WorldWideScience

Sample records for arthritis clinical practice

  1. Impact of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor treatment on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bøyesen, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice.......To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice....

  2. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  3. Two-year efficacy of tocilizumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notario Ferreira, Irene; Ferrer González, Miguel Angel; Morales Garrido, Pilar; González Utrilla, Alfonso; García Sanchez, Antonio; Soto Pino, María José; Suero Rosario, Evelyn; Caro Hernández, Cristina; Añón Oñate, Isabel; Pérez Albaladejo, Lorena; Cáliz Cáliz, Rafael

    To evaluate the efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice, retention rates of the drug and predictors of response. We performed a descriptive, prospective, longitudinal, open-label study in patients receiving TCZ (8mg/kg/4 weeks) in a clinical practice setting. The clinical responses were evaluated using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria, and the low activity and remission rates according to the Disease Activity Score 28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) and the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI). The EULAR response rate was 86.63% and the DAS28 remission rate was 53.7% after 6 months of treatment; rates of low disease activity were 52.9% on CDAI and 47.1% on DAS28 at month 24. There were no statistically significant differences in EULAR response, rates of low activity and remission on DAS28 between patients receiving TCZ alone and those receiving TCZ in combination therapy, or between patients positive or negative for rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies. The naïve biological therapy patients showed better remission and low activity rates after 6 months of treatment. The retention rate was 61% at month 24. Adverse events were among the most frequent causes of discontinuation. Tocilizumab is effective in RA, has a similar efficacy when used alone or in combination with synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and shows high retention rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. Anakinra, a recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist, in clinical practice. Outcome in 60 patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated both the efficacy and safety of anakinra in daily routine rheumatoid arthritis clinical practice. Methods:We studied 60 cases, including patients with previous anti-TNFα exposure, treated with anakinra (100 mg/daily s.c. in combination with methotrexate (7.5-10 mg/week i.m. or leflunomide (20 mg/die in a two year observational study. Efficacy measures were assessed using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR response criteria. Safety was evaluated according to a modified World Health Organization adverse reaction term dictionary. Results: At week 14, ACR 20% response criteria have been fulfilled by 53 (91.3% out of 58 patients, 51 (87.9% of them achieving also an ACR 50%and 15 (25.8% an ACR 70%response. Thirteen patients touched 102 weeks of treatment: ACR 20% response was achieved in 92.3%, while ACR 50% and ACR 70% were respectively found in 84.6% and 38.4% of the cases. The mean decrease in HAQ score was 0.38, p<0.001. Of the 16 patients who were previously treated with anti-TNFα blockers, 81.2% responded to anakinra. There was no significant difference in the ACR response between groups with and without previous anti-TNFα exposure. Seventeen patients (28.3% stopped anakinra because of side-effects (5% or failure to respond (23.3%. Only 4 cases of pulmonitis, of which 2 have been hospitalised, and 1 case with tuberculosis (previously treated with infliximab were observed. Conclusions: Our clinical experience confirms that anakinra is effective and safe in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Anakinra seems also useful in patients with previous anti-TNFα blockers failures. Even though major adverse events were rare, clinicians should be aware of such a possibility

  5. Analysis of effectiveness, safety and optimization of tocilizumab in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Vázquez, Natalia; Manrique-Arija, Sara; Rojas-Giménez, Marta; Ureña-Garnica, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Núñez, Francisco G; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of tocilizumab (TCZ) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice, establishing the optimized regimen and switching from intravenous (IV) to subcutaneous (SC) therapy. Retrospective observational study. We included 53 RA patients treated with TCZ. The main outcome was TCZ effectiveness at week 24. Secondary outcome variables included effectiveness at week 52, therapeutic maintenance, physical function and safety. The effectiveness of optimization and the switch from IV to SC was evaluated at 3 and 6 months. The efficacy was measured with the Disease Activity Score. Paired t-tests or Wilcoxon were used to evaluate effectiveness and survival time using Kaplan-Meier. The proportion of patients who achieved remission or low disease activity at weeks 24 and 52 was 75.5% and 87.3%, respectively. The mean retention time (95% confidence interval [95% CI] was 81.7 months [76.6-86.7]). Twenty-one of 53 patients (39.6%) optimized the TCZ dose and 35 patients switched from IV TCZ to SC, with no changes in effectiveness. The adverse event rate was 13.6 events/100 patient-years. Tocilizumab appears to be effective and safe in RA in clinical practice. The optimized regimen appears to be effective in most patients in remission, even when they change from IV to SC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: International Consensus-based Recommendations for Monitoring Patients in Clinical Practice and Research Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Koos, Bernd; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Cron, Randy Q; Abramowicz, Shelly; Verna, Carlalberta; Peltomäki, Timo; Alstergren, Per; Petty, Ross; Ringold, Sarah; Nørholt, Sven Erik; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Herlin, Troels

    2017-03-01

    To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains and items to be included in the recommendations. Phase 3: A systematic literature review was performed to assess the evidence supporting the consensus-based recommendations. Phase 4: An independent group of orofacial and JIA experts were invited to assess the content validity of the task force's recommendations. Five recommendations were developed to assess the following 5 domains: medical history, orofacial symptoms, muscle and temporomandibular joint function, orofacial function, and dentofacial growth. After application of data search criteria, 56 articles were included in the systematic review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized data collection for future studies. The task force has formulated a future research program based on the proposed recommendations.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  8. Effect of infliximab dose increase in rheumatoid arthritis at different trough concentrations: a cohort study in clinical practice conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamaida ePlasencia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence supporting treatment intensification in rheumatoid arthritis is limited and controversial. We explored outcomes of infliximab dose increases and accounted for pre-existing trough levels in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA.MethodsThis study was a retrospective study of 42 RA patients who received increased infliximab following an insufficient response (DAS28 > 3.2. Serum concentrations of infliximab and antibodies to infliximab (ATI and DAS28 and EULAR clinical response parameters were recorded for one year. Analyses were performed in three patient groups that were defined by infliximab serum concentration prior to treatment enhancement: No detectable, Low (< 1.1 µg/mL or High (≥ 1.1 µg/mL drug levels. Results No circulating infliximab was detected in 20 patients (47.6 %, but 13 (30.9 % and 9 (21.4 % patients exhibited Low and High levels, respectively. ATI were only detected in patients with No detectable drug levels because the drug interferes with ELISA. DAS28 disease activity globally showed a modest improvement after dose escalation, but this improvement did not persist after 6 and 12 months. Infliximab serum levels increased significantly in the High group (p=0.016, but no increase was achieved in the Low and No detectable groups. The three study groups exhibited similar disease activity over time, and no improvement was observed in the non-responder EULAR rates. ConclusionsThese results suggest that the efficacy of an infliximab dose increase is limited, and the response is independent of the infliximab trough serum concentration that is achieved prior to escalation.

  9. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis II: An Innovative Strategy to Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients through Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Brooks, Sydney; De Angelis, G.; Bell, Mary; Egan, Mary; Poitras, Stephane; King, Judy; Casimiro, Lynn; Loew, Laurianne; Novikov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine if an updated online evidence-based educational programme delivered through Facebook is effective in improving the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of patients with arthritis in relation to evidence-based self-management rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid…

  10. Safety, Effectiveness, and Treatment Persistence of Golimumab in Elderly Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Real-World Clinical Practice in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Masateru; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Shimizu, Hirohito; Ishii, Yutaka; Yajima, Tsutomu; Kanbori, Masayoshi

    2018-03-02

    Golimumab has been proven as an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical trials. However, there is a scarcity of data regarding its use in elderly patients in a real-world setting. This study aims to evaluate the safety, effectiveness, and treatment persistence of golimumab in elderly Japanese patients (≥ 75 years) with rheumatoid arthritis. This study was a post hoc analysis of post-marketing surveillance data on 5137 Japanese patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who received golimumab for 24 weeks. The study population was divided into two age groups (younger: effectiveness, and treatment persistence of golimumab were assessed. Also, the reasons for discontinuing golimumab treatment were analyzed by multi-logistic regression. During golimumab treatment over 24 weeks, younger and elderly groups exhibited comparable improvement of disease activity as measured by EULAR response criteria with similar overall rates of adverse events. However, the survival curve of golimumab for elderly patients was significantly different from that for younger patients due largely to the discontinuation at 4 weeks. The most common reason for discontinuation in elderly patients was patient choice, while it was disease progression in younger patients. Analysis of elderly patients who discontinued treatment by their own decision identified EULAR good response as a factor associated with continuation of golimumab treatment whereas no predictive factor associated with discontinuation was identified. The safety and effectiveness of golimumab treatment in elderly Japanese patients aged 75 years or older were comparable to those in younger patients in real-world clinical practice. Analysis of the survival curves suggested that continuous use of golimumab might further improve clinical benefit of golimumab in elderly patients, underpinning the importance of effective communication between physicians and elderly patients based on the treat-to-target strategy

  11. EULAR-PReS points to consider for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch-Bourn, A N; Edwards, C J; Collado, P

    2015-01-01

    and patients from nine countries. Eleven questions on imaging in JIA were generated using a process of discussion and consensus. Research evidence was searched systematically for each question using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL. Imaging modalities included were conventional radiography, ultrasound, MRI...... the search process, from which 204 studies were included in the systematic review. Nine points to consider were produced, taking into account the heterogeneity of JIA, the lack of normative data and consequent difficulty identifying pathology. These encompassed the role of imaging in making a diagnosis......To develop evidence based points to consider the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical practice. The task force comprised a group of paediatric rheumatologists, rheumatologists experienced in imaging, radiologists, methodologists...

  12. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  13. Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van Den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov

    2017-01-01

    issues still remain open in the clinical practice. We performed a systematic review of the literature on botulinum toxin treatment for CD based on a question-oriented approach, with the aim to provide practical recommendations for the treating clinicians. Key questions from the clinical practice were...... explored. Results suggest that while the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin treatment on different aspects of CD is well established, robust evidence is still missing concerning some practical aspects, such as dose equivalence between different formulations, optimal treatment intervals, treatment...

  14. Drug retention rates and treatment discontinuation among anti-TNF-α agents in psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbroni, Marta; Cantarini, Luca; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Pagano, Veronica Anna; Frediani, Bruno; Manganelli, Stefania; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The study aim was to determine treatment persistence rates and to identify causes of discontinuation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients in clinical practice. Patients treated with adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETA), or infliximab (INF) were retrospectively included. Treatment persistence rates were analyzed by means of a stepwise logistic regression. Differences between therapy duration were assessed by means of an analysis of variance model (ANOVA), while a chi-square test was used to evaluate relationships between therapies and causes of treatment discontinuation and the administration of concomitant disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) among therapies and types of disease considering completed courses of therapy versus courses that were discontinued. 268 patients received a total of 353 anti-TNF treatment courses (97 ADA, 180 ETA, and 76 INF). Comparison among therapies showed significant difference regarding the treatment persistence rates due to the contrast between ETA and INF (P = 0.0062). We observed that 84.7% of patients were still responding after 6 months of follow-up. Comparison among diseases showed that there were significant differences between PsA and AS (P = 0.0073) and PsA and PsA with predominant axial involvement (P = 0.0467) in terms of duration of the therapy, while there were no significant differences with regard to the persistence rate. In this cohort, anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with high drug persistence rates. As in rheumatoid arthritis, switching to another anti-TNF-α agent can be an effective option when, during the treatment of AS or PsA, therapy is suspended because of inefficacy or an adverse event. Combination therapy with DMARDs was associated with a better persistence rate.

