therapy alone. Morning stiffness, pain and joint swelling Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor, the number of joints affected by RA and adverse effects likely related to RA. A total of 304 potentially relevant studies were identified; only one RCT met our inclusion criteria. Compared with placebo, BVA may more effectively improve joint pain, swollen joint counts, tender joint counts, ESR and CRP but was not shown to improve morning stiffness. There is low-quality evidence, based on one trial, that BVA can significantly reduce pain, morning stiffness, tender joint counts, swollen joint counts and improve the quality of life of patients with RA compared with placebo (normal saline injection) control. However, the number of trials, their quality and the total sample size were too low to draw firm conclusions. PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013005853. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Novel joint selection methods can reduce sample size for rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials with ultrasound endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John C; Thumboo, Julian; Lye, Weng Kit; Conaghan, Philip G; Chew, Li-Ching; Tan, York Kiat

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether novel methods of selecting joints through (i) ultrasonography (individualized-ultrasound [IUS] method), or (ii) ultrasonography and clinical examination (individualized-composite-ultrasound [ICUS] method) translate into smaller rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trial sample sizes when compared to existing methods utilizing predetermined joint sites for ultrasonography. Cohen's effect size (ES) was estimated (ES^) and a 95% CI (ES^L, ES^U) calculated on a mean change in 3-month total inflammatory score for each method. Corresponding 95% CIs [nL(ES^U), nU(ES^L)] were obtained on a post hoc sample size reflecting the uncertainty in ES^. Sample size calculations were based on a one-sample t-test as the patient numbers needed to provide 80% power at α = 0.05 to reject a null hypothesis H 0 : ES = 0 versus alternative hypotheses H 1 : ES = ES^, ES = ES^L and ES = ES^U. We aimed to provide point and interval estimates on projected sample sizes for future studies reflecting the uncertainty in our study ES^S. Twenty-four treated RA patients were followed up for 3 months. Utilizing the 12-joint approach and existing methods, the post hoc sample size (95% CI) was 22 (10-245). Corresponding sample sizes using ICUS and IUS were 11 (7-40) and 11 (6-38), respectively. Utilizing a seven-joint approach, the corresponding sample sizes using ICUS and IUS methods were nine (6-24) and 11 (6-35), respectively. Our pilot study suggests that sample size for RA clinical trials with ultrasound endpoints may be reduced using the novel methods, providing justification for larger studies to confirm these observations. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. [Caprine arthritis-encephalitis: trial of an adjuvant vaccine preparation. I. Clinical and virological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Vitu, C; Fontaine, J J; Vignoni, M

    1993-04-01

    In purpose to protect goats against caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), the first group of kids (I) was inoculated with purified, inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions, the second group (II) with adjuvant and the third one (III) with culture medium. 2-4 months later, the three groups were challenged with virulent CAEV by intraarticular route. On the clinical level, vaccinated and challenged kids show more early and severe arthritis than other groups. On the virological level, isolation of lentivirus from white blood cells and different organs is more important in group I than groups II and III. Therefore, vaccinations with inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions do not protect against a virulent challenge; there is an enhancement of lesions. We note that the adjuvant elicits a mild non-specific protection against virulent challenge.

  10. A multinational randomized, controlled, clinical trial of etoricoxib in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis [ISRCTN25142273

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Peng

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etoricoxib is a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor which was evaluated for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods Double-blind, randomized, placebo and active comparator-controlled, 12-week study conducted at 67 sites in 28 countries. Eligible patients were chronic NSAID users who demonstrated a clinical worsening of arthritis upon withdrawal of prestudy NSAIDs. Patients received either placebo, etoricoxib 90 mg once daily, or naproxen 500 mg twice daily (2:2:1 allocation ratio. Primary efficacy measures included direct assessment of arthritis by counts of tender and swollen joints, and patient and investigator global assessments of disease activity. Key secondary measures included the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, patient global assessment of pain, and the percentage of patients who achieved ACR20 responder criteria response (a composite of pain, inflammation, function, and global assessments. Tolerability was assessed by adverse events and routine laboratory evaluations. Results 1171 patients were screened, 891 patients were randomized (N = 357 for placebo, N = 353 for etoricoxib, and N = 181 for naproxen, and 687 completed 12 weeks of treatment (N = 242 for placebo, N = 294 for etoricoxib, and N = 151 for naproxen. Compared with patients receiving placebo, patients receiving etoricoxib and naproxen showed significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints (p Conclusions In this study, etoricoxib 90 mg once daily was more effective than placebo and similar in efficacy to naproxen 500 mg twice daily for treating patients with RA over 12 weeks. Etoricoxib 90 mg was generally well tolerated in RA patients.

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions and clinical trials. Optimizing our Clinical Trials Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical ... multi-pronged approach to Optimize our Clinical Trials Enterprise that will make our clinical trials enterprise even ...

  13. A randomized multicenter clinical trial of 99 Tc-methylene diphosphonate in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Rong; Liang, Jun; Sun, Lingyun; Zhang, Zhuoli; Liu, Xiangyuan; Huang, Cibo; Zhu, Ping; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Gu, Jieruo; Li, Xiangpei; Li, Xingfu; Liu, Yi; Feng, Ping; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of technetium-99 conjugated with methylene diphosphonate ( 99 Tc-MDP, Yunke Pharmaceutical industry) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 120 patients with active RA were randomly divided into three groups: Group A (receiving oral meloxicam tablets); Group B (receiving intravenous drip of 99 TC-MDP); Group C (receiving combination treatment of intravenous drip of 99 Tc-MDP and oral meloxicam tablets). The main clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated at baseline and after 14 days of therapy. After 14 days of treatment, American College of Rheumatology 20 response was 15.62%, 34.04% and 48.78% in the three groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events in three groups were 3.13%, 8.51% and 9.76% respectly, and has no significant difference. In addition, biochemical markers of bone metabolism including bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), all improved in the three groups, although more significant in Group B than Group A, and more significant in the combination group than monotherapy groups. 99 Tc-MDP has good efficacy and safety in the treatment of active RA patients; the benefit was more remarkable when 99 Tc-MDP was combined with NSAIDs. 99 Tc-MDP may also have potential to improve bone metabolism. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance ...

  17. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial for Reducing Arthritis Fatigue by clinical Teams (RAFT) using cognitive-behavioural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Ambler, N; Almeida, C; Blair, P S; Choy, E; Dures, E; Hammond, A; Hollingworth, W; Kirwan, J; Plummer, Z; Rooke, C; Thorn, J; Tomkinson, K; Pollock, J

    2015-08-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fatigue is distressing, leading to unmanageable physical and cognitive exhaustion impacting on health, leisure and work. Group cognitive-behavioural (CB) therapy delivered by a clinical psychologist demonstrated large improvements in fatigue impact. However, few rheumatology teams include a clinical psychologist, therefore, this study aims to examine whether conventional rheumatology teams can reproduce similar results, potentially widening intervention availability. This is a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial of a group CB intervention for RA fatigue self-management, delivered by local rheumatology clinical teams. 7 centres will each recruit 4 consecutive cohorts of 10-16 patients with RA (fatigue severity ≥ 6/10). After consenting, patients will have baseline assessments, then usual care (fatigue self-management booklet, discussed for 5-6 min), then be randomised into control (no action) or intervention arms. The intervention, Reducing Arthritis Fatigue by clinical Teams (RAFT) will be cofacilitated by two local rheumatology clinicians (eg, nurse/occupational therapist), who will have had brief training in CB approaches, a RAFT manual and materials, and delivered an observed practice course. Groups of 5-8 patients will attend 6 × 2 h sessions (weeks 1-6) and a 1 hr consolidation session (week 14) addressing different self-management topics and behaviours. The primary outcome is fatigue impact (26 weeks); secondary outcomes are fatigue severity, coping and multidimensional impact, quality of life, clinical and mood status (to week 104). Statistical and health economic analyses will follow a predetermined plan to establish whether the intervention is clinically and cost-effective. Effects of teaching CB skills to clinicians will be evaluated qualitatively. Approval was given by an NHS Research Ethics Committee, and participants will provide written informed consent. The copyrighted RAFT package will be freely available. Findings

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... take part in a clinical trial. When researchers think that a trial's potential risks are greater than ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are ... earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ...

  20. American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism Preliminary Definition of Remission in Rheumatoid Arthritis for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T.; Smolen, Josef S.; Wells, George; Zhang, Bin; van Tuyl, Lilian H. D.; Funovits, Julia; Aletaha, Daniel; Allaart, Renée; Bathon, Joan; Bombardieri, Stefano; Brooks, Peter; Brown, Andrew; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Choi, Hyon; Combe, Bernard; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Furst, Dan; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Hawker , Gillian; Keystone, Edward; Khanna, Dinesh; Kirwan, John; Kvien, Tore; Landewé, Robert; Listing, Joachim; Michaud, Kaleb; Mola, Emilio Martin; Montie, Pam; Pincus, Ted; Richards, Pam; Siegel, Jeff; Simon, Lee; Sokka, Tuulikki; Strand, Vibeke; Tugwell, Peter; Tyndall, Alan; van der Heijde, Desirée; Verstappen, Suzan; White, Barbara; Wolfe, Fred; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Background With remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) an increasingly attainable goal, there is no widely used definition of remission that is stringent but achievable and could be applied uniformly as an outcome in clinical trials. Methods A committee consisting of members of the American College of Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Initiative (OMERACT) met to guide the process and review prespecified analyses from clinical trials of patients with RA. The committee requested a stringent definition (little, if any, active disease) and decided to use core set measures to define remission including at least joint counts and an acute phase reactant. Members were surveyed to select the level of each core set measure consistent with remission. Candidate definitions of remission were tested including those that constituted a number of individual measures in remission (Boolean approach) as well as definitions using disease activity indexes. To select a definition of remission, trial data were analyzed to examine the added contribution of patient reported outcomes and the ability of candidate measures to predict later good x-ray and functional outcomes. Results Survey results for the definition of remission pointed to indexes at published thresholds and to a count of core set measures with each measure scored as 1 or less (e.g. tender and swollen joint counts, CRP and global assessments on 0-10 scale). Analyses suggested the need to include a patient reported measure. Examination of 2 year follow-up data suggested that many candidate definitions performed comparably in terms of predicting later good x-ray and functional outcomes, although DAS28 based measures of remission did not predict good radiographic outcomes as well as did the other candidate definitions. Given these and other considerations, we propose that a patient be defined as in remission based on one of two definitions : 1: When their scores on the

  1. The Warwick patellofemoral arthroplasty trial: a randomised clinical trial of total knee arthroplasty versus patellofemoral arthroplasty in patients with severe arthritis of the patellofemoral joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odumenya Michelle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe arthritis of the knee is a disabling condition, with over 50,000 knee replacements performed each year in the UK. Isolated patellofemoral joint arthritis occurs in over 10% of these patients with the treatment options being patellofemoral arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. Whilst many surgeons believe total knee arthroplasty is the 'gold standard' treatment for severe knee arthritis, patellofemoral arthroplasty has certain potential advantages. Primarily, because this operation allows the patient to keep the majority of their own knee joint; preserving bone-stock and the patients' own ligaments. Patellofemoral arthroplasty has also been recognised as a less 'invasive' operation than primary total knee arthroplasty, facilitating a more rapid recovery. There are currently no published results of randomised clinical trials comparing the two arthroplasty techniques. The primary objective of the current study is to assess whether there is a difference in functional knee scores and quality of life outcome assessments at one year post-operation between patellofemoral arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The secondary objective is to assess the complication rates for both procedures. Methods/design Patients who are deemed suitable, by an Orthopaedic Consultant, for patellofemoral arthroplasty and medically fit for surgery are eligible to take part in this trial. The consenting patients will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation to a total knee or patellofemoral arthroplasty. The randomisation sequence will be computer generated and administered by a central independent randomisation service. Following consent, all participants will have their knee function, quality of life and physical activity level assessed through questionnaires. The assigned surgery will then be performed using the preferred technique and implant of the operating surgeon. The first post-operative assessments will take place at six weeks, followed by

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal ... for the clinical trial. The protocol outlines what will be done during the clinical trial and why. ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial ... clinical trial; and detailed information about the treatment plan. Eligibility Criteria A clinical trial's protocol describes what ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because they want ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies ... parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, ...

  9. Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W; Yang, Mini; Park, Sunmin

    2016-08-01

    Although turmeric and its curcumin-enriched extracts have been used for treating arthritis, no systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to evaluate the strength of the research. We systemically evaluated all RCTs of turmeric extracts and curcumin for treating arthritis symptoms to elucidate the efficacy of curcuma for alleviating the symptoms of arthritis. Literature searches were conducted using 12 electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Korean databases, Chinese medical databases, and Indian scientific database. Search terms used were "turmeric," "curcuma," "curcumin," "arthritis," and "osteoarthritis." A pain visual analogue score (PVAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were used for the major outcomes of arthritis. Initial searches yielded 29 articles, of which 8 met specific selection criteria. Three among the included RCTs reported reduction of PVAS (mean difference: -2.04 [-2.85, -1.24]) with turmeric/curcumin in comparison with placebo (P curcumin treatment (mean difference: -15.36 [-26.9, -3.77]; P = .009). Furthermore, there was no significant mean difference in PVAS between turmeric/curcumin and pain medicine in meta-analysis of five studies. Eight RCTs included in the review exhibited low to moderate risk of bias. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. In conclusion, these RCTs provide scientific evidence that supports the efficacy of turmeric extract (about 1000 mg/day of curcumin) in the treatment of arthritis. However, the total number of RCTs included in the analysis, the total sample size, and the methodological quality of the primary studies were not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Thus, more rigorous and larger studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic efficacy of turmeric for arthritis.

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... protocol affect the trial's results. Comparison Groups In most clinical trials, researchers use comparison groups. This means ... study before you agree to take part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about eligibility criteria, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Work?" Some trials enroll people who ... for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" For more information about ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key ... Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This method helps ensure that any differences observed during a ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ... All types of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks and benefits of any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about ...

  20. Brief report: enhancement of patient recruitment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials using a multi-biomarker disease activity score as an inclusion criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Bolce, Rebecca; Hambardzumyan, Karen; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F; Sasso, Eric H; Hwang, C C; Segurado, Oscar G; Geborek, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials often exclude patients who have low C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, which slows enrollment into the trial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high Multi-Biomarker Disease Activity (MBDA) scores (>44) in RA patients with low CRP levels (≤10 mg/liter) could be used as a complement to CRP levels >10 mg/liter to enhance patient recruitment without affecting clinical trial outcomes. We evaluated patients from the Swedish Pharmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial, which did not include any selection criteria for CRP levels. Clinical outcomes were assessed after 3 months of methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy in MTX-naive RA patients (n = 220) and after 3-10 months of add-on therapy in patients who were incomplete responders to MTX alone (MTX-IR) (n = 127). Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 1 year in all patients. Within each cohort, the outcomes were compared between patients with a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at the start of the respective treatment interval versus those with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter. Patients with both a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at baseline had clinical and radiographic outcomes that were comparable to those in patients with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter at baseline. This broadened definition of the inclusion criteria identified an additional 24% of patients in the MTX-naive cohort and 47% in the MTX-IR cohort. Patient recruitment into RA clinical trials may be substantially enhanced, without any decrease in clinical and radiographic outcomes, by using as an inclusion criterion "a CRP level of >10 mg/liter and/or an MBDA score of >44." © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to the strategies and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking part in a clinical trial is different ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics / About Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. Clinical research is done only if doctors don't know ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children have the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the ... more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about ... clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're interested in. For a list of questions to ask your doctor and the ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, ... and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ... otherwise. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. These studies also may show which ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human ... of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ... phase I clinical trials test new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risks that outweigh any possible benefits. Clinical Trial Phases Clinical trials of new medicines or medical devices are done in phases. These phases have different purposes and help researchers ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. An IRB is an independent committee created by the institution that sponsors a clinical trial. ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers ( ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ... in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... and advance medical care. They also can help health care decisionmakers direct resources to the strategies and treatments ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about ... other National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ... are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might ... enroll in a clinical trial, a doctor or nurse will give you an informed consent form that ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial ... volunteer because they want to help others. Possible Risks Clinical trials do have risks and some downsides, ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... providers don't always cover all patient care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about ... clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the best choice for you. ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Find a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  19. Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W.; Yang, Mini

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although turmeric and its curcumin-enriched extracts have been used for treating arthritis, no systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to evaluate the strength of the research. We systemically evaluated all RCTs of turmeric extracts and curcumin for treating arthritis symptoms to elucidate the efficacy of curcuma for alleviating the symptoms of arthritis. Literature searches were conducted using 12 electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Korean databases, Chinese medical databases, and Indian scientific database. Search terms used were “turmeric,” “curcuma,” “curcumin,” “arthritis,” and “osteoarthritis.” A pain visual analogue score (PVAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were used for the major outcomes of arthritis. Initial searches yielded 29 articles, of which 8 met specific selection criteria. Three among the included RCTs reported reduction of PVAS (mean difference: −2.04 [−2.85, −1.24]) with turmeric/curcumin in comparison with placebo (P < .00001), whereas meta-analysis of four studies showed a decrease of WOMAC with turmeric/curcumin treatment (mean difference: −15.36 [−26.9, −3.77]; P = .009). Furthermore, there was no significant mean difference in PVAS between turmeric/curcumin and pain medicine in meta-analysis of five studies. Eight RCTs included in the review exhibited low to moderate risk of bias. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. In conclusion, these RCTs provide scientific evidence that supports the efficacy of turmeric extract (about 1000 mg/day of curcumin) in the treatment of arthritis. However, the total number of RCTs included in the analysis, the total sample size, and the methodological quality of the primary studies were not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Thus, more rigorous and larger studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic efficacy

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more screening tests to see which test produces the best results. Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the ... and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you to explore NIH Clinical Center for patient recruitment and clinical trial information. For more information, please email the NIH Clinical Center Office of Patient Recruitment at cc-prpl@cc.nih.gov or call ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ... based on what is known to work in adults. To improve clinical care of children, more studies ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments ... sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the benefits of ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including ... our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... identified earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ... supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the past, clinical trial participants often were White men. Researchers assumed that trial results were valid for ... different ethnic groups sometimes respond differently than White men to the same medical approach. As a result, ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or strategies work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Some clinical trials show a positive result. For example, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored a trial of two different ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... healthy people to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants ... DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National Heart, Lung, and ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored ... risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether surgery ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to ... as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. This involves assigning patients to different comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in ... Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking ... people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the clinical trial you take part in, the information gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get ... legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people ... participants, it may not work for you. A new treatment may have side ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... phase II clinical trials. The risk of side effects might be even greater for ... treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't always ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn more about ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ... cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT ... Clinical Trials Work If you take ...

  2. Testing of the preliminary OMERACT validation criteria for a biomarker to be regarded as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: the example of C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keeling, Stephanie O.; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree; Bathon, Joan; Boers, Maarten; Garnero, Patrick; Geusens, Piet; El-Gabalawy, Hani; Inman, Robert D.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Kvien, Tore K.; Mease, Philip J.; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Ritchlin, Chris; Syversen, Silje W.; Maksymowych, Walter P.

    2007-01-01

    A list of 14 criteria for guiding the validation of a soluble biomarker as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials was drafted by an international working group after a Delphi consensus exercise. C-reactive protein (CRP), a soluble biomarker extensively

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial found that one of the combinations worked much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other expenses (for example, travel and child care)? Who will be in charge of my care? What will happen after the trial? Taking part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... strict scientific standards. These standards protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one ... are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients to find out whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, ... device improves patient outcomes; offers no benefit; or causes unexpected harm All of these results are important ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and compare new treatments with other available treatments. Steps To Avoid Bias The researchers doing clinical trials take steps to avoid bias. "Bias" means that human choices ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because they want to help others. ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of Health ( ... III clinical trial is required to have a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). This board consists ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Locator DBSA In-Person Support ... by participating in a clinical trial is to science first and to the patient second. More About ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ... the new approach. You also will have the support of a team of health care providers, who ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists ... part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical centers and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling the clinical trial participants which treatment they're getting. Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and ... how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees all research ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trial. IRB members are doctors, statisticians, and community members. The IRB's purpose is to ensure that ... lung, and blood disorders. By engaging the research community and a broad group of stakeholders and advisory ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... studies. View funding information for clinical trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The ... a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether the patient has had ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines who is eligible to take part in the ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical care of children, more studies are needed focusing on children's health with the goal to develop ... study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for ... or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; ... age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about the new approach's risks and benefits. ... explore whether surgery or other medical treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... study explored whether the benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ... in Bethesda, Maryland. The physicians, nurses, scientists and staff of the NHLBI encourage you to explore NIH ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well ... confirm how well treatments work, further examine side effects, and compare new treatments with other available treatments. ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... records can quickly show this information if safety issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines ... and materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ... often differ for children. For example, children may need lower doses of certain medicines or smaller medical ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ... taking part in a clinical trial. Your treatment team also may ask you to do other tasks. ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well treatments work and further review these treatments for safety. Phase ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense ... FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes ... for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... combination of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ... to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants often were ...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. ( ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ... minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  14. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, controlled clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei; Xiao, Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu

    2008-07-15

    To assess the efficacy and safety of chicken type II collagen (CCII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a prospective, 24-week, followup, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study of CCII (0.1 mg/day) versus MTX (10 mg/week) in patients with active RA. Clinical assessments were performed at screening and at 12, 18, and 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 236 RA patients were included; 211 patients (89.4%) completed the 24-week followup. In both groups there was a decrease in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire score, and investigator and patient assessment of function; all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level decreased. Rheumatoid factor did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 68.57% of patients in the CCII group and 83.02% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20), and 40.95% and 57.54%, respectively, met the ACR50 criteria. The ACR20 and ACR50 response rates in the CCII group were lower than those in the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in both groups. There were fewer and milder side effects in the CCII group than the MTX group. The difference in incidence of adverse events between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CCII is effective in the treatment of RA. CCII is well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events of CCII is lower than that of MTX.

  15. Obesity is a strong predictor of worse clinical outcomes and treatment responses in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levitsky, Adrian; Brismar, Kerstin; Hafström, Ingiäld; Hambardzumyan, Karen; Lourdudoss, Cecilia; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Saevarsdottir, Saedis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyse the impact of obesity, in addition to known predictors, on disease outcome in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Body mass index (BMI) was available in 260 patients from the Swedish pharmacotherapy trial (SWEFOT). Differences in disease activity (DAS28), functional

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment team. ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; look at the best age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests to see which test ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient has had certain treatments or has other health problems. Eligibility criteria ensure that new approaches are tested ... public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part ... about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT to prevent heart disease. When HT is used for menopausal symptoms, it should be taken only at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ...

  7. A randomised trial of differentiated prednisolone treatment in active rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical benefits and skeletal side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Podenphant, J; Florescu, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study benefits and skeletal side effects of carefully monitored prednisolone treatment in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: One hundred and two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to treatment with disease modifying anti......-inflammatory drug (DMARD) alone or DMARD and prednisolone in a one year follow up study. Prednisolone was given in a dose regimen adapted to the disease activity of the individual patient. The mean dose was 6 mg and the mean cumulated dose was 2160 mg. Patients were followed up with disease activity parameters......, radiograph of the hands (Larsen score), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine, distal forearm and hand. At one year 26 patients had withdrawn from the investigation leaving 76 patients for evaluation. RESULTS: The results showed that disease activity in the prednisolone treated group was reduced...

  8. Can rheumatoid arthritis (RA) registries provide contextual safety data for modern RA clinical trials? The case for mortality and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kaleb; Berglind, Niklas; Franzén, Stefan; Frisell, Thomas; Garwood, Christopher; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Ho, Meilien; Holmqvist, Marie; Horne, Laura; Inoue, Eisuke; Nyberg, Fredrik; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Reed, George; Symmons, Deborah; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tran, Trung N; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Wesby-van Swaay, Eveline; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Askling, Johan

    2016-10-01

    We implemented a novel method for providing contextual adverse event rates for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) programme through coordinated analyses of five RA registries, focusing here on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Each participating registry (Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) (USA), Swedish Rheumatology Quality of Care Register (SRR) (Sweden), Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) (UK), CORRONA International (East Europe, Latin America, India) and Institute of Rheumatology, Rheumatoid Arthritis (IORRA) (Japan)) defined a main cohort from January 2000 onwards. To address comparability and potential bias, we harmonised event definitions and defined several subcohorts for sensitivity analyses based on disease activity, treatment, calendar time, duration of follow-up and RCT exclusions. Rates were standardised for age, sex and, in one sensitivity analysis, also HAQ. The combined registry cohorts included 57 251 patients with RA (234 089 person-years)-24.5% men, mean (SD) baseline age 58.2 (13.8) and RA duration 8.2 (11.7) years. Standardised registry mortality rates (per 100 person-years) varied from 0.42 (CORRONA) to 0.80 (NOAR), with 0.60 for RCT patients. Myocardial infarction and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) rates ranged from 0.09 and 0.31 (IORRA) to 0.39 and 0.77 (SRR), with RCT rates intermediate (0.18 and 0.42), respectively. Additional subcohort analyses showed small and mostly consistent changes across registries, retaining reasonable consistency in rates across the Western registries. Additional standardisation for HAQ returned higher mortality and MACE registry rates. This coordinated approach to contextualising RA RCT safety data demonstrated reasonable differences and consistency in rates for mortality and CVD across registries, and comparable RCT rates, and may serve as a model method to supplement clinical trial analyses for drug development programmes. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  9. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available soriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine and entheses from a group of spondyloarthritis (SpA, which is usually observed in patients with psoriasis (Ps. The diagnosis of PsA is based on the CASPAR criteria for psoriatic arthritis. The disease results from interactions between genetic, immunological and environmental factors. The main clinical manifestations of PsA include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. PsA must be differentiated from rheumatoid arthritis, gout, reactive arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Due to the fact that PsA is a clinically heterogeneous disease, its activity is assessed using complex indices, by taking into account that the patient has arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The goal of treatment for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of the main clinical manifestations of the disease, to slow down or prevent radiographic progression, to increase life expectancy and quality of life in the patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities, which is achieved through a wide range of drugs of different classes. Therapy should be chosen based on the clinical manifestations of PsA and comorbidities in the patients. 