  15. Interval between onset of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comparing the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink with a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, William; Charlton, Rachel; Nightingale, Alison; Snowball, Julia; Green, Amelia; Smith, Catherine; Shaddick, Gavin; McHugh, Neil

    2017-12-01

    To describe the time interval between the onset of psoriasis and PsA in the UK primary care setting and compare with a large, well-classified secondary care cohort. Patients with PsA and/or psoriasis were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The secondary care cohort comprised patients from the Bath PsA longitudinal observational cohort study. For incident PsA patients in the CPRD who also had a record of psoriasis, the time interval between PsA diagnosis and first psoriasis record was calculated. Comparisons were made with the time interval between diagnoses in the Bath cohort. There were 5272 eligible PsA patients in the CPRD and 815 in the Bath cohort. In both cohorts, the majority of patients (82.3 and 61.3%, respectively) had psoriasis before their PsA diagnosis or within the same calendar year (10.5 and 23.8%), with only a minority receiving their PsA diagnosis first (7.1 and 14.8%). Excluding those who presented with arthritis before psoriasis, the median time between diagnoses was 8 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2-15] in the CPRD and 7 years (IQR 0-20) in the Bath cohort. In the CPRD, 60.1 and 75.1% received their PsA diagnosis within 10 and 15 years of their psoriasis diagnosis, respectively; this was comparable with 57.2 and 67.7% in the Bath cohort. A similar distribution for the time interval between psoriasis and arthritis was observed in the CPRD and secondary care cohort. These data can inform screening strategies and support the validity of data from each cohort. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Prevalence of Comorbidities in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Evaluation of Their Monitoring in Clinical Practice: The Spanish Cohort of the COMORA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Alejandro; Lojo-Oliveira, Leticia; Alperi-López, Mercedes; García-Manrique, María; Ordóñez-Cañizares, Carmen; Pérez, Lorena; Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Corrales, Alfonso; Narváez, Javier; Rey-Rey, José; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Ojeda, Soledad; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Nolla, Joan M; García-Torrón, José; Gamero, Fernando; García-Vicuña, Rosario; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Campos, José; Rosas, José; García-Llorente, José Francisco; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Cáliz, Rafael; Sanmartí, Raimon; Bermúdez, Alberto; Abasolo-Alcázar, Lydia; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Marras, Carlos; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Hmamouchi, Ihsane; Martín-Mola, Emilio

    2017-07-12

    To describe the prevalence of comorbidities in patients with RA in Spain and discuss their management and implications using data from the Spanish cohort of the multinational study on COMOrbidities in Rheumatoid Arthritis (COMORA). This is a national sub-analysis of the COMORA study. We studied the demographics and disease characteristics of 200 adults patients diagnosed with RA (1987 ACR), and routine practices for screening and preventing the following selected comorbidities: cardiovascular, infections, cancer, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, osteoporosis and depression. Patients had a mean age of 58 years and a mean RA duration of 10 years. Mean DAS28 score was 3.3 and approximately 25% of patients were in remission (DAS28 20% (51%), hypercholesterolemia (46%) or hypertension (41%) and smoking (25%) were the most common CV risk factors. For prostate, colon and skin cancers, only 9%, 10% and 18% of patients, respectively, were optimally monitored. Infections were also inadequately managed, with 7% and 17% of patients vaccinated against influenza and pneumococcal, respectively, as was osteoporosis, with 47% of patients supplemented with vitamin D and 56% with a bone densitometry performed. In Spain, the prevalence of comorbidities and CV risk factors in RA patients with established and advanced disease is relatively high, and their management in clinical daily practice remains suboptimal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence rates of suicidal behaviors and treated depression in patients with and without psoriatic arthritis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Li, Lin; Peng, Michael; Shah, Kamal; Paris, Maria; Jick, Susan

    2016-09-01

    To estimate rates of suicidal behaviors and treated depression in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in comparison to non-PsA patients. Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we conducted a cohort study of patients with PsA compared to non-PsA patients. Patients with codes for suicidal behaviors (ideation, attempts, and suicide) and treated depression (diagnosis plus anti-depressant prescription) recorded during follow-up were identified as cases. We estimated incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each outcome and stratified results in the PsA cohort by receipt of systemic PsA drugs. The rates of suicide ideation, attempt, and suicide were similar for PsA and non-PsA patients [IRR = 0.99 (95%CI: 0.67-1.47), IRR = 1.07 (95%CI: 0.86-1.34), and 0.34 (95%CI: 0.05-2.48), respectively] and rates of suicidal behaviors were slightly higher among PsA patients who received PsA drugs compared to those who did not. PsA patients had slightly higher rate of treated depression compared to non-PsA patients [IRR = 1.38 (95%CI: 1.27-1.49)] and were significantly higher in PsA patients who received drugs [IRR = 1.59 (95%CI: 1.35-1.86)]. Rate of depression was higher in patients with PsA compared to non-PsA patients. The rate of suicidal behaviors was similar between the two cohorts.

  18. Adjustment in the clinical practice of treat-to-target guidelines for rheumatoid arthritis: Results of the ToARCan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Cáceres, Laura; Hernández-Beriaín, José Ángel; Francisco, Félix; Ojeda, Soledad; Talaverano, Sigrid; Nóvoa-Medina, Javier; Martín, José Adán; Delgado, Esmeralda; Trujillo, Elisa; Álvarez, Fátima; Magdalena, Laura; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To analyze compliance with t2t clinical practice guidelines. Cross-sectional observational study in consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 5 hospitals in the Canary Islands. Patients filled out activity scales, HAQ and answered the question of whether the doctor had explained the treatment target. The rheumatologist also collected: visits in the past year, use of activity indices and HAQ, DAS28 of current visit and date of the next visit. The percentage of compliance to indicators based on the t2t recommendations (R) 1, 3, 5-7 and 10 was analyzed. A total of 343 patients were recruited, 77% female, mean age 57, RA duration of 10 years. Median visits in the last year were 3 and mean time between last and current visit was 5.6 months. A total of 93% of the patients were treated with DMARDs and 44% were in remission by DAS (R1). In the previous visit, documented joint count was present in 85%, a HAQ in 19%, patient VAS in 41%, and a DAS28 in 35% of the patients (R6). The next visit was scheduled at an average of 4.3 months (R5). In 64% of patients with DAS28> 3.2 a visit between one and 3 months was scheduled (R5). A total of 96% of patients said they had been informed of the treatment target (R10). Variability between centers existed but was moderate. The only factor determining the performance of a DAS28 in the last visit was the patient's center of origin. The Canary Island centers studied achieved high levels of remission and low activity in their patients. The performance of composite indices and follow-up frequency recommended by the t2t are met, although there is room for improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Malignant Neoplasms in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors, Tocilizumab, Abatacept, or Rituximab in Clinical Practice: A Nationwide Cohort Study From Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadström, Hjalmar; Frisell, Thomas; Askling, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Considering the widespread and increasing use of biological immunomodulators (biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs [bDMARDs]) to treat chronic inflammatory conditions, and the concern that immunomodulation may alter cancer risk and progression, the limited available data on use of these therapies as used in clinical practice and cancer risks are a concern. To assess the risk of incident malignant neoplasms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with bDMARDs. This was a national register-based prospective cohort study of the public health care system in Sweden from 2006 to 2015. Cohorts of patients with RA initiating treatment with tocilizumab (n = 1798), abatacept (n = 2021), and rituximab (n = 3586), a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) as first-ever (n = 10 782) or second-ever (n = 4347) bDMARD, a biologics-naive cohort treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) (n = 46 610), and a general population comparator cohort (n = 107 491). Treatment with tocilizumab, abatacept, rituximab, or TNFi. Outcomes included a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm, or skin cancer. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox-regression, adjusted for age, sex, disease and treatment characteristics, and educational level. We identified a total of 15 129 initiations of TNFi as the first or second bDMARD, 7405 initiations of other bDMARDs, and 46 610 csDMARD users. The mean age varied from 58 to 64 years, and the proportion of female patients varied from 71% to 80%, across the 7 cohorts under study. The observed numbers of events (crude incidence per 100 000 person-years) for a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm were 50 (959) for tocilizumab, 61 (1026) for abatacept, 141 (1074) for rituximab, 478 (978) for initiators of TNFi as first bDMARD, and 169 (917) for TNFi as second bDMARD. There were no statistically significant differences between

  20. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimabukuro, Kunisada; Sakata, Hiromichi; Shirono, Kazuo; Nakajo, Masataka; Shinohara, Shinji

    1983-01-01

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice. Agreement between self-rated clinimetric evaluation and clinical evaluation with activity indexes: DAS28, CDAI and SDAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Pérez Bolde-Hernández, Arturo; Hernández-Cabrera, María Fernanda; Vergara-Sánchez, Imelda; Romero-Figueroa, María Del Socorro

    2017-10-11

    To achieve control of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) it is necessary to be able to evaluate its activity. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recommends for this purpose indexes of activity that can be performed by the patient (PAS-II and RAPID-3) and IA including medical evaluation with laboratory studies (DAS28 and SDAI) or without them (CDAI). The objective was to analyze the concordance between self-rated clinimetric evaluation and clinimetric evaluation performed by the physician. Analytical cross-sectional study in 126 patients with RA. The agreement was evaluated through the weighted κ coefficient and the Krippendorff's α coefficient. The PAS-II and RAPID-3 significantly correlated with all variables included in the core set of measures recommended by the ACR/EULAR. The agreement between PAS-II and CDAI-SDAI was good (κ: 0.6, α: 0.61-0.62), and moderate with DAS28-ESR (κ: 0.53, α: 0.56). The concordance between RAPID-3 and CDAI-SDAI was moderate (κ: 0.55-0.57, α: 0.50-0.51), and moderate with DAS28-ESR (κ: 0.55, α: 0.53). When categorizing the activity in remission/low activity vs. moderate/severe activity, the agreement was greater with the PAS-II (0.59 vs. 0.34; P=.012). The good concordance between PAS-II and SDAI supports their use in clinical practice, especially if biomarkers of inflammation or the possibility of joint count are not available. However, in order to recommend its routine application in clinical practice, it is necessary to perform longitudinal studies that assess its responsiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function study. Stephen C. Morrison, Girish M. Mody, Sally R. Benatar, Orlando L Meyers. Abstract. Objective. To detennine the prevalence and spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a developing country.

  3. Direct comparison of treatment responses, remission rates, and drug adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab: Results from eight years of surveillance of clinical practice in the nationwide Danish DANBIO registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Tarp, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors directly regarding the rates of treatment response, remission, and the drug survival rate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to identify clinical prognostic factors for response. METHODS: The nationwide DANBIO registry...

  4. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture gives basic information about psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine, and enthesises from a group of spondyloarthritis. It describes the epidemiology of the disease and considers current ideas on its pathogenesis and factors influencing the development of PsA in psoriatic patients. The classification and clinical forms of PsA are presented. The major clinical manifestations of the disease are indicated to include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The diagnosis of the disease is noted to be established on the basis of its detected typical clinical and radiological signs, by applying the CASPAR criteria. A dermatologist, rheumatologist, and general practitioner screen PsA, by actively detecting complaints, characteristic clinical and radiological signs of damage to the joints, and/or spine, and/or enthesises and by using screening questionnaires. There are data that patients with PsA are observed to be at higher risk for a number of diseases type 2 diabetes mellitus hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, etc. The aim of current pharmacotherapy for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of clinical manifestations of the disease, to delay or prevent its X-ray progression, to increase survival, to improve quality of life in patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities. The paper considers groups of medicines used to treat the disease, among other issues, information about biological agents (BA registered in the Russian Federation for the treatment of PsA. Most patients are mentioned to show a good response to this therapy option just 3–6 months after treatment initiation; however, some of them develop primary inefficiency. In this case, switching one BA to another is recommended. Some patients using a BA develop secondary treatment inefficiency, which is firstly due to the appearance of

  5. Psoriatic arthritis: performance of rheumatologists in daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, S; van der Heijde, D M F M; van der Linden, S; Houben, H; Rethans, J J; Scherpbier, A J J A; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2002-03-01

    To assess, using standardised patients (SPs), how rheumatologists diagnose psoriatic arthritis, whether the diagnostic efficiency is influenced by specific characteristics of the rheumatologists, and to study the relationship with costs. Twenty three rheumatologists were each visited by one of two SPs (one male, one female) presenting as a patient with psoriatic arthritis. SPs remained incognito for all meetings for the duration of the study. Immediately after the encounter, SPs completed case-specific checklists on the medical content of the encounter. Information on ordered laboratory and imaging tests was obtained from each hospital. Fourteen rheumatologists diagnosed psoriatic arthritis correctly. They inspected the skin for psoriatic lesions more often than those rheumatologists who established other diagnoses. Rheumatologists diagnosing psoriatic arthritis spent more on additional laboratory and imaging investigations. These were carried out after the diagnosis to confirm it and to record the extent and severity of the disease. No differences in type of practice, number of outpatients seen each week, working experience, or sex were found between rheumatologists who made the correct diagnosis and those who made other diagnoses. The correct diagnosis was more often missed by rheumatologists who saw the male SP, who presented with clear distal interphalangeal DIP joint arthritis only, causing confusion with osteoarthritis of the DIP joints. There is a considerable amount of variation in the delivery of care among rheumatologists who see an SP with psoriatic arthritis. Rheumatologists focusing too much on the most prominent features (DIP joint arthritis) sometimes seem to forget "the hidden (skin) symptoms".

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Clinical characteristics and outcomes in polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Sarah B; Fowler, Mary Louise; Zhu, Clara; Moore, Andrew; Shmerling, Robert H; Paz, Ziv

    2017-09-14

    Septic polyarthritis is rarer than septic monoarthritis, but associated with higher mortality. Septic polyarthritis may be difficult to distinguish clinically from noninfectious inflammatory arthritis. We describe one of the largest samples of septic polyarthritis with the aim of distinguishing septic monoarthritis from polyarthritis. We conducted a retrospective study of adults admitted to tertiary care with septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis. Baseline characteristics, microbial profiles, joint involvement, length of stay, and 60-day readmission rates were determined. We identified 464 and 42 cases of septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis, respectively, including 7 cases of septic polyarthritis with comorbid rheumatoid arthritis. Compared to those with septic monoarthritis, patients with septic polyarthritis were more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis (Pseptic arthritis (Pseptic polyarthritis with/without underlying rheumatoid arthritis were similar in terms of presenting features and outcomes, except for more frequent immunosuppressive therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (Pseptic arthritis, patients with septic polyarthritis were more likely to have systemic infection at presentation than those with septic monoarthritis. Despite this difference, patients with septic monoarthritis and polyarthritis tended to have similar outcomes. While rheumatoid arthritis was observed more frequently among patients with septic polyarthritis, those with/without underlying rheumatoid arthritis had similar presenting features and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. CLINICAL HETEROGENEITY OF EARLY PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the characteristic symptoms and syndromes of early-stage psoriatic arthritis (ePsA, which are pivotal to its early diagnosis.Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients with a PsA duration of less than 2 years (mean 12 months were examined. The diagnosis of PsA was established on the basis of the conventional CASPAR criteria and the Russian criteria developed by the expert method. The conventional current criteria, including the number of tender and swollen joints, DAS28, values of acute-phase indicators, were used to detect inflammatory activity. Skin syndrome was evaluated using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. X-ray study of the hands, distal and proximal feet, pelvis, and other involved joints and MRI of the distal hands/feet were performed. The Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score (MASES and reduced GUESS were used to assess enthesopathy.Results. The types of articular syndrome in ePsA were identified in accordance of the duration of the disease. The authors determined the characteristic features of arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, their diagnostic value and associations with other manifestations in the first 2 years of PsA. There was a relationship of dermatitis and psoriatic onychopathy to the clinical picture of articular syndrome.Conclusion. ePsA is characterized by marked heterogeneity of articular syndrome with predominantly mono/oligoarthritic and polyarthritic articular syndrome. The significant signs are enthesitis and dactylitis, which serve as risk factors for the unfavorable course of the disease. 

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective-tissue disease are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic inflammation. This review will focus on immunopathogenic mechanisms, aspects of early disease, co-morbidity and therapy in RA ...

  10. EROMIA in inflammatory arthritis: the next step in standard practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) have been increasingly recognized as important tools in rheumatoid arthritis. PROMs add up to a composite score that directly reflects changes in outcomes of immediate importance to patients on a daily basis, such as pain, sleep, fatigue, functional impairment and quality of life. Prospective collection of the patients' information in databases has been attempted, mainly in research studies. This work was carried out to assess the possibility of systematically collecting and aggregating a focused set of clinical data in the standard clinical practice, directly and comfortably from the point of care and on an ongoing basis, using EROMIA software. Recording the patients' data electronically has significantly (P<0.01) saved time in comparison with written paper format. It also significantly (P<0.001) saved time in retrieving patients' recorded data. In addition to the traditional disease outcome measures, disease comorbidities such as falls and cardiovascular risks could be recorded. Recording tender and swollen joints individually was made possible. EROMIA offered a hospital-based integrated monitoring database that echoes daily clinical practice. It does not require advanced computer knowledge.

  11. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking......: DXR-BMD was measured from hand x-rays in a reference cohort (1485 men/2541 women) without arthritis randomly selected from an urban Danish population. Sex- and age-related HBL/year was estimated. DXR-BMD was measured in rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 350: at start of TNFI, and ~2 years after TNFI...... start), of which 135 patients had three x-rays (~2 years prior to TNFI, at start of TNFI, and ~2 years after TNFI start). Individual HBL/year prior to and during TNFI was calculated and compared to reference values. RESULTS: Estimated HBL/year varied strongly with age and sex. Compared to the reference...

  12. [Evaluation of a clinical pathway for septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Muñoz, R; Martín Vega, A; García Caballero, J; García-Consuegra Molina, J

    2007-07-01

    Clinical pathways are tools that coordinate clinical work, reducing interclinican variability and improving patient care and management. The use of clinical pathways in septic arthritis is appropriate, as this disease has a predictable course and there is considerable variation in its management. The aim of this study was to evaluate a septic arthritis clinical pathway 2 years after its introduction and to describe the characteristics of the patients included. Clinical pathway documents: pathway matrix sheet, variance form, parent information sheet, satisfaction survey and evaluation indicators sheet. Thirty-five patients were included, seven with a definitive diagnosis of septic arthritis and 28 with probable septic arthritis. No differences were found between the two groups, with good outcomes in both. Laboratory analyses were performed at admission in all patients, at discharge in 51 %, and at the end of treatment in 97 %. The indicators that best met the standard were clinical pathway coverage, performance of arthrocentesis/arthrotomy, and satisfaction with dealings with staff and the information received. The indicators furthest from the standard were admission shorter than 7 days (77 % vs > 95 %) and obtaining articular fluid prior to antibiotic therapy (76 % vs > 90 %). The clinical pathway is useful for standardizing the process of septic arthritis diagnosis and treatment. With adequate clinical support, application of this pathway allows decisions to be made on hospital discharge following the clinical criteria of improvement without worsening prognosis. Our immediate challenges are to reduce inpatient stay and to obtain synovial fluid before starting antibiotic therapy.

  13. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking...

  14. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common type of arthritis. It's often related to aging or to an injury. Autoimmune arthritis happens when your body's immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  15. Glenohumeral arthritis after Latarjet procedure: Progression and it's clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Young Moon; Kim, Hwan Jin; Kim, Jung Youn; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-09-01

    The risk factors of glenohumeral arthritis after the Latarjet procedure remain relatively unexplored. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the clinical significance of glenohumeral arthritis after the Latarjet procedure, and to investigate risk factors associated with arthritis progression. We evaluated 110 patients (110 shoulders) who underwent the Latarjet procedure for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Patients had a mean age of 23.8 years (range, 14-52 years) at the time of the operation, and the mean duration of follow-up was 31 months (range, 24-111 months). At the last follow-up, the mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores significantly improved from 3.1, 36.5 and 23.6 points preoperatively to 1.6, 87.6 and 32.6 points (all P Latarjet procedure was in 20 shoulders (18.2%). At the final, overall prevalence of arthritis was 23.6% (26 shoulders). The non-arthritis group showed significantly better functional outcomes (VAS score: 0.9, Rowe Score: 89.3, UCLA score: 33.5) than the arthritis group (2.1, 84.9, 29.2; all P Latarjet procedure yielded satisfactory functional outcomes with low recurrent rate at mid-term follow-up. Development or progression of arthritis was observed in 18.2% of patients, postoperatively. Glenohumeral arthritis after the Latarjet procedure had an adverse effect on clinical outcome. Generalized laxity and lateral overhang should be considered as risk factors of progression to glenohumeral arthritis after the Latarjet procedure. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a well-documented clinical entity,[1] epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of. South African (SA) patients are scarce. There are, in fact, no published data regarding the prevalence and incidence of PsA in the SA population. In 1973, Moll and Wright[1] defined PsA as an.

  17. Hypothyroidism in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Qari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points.

  18. Clinical value of MRI on wrists with arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qiang; Ma Daqing; He Wen; Le Erhu; Ma Xinfa; Wang Jun; Zuo Zhaoyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of various kinds of arthritis on MRI, and to assess and evaluate the role of MRI on diagnosing various kinds of arthritis. Methods: One hundred and fifty-one patients with medical history of wrist pain entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, STIR (short time inversion recovery) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were examined in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical data including swollen joint and patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory, examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score (HAQ). According to 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, in 151 patients, 80 patients were diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis, 29 patients as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, 20 patients as seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and 22 as other kinds of connective tissue diseases. Results: All 80 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis had bilateral pannus. Among 29 patients diagnosed with undifferentiated spondyloanthropathy, 3 cases had bilateral pannus, 24 had lateral pannus. Among 20 patients diagnosed with seronegative spondyloanthropathy, 4 cases had bilateral pannus, 15 had lateral pannus. Among 22 patients diagnosed with other kinds of connective tissue disease, 21 had lateral pannus. Bilateral pannus on bilateral wrists occured in 87 patients. There were not significant difference in the unilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =6.157; P>0.05). But there were significant difference in the bilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =126.882, P 2 =94.192, P 2 =70.354, P 2 =96.174, P<0.001). Conclusion: MRI can show the pathologic changes of wrists with various kinds of arthritis. MRI plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of various kinds of arthritis

  19. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ali, S. R.; Ishaque, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  20. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent joint damage. If you have a family history of arthritis, tell your provider, even if you do not have joint pain. Avoiding ... in hip Rheumatoid arthritis Knee joint replacement - series Hip joint ...

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascoli, G.; Cinti, P.; Nonni, M.; Rossi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  2. Efficacy and safety of leflunomide in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in real-life clinical practice (results of the Russian multicenter surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methotrexate or leflunomide is recommended to be used as the first synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug to treat rheumatoid arthri- tis (RA. In 2011, ELAFRA (leflunomide, Haupt Pharma Munster GmbH, Germany; license LP-000804 registered October 3, 2011 was cer- tified and approved in Russia. This surveillance study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness and tolerability of ELAFRA in RA patients in real-life clinical practice. Material and Methods. The study involved patients corresponding to the 1987 RA classification criteria, with varying disease duration. The patients were monitored at 33 Russian medical institutions in March–December 2013. According to the drug label, ELAFRA was prescribed at a dose of 10 mg/day during the first 3 days and subsequently at a dose of 20 mg/day. In case of adverse effects (AEs, the daily dose was recommended to be reduced to 10 mg. The patients were examined before the drug was prescribed; as well as 1, 3, 6 months after therapy was started. The number of painful swollen joints and pain intensity according to the Visual Analog Scale (VAS were assessed. The patients were subjected to laboratory exam- ination (blood test; ESR test; C-reactive protein (CRP test. RA activity was determined using the DAS28 index. AEs were identified. The data on 99 patients (87 females and 12 males; mean age: 51.1±11.1 years; mean disease duration 74.9±65.7 months were used for sta- tistical analysis. Disease activity was moderate in 9 patients and high in 90 patients.Results. Six-month therapy with ELAFRA reduced the mean number of swollen joints from 13.7 to 5.1 and the number of painful joints, from 14.9 to 9.5. VAS pain intensity decreased from 62.7 to 29.6 mm; ESR decreased from 38.8 to 22.18 mm/h; SRP, from 24.9 to 13.0. Low and moderate RA activity according to DAS28 and CDAI indices after treatment was observed in 63 and 46 patients, respectively. No serious AEs have been revealed; non-serious AEs were

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application; Magnetresonanztomographie der Hand bei rheumatoider Arthritis. Wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und praktische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Radiologie am Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist ein sensitives Verfahren zur Detektion entzuendlicher Veraenderungen der peripheren Gelenke. Den breiten Einsatz der MRT im Fruehstadium der rheumatoiden Arthritis behindern derzeit jedoch der im Vergleich zur konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik hoehere technische Aufwand und vermehrte Kosten. Diese Uebersichtsarbeit fasst wichtige Studienergebnisse zusammen und gibt praktische Hinweise fuer Hand-MRTs. Ein geeignetes Sequenzprotokoll wird vorgestellt, Vor- und Nachteile von Niederfeld-MRTs werden beruecksichtigt, moegliche Fehlerquellen und Artefakte diskutiert. Magnetresonanztomographische Befunde bei rheumatoider Arthritis wie Synovitis, Tenosynovitis, Erosionen und Knochenmarkoedeme werden beschrieben und deren prognostische Bedeutung dargestellt. Gesicherte Fakten zur Validierung und Moeglichkeiten der Graduierung MR-tomographischer Veraenderungen bei rheumatoider Arthritis werden zusammengefasst. Der Nutzen der MRT zur differenzialdiagnostischen

  4. Tocilizumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: subanalysis of Spanish results of an open-label study close to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Gracia, José M; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; García-López, Alicia; Guzmán, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco J; Navarro, Francisco J; Bustabad, Sagrario; Armendáriz, Yolanda; Román-Ivorra, José A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the Spanish experience in an international study which evaluated tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis) in a clinical practice setting. Subanalysis of 170 patients with RA from Spain who participated in a phase IIIb, open-label, international clinical trial. Patients presented inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. They received 8mg/kg of tocilizumab every 4 weeks in combination with a DMARD or as monotherapy during 20 weeks. Safety and efficacy of tocilizumab were analyzed. Special emphasis was placed on differences between failure to a DMARD or to a TNFi and the need to switch to tocilizumab with or without a washout period in patients who had previously received TNFi. The most common adverse events were infections (25%), increased total cholesterol (38%) and transaminases (15%). Five patients discontinued the study due to an adverse event. After six months of tocilizumab treatment, 71/50/30% of patients had ACR 20/50/70 responses, respectively. A higher proportion of TNFi-naive patients presented an ACR20 response: 76% compared to 64% in the TNFi group with previous washout and 66% in the TNFi group without previous washout. Safety results were consistent with previous results in patients with RA and an inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. Tocilizumab is more effective in patients who did not respond to conventional DMARDs than in patients who did not respond to TNFis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  6. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  7. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  8. The clinical role of nuclear medicine in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, K. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Rheumatology); Van der Linden, E. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology); Pauwels, E.K.J. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Division of Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis activity is the dominant clinical variable that determines the therapeutic approach. At present, the amount of painful and swollen joint assessed by physical examination, is generally used to measure the degree of synovitis activity is not available. The availability of an objective and reproducible method to evaluate synovitis activity in RA would be of great value in patient management and in examination of therapeutic effects. An advantage of the use of radiopharmaceuticals in detection of arthritis activity, compared with other imaging techniques, is the possibility to depict all joints in a single image. Furthermore the technique may image joints which are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically and may also detect joint inflammation in an early phase. In this overview different scintigraphic techniques are compared with each other and with other diagnostic imaging modalities.

  9. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis can occur in people who have psoriasis (scaly red and white skin patches). It affects ... Cómo vivir con artritis: Información básica de salud para usted y su familia Rheumatoid Arthritis: Handout on ...