  10. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, Gerhardus J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients with

  11. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T.F. Tijhuis (Marijke); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); F.C. Breedveld (Ferdinand); P.M.T. Vliet Vlieland (P.M. Theodora)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAim. To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients

  12. The Effects of Written Emotional Disclosure and Coping Skills Training in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Mark A.; Keefe, Francis J.; Mosley-Williams, Angelia; Rice, John R.; McKee, Daphne; Waters, Sandra J.; Partridge, R. Ty; Carty, Jennifer N.; Coltri, Ainoa M.; Kalaj, Anita; Cohen, Jay L.; Neely, Lynn C.; Pahssen, Jennifer K.; Connelly, Mark A.; Bouaziz, Yelena B.; Riordan, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Two psychological interventions for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cognitive-behavioral coping skills training (CST) and written emotional disclosure (WED). These approaches have developed independently, and their combination may be more effective than either one alone. Furthermore, most studies of each intervention have methodological limitations, and each needs further testing. Method We randomized 264 adults with RA in a 2 × 2 factorial design to one of two writing conditions (WED vs. control writing) followed by one of two training conditions (CST vs. arthritis education control training). Patient-reported pain and functioning, blinded evaluations of disease activity and walking speed, and an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) were assessed at baseline and 1-, 4-, and 12-month follow-ups. Results Completion of each intervention was high (> 90% of patients), and attrition was low (10.2% at 12-month follow-up). Hierarchical linear modeling of treatment effects over the follow-up period, and ANCOVAs at each assessment point, found no interactions between writing and training; however, both interventions had main effects on outcomes, with small effect sizes. Compared to control training, CST decreased pain and psychological symptoms through 12 months. The effects of WED were mixed: compared with control writing, WED reduced disease activity and physical disability at 1 month only, but WED had more pain than control writing on one of two measures at 4 and 12 months. Conclusions The combination of WED and CST does not improve outcomes, perhaps because each intervention has unique effects at different time points. CST improves health status in RA and is recommended for patients, whereas WED has limited benefits and needs strengthening or better targeting to appropriate patients. PMID:24865870

  13. The minimally important difference for the health assessment questionnaire in rheumatoid arthritis clinical practice is smaller than in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Janet E; Khanna, Dinesh; Norrie, Deborah; Ouimet, Janine M

    2009-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes are used in clinical practice and trials. We studied a large clinical practice to determine the minimally important difference (MID) estimates for (1) the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Damage Index (HAQ-DI): improvement and worsening using patient global assessment anchor; and (2) pain using a patient-reported pain anchor. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; N = 225) had clinic visits at 2 timepoints within 1 year, completed the HAQ-DI and pain visual analog scale (VAS; 0-100 mm), and answered the question, "How would you describe your overall status/overall pain since the last visit?", as much worsened, somewhat worsened, the same, somewhat improved, or much improved. If rated as somewhat improved or worsened, they were defined as the minimally changed subgroups. Eighty-three percent were women, mean age 60 years, with disease duration 11.7 +/- 10.7 years. The baseline HAQ-DI was 0.97 +/- SD 0.76, and at followup 1.0 +/- 0.77 (mean change +0.03 +/- 0.40). The baseline pain VAS was 42.3 +/- 28.8, and at followup 38.5 +/- 27.9 (mean change -2.8 +/- 25.9). The mean (SD) HAQ-DI change score was -0.09 (0.42) for somewhat improved and 0.15 (0.33) for somewhat worsened. The HAQ-DI change for somewhat/much better was -0.20 +/- 0.52, and for somewhat/much worse +0.21 +/- 0.33. For pain, somewhat improved changed by -11.9 mm on the VAS, and somewhat worsened by 6.8 mm. Estimates for HAQ-DI and pain were larger than the for no-change group, 0.03 (0.32) and -3.2 (20.9). The MID for HAQ-DI in clinical practice is smaller than it is in trials. This may have implications for observational studies and clinical care.

  14. Textbook of clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Simon; Machin, David; Green, Sylvan B

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 The Development of Clinical Trials Simon...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the ... bias. "Bias" means that human choices or other factors not related to the protocol affect the trial's ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ... stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful ...

  17. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled phase III clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu; Wu, Yu-Qing; Sun, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Sun, Bao-Liang; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Jie; Liu, Hua-Xiang; Wang, Ren-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Chicken type II collagen (CCII) is a protein extracted from the cartilage of chicken breast and exhibits intriguing possibilities for the treatment of autoimmune diseases by inducing oral tolerance. A 24-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, methotrexate (MTX)-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CCII in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five hundred three RA patients were included in the study. Patients received either 0.1 mg daily of CCII (n = 326) or 10 mg once a week of MTX (n = 177) for 24 weeks. Each patient was evaluated for pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), assessments by investigator and patient, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) by using the standard tools at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 12 and 24. Additionally, rheumatoid factor (RF) was evaluated at weeks 0 and 24. Measurement of a battery of biochemical parameters in serum, hematological parameters, and urine analysis was performed to evaluate the safety of CCII. Four hundred fifty-four patients (94.43%) completed the 24-week follow-up. In both groups, there were decreases in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, HAQ, and assessments by investigator and patient, and all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, ESR and CRP decreased. RF did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 41.55% of patients in the CCII group and 57.86% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR-20) and 16.89% and 30.82%, respectively, met the ACR 50% improvement criteria (ACR-50). Both response rates for ACR-20 and ACR-50 in the CCII group were lower than those of the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts) values of the two treatment groups were calculated, and there was a statistically

  18. Synovial tissue sublining CD68 expression is a biomarker of therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: consistency across centers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bresnihan, Barry

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the correlation between the mean change in disease activity and the mean change in synovial sublining (sl) CD68 expression could be demonstrated across different academic centers. METHODS: Synovial biopsies obtained at arthroscopy from patients with rheumatoid arthritis before and 160 days after rituximab therapy were selected and coded. Paired sections were processed independently at Amsterdam Medical Center (AMC) and at St. Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH), Dublin. Digital image analysis (DIA) was employed at both centers to quantify sublining CD68 expression. RESULTS: After analysis of CD68sl expression at centers in 2 different countries, high levels of intracenter and intercenter agreement were observed. For the pooled sections stained at AMC, the correlation between 2 investigators was R = 0.942, p = 0.000, and for sections stained at SVUH, R = 0.899, p = 0.001. Similarly, the intracenter correlations for DeltaCD68sl expression after treatment were R = 0.998, p = 0.000, for sections stained at AMC and R = 0.880, p = 0.000, for sections stained at SVUH. The intercenter correlation for the pooled scores of sections stained at AMC was R = 0.85, p = 0.000, and for the sections stained at SVUH, R = 0.62, p = 0.001. The consistent correlation between DeltaDAS (Disease Activity Score) and DeltaCD68sl expression across different studies (Pearson correlation = 0.895, p < 0.001) was confirmed. The standardized response mean values for DeltaCD68sl, calculated from analyses at both AMC and SVUH, were consistently 0.5 or greater, indicating a moderate to high potential to detect change. CONCLUSION: The correlation between mean DeltaDAS and mean DeltaCD68sl expression was confirmed across 2 centers. Examination of serial biopsy samples can be used reliably to screen for interesting biological effects at the site of inflammation at an early stage of drug development.

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people who fit the patient traits for that study (the eligibility criteria). Eligibility criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective ... trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sponsored a trial of two different combinations of asthma treatments. The trial found that one of the ... much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsors also may stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ...

  5. Marine Oil Supplements for Arthritis Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninna K. Senftleber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched systematically (24 February 2015. We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML-based meta-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD suggested a favorable effect (−0.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, −0.42 to −0.07; heterogeneity, I2 = 63%. A significant effect was found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (22 trials; −0.21; 95% CI, −0.42 to −0.004 and other or mixed diagnoses (3 trials; −0.63; 95% CI, −1.20 to −0.06, but not in osteoarthritis patients (5 trials; −0.17; 95% CI, −0.57–0.24. The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. An open randomized active-controlled clinical trial with low-dose SKA cytokines versus DMARDs evaluating low disease activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Martin LS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available LS Martin-Martin,1 F Giovannangeli,2 E Bizzi,2 U Massafra,2 E Ballanti,2 M Cassol,3 A Migliore2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, 2Operative Unit of Rheumatology, 3Department of Internal Medicine, San Pietro Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, Italy Background: Biologic agents are currently the strongest immunosuppressive drugs able to induce remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the objectives of the medical scientific community now is how to maintain remission or low disease activity (LDA. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of low-dose sequential kinetic activation (SKA IL-4, IL-10, and anti-IL-1 antibodies (10 fg/mL in patients affected by RA in maintaining LDA or remission obtained after biological therapy. Method: This is a randomized, open, active-controlled, prospective, Phase IV trial. Disease activity score (DAS28, clinical disease activity index, simplified disease activity index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, global health assessment, and pain visual analog scale were evaluated at baseline visit and then every 3 months together with an assessment of side effects till 12 months. Thirty-nine RA patients were enrolled and randomized to continue disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs therapy or to receive a combination of SKA low-dose cytokines formulated in concentration of 10 fg/mL orally administered at a dose of 20 drops/d for 12 consecutive months. Results: The rate of maintenance of LDA at 12 months was superior in the group treated with low-dose cytokines compared with patients treated with DMARDs, 66.7% and 42.1%, respectively; however, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. No side effects were reported in both groups. Conclusion: This is the first study using a combination of three low-dose cytokines in RA, after data published on psoriasis. These data suggest that the use of a combination of low-dose SKA

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often had to ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... participants. Children and Clinical Studies Learn about the importance of children in clinical studies and get answers ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's ...

  10. Efficacy and safety of Tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to conventional therapy: Preliminary results of an open-label clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Luchikhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which are associated with the use of biological anti-rheumatic drugs, the problemof effective treatment of RA is not still solved. Inclusion of new methods in treatment strategies, in particular the so-called «small molecules», i.e. synthetic compounds acting on intracellular signaling pathways, such as Tofacitinib (TOFA approved for use in rheumatologic practice, is very important.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (s-DMARDs, primarily methotrexate (MTX in in patients with active RA in real clinical practice.Subjects and methods. This ongoing open-label trial is a part of the scientific program «Russian Investigation of Methotrexate and Biologics in Early Active Inflammatory Arthritis» (REMARCA that explores the possibility of adapting the «treat-to-target» strategy in real prac-tice in Russia. The study included RA patients with moderate to high disease activity despite treatment with MTX or other DMARDs. A total of 41 patients with RA were included (8 males, 33 females; mean age 52.6±14.2 years, disease duration 47.2±49.7 months, 82.9% RF+ and 80.5% anti-CCP+,DAS28-ESR 5.45±0.95, SDAI 30.2±12.2. All the patients had previously received s-DMARDs; 12 (29.3% patients also had biological DMARDs (1 to 4 biologics. Oral TOFA 5 mg in combination with MTX or leflunomide was administered twice daily to 40 and 1 patients, respectively, with the possibility of increasing the dose up to 10 mg BID. To date, 37 and 12 patients received TOFA for 3 and 6 months, respectively.Results. TOFA was used as a second-line drug (after s-DMARDs failure in 29 (70.7%, as a third line drug (after s-DMARDs and biologics failure in 12 (29.3% patients. The dose was escalated to 10 mg BID in 13 (31.2% patients, on the average, 11.2±1.7 weeks after treatment initiation. TOFA was not

  11. Testing of the preliminary OMERACT validation criteria for a biomarker to be regarded as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: the example of C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A list of 14 criteria for guiding the validation of a soluble biomarker as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials was drafted by an international working group after a Delphi consensus exercise. C-reactive protein (CRP), a soluble biomarker...... of individual criteria in the draft set. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to elicit evidence in support of each specific criterion composing the 14-criteria draft set. A summary of the key literature findings per criterion was presented to both the working group and to participants...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ... How long will the trial last? Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive? Will ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these ... trials are a key research tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, researchers also may not be told which treatments ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... a safety measure. They ensure a trial excludes any people for whom the protocol has known risks ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT was already in common use for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug ... life? Will I have to be in the hospital? How long will the trial last? Who will ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedures painful? What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are ethical and that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the ... may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems promising, the ... Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ... also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study found that HT increased the risk ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Get ... and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Connect ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the study begins. An IRB will only approve research that deals with medically important questions ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to preexisting differences between the patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term " ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study ... a trial are due to the different strategies being used, not to preexisting differences between the patients. ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... assumed that trial results were valid for other populations as well. Researchers now realize that women and ...

  10. Understanding Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch these videos to learn about some basic aspects of cancer clinical trials such as the different phases of clinical trials, methods used to protect patient safety, and how the costs of clinical trials are covered.

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... go to the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about ... Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... rights that help protect them. Scientific Oversight Institutional Review Board Institutional review boards (IRBs) help provide scientific ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taking the same treatment the same way. These patients are closely watched by Data and Safety Monitoring Boards. Even if you don't directly ... risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as ... trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't ... of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, ... helps ensure that any differences observed during a trial are due to the ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and useful results, which in turn will improve public health. We offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ... of research studies at the NIH Clinical Center, America's research hospital, located on the NIH campus in ...

  4. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Dick, Andrew D; Benton, Diana; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, Sandrine; Dawoud, Dalia; Hardwick, Ben; Hickey, Helen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Jones, Ashley; Woo, Patricia; Edelsten, Clive; Beresford, Michael W

    2014-01-09

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the uveitis is asymptomatic. This has led to current practice of screening all children with JIA for uveitis. Approximately 12% to 38% of patients with JIA develop uveitis in seven years following onset of arthritis. In 30% to 50% of children with JIA-associated uveitis structural complications are present at diagnosis. Furthermore about 50% to 75% of those with severe uveitis will eventually develop visual impairment secondary to ocular complications such as cataract and glaucoma. Defining the severity of inflammation and structural complications in uveitis patients is now possible following Standardised Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) guidelines, and modified to incorporate the consensus of end point and outcome criteria into the design of randomised trials. Despite current screening and therapeutic options (pre-biologics) 10% to 15% of children with JIA-associated uveitis may develop bilateral visual impairment and certified legally blind. To date, there remains no controlled trial evidence of benefits of biologic therapy. This study will randomise 154 patients aged 2 to 18 years with active JIA-associated uveitis (despite methotrexate (MTX) treatment for at least 12 weeks). All participants will be treated for 18 months, with follow up of 3 years from randomisation (continuing on MTX throughout). All participants will receive a stable dose of MTX and in addition either adalimumab (20 mg/0.8 ml for patientstreatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis. ISRCTN10065623.

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seems promising, the next step may involve animal testing. This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis of serious infections with tofacitinib and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Ahadieh, Sima; French, Jonathan; Geier, Jamie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Menon, Sujatha; Checchio, Tina; Tensfeldt, Thomas G; Hoffman, Elaine; Riese, Richard; Boy, Mary; Gómez-Reino, Juan J

    2015-12-15

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib modulates the signaling of cytokines that are integral to lymphocyte activation, proliferation, and function. Thus, tofacitinib therapy may result in suppression of multiple elements of the immune response. Serious infections have been reported in tofacitinib RA trials. However, limited head-to-head comparator data were available within the tofacitinib RA development program to directly compare rates of serious infections with tofacitinib relative to biologic agents, and specifically adalimumab (employed as an active control agent in two randomized controlled trials of tofacitinib). A systematic literature search of data from interventional randomized controlled trials and long-term extension studies with biologics in RA was carried out. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) consensus was followed for reporting results of the review and meta-analysis. Incidence rates (unique patients with events/100 patient-years) for each therapy were estimated based on data from randomized controlled trials and long-term extension studies using a random-effects model. Relative and absolute risk comparisons versus placebo used Mantel-Haenszel methods. The search produced 657 hits. In total, 66 randomized controlled trials and 22 long-term extension studies met the selection criteria. Estimated incidence rates (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for abatacept, rituximab, tocilizumab, and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors were 3.04 (2.49, 3.72), 3.72 (2.99, 4.62), 5.45 (4.26, 6.96), and 4.90 (4.41, 5.44), respectively. Incidence rates (95% CIs) for tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily (BID) in phase 3 trials were 3.02 (2.25, 4.05) and 3.00 (2.24, 4.02), respectively. Corresponding incidence rates in long-term extension studies were 2.50 (2.05, 3.04) and 3.19 (2.74, 3.72). The risk ratios (95% CIs) versus placebo for tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg BID

  8. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  9. Methodological considerations for a randomised controlled trial of podiatry care in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from an exploratory trial

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Deborah E; Helliwell, Philip S; Woodburn, James

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Whilst evidence exists to support the use of single treatments such as orthoses and footwear, the effectiveness of podiatry-led care as a complex intervention for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) related foot problems is unknown. The aim of this study was to undertake an exploratory randomised controlled parallel arm clinical trial (RheumAFooT) to inform the design and implementation of a definitive trial and to understand the potential benefits of this care. Method...

  10. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  11. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  12. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimabukuro, Kunisada; Sakata, Hiromichi; Shirono, Kazuo; Nakajo, Masataka; Shinohara, Shinji

    1983-01-01

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  13. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly after a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  14. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly before a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  15. Synovial tissue rank ligand expression and radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: observations from a proof-of-concept randomized clinical trial of cytokine blockade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rooney, Terence

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate synovial tissue receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) as biomarkers of disease activity, progressive joint damage, and therapeutic response, during cytokine blockade in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active RA entered a randomized open-label 12-month study of anakinra 100 mg\\/day, administered as monotherapy or in combination with pegsunercept 800 mug\\/kg twice weekly. Arthroscopic synovial tissue biopsies were obtained at baseline, at 4 weeks and at the final time point. Following immunohistochemical staining, RANKL and OPG expression was quantified using digital image analysis. Radiographic damage was evaluated using the van der Heijde modification of the Sharp scoring system. Twenty-two patients were randomized. Baseline expression of RANKL, but not OPG, correlated significantly with baseline CRP levels (r = 0.61, P < 0.01). While a significant reduction in OPG expression following treatment was observed in clinical responders at the final time point (P < 0.05 vs. baseline), RANKL levels did not change, and the RANKL:OPG ratio remained unaltered, even at the highest levels of clinical response. When potential predictors of radiographic outcome were evaluated, baseline RANKL expression correlated with erosive progression at 1 year (r = 0.71, P < 0.01). Distinct, though related, pathophysiologic processes mediate joint inflammation and destruction in RA. Elevated synovial tissue RANKL expression is associated with progressive joint erosion, and may be independent of the clinical response to targeted therapy. The potential therapeutic importance of modulating RANKL in RA is highlighted, if radiographic arrest is to be achieved.

  16. The effects of arthritis gloves on people with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Inflammatory Arthritis with hand pain: a study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (the A-GLOVES trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Yeliz; Sutton, Chris; Cotterill, Sarah; Adams, Jo; Camacho, Elizabeth; Arafin, Nazina; Firth, Jill; O'Neill, Terence; Hough, Yvonne; Jones, Wendy; Hammond, Alison

    2017-05-30

    Arthritis gloves are regularly provided as part of the management of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated (early) inflammatory arthritis (IA). Usually made of nylon and elastane (i.e. Lycra®), these arthritis gloves apply pressure with the aims of relieving hand pain, stiffness and improving hand function. However, a systematic review identified little evidence supporting their use. We therefore designed a trial to compare the effectiveness of the commonest type of arthritis glove provided in the United Kingdom (Isotoner gloves) (intervention) with placebo (control) gloves (i.e. larger arthritis gloves providing similar warmth to the intervention gloves but minimal pressure only) in people with these conditions. Participants aged 18 years and over with RA or IA and persistent hand pain will be recruited from National Health Service Trusts in the United Kingdom. Following consent, participants will complete a questionnaire booklet, then be randomly allocated to receive intervention or placebo arthritis gloves. Within three weeks, they will be fitted with the allocated gloves by clinical specialist rheumatology occupational therapists. Twelve weeks (i.e. the primary endpoint) after completing the baseline questionnaire, participants will complete a second questionnaire, including the same measures plus additional questions to explore adherence, benefits and problems with glove-wear. A sub-sample of participants from each group will be interviewed at the end of their participation to explore their views of the gloves received. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention, compared to placebo gloves, will be evaluated over 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is hand pain during activity. Qualitative interviews will be thematically analysed. This study will evaluate the commonest type of arthritis glove (Isotoner) provided in the NHS (i.e. the intervention) compared to a placebo glove. The results will help

  17. A randomized controlled trial examining Iyengar yoga for young adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternlieb Beth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, disabling disease that can compromise mobility, daily functioning, and health-related quality of life, especially in older adolescents and young adults. In this project, we will compare a standardized Iyengar yoga program for young people with rheumatoid arthritis to a standard care wait-list control condition. Methods/Design Seventy rheumatoid arthritis patients aged 16-35 years will be randomized into either the 6-week Iyengar yoga program (12 - 1.5 hour sessions twice weekly or the 6-week wait-list control condition. A 20% attrition rate is anticipated. The wait-list group will receive the yoga program following completion of the first arm of the study. We will collect data quantitatively, using questionnaires and markers of disease activity, and qualitatively using semi-structured interviews. Assessments include standardized measures of general and arthritis-specific function, pain, mood, and health-related quality of life, as well as qualitative interviews, blood pressure/resting heart rate measurements, a medical exam and the assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Data will be collected three times: before treatment, post-treatment, and two months following the treatment. Discussion Results from this study will provide critical data on non-pharmacologic methods for enhancing function in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In particular, results will shed light on the feasibility and potential efficacy of a novel intervention for rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, paving the way for a larger clinical trial. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096823

  18. The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function study. Stephen C. Morrison, Girish M. Mody, Sally R. Benatar, Orlando L Meyers. Abstract. Objective. To detennine the prevalence and spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a developing country.

  19. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture gives basic information about psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine, and enthesises from a group of spondyloarthritis. It describes the epidemiology of the disease and considers current ideas on its pathogenesis and factors influencing the development of PsA in psoriatic patients. The classification and clinical forms of PsA are presented. The major clinical manifestations of the disease are indicated to include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The diagnosis of the disease is noted to be established on the basis of its detected typical clinical and radiological signs, by applying the CASPAR criteria. A dermatologist, rheumatologist, and general practitioner screen PsA, by actively detecting complaints, characteristic clinical and radiological signs of damage to the joints, and/or spine, and/or enthesises and by using screening questionnaires. There are data that patients with PsA are observed to be at higher risk for a number of diseases type 2 diabetes mellitus hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, etc. The aim of current pharmacotherapy for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of clinical manifestations of the disease, to delay or prevent its X-ray progression, to increase survival, to improve quality of life in patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities. The paper considers groups of medicines used to treat the disease, among other issues, information about biological agents (BA registered in the Russian Federation for the treatment of PsA. Most patients are mentioned to show a good response to this therapy option just 3–6 months after treatment initiation; however, some of them develop primary inefficiency. In this case, switching one BA to another is recommended. Some patients using a BA develop secondary treatment inefficiency, which is firstly due to the appearance of

  20. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  1. Managing clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation.

  2. A protocol for a randomised controlled trial of prefabricated versus customised foot orthoses for people with rheumatoid arthritis: the FOCOS RA trial [Foot Orthoses - Customised v Off-the-Shelf in Rheumatoid Arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kellie S; Godwin, Jon; Hendry, Gordon J; Steultjens, Martijn; Woodburn, Jim

    2018-01-01

    Foot pain is common in rheumatoid arthritis and appears to persist despite modern day medical management. Several clinical practice guidelines currently recommend the use of foot orthoses for the treatment of foot pain in people with rheumatoid arthritis. However, an evidence gap currently exists concerning the comparative clinical- and cost-effectiveness of prefabricated and customised foot orthoses in people with early rheumatoid arthritis. Early intervention with orthotics may offer the best opportunity for positive therapeutic outcomes. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the comparative clinical- and cost-effectiveness of prefabricated versus customised orthoses for reducing foot pain over 12 months. This is a multi-centre two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial comparing prefabricated versus customised orthoses in participants with early rheumatoid arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, global functional status via the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, foot disease activity via the Rheumatoid Arthritis Foot Disease Activity Index, and health-related quality of life at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Process outcomes will include recruitment/retention rates, data completion rates, intervention adherence rates, and participant intervention and trial participation satisfaction. Cost-utility and cost-effectiveness analyses will be undertaken. Outcome measures collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months will be used to evaluate the comparative clinical- and cost- effectiveness of customised versus prefabricated orthoses for this treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis foot conditions. This trial will help to guide orthotic prescription recommendations for the management of foot pain for people with early rheumatoid arthritis in future. ISRCTN13654421. Registered 09 February 2016.

  3. Types of Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the several types of cancer clinical trials, including treatment trials, prevention trials, screening trials, supportive and palliative care trials. Each type of trial is designed to answer different research questions.

  4. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  5. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Dick, Andrew D; Benton, Diana; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, Sandrine; Dawoud, Dalia; Hardwick, Ben; Hickey, Helen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Jones, Ashley; Woo, Patricia; Edelsten, Clive; Beresford, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the uv...

  6. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanan, A. V.; Benton, D.; Dick, A. D.; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, S.; Woo, P.; Edelsten, C.; Hardwick, B.; Hickey, H.; Jones, A.; Beresford, M. W.; Dawoud, D.; Hughes, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the u...

  7. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  8. Dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis: clinical features, diagnosis, immunopathogenesis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When dactylitis is detected in a patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, it is necessary to use active treatment as soon as possible, since in the absence of therapy the disease progresses to joint erosion and  functional disorders. The paper considers the clinical signs and  diagnosis of PsA and notes the importance of differential diagnosis in this sign with other joint inflammatory diseases. It points to the  necessity of elaborating common approaches to an objective  assessment of the severity of dactylitis. Its immunopathogenesis and main treatment areas, including the use of biological agents (BAs,  are detailed. There are data of clinical trials that have evaluated the  efficiency of treatment for dactylitis and established that in most  cases, the use of BAs considerably reduce not only the severity of its clinical signs, but also concomitant bone marrow edema. It is noted  that the development of new pathogenetic treatments targeting a number of currently established biologically active molecules that  play an important role in the pathogenesis of dactylitis will enhance  the efficiency of treatment in patients with PsA.

  9. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  10. Cancer clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurlen, A.; Kay, R.; Baum, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on Cancer clinical trials: A critical appraisal. Topics covered include: Scientific fundamentals; Heterogeneous treatment effects; On combining information: Historical controls, overviews, and comprehensive cohort studies; and assessment of quality of life

  11. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  12. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  13. Clinical value of MRI on wrists with arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qiang; Ma Daqing; He Wen; Le Erhu; Ma Xinfa; Wang Jun; Zuo Zhaoyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of various kinds of arthritis on MRI, and to assess and evaluate the role of MRI on diagnosing various kinds of arthritis. Methods: One hundred and fifty-one patients with medical history of wrist pain entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, STIR (short time inversion recovery) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were examined in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical data including swollen joint and patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory, examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score (HAQ). According to 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, in 151 patients, 80 patients were diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis, 29 patients as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, 20 patients as seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and 22 as other kinds of connective tissue diseases. Results: All 80 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis had bilateral pannus. Among 29 patients diagnosed with undifferentiated spondyloanthropathy, 3 cases had bilateral pannus, 24 had lateral pannus. Among 20 patients diagnosed with seronegative spondyloanthropathy, 4 cases had bilateral pannus, 15 had lateral pannus. Among 22 patients diagnosed with other kinds of connective tissue disease, 21 had lateral pannus. Bilateral pannus on bilateral wrists occured in 87 patients. There were not significant difference in the unilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =6.157; P>0.05). But there were significant difference in the bilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =126.882, P 2 =94.192, P 2 =70.354, P 2 =96.174, P<0.001). Conclusion: MRI can show the pathologic changes of wrists with various kinds of arthritis. MRI plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of various kinds of arthritis

  14. Conducting clinical trials in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, K T

    1999-04-01

    All clinical trials in Singapore will now have to conform to the Medicines (Clinical Trials) Amended Regulations 1998 and the Singapore Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guidelines 1998. The Medical Clinical Research Committee (MCRC) has been established to oversee the conduct of clinical drug trials in Singapore and together with the legislations in place, these will ensure that clinical trials conducted in Singapore are properly controlled and the well-being of trial subjects are safe guarded. All clinical drug trials require a Clinical Trial Certificate from the MCRC before the trial can proceed. The hospital ethics committee (EC) vets the application for a trial certificate before it is sent to MCRC. The drug company sponsoring the trial has to indemnify the trial investigators and the hospital for negligence arising from the trial. The MCRC, apart from ensuring the safety of trial subjects, has to provide continuing review of the clinical trial and monitors adverse events in the course of the trial. The EC will conduct continuing review of clinical trials. When a non-drug clinical trial is carried out, the EC will ensure that the proposed protocol addresses ethical concerns and meets regulatory requirements for such trials. There is great potential for pharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D) in Singapore. We must develop our skills and infrastructure in clinical trials to enable Singapore to be a regional hub for R&D of drugs in Asia.