  10. Rheumatoid disease without arthritis; clinical case of pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid nodulosis and positive rheumatoid factor without arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Franco, Julian Andres; Canas Davila, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We reported a case of a patient suffering pulmonary fibrosis rapidly progressive and a positive rheumatoid factor test with the presence of HLA DR11 y HLADR17, without arthritis, We discuss how rare is this clinical appearance, and remark the concept that rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, with a wide clinical presentation, that some authors with a right criteria have called rheumatoid disease

  11. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however....... The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews...... it was a prerequisite that they should be easy to apply and not demand interruptions in clinical work. Based on my research, I found that computerized clinical guidance should be: • Activity specific • Present at the point of care • Embedded in work practice • Flexible • A source for coordination • Automated when...

  12. Patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. Clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaffagnini, Stefano [Laboratorio di Biomeccanica, Bologna (Italy). Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli; Dejour, David [Lyon-Ortho-Clinic (France). Knee Surgery Orthopaedic Dept.; Arendt, Elizabeth A. (eds.) [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedics

    2010-07-01

    Despite numerous studies, a lack of consensus still exists over many aspects of patellofemoral pain, instability, and arthritis. This book adopts an evidence-based approach to assess each of these topics in depth. The book reviews general features of clinical examination and global evaluation techniques including the use of different imaging methods, e.g. x-rays, CT, MRI, stress x-rays, and bone scan. Various conservative and surgical treatment approaches for each of the three presentations - pain, instability, and arthritis - are then explained and assessed. Postoperative management and options in the event of failed surgery are also evaluated. Throughout, careful attention is paid to the literature in an attempt to establish the level of evidence for the efficacy of each imaging and treatment method. It is hoped that this book will serve as an informative guide for the practitioner when confronted with disorders of the patellofemoral joint. (orig.)

  13. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  14. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Bernstein, Anke; Feucht, Matthias J

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective...

  15. Clinical manifestations, treatment outcomes, and risk factors for sternoclavicular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchuae, Muchima; Ruangpin, Chonlada; Katchamart, Wanruchada

    2017-05-01

    Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is an atypical and rarely seen clinical condition. The prognosis for patients with SCJ septic arthritis is often poor. The objective of this study was to compare clinical characteristics between SCJ and non-sternoclavicular joint (NSCJ) septic arthritis and to identify independent risk factors for SCJ septic arthritis. A total of 450 adult patients diagnosed with septic arthritis during the January 2002 to December 2013 study period were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patient characteristics, clinical manifestations, and treatment outcomes were examined. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for SCJ septic arthritis. Thirty-three (7.3%) of 450 patients had SCJ septic arthritis and the remaining 417 patients had NSCJ. Oligoarthritis or polyarthritis were seen more often in SCJ patients than in NSCJ patients (55 vs. 19%; p septic arthritis. SCJ septic arthritis is an uncommon septic arthritis that frequently presents with local and systemic complications. Factors found to be significantly associated with SCJ septic arthritis were extra-articular infection and immunocompromised host. A high index of suspicion in high-risk patients is the key to achieving improved outcomes.

  16. Clinical registry for rheumatoid arthritis; a preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, A.; Hakim, F.; Zaidi, S.K.; Sharif, A.

    2017-01-01

    To establish a clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis and delineate the most common symptoms that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience in our set up. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was carried out at Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi at Rheumatology Department during the period of Jan 2013 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis was developed as per criteria jointly developed by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) along with European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) (2010). Fifty-eight patients were registered after their informed consent and approval by Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi ethical committee. Age, gender and relevant clinical parameters of RA patients were recorded on case report forms and stored for analysis in the RA registry in Excel 2010. The figures were reported in frequencies and percentages. Results: Multiple joint pains (48.28%), fever (24.14%), morning stiffness of joints (22.41%) were the most common symptoms in RA patients. Other clinical manifestations included painful bilateral swollen joints (13.79%), pain in different parts of the body (10.34%), Raynaud's phenomenon (10.34%), malaise (8.62%), swollen body parts (8.62%), ulcers (8.62%), fatigue (6.90%), nodules on skin/elbow/interphalangeal joints (6.90%), deformities of fingers/ hand (3.45%), redness of eyes (3.45%), body rash (3.45%), inability to walk (3.45%), cervical lymphadenopathy (1.72%), stiffness of spine (1.72%) and myalgias (1.72%). Conclusion: It is concluded that multiple joint pains, fever and morning stiffness of joints are the most common symptoms of RA patients. (author)

  17. The Effect of Triptolide in Rheumatoid Arthritis: From Basic Research towards Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Triptolide (TP, a major extract of the herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF, has been shown to exert potent pharmacological effects, especially an immunosuppressive effect in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its multiorgan toxicity prevents it from being widely used in clinical practice. Recently, several attempts are being performed to reduce TP toxicity. In this review, recent progress in the use of TP for RA, including its pharmacological effects and toxicity, is summarized. Meanwhile, strategies relying on chemical structural modifications, innovative delivery systems, and drug combinations to alleviate the disadvantages of TP are also reviewed. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation.

  18. Infliximab in Russian clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Lukina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of infliximab began (INF in Russia in 2001. It was the first genetically engineered biological agent (GEBA registered in our country to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. With the advent of infliximab, a Russian biological rheumatoid arthritis therapy registry started its work. In October 2005, it was set up on the basis of GEBA centers founded in the leading rheumatology clinics of Russia. Objective: to generalize the Russian experience in using INF (its efficacy, tolerance, and side effects in patients with RA in real clinical practice within the framework of a multicenter observational study. Subjects and methods. The register included patients with a valid diagnosis of RA in whom INF treatment was first started. The main indication for this was previous basic therapy failure. This investigation analyzed 396 patients receiving INF therapy. Prior to INF administration, all the patients were examined to identify whether they had possible latent tuberculosis, by applying chest X-ray study and Mantoux test. The European League Against Rheumatism criteria were used to evaluate the efficiency of INF therapy. The relationship between the therapeutic effects of the drug and its cumulative dose was specially used. The trend in X-ray progression was estimated using the Sharp method modified by van der Heijde. INF was given in a dose of 3 mg/kg by the classical regimen: at 0, 2, and 6 weeks, then every 8 weeks. The main assessment periods were at 22 and 46—54 weeks. Results. Analysis of the data of real clinical practice in Russia demonstrates that the use of INF in RA patients with the inadequate effect of traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs is able to cause a rapid and pronounced reduction in disease activity. There is significant evidence that the IFN-treated patients with RA had also suppressed bone destruction. INF treatment for early RA gives rise to remissions more frequently in the early stage of

  19. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of children with Lyme arthritis in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaude, Pier Diane; Huber, Adam M; Mailman, Timothy; Ramsey, Suzanne; Lang, Bianca; Stringer, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging problem in Nova Scotia. Lyme arthritis is a late manifestation of Lyme disease. To describe the demographic characteristics, referral patterns and clinical course of children diagnosed with Lyme arthritis in a tertiary care pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. In the present retrospective chart review, subjects diagnosed with Lyme arthritis between 2006 and 2013 were identified through the clinic database. Demographic variables, referral patterns, clinical presentation and information regarding treatment course and outcome were collected. Seventeen patients were identified; 76% presented in 2012 and 2013. In 37.5% of cases, the referring physician suspected Lyme disease. Most patients presented with one or more painful and/or swollen joints; 94% had knee involvement. Only three of 17 patients had a history of erythema migrans and four of 17 recalled a tick bite. Five patients had a history of neurological manifestations consistent with Lyme disease, although, none had a diagnosis made at the time. Arthritis usually resolved after treatment with standard antibiotics; however, at last follow-up, two patients had antibiotic refractory Lyme arthritis, with one having joint damage despite aggressive arthritis treatment. A significant increase in cases of Lyme arthritis has recently been recognized in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in Nova Scotia. A history of a tick bite or erythema migrans were not sensitive markers of Lyme arthritis, and this diagnosis was often not considered by the referring physician. Educational initiatives should be undertaken to increase local awareness of this treatable cause of arthritis in children.

  20. Exploratory analyses of the association of MRI with clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, Paul; van der Heijde, Désirée; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  1. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP levelseptic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRPseptic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRParthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP10 mg/L during septic arthritis in children, it could be negative in up to 20% of patients in different studies. However, a mild inflammatory syndrome or even a CRPseptic arthritis. Therefore, a first episode of monoarthritis in children has to be considered as septic arthritis and treatment should not be delayed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Yik Lim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA septic arthritis. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of CA-MRSA septic arthritis in a tertiary care hospital from 2000-2013. We compared CA-MRSA septic arthritis cases with HA-MRSA septic arthritis cases to identify important differences between the two groups. Results: We identified 11 cases of CA-MRSA septic arthritis and 34 cases of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant SA (HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus caused 25% of the MRSA septic arthritis cases. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis occurred in younger patients with fewer comorbidities or risk factors. There was no difference in initial presentation between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients were less likely to be treated with appropriate antibiotics initially. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was associated with increased morbidity with a high percentage of patients developing poor joint outcomes or osteomyelitis complications.  Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was also associated with increased utilization of health care resources due to long hospital stays, high readmissions rates, and increased requirements for rehabilitation facility placement and home health support. There was no difference in mortality, poor joint outcome, readmissions, and osteomyelitis complications between CA-MRSA septic arthritis and HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Conclusions: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is associated with increased morbidity and health care resource utilization. Increased awareness into CA-MRSA as a cause of septic

  3. [Neuroethics in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, H

    2009-08-01

    In recent years the ability of neuroscience to identify and intervene in mental functions has progressed immensely, which raises several anthropologic and ethical questions. Meanwhile neuroethics arose as a new interdisciplinary field for critical analysis of neuroscientific actions and ethical reflection on the increasing knowledge of the human brain, with regard to society and politics. This article provides a survey of neuroethical implications for clinical practice.

  4. Native Joint Septic Arthritis: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Microbiological Causes in a New Zealand Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nicholas; Chambers, Steven T; Nolan, Imogen; Gallagher, Kate; Werno, Anja; Browne, Melanie; Stamp, Lisa K

    2015-12-01

    To determine the epidemiology, clinical features, and microbiology of adult native joint septic arthritis in Canterbury, New Zealand, over a 5-year period in individuals with and without an underlying rheumatic disorder. Patients with native joint septic arthritis were identified retrospectively and classified by Newman's criteria. The clinical characteristics were described and comparisons made between those with and without underlying rheumatic disease. Two hundred forty-eight cases of native joint septic arthritis (mean age 60, range 16-97 yrs) were identified with an overall incidence rate of 12.0/100,000/year (95% CI 10.6-13.6). Yearly incidence increased with age to a maximum of 73.4/100,000 in those > 90 years of age. Septic arthritis was iatrogenic in 16.9% of cases while 27% had an underlying inflammatory arthritis including gout (14.9%), calcium pyrophosphate disease (8.5%), and rheumatoid arthritis (4%). Few patients were taking immunosuppressant therapy, with just 1 taking a biological agent. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly identified organism. Those with underlying inflammatory arthritis were significantly older (73.6 yrs vs 55.6 yrs; p septic polyarthritis (16.4% vs 4.4%; p = 0.002). The 30-day mortality was 2%, increasing to 6% at 90 days. The incidence of septic arthritis in Canterbury, New Zealand, is higher than in previous studies. Crystal arthropathy commonly coexisted with infection although autoimmune arthritis and immunosuppression was less of a factor than anticipated.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Pregnancy-induced Amelioration of Rheumatoid Arthritis: PARA-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.A. de Man (Yael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this PhD thesis, embedded in the PARA (Pregnancy-induced Amelioration of Rheumatoid Arthritis) study, several clinical aspects of the spontaneously occurring pregnancy-induced improvement of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are addressed. An overview is given of inflammatory rheumatic

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center ...

  7. Biomechanics in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusinger, R H

    1984-12-01

    Evidence from dynamic biomechanical analyses of physical activities has greatly expanded our knowledge about the mechanical bases for human movement function with potential implications for further understanding movement dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to relate these findings to present knowledge about the effect on human joints during movement, the role of muscle action on human skeletal levers during movement, and the application of this information to functional tasks by physical therapy clinicians. Also presented are some thoughts regarding what must be accomplished so that this material can be generalized to clinical practice.

  8. An Insight into Methods and Practices in Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Mosleh-shirazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total hip arthroplasty (THA has improved the quality of life of patients with hip arthritis. Orthopedic community is striving for excellence to improve surgical techniques and postoperative care. Despite these efforts, patients continue facing postoperative complications. In particular, patients with rheumatoid arthritis display a higher risk of certain complications such as dislocation, periprosthetic infection, and shorter prosthesis durability. In this review we present the current knowledge of hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with more insight into common practices and interventions directed at enhancing recovery of these patients and current shortfalls.

  9. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  10. Thiamin in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    Thiamin is a water-soluble vitamin also known as vitamin B1. Its biologically active form, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), is a cofactor in macronutrient metabolism. In addition to its coenzyme roles, TPP plays a role in nerve structure and function as well as brain metabolism. Signs and symptoms of thiamin deficiency (TD) include lactic acidosis, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, and ocular changes (eg, nystagmus). More advanced symptoms include confabulation and memory loss and/or psychosis, resulting in Wernicke's encephalopathy and/or Wernicke's Korsakoff syndrome, respectively. The nutrition support clinician should be aware of patients who may be at risk for TD. Risk factors include those patients with malnutrition due to 1 or more nutrition-related etiologies: decreased nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, or impaired nutrient absorption. Clinical scenarios such as unexplained heart failure or lactic acidosis, renal failure with dialysis, alcoholism, starvation, hyperemesis gravidarum, or bariatric surgery may increase the risk for TD. Patients who are critically ill and require nutrition support may also be at risk for TD, especially those who are given intravenous dextrose void of thiamin repletion. Furthermore, understanding thiamin's role as a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes, some inborn errors of metabolism, and neurodegenerative diseases warrants further research. This tutorial describes the absorption, digestion, and metabolism of thiamin. Issues pertaining to thiamin in clinical practice will be described, and evidence-based practice suggestions for the prevention and treatment of TD will be discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Insights into methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis: a clinical review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the efficacy and safety profile of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Data source: Published original research work and reviews were searched in English related to efficacy and safety profile of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Study design: Only articles that emphasis on efficacy and safety profile of ...