  15. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ali, S. R.; Ishaque, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  16. Genetic architecture distinguishes systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis from otherforms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Arthur, Victoria L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Hinks, Anne; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei A.; Foell, Dirk; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterized by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, longstanding arthritis that...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascoli, G.; Cinti, P.; Nonni, M.; Rossi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  18. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...

  19. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...

  20. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, Michael D.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives O besity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. Methods T his study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised...... clinical trials. Included patients had blinded clinical disease activity measures and MRI at baseline, 24 and 52 weeks. Synovitis, osteitis and total inflammation scores were determined using the RA MRI scoring system. Multivariable logistic regression analyses compared odds of achieving Disease Activity...

  1. Ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, S F

    1996-05-01

    The modern clinical trial is a form of human experimentation. There is a long history of disregard for individual rights of the patient in this context, and special attention must be paid to ethical guidelines for these studies. Clinical trials differ in basic ways from clinical practice. Foremost is the introduction of outside interests, beyond those of the patient's health, into the doctor-patient therapeutic alliance. Steps must be taken to protect the interests of the patient when such outside influence exists. Kantian moral theory and the Hippocratic oath dictate that the physician must respect the individual patient's rights and hold such interests paramount. These principles are the basis for informed consent. Randomization of patients is justified when a condition of equipoise exists. The changing nature of health care delivery in the United States introduces new outside interests into the doctor-patient relationship.

  2. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Eichas Katy; Mandel David R; Holmes Judith

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in co...

  3. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  4. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  5. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  6. Task-Oriented Training with Computer Games for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Hand Osteoarthritis: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Shay, Barbara; Szturm, Tony

    2016-09-13

    To examine the feasibility of a clinical trial on a novel, home-based task-oriented training with conventional hand exercises in people with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis. To explore the experiences of participants who completed their respective home exercise programmes. Thirty volunteer participants aged between 30 and 60 years and diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis were proposed for a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial ( ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT01635582). Participants received task-oriented training with interactive computer games and objects of daily life or finger mobility and strengthening exercises. Both programmes were home based and were done four sessions per week with 20 minutes each session for 6 weeks. Major feasibility outcomes were number of volunteers screened, randomized, and retained; completion of blinded assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data management; and clinical outcomes of hand function. Reaching the recruitment target in 18 months and achieving exercise compliance >80% were set as success criteria. Concurrent with the trial, focus group interviews explored experiences of those participants who completed their respective programmes. After trial initiation, revisions in inclusion criteria were required to promote recruitment. A total of 17 participants were randomized and 15 were retained. Completion of assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data collection and management demonstrated excellent feasibility. Both groups improved in hand function outcomes and exercise compliance was above 85%. Participants perceived both programmes as appropriate and acceptable. Participants who completed task-oriented training also agreed that playing different computer games was enjoyable, engaging, and motivating. Findings demonstrate initial evidence on recruitment, feasibility of trial procedures, and acceptability of

  7. Clinical presentation and treatment of septic arthritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro-Lago, I; Talavera, G; Moraleda, L; González-Morán, G

    The aim of this study is to determine the epidemiological features, clinical presentation, and treatment of children with septic arthritis. A retrospective review was conducted on a total of 141 children with septic arthritis treated in Hospital Universitario La Paz (Madrid) between the years 2000 to 2013. The patient data collected included, the joint affected, the clinical presentation, the laboratory results, the appearance, Gram stain result, and the joint fluid culture, as well as the imaging tests and the treatment. Most (94%) of the patients were less than 2 years-old. The most common location was the knee (52%), followed by the hip (21%). The septic arthritis was confirmed in 53%. No type of fever was initially observed in 49% of them, and 18% had an ESR (mm/h) or CRP (mg/l) less than 30 in the initial laboratory analysis. The joint fluid was purulent in 45% and turbid in 12%. The Gram stain showed bacteria in 4%. The fluid culture was positive in 17%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen found, followed by Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Kingella kingae. Antibiotic treatment was intravenous administration for 7 days, followed by 21 days orally. Surgery was performed in 18% of cases. The diagnosis was only confirmed in 53% of the patients. Some of the confirmed septic arthritis did not present with the classical clinical/analytical signs, demonstrating that the traumatologist or paediatrician requires a high initial level of clinical suspicion of the disease. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Rheumatoid disease without arthritis; clinical case of pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid nodulosis and positive rheumatoid factor without arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Franco, Julian Andres; Canas Davila, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We reported a case of a patient suffering pulmonary fibrosis rapidly progressive and a positive rheumatoid factor test with the presence of HLA DR11 y HLADR17, without arthritis, We discuss how rare is this clinical appearance, and remark the concept that rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, with a wide clinical presentation, that some authors with a right criteria have called rheumatoid disease

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  11. Clinical trials in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; M, Raghavendra

    2007-07-01

    The concept of outsourcing for the development and global studies on new drugs has become widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost and uncertainty. India is going to be the most preferred location for contract pharma research and development due to its huge treatment naïve population, human resources, technical skills, adoption/amendment/implementation of rules/laws by regulatory authorities, and changing economic environment. But still 'miles to go' to fulfill the pre-requisites to ensure India's success. In spite of all the pitfalls, the country is ambitious and optimist to attract multinational pharmaceutical companies to conduct their clinical trials in India.

  12. Patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. Clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Dejour, David; Arendt, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, a lack of consensus still exists over many aspects of patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. This book adopts an evidence-based approach to assess each of these topics in depth. The book reviews general features of clinical examination and global evaluation techniques including the use of different imaging methods, e.g. x-rays, CT, MRI, stress x-rays, and bone scan. Various conservative and surgical treatment approaches for each of the three presentations - pain, instability, and arthritis - are then explained and assessed. Postoperative management and options in the event of failed surgery are also evaluated. Throughout, careful attention is paid to the literature in an attempt to establish the level of evidence for the efficacy of each imaging and treatment method. It is hoped that this book will serve as an informative guide for the practitioner when confronted with disorders of the patellofemoral joint. (orig.)

  13. Patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. Clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaffagnini, Stefano [Laboratorio di Biomeccanica, Bologna (Italy). Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli; Dejour, David [Lyon-Ortho-Clinic (France). Knee Surgery Orthopaedic Dept.; Arendt, Elizabeth A. (eds.) [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedics

    2010-07-01

    Despite numerous studies, a lack of consensus still exists over many aspects of patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. This book adopts an evidence-based approach to assess each of these topics in depth. The book reviews general features of clinical examination and global evaluation techniques including the use of different imaging methods, e.g. x-rays, CT, MRI, stress x-rays, and bone scan. Various conservative and surgical treatment approaches for each of the three presentations - pain, instability, and arthritis - are then explained and assessed. Postoperative management and options in the event of failed surgery are also evaluated. Throughout, careful attention is paid to the literature in an attempt to establish the level of evidence for the efficacy of each imaging and treatment method. It is hoped that this book will serve as an informative guide for the practitioner when confronted with disorders of the patellofemoral joint. (orig.)

  14. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  15. [Maraviroc: clinical trials results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidiac, C; Katlama, C; Yeni, P

    2008-03-01

    Just over a decade after identification of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 as coreceptors for HIV, maraviroc (Celsentri), the first CCR5 antagonist, has recently obtained its Marketing Authorization in the United States and Europe, for treatment of treatment-experienced adult patients infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 detectable. CCR5 antagonists, after fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide available since 2003, also belong to entry inhibitors. These molecules, unlike previous antiretrovirals, do not target the virus but its target cell by blocking viral penetration. Maraviroc has shown its clinical efficacy in patients failing other antiretroviral classes. Its safety profile was similar to placebo in two large phase III trials. However, careful assessment of both hepatic and immunologic safety of this new therapeutic class is needed. Viral tropism testing has to be investigated before using maraviroc in the clinic, because CCR5 antagonists are not active against CXCR4 viruses. For the moment indicated for the treatment-experienced patient population, maraviroc could in the future benefit to other types of patients, depending on ongoing trials results.

  16. CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL FEATURES OF PANCREAS STATE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Basieva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: complex pancreas study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: 120 RA pts were examined clinically Pancreas US-and biochemical study (level of a-amylase and lipase of blood serum by kinetic-calorimetric method was performed in this grouh. Results: 50.8% of pts demonstrated increase of pancreas echo, in 23.3%- widened Wirsung s duct, in 45%- single small focal indurations, more often in the body and cauda pancreatis. Decrease of lipolitic and amylolytic pancreas activity is characteristic for RA, especially in systemic process and long-term disease. Clinical and functional disturbances are connected with morphological changes.

  17. [Clinical trials in nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Paola; Campagna, Sara; Dimonte, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are pivotal for the development of nursing knowledge. To describe the clinical trials published in nursing journals in the last two years and propose some general reflections on nursing research. A search with the key-word trial was done on PubMed (2009-2013) on Cancer Nursing, European Journal of Oncology Nursing, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Nursing Research. Of 228 trials identified, 104 (45.8%) were published in the last 2 years. Nurses from Asian countries published the larger number of trials. Educational and supportive interventions were the most studied (61/104 trials), followed by clinical interventions (33/104). Samples were limited and most trials are monocentric. A growing number of trials is published, on issues relevant for the nursing profession, however larger samples and multicentric studies would be necessary.

  18. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA: a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Gordon J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with foot and ankle problems exists. Methods/design An exploratory phase II non-pharmacological randomised controlled trial where patients including young children, adolescents and adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and associated foot/ankle problems will be randomised to receive integrated podiatric care via a new foot care programme, or to receive standard podiatry care. Sixty patients (30 in each arm including children, adolescents and adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited from 2 outpatient centres of paediatric and adult rheumatology respectively. Participants will be randomised by process of minimisation using the Minim software package. The primary outcome measure is the foot related impairment measured by the Juvenile Arthritis Disability Index questionnaire's impairment domain at 6 and 12 months, with secondary outcomes including disease activity score, foot deformity score, active/limited foot joint counts, spatio-temporal and plantar-pressure gait parameters, health related quality of life and semi-quantitative ultrasonography score for inflammatory foot lesions. The new foot care programme will comprise rapid assessment and investigation, targeted treatment, with detailed outcome assessment and follow-up at minimum intervals of 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months from baseline

  19. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity in Australian clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological agent for rheumatoid arthritis. Disease activity measures and radiographic assessments were collected from each patient's last consultation. For biologic patients, disease activity measures were also collected from when the patient was first initiated on the biological agent. Results. At last consultation, the disease measures that were recorded most often were ESR (89.2%), haemoglobin (87.5%), and CRP (84.2%). DAS28 was infrequently recorded (16.3%). The rate of recording disease activity measures for patients receiving biologic DMARDs decreased over time (mean 27 months). Conclusion. This review has shown inconsistency of RA activity measures being recorded in Australian rheumatology clinical practice. An accurate assessment of the disease process is necessary to effectively target rheumatoid arthritis patients to treat in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  1. Clinical registry for rheumatoid arthritis; a preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, A.; Hakim, F.; Zaidi, S.K.; Sharif, A.

    2017-01-01

    To establish a clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis and delineate the most common symptoms that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience in our set up. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was carried out at Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi at Rheumatology Department during the period of Jan 2013 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis was developed as per criteria jointly developed by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) along with European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) (2010). Fifty-eight patients were registered after their informed consent and approval by Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi ethical committee. Age, gender and relevant clinical parameters of RA patients were recorded on case report forms and stored for analysis in the RA registry in Excel 2010. The figures were reported in frequencies and percentages. Results: Multiple joint pains (48.28%), fever (24.14%), morning stiffness of joints (22.41%) were the most common symptoms in RA patients. Other clinical manifestations included painful bilateral swollen joints (13.79%), pain in different parts of the body (10.34%), Raynaud's phenomenon (10.34%), malaise (8.62%), swollen body parts (8.62%), ulcers (8.62%), fatigue (6.90%), nodules on skin/elbow/interphalangeal joints (6.90%), deformities of fingers/ hand (3.45%), redness of eyes (3.45%), body rash (3.45%), inability to walk (3.45%), cervical lymphadenopathy (1.72%), stiffness of spine (1.72%) and myalgias (1.72%). Conclusion: It is concluded that multiple joint pains, fever and morning stiffness of joints are the most common symptoms of RA patients. (author)

  2. Differences between participants and nonparticipants in an exercise trial for adults with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Z. de; Munneke, M.; Jansen, L.M.; Ronday, K.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Brand, R.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Zuijderduin, W.M.; Hazes, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the generalizability of the results of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of long-term, high-intensity exercises in the rheumatoid arthritis patients in training (RAPIT) trial by comparing the characteristics of the participants with the nonparticipants.

  3. A randomized comparison of care provided by a clinical nurse specialist, an inpatient team, and a day patient team in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, Gerhardus J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare in a randomized, controlled trial the clinical effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist, inpatient team care, and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have increasing functional limitations. METHODS: Between December 1996

  4. Does intensive management improve remission rates in patients with intermediate rheumatoid arthritis? (the TITRATE trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Naomi H; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Tom, Brian; Galloway, James; Wailoo, Allan; Tosh, Jonathan; Lempp, Heidi; Prothero, Louise; Georgopoulou, Sofia; Sturt, Jackie; Scott, David L

    2017-12-08

    Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis can lead to increasing disability and reduced quality of life over time. 'Treating to target' has been shown to be effective in active established disease and also in early disease. However, there is a lack of nationally agreed treatment protocols for patients with established rheumatoid arthritis who have intermediate disease activity. This trial is designed to investigate whether intensive management of disease leads to a greater number of remissions at 12 months. Levels of disability and quality of life, and acceptability and cost-effectiveness of the intervention will also be examined. The trial is a 12-month, pragmatic, randomised, open-label, two-arm, parallel-group, multicentre trial undertaken at specialist rheumatology centres across England. Three hundred and ninety-eight patients with established rheumatoid arthritis will be recruited. They will currently have intermediate disease activity (disease activity score for 28 joints assessed using an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 3.2 to 5.1 with at least three active joints) and will be taking at least one disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug. Participants will be randomly selected to receive intensive management or standard care. Intensive management will involve monthly clinical reviews with a specialist health practitioner, where drug treatment will be optimised and an individualised treatment support programme delivered based on several principles of motivational interviewing to address identified problem areas, such as pain, fatigue and adherence. Standard care will follow standard local pathways and will be in line with current English guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Patients will be assessed initially and at 6 and 12 months through self-completed questionnaires and clinical evaluation. The trial will establish whether the known benefits of intensive treatment strategies in active rheumatoid arthritis are also seen

  5. A Phase III, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Apremilast in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Results of the PALACE 2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Myerson, Gary E; Fleischmann, Roy M; Lioté, Frédéric; Díaz-González, Federico; Van den Bosch, Filip; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Feist, Eugen; Shah, Kamal; Hu, ChiaChi; Stevens, Randall M; Poder, Airi

    2016-09-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, downregulates intracellular inflammatory mediator synthesis by elevating cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. The PALACE 2 trial evaluated apremilast efficacy and safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) despite prior conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic therapy. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg BID, or apremilast 30 mg BID. At Week 16, patients with swollen and tender joint count improvement 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at Week 16. In the intent-to-treat population (N = 484), ACR20 at Week 16 was achieved by more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg BID [37.4% (p = 0.0002)] and 30 mg BID [32.1% (p = 0.0060)] versus placebo (18.9%). Clinically meaningful improvements in signs and symptoms of PsA, physical function, and psoriasis were observed with apremilast through Week 52. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection. Diarrhea and nausea generally occurred early and usually resolved spontaneously with continued treatment. Laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and transient. Apremilast demonstrated clinical improvements in PsA for up to 52 weeks, including signs and symptoms, physical function, and psoriasis. No new safety signals were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01212757.

  6. "Employment and arthritis: making it work" a randomized controlled trial evaluating an online program to help people with inflammatory arthritis maintain employment (study protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Erin C; Rogers, Pamela; Backman, Catherine L; Goldsmith, Charles H; Gignac, Monique A; Marra, Carlo; Village, Judy; Li, Linda C; Esdaile, John M; Lacaille, Diane

    2014-07-21

    estimate the risk of work cessation associated with the intervention after controlling for risk factors for WD and other important predictors imbalanced at baseline. This program fills an important gap in arthritis health services and addresses an important and costly problem. Knowledge gained from the RCT will be useful to health care professionals, policy planners and arthritis stakeholders. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01852851; registered April 13, 2012; first participant randomized on July 6, 2013.

  7. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of children with Lyme arthritis in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaude, Pier Diane; Huber, Adam M; Mailman, Timothy; Ramsey, Suzanne; Lang, Bianca; Stringer, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging problem in Nova Scotia. Lyme arthritis is a late manifestation of Lyme disease. To describe the demographic characteristics, referral patterns and clinical course of children diagnosed with Lyme arthritis in a tertiary care pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. In the present retrospective chart review, subjects diagnosed with Lyme arthritis between 2006 and 2013 were identified through the clinic database. Demographic variables, referral patterns, clinical presentation and information regarding treatment course and outcome were collected. Seventeen patients were identified; 76% presented in 2012 and 2013. In 37.5% of cases, the referring physician suspected Lyme disease. Most patients presented with one or more painful and/or swollen joints; 94% had knee involvement. Only three of 17 patients had a history of erythema migrans and four of 17 recalled a tick bite. Five patients had a history of neurological manifestations consistent with Lyme disease, although, none had a diagnosis made at the time. Arthritis usually resolved after treatment with standard antibiotics; however, at last follow-up, two patients had antibiotic refractory Lyme arthritis, with one having joint damage despite aggressive arthritis treatment. A significant increase in cases of Lyme arthritis has recently been recognized in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. A history of a tick bite or erythema migrans were not sensitive markers of Lyme arthritis, and this diagnosis was often not considered by the referring physician. Educational initiatives should be undertaken to increase local awareness of this treatable cause of arthritis in children.

  8. Cross-Over Clinical Trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Gachkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cross-Over Clinical Trials in comparison with Parallel groups clinical trials have some advantages such as control of confounding variables, small sample size, and short time to implement the research project. But this type of research has few essential limitations that discusses in this monogram.

  9. INFLUENCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ON CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    T.L. Nastausheva; L.T. Dmitrieva

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and immunological status has been evaluated in 85 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after physiotherapeutic procedures: electrophoresis with dimexid and magnetotherapy. The control group of 31 children did not follow physiotherapeutic procedures. The following results were fixed: clinical indices and immunological status of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been changed in a larger degree in case of magnetotherapy.

  10. Exploratory analyses of the association of MRI with clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, Paul; van der Heijde, Désirée; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  11. Social media in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  12. Imaging in the diagnosis and management of peripheral psoriatic arthritis-The clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eder, Lihi; Christiansen, Sara Nysom

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterised by the presence of arthritis and often enthesitis and/or spondylitis in patients with psoriasis. However, it presents a wide range of disease manifestations in various patterns. Imaging is an important part of management of PsA...... or clinical studies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detailed assessment of all peripheral and axial joints involved in PsA, and can visualise both inflammation and structural changes. Ultrasonography (US) can visualise many of the peripheral heterogeneous tissue compartments affected by PsA....... In contrast to MRI, US is not useful for assessing axial involvement in the spine and sacroiliac joints. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the status, strengths and limitations of MRI and US in peripheral PsA in routine clinical practice and clinical trials....

  13. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For eac...

  14. Use of risk stratification to target therapies in patients with recent onset arthritis; design of a prospective randomized multicenter controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claessen Susanne JJ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and intensive treatment is important to inducing remission and preventing joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. While intensive combination therapy (Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs and/or biologicals is the most effective, rheumatologists in daily clinical practice prefer to start with monotherapy methotrexate and bridging corticosteroids. Intensive treatment should be started as soon as the first symptoms manifest, but at this early stage, ACR criteria may not be fulfilled, and there is a danger of over-treatment. We will therefore determine which induction therapy is most effective in the very early stage of persistent arthritis. To overcome over-treatment and under-treatment, the intensity of induction therapy will be based on a prediction model that predicts patients' propensity for persistent arthritis. Methods A multicenter stratified randomized single-blind controlled trial is currently being performed in patients 18 years or older with recent-onset arthritis. Eight hundred ten patients are being stratified according to the likelihood of their developing persistent arthritis. In patients with a high probability of persistent arthritis, we will study combination Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug therapy compared to monotherapy methotrexate. In patients with an intermediate probability of persistent arthritis, we will study Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug of various intensities. In patients with a low probability, we will study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, hydroxychloroquine and a single dose of corticosteroids. If disease activity is not sufficiently reduced, treatment will be adjusted according to a step-up protocol. If remission is achieved for at least six months, medication will be tapered off. Patients will be followed up every three months over two years. Discussion This is the first rheumatological study to base treatment in early arthritis on a prediction rule

  15. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  16. Ultrasonographic examination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is better than clinical examination for identification of intraarticular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Erik; Strandberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA.......The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA....

  17. Aggressive treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, CHM; Jacobs, JWG; van der Veen, MJ; Blaauw, AAM; Kruize, AA; Hofman, DM; Brus, HLM; van Albada-Kuipers, GA; Heurkens, AHM; ter Borg, EJ; Haanen, HCM; van Booma-Frankfort, C; Schenk, Y; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Objectives-To compare three therapeutic strategies using slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for their disease modifying properties, toxicity, and lag time until treatment effect. Methods-Patients with recent onset RA from six hospitals were randomly assigned

  18. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2016-04-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  20. Clinical utility of the oral JAK inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutolo M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Cutolo, Marianna Meroni Research Laboratories and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova, Italy Abstract: Immune/inflammatory cells act in rheumatoid arthritis (RA-affected patients by synthesizing several inflammatory mediators, including cytokines that initiate intracellular signaling. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of transduction and transcription signals that influence the intracellular pathways (such as the Janus kinase [JAK] family of tyrosine kinases have been tested for RA treatment. Four members of the JAK family are known: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and TyK2. JAK1/JAK3 constitutively binds to the cytoplasmic portion of the cytokine receptor – the common gamma chain – that represents a common subunit of several cytokines involved in T-cell and natural killer cell development, as well as in B-cell activation. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that is now available and effective in RA treatment, as shown in multiple Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. However, long-term safety data and comparisons with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and small molecule inhibitors are necessary to better determine the role of tofacitinib in RA. Keywords: Janus kinase inhibitors, tofacitinib, rheumatoid arthritis, kinases, small molecules inhibitors, intracellular signaling

  1. Disparity between ultrasound and clinical findings in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, Rusmir; Gretler, Judith; Felber, Anja; Graninger, Winfried B; Duftner, Christina; Hermann, Josef; Dejaco, Christian

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the association between psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-specific clinical composite scores and ultrasound-verified pathology as well as comparison of clinical and ultrasound definitions of remission. We performed a prospective study on 70 consecutive PsA patients. Clinical assessments included components of Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and the Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). Minimal disease activity (MDA) and the following remission criteria were applied: CPDAI joint, entheses and dactylitis domains (CPDAI-JED)=0, DAPSA≤3.3, Boolean's remission definition and physician-judged remission (rem-phys). B-mode and power Doppler (PD-) ultrasound findings were semiquantitatively scored at 68 joints (evaluating synovia, peritendinous tissue, tendons and bony changes) and 14 entheses. Ultrasound remission and minimal ultrasound disease activity (MUDA) were defined as PD-score=0 and PD-score ≤1, respectively, at joints, peritendinous tissue, tendons and entheses. DAPSA but not CPDAI correlated with B-mode and PD-synovitis. Ultrasound signs of enthesitis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis and perisynovitis were not linked with clinical composites. Clinical remission or MDA was observed in 15.7% to 47.1% of PsA patients. Ultrasound remission and MUDA were present in 4.3% and 20.0% of patients, respectively. Joint and tendon-related PD-scores were higher in patients with active versus inactive disease according to CPDAI-JED, DAPSA, Boolean's and rem-phys, whereas no difference was observed regarding enthesitis and perisynovitis. DAPSA≤3.3 (OR 3.9, p=0.049) and Boolean's definition (OR 4.6, p=0.03) were more useful to predict MUDA than other remission criteria. PsA-specific composite scores partially reflect ultrasound findings. DAPSA and Boolean's remission definitions better identify MUDA patients than other clinical criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  2. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A; Smith, G

    2016-01-01

    of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. MethodsThis was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using...