  12. From clinical expert to guide: experiences from coaching people with rheumatoid arthritis to increased physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessen, Thomas; Opava, Christina H; Martin, Cathrin; Demmelmaier, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Physical activity levels in people with rheumatoid arthritis are lower than what are recommended for a healthful lifestyle. To support physical activity, health care professionals may use behavioral change techniques based on a biopsychosocial perspective. Investigating the implementation process may be relevant for understanding how these techniques translate to practice. The study objective was to explore the experiences of physical therapists using behavioral change techniques to coach people with rheumatoid arthritis to health-enhancing physical activity in a 2-year trial, the Physical Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis 2010 study. This was an exploratory study with qualitative content analysis. Semistructured interviews were conducted with all 12 physical therapists in the study. They were asked about their experiences with an educational program and with their delivery of a health-enhancing physical activity intervention. Codes, subcategories, categories, and an overarching theme were derived from the transcribed interviews by use of qualitative content analysis. The overarching theme (from clinical expert to guide) was based on 3 main categories: challenges in the coaching role, growing into the coaching role, and coach education and support. Early in the process, the physical therapists encountered challenges that needed to be addressed for a smoother transition into their coaching role. Assisted by education and support, they gradually adopted practices that facilitated their use of behavioral change techniques and promoted growth into the role of coach. Adapting to a new role is a challenging process for health care professionals; it requires relevant education and support. The experiences identified in the present study may inform future educational programs targeting the skills of health care professionals in promoting various health-related behaviors.

  13. Clinical course and outcome of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, I A; Katsimbri, P; Katsaraki, A; Temekonidis, T; Georgiadis, A; Drosos, A A

    2001-07-01

    We studied whether patients with seropositivity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) comprise a different clinical group than those with seronegativity. Four hundred seventeen patients with early RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (disease duration less than 1 year) were retrospectively studied by analysis of demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and therapeutic disease characteristics from the time of diagnosis until the end of the study period (1981 1999) using a data base. There were 248 seropositive patients and 169 seronegative patients with RA. No statistically significant differences were seen between the two groups before commencement of the study period in relation to age of disease onset, male:female ratio, and disease duration. However, seropositive patients showed longer medical follow-up. In addition, at disease onset, seropositive RA patients presented more frequently with symmetrical polyarthritis and small joint involvement than seronegative patients. The seropositive group also had more tender and swollen joints, weaker grip strength, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation and C-reactive protein rates during the follow-up period. In contrast, the seronegative group had less severe radiological findings and greater functional ability at the end of the study. In Greek patients with early RA, rheumatoid factor seems to be a predictor of more severe disease activity.

  14. The clinical and radiological evaluation of pyogenic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung Joo; Yoo, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Hur, Don

    1984-01-01

    Pyogenic arthritis remain a difficult problem, despite the availability of a wide range of powerful modern antibiotics. Early and correct diagnosis is imperative to assure the prompt initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen and the prevent of late sequela. Careful clinical, laboratory and roentgenological analysis are fundamental to early and precise diagnosis. Therefore, plain roentgenogram should not be overlooked. A radiological and clinical observation was made in 51 cases of pyogenic arthritis admitted to Chosun University Hospital during the period from January 1976 to December 1983 and following results were obtained. 1. Among the 51 cases, 36 cases (70.6%) were male and 15 cases (29.4%) were females. The most prevalent age was 5 to 9 (27.6%). 2. Symptom duration less than 5 days was in 21 cases (41.2%) and more than 31 days was in 6 cases (11.7%). 3. The most common symptom on admission was pain around the involved joint and others are limitation of motion, swelling, tenderness, fever, local heating and erythema. 4. The underlying causes were composed of unknown in 21 cases (41.2%), trauma in 18 cases (35.3%), infections focus in 8 cases (15.7%) and iatrogenic reason 4 cases (7.8%). 5. The most commonly affected joint was hip joint (45.1%). The other affected sites in order of frequency were knee, ankle, shoulder, S-I and elbow joint. In infants and children, hip and knee joint are commonly affected: in adults, knee joint is most is most commonly affected. 6. In laboratory findings, the number of W.B.C and E.S.R were increased in 56.9%. Symptom duration more than 31 days in 5 cases were increased E.S.R only. Causative microorganism was isolated in 31 cases: the most common microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus in 22 cases. Others are B-hemolytics Stretoocccus, Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 7. In 26 cases (50.9%) of the patients, roentgenographic findings was negative. The most common radiological findings was soft tissue

  15. Clinical and immunogenetic characterization in psoriatic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Citera, Gustavo; Rodríguez Gil, Gustavo; Granel, Amelia; Arturi, Alfredo; Rosemffet, Gabriel Marcos; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Berman, Alberto; Spindler, Alberto; Morales, Victor Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In psoriatic arthritis (PsA), genetic factors play a substantial role in disease susceptibility as well as in its expression. This study aims to determine the distribution of class I and class II HLA antigens in PsA patients and secondly to analyze the influence of genetic factors in the clinical expression of the disease. Consecutive PsA patients (CASPAR criteria) with less than 1 year of disease duration were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded. Blood samples were obtained, DNA was extracted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DR) HLA antigens were determined by oligotyping. A control group of 100 nonrelated healthy controls from the general population served as control. p values were corrected (pc) according to the number of alleles tested. A total of 73 patients were included, 37 were females (50.7 %) with a median disease duration of 72 months (interquartile range (IQR) 24-149). Thirty-three patients (45.2 %) had a family history of psoriasis. When analyzing all the class I and class II HLA antigens, a significantly higher frequency of B38 (odds ratio (OR) 2.95, p = 0.03) and Cw6 (OR 2.78, p = 0.009) was found in PsA patients compared to the control group. On the contrary, the HLA-A11 (OR 0.14, p = 0.04) and B7 (OR 0.31, p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent among healthy controls. Furthermore, B18 was significantly more frequent in patients with early arthritis onset (less than 40 years): seven patients (22.6 %) with early onset compared to two patients (4.8 %) with late onset (p = 0.03). No association between HLA-B27 and spondylitis or HLA-DR4 with polyarticular involvement was observed. The HLA-B38 and Cw6 alleles are associated with a greater PsA susceptibility in Argentine population.

  16. Antigens from Leishmania amastigotes inducing clinical remission of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daly, J A; Gleason, J; Lezama, R; Rodriguez, P J; Silva, E; Indriago, N R

    2011-08-01

    A first generation vaccine (AS100-1) was manufactured with protein from four cultured Leishmania species, which proved to be effective in the treatment of psoriasis. A single blind trial on 3,132 psoriasis patients revealed 508 (16.2%) subjects with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) that received AS100-1 antigens. The study group was distributed according to percent psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) reduction from PASI 10 to PASI 100. All groups decreased in arthritis score (AS), tender joints counts and nail changes after treatment; the highest decreased in the PASI 100 group. Relapses of psoriasis and PsA had PASI and AS lower than initial values before treatment. Clinical remissions were at lower doses and less time, after the second course of treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) lymphocyte subsets (LS) varied with PASI range (1-10, 11-20 and 21-72). Pre-treatment, absolute values of gated LS: CD4+, CD8+HLA-, CD8+HLA+, CD8+CD3-, CD8+CD3+ decreased in PBMC as PASI increased, suggesting migration from the blood to the skin. In contrary to the previous finding, the following LS: CD8+CD4-, CD3+CD8-, HLA+CD8-, CD19, CD8+CD4+ and membrane surface immunoglobulin IgA+, IgD+, IgM+, IgE+, and IgG+ increased in PBMC as PASI increased suggesting activation and proliferation by unknown antigens creating a homeostatic cycle between skin/joints and peripheral blood. After nine doses of AS100-1, the following LS: CD8+CD3+, CD8+HLA+, CD3+CD8-, CD4+CD8-, CD8+HLA-, HLA+CD8-, CD8+CD3-, CD19+, CD8+CD4-, CD8+CD4+, IgA+, IgD+, IgM+, IgE+, and IgG+ decreased significantly as compared with values before treatment. The LS decreased stops the vicious cycle between skin/joints and blood explaining clinical remission of lesions.

  17. INFLUENCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ON CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Nastausheva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and immunological status has been evaluated in 85 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA before and after physiotherapeutic procedures: electrophoresis with dimexid and magnetotherapy. The control group of 31 children did not follow physiotherapeutic procedures. The following results were fixed: clinical indices and immunological status of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been changed in a larger degree in case of magnetotherapy.

  18. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  19. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  20. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly before a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  1. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly after a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  2. CLINICAL CASE OF TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY IN A PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of successful application of a monoclonal antibodies drug to interleukin 6 receptors (tocilizumab at severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis with the development of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Tocilizumab treatment secured a decrease in clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease activity, life quality improvement, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hemophagocytic syndrome remission and allowed avoiding the per os prescription of glucocorticoids.

  3. Interleukins and interleukin receptors in rheumatoid arthritis: Research, diagnostics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, Lili; Varszegi, Dalma; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Sarlos, Patricia; Farago, Bernadett; Javorhazy, Andras; Sumegi, Katalin; Banfai, Zsolt; Melegh, Bela

    2014-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, resulting in a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder. It may affect many tissues and organs, but it primarily affects the flexible joints. In clinical practice patient care generates many questions about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. It is challenging for health care specialists to keep up to date with the medical literature. This review summarizes the pathogenesis, the polymorphisms of interleukin and interleukin genes and the standard available and possible future immunologic targets for RA treatment. The identification of disease-associated interleukin and interleukin receptor genes can provide precious insight into the genetic variations prior to disease onset in order to identify the pathways important for RA pathogenesis. The knowledge of the complex genetic background may prove useful for developing novel therapies and making personalized medicine based on the individual's genetics.

  4. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  5. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J.; Kvien, Tore K.; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Abadie, Eric C.; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for

  6. Applying science in practice: the optimization of biological therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Landewé, Robert B.; da Silva, José António P.

    2010-01-01

    Most authorities recommend starting biological agents upon failure of at least one disease-modifying agent in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. However, owing to the absence of head-to-head studies, there is little guidance about which biological to select. Still, the practicing clinician has to

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice.......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may......, and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical...

  8. Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Magno Coelho Horimoto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24–97% of patients with SSc. Objectives: To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Methods: Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Results: Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%, mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%, limited form of the disease (47.6%, time of diagnosis between 5 and 10 years (47.6% and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9% had positive rheumatoid factor (RF, while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%, with positivity being observed only in patients with

  9. Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Alex Magno Coelho; da Costa, Izaias Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral) and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24-97% of patients with SSc. To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%), mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%), limited form of the disease (47.6%), time of diagnosis between 5 and 10 years (47.6%) and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9%) had positive rheumatoid factor (RF), while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP) test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%), with positivity being observed only in patients with SSc/RA overlap. Comparing the clinical manifestations among the

  10. [Overlap between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: a distinct clinical entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Alex Magno Coelho; Costa, Izaias Pereira da

    2015-03-04

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue characterized by the triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity (cellular and humoral) and tissue fibrosis. It is estimated that musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint of patients with SSc, ranging from 40 to 80%, and mainly in patients with early diffuse disease. Arthritis, clinically observed, may be a feature seen in the presentation of SSc, often leading to early diagnostic errors with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the course of the disease, arthritis is observed in 24 to 97% of patients with SSc. To correlate the occurrence or nonoccurrence of arthritis in patients with SSc of the Midwest region of Brazil with possible distinct clinical and laboratory manifestations observed in three groups of patients. To report the frequency of true association between systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis in patients with clinically and radiologically observed synovitis. Sixty-one SSc patients were subsequently assessed every 3 months within 1 year, in order to clinically observe the occurrence of synovitis and its patterns of progression. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 41 patients with SSc without arthritis, 16 SSc patients with arthritis and 4 patients with overlap of SSc and RA. All patients underwent a radiological examination of the hands at the end of the study. Among all patients evaluated, we found a female predominance (98.7%), mean age of 50.94 years, white color (49.2%), limited form of the disease (47.6%), time of diagnosis between 5 to 10 years (47.6%) and duration of the disease of 8.30 years. Among all patients, 14 (22.9%) had positive rheumatoid factor (RF), while among those with positive RF, only 10 patients had arthritis during one-year follow-up. The antibody anticitrulline (anti-CCP) test was performed in 24 patients, being positive in 4 of them (16.7%), with positivity being observed only in patients with SSc/RA overlap. Comparing the clinical manifestations among

  11. Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunkel, David E; Bauer, Carol A; Sun, Gordon H; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Cunningham, Eugene R; Archer, Sanford M; Blakley, Brian W; Carter, John M; Granieri, Evelyn C; Henry, James A; Hollingsworth, Deena; Khan, Fawad A; Mitchell, Scott; Monfared, Ashkan; Newman, Craig W; Omole, Folashade S; Phillips, C Douglas; Robinson, Shannon K; Taw, Malcolm B; Tyler, Richard S; Waguespack, Richard; Whamond, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile

  12. The Clinical Application of Anti-CCP in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CT Chou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common rheumatic disease in Caucasians and in other ethnic groups. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features. Before 1998, the only serological laboratory test that could contribute to the diagnosis was that for rheumatoid factor (RF. The disease activity markers for the evaluation of clinical symptoms or treatment outcome were the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. As a matter of fact, the diagnosis of early RA is quite impossible, as the clinical criteria are insuffi cient at the beginning stage of the disease. In 1998, Schelleken reported that a high percentage of RA patients had a specifi c antibody that could interact with a synthetic peptide which contained the amino acid citrulline. The high specifi city (98% for RA of this new serological marker, anti-cyclic citrullinated antibody (anti-CCP antibody, can be detected early in RA, before the typical clinical features appear. The presence or absence of this antibody can easily distinguish other rheumatic diseases from RA. Additionally, the titer of anti-CCP can be used to predict the prognosis and treatment outcome after DMARDs or biological therapy. Therefore, with improvement of sensitivity, the anti-CCP antibody will be widely used as a routine laboratory test in the clinical practice for RA.

  13. Psoriatic – Arthritis among Psoriasis Patients Attending Skin Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psoriasis is an autoimmune inflammatory disease which primarily affects the skin but joints may also be targeted. Psoriatic arthritis is a destructive inflammatory arthropathy and ensethopathy which is considered to be rare in sub Saharan Africa. Left untreated the condition is permanently disabling. There are ...

  14. Clinical Practice in Portuguese Sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcão, Violeta; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Joana; Giami, Alain

    2017-11-17

    Few studies explore the clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexuality, despite their role in the sexual-health socialization process. This study focuses on Portuguese sexologists engaged in clinical practice. It aims to characterize sexologists' sex education and training and their clinical practices, including diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This research followed the methodology of an European survey on sexology as a profession (Euro-Sexo). From the 91 respondents who completed questionnaires, 51 (56%) were active in clinical practice. Results indicate that the Portuguese clinical sexologist is significantly older, predominantly male, has had training in sexology, performs more scientific research, and is more engaged in teaching activities when compared to nonclinical working sexologists. This article describes the main sexual problems presented by patients to Portuguese clinical sexologists and highlights differences in the professional groups and approaches toward treating these problems by medical doctors and nonmedical professionals. Results reinforce the idea that there are intra-European differences in the educational background of sexologists and reveal important variations in Portuguese sexologists' education, training, and clinical practice. The representations and practices of the sexologists in Portugal, as in other European countries, are embedded in cultural scenarios and sexual cultures, with implications for the clinical practice.

  15. Learning clinical practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feedback, support and encouragement. To ensure they get the right experience they need to work to a curriculum, and within a programme, so that their learning can be managed. So, postgraduate medical education (PGME) should offer young doctors teaching, clinical experience, supervision and support. It should be able.

  16. Electrogastroenterography in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel M. Kosenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The review contains the information on the basics of electrophysiological evaluation of motor-evacuator function of stomach. It describes the main methods for registration of electric activity of stomach and intestine, characterizes the registered parameters, and gives modern data on its clinical application.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of clinical remission by treat to target strategy in established rheumatoid arthritis: results of the CREATE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, M; de la Fuente, S; Castro-Villegas, M C; Romero-Gómez, M; Ruiz-Vílchez, D; Calvo-Gutiérrez, J; Escudero-Contreras, A; Del Prado, J R; Collantes-Estévez, E; Font, P

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the cost-effectiveness, in daily clinical practice, of the strategy of treating to the target of clinical remission (CR) in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA), after 2 years of treatment with biological therapy. Adult patients with established RA were treated with biological therapy and followed up for 2 years by a multidisciplinary team responsible for their clinical management. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated by the DAS28 score. The direct costs incurred during this period were quantified from the perspective of the healthcare system. We calculated the cost-effectiveness of obtaining a DAS28 cost of achieving CR at 2 years was 79,681 ± 38,880 euros. The strategy of treatment to the target of CR is considered the most effective, but in actual clinical practice in patients with established RA, it has a high cost.

  18. Assessment of enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome; Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup; Schmidt, Erik Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enthesitis is a major feature of psoriatic arthritis. However, clinical assessment of enthesitis is known to lack accuracy and have poor interobserver reliability. OBJECTIVE: To determine effect of training on clinical assessment of enthesitis and to compare ultrasonography with clini...

  19. Pharmacogenomics of Methotrexate Membrane Transport Pathway: Can Clinical Response to Methotrexate in Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aurea; Bernardes, Miguel; Azevedo, Rita; Medeiros, Rui; Seabra, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used as predictors of patients’ therapeutic outcome variability. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the influence of SNPs in genes encoding for MTX membrane transport proteins in order to predict clinical response to MTX. Methods: Clinicopathological data from 233 RA patients treated with MTX were collected, clinical response defined, and patients genotyped for 23 SNPs. Genotype and haplotype analyses were performed using multivariate methods and a genetic risk index (GRI) for non-response was created. Results: Increased risk for non-response was associated to SLC22A11 rs11231809 T carriers; ABCC1 rs246240 G carriers; ABCC1 rs3784864 G carriers; CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs2074087 and rs3784864; and CGG haplotype for ABCC1 rs35592, rs246240 and rs3784864. GRI demonstrated that patients with Index 3 were 16-fold more likely to be non-responders than those with Index 1. Conclusions: This study revealed that SLC22A11 and ABCC1 may be important to identify those patients who will not benefit from MTX treatment, highlighting the relevance in translating these results to clinical practice. However, further validation by independent studies is needed to develop the field of personalized medicine to predict clinical response to MTX treatment. PMID:26086825

  20. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  1. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  2. Good clinical practice in clinical interventional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Herman; Diamant, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Good clinical practice (GCP) guidelines should always be implemented and obeyed in clinical interventional studies. In this mini-review, we will address several burning questions relating to GCP in a concise 'frequently asked questions' format. While compliance to current rules and regulations is our mission, we also wish to play devil's advocate attempting to translate the rules into sizeable chunks using a high dose of common sense.

  3. Treating Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: Position Paper on Applying the Treat-to-target Concept to Canadian Daily Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, Dafna D; Poulin, Yves; Adams, Karen; Bourcier, Marc; Barac, Snezana; Barber, Kirk; Chandran, Vinod; Dutz, Jan; Flanagan, Cathy; Gooderham, Melinda J; Gulliver, Wayne P; Ho, Vincent C; Hong, Chih-Ho; Karsh, Jacob; Khraishi, Majed M; Lynde, Charles W; Papp, Kim A; Rahman, Proton; Rohekar, Sherry; Rosen, Cheryl F; Russell, Anthony S; Vender, Ronald B; Yeung, Jensen; Ziouzina, Olga; Zummer, Michel

    2017-04-01

    To develop preliminary treat-to-target (T2T) recommendations for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) for Canadian daily practice. A task force composed of expert Canadian dermatologists and rheumatologists performed a needs assessment among Canadian clinicians treating these diseases as well as an extensive literature search on the outcome measures used in clinical trials and practice. Based on results from the needs assessment and literature search, the task force established 5 overarching principles and developed 8 preliminary T2T recommendations. The proposed recommendations should improve management of psoriasis and PsA in Canadian daily practice. However, these recommendations must be further validated in a real-world observational study to ensure that their use leads to better longterm outcomes.

  4. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch, Alexandra N; Edwards, Christopher John; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  6. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  7. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice is the official publication of the Medical and Dental Consultants Association of Nigeria (MDCAN) established in 1997 and published regularly twice yearly in June and December. Its purpose is to promote clinical and academic excellence in Medicine and Dentistry and allied sciences ...

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  9. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, Michael D.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives O besity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. Methods T his study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised cl...

  10. MODERN APPROACHES TO CLINICAL AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Rekalov

    2013-10-01

    methods of diagnosis of RA. Describes the diagnostic capabilities of the periarticular soft tissue changes at different stages. Provides information about using US of joints as a methodology for monitoring patients with eRA. The data presents the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with eRA by using different modes of MRI and radiopaque substance with a strong tropism to the synovial membrane. Conclusion: For the purpose of early diagnosis and prognosis of joint erosions appropriate set of laboratory monitoring indicators (ESR, CRP, RF and ACPA anti-MCV characterize the pathological changes of the articular structure in patients with eRA. The introduction into the routine clinical practice US of joints allows to reach high accuracy of the diagnosis of eRA (before the erosive and destructive changes of bone tissue, which significantly improvement prognosis of the patients. Instrumental examination using MRI (especially in the study of small joints and muscles function T1 fs-fat is essential for the study of the pathophysiology of objectification of patients with eRA. When conducting MRI in patients with very eRA - is diagnostic and prognostic factor in the rapid progression to erosive and destructive arthritis.

  11. [Clinical observation of traumatic ankle arthritis with orthopedics lotion on 60 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Observing the clinical curative effect of orthopedics lotion to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, the outpatient department of orthopedics in Guang'anmen Hospital collected 60 cases who were diagnosed as traumatic ankle arthritis. The cases who already met the inclusion criteria, were randomly divided into the treatment group (30 cases) and control group (30 cases). Thirty patients in treatment group were received fumigation treatment with orthopedics lotion; 30 patients in control group were treated by intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate. After 5 weeks treatment, the effects on the both groups would be observed and analysed. Baird-Jackson scoring system was used to assess the overall curative effect. Visual analogue scales (VAS) was used to assess analgesic effect. BJ scores of pre-treatment and post-treatment in both the treatment group and the control group were compared, P orthopedics lotion is a effective way to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, and it has significant effect on analgesic.

  12. Implementing ABPM into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderliter, Alan L; Voora, Raven A; Viera, Anthony J

    2018-02-05

    To review the data supporting the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), and to provide practical guidance for practitioners who are establishing an ambulatory monitoring service. ABPM results more accurately reflect the risk of cardiovascular events than do office measurements of blood pressure. Moreover, many patients with high blood pressure in the office have normal blood pressure on ABPM-a pattern known as white coat hypertension-and have a prognosis similar to individuals who are normotensive in both settings. For these reasons, ABPM is recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension in patients with high office blood pressure before medical therapy is initiated. Similarly, the 2017 ACC/AHA High Blood Pressure Clinical Practice Guideline advocates the use of out-of-office blood pressure measurements to confirm hypertension and evaluate the efficacy of blood pressure-lowering medications. In addition to white coat hypertension, blood pressure phenotypes that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and that can be recognized by ABPM include masked hypertension-characterized by normal office blood pressure but high values on ABPM-and high nocturnal blood pressure. In this review, best practices for starting a clinical ABPM service, performing an ABPM monitoring session, and interpreting and reporting ABPM data are described. ABPM is a valuable adjunct to careful office blood pressure measurement in diagnosing hypertension and in guiding antihypertensive therapy. Following recommended best practices can facilitate implementation of ABPM into clinical practice.

  13. Predictive risk factors of serious infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with abatacept in common practice: results from the Orencia and Rheumatoid Arthritis (ORA) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J H; Gottenberg, J E; Ravaud, P; Cantagrel, A; Combe, B; Flipo, R M; Schaeverbeke, T; Houvenagel, E; Gaudin, P; Loeuille, D; Rist, S; Dougados, M; Sibilia, J; Le Loët, X; Meyer, O; Solau-Gervais, E; Marcelli, C; Bardin, T; Pane, I; Baron, G; Perrodeau, E; Mariette, X

    2016-06-01

    Little data are available regarding the rate and predicting factors of serious infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with abatacept (ABA) in daily practice. We therefore addressed this issue using real-life data from the Orencia and Rheumatoid Arthritis (ORA) registry. ORA is an independent 5-year prospective registry promoted by the French Society of Rheumatology that includes patients with RA treated with ABA. At baseline, 3 months, 6 months and every 6 months or at disease relapse, during 5 years, standardised information is prospectively collected by trained clinical nurses. A serious infection was defined as an infection occurring during treatment with ABA or during the 3 months following withdrawal of ABA without any initiation of a new biologic and requiring hospitalisation and/or intravenous antibiotics and/or resulting in death. Baseline characteristics and comorbidities: among the 976 patients included with a follow-up of at least 3 months (total follow-up of 1903 patient-years), 78 serious infections occurred in 69 patients (4.1/100 patient-years). Predicting factors of serious infections: on univariate analysis, an older age, history of previous serious or recurrent infections, diabetes and a lower number of previous anti-tumour necrosis factor were associated with a higher risk of serious infections. On multivariate analysis, only age (HR per 10-year increase 1.44, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.76, p=0.001) and history of previous serious or recurrent infections (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.20, p=0.009) were significantly associated with a higher risk of serious infections. In common practice, patients treated with ABA had more comorbidities than in clinical trials and serious infections were slightly more frequently observed. In the ORA registry, predictive risk factors of serious infections include age and history of serious infections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  14. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Uptake in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Immunosuppressive Therapy in the UK: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using Data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop, Kevin L.; Pye, Stephen R.; Brown, Benjamin; Dixon, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) recommend using influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations to mitigate infection risk. The level of adherence to these guidelines is not well known in the UK. The aims of this study were to describe the uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in patients with RA in the UK, to compare the characteristics of those vaccinated to those not vaccinated and to compare vaccination rates across regions of the UK. Methods A retrospective cohort study of adults diagnosed with incident RA and treated with non-biologic immunosuppressive therapy, using data from a large primary care database. For the influenza vaccination, patients were considered unvaccinated on 1st September each year and upon vaccination their status changed to vaccinated. For pneumococcal vaccination, patients were considered vaccinated after their first vaccination until the end of follow-up. Patients were stratified by age 65 at the start of follow-up, given differences in vaccination guidelines for the general population. Results Overall (N = 15,724), 80% patients received at least one influenza vaccination, and 50% patients received a pneumococcal vaccination, during follow-up (mean 5.3 years). Of those aged below 65 years (N = 9,969), 73% patients had received at least one influenza vaccination, and 43% patients received at least one pneumococcal vaccination. Of those aged over 65 years (N = 5,755), 91% patients received at least one influenza vaccination, and 61% patients had received at least one pneumococcal vaccination. Those vaccinated were older, had more comorbidity and visited the GP more often. Regional differences in vaccination rates were seen with the highest rates in Northern Ireland, and the lowest rates in London. Conclusions One in five patients received no influenza vaccinations and one in two patients received no pneumonia vaccine over five years of follow-up. There remains significant scope to improve