  3. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  5. A Novel Mobile App and Population Management System to Manage Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penny; Luo, Dee; Lu, Fengxin; Elias, Josephine S; Landman, Adam B; Michaud, Kaleb D; Lee, Yvonne C

    2018-04-11

    Rheumatoid arthritis flares have a profound effect on patients, causing pain and disability. However, flares often occur between regularly scheduled health care provider visits and are, therefore, difficult to monitor and manage. We sought to develop a mobile phone app combined with a population management system to help track RA flares between visits. The objective of this study is to implement the mobile app plus the population management system to monitor rheumatoid arthritis disease activity between scheduled health care provider visits over a period of 6 months. This is a randomized controlled trial that lasts for 6 months for each participant. We aim to recruit 190 patients, randomized 50:50 to the intervention group versus the control group. The intervention group will be assigned the mobile app and be prompted to answer daily questionnaires sent to their mobile devices. Both groups will be assigned a population manager, who will communicate with the participants via telephone at 6 weeks and 18 weeks. The population manager will also communicate with the participants in the intervention group if their responses indicate a sustained increase in rheumatoid arthritis disease activity. To assess patient satisfaction, the primary outcomes will be scores on the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication as well as the Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions questionnaire at 6 months. To determine the effect of the mobile app on rheumatoid arthritis disease activity, the primary outcome will be the Clinical Disease Activity Index at 6 months. The trial started in November 2016, and an estimated 2.5 years will be necessary to complete the study. Study results are expected to be published by the end of 2019. The completion of this study will provide important data regarding the following: (1) the assessment of validated outcome measures to assess rheumatoid arthritis disease activity with a mobile app between routinely scheduled health care

  6. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichas Katy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Methods Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI, and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052 and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046 vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Conclusions Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. Trial registration ACTRN12609000435280

  7. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Methods Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Results Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052) and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046) vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Conclusions Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. Trial registration ACTRN12609000435280 PMID:20067641

  8. Cryotherapy decreases synovial Doppler activity and pain in knee arthritis: A randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Xavier; Tordi, Nicolas; Prati, Clément; Verhoeven, Frank; Pazart, Lionel; Wendling, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    To measure and compare the effects of 2 local cryotherapy techniques on synovial power Doppler activity (primary outcome) and pain in non-septic knee arthritis without any concurrent treatment. 30 patients were randomized (ice: 30min, n=15 or cold CO 2 : 2min, n=15 both applied twice at 8h interval). Contralateral non-treated arthritic knees were used as paired controls (n=11 and n=10 respectively). The PDUS semi-quantitative score (0-3) and pain visual analogic scale were evaluated before/after each cold application, 2min, 2h, 24h after the first application. PDUS scores were checked in double-blind by 2 ultrasonographists. The inter-class effect size of local cryotherapy on the power Doppler score remained significant the day after treatment in local cryotherapy-treated compared to contralateral non-treated knees (Global difference: -1 [95% confidence interval: -1.23; -0.77]; ice: -0.73 [-1.06; -0.4]; CO 2 : -0.7 [-1.18; -0.22]). Both techniques significantly and to the same extent reduced the power Doppler score and pain visual analogic scale at all evaluation times and globally throughout the 24 hour-study period. No dropout nor adverse event was reported. In multivariate analysis, the Power Doppler score decrease was associated with pain decrease, while pain decrease was associated with the female sex and ice technique. Local ice and cold CO 2 applied twice equally reduced synovial Power Doppler activity and pain over 24h in knee arthritis. These effects remained significant the day after treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02573298. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Short-term effect of ultrasound-guided low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid injection on clinical outcomes and imaging changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle and foot joints. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Lee, Si-Huei; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Liu, Fu-Wei; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chan, Rai-Chi; Chou, Chen-Liang

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into rheumatoid arthritis ankles and feet can achieve improvement in foot function and reduce synovial hyper-vascularization. Forty-four patients with RA having unilateral or bilateral painful ankle and foot involvement (N = 75) were studied. All the patients were randomized to receive HA (N = 40) or lidocaine (LI) (N = 35) injection at 2-week intervals; Clinical assessments were performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and foot function index (FFI total ) including subscales of pain (FFI pain) before injection at baseline, 4 weeks (first evaluation) and 12 weeks (secondary evaluation). Imaging evaluation based on color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and synovitis scores was performed simultaneously. HA injection improved the VAS score (p = .009), FFI pain (p = .041), and FFI total (p = .032) considerably more than LI injections did at the first evaluation. The CDUS values at first evaluation (p = .005) and secondary evaluation (p injections reduced the CDUS values of more than half of the joints (54%, p = .042) while the control group exhibited no change (20%, p = .56). However, HA injection did not reduce the CDUS values more than LI injection did. Regarding the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy, no significant difference was observed between or within the groups in the synovitis scores. HA injection improved short-term foot function and pain reduction. HA injection may have a modest effect in reducing synovial hyper-vascularization. Further large-scale study is warranted to confirm this result.

  10. Generalization and extrapolation of treatment effects from clinical studies in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, S.C.; Kievit, W.; Janse, R.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Fransen, J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Welsing, P.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pragmatic clinical trials have been proposed as a solution for nongeneralizability of randomized clinical trial (RCT) results. We investigated whether treatment effects of pragmatic clinical trials are indeed generalizable to clinical practice and how efficacy estimates from published

  11. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2018-04-01

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical course and outcome of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, I A; Katsimbri, P; Katsaraki, A; Temekonidis, T; Georgiadis, A; Drosos, A A

    2001-07-01

    We studied whether patients with seropositivity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) comprise a different clinical group than those with seronegativity. Four hundred seventeen patients with early RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (disease duration less than 1 year) were retrospectively studied by analysis of demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and therapeutic disease characteristics from the time of diagnosis until the end of the study period (1981 1999) using a data base. There were 248 seropositive patients and 169 seronegative patients with RA. No statistically significant differences were seen between the two groups before commencement of the study period in relation to age of disease onset, male:female ratio, and disease duration. However, seropositive patients showed longer medical follow-up. In addition, at disease onset, seropositive RA patients presented more frequently with symmetrical polyarthritis and small joint involvement than seronegative patients. The seropositive group also had more tender and swollen joints, weaker grip strength, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation and C-reactive protein rates during the follow-up period. In contrast, the seronegative group had less severe radiological findings and greater functional ability at the end of the study. In Greek patients with early RA, rheumatoid factor seems to be a predictor of more severe disease activity.

  13. Methodological considerations for a randomised controlled trial of podiatry care in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from an exploratory trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helliwell Philip S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst evidence exists to support the use of single treatments such as orthoses and footwear, the effectiveness of podiatry-led care as a complex intervention for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA related foot problems is unknown. The aim of this study was to undertake an exploratory randomised controlled parallel arm clinical trial (RheumAFooT to inform the design and implementation of a definitive trial and to understand the potential benefits of this care. Methods Patients with a definite diagnosis of RA, stable drug management 3 months prior to entry, and a current history of foot problems (pain, deformity, stiffness, skin or nail lesions, or footwear problems were recruited from a hospital outpatient rheumatology clinic and randomised to receive 12 months of podiatry treatment or no care. The primary outcome was change in foot health status using the impairment/footwear (LFISIF and activity limitation/participation restriction (LFISAP subscales of the Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Disease Activity Score (DAS, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ score and walking speed (m/s were also recorded. Results Of the 80 patients identified, 64 patients were eligible to participate in the pilot and 34 were recruited. 16 patients were randomised to receive podiatry led foot care and 18 received no care. Against a backdrop of stable disease (DAS and HAQ scores, there was a statistically significant between group difference in the change in foot health status for foot impairment (LFISIF but not activity/participation (LFISAP or function (walking speed over 12 months. In the podiatry arm, 1 patient declined treatment following randomisation (did not want additional hospital visits and 3 self-withdrew (lost to follow-up. Patients received an average of 3 consultations for assessment and treatment comprising routine care for skin and nail lesions (n = 3, foot orthoses (n = 9, footwear referral to the orthotist (n = 5, and ultrasound

  14. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...... the design, conduct and analytical approaches to RCTs evaluating the preventative effect of joint injury prevention strategies. Recommendations regarding the design, conduct, and reporting of RCTs evaluating injury prevention interventions were established based on the consensus of nine researchers...... internationally with expertise in epidemiology, injury prevention and/or osteoarthritis (OA). Input and resultant consensus was established through teleconference, face to face and email correspondence over a 1 year period. Recommendations for injury prevention RCTs include context specific considerations...

  15. Clinical and immunogenetic characterization in psoriatic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Citera, Gustavo; Rodríguez Gil, Gustavo; Granel, Amelia; Arturi, Alfredo; Rosemffet, Gabriel Marcos; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Berman, Alberto; Spindler, Alberto; Morales, Victor Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In psoriatic arthritis (PsA), genetic factors play a substantial role in disease susceptibility as well as in its expression. This study aims to determine the distribution of class I and class II HLA antigens in PsA patients and secondly to analyze the influence of genetic factors in the clinical expression of the disease. Consecutive PsA patients (CASPAR criteria) with less than 1 year of disease duration were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded. Blood samples were obtained, DNA was extracted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DR) HLA antigens were determined by oligotyping. A control group of 100 nonrelated healthy controls from the general population served as control. p values were corrected (pc) according to the number of alleles tested. A total of 73 patients were included, 37 were females (50.7 %) with a median disease duration of 72 months (interquartile range (IQR) 24-149). Thirty-three patients (45.2 %) had a family history of psoriasis. When analyzing all the class I and class II HLA antigens, a significantly higher frequency of B38 (odds ratio (OR) 2.95, p = 0.03) and Cw6 (OR 2.78, p = 0.009) was found in PsA patients compared to the control group. On the contrary, the HLA-A11 (OR 0.14, p = 0.04) and B7 (OR 0.31, p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent among healthy controls. Furthermore, B18 was significantly more frequent in patients with early arthritis onset (less than 40 years): seven patients (22.6 %) with early onset compared to two patients (4.8 %) with late onset (p = 0.03). No association between HLA-B27 and spondylitis or HLA-DR4 with polyarticular involvement was observed. The HLA-B38 and Cw6 alleles are associated with a greater PsA susceptibility in Argentine population.

  16. The clinical and radiological evaluation of pyogenic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung Joo; Yoo, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Hur, Don [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Pyogenic arthritis remain a difficult problem, despite the availability of a wide range of powerful modern antibiotics. Early and correct diagnosis is imperative to assure the prompt initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen and the prevent of late sequela. Careful clinical, laboratory and roentgenological analysis are fundamental to early and precise diagnosis. Therefore, plain roentgenogram should not be overlooked. A radiological and clinical observation was made in 51 cases of pyogenic arthritis admitted to Chosun University Hospital during the period from January 1976 to December 1983 and following results were obtained. 1. Among the 51 cases, 36 cases (70.6%) were male and 15 cases (29.4%) were females. The most prevalent age was 5 to 9 (27.6%). 2. Symptom duration less than 5 days was in 21 cases (41.2%) and more than 31 days was in 6 cases (11.7%). 3. The most common symptom on admission was pain around the involved joint and others are limitation of motion, swelling, tenderness, fever, local heating and erythema. 4. The underlying causes were composed of unknown in 21 cases (41.2%), trauma in 18 cases (35.3%), infections focus in 8 cases (15.7%) and iatrogenic reason 4 cases (7.8%). 5. The most commonly affected joint was hip joint (45.1%). The other affected sites in order of frequency were knee, ankle, shoulder, S-I and elbow joint. In infants and children, hip and knee joint are commonly affected: in adults, knee joint is most is most commonly affected. 6. In laboratory findings, the number of W.B.C and E.S.R were increased in 56.9%. Symptom duration more than 31 days in 5 cases were increased E.S.R only. Causative microorganism was isolated in 31 cases: the most common microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus in 22 cases. Others are B-hemolytics Stretoocccus, Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 7. In 26 cases (50.9%) of the patients, roentgenographic findings was negative. The most common radiological findings was soft tissue

  17. The clinical and radiological evaluation of pyogenic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung Joo; Yoo, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Hur, Don

    1984-01-01

    Pyogenic arthritis remain a difficult problem, despite the availability of a wide range of powerful modern antibiotics. Early and correct diagnosis is imperative to assure the prompt initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen and the prevent of late sequela. Careful clinical, laboratory and roentgenological analysis are fundamental to early and precise diagnosis. Therefore, plain roentgenogram should not be overlooked. A radiological and clinical observation was made in 51 cases of pyogenic arthritis admitted to Chosun University Hospital during the period from January 1976 to December 1983 and following results were obtained. 1. Among the 51 cases, 36 cases (70.6%) were male and 15 cases (29.4%) were females. The most prevalent age was 5 to 9 (27.6%). 2. Symptom duration less than 5 days was in 21 cases (41.2%) and more than 31 days was in 6 cases (11.7%). 3. The most common symptom on admission was pain around the involved joint and others are limitation of motion, swelling, tenderness, fever, local heating and erythema. 4. The underlying causes were composed of unknown in 21 cases (41.2%), trauma in 18 cases (35.3%), infections focus in 8 cases (15.7%) and iatrogenic reason 4 cases (7.8%). 5. The most commonly affected joint was hip joint (45.1%). The other affected sites in order of frequency were knee, ankle, shoulder, S-I and elbow joint. In infants and children, hip and knee joint are commonly affected: in adults, knee joint is most is most commonly affected. 6. In laboratory findings, the number of W.B.C and E.S.R were increased in 56.9%. Symptom duration more than 31 days in 5 cases were increased E.S.R only. Causative microorganism was isolated in 31 cases: the most common microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus in 22 cases. Others are B-hemolytics Stretoocccus, Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 7. In 26 cases (50.9%) of the patients, roentgenographic findings was negative. The most common radiological findings was soft tissue

  18. INFLUENCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ON CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Nastausheva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and immunological status has been evaluated in 85 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA before and after physiotherapeutic procedures: electrophoresis with dimexid and magnetotherapy. The control group of 31 children did not follow physiotherapeutic procedures. The following results were fixed: clinical indices and immunological status of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been changed in a larger degree in case of magnetotherapy.

  19. [Analysis of clinical and imaging characteristics of infectious sacroiliac arthritis and review of literatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yanyan; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Jingyu; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jianglin; Huang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    To study the clinical and imaging characteristics of patients with infectious sacroiliac arthritis. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with infectious sacroiliac arthritis were analyzed retrospectively between 2000 and 2014. The chief complaint was pain in hip and lumbosacral area. Their clinical features, laboratory tests and pathological examination results as well as CT/MRI/PET-CT images were evaluated. There were nine males and thirteen females eighteen (85.7%) patients had unilateral sacroiliac joint involvement. Among these patients, three were diagnosed with brucellosis sacroiliac arthritis (BSI), eight patients with tuberculosis sacroiliac arthritis (TSI), and ten patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis (ISI). For those patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were dramatically increased. Twelve patients were diagnosed pathologically including 6 ISI, 2 BSI and 4 TSI. Twelve patients and seventeen patients were scanned by CT and MRI respectively. Two patients undertook PET-CT examination. Antibiotic therapy showed significant therapeutic effects in all patients. Infectious sacroiliac arthritis patients with hip or lumbosacral pain as the chief complaint can be easily misdiagnosed as spondyloarthritis. Comprehensive analysis of clinical features, imaging and laboratory findings is essential for accurate diagnosis.

  20. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, David R; Eichas, Katy; Holmes, Judith

    2010-01-12

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052) and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046) vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. ACTRN12609000435280.

  1. Adaptive designs in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Bowalekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the expensive and lengthy process of developing a new medicine, the attrition rate in clinical research was on the rise, resulting in stagnation in the development of new compounds. As a consequence to this, the US Food and Drug Administration released a critical path initiative document in 2004, highlighting the need for developing innovative trial designs. One of the innovations suggested the use of adaptive designs for clinical trials. Thus, post critical path initiative, there is a growing interest in using adaptive designs for the development of pharmaceutical products. Adaptive designs are expected to have great potential to reduce the number of patients and duration of trial and to have relatively less exposure to new drug. Adaptive designs are not new in the sense that the task of interim analysis (IA/review of the accumulated data used in adaptive designs existed in the past too. However, such reviews/analyses of accumulated data were not necessarily planned at the stage of planning clinical trial and the methods used were not necessarily compliant with clinical trial process. The Bayesian approach commonly used in adaptive designs was developed by Thomas Bayes in the 18th century, about hundred years prior to the development of modern statistical methods by the father of modern statistics, Sir Ronald A. Fisher, but the complexity involved in Bayesian approach prevented its use in real life practice. The advances in the field of computer and information technology over the last three to four decades has changed the scenario and the Bayesian techniques are being used in adaptive designs in addition to other sequential methods used in IA. This paper attempts to describe the various adaptive designs in clinical trial and views of stakeholders about feasibility of using them, without going into mathematical complexities.

  2. Adaptive designs in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowalekar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the expensive and lengthy process of developing a new medicine, the attrition rate in clinical research was on the rise, resulting in stagnation in the development of new compounds. As a consequence to this, the US Food and Drug Administration released a critical path initiative document in 2004, highlighting the need for developing innovative trial designs. One of the innovations suggested the use of adaptive designs for clinical trials. Thus, post critical path initiative, there is a growing interest in using adaptive designs for the development of pharmaceutical products. Adaptive designs are expected to have great potential to reduce the number of patients and duration of trial and to have relatively less exposure to new drug. Adaptive designs are not new in the sense that the task of interim analysis (IA)/review of the accumulated data used in adaptive designs existed in the past too. However, such reviews/analyses of accumulated data were not necessarily planned at the stage of planning clinical trial and the methods used were not necessarily compliant with clinical trial process. The Bayesian approach commonly used in adaptive designs was developed by Thomas Bayes in the 18th century, about hundred years prior to the development of modern statistical methods by the father of modern statistics, Sir Ronald A. Fisher, but the complexity involved in Bayesian approach prevented its use in real life practice. The advances in the field of computer and information technology over the last three to four decades has changed the scenario and the Bayesian techniques are being used in adaptive designs in addition to other sequential methods used in IA. This paper attempts to describe the various adaptive designs in clinical trial and views of stakeholders about feasibility of using them, without going into mathematical complexities.

  3. A Clinical Update and Global Economic Burden of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Syed Ali; Khan, Mohammad; Nishi, Shamima E; Alam, Fahmida; Zarin, Nowshin; Bari, Mohammad T; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2018-02-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a predominant inflammatory autoimmune disorder. The incidence and prevalence of RA is increasing with considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of RA has become clearer due to many significant research outputs during the last two decades. Many inflammatory cytokines involved in RA pathophysiology and the presence of autoantibodies are being used as potential biomarkers via the use of effective diagnostic techniques for the early diagnosis of RA. Currently, several disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are being prescribed targeting RA pathophysiology, which have shown significant contributions in improving the disease outcomes. Even though innovations in treatment strategies and monitoring are helping the patients to achieve early and sustained clinical and radiographic remission, the high cost of drugs and limited health care budgets are restricting the easy access of RA treatment. Both direct and indirect high cost of treatment are creating economic burden for the patients and affecting their quality of life. The aim of this review is to describe the updated concept of RA pathophysiology and highlight current diagnostic tools used for the early detection as well as prognosis - targeting several biomarkers of RA. Additionally, we explored the updated treatment options with side effects besides discussing the global economic burden. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Sternoclavicular Arthritis as a Clinical Presentation for Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Rosenkranz, Margalit; Nowalk, Andrew J; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2018-04-01

    Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and can lead to dermatologic, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal manifestations. The arthritis of Lyme disease is typically monoarticular, with the knee being most commonly involved. Lyme arthritis of small joints has not previously been well described. We report 3 children who presented with sternoclavicular joint swelling and who were found to have Lyme disease based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. This description of sternoclavicular Lyme arthritis highlights the importance of considering Lyme disease in the differential and diagnostic workup of new onset, small joint arthritis in patients presenting from or with travel to Lyme endemic regions. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  6. Methodological considerations for a randomised controlled trial of podiatry care in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from an exploratory trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Deborah E; Helliwell, Philip S; Woodburn, James

    2007-11-06

    Whilst evidence exists to support the use of single treatments such as orthoses and footwear, the effectiveness of podiatry-led care as a complex intervention for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) related foot problems is unknown. The aim of this study was to undertake an exploratory randomised controlled parallel arm clinical trial (RheumAFooT) to inform the design and implementation of a definitive trial and to understand the potential benefits of this care. Patients with a definite diagnosis of RA, stable drug management 3 months prior to entry, and a current history of foot problems (pain, deformity, stiffness, skin or nail lesions, or footwear problems) were recruited from a hospital outpatient rheumatology clinic and randomised to receive 12 months of podiatry treatment or no care. The primary outcome was change in foot health status using the impairment/footwear (LFISIF) and activity limitation/participation restriction (LFISAP) subscales of the Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Disease Activity Score (DAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score and walking speed (m/s) were also recorded. Of the 80 patients identified, 64 patients were eligible to participate in the pilot and 34 were recruited. 16 patients were randomised to receive podiatry led foot care and 18 received no care. Against a backdrop of stable disease (DAS and HAQ scores), there was a statistically significant between group difference in the change in foot health status for foot impairment (LFISIF) but not activity/participation (LFISAP) or function (walking speed) over 12 months. In the podiatry arm, 1 patient declined treatment following randomisation (did not want additional hospital visits) and 3 self-withdrew (lost to follow-up). Patients received an average of 3 consultations for assessment and treatment comprising routine care for skin and nail lesions (n = 3), foot orthoses (n = 9), footwear referral to the orthotist (n = 5), and ultrasound guided intra-articular steroid injection

  7. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  8. Pediatric Obstructive Uropathy: Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C. M. C.; Scheinman, J. I.; Roth, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    As the powerful tools of molecular biology continue to delineate new concepts of pathogenesis of diseases, new molecular-level therapeutic modalities are certain to emerge. In order to design and execute clinical trials to evaluate outcomes of these new treatment modalities, we will soon need a new supply of investigators with training and experience in clinical research. The slowly-progressive nature of chronic pediatric kidney disease often results in diagnosis being made at a time remote from initial result, and the inherently slow rate of progression makes changes difficult to measure. Thus, development of molecular markers for both diagnosis and rate of progression will be critical to studies of new therapeutic modalities. We will review general aspects of clinical trials and will use current and past studies as examples to illustrate specific points, especially as these apply to chronic kidney disease associated with obstructive uropathy in children. (author)

  9. Total glucosides of paeony for rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Jin, Di-Er; Yang, Guo-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Wang, Jian-Ming; Kong, Wei-Ping; Tao, Qing-Wen

    2017-10-01

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. However, clinical practice hasn't been well informed by evidence from appropriately conducted systematic reviews. This PRISMA-compliant systematic review aims at examining the effectiveness and safety of TGP for RA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TGP with placebo, no treatment, or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for patients with RA were retrieved by searching seven databases. Primary outcomes included disease improvement and disease remission. Secondary outcomes included adverse effects, pain, health-related quality of life, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Data extraction and analyses were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. We assessed risk of bias for each included studies and quality of evidence on pre-specified outcomes. Eight studies enrolling 1209 patients with active RA were included in this systematic review. On the basis of traditional DMARD(s), TGP might be beneficial for patients with RA in improvement of American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response rate, ACR 50 response rate, ACR70 response rate, and in reduction of adverse effects, compared with no treatment. The overall methodological quality of included studies and the quality of evidence for each outcome were limited. Current trials suggested potential benefits of TGP for RA on the basis of traditional DMARD(s). Therefore, TGP may be a good choice for RA as an adjuvant therapy. However, considering the limited methodological quality and strength of evidence, high-quality RCTs are warranted to support the use of TGP for RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. CLINICAL CASE OF TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY IN A PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of successful application of a monoclonal antibodies drug to interleukin 6 receptors (tocilizumab at severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis with the development of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Tocilizumab treatment secured a decrease in clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease activity, life quality improvement, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hemophagocytic syndrome remission and allowed avoiding the per os prescription of glucocorticoids.

  11. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  12. Comfrey root: from tradition to modern clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Christiane

    2013-02-01

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.) has been used over many centuries as a medicinal plant. In particular, the use of the root has a longstanding tradition. Today, several randomised controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety. Comfrey root extract has been used for the topical treatment of painful muscle and joint complaints. It is clinically proven to relieve pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints in the case of degenerative arthritis, acute myalgia in the back, sprains, contusions and strains after sports injuries and accidents, also in children aged 3 years and older. This paper provides information on clinical trials, non-interventional studies and further literature published on comfrey root till date.

  13. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis clinical features and management strategies at an urban tertiary facility in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Rehan; Saeed, Mohammad; Haider, Rimsha; Jassani, Zahra; Riaz, Amir; Perveen, Tahira

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presentation patterns, biologically vulnerable patient groups and treatment strategies of rheumatoid arthritis. The retrospective study was conducted at the Rheumatology Clinic of Liaquat National Hospital and Medical College, Karachi, and comprised data of rheumatology patients who presented between September 2006 and September 2012. After screening all the files, rheumatoid arthritis cases were identified. Data collection was done using a questionnaire that included patient demographics, co-morbidities, clinical manifestations and drug therapy. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 2300 files screened, 500(21.7%) related to patients of rheumatoid arthritis. The mean age at presentation of these 500 patients was 41±15 years. There were 367(73.4%) women and they presented at an earlier age compared to men (p<0.024). Erosions were present in 198(40%) patients on X-rays and 22(4.4%) had joint deformities. Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis was associated with higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels (p<0.014), but did not differ from seronegative rheumatoid arthritis in terms of Disease Activity Score-28 levels (p<0.21). The skewed gender distribution was likely an effect of rheumatoid arthritis biology rather than due to issues of healthcare accessibility. Seronegative RA is likely to present late though it is as destructive as the seropositive disease.

  15. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV/ ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Last Reviewed: August 25, 2017 ...

  16. NCI National Clinical Trials Network Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about how the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) is structured. The NCTN is a program of the National Cancer Institute that gives funds and other support to cancer research organizations to conduct cancer clinical trials.

  17. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  18. Clinical patterns of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A single tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Medical records of patients with a diagnosis of chronic arthritis with ... One patient had the typical rash of systemic onset JIA (Still's) and another had uveitis. ... corticosteroids and methotrexate were used in 16/68 (23.5%) patients and ...

  19. Tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous disease that has been difficult to manage until the recent advent of biologics. However, there are still unmet medical needs for newer agents. Tofacitinib is a Janus family of kinases inhibitor approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis in many countries and psoriasis in Russia. We reviewed the evidences of tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis treatment. The efficacy and safety profiles result from Phase III clinical trials (OPAL BROADEN and OPAL BEYOND) and one open-label extension study (OPAL BALANCE). Both tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice a day were superior to placebo for American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria response at 3 months and showed significant improvement of skin, enthesitis and dactylitis. Tofacitinib is a promising treatment option for psoriatic arthritis.

  20. [Principles of controlled clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, P

    1962-01-01

    The recovery of the patient should be facilitated as the result of therapeutic research. The basic rule for every therapeutic-clinical trial mist involve a comparison of therapeutic approaches. In acute conditions, such as acute infectious diseases, infarcts, etc., comparisons should be made between two or more groups: the collective therapeutic comparison = the between patients trial. The formation of groups, to be compared one with the other can be justified only if one is reasonably sure that a pathogenic condition indeed exists. In chronic diseases, which extend essentially unchanged over a lengthy period but are nevertheless reversible, therapeutic comparisons may be made between two or more time intervals within the course of the disease in the same individual. This type of therapeutic trial rests primarily upon a (refined!) type of specious reasoning and secondarily, upon modified statistics: the individual therapeutic comparison = the within patient trial. The collective therapeutic comparison, on the one hand, and the individual therapeutic comparison on the other, overlap somewhat in scope. The immediate therapeutic effect is not always an indication of its true value, which may become evident only upon long-term treatment. The short-term trials of therapeutic regimens in an individual must, therefore, be frequently supplemented by long-term trials which can only be carried out by comparing two groups. For many clinical investigations, therefore, the joint efforts of numerous hospitals are absolutely necessary. The second basic rule of therapeutic research is the elimination of secondary causes. The difficulties introduced by these secondary considerations are far greater in therapeutic trials carried out on ambulatory patients than has been hitherto realized. In order to remove subjective secondary causes, the author demanded, in 1931, the use of hidden or illusory media (placebos, dummies) that is, unconscious causative agents. The double blind

  1. Assessment of enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome; Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup; Schmidt, Erik Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enthesitis is a major feature of psoriatic arthritis. However, clinical assessment of enthesitis is known to lack accuracy and have poor interobserver reliability. OBJECTIVE: To determine effect of training on clinical assessment of enthesitis and to compare ultrasonography with clini...

  2. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  3. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  4. Where are clinical trials going? Society and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, P

    2004-02-01

    Clinical trials now increasingly impinge on society at large. First there is growing emphasis from health organizations on the need for unbiased evidence about the effectiveness of promoted remedies. Second, as most novel treatments accrue increased costs to society, these need to be evaluated in terms of value for money. Third, there has been confusion and concern about the resolution of conflicting evidence, especially the role of advertising and commercial pressures from a powerful pharmaceutical industry motivated by profit. Fourth, there is concern about research fraud and the ethics of clinical trials. Fifth, there is increasing suspicion of political advice, which sometimes has sought to reassure an anxious public on the basis of complex and possibly inadequate scientific information. Some of these issues are addressed by truly independent and properly constituted data and safety monitoring committees, which are of particular importance when academic investigators or universities have a large financial conflict of interest. This is now more problematic with the current encouragement of investigator-led spin-off companies. These issues are best resolved by independent financial support (from government or other institutions) rather than relying on the commercial sponsor.

  5. The therapeutic effect of probiotics on rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized control trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdelrahman Tarek; Khattab, Mohammed; Ahmed, Ali Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek; Sakr, Nora; M Khalil, Adham; Abdelhalim, Mohamed; Sawaf, Bisher; Hirayama, Kenji; Huy, Nguyen Tien

    2017-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which probiotics appears to have an immune modulating action along with decreased inflammatory process. Therefore, we aim to investigate the efficacy of probiotics as an adjuvant therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using nine databases including PubMed and Web of Science. Interesting data was extracted and meta-analyzed. We assessed the risk of bias using Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD 42016036769). We found nine studies involving 361 patients who met our eligibility criteria. Our meta-analysis indicated that pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower in the probiotics compared with the placebo group (standardized mean difference = - 0.708; 95% confidence interval (CI) - 1.370 to 0.047, P = 0.036). However, there was no difference between probiotics and placebo in disease activity score (mean difference 0.023; 95% CI - 0.584 to 0.631, P = 0.940). Probiotics lowered pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 in RA; however, its clinical effect is still unclear. Hence, many high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are still needed to prove this effect.

  6. Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity in Australian Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological...

  7. Credentialing for participation in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Urie, Marcia; Galvin, James M.; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based clinical trial processes for improvements in patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process to launch, conduct, and publish clinical trials more rapidly. Institutional participation in clinical trials can be made more efficient and include the expansion of relationships with international partners. This paper reviews the current processes that are in use in radiation therapy trials and the importance of maintaining effective credentialing strategies to assure the quality of the outcomes of clinical trials. The paper offers strategies to streamline and harmonize credentialing tools and processes moving forward as the NCI undergoes transformative change in the conduct of clinical trials.

  8. Credentialing for participation in clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, David S. [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Urie, Marcia [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ulin, Kenneth [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: dfollowi@mdanderson.org [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2012-12-26

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based clinical trial processes for improvements in patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process to launch, conduct, and publish clinical trials more rapidly. Institutional participation in clinical trials can be made more efficient and include the expansion of relationships with international partners. This paper reviews the current processes that are in use in radiation therapy trials and the importance of maintaining effective credentialing strategies to assure the quality of the outcomes of clinical trials. The paper offers strategies to streamline and harmonize credentialing tools and processes moving forward as the NCI undergoes transformative change in the conduct of clinical trials.

  9. Clinical trials and gender medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassese, Mariarita; Zuber, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22%) which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa) which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  10. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  11. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly vari...

  12. European perspective on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: clinical utility of tofacitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalec P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paweł Kawalec,1 Katarzyna Śladowska,2 Iwona Malinowska-Lipień,3 Tomasz Brzostek,3 Maria Kózka4 1Drug Management Department, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Department of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biology and Earth Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; 3Department of Internal and Community Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 4Department of Clinical Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland Abstract: Xeljanz® (tofacitinib is an oral small-molecule inhibitor that reversibly inhibits Janus-activated kinase (JAK-dependent cytokine signaling, thus reducing inflammation. As a result of these mechanisms, effects on the immune system such as a moderate decrease in the total lymphocyte count, a dose-dependent decrease in natural killer (NK cell count, and an increase in B-cell count have been observed. Therefore, tofacitinib provides an innovative approach to modulating the immune and inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which is especially important in individuals who do not respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or show a loss of response over time. The aim of this article was to review studies on the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of tofacitinib in patients with RA. Tofacitinib has been shown to reduce symptoms of RA and improve the quality of life in the analyzed groups of patients. Moreover, it showed high efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in Phase III randomized clinical trials on RA and was the first JAK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA in the RA therapy, thus providing a useful alternative

  13. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  14. NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick Links ...

  15. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael D; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Baker, Daniel G; Baker, Joshua F

    2017-10-01

    Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. This study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised clinical trials. Included patients had blinded clinical disease activity measures and MRI at baseline, 24 and 52 weeks. Synovitis, osteitis and total inflammation scores were determined using the RA MRI scoring system. Multivariable logistic regression analyses compared odds of achieving Disease Activity Score using 28 joints and C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) remission, low component measures, or low MRI inflammation measures at 24 weeks in patients with obesity versus no obesity. At 24 weeks, patients with obesity were significantly less likely to achieve DAS28(CRP) remission (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.92, p=0.03). In contrast, patients with obesity had similar odds of achieving low synovitis (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.51 to 1.72, p=0.84) and inflammation scores (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.61 to 2.22, p=0.64) and greater odds of achieving low osteitis scores (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.10 to 3.84, p=0.02) versus normal weight patients. Patients with RA and obesity have lower rates of DAS28 remission but similar rates of low MRI activity compared with patients without obesity, suggesting that obesity and its associated comorbidities can bias clinical disease activity measures. NCT00361335 and NCT00264550; Post-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Evaluation of new drugs in daily clinical practice: anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kievit, W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the value and the validity of data collected in daily clinical practice for drug evaluation and cost-effectiveness studies, using data collected on TNFa blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis. First, the need for and value of information from daily clinical practice was researched. Together, the results of Chapters 3, 4 and 5 illustrated that treatment of RA patients with anti-TNFa blocking agents in daily clinical practice was different from what ...

  17. Septic arthritis: a 12 years retrospective study in a rheumatological university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Septic arthritis is a disabling and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. The most important risk factors are joint prosthesis, pre-existing joint disease and immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of our study therefore was to revaluate all septic arthritis cases discharged from our Rheumatologic Unit in the last 12 years, to assess the risk factors, the clinical and laboratory characteristics, the causative microorganisms and its possible increase in frequency. Methods: The medical records of 42 consecutive patients with septic arthritis discharged from our Rheumatology Unit between January 1995 and December 2006 were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 23 to 90 and there isn’t gender predominance. Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on the finding of purulent material in the joint space and/or the isolation of a bacterial pathogen from joint fluid. Demographic data, risk factors, co-morbidity, clinical manifestations, time interval between symptoms onset and diagnosis, treatment and laboratory data including serum white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, synovial white blood cells and culture results were analysed. We considered these parameters in the whole population and in two different age groups (≤60, >60 and tried to determine if there was a change of microorganisms involved in septic arthritis during the years. Results: Of 42 patients, 47% were aged 60 and younger. Only 10 patients were admitted to our unit before 2001. A predisposing factor was recorded in 90,5% of cases: 15 patients had rheumatoid arthritis, 8 were diabetic, 6 had seronegative arthritis, 4 had a connective tissue disease, 8 patients had a prosthetic infection and 3 were subjected recently to arthrocentesis. We found that patients aged 60 and younger were more frequently affected by joint disease and had a synovial white blood cell count lower than patients

  18. RESULTS OF AN OPEN CLINICAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF LEFLUNOMIDE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I M Marusenko

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion. The new basic drug leflunomide is as effective as the gold standard methotrexate, at the same time it allows clinical improvement to be more rapidly achieved. Leflunomide also slows down the rate of progression of erosive arthritis and it is well tolerated.

  19. Evaluation of new drugs in daily clinical practice: anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the value and the validity of data collected in daily clinical practice for drug evaluation and cost-effectiveness studies, using data collected on TNFa blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis. First, the need for and value of information from daily

  20. Long-term safety of tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis up to 8.5 years: integrated analysis of data from the global clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stanley B; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Mariette, Xavier; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Lee, Eun Bong; Nash, Peter; Winthrop, Kevin L; Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Thirunavukkarasu, Krishan; DeMasi, Ryan; Geier, Jamie; Kwok, Kenneth; Wang, Lisy; Riese, Richard; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report an integrated safety summary of tofacitinib from two phase I, nine phase II, six phase III and two long-term extension studies in adult patients with active RA. Data were pooled for all tofacitinib-treated patients (data cut-off: 31 March 2015). Incidence rates (IRs; patients with event/100 patient-years) and 95% CIs are reported for adverse events (AEs) of interest. 6194 patients received tofacitinib for a total 19 406 patient-years' exposure; median exposure was 3.4 patient-years. IR (95% CI) for serious AEs was 9.4 (9.0 to 9.9); IR for serious infections was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0). IR for (all) herpes zoster was 3.9 (3.6 to 4.2); IR for disseminated or multidermatomal herpes zoster was 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4). IR for opportunistic infections (excluding tuberculosis) was 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4) and was 0.2 (0.1 to 0.3) for tuberculosis. IR for malignancies (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC)) was 0.9 (0.8 to 1.0); NMSC IR was 0.6 (0.5 to 0.7). IR for gastrointestinal perforations was 0.1 (0.1 to 0.2). Analysis of IR for serious infections, herpes zoster and malignancies by 6-month intervals did not reveal any notable increase in IR with longer-duration tofacitinib exposure. This analysis of tofacitinib exposure up to 8.5 years allowed estimation of safety events with improved precision versus previous tofacitinib reports. AEs were generally stable over time; no new safety signals were observed compared with previous tofacitinib reports. NCT01262118, NCT01484561, NCT00147498, NCT00413660, NCT00550446, NCT00603512, NCT00687193, NCT01164579, NCT00976599, NCT01059864, NCT01359150, NCT00960440, NCT00847613, NCT00814307, NCT00856544, NCT00853385, NCT01039688, NCT00413699, NCT00661661; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Analysis of non-melanoma skin cancer across the tofacitinib rheumatoid arthritis clinical programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Lee, Eun Bong; Martin, George; Mariette, Xavier; Terry, Ketti K; Chen, Yan; Geier, Jamie; Andrews, John; Kaur, Mandeep; Fan, Haiyun; Nduaka, Chudy I

    2017-01-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) across the tofacitinib RA development programme. NMSC events (through August 2013) were identified in patients receiving tofacitinib in two Phase (P)1, eight P2, six P3 and two long-term extension (LTE) studies. In P123 studies, tofacitinib was administered at various doses (1-30 mg twice daily [BID], 20 mg once daily), as monotherapy or with conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, mainly methotrexate. In LTE studies, patients from qualifying P123 studies received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg BID. Crude incidence rates (IRs; patients with events/100 patient-years) for first NMSC event were evaluated across doses and over time. In the overall population, comprising data from 18 studies (15,103 patient-years), 83 of 6092 tofacitinib-treated patients had NMSC events. The IR for NMSC (0.55 [95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.69] overall population) was stable up to 84 months of observation. IRs for tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg BID in combined P123 trials were 0.61 (0.34-1.10) and 0.47 (0.24-0.90), respectively. Corresponding IRs for LTE studies were 0.41 (0.26-0.66) and 0.79 (0.60-1.05). The IR for NMSC across the tofacitinib RA clinical development programme was low and remained stable over time. The IR for NMSC in LTE studies was numerically but not significantly higher with tofacitinib 10 versus 5 mg BID; an inverse dose relationship was observed in P123 trials. Longer follow-up is required to confirm these results.

  2. Clinical trials in dentistry in India: Analysis from trial registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowri, S; Kannan, Sridharan

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice requires clinical trials to be performed. In India, if any clinical trial has to be performed, it has to be registered with clinical trial registry of India. Studies have shown that the report of clinical trials is poor in dentistry. Hence, the present study has been conducted to assess the type and trends of clinical trials being undertaken in dentistry in India over a span of 6 years. All the clinical trials which were registered with the Central Trial Registry of India (CTRI) (www.ctri.nic.in) from January 1, 2007 to March 3, 2014 were evaluated using the keyword "dental." Following information were collected for each of the clinical trials obtained from the search; number of centres (single center/multicentric), type of the institution undertaking the research (government/private/combined), study (observational/interventional), study design (randomized/single blinded/double-blinded), type of health condition, type of participants (healthy/patients), sponsors (academia/commercial), phase of clinical trial (Phase 1/2/3/4), publication details (published/not published), whether it was a postgraduate thesis or not and prospective or retrospective registration of clinical trials, methodological quality (method of randomization, allocation concealment). Descriptive statistics was used for analysis of various categories. Trend analysis was done to assess the changes over a period of time. The search yielded a total of 84 trials of which majority of them were single centered. Considering the study design more than half of the registered clinical trials were double-blinded (47/84 [56%]). With regard to the place of conducting a trial, most of the trials were planned to be performed in private hospitals (56/84 [66.7%]). Most (79/84, 94.1%) of the clinical trials were interventional while only 5/84 (5.9%) were observational. Majority (65/84, 77.4%) of the registered clinical trials were recruiting patients while the rest were being done in healthy

  3. Clinical responsiveness of self-report functional assessment measures for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing intraarticular corticosteroid injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G Ted; Wright, F Virginia; Lang, Bianca A; Birdi, Nina; Oen, Kim; Stephens, Derek; McComas, Joan; Feldman, Brian M

    2005-12-15

    The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), Juvenile Arthritis Functional Assessment Report (JAFAR), and Juvenile Arthritis Functional Status Index (JASI) are widely used functional measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that differ in content, format, and completion time. We compared the responsiveness and child-parent agreement of the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI in a prospective, multicenter study. Children and adolescents from 5 rheumatology centers were enrolled. Subjects were about to undergo therapy (intraarticular corticosteroid injections [IAS] and methotrexate or hip surgery (MTX/hip]) expected to produce a functional improvement. All subjects were studied before the intervention and at 6 weeks and 6 months posttreatment. At each study visit, the 3 measures were administered in randomized, balanced order to both parents and children. A total of 92 subjects (mean age 12.8 years) were enrolled in the study, 74 of which were in the IAS group. The responsiveness of all 3 measures was moderate to strong. The standardized response mean at 6 weeks for the IAS group on the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI was 0.41 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.18, 0.64), 0.70 (95% CI 0.47, 0.93), and 0.36 (95% CI 0.13, 0.59), respectively. The CHAQ was somewhat more responsive to change at 6 weeks (IAS group: relative efficiency 0.34 [JAFAR], 0.27 [JASI]), but less responsive at 6 months (MTX/hip group: relative efficiency 5.1 [JAFAR], 3.9 [JASI]). All 3 questionnaires showed acceptable parent-child agreement, and overall, there were few differences between the 3 questionnaires. The functional outcome measures currently used for JIA are all adequately responsive for use in trials or in the clinic setting. The choice of which measure to use should therefore be based on the time available for completion, the intended clinical/research use, and the depth of content required.

  4. Opioid detoxification : from controlled clinical trial to clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Boukje A G; De Jong, Cor A J; Wensing, Michel; Krabbe, Paul F M; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2010-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials have high internal validity but suffer from difficulties in external validity. This study evaluates the generalizability of the results of a controlled clinical trial on rapid detoxification in the everyday clinical practice of two addiction treatment centers. The results

  5. Spine device clinical trials: design and sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel J; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-05-01

    Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trials represent the best evidence to support the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Industry sponsorship of multicenter clinical trials is purported to lead to bias. To determine what proportion of spine device-related trials are industry-sponsored and the effect of industry sponsorship on trial design. Analysis of data from a publicly available clinical trials database. Clinical trials of spine devices registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible trial database, were evaluated in terms of design, number and location of study centers, and sample size. The relationship between trial design characteristics and study sponsorship was evaluated using logistic regression and general linear models. One thousand six hundred thrity-eight studies were retrieved from ClinicalTrials.gov using the search term "spine." Of the 367 trials that focused on spine surgery, 200 (54.5%) specifically studied devices for spine surgery and 167 (45.5%) focused on other issues related to spine surgery. Compared with nondevice trials, device trials were far more likely to be sponsored by the industry (74% vs. 22.2%, odds ratio (OR) 9.9 [95% confidence interval 6.1-16.3]). Industry-sponsored device trials were more likely multicenter (80% vs. 29%, OR 9.8 [4.8-21.1]) and had approximately four times as many participating study centers (pdevices not sponsored by the industry. Most device-related spine research is industry-sponsored. Multicenter trials are more likely to be industry-sponsored. These findings suggest that previously published studies showing larger effect sizes in industry-sponsored vs. nonindustry-sponsored studies may be biased as a result of failure to take into account the marked differences in design and purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonta, Patrick I

    2014-05-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  7. European perspective on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: clinical utility of tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Śladowska, Katarzyna; Malinowska-Lipień, Iwona; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kózka, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Xeljanz ® (tofacitinib) is an oral small-molecule inhibitor that reversibly inhibits Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-dependent cytokine signaling, thus reducing inflammation. As a result of these mechanisms, effects on the immune system such as a moderate decrease in the total lymphocyte count, a dose-dependent decrease in natural killer (NK) cell count, and an increase in B-cell count have been observed. Therefore, tofacitinib provides an innovative approach to modulating the immune and inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is especially important in individuals who do not respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or show a loss of response over time. The aim of this article was to review studies on the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of tofacitinib in patients with RA. Tofacitinib has been shown to reduce symptoms of RA and improve the quality of life in the analyzed groups of patients. Moreover, it showed high efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in Phase III randomized clinical trials on RA and was the first JAK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the RA therapy, thus providing a useful alternative treatment strategy. Randomized controlled studies revealed a significant benefit over placebo in efficacy outcomes (American College of Rheumatology [ACR] 20 and ACR50 response rates); accordingly, clinically meaningful improvements in patient-related outcomes compared with placebo have been reported. The safety profile seems acceptable, although some severe adverse effects have been observed, including serious infections, opportunistic infections (including tuberculosis and herpes zoster), malignancies, and cardiovascular events, which require strict monitoring irrespective of the duration of tofacitinib administration. As an oral drug, tofacitinib offers an alternative to subcutaneous or intravenous biologic drugs and

  8. Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Mediavilla, M D; Tan, D X; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous clinical trials have examined the therapeutic usefulness of melatonin in different fields of medicine. The objective of this article is to review, in depth, the science regarding clinical trials performed to date. The efficacy of melatonin has been assessed as a treatment of ocular diseases, blood diseases, gastrointestinal tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, sleep disturbances, aging and depression. Melatonin has been also used as a complementary treatment in anaesthesia, hemodialysis, in vitro fertilization and neonatal care. The conclusion of the current review is that the use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy seems to be well funded for macular degeneration, glaucoma, protection of the gastric mucosa, irritable bowel syndrome, arterial hypertension, diabetes, side effects of chemotherapy and radiation in cancer patients or hemodialysis in patients with renal insufficiency and, especially, for sleep disorders of circadian etiology (jet lag, delayed sleep phase syndrome, sleep deterioration associated with aging, etc.) as well as in those related with neurological degenerative diseases (Alzheimer, etc.,) or Smith-Magenis syndrome. The utility of melatonin in anesthetic procedures has been also confirmed. More clinical studies are required to clarify whether, as the preliminary data suggest, melatonin is useful for treatment of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neoplasias or neonatal care. Preliminary data regarding the utility of melatonin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis are either ambiguous or negative. Although in a few cases melatonin seems to aggravate some conditions, the vast majority of studies document the very low toxicity of melatonin over a wide range of doses.

  9. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    clinical efforts that will impact the NEER network going forward and laid the ground work for the CTECs to participate in ongoing clinical trials for...Clinical Implications: • How will the proposed clinical trial have a significant impact on disease outcome? 34 • How will the clinical trial offer...was 0 041U>< for pat<t!nts NPtS and <H08, 0 4 1ux !01 Ct 110, 1nd 10.0 lux f01 < H13 OJ)Ilo •her on~tion are indiuttd AhtrNtor19 stimuli Wl’f1! pres

  10. The Stop Arthritis Very Early (SAVE) trial, an international multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on glucocorticoids in very early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machold, Klaus P.; Landewé, Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Stamm, Tanja A.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Verpoort, Kirsten N.; Brickmann, Kerstin; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Karateev, Dimitri E.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Emery, Paul; Huizinga, Thomas W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are often used as early arthritis treatment and it has been suggested that they induce remission or at least delay the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the need to start disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). To test the effect of GCs on patients with very

  11. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong conclusions led to an inappropriate clinical practice, favoring the involved economic aspect. In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE, supported by the World Association of Medical Editors, started demanding as a requisite for publication that all clinical trials be registered at the database ClinicalTrials.gov. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO created the International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP, which gathers several registry centers from all over the world, and required that all researchers and pharmaceutical industries register clinical trials. Such obligatory registration has progressed and will extend to all scientific journals indexed in all worldwide databases. Registration of clinical trials means another step of clinical research towards transparency, ethics and impartiality, resulting in real evidence to the forthcoming changes in clinical practice as well as in the health situation.

  12. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) through the conduct of clinical trials and other...design and conduct of effective and efficient clinical trials for inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry AMD; • Limited number and...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease ) . As new interventions b

  14. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibfelt EH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Else Helene Ibfelt,1 Dorte Vendelbo Jensen,2,3 Merete Lund Hetland2,4 1Registry Support Centre (East, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup University Hospital, 2DANBIO Registry and Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, 3Department of Rheumatology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Introduction: DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. Study population: The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Main variables: Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. Descriptive data: The DANBIO cohort comprised ~26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6

  15. Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), cardiovascular outcomes: randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkouh, M.E.; Kirshner, H.; Harrington, R.A.; Ruland, S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Schnitzer, T.J.; Burmester, G.R.; Mysler, E.; Hochberg, M.C.; Doherty, M.; Ehrsam, E.; Gitton, X.; Krammer, G.; Mellein, B.; Gimona, A.; Matchaba, P.; Hawkey, C.J.; Chesebro, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential for cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2)-selective inhibitors to increase the risk for myocardial infarction is controversial. The Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET) aimed to assess gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety of the COX2 inhibitor

  16. Is a long-term high-intensity exercise program effective and safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Zuzana; Munneke, Marten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Kroon, Herman M.; Jansen, Annemarie; Ronday, Karel H.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Dijkmans, Ben A. C.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are insufficient data on the effects of long-term intensive exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We undertook this randomized, controlled, multicenter trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of a 2-year intensive exercise program (Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

  17. Is a long-term high-intensity exercise program effective and safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Z. de; Munneke, M.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Kroon, H.M.; Jansen, A.; Ronday, K.H.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Breedveld, F.C.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are insufficient data on the effects of long-term intensive exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We undertook this randomized, controlled, multicenter trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of a 2-year intensive exercise program (Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

  18. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials) and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong c...

  19. Methodology series module 4: Clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Singh Setia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care. We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1 parallel study design, (2 cross-over design, (3 factorial design, and (4 withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials. Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an "open trial." However, many of the trials are not open - they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India.

  20. Methodology Series Module 4: Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually) divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care). We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1) parallel study design, (2) cross-over design, (3) factorial design, and (4) withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV) or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials). Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an "open trial." However, many of the trials are not open - they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India.

  1. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Paul

    2009-01-01

    results will contribute to the evidence base regarding the clinical efficacy for physiotherapy interventions in hip OA. Trial Registration Number: NCT00709566

  2. Tofacitinib in Combination With Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient-Reported Outcomes From a Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Kremer, Joel M; Gruben, David; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Zwillich, Samuel H; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2017-04-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with RA treated with tofacitinib or placebo in combination with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In a 12-month, phase III randomized controlled trial (ORAL Sync), patients (n = 795) with active RA and previous inadequate response to therapy with ≥1 conventional or biologic DMARD were randomized 4:4:1:1 to tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID), tofacitinib 10 mg BID, placebo advanced to 5 mg BID, or placebo to 10 mg BID, in combination with stable background DMARD therapy. PROs included patient global assessment of arthritis (PtGA), patient assessment of arthritis pain (Pain), physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36]), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue [FACIT-F]), and sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep [MOS Sleep]). At month 3, statistically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo were reported in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, all 8 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 10 mg BID, and in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, 7 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 5 mg BID. Improvements were sustained to month 12. Significantly more tofacitinib-treated patients reported improvements of greater than or equal to the minimum clinically important differences at month 3 versus placebo in all PROs, except the SF-36 role-emotional domain (significant for tofacitinib 10 mg BID). Patients with active RA treated with tofacitinib combined with background conventional DMARD therapy reported sustained, significant, and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs versus placebo. © 2016, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Gouty arthritis in Nigerians: clinical and laboratory correlates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... diuretics and low dosage of aspirin may also be among the contributing factors. These factors are also increasingly been found in black Africans. ... The clinic serves as a major referral rheumatology clinic for Lagos and the adjoining states.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of South African (SA) patients are scarce. Objectives. To assess clinical, biochemical and radiological features in a single-centre SA cohort. Methods. We conducted a prospective assessment ...

  5. Best clinical trials reported in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, John B; Grayburn, Paul A; Yancy, Clyde W

    2011-07-01

    Each year, a number of clinical trials emerge with data sufficient to change clinical practice. Determining which findings will result in practice change and which will provide only incremental benefit can be a dilemma for clinicians. The authors review selected clinical trials reported in 2010 in journals, at society meetings, and at conferences, focusing on those studies that have the potential to change clinical practice. This review offers 3 separate means of analysis: an abbreviated text summary, organized by subject area; a comprehensive table of relevant clinical trials that provides a schematic review of the hypotheses, interventions, methods, primary end points, results, and implications; and a complete bibliography for further reading as warranted. It is hoped that this compilation of relevant clinical trials and their important findings released in 2010 will be of benefit in the everyday practice of cardiovascular medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  7. Impact of tofacitinib on patient outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis – review of clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyce EG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eric G Boyce, Deepti Vyas, Edward L Rogan, Cynthia S Valle-Oseguera, Kate M O'Dell Department of Pharmacy Practice, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, progressive autoimmune disease associated with inflammation and destruction of joints and systemic effects, which result in significant impact on patient's quality of life and function. Tofacitinib was approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the USA in 2012 and subsequently in other countries, but not by the European Medicines Agency. The goal of this review was to evaluate the impact of tofacitinib on patient-reported and patient-specific outcomes from prior clinical studies, focusing on quality of life, functionality, pain, global disease assessment, major adverse consequences, and withdrawals. A total of 13 reports representing 11 clinical studies on tofacitinib in rheumatoid arthritis were identified through PubMed and reference lists in meta-analyses and other reviews. Data on improvements in patient-driven composite tools to measure disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis, such as the Health Assessment Questionnaire, served as a major outcome evaluated in this review and were extracted from each study. Additional data extracted from those clinical studies included patient assessment of pain (using a 0–100 mm visual analog scale, patient global assessment of disease (using a 0–100 mm visual analog scale, patient withdrawals, withdrawals due to adverse effects or lack of effect, and risk of serious adverse effects, serious infections, and deaths. Tofacitinib 5 mg bid appears to have a favorable impact on patient outcomes related to efficacy and safety when compared with baseline values and with comparator disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and placebo. Improvements were seen in the composite and individual measures of disease activity. Serious adverse effects, other

  8. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-04-08

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  9. AUTOANTIBODIES TO CIRTULLINATED ANTIGENS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF CLINICAL COURSE IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Belyaeva

    2007-01-01

    , both RF- and anti-CCP seropositivity represent sufficient risk factors for erosive arthritis within a year after clinical manifestations.