  15. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibfelt EH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Else Helene Ibfelt,1 Dorte Vendelbo Jensen,2,3 Merete Lund Hetland2,4 1Registry Support Centre (East, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup University Hospital, 2DANBIO Registry and Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, 3Department of Rheumatology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Introduction: DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. Study population: The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Main variables: Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. Descriptive data: The DANBIO cohort comprised ~26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6

  16. [Seborrheic dermatitis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Francesca; Mercuri, Santo Raffaele; Naldi, Luigi

    2011-03-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin condition characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches in areas rich in sebaceous glands. It is one of the most frequent skin disorders and may be socially embarrassing. Fungi of the genus Malassezia, lipid-dependent, ubiquitous skin residents, play a pathogenic role. Topical antifungal agents (e.g., ketoconazole) are the mainstay of treatment, and if used intermittently they can maintain remission. The vehicle itself may also play a relevant role. Improvements in diagnostic criteria, severity measures and outcome variables are needed to better design clinical trials and inform clinical practice.

  17. Reflections in the clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell-Carrió, F; Hernández-Clemente, J C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze some models of expert decision and their impact on the clinical practice. We have analyzed decision-making considering the cognitive aspects (explanatory models, perceptual skills, analysis of the variability of a phenomenon, creating habits and inertia of reasoning and declarative models based on criteria). We have added the importance of emotions in decision making within highly complex situations, such as those occurring within the clinical practice. The quality of the reflective act depends, among other factors, on the ability of metacognition (thinking about what we think). Finally, we propose an educational strategy based on having a task supervisor and rectification scenarios to improve the quality of medical decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Arnor; Graziano, Frank M

    1993-12-01

    Preview Once considered relatively benign, rheumatoid arthritis is now recognized as a disabling systemic disease that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Early, aggressive therapy may be critical for altering the course of disease. Drs Vikings-son and Graziano describe the causes and clinical course of rheumatoid arthritis and discuss diagnostic considerations and prognostic indicators that support optimum management.

  19. Clinical and microbiological findings of septic arthritis caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, F; Jiménez, G; Rodríguez-Granger, J; Sampedro, A; Aliaga-Martínez, L; Navarro-Marí, J M

    2017-12-01

    To report a case of septic arthritis due to H. parainfluenzae and to review the clinical and microbiological characteristics of published case patients. Data was collected on age, sex, infection localization, underlying risk factors, symptom onset-diagnosis interval, analytical findings, microbiological diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and follow-up of the present patient (presenting with septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis due to H. parainfluenzae) and those identified in a literature analysis. Data of 18 patients, including 17 reported case patients, was collected. Mean age at presentation was 51±9 years. Underlying diseases for septic arthritis were recorded in 11 patients. The infection site was the knee in eight patients, hip and/or acromioclavicular joint in five. Pain was observed in 15 patients and fever in 10; the mean symptom onset-diagnosis interval was 9.4 days. Diagnosis was obtained from synovial fluid aspirate in 12 patients and from blood cultures in four. Susceptibility of H. parainfluenzae strains was reported in 12 cases. Eight patients were treated with cephalosporins and 10 with penicillins. A favorable outcome was observed in 13 patients. Septic arthritis caused by H. parainfluenzae is a rare entity that requires a high level of suspicion before application of laboratory methods for rapid diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis: clinical and economic consequences of the use of etanercept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Sacchi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritis (SpA is the name for a family of inflammatory rheumatic disease that can affect the spine and joints, ligaments and tendons. Spondyloarthritis disease include ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, the spondylitis associated with the inflammatory bowel diseases and the undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. The most common treatments prescribed for spondyloarthritis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs given in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Due to a recently suggested role of the tumour necrosis factor (TNFa in the pathogenesis of SpA, new therapies specifically blocking TNFa have been investigated. Anti-TNF medications currently available on the Italian market are etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. The aim of the present work was to furnish a clinical and pharmaco-economical profile of etanercept in treatment of psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis based on a review of the published literature. Economical evaluations performed in several countries indicate that total treatment costs are lower with etanercept and adalimumab as compared to infliximab, mainly because of differences in the route of administration. Etanercept appears to be cost effective for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis especially considering improved health related quality of life and lower medical costs due to superior efficacy of treatment.

  1. Agreement of clinical examination and ultrasound methods for detection of joints involvements in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karimzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial tissue inflammation and destruction of articular components which if not controlled properly, can cause disability in patients. For this reason, evaluation of disease activity and its control is very important. In recent years using sonography is promising for the evaluation of disease activity. This study aimed to compare “clinical examination” and “ultrasonography” methods in the detection of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2015 in Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan. Based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria, ninety patients with rheumatoid arthritis who diagnosed by rheumatologist entered into the study. All patients, collaborator by radiologists were subjected to sonography of specific joints structures using two methods, i.e., high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. Results: A total of 2520 joints from ninety patients were examined by physical examination and ultrasonography that 244 joints (9.7% in physical examination and 348 joints (13.4% in ultrasonography were involved and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Probably, ultrasonography can diagnose joint involvement better than physical examination in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Agreement of clinical examination and ultrasound methods for detection of joints involvements in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Hadi; Rafiei, Ramin; Sayedbonakdar, Zahra; Karami, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial tissue inflammation and destruction of articular components which if not controlled properly, can cause disability in patients. For this reason, evaluation of disease activity and its control is very important. In recent years using sonography is promising for the evaluation of disease activity. This study aimed to compare "clinical examination" and "ultrasonography" methods in the detection of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2015 in Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan. Based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria, ninety patients with rheumatoid arthritis who diagnosed by rheumatologist entered into the study. All patients, collaborator by radiologists were subjected to sonography of specific joints structures using two methods, i.e., high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. A total of 2520 joints from ninety patients were examined by physical examination and ultrasonography that 244 joints (9.7%) in physical examination and 348 joints (13.4%) in ultrasonography were involved and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant ( P < 0.001). Probably, ultrasonography can diagnose joint involvement better than physical examination in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Candida infections in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients treated with IL-17 inhibitors and their practical management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, D M; Mrowietz, U; Puig, L

    2017-01-01

    infections, especially those due to Candida sp., as evidenced by findings in patients with genetic defects in IL-17 related immune responses. To assess the potential of anti-Il-17 treatment to promote Candida infections, here we have systematically reviewed published clinical trials of patients...... with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Candida infections were reported in 4.0% of patients treated with brodalumab, 2.1% with secukinumab, and 3.3% with ixekizumab, compared with 0.3%, 2.3% and 0.8% of those assigned to placebo, ustekinumab or etanercept, respectively. Although the incidence of Candida...... infection was found to be increased by a only small degree during anti-IL-17 therapy, patients undergoing such treatment should be monitored for fungal infection and treated as necessary. We propose to adopt the recently updated recommendations for the practical management of Candida infection in patients...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of South African (SA) patients are scarce. Objectives. To assess clinical, biochemical and radiological features in a single-centre SA cohort. Methods. We conducted a prospective assessment ...

  5. On research in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Nanivadekar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical research implies advancing current knowledge about health care by continually developing and testing new ideas about diseases, products, procedures, and strategies. Although this trait is inherent in human nature, it needs to be encouraged, nurtured, groomed, and channelized by creating a suitable atmosphere for it, providing the necessary resources, inculcating the necessary conceptual and manual skills, and rewarding the efforts and achievements suitably. Language, logic, statistics, and psychology play an important role in acquiring and developing research capability. To be socially relevant and economically viable, clinical research will need to partner with patients and their doctors in identifying what their goals of health care are, what they value, and what they are willing to "buy" in terms of goods and services. Besides, clinical research will need to bring on one platform the sponsors, the researchers, the patients, the payers, and the regulators to ensure that they do not work at cross purposes, that the cost of developing health care measures is scaled down through innovative approaches such as large simple trials, sequential trials, early marketing conditional on post-marketing surveillance, and so on. All these will be possible if day-to-day practice is slowly and systemically transformed into the largest laboratory of clinical research, which it ought to be, by forming networks of research-oriented practices, and popularizing the use of data collection and analysis tools such as Epi Info which are in the public domain.

  6. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  7. Kinetics of gene expression and bone remodelling in the clinical phase of collagen induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja Caroline Marie; Litman, Thomas; Marstrand, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological bone changes differ considerably between inflammatory arthritic diseases and most studies have focused on bone erosion. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a model for rheumatoid arthritis, which, in addition to bone erosion, demonstrates bone formation at the time...... of clinical manifestations. The objective of this study was to use this model to characterise the histological and molecular changes in bone remodelling, and relate these to the clinical disease development. Methods: A histological and gene expression profiling time-course study on bone remodelling in CIA......), and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1). Pregnancy-associated protein A (Pappa) and periostin (Postn), differentially expressed in the early disease phase, are proposed to participate in bone formation, and we suggest that they play a role in early bone formation in the CIA model. Comparison to human genome...

  8. Clinical significance of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of wrist joint in Rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yong Woon; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    To assess the role of contrast-enhanced dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in evaluation disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Forty-seven wrist joints with rheumatoid arthritis were examined prospectively. Coronal images of the wrist were obtained using fat-suppression Fast multi-planar spoiled gradient recalled (FMPSPGR) acquisition in the steady state ; TR/TE 102/6.4 msec, flip angle = 60, 4 slices per sequence, FOV = 8 cm, matrix 256 X 192 at 1.5 Tesla. Scans were carried out once before and five to eight times after an intravenous Gd-DPTA injection, at 30-second-intervals. The enhancement of synovium were measured, the enhancement ratio was calculated(postcontrast SNR/precontrast SNR) and time-enhancement ratio curves were plotted. Patients were divided into three groups according to the ratio of initial to peak enhancement : less than 30% ; 30-80% more than 80%. Differences among the three groups were statistically tested using clinical indices and laboratory data as variable. Comparing one group with another, there were no significant differences in clinical indices and laboratory data except for the parameter of grip strength. Enhancement pattern measured in a single wrist joint was not comparable to a clinical index in predicting disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

  9. Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

    2013-09-01

    The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  11. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  12. The clinical significance of Epitrochlear lymphadenopathy on elbow radiographs in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Bae Ju; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Hak Soo; Song, Ho Taek; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the radiographic findings of epitrochlear lymphadenopathy with regard to the distribution and severity of the disease and clinal parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Forty six patients with rheumatoid arthritis in whom epitrochlear oval-shaped densities were seen on radiographs were involved in this study. There were 14 cases of unilateral epitrochlear lymphadenopathy in which bilateral arthritic evidence was revealed by radiographs (mixed group), and 32 of bilateral lymphadenopathy in which there was arthritic evidence (positive group). Twenty-three patients in whom lymphadenopathy was not seen on radiographs of the elbow and who were diagnosed as suffering from rheumatoid arthritis functioned as controls (negative group).For scoring the degree of arthritis using the simplified scoring method proposed by Kaye et al., joints were divided into six groups, as follows: Joint 1, elbow; Joint 2, wrist; Joint 3, radial (1st and 2nd) PIP and MCP; Joint 4, ulnar (3rd, 4th, 5th) PIP and MCP; Joint 5, Joints 1 + 2+ 3 + 4; Joint 6, Joints 1 + 4. For each joint, scores were compared with those on the contralateral side in the mixed group. Differences in clinical parameters ( disease duration, rheumatoid factor, ESR, and CRP), and scores for each joint in each arm were statistically compared between be positive and negative group. The number, mean diameter, and maximal diameter of epitrochlear lymph nodes were calculated and correlated with clinical parameters and scores for each joint. To evaluate the incidence of epitrochlear lymphadenopathy without radiographic evidence of arthritis in 46 patients (78 arms) with lymphadenopathy, the frequency of cases in which the score for the joint was zero was assessed. In the mixed group, the mean score for Joint 6 of the arm with epitrochlear lymphadenopathy was significantly higher than that for the contralateral side in the mixed group (p=3D0.022). Only CRP was significantly higher in the positive group than

  13. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  14. A report on clinical application of 99Tc-MDP treatment in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huilin; Chen Wanqian; Xie Mei; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To asses clinical application of the Yunke therapy and observe the early curative effect in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 9 patients of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled. The age ranged 4.5-16 years old with medical history ranged 3-12 months. All patients had been treated using Yunke therapy. A high dose of 100 mg or 200 mg was given by intravenous infusion in alternative day for 2 to 3 times during the first course of treatment. Then a small dose of 5 mg alternate day was given by intravenous injection for 10-15 times during the second course and the treatment phase continue for 2-3 courses. Results: Significance curative effect was observed in all cases. Conclusion: Early clinical effect of the Yunke therapy was obvious in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It was necessary that a specific dose be used for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  15. [The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis--the complex of three independent mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Hans Georg; Meyer-Scholten, Carola; Zorn, Kati

    2009-01-01

    The assumption of inflamation as the only cause of the complex clinical picture of rheumatoid atrhritis does not correspond to facts. We have found and proven the existence of three seemingly unconnected mechanisms, and only their combination can account for the general clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis. They are: 1. immunologic synovitis, responsible for pain, swelling and stiffnes; 2. oncological process ("tumorlike proliferation"), responsible for the destruction of joints; 3. Primary necrotizing process, responsible for the (sometimes lethal) destructions in the heart and blood vessels.