  10. Clinical significance of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of wrist joint in Rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yong Woon; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    To assess the role of contrast-enhanced dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in evaluation disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Forty-seven wrist joints with rheumatoid arthritis were examined prospectively. Coronal images of the wrist were obtained using fat-suppression Fast multi-planar spoiled gradient recalled (FMPSPGR) acquisition in the steady state ; TR/TE 102/6.4 msec, flip angle = 60, 4 slices per sequence, FOV = 8 cm, matrix 256 X 192 at 1.5 Tesla. Scans were carried out once before and five to eight times after an intravenous Gd-DPTA injection, at 30-second-intervals. The enhancement of synovium were measured, the enhancement ratio was calculated(postcontrast SNR/precontrast SNR) and time-enhancement ratio curves were plotted. Patients were divided into three groups according to the ratio of initial to peak enhancement : less than 30% ; 30-80% more than 80%. Differences among the three groups were statistically tested using clinical indices and laboratory data as variable. Comparing one group with another, there were no significant differences in clinical indices and laboratory data except for the parameter of grip strength. Enhancement pattern measured in a single wrist joint was not comparable to a clinical index in predicting disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Clinical trials: bringing research to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvay, C A

    1991-02-01

    Over the years, clinical trials with their structured treatment plans and multicenter involvement have been instrumental in developing new treatments and establishing standard of care therapy. While clinical trials strive to advance medical knowledge, they provide scientifically sound, state of the art care and their use should be increased. The Brain Tumor Cooperative Group, one such NCI-sponsored cooperative group, has been the primary group for the treatment of malignant gliomas. As the field of neuro-oncology expands, the neuroscience nurse needs to develop an understanding of clinical trials and their operation. The nurse is in an optimal position to support medical research and the research participant.

  12. clinical trials of Sutherlandia frutescens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic and political imperatives surrounding randomised controlled trials and the ambiguous, or even ..... the medicinal properties of the plant, as reported both in the book, and also in the .... London, UK: Harvard University Press. Latour, B.

  13. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  14. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entwistle Vikki A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  15. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-11-20

    Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in - hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  16. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Hinman, R S; Zeni, J; Risberg, M A; Snyder-Mackler, L; Bennell, K L

    2015-05-01

    A Task Force of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has previously published a set of guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Limited material available on clinical trials of rehabilitation in people with OA has prompted OARSI to establish a separate Task Force to elaborate guidelines encompassing special issues relating to rehabilitation of OA. The Task Force identified three main categories of rehabilitation clinical trials. The categories included non-operative rehabilitation trials, post-operative rehabilitation trials, and trials examining the effectiveness of devices (e.g., assistive devices, bracing, physical agents, electrical stimulation, etc.) that are used in rehabilitation of people with OA. In addition, the Task Force identified two main categories of outcomes in rehabilitation clinical trials, which include outcomes related to symptoms and function, and outcomes related to disease modification. The guidelines for rehabilitation clinical trials provided in this report encompass these main categories. The report provides guidelines for conducting and reporting on randomized clinical trials. The topics include considerations for entering patients into trials, issues related to conducting trials, considerations for selecting outcome measures, and recommendations for statistical analyses and reporting of results. The focus of the report is on rehabilitation trials for hip, knee and hand OA, however, we believe the content is broad enough that it could be applied to rehabilitation trials for other regions as well. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Problematic trial detection in ClinicalTrials.gov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgerink, C.H.J.; George, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are crucial in determining the effectiveness of treatments and directly affect clinical and policy decisions. These decisions are undermined if the data are problematic due to data fabrication or other errors. Researchers have worked on developing statistical methods to detect

  18. The effect of pregabalin or duloxetine on arthritis pain: a clinical and mechanistic study in people with hand osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofat N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nidhi Sofat,1 Abiola Harrison,1 Mark D Russell,1 Salma Ayis,2 Patrick D Kiely,3 Emma H Baker,1 Thomas Richard Barrick,4 Franklyn A Howe4 1Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s University of London, 2Division of Health & Social Care Research, King’s Clinical Trials Unit, King’s College London, 3Department of Rheumatology, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 4Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George’s University of London, London, UK Abstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most prevalent arthritis worldwide and is characterized by chronic pain and impaired physical function. We hypothesized that heightened pain in hand OA could be reduced with duloxetine or pregabalin. In this prospective, randomized clinical study, we recruited 65 participants, aged 40–75 years, with a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS for pain of at least 5. Participants were randomized to one of the following three groups: duloxetine, pregabalin, and placebo. The primary endpoint was the NRS pain score, and the secondary endpoints included the Australian and Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN pain, stiffness, and function scores and quantitative sensory testing by pain pressure algometry. After 13 weeks, compared to placebo, ANOVA found significant differences between the three groups (P=0.0078. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the pregabalin group showed improvement for NRS pain (P=0.023, AUSCAN pain (P=0.008, and AUSCAN function (P=0.009, but no difference between duloxetine and placebo (P>0.05 was observed. In the per protocol analysis, NRS pain was reduced for pregabalin (P<0.0001 and duloxetine (P=0.029 compared to placebo. We conclude that centrally acting analgesics improve pain outcomes in people with hand arthritis, offering new treatment paradigms for OA pain. Keywords: pain, hand osteoarthritis, sensitization, duloxetine, pregabalin

  19. The clinical significance of Epitrochlear lymphadenopathy on elbow radiographs in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Bae Ju; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Hak Soo; Song, Ho Taek; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the radiographic findings of epitrochlear lymphadenopathy with regard to the distribution and severity of the disease and clinal parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Forty six patients with rheumatoid arthritis in whom epitrochlear oval-shaped densities were seen on radiographs were involved in this study. There were 14 cases of unilateral epitrochlear lymphadenopathy in which bilateral arthritic evidence was revealed by radiographs (mixed group), and 32 of bilateral lymphadenopathy in which there was arthritic evidence (positive group). Twenty-three patients in whom lymphadenopathy was not seen on radiographs of the elbow and who were diagnosed as suffering from rheumatoid arthritis functioned as controls (negative group).For scoring the degree of arthritis using the simplified scoring method proposed by Kaye et al., joints were divided into six groups, as follows: Joint 1, elbow; Joint 2, wrist; Joint 3, radial (1st and 2nd) PIP and MCP; Joint 4, ulnar (3rd, 4th, 5th) PIP and MCP; Joint 5, Joints 1 + 2+ 3 + 4; Joint 6, Joints 1 + 4. For each joint, scores were compared with those on the contralateral side in the mixed group. Differences in clinical parameters ( disease duration, rheumatoid factor, ESR, and CRP), and scores for each joint in each arm were statistically compared between be positive and negative group. The number, mean diameter, and maximal diameter of epitrochlear lymph nodes were calculated and correlated with clinical parameters and scores for each joint. To evaluate the incidence of epitrochlear lymphadenopathy without radiographic evidence of arthritis in 46 patients (78 arms) with lymphadenopathy, the frequency of cases in which the score for the joint was zero was assessed. In the mixed group, the mean score for Joint 6 of the arm with epitrochlear lymphadenopathy was significantly higher than that for the contralateral side in the mixed group (p=3D0.022). Only CRP was significantly higher in the positive group than

  20. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    , in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  1. Critical concepts in adaptive clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park JJH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Jay JH Park,1 Kristian Thorlund,2,3 Edward J Mills2,3 1Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Adaptive clinical trials are an innovative trial design aimed at reducing resources, decreasing time to completion and number of patients exposed to inferior interventions, and improving the likelihood of detecting treatment effects. The last decade has seen an increasing use of adaptive designs, particularly in drug development. They frequently differ importantly from conventional clinical trials as they allow modifications to key trial design components during the trial, as data is being collected, using preplanned decision rules. Adaptive designs have increased likelihood of complexity and also potential bias, so it is important to understand the common types of adaptive designs. Many clinicians and investigators may be unfamiliar with the design considerations for adaptive designs. Given their complexities, adaptive trials require an understanding of design features and sources of bias. Herein, we introduce some common adaptive design elements and biases and specifically address response adaptive randomization, sample size reassessment, Bayesian methods for adaptive trials, seamless trials, and adaptive enrichment using real examples. Keywords: adaptive designs, response adaptive randomization, sample size reassessment, Bayesian adaptive trials, seamless trials, adaptive enrichment

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital and School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, .... Five patients had uveitis as the .... methotrexate monotherapy at an average dose of 17.5 mg/week.

  3. Clinical trial data analysis using R

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Ding-Geng; Peace, Karl E

    2011-01-01

    .... Case studies demonstrate how to select the appropriate clinical trial data. The authors introduce the corresponding biostatistical analysis methods, followed by the step-by-step data analysis using R...

  4. Overcoming Age Limits in Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescents, young adults, and the elderly lag far behind other age groups when it comes to enrolling in clinical trials. Their participation is critical to advancing effective therapies for these age groups.

  5. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... operating within extended clinical trials R&D value chains. Companies often ... Source: CeSTII Survey Management and Results System internal database. Table III.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  8. USE OF SUBCUTANEOUS METHOTREXATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: THE REMARCA TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The early administration of methotrexate (MTX and the use of its high (by the rheumatology practice standards doses contribute to the enhanced efficiency of therapy and the reduced severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the important merits of MTX in the treatment of RA is the possibility of adjusting its dose and choosing its (oral or subcutaneous administration routes, which makes it possible to individualize treatment. Particular emphasis has been recently placed just on a subcutaneous MTX formulation that creates prerequisites for substantially improving the efficiency of RA therapy. The paper gives the data of the REMARCA (Russian investigation of methotrexate and biologicals for early active arthritis trial assessing the results of RA treatment in the use of the subcutaneous MTX dosage form as a first-line drug and in the elaboration of management tactics for this disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation included 191 patients (34 men and 157 women with active RA; of whom 51.8% had very early RA (< 6 months' disease duration. 115 patients with RA completed a 24-month follow-up period; and their data were analyzed in more detail.Results and discussion. The findings may substantiate treatment policy based on the prescription of subcutaneous MTX (without previously administering its oral formulation in patients with early RA and high disease activity, starting the drug at 15 mg/week and rapidly escalating with the highest tolerable doses during 4-8 weeks, which allows remission (or low disease activity in the majority of patients without using glucocorticoids and biological agents.

  9. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...... the infection, so when treatment is started it is currently a lifelong commitment. Is it reasonable then that guidelines are based almost completely on short-term randomized trials and observational studies of surrogate markers, or is there still a need for trials with clinical outcomes?...

  10. A report on clinical application of 99Tc-MDP treatment in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huilin; Chen Wanqian; Xie Mei; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To asses clinical application of the Yunke therapy and observe the early curative effect in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 9 patients of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled. The age ranged 4.5-16 years old with medical history ranged 3-12 months. All patients had been treated using Yunke therapy. A high dose of 100 mg or 200 mg was given by intravenous infusion in alternative day for 2 to 3 times during the first course of treatment. Then a small dose of 5 mg alternate day was given by intravenous injection for 10-15 times during the second course and the treatment phase continue for 2-3 courses. Results: Significance curative effect was observed in all cases. Conclusion: Early clinical effect of the Yunke therapy was obvious in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It was necessary that a specific dose be used for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...... and knowledge of HIV led to short-term trials using surrogate outcomes such as viral load and CD4 count. This established a faster drug approval process that complimented the rapid need to evaluate and provide access to drugs based on short-term trials. However, no treatment has yet been found that eradicates...... the infection, so when treatment is started it is currently a lifelong commitment. Is it reasonable then that guidelines are based almost completely on short-term randomized trials and observational studies of surrogate markers, or is there still a need for trials with clinical outcomes?...

  12. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors...... original papers as well as annual reports of clinical quality (since 2005) have been published. Conclusion: DANBIO is a powerful register for research in rheumatologic diseases and furthermore serves as a Clinical Quality Register with the aim of monitoring treatment quality in patients with RA in Denmark....

  13. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  14. The Effect of Triptolide in Rheumatoid Arthritis: From Basic Research towards Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Triptolide (TP, a major extract of the herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF, has been shown to exert potent pharmacological effects, especially an immunosuppressive effect in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its multiorgan toxicity prevents it from being widely used in clinical practice. Recently, several attempts are being performed to reduce TP toxicity. In this review, recent progress in the use of TP for RA, including its pharmacological effects and toxicity, is summarized. Meanwhile, strategies relying on chemical structural modifications, innovative delivery systems, and drug combinations to alleviate the disadvantages of TP are also reviewed. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation.

  15. Strengthening and stretching for rheumatoid arthritis of the hand (SARAH: design of a randomised controlled trial of a hand and upper limb exercise intervention - ISRCTN89936343

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA commonly affects the hands and wrists with inflammation, deformity, pain, weakness and restricted mobility leading to reduced function. The effectiveness of exercise for RA hands is uncertain, although evidence from small scale studies is promising. The Strengthening And Stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand (SARAH trial is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of adding an optimised exercise programme for hands and upper limbs to best practice usual care for patients with RA. Methods/design 480 participants with problematic RA hands will be recruited through 17 NHS trusts. Treatments will be provided by physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Participants will be individually randomised to receive either best practice usual care (joint protection advice, general exercise advice, functional splinting and assistive devices or best practice usual care supplemented with an individualised exercise programme of strengthening and stretching exercises. The study assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation and will follow participants up at four and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is the Hand function subscale of the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire, and secondary outcomes include hand and wrist impairment measures, quality of life, and resource use. Economic and qualitative studies will also be carried out in parallel. Discussion This paper describes the design and development of a trial protocol of a complex intervention study based in therapy out-patient departments. The findings will provide evidence to support or refute the use of an optimised exercise programme for RA of the hand in addition to best practice usual care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89936343

  16. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  17. Effectiveness of the primary therapist model for rheumatoid arthritis rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda C; Davis, Aileen M; Lineker, Sydney C; Coyte, Peter C; Bombardier, Claire

    2006-02-15

    To compare the primary therapist model (PTM), provided by a single rheumatology-trained primary therapist, with the traditional treatment model (TTM), provided by a physical therapy (PT) and/or occupational therapy (OT) generalist, for treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Eligible patients were adults requiring rehabilitation treatment who had not received PT/OT in the past 2 years. Participants were randomized to the PTM or TTM group. The primary outcome was defined as the proportion of clinical responders who experienced a > or =20% improvement in 2 of the following measures from baseline to 6 months: Health Assessment Questionnaire, pain visual analog scale, and Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit RA Knowledge Questionnaire. Of 144 consenting patients, 33 (10 PTM participants, 23 TTM participants) dropped out without completing any followup assessment, leaving 111 for analysis (63 PTM participants, 48 TTM participants). The majority were women (PTM 87.3%, TTM 79.2%), with a mean age of 54.2 years and 56.8 years for the PTM and TTM groups, respectively. Average disease duration was 10.6 years and 13.2 years for each group, respectively. At 6 months, 44.4% of patients in the PTM group were clinical responders versus 18.8% in the TTM group (chi(2) = 8.09, P = 0.004). Compared with the TTM, the PTM was associated with better outcomes in patients with RA. The results, however, should be interpreted with caution due to the high dropout rate in the TTM group.

  18. Inclusion of Minority Patients in Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: The Role of the Clinical Trial Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaplan, Celia P

    2007-01-01

    .... While inroads to increasing minority inclusion in breast cancer clinical trials have been made, recent reports continue to demonstrate lower enrollment among African Americans, Asian Americans...

  19. Massage Therapy for Pain and Function in Patients With Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole L; Churilla, James R

    2017-09-01

    Massage therapy is gaining interest as a therapeutic approach to managing osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. To date, there have been no systematic reviews investigating the effects of massage therapy on these conditions. Systematic review was used. The primary aim of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the current evidence regarding the effects of massage therapy as a stand-alone treatment on pain and functional outcomes among those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Relevant randomized controlled trials were searched using the electronic databases Google Scholar, MEDLINE, and PEDro. The PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was assessed with the GRADE approach. This review found seven randomized controlled trials representing 352 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias ranged from four to seven. Our results found low- to moderate-quality evidence that massage therapy is superior to nonactive therapies in reducing pain and improving certain functional outcomes. It is unclear whether massage therapy is more effective than other forms of treatment. There is a need for large, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of massage therapy as an intervention for individuals with arthritis.

  20. Definition of treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis based on the simplified and the clinical disease activity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletaha, Daniel; Martinez-Avila, Jose; Kvien, Tore K; Smolen, Josef S

    2012-07-01

    The simplified disease activity index (SDAI) and the clinical disease activity index (CDAI) are established instruments to measure disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To date, no validated response definitions for the SDAI and CDAI are available. The authors aimed to define minor, moderate and major response criteria for the SDAI. The authors used data from two clinical trials on infliximab versus methotrexate in early (ASPIRE) or established (ATTRACT) RA, and identified the three SDAI cutpoints based on the best agreement (by κ statistics) with the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20/50/70 responses. Cutpoints were then tested for different aspects of validity in the trial datasets and in a Norwegian disease modifying antirheumatic drug prescription dataset (NOR-DMARD). Based on agreement with the ACR response, the minor, moderate and major responses were identified as SDAI 50%, 70% and 85% improvement. These cutpoints had good face validity concerning the disease activity states achieved by the different response definitions. Construct validity was shown by a clear association of increasing SDAI response categories with increasing levels of functional improvement, achievement of better functional states and lower annual radiographic progression. Across SDAI 50/70/85, the sensitivities regarding a patient-perceived improvement decreased (73%/39%/22%) and the specificities increased (61%/89%/96%) in a meaningful way. Further, the cutpoints discriminated the different treatment arms in ASPIRE and ATTRACT. The same cutpoints were used for the CDAI, with similar results in the validation analyses. These new response criteria expand the usefulness of the SDAI and CDAI for their use as endpoints in clinical trials beyond the definition of disease activity categories.

  1. Parents' perceived obstacles to pediatric clinical trial participation: Findings from the clinical trials transformation initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Gamel, Breck; Bloom, Diane; Bradley, John; Jafri, Hasan S; Hinton, Denise; Nambiar, Sumathi; Wheeler, Chris; Tiernan, Rosemary; Smith, P Brian; Roberts, Jamie; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2018-03-01

    Enrollment of children into pediatric clinical trials remains challenging. More effective strategies to improve recruitment of children into trials are needed. This study used in-depth qualitative interviews with parents who were approached to enroll their children in a clinical trial in order to gain an understanding of the barriers to pediatric clinical trial participation. Twenty-four parents whose children had been offered the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial were interviewed: 19 whose children had participated in at least 1 clinical trial and 5 who had declined participation in any trial. Each study aspect, from the initial explanation of the study to the end of the study, can affect the willingness of parents to consent to the proposed study and future studies. Establishing trust, appropriate timing, a transparent discussion of risks and benefits oriented to the layperson, and providing motivation for children to participate were key factors that impacted parents' decisions. In order for clinical trial accrual to be successful, parents' priorities and considerations must be a central focus, beginning with initial trial design. The recommendations from the parents who participated in this study can be used to support budget allocations that ensure adequate training of study staff and improved staffing on nights and weekends. Studies of parent responses in outpatient settings and additional inpatient settings will provide valuable information on the consent process from the child's and parent's perspectives. Further studies are needed to explore whether implementation of such strategies will result in improved recruitment for pediatric clinical trials.

  2. Evaluation of clinical and cytogenetic parameters in rheumatoid arthritis patients for effective diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandirasekar, R; Kumar, B Lakshman; Jayakumar, R; Uthayakumar, V; Jacob, Raichel; Sasikala, K

    2015-01-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the commonest inflammatory joint disease, affecting nearly 1% of the adult population worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have become increasingly important. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the relationships between hematological, biochemical, immunological and cytogenetic parameters in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy normal controls. The study group comprised of 126 RA patients and equal number of healthy normal control subjects. The blood was collected and analyzed for biochemical, immunological, enzymatic and cytogenetic parameters. Results of the present study indicated that 20% of RA patient's hematological, 31% of biochemical and 70% immunological parameters had a significant difference from the controls and reference range. The RF and anti-CCP antibody levels were also positive in 70% of RA patients. A significant increase in minor chromosomal abnormalities was also observed in patients as compared to controls. The knowledge about autoimmune diseases is very low among the South Indian population. The present study has thus helped in understanding the RA disease in a better way based on a pattern of various clinical markers of the disease condition which might help in planning therapeutic intervention strategies and create awareness about the disease management among RA patients of the population studied. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Schueller, Gerd; Aringer, Martin; Weber, Michael; Kainberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings

  4. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Aringer, Martin [Department of Rheumatology, Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-06-15

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings.

  5. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  6. Patient engagement in clinical trials: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative's leadership from theory to practical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick-Lake, Bray

    2018-02-01

    Patient engagement is an increasingly important aspect of successful clinical trials. Over the past decade, as patient group involvement in clinical trials has continued to increase and diversify, the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative has not only recognized the crucial role patients play in improving the clinical trial enterprise but also made a deep commitment to help grow and shape the emerging field of patient engagement. This article describes the evolution of patient engagement including the origins of the patient engagement movement; barriers to successful engagement and remaining challenges to full and valuable collaboration between patient groups and trial sponsors; and Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative's role in influencing the field through organizational practices, formal project work and resulting recommendations, and external advocacy efforts.

  7. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  8. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis) for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. The DANBIO cohort comprised ∼26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6,200 patients with psoriatic arthritis in 2015. DANBIO has high nationwide coverage and completeness on key data variables. More than 60 original papers as well as annual reports of clinical quality (since 2005) have been published. DANBIO is a powerful register for research in rheumatologic diseases and furthermore serves as a Clinical Quality Register with the aim of monitoring treatment quality in patients with RA in Denmark.

  9. Public information about clinical trials and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plétan, Yannick; Zannad, Faïez; Jaillon, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Be it to restore the confused image of clinical research in relation to the lay public, or to develop new ways of accruing healthy volunteers or patients for clinical trials, there is a need to draft some guidance on how best to provide information on research. Although the French legal and regulatory armamentarium in this area is essentially liberal, there is currently little-justified reluctance among study sponsors to advertise publicly. A group of academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers, assembled for a workshop, together with regulators, journalists, representatives from ethics committees, social security, patient and health consumer groups and other French institutional bodies, has suggested the following series of recommendations: there is no need for additional legal or regulatory constraints; sponsors should be aware of and make use of direct public information on trials; a 'good practice charter' on public communication about clinical trials should be developed; all professionals should be involved in this communication platform; communication in the patient's immediate vicinity should be preferred (primary-care physician, local press); clinical databases and websites accessible to professionals, but also to patients and non-professionals, should be developed; genuine instruction on clinical trials for physicians and health professionals unfamiliar with such trials should be developed and disseminated; media groups should receive at least some training in the fundamentals of clinical research.

  10. Aspergillus arthritis: analysis of clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of 31 reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Henry, Michael; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Denning, David W; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Aspergillus arthritis is a debilitating form of invasive aspergillosis. Little is known about its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory features, treatment, and prognosis. Cases of Aspergillus arthritis were reviewed in the English literature from 1967 through 2015 for variables of arthritis with Aspergillus spp. recovered from joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, symptoms, signs, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Among 31 evaluable cases, 87% were males and 13% pediatric. Median age was 50 y (range 1-83 y). Seventeen (55%) patients were immunosuppressed with such conditions as hematological malignancies (26%), corticosteroids (39%), and/or transplantation (26%). Approximately one-half (52%) of patients had hematogenous seeding of the joint, and more than 80% had de novo infection with no prior antifungal therapy. Oligoarticular infection (2-3 joints) occurred in 45% and contiguous osteomyelitis was present in 61%. Clinical manifestations included pain (87%), edema (26%), and limited function (23%), with knees (35%), intervertebral discs (26%), and hips (16%) being most commonly infected. Aspergillus fumigatus constituted 77% of cases followed by Aspergillus flavus in 13%, Aspergillus niger in 3%, and not specified in 7%. Median ESR was 90 mm/hr and median CRP was 3.6 mg/dl. Median synovial fluid WBC was 17,200/μL (7,300-128,000) with 72% PMNs (range 61-92). Osteolysis occurred in 35%, and soft-tissue extension 47%. Nineteen patients (61%) were managed with combined medical and surgical therapy, 10 (32%) with medical therapy only, and 2 (6%) surgery only. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the most frequently used agents with median duration of therapy of 219 days (range 30-545). Surgical interventions included debridement in 61%, drainage 19%, and amputation 6%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 71% and relapse occurred in 16%. Medical therapy was reinstituted with successful outcome in

  11. Relationship Between Work Productivity and Clinical Characteristics in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Mejía, Carlos Eduardo; Galarza-Delgado, Dionicio Ángel; Colunga-Pedraza, Iris Jazmín; Azpiri-López, José Ramón; Wah-Suárez, Martín; Wimer-Castillo, Blanca Otilia; Salazar-Sepúlveda, Laura Leticia

    2018-03-01

    This study assesses the relationship between the ability to perform productive activities and the clinical characteristics of RA, such as disease activity, quality of life, functional capacity, workload, pharmacotherapy, and comorbidities. A cross-sectional, observational and descriptive study was conducted. Patients aged 18-75years with a diagnosis of RA according to ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria who attended regularly to the Rheumatology service in the period between January and March 2017 were included. The questionnaires, WPAI-AR, HAQ-DI and RAQoL, were applied. RA disease activity was measured by DAS28-PCR. Correlations were made between the clinical data obtained and work productivity and activity impairment measured by WPAI-AR. Two hundred four patients with a diagnosis of RA were included, of whom 92.6% were women. Mean age was 54.46±9.3years. Regarding the percentage of impairment of daily life activities, we found a significant difference between employed and unemployed patients (P≤.002). A positive correlation was found between RA activity measured by DAS28-PCR, quality of life, and functional ability with the percentages of absenteeism, presenteeism, overall productivity loss, and impairment of daily life activities. A correlation between RA disease activity, functional capacity, quality of life, and working impairment was found. The strongest association was established with the degree of functional capacity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  13. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French, Helen P

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a major cause of functional disability and reduced quality of life. Management options aim to reduce pain and improve or maintain physical functioning. Current evidence indicates that therapeutic exercise has a beneficial but short-term effect on pain and disability, with poor long-term benefit. The optimal content, duration and type of exercise are yet to be ascertained. There has been little scientific investigation into the effectiveness of manual therapy in hip OA. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT) found greater improvements in patient-perceived improvement and physical function with manual therapy, compared to exercise therapy.

  14. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials. PMID:22145122

  15. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials.

  16. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Entwistle Vikki A; Snowdon Claire; Garcia Jo; Knight Rosemary C; Shakur Haleema; Elbourne Diana R; Roberts Ian; Francis David; McDonald Alison M; Grant Adrian M; Campbell Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, o...

  17. Effects of Amerindian Genetic Ancestry on Clinical Variables and Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Elena; García de la Torre, Ignacio; Sacnún, Mónica; Goñi, Mario; Berbotto, Guillermo; Paira, Sergio; Musuruana, Jorge Luis; Graf, César; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Messina, Osvaldo D; Babini, Alejandra; Strusberg, Ingrid; Marcos, Juan Carlos; Scherbarth, Hugo; Spindler, Alberto; Quinteros, Ana; Toloza, Sergio; Moreno, José Luis C; Catoggio, Luis J; Tate, Guillermo; Eimon, Alicia; Citera, Gustavo; Pellet, Antonio Catalán; Nasswetter, Gustavo; Cardiel, Mario H; Miranda, Pedro; Ballesteros, Francisco; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A; Acevedo-Vásquez, Eduardo M; García, Conrado García; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2017-12-01

    To define whether Amerindian genetic ancestry correlates with clinical and therapeutic variables in admixed individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from Latin America. Patients with RA (n = 1347) and healthy controls (n = 1012) from Argentina, Mexico, Chile, and Peru were included. Samples were genotyped for the Immunochip v1 using the Illumina platform. Clinical data were obtained through interviews or the clinical history. Percentage of Amerindian ancestry was comparable between cases and controls. Morning stiffness (p ancestry after Bonferroni correction. Higher Amerindian ancestry correlated only with weight loss (p Bonferroni ancestry correlated with higher doses of azathioprine (p ancestry protects against most major clinical criteria of RA, but regarding the association of RF with increased European ancestry, age, sex, and smoking are modifiers. Ancestry also correlates with the therapeutic profiles.

  18. American College of Rheumatology provisional criteria for defining clinical inactive disease in select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Huang, Bin; Itert, Lukasz; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    To prospectively validate the preliminary criteria for clinical inactive disease (CID) in patients with select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We used the process for development of classification and response criteria recommended by the American College of Rheumatology Quality of Care Committee. Patient-visit profiles were extracted from the phase III randomized controlled trial of infliximab in polyarticular-course JIA (i.e., patients considered to resemble those with select categories of JIA) and sent to an international group of expert physician raters. Using the physician ratings as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the preliminary criteria. Modifications to the criteria were made, and these were sent to a larger group of pediatric rheumatologists to determine quantitative, face, and content validity. Variables weighted heaviest by physicians when making their judgment were the number of joints with active arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), physician's global assessment, and duration of morning stiffness. Three modifications were made: the definition of uveitis, the definition of abnormal ESR, and the addition of morning stiffness. These changes did not alter the accuracy of the preliminary set. The modified criteria, termed the "criteria for CID in select categories of JIA," have excellent feasibility and face, content, criterion, and discriminant validity to detect CID in select categories of JIA. The small changes made to the preliminary criteria set did not alter the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.954) or accuracy (91%), but have increased face and content validity. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  19. The effect of an educational intervention, based on clinical simulation, on the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ávila, Daniel G; Ruiz, Álvaro J; Gil, Fabián; Mora, Sergio A; Tobar, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Juan M; Rosselli, Diego

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational tool for general physicians, based on rheumatological clinical simulation, for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical study was carried out, in which the physician research subjects were assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group (educational intervention for rheumatoid arthritis with clinical simulation) or the control group (educational intervention for the basic aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis). Four weeks after the educational intervention, the members of both groups completed an examination that included four clinical cases with real patients, two clinical cases with two clinical simulation models and six virtual clinical cases. In this examination, the participants noted clinical findings, established a diagnosis and defined the complementary tests they would request, if necessary, to corroborate their diagnosis. A total of 160 doctors participated (80 in the active educational intervention for rheumatoid arthritis and 80 in the control group), of whom 89 were women (56%). The mean age was 35 (standard deviation 7.7) years. Success was defined as a physician correctly diagnosing at least 10 of the 12 cases presented. A significant difference of 81.3% (95% confidence interval 72-90%; p educational intervention based on clinical simulation to improve the diagnostic approach to rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The results open a new horizon in the teaching of rheumatology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Update on clinical trials in Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, Jeri A

    2006-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often known as the gold standard in treatment efficacy studies. This article defines the characteristics of RCTs and the factors that investigators must consider in designing clinical trials in dysphagia. Design issues unique to behavioral treatments often used in dysphagia are discussed. Ongoing RCTs in dysphagia are described including studies of (1) the effectiveness of the Shaker exercise versus standardized treatment in patients with severe dysphagia resulting from stroke or treatment for head and neck cancer who have been nonoral for at least three months; (2) the comparative effects of nectar- and honey-thickened liquids versus chin tuck posture and in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease with or without dementia who aspirate on thin liquids; and (3) the comparative effects of muscle exercise versus sensory postural therapy for dysphagia resulting from treatment for head and neck cancer. Issues in generalizing from the results of clinical trials are also described.

  1. Job retention vocational rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis (WORK-IA): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Alison; O'Brien, Rachel; Woodbridge, Sarah; Bradshaw, Lucy; Prior, Yeliz; Radford, Kate; Culley, June; Whitham, Diane; Ruth Pulikottil-Jacob

    2017-07-21

    Inflammatory arthritis leads to work disability, absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e. at-work productivity loss) at high cost to individuals, employers and society. A trial of job retention vocational rehabilitation (VR) in the United States identified this helped people keep working. The effectiveness of this VR in countries with different socioeconomic policies and conditions, and its impact on absenteeism, presenteeism and health, are unknown. This feasibility study tested the acceptability of this VR, modified for the United Kingdom, compared to written advice about managing work problems. To help plan a randomized controlled trial, we tested screening, recruitment, intervention delivery, response rates, applicability of the control intervention and identified the relevant primary outcome. A feasibility randomized controlled trial with rheumatoid, psoriatic or inflammatory arthritis patients randomized to receive either job retention VR or written information only (the WORK-IA trial). Following three days VR training, rheumatology occupational therapists provided individualised VR on a one to one basis. VR included work assessment, activity diaries and action planning, and (as applicable) arthritis self-management in the workplace, ergonomics, fatigue and stress management, orthoses, employment rights and support services, assistive technology, work modifications, psychological and disclosure support, workplace visits and employer liaison. Fifty five (10%) people were recruited from 539 screened. Follow-up response rates were acceptable at 80%. VR was delivered with fidelity. VR was more acceptable than written advice only (7.8 versus 6.7). VR took on average 4 h at a cost of £135 per person. Outcome assessment indicated VR was better than written advice in reducing presenteeism (Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) change score mean: VR = -12.4 (SD 13.2); control = -2.5 (SD 15.9), absenteeism, perceived risk of job loss and improving pain and health status

  2. Industry funded clinical trials: bias and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Parigi, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The quality of the clinical data supporting the development and ultimately the approval for medical use of new drugs is often challenged. Many share the perception that the business goals of the pharmaceutical industry overrule the best scientific efforts to accrue critical knowledge on a new molecule, in order to inform investment of resources, regulatory approvals and appropriate use by patients. Despite this common belief, few scientists have attempted to assess objectively the quality of industry funded (IF) clinical trials by measuring it and comparing it with non-industry funded (NIF) clinical trials in a data-driven fashion. Overall, the average quality of IF clinical research has been reported to be higher than the quality of NIF clinical research.

  3. Genomic sequencing in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Mestan, Karen K; Ilkhanoff, Leonard; Mouli, Samdeep; Lin, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human genome sequencing is the process by which the exact order of nucleic acid base pairs in the 24 human chromosomes is determined. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, genomic sequencing is rapidly becoming a major part of our translational research efforts to understand and improve human health and disease. This article reviews the current and future directions of clinical research with respect to genomic sequencing, a technology that is just beginning to fin...

  4. Clinical trials in male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhizomes of Eremostachys laciniata: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Chemical Constituents and a Clinical Trial on Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Delazar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was the isolation and structure elucidation of chemical compounds from the rhizomes of Eremostachys laciniata (L Bunge (EL, an Iranian traditional medicinal herb with a thick root and pale purple or white flowers as well as the clinical studies on the therapeutic efficacy and safety of topical application of the EL extract in the management of some inflammatory conditions, e.g., arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and septic arthritis (Riter’s syndrome. Methods: The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated unequivocally on the basis of one and two dimensional NMR, UV and HR-FABMS spectroscopic data analyses. A single-blinded randomized clinical trial was carried out with the extract of the rhizomes of E. laciniata (EL to determine the efficacy and safety of the traditional uses of EL compared to that of piroxicam in treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g., osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and Reiter’s syndrome. Results: Eleven iridoid glycosides, two phenylethanoids and two phytosterols were isolated and identified for the first time from the rhizomes of EL. After 14 days of treatment with the EL and piroxicam ointments, all groups showed significant improvements compared to the control groups. EL (5% ointment induced better initial therapeutic response than piroxicam (5% onitment. Conclusion: This clinical trial established that EL was suitable for topical applications as a safe and effective complementary therapy for inflammatory diseases.

  6. Clinical trial optimization: Monte Carlo simulation Markov model for planning clinical trials recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ismail; Rovira, Joan; Casanovas, Josep

    2007-05-01

    The patient recruitment process of clinical trials is an essential element which needs to be designed properly. In this paper we describe different simulation models under continuous and discrete time assumptions for the design of recruitment in clinical trials. The results of hypothetical examples of clinical trial recruitments are presented. The recruitment time is calculated and the number of recruited patients is quantified for a given time and probability of recruitment. The expected delay and the effective recruitment durations are estimated using both continuous and discrete time modeling. The proposed type of Monte Carlo simulation Markov models will enable optimization of the recruitment process and the estimation and the calibration of its parameters to aid the proposed clinical trials. A continuous time simulation may minimize the duration of the recruitment and, consequently, the total duration of the trial.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaclyn; Caplan, Liron; Yazdany, Jinoos; Robbins, Mark L; Neogi, Tuhina; Michaud, Kaleb; Saag, Kenneth G; O'Dell, James R; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2012-05-01

    Although the systematic measurement of disease activity facilitates clinical decision making in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), no recommendations currently exist on which measures should be applied in clinical practice in the US. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) convened a Working Group (WG) to comprehensively evaluate the validity, feasibility, and acceptability of available RA disease activity measures and derive recommendations for their use in clinical practice. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify RA disease activity measures. Using exclusion criteria, input from an Expert Advisory Panel (EAP), and psychometric analysis, a list of potential measures was created. A survey was administered to rheumatologists soliciting input. The WG used these survey results in conjunction with the psychometric analyses to derive final recommendations. Systematic review of the literature resulted in identification of 63 RA disease activity measures. Application of exclusion criteria and ratings by the EAP narrowed the list to 14 measures for further evaluation. Practicing rheumatologists rated 9 of these 14 measures as most useful and feasible. From these 9 measures, the WG selected 6 with the best psychometric properties for inclusion in the final set of ACR-recommended RA disease activity measures. We recommend the Clinical Disease Activity Index, Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein), Patient Activity Scale (PAS), PAS-II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures, and Simplified Disease Activity Index because they are accurate reflections of disease activity; are sensitive to change; discriminate well between low, moderate, and high disease activity states; have remission criteria; and are feasible to perform in clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  9. The efficacy of the traditional Chinese medicine Juanbi pill combined with methotrexate in active rheumatoid arthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Wang, Yi-Ru; Jia, Qing-Yun; Liu, Li; Xu, Chong-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Yao, Min; Cui, Xue-Jun; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yong-Jun; Liang, Qian-Qian

    2018-03-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by swelling and painful joints, eventually leading to joint destruction. There is still a lack of effective therapy to treat RA. The Juanbi pill is a Chinese medicine that has been widely used to treat active RA in China for hundreds of years, relieving pain and protecting the affected joints from malformation. However, there is no solid evidence to show the effect of the Juanbi pill on the management of active RA. We will conduct a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine whether the traditional Chinese medicine Juanbi pill could relieve joint pain in RA and protect the joints. A total of 120 patients with active RA will be enrolled and treated with the Juanbi pill or a placebo for 3 months. The primary outcome measures are as follows: rate of in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)50, change in the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) from baseline at beginning of therapy to 3 months, and a change in the van der Heijde modified Sharp score measured from baseline to 12 months. The secondary outcome measures are as follows: rate of change in ACR20, ACR70, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and change in score in the Patient Assessment of Arthritis Pain, Patient Global Assessment of Arthritis, and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) from baseline to 2-week, 1-month, 2-month, 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow up. In addition, the rate of change (score) in the ACR50 and DAS28 from the baseline to 2-week, 1-month, 2-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow up are also the secondary outcome measures. Although the Juanbi pill has been used in China for many years to treat RA, there is a lack of consensus about its effectiveness. This trial will provide convincing evidence about the effect of Juanbi pill on active RA. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02885597 . Registered on 30 August 2016.

  10. Acute gouty arthritis and rapidly progressive renal failure as manifestation of multiple myeloma: clinical case description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Gudym

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a clinical case of multiple myeloma in 78-year-old man, its clinical onset was as an acute attack of gout. The patient was admitted to hospital due to the development of the first acute attack of gout. The attack was characterized by polyarthricular joint lesion of the upper and lower extremities, pronounced inflammatory reaction, insufficient response to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and a high level of hyperuricemia. The serum uric acid concentration ranged from 636 to 712 μmol/l. The study of the synovial fluid of the inflamed knee joint made it possible to reveal uric acid crystals and to confirm the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis. Simultaneously, the patient had significant renal impairment: creatinine was 574 μmol/l, urea — 39.9 mmol/l, glomerular filtration rate according to CKD-EPI — 8 ml/min. The daily proteinuria was 1.8 g. A retrospective assessment of laboratory parameters allowed to reveal completely normal indicators of renal function 6 months ago. Considering the development of acute gouty arthritis, its polyarticular nature, persistent course, rapid involvement of new joints, high uric acid levels during an acute attack exceeding 600 μmol/l (10 mg/dL, rapid development of renal failure within 6 months until the terminal stage, it was suggested the secondary nature of gout on the background of kidney damage by another pathological process. Further clinical, laboratory and instrumental studies allowed verifying multiple myeloma with renal damage. Bence Jones protein in the urine was not detected, there was also no evidence of hyperproteinemia. However, pain in the spine, ribs and chest was the basis for carrying out an X-ray study of the bones of the skeleton. Changes in the skeleton typical for multiple myeloma have been identified. Myelogram showed a high content of plasma cells (21.1 %, electrophoresis of blood proteins showed a high M-gradient (30.42 %, and a cytochemical

  11. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    A Zimmerman, T Duong, J Florence and the CINRG Investigators. Pulmonary Function Characteristics of Boys with Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy ...designated CINRG site staff 1. Has the participant been clinically diagnosed with Limb-Girdle or Becker muscular dystrophy ? LGMD BMD 2. Was...Number: W81XWH-09-1-0592 TITLE: CINRG: Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Avital Cnaan, PhD

  12. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  13. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  14. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  16. Quality assurance of asthma clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Peszek, Iza; Al Botto; Lu, Susan; Enright, Paul L; Reiss, Theodore F

    2002-04-01

    Accuracy and repeatability of spirometry measurements are essential to obtain reliable efficacy data in randomized asthma clinical trials. We report our experience with a centralized spirometry quality assurance program that we implemented in our phase III asthma trials. Six asthma trials of 4 to 21 weeks in duration were conducted at 232 clinical centers in 31 countries. Approximately 23,100 prebronchodilator and 13,700 postbronchodilator spirometry tests were collected from 2523 adult and 336 pediatric asthmatic patients. The program used a standard spirometer (the Renaissance spirometry system) with maneuver quality messages and automated quality grading of the spirometry tests. Each clinical center transmitted spirometry data weekly to a central database, where uniform monitoring of data quality was performed and feedback was provided in weekly quality reports. Seventy-nine percent of all patients performed spirometry sessions with quality that either met or exceeded American Thoracic Society standards and improved over time. Good-quality spirometry was associated with (1) less severe asthma; (2) active treatment; (3) infrequent nocturnal awakenings; (4) age above 15 years; and (5) low body weight. Maneuver-induced bronchospasm was rare. Good-quality spirometry was observed in multicenter asthma clinical trials that employed a standard spirometer and continuous monitoring. Both within- and between-patient variability decreased. Spirometry quality improved with time as study participants and technicians gained experience.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... companies to manufacture pharmaceuticals, 24 to carry out quality control and ... represents a 3% real growth from 2004/2005, it represents a slight decline from ... manufacturer for the pharmas, or can it leverage strengths in medical ... increased clinical trials activity, R&D investment is too low to make it a ...

  18. Pharmacoligaclly Active: Clinical Trials and the Pharmaceuticals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multinational pharmaceutical companies ('pharmas') import and produce pharmaceuticals and also conduct clinical trials which are an important aspect of research and development (R&D). This may raise the question: Is South Africa a guinea pig for the pharmas? The Department of Trade and Industry National Industrial ...

  19. Gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi. (orig.)

  20. Spa therapy adjunct to pharmacotherapy is beneficial in rheumatoid arthritis: a crossover randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to investigate whether 2-week spa therapy, as an adjunct to usual pharmacological therapy, has any beneficial effect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this single-blind crossover study, 50 patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 manner to receive usual pharmacological therapy plus 2-week spa therapy or usual pharmacological therapy alone (period 1.6 months); after a 9-month washout, patients were crossed over to the opposite assignment (period 2.6 months). Spa therapy program included a daily saline balneotherapy session at 36-37 °C for 20 min except Sundays. The clinical outcomes were evaluated at baseline, after spa therapy (2 weeks) and 3 and 6 months after the spa therapy in both period and were pain (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)), patient and physician global assessments (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Spa therapy was superior to control therapy in improving all the assessed clinical outcomes at the end of the spa therapy. This superiority persisted significantly in physician global assessment ( p = 0.010) and with a trend in favor of spa group in patient global assessment ( p = 0.058), function ( p = 0.092), and disease activity ( p = 0.098) at 3 months. Statistically significant improvements were found in spa therapy compared to control in disease activity ( p = 0.006) and patient ( p = 0.020) and physician global ( p = 0.011) assessments, and a trend toward improvements in pain ( p = 0.069) and swollen joints ( p = 0.070) at 6 months. A 2-week spa therapy adjunct to usual pharmacological therapy provided beneficial clinical effects compared to usual pharmacological therapy alone, in RA patients treated with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. These beneficial effects may last for 6 months.

  1. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwacke, C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  2. Information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viergever Roderik F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on blinding is part of the data that should be provided upon registration of a trial at a clinical trials registry. Reporting of blinding is often absent or of low quality in published articles of clinical trials. This study researched the presence and quality of information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials and highlights the important role of data-recording formats at clinical trial registries in ensuring high-quality registration.

  3. Clinical trial quality: From supervision to collaboration and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker-O'Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decade, clinical trial quality has evolved from an after-the-fact, reactive activity to one focused on the important work of evidence generation from well-designed trials. This article explores the role the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative has played in advancing quality as a core element of clinical trial design, through project work that initially focused on monitoring but evolved into a holistic, prospective, and comprehensive quality by design approach to clinical trial design and conduct.

  4. Therapeutic roles of curcumin: lessons learned from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C; Patchva, Sridevi; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research over the past half century has shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of the golden spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), can modulate multiple cell signaling pathways. Extensive clinical trials over the past quarter century have addressed the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of this nutraceutical against numerous diseases in humans. Some promising effects have been observed in patients with various pro-inflammatory diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, uveitis, ulcerative proctitis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel disease, tropical pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, gastric ulcer, idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, oral lichen planus, gastric inflammation, vitiligo, psoriasis, acute coronary syndrome, atherosclerosis, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic microangiopathy, lupus nephritis, renal conditions, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, β-thalassemia, biliary dyskinesia, Dejerine-Sottas disease, cholecystitis, and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Curcumin has also shown protection against hepatic conditions, chronic arsenic exposure, and alcohol intoxication. Dose-escalating studies have indicated the safety of curcumin at doses as high as 12 g/day over 3 months. Curcumin's pleiotropic activities emanate from its ability to modulate numerous signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, apoptotic proteins, NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-LOX, STAT3, C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E(2), prostate-specific antigen, adhesion molecules, phosphorylase kinase, transforming growth factor-β, triglyceride, ET-1, creatinine, HO-1, AST, and ALT in human participants. In clinical trials, curcumin has been used either alone or in combination with other agents. Various formulations of curcumin, including nanoparticles, liposomal encapsulation, emulsions, capsules, tablets, and powder, have been examined. In this review, we discuss in detail the various human diseases in which the

  5. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  6. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-03-22

    To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, protocol initiator and funding source. We analyzed trials across 8 available trial protocol elements registered within the database. In total 245 clinical trials were identified, 147 with BT as primary investigated treatment modality and 98 that included BT as an optional treatment component or as part of the standard treatment. Academic centers were the most frequent protocol initiators in trials where BT was the primary investigational treatment modality (p < 0.01). High dose rate (HDR) BT was the most frequently investigated type of BT dose rate (46.3 %) followed by low dose rate (LDR) (42.0 %). Prostate was the most frequently investigated tumor entity in trials with BT as the primary treatment modality (40.1 %) followed by breast cancer (17.0 %). BT was rarely the primary investigated treatment modality for cervical cancer (6.8 %). Most clinical trials using BT are predominantly in early phases, investigator-initiated and with low accrual numbers. Current investigational activities that include BT mainly focus on prostate and breast cancers. Important questions concerning the optimal usage of BT will not be answered in the near future.

  7. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, protocol initiator and funding source. We analyzed trials across 8 available trial protocol elements registered within the database. In total 245 clinical trials were identified, 147 with BT as primary investigated treatment modality and 98 that included BT as an optional treatment component or as part of the standard treatment. Academic centers were the most frequent protocol initiators in trials where BT was the primary investigational treatment modality (p < 0.01). High dose rate (HDR) BT was the most frequently investigated type of BT dose rate (46.3 %) followed by low dose rate (LDR) (42.0 %). Prostate was the most frequently investigated tumor entity in trials with BT as the primary treatment modality (40.1 %) followed by breast cancer (17.0 %). BT was rarely the primary investigated treatment modality for cervical cancer (6.8 %). Most clinical trials using BT are predominantly in early phases, investigator-initiated and with low accrual numbers. Current investigational activities that include BT mainly focus on prostate and breast cancers. Important questions concerning the optimal usage of BT will not be answered in the near future. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0624-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  8. [Ethical principles of clinical trials in minors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, H J; Raschka, C

    2002-12-05

    Clinical trials in volunteers and patients are essential to ensure rational treatment of patients. As a rule, drugs are routinely developed for adults, but children are excluded. A major reason for this restriction are ethical justifications, in particular the lack of autonomy on the part of children. The principle of fairness, however, requires that everyone should benefit from progress. Industry, science and society are therefore called upon to find ways of making available safe and adequate treatment for children as quickly as possible, by defining the required conditions for pediatric clinical trials. Important principles are minimal risk, minimal invasivity, rapid decision-making, and careful documentation of trial results. Dynamic ethical principles, such as autonomy and competence in adolescents must be considered on equal footing with existing international GCP guidelines. Aspects of child psychology indicate that the autonomy of adolescents should be respected. Where economic incentives for such trials are absent, for example, in the case of non-pharmacological problems, pediatric trials must be considered a task for society as a whole.

  9. Magnet therapy for the relief of pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (CAMBRA: A randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond Stewart J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory autoimmune disease. Although disease activity may be managed effectively with prescription drugs, unproven treatments such as magnet therapy are sometimes used as an adjunct for pain control. Therapeutic devices incorporating permanent magnets are widely available and easy to use. Magnets may also be perceived as a more natural and less harmful alternative to analgesic compounds. Of interest to health service researchers is the possibility that magnet therapy might help to reduce the economic burden of managing chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Magnets are extremely cheap to manufacture and prolonged treatment involves a single cost. Despite this, good quality scientific evidence concerning the safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of magnet therapy is scarce. The primary aim of the CAMBRA trial is to investigate the effectiveness of magnet therapy for relieving pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods/Design The CAMBRA trial employs a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design. Participant will each wear four devices: a commercially available magnetic wrist strap; an attenuated wrist strap; a demagnetised wrist strap; and a copper bracelet. Device will be allocated in a randomised sequence and each worn for five weeks. The four treatment phases will be separated by wash out periods lasting one week. Both participants and researchers will be blind, as far as feasible, to the allocation of experimental and control devices. In total 69 participants will be recruited from general practices within the UK. Eligible patients will have a verified diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis that is being managed using drugs, and will be experiencing chronic pain. Outcomes measured will include pain, inflammation, disease activity, physical function, medication use, affect, and health related costs. Data will be collected using questionnaires, diaries, manual

  10. New EORTC clinical trials for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideghety, K.; Moss, R.; Vries, M. de

    2000-01-01

    Due to ethical reasons, a separated optimization of the two components of BNCT in the frame of clinical investigations can only be performed applying the whole binary system. The ongoing trial at HFR (High Flux Reactor Petten) has proven the feasibility of BNCT under defined conditions. On that basis the European Commission supported a comprehensive research project on boron imaging including three further clinical studies. In the first trial the boron uptake related to the blood boron concentration and surrounding normal tissue in various solid tumours will be examined using BSH (Sodiumborocaptate), BPA (Boronophenylalanine) or both in order to explore tumour entities, which may gain benefit from BNCT. The major objectives of the second trial are to define the maximum tolerated single and cumulative dose, and the dose limiting toxicity of BSH. The third clinical trial, a phase II study is designed to evaluate the anti-tumour effect of fractionated BNCT at the Petten treatment facility against cerebral metastasis of malignant melanoma using BPA. (author)

  11. Characterization of rheumatoid arthritis subtypes using symptom profiles, clinical chemistry and metabolomics measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman A van Wietmarschen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim is to characterize subgroups or phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients using a systems biology approach. The discovery of subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients is an essential research area for the improvement of response to therapy and the development of personalized medicine strategies. METHODS: In this study, 39 RA patients are phenotyped using clinical chemistry measurements, urine and plasma metabolomics analysis and symptom profiles. In addition, a Chinese medicine expert classified each RA patient as a Cold or Heat type according to Chinese medicine theory. Multivariate data analysis techniques are employed to detect and validate biochemical and symptom relationships with the classification. RESULTS: The questionnaire items 'Red joints', 'Swollen joints', 'Warm joints' suggest differences in the level of inflammation between the groups although c-reactive protein (CRP and rheumatoid factor (RHF levels were equal. Multivariate analysis of the urine metabolomics data revealed that the levels of 11 acylcarnitines were lower in the Cold RA than in the Heat RA patients, suggesting differences in muscle breakdown. Additionally, higher dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS levels in Heat patients compared to Cold patients were found suggesting that the Cold RA group has a more suppressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis function. CONCLUSION: Significant and relevant biochemical differences are found between Cold and Heat RA patients. Differences in immune function, HPA axis involvement and muscle breakdown point towards opportunities to tailor disease management strategies to each of the subgroups RA patient.

  12. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Fiona F; Thomas, Kim S; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Williams, Hywel C; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Ormerod, Anthony D

    2012-04-28

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by lesion size, and

  13. THE FIRST RUSSIAN STRATEGIC STUDY OF PHARMACOTHERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (REMARCA TRIAL: RESULTS OF 12-MONTH TREATMENT IN 130 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To introduce treat-to-target recommendations is an important task of modern rheumatology; however, there is still a diversity of serious problems relating to a scientific rationale and a clinical one for this strategy and to the possibilities of its implementation in real clinical practice, in the rheumatology service of the Russian Federation in particular, by taking into account the specific features of funding for high-tech medical care.Objective: to determine the efficiency and safety of combined therapy with subcutaneous methotrexate (MT and biological agents (BA when using the treat-to-target strategy in patients with active early and extended-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA who have risk factors for a poor prognosis.Subjects and methods.The results of the REMARCA (Russian InvEstigation of MethotrexAte and biologicals in eaRly aCtive inflammatory Arthritis trial of 130 patients followed up for 12 months or more were given. There was a female preponderance; mean age 48.9±13.9 years, rheumatoid factor positivity (86.9%; anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity (89.2%. Seventy patients formed a subgroup of early RA (disease duration ≤6 months (mean 4.17±1.39 months; 60 patients were a subgroup of advanced-stage RA (disease duration >6 months (mean 30.8±32.7 months. In all the patients, therapy was initiated by using subcutaneous MT with its rapid dose escalation up to 20–30 mg/week and the achievement of the treatment goal (low disease activity or remission was checked every 3 months and depending on the result a decision had been taken to add or not to add a biological agent (BA (a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor or abatacept. If the former was insufficiently effective, it was substituted for a BA from another class.Results. Subcutaneous MT monotherapy provided remission or low disease activity in 49 (37.7% patients; a BA was given to 81 (62.3% patients. Following 6 and 12 months, low activity or remission

  14. THE FIRST RUSSIAN STRATEGIC STUDY OF PHARMACOTHERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (REMARCA TRIAL: RESULTS OF 12-MONTH TREATMENT IN 130 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karatee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To introduce treat-to-target recommendations is an important task of modern rheumatology; however, there is still a diversity of serious problems relating to a scientific rationale and a clinical one for this strategy and to the possibilitiesof its implementation in real clinical practice, in the rheumatology service of the Russian Federation in particular, by taking into account the specific features of funding for high-tech medical care.Objective: to determine the efficiency and safety of combined therapy with subcutaneous methotrexate (MT and biological agents (BA when using the treat-to-target strategy in patients with active early and extended-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA who have risk factors for a poor prognosis.Subjects and methods. The results of the REMARCA (Russian InvEstigation of MethotrexAte and biologicals in eaRly aCtive inflammatory Arthritis trial of 130 patients followed up for 12 months or more were given. There was a female preponderance; mean age 48.9±13.9 years, rheumatoid factor positivity (86.9%; anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide anti body positivity (89.2%. Seventy patients formed a subgroup of early RA (disease duration ≤6 months (mean 4.17±1.39 months; 60 patients were a subgroup of advanced-stage RA (disease duration >6 months (mean 30.8±32.7 months. In all the patients, therapy was initiated by using subcutaneous MT with its rapid dose escalation up to 20–30 mg/week and the achievement of the treatment goal (low disease activity or remission was checked every 3 months and depending on the result a decision had been taken to add or not to add a biological agent (BA (a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor or abatacept. If the former was insufficientlyeffective, it was substituted for a BA from another class.Results. Subcutaneous MT monotherapy provided remission or low disease activity in 49 (37.7% patients; a BA was given to 81 (62.3% patients. Following 6 and 12 months, low activity or remission according to

  15. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Activating clinical trials: a process improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diego A; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Yalcin, Ali; Zayas-Castro, José L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2016-02-24

    The administrative process associated with clinical trial activation has been criticized as costly, complex, and time-consuming. Prior research has concentrated on identifying administrative barriers and proposing various solutions to reduce activation time, and consequently associated costs. Here, we expand on previous research by incorporating social network analysis and discrete-event simulation to support process improvement decision-making. We searched for all operational data associated with the administrative process of activating industry-sponsored clinical trials at the Office of Clinical Research of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. We limited the search to those trials initiated and activated between July 2011 and June 2012. We described the process using value stream mapping, studied the interactions of the various process participants using social network analysis, and modeled potential process modifications using discrete-event simulation. The administrative process comprised 5 sub-processes, 30 activities, 11 decision points, 5 loops, and 8 participants. The mean activation time was 76.6 days. Rate-limiting sub-processes were those of contract and budget development. Key participants during contract and budget development were the Office of Clinical Research, sponsors, and the principal investigator. Simulation results indicate that slight increments on the number of trials, arriving to the Office of Clinical Research, would increase activation time by 11 %. Also, incrementing the efficiency of contract and budget development would reduce the activation time by 28 %. Finally, better synchronization between contract and budget development would reduce time spent on batching documentation; however, no improvements would be attained in total activation time. The presented process improvement analytic framework not only identifies administrative barriers, but also helps to devise and evaluate potential improvement scenarios. The strength

  18. Clinical trials integrity: a CRO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, J E

    2001-01-01

    When contract research organizations (CROs) were first formed, pharmaceutical companies outsourced to them only certain aspects of the conduct of their clinical trials. At first CROs were highly specialized entities, providing, for example, either biostatistical advice, clinical research associates who monitored investigational sites for regulatory compliance, or regulatory support. Gradually, full service CROs emerged, offering a full range of services for clinical trials, including the selection of investigators and investigational sites, assistance with patient recruitment, safety surveillance and reporting, site audits, and data management and biostatistics. This evolving relationship between CROs and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has resulted in CROs assuming more and more of the regulatory and ethical risks and responsibilities inherent in the conduct of clinical trials. In this full service role, CROs, unlike sponsors, are not interested in the outcome of study, but like sponsors, are subject to heavy regulation by the federal government, must follow applicable state laws, must respect international guidelines, and are obliged to follow their own operating procedures. Moreover, they are judged by the industry on the basis of the scope and quality of services provided, including the degree of adherence to the research protocol, regulatory requirements, and timelines; the quality of the professional working relationships with investigators and institutions, both academic and community-based; and the validity of the data. Further, CROs are subject to comprehensive audits by sponsoring companies, FDA, and other regulatory authorities. For all these reasons, CROs are being tasked with strict vigilance of all stages of the clinical trial process to ensure that the laws, regulations, and industry standards designed for the protection of human subjects and data integrity are maintained.

  19. Screening for amyloid in subcutaneous fat tissue of Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis : clinical and laboratory characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Mansoury, T.M.; Hazenberg, B. P. C.; Badawy, S. A. El; Ahmed, A.H.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Van Rijswijk, M.H.

    Objective: To screen for amyloid and to assess associated clinical and laboratory characteristics in Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Abdominal subcutaneous fat aspirates were consecutively collected from 112 patients (103 women, nine men) having RA for five years or more.

  20. Preclinical and clinical investigation of a CCR5 antagonist, AZD5672, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving methotrexate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Hollis, Sally; Layton, Mark; Vencovský, Jiří; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Braddock, Martin; Tak, Paul P.; Oparanov, Boycho; Stoilov, Rumen; Yaneva, Tanya; Batalov, Anastas; Arteaga, Edgardo Tobias; Escalante, William Otero; Velez, Patricia; Restrepo, Jose Molina; Augustinova, Sevda; Blahova, Anna; Dvorak, Zdenek; Novosad, Libor; Rosa, Jan; Stehlikova, Helena; Vitek, Petr; Balazs, Tibor; Seregely, Katalin; Szombati, Istvan; Tarjan, Katalin; Csengei, Gabor; Galeazzi, Mauro; Saleniece, Sarmite; Saulite-Kandevica, Daina; Coleiro, Bernard; Badurski, Janusz; Brzosko, Marek; Chudzik, Dariusz; Gruszecka-Marczynska, Katarzyna; Hensel, Joanna; Pokrzywnicka-Gajek, Ines; Korpanty-Danda, Joanna; Sochocka-Bykowska, Malgorzata; Tlustochowicz, Witold; Stopinska-Polaszewska, Maria; Gluszko, Piotr; Nedelcovici, Corina; Radulescu, Florin; Gavrila, Mirea; Tanasescu, Coman; Korshunov, Nikolay; Matsievskaia, Galina; Damjanov, Nemanja; Dimic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate both the preclinical effects of blocking the chemokine receptor CCR5 and the clinical effects of this approach on the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with active disease. Preclinical evaluations of AZD5672, a small-molecule antagonist of CCR5, were

  1. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  2. Clinical trials recruitment planning: A proposed framework from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grant D; Bull, Jonca; Johnston McKee, Kelly; Mahon, Elizabeth; Harper, Beth; Roberts, Jamie N

    2018-03-01

    Patient recruitment is widely recognized as a key determinant of success for clinical trials. Yet a substantial number of trials fail to reach recruitment goals-a situation that has important scientific, financial, ethical, and policy implications. Further, there are important effects on stakeholders who directly contribute to the trial including investigators, sponsors, and study participants. Despite efforts over multiple decades to identify and address barriers, recruitment challenges persist. To advance a more comprehensive approach to trial recruitment, the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) convened a project team to examine the challenges and to issue actionable, evidence-based recommendations for improving recruitment planning that extend beyond common study-specific strategies. We describe our multi-stakeholder effort to develop a framework that delineates three areas essential to strategic recruitment planning efforts: (1) trial design and protocol development, (2) trial feasibility and site selection, and (3) communication. Our recommendations propose an upstream approach to recruitment planning that has the potential to produce greater impact and reduce downstream barriers. Additionally, we offer tools to help facilitate adoption of the recommendations. We hope that our framework and recommendations will serve as a guide for initial efforts in clinical trial recruitment planning irrespective of disease or intervention focus, provide a common basis for discussions in this area and generate targets for further analysis and continual improvement. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Parents' perceived obstacles to pediatric clinical trial participation: Findings from the clinical trials transformation initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel G. Greenberg

    2018-03-01

    In order for clinical trial accrual to be successful, parents' priorities and considerations must be a central focus, beginning with initial trial design. The recommendations from the parents who participated in this study can be used to support budget allocations that ensure adequate training of study staff and improved staffing on nights and weekends. Studies of parent responses in outpatient settings and additional inpatient settings will provide valuable information on the consent process from the child's and parent's perspectives. Further studies are needed to explore whether implementation of such strategies will result in improved recruitment for pediatric clinical trials.

  4. A randomized controlled cross-over trial investigating the effect of anti-inflammatory diet on disease activity and quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis: the Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis (ADIRA) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkvist, Anna; Bärebring, Linnea; Gjertsson, Inger; Ellegård, Lars; Lindqvist, Helen M

    2018-04-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 0.5-1.0% of the population, and where many patients in spite of modern pharmacological treatment fail to reach remission. This affects physical as well as mental wellbeing and leads to severely reduced quality of life and reduced work capacity, thus yielding high individual as well as societal costs. As a complement to modern pharmacological treatment, lifestyle intervention should be evaluated as a treatment option. Scientific evidence exists for anti-inflammatory effects by single foods on RA, but no study exists where these foods have been combined to obtain maximum effect and thus offer a substantial improvement in patient life quality. The main goal of the randomized cross-over trial ADIRA (Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis) is to test the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory diet intervention, compared to a regular diet, will decrease disease activity and improve quality of life in patients with stable established RA. In total, 50 RA patients with moderate disease activity are randomized to receive initially either a portfolio diet based on several food items with suggested anti-inflammatory effects or a control diet during 2 × 10 weeks with 3 months wash-out between diets. Food bags are delivered weekly by a home food delivery chain and referred to as the fiber bag and the protein bag, respectively, to partially blind participants. Both groups continue with regular pharmacological treatment. Known food biomarkers will be analyzed to measure intervention compliance. Impact on disease severity (measured by DAS28, a composite score which predicts disability and progression of RA), risk markers for cardiovascular disease and quality of life are evaluated after each diet regimen. Metabolomics will be used to evaluate the potential to predict responders to dietary treatment. A health economic evaluation is also included. The nutritional status of patients with RA often is

  5. Recent clinical trials in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Daniel; Anwaruddin, Saif

    2017-07-01

    With widespread adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there has been a change in the approach to management of valvular heart disease. New interest has taken hold in transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease, as well as research into pathophysiology and progression of disease. Additionally, several key trials have further refined our understanding of surgical management of valvular heart disease. This review will elucidate recent clinical trial data leading to changes in practice. There have been several landmark trials expanding the indications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Additionally, although still early, trials are beginning to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of transcatheter mitral valves. Options for transcatheter management of right-sided valvular disease continue to evolve, and these are areas of active investigation. The emergence of novel therapies for valvular heart disease has expanded the management options available, allowing physicians to better individualize treatment of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will focus on the recent (within 2 years) trials in this field of interest.

  6. [The clinical significance of hepcidin detection in the patients with anemia and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of anemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varies from 30 to 70%. 25% of the cases are diagnosed within 1 year after onset of the disease. On the whole, anemia in RA is described as anemia of a chronic disease (ACD). Pathogenesis ofACD is a multifactor process underlain by an immune mechanism: cytokines and cells ofthe reticuloendothelial system cause changes in iron homeostasis, proliferation of erythroid precursors, erythropoietin production and lifespan of erythrocytes. The key pathogenetic factor is disordered iron metabolism. IL-6 increasing hepatic production acute-phase protein (hepcidin) is the most important cytokine involved in ACD pathogenesis. Hence the necessity to measure its serum level for differential diagnostics of anemic syndrome in patients with RA and the choice of effective basal therapy. Recent data on the therapeutic potency of tocilizumab (IL-6 receptor inhibitor) demonstrate not its safety and sustainable beneficial clinical effect in combination with the favourable action on hemoglobin profile and reduction offatigue.

  7. The effects of the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor fostamatinib on ambulatory blood pressure in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: results of the OSKIRA-ABPM (ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitas, George D; Abreu, Gabriel; Jedrychowicz-Rosiak, Krystyna; Miller, Jeffrey L; Nakov, Roumen; Panfilov, Seva; Vencovsky, Jiri; Wang, Millie; Weinblatt, Michael E; White, William B

    2014-11-01

    Clinical trials of fostamatinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed blood pressure (BP) elevation using clinic measurements. The OSKIRA-ambulatory BP monitoring trial assessed the effect of fostamatinib on 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. One hundred thirty-five patients were randomized to fostamatinib 100 mg twice daily (bid; n = 68) or placebo bid (n = 67) for 28 days. Ambulatory, clinic, and home BPs were measured at baseline and after 28 days of therapy. Primary end point was change from baseline in 24-hour mean SBP. Fostamatinib increased 24-hour mean SBP by 2.9 mm Hg (P = .023) and diastolic BP (DBP) by 3.5 mm Hg (P < .001) versus placebo. Clinic/home-measured BPs were similar to those observed with ambulatory BP monitoring. After treatment discontinuation (1 week), clinic BP values returned to baseline levels. Fostamatinib induced elevations in 24-hour mean ambulatory SBP and DBP. BP elevations resolved with fostamatinib discontinuation. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib monotherapy, tofacitinib with methotrexate, and adalimumab with methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (ORAL Strategy): a phase 3b/4, double-blind, head-to-head, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Roy; Mysler, Eduardo; Hall, Stephen; Kivitz, Alan J; Moots, Robert J; Luo, Zhen; DeMasi, Ryan; Soma, Koshika; Zhang, Richard; Takiya, Liza; Tatulych, Svitlana; Mojcik, Christopher; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Menon, Sujatha; Smolen, Josef S

    2017-07-29

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The Oral Rheumatoid Arthritis triaL (ORAL) Strategy aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy, tofacitinib plus methotrexate, and adalimumab plus methotrexate for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in patients with a previous inadequate response to methotrexate. ORAL Strategy was a 1 year, double-blind, phase 3b/4, head-to-head, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial in patients aged 18 years or older with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive oral tofacitinib (5 mg twice daily) monotherapy, oral tofacitinib (5 mg twice daily) plus methotrexate, or subcutaneous adalimumab (40 mg every other week) plus methotrexate at 194 centres in 25 countries. Eligible patients received live zoster vaccine at investigators' discretion. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who attained an American College of Rheumatology response of at least 50% (ACR50) at month 6 in the full analysis set (patients who were randomly assigned to a group and received at least one dose of the study treatment). Non-inferiority between groups was shown if the lower bound of the 98·34% CI of the difference between comparators was larger than -13·0%. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02187055. 1146 patients received treatment (384 had tofacitinib monotherapy; 376 had tofacitinib and methotrexate; and 386 had adalimumab and methotrexate). At 6 months, ACR50 response was attained in 147 (38%) of 384 patients with tofacitinib monotherapy, 173 (46%) of 376 patients with tofacitinib and methotrexate, and 169 (44%) of 386 patients with adalimumab and methotrexate. Non-inferiority was declared for tofacitinib and methotrexate versus adalimumab and methotrexate (difference 2% [98·34% CI -6 to 11]) but not for tofacitinib monotherapy versus either adalimumab and methotrexate (-6

  9. Pharmacogenomics of Methotrexate Membrane Transport Pathway: Can Clinical Response to Methotrexate in Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Predicted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methotrexate (MTX is widely used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs could be used as predictors of patients’ therapeutic outcome variability. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the influence of SNPs in genes encoding for MTX membrane transport proteins in order to predict clinical response to MTX. Methods: Clinicopathological data from 233 RA patients treated with MTX were collected, clinical response defined, and patients genotyped for 23 SNPs. Genotype and haplotype analyses were performed using multivariate methods and a genetic risk index (GRI for non-response was created. Results: Increased risk for non-response was associated to SLC22A11 rs11231809 T carriers; ABCC1 rs246240 G carriers; ABCC1 rs3784864 G carriers; CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs2074087 and rs3784864; and CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs246240 and rs3784864. GRI demonstrated that patients with Index 3 were 16-fold more likely to be non-responders than those with Index 1. Conclusions: This study revealed that SLC22A11 and ABCC1 may be important to identify those patients who will not benefit from MTX treatment, highlighting the relevance in translating these results to clinical practice. However, further validation by independent studies is needed to develop the field of personalized medicine to predict clinical response to MTX treatment.

  10. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Soluble biomarker assessments in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M; Henrotin, Y; Lohmander, L S; Losina, E; Önnerfjord, P; Persiani, S

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase I to phase IV trials. As demonstrated by this summary, biomarkers can provide value at all stages of therapeutics development. When resources permit, we recommend collection of biospecimens in all OA clinical trials for a wide variety of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute treatment at a time more amenable to disease modification. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cluster-Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Intervention to Incorporate a Treat-to-Target Approach to Care of US Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Leslie R; Reed, George W; John, Ani; Barr, Christine J; Soe, Kevin; Magner, Robert; Saunders, Katherine C; Ruderman, Eric M; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Gibofsky, Allan; Harrington, J Timothy; Kremer, Joel M

    2018-03-01

    To assess the feasibility and efficacy of implementing a treat-to-target approach versus usual care in a US-based cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In this behavioral intervention trial, rheumatology practices were cluster-randomized to provide treat-to-target care or usual care. Eligible patients with moderate/high disease activity (Clinical Disease Activity Index [CDAI] score >10) were followed for 12 months. Both treat-to-target and usual care patients were seen every 3 months. Treat-to-target providers were to have monthly visits with treatment acceleration at a minimum of every 3 months in patients with CDAI score >10; additional visits and treatment acceleration were at the discretion of usual care providers and patients. Coprimary end points were feasibility, assessed by rate of treatment acceleration conditional on CDAI score >10, and achievement of low disease activity (LDA; CDAI score ≤10) by an intent-to-treat analysis. A total of 14 practice sites per study arm were included (246 patients receiving treat-to-target and 286 receiving usual care). The groups had similar baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Rates of treatment acceleration (treat-to-target 47% versus usual care 50%; odds ratio [OR] 0.92 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.64, 1.34]) and achievement of LDA (treat-to-target 57% versus usual care 55%; OR 1.05 [95% CI 0.60, 1.84]) were similar between groups. Treat-to-target providers reported patient reluctance and medication lag time as common barriers to treatment acceleration. This study is the first to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a treat-to-target approach in typical US rheumatology practice. Treat-to-target care was not associated with increased likelihood of treatment acceleration or achievement of LDA, and barriers to treatment acceleration were identified. © 2017, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Interpreting clinical trial results by deductive reasoning: In search of improved trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Mihaljević, Slobodan

    2017-10-01

    Clinical trial results are often interpreted by inductive reasoning, in a trial design-limited manner, directed toward modifications of the current clinical practice. Deductive reasoning is an alternative in which results of relevant trials are combined in indisputable premises that lead to a conclusion easily testable in future trials. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated Mechanisms: A Systemic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this review is to investigate the detailed existing scientific information about the clinical efficacy of acupuncture on rheumatoid arthritis (RA conditions and to reveal the proposed mechanisms. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine, NCCAM (The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1974 to 2018. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 43 studies were recruited. Each research was analyzed for study design, subject characteristics, intervention, selected acupoints, assessment parameters, proposed mechanisms, and results/conclusions. Conclusions. In our review, we concluded that acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment modalities is beneficial to the clinical conditions of RA without adverse effects reported and can improve function and quality of life and is worth trying. Several important possible mechanisms were summarized including anti-inflammatory effect, antioxidative effect, and regulation of immune system function. However, there is still inconsistency regarding the clinical efficacy and lack of well-designed human/animal double-blinded RCTs. Future discussion for further agreement on taking traditional Chinese medicine (TCM theory into consideration as much as possible is a top priority.

  15. Clinical Incidence of Sacroiliac Joint Arthritis and Pain after Sacropelvic Fixation for Spinal Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainoh, Takeshi; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Arai, Gen; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine has been reported with an improved fusion rate and clinical results. On the other hand, there is a potential for clinical problems related to iliac fixation, including late sacroiliac joint arthritis and pain. Materials and Methods Twenty patients were evaluated. Degenerative scoliosis was diagnosed in 7 patients, failed back syndrome in 6 patients, destructive spondyloarthropathy in 4 patients, and Charcot spine in 3 patients. All patients underwent posterolateral fusion surgery incorporating lumbar, S1 and iliac screws. We evaluated the pain scores, bone union, and degeneration of sacroiliac joints by X-ray imaging and computed tomography before and 3 years after surgery. For evaluation of low back and buttock pain from sacroiliac joints 3 years after surgery, lidocaine was administered in order to examine pain relief thereafter. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. All patients showed bone union at final follow-up. Degeneration of sacroiliac joints was not seen in the 20 patients 3 years after surgery. Patients showed slight low back and buttock pain 3 years after surgery. However, not all patients showed relief of the low back and buttock pain after injection of lidocaine into the sacroiliac joint, indicating that their pain did not originate from sacroiliac joints. Conclusion The fusion rate and clinical results were excellent. Also, degeneration and pain from sacroiliac joints were not seen within 3 years after surgery. We recommend sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine. PMID:22318832

  16. A study comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Niu Jinliang; Xie Weina; Song Zhizhen; Zheng Jie; Ma Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI, and compare MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA. Methods: Fifty patients, fulfilled 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, and 10 age-matched healthy controls entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were performed in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical date, including swollen joint, patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score. Results: In 50 patients, all had pannus on MRI of wrists, 38 patients had enhanced signal intensity for pannus, 21 patients had bone marrow edema, 37 patients had joint effusion, and 37 patients had bone erosions. There were significant difference in the ESR, HAQ, AIMS as well as swollen joint count between patients with bone marrow edema and patients without bone marrow edema (P 2 =5.06, P=0.025; χ 2 =5.59, P=0.018). Number of patients with MRI erosion of wrists was associated with the number of patients without MRI bone marrow edema of wrists (χ 2 =5.11, P=0.024). Conclusion: MRI can find the appearances of wrists with RA. Comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA, authors can assess and evaluate the role of MRI on RA

  17. Managing Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Clinical Updates and Three Strategic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodara, Ann M; Wattiaux, Aimée; Bartels, Christie M

    2017-04-01

    ᅟ: The increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is well known; however, appropriate management of this elevated risk in rheumatology clinics is less clear. By critically reviewing literature published within the past 5 years, we aim to clarify current knowledge and gaps regarding CVD risk management in RA. We examine recent guidelines, recommendations, and evidence and discuss three approaches: (1) RA-specific management including treat-to-target and medication management, (2) assessment of comprehensive individual risk, and (3) targeting traditional CVD risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity) at a population level. Considering that 75% of US RA visits occur in specialty clinics, further research is needed regarding evidence-based strategies to manage and reduce CVD risk in RA. This review highlights clinical updates including US cardiology and international professional society guidelines, successful evidence-based population approaches from primary care, and novel opportunities in rheumatology care to reduce CVD risk in RA.

  18. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Wee, Marieke M.; Coupé, Veerle M. H.; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S.; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit J. S. M.; Nurmohamed, Mike T.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164

  19. Subcutaneous golimumab for children with active polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis : results of a multicentre, double-blind, randomised-withdrawal trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Hermine I; Ruperto, Nicolino; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Horneff, Gerd; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G.; Panaviene, Violeta Vladislava; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Reiff, Andreas; Alexeeva, Ekaterina; Rubio-Pérez, Nadina; Keltsev, Vladimir; Kingsbury, Daniel J.; Del Rocio Maldonado Velázquez, Maria; Nikishina, Irina; Silverman, Earl D.; Joos, Rik; Smolewska, Elzbieta; Bandeira, Márcia; Minden, Kirsten; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Emminger, Wolfgang; Foeldvari, Ivan; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Sztajnbok, Flavio; Gilmer, Keith E.; Xu, Zhenhua; Leu, Jocelyn H.; Kim, Lilianne; Lamberth, Sarah L.; Loza, Matthew J.; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This report aims to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and efficacy of subcutaneous golimumab in active polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyJIA). METHODS: In this three-part randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled withdrawal trial, all patients received

  20. Clinical trials attitudes and practices of Latino physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Wildes, Kimberly; Talavera, Greg; Nápoles-Springer, Anna; Gallion, Kipling; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2008-07-01

    Ethnic differences in physicians' attitudes and behaviors related to clinical trials might partially account for disparities in clinical trial participation among Latino patients. Literature regarding Latino physicians' clinical trials attitudes and practices, in comparison to White physicians, was lacking. Cross-sectional data from randomly selected physicians (N=695), stratified by ethnicity, were analyzed to test associations of ethnicity with physicians' participation in and attitudes toward referral of patients to clinical trials. Chi-square analyses showed significant (pLatino physicians were significantly less involved in clinical trials than White physicians and found less scientific value in them, highlighting areas for future education and intervention.