  16. Generalization and extrapolation of treatment effects from clinical studies in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, S.C.; Kievit, W.; Janse, R.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Fransen, J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Welsing, P.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pragmatic clinical trials have been proposed as a solution for nongeneralizability of randomized clinical trial (RCT) results. We investigated whether treatment effects of pragmatic clinical trials are indeed generalizable to clinical practice and how efficacy estimates from published

  17. Septic Arthritis of the Elbow in Children: Clinical Presentation and Microbiological Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduaguba, Afamefuna M; Flynn, John M; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the elbow in children is a rare but important musculoskeletal infection, and there is little published data to guide treating clinicians. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and diagnostic findings, associated pathology, and microbiological profile of septic arthritis of the elbow in a pediatric population. We retrospectively analyzed a consecutive series of children who had an elbow arthrocentesis for presumed septic arthritis and whose joint aspirates were positive for microbial growth. Data collected included demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, imaging, and laboratory data, including culture results. Twelve children underwent diagnostic arthrocentesis of the elbow joint for septic arthritis at an average age of 6 years and 9 months (range, 2 mo to 13 y and 7 mo). Every child had pain, localized erythema and edema, and restricted range of motion; 10/12 were febrile. Mean duration of symptoms prior to joint tap was 4 days (range, 1 to 14 d). Concurrent osteomyelitis was found in 7 patients, as confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): 5 at initial presentation and 2 after readmission for persistent symptoms. Causative pathogens were MSSA (7), MRSA (2), Group G streptococcus (1), Pseuodomonas aureginosa (1), and Streptococcus pneumonia (1). ESR was >40 mm/h in 8/11 patients, CRP was >2 mg/dL in all patients, and synovial WBC count was >50,000 cells/mm in 8/9 patients. One patient developed fulminant sepsis during hospitalization and 2 children were readmitted within 30 days of discharge for unrecognized osteomyelitis and/or recurrence of septic arthritis of the elbow. In 12 children studied with septic arthritis, S. aureus was the most common pathogen. Diagnosis is often delayed, and in most cases inflammatory markers were elevated (ESR>40 mm/h, CRP>2 mg/dL). Concomitant osteomyelitis is quite common, and therefore magnetic resonance imaging should be considered as part of the diagnostic work

  18. Nursing support at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis: Time and space for emotions, practicalities and self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehir, M; Carr, M; Davis, B; Radford, S; Robertson, L; Tipler, S; Hewlett, S

    2008-06-01

    Following a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), patients have to adapt to lifelong, unpredictable but repeated episodes of pain and disability, potentially leading to permanent loss of function and its consequences on their lives. We established nurse clinics with the aim of supporting newly diagnosed RA patients in adapting to and managing their long-term condition. The aim of this study was to explore the content of clinic discussions in this new clinical service, in order to ascertain patients' needs upon diagnosis. All clinic letters from the nurse to the family doctor were analysed. Every topic mentioned was systematically coded independently by a researcher and a patient research partner, who compared and agreed codes. Codes were organized into categories, and, finally, into overarching themes. Twenty-four patients had 74 appointment letters. A total of 79 codes were identified, from which ten categories emerged, and, finally, three overarching themes. The first theme related to 'Emotional support', which underpinned the other two themes and was discussed in almost all appointments. Issues included discussions about the emotional consequences of RA, needing time to adjust, frustration and fears for the future. The second theme 'Practicalities of the treatment of RA', included subordinate themes relating to the nature of RA, such as identity, cause, timeline, consequences and treatment. Medication issues were discussed and referrals to the multidisciplinary team were made. The final theme related to the 'Self-management of RA', and included discussions on physical symptoms and their management. The offer to attend a nurse clinic soon after diagnosis allowed RA patients to discuss a wide range of practical and self-management issues. However, most patients also took the opportunity and time to discuss emotional reactions and adaptations to diagnosis. The data suggest an unmet need for emotional support that a nurse clinic might be able to provide.

  19. Clinical significance of changes of plasma prethrombotic state markers levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghua; Qian Haigen; Gao Li; Tang Jie

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of plasma prethrombotic state markers levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: The plasma concentrations of TAT, FPA, PC, vWF, P-selectin, TpP and D-D were detected with ELISA in 84 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 70 controls. Hand and wrist X-ray pictures were taken in all the 84 patients for staging of the disease with ARA 1987 revised criteria. Results: The plasma levels of TpP, TAT, vWF, FPA, P-Selectin and D-D were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P<0.05, respectively), but the plasma levels of PC were significantly lower (P<0.01). Changes of levels between successive stages were significantly (P<0.05) with the exception of the change between stage III and stage IV. Except PC, the levels of all the markers were significantly higher in patients with active disease (n=46) than those in patients with inactive disease (n=38) (P<0.05). Conclusion: There was risk for development of thrombotic events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and prophylactic treatment might be desirable. (authors)

  20. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Schueller, Gerd; Aringer, Martin; Weber, Michael; Kainberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings

  1. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice.Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fused, multicuspid, supernumerary deciduous tooth 64s of having several interconnected roots, and third - erupted odontoma between teeth 13 and 14. In all cases treatment involved the removal of the supernumerary tooth.Conclusions: The decision on proceeding with the supernumerary teeth should be based on the full clinical picture and interview. Early diagnosis and removal of supernumerary teeth allow to avoid or reduce possible complications.

  2. Bullous pemphigoid: clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes de Vega, I; Iranzo-Fernández, P; Mascaró-Galy, J M

    2014-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease in which autoantibodies are directed against components of the basement membrane. Most of these antibodies belong to the immunoglobulin G class and bind principally to 2 hemidesmosomal proteins: the 180-kD antigen (BP180) and the 230-kD antigen (BP230). It is the most common blistering disease in the adult population in developed countries, with an estimated incidence in Spain of 0.2 to 3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The disease primarily affects older people, although it can also occur in young people and even in children. In recent years, advances in clinical practice have led to a better understanding and improved management of this disorder. These advances include new diagnostic techniques, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for BP180 and new drugs for the treatment of BP, with diverse therapeutic targets. There is, however, still no international consensus on guidelines for the management of BP. This article is an updated review of the scientific literature on the treatment of BP. It focuses primarily on evidence-based recommendations and is written from a practical standpoint based on experience in the routine management of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis) for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. The DANBIO cohort comprised ∼26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6,200 patients with psoriatic arthritis in 2015. DANBIO has high nationwide coverage and completeness on key data variables. More than 60 original papers as well as annual reports of clinical quality (since 2005) have been published. DANBIO is a powerful register for research in rheumatologic diseases and furthermore serves as a Clinical Quality Register with the aim of monitoring treatment quality in patients with RA in Denmark.

  4. Body composition in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspergillus arthritis: analysis of clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of 31 reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Henry, Michael; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Denning, David W; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Aspergillus arthritis is a debilitating form of invasive aspergillosis. Little is known about its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory features, treatment, and prognosis. Cases of Aspergillus arthritis were reviewed in the English literature from 1967 through 2015 for variables of arthritis with Aspergillus spp. recovered from joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, symptoms, signs, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Among 31 evaluable cases, 87% were males and 13% pediatric. Median age was 50 y (range 1-83 y). Seventeen (55%) patients were immunosuppressed with such conditions as hematological malignancies (26%), corticosteroids (39%), and/or transplantation (26%). Approximately one-half (52%) of patients had hematogenous seeding of the joint, and more than 80% had de novo infection with no prior antifungal therapy. Oligoarticular infection (2-3 joints) occurred in 45% and contiguous osteomyelitis was present in 61%. Clinical manifestations included pain (87%), edema (26%), and limited function (23%), with knees (35%), intervertebral discs (26%), and hips (16%) being most commonly infected. Aspergillus fumigatus constituted 77% of cases followed by Aspergillus flavus in 13%, Aspergillus niger in 3%, and not specified in 7%. Median ESR was 90 mm/hr and median CRP was 3.6 mg/dl. Median synovial fluid WBC was 17,200/μL (7,300-128,000) with 72% PMNs (range 61-92). Osteolysis occurred in 35%, and soft-tissue extension 47%. Nineteen patients (61%) were managed with combined medical and surgical therapy, 10 (32%) with medical therapy only, and 2 (6%) surgery only. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the most frequently used agents with median duration of therapy of 219 days (range 30-545). Surgical interventions included debridement in 61%, drainage 19%, and amputation 6%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 71% and relapse occurred in 16%. Medical therapy was reinstituted with successful outcome in

  6. Relationship Between Work Productivity and Clinical Characteristics in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Mejía, Carlos Eduardo; Galarza-Delgado, Dionicio Ángel; Colunga-Pedraza, Iris Jazmín; Azpiri-López, José Ramón; Wah-Suárez, Martín; Wimer-Castillo, Blanca Otilia; Salazar-Sepúlveda, Laura Leticia

    2018-03-01

    This study assesses the relationship between the ability to perform productive activities and the clinical characteristics of RA, such as disease activity, quality of life, functional capacity, workload, pharmacotherapy, and comorbidities. A cross-sectional, observational and descriptive study was conducted. Patients aged 18-75years with a diagnosis of RA according to ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria who attended regularly to the Rheumatology service in the period between January and March 2017 were included. The questionnaires, WPAI-AR, HAQ-DI and RAQoL, were applied. RA disease activity was measured by DAS28-PCR. Correlations were made between the clinical data obtained and work productivity and activity impairment measured by WPAI-AR. Two hundred four patients with a diagnosis of RA were included, of whom 92.6% were women. Mean age was 54.46±9.3years. Regarding the percentage of impairment of daily life activities, we found a significant difference between employed and unemployed patients (P≤.002). A positive correlation was found between RA activity measured by DAS28-PCR, quality of life, and functional ability with the percentages of absenteeism, presenteeism, overall productivity loss, and impairment of daily life activities. A correlation between RA disease activity, functional capacity, quality of life, and working impairment was found. The strongest association was established with the degree of functional capacity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Distress management. Clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The evaluation and treatment model expressed in the NCCN Distress Management Guidelines recommends that each new patient be rapidly assessed in the office or clinic waiting room for evidence of distress using a brief screening tool (the Distress Thermometer and Problem List) presented in Figure 1 (see page 369). A score of 5 or greater on the thermometer should trigger further evaluation and referral to a psychosocial service. The choice of which service should be determined by the problem areas specified on the Problem List. Patients with practical and psychosocial problems are referred to social work, emotional or psychological (excessive sadness, worry, nervousness) problems to mental health, and spiritual concerns to pastoral counselors. The primary oncology team members--doctor, nurse, and social worker--are central to making this model work. Team members collect information from the brief screening and problem list and expand it with the clinical evaluation. It is critical for at least one team member to be familiar with the mental health, psychosocial, and pastoral counseling resources available in the institution and the community. A list of the names and phone numbers for these resources should be kept in all oncology clinics and updated frequently. The first step in implementing this model is to establish a multidisciplinary committee in each institution or office responsible for 1) revising and modifying the standards of care to fit the particular clinical care setting and 2) implementing and monitoring the use of these standards. Because each institution has its own culture, standards must be implemented in ways that are compatible with each institution. The second step is to institute professional educational programs to ensure that staff is 1) aware that distress is under-recognized, 2) knowledgeable about the management of distress, and 3) aware of the resources available to treat it. It is important to have access to mental health professionals and

  8. Effects of Amerindian Genetic Ancestry on Clinical Variables and Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Elena; García de la Torre, Ignacio; Sacnún, Mónica; Goñi, Mario; Berbotto, Guillermo; Paira, Sergio; Musuruana, Jorge Luis; Graf, César; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Messina, Osvaldo D; Babini, Alejandra; Strusberg, Ingrid; Marcos, Juan Carlos; Scherbarth, Hugo; Spindler, Alberto; Quinteros, Ana; Toloza, Sergio; Moreno, José Luis C; Catoggio, Luis J; Tate, Guillermo; Eimon, Alicia; Citera, Gustavo; Pellet, Antonio Catalán; Nasswetter, Gustavo; Cardiel, Mario H; Miranda, Pedro; Ballesteros, Francisco; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A; Acevedo-Vásquez, Eduardo M; García, Conrado García; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2017-12-01

    To define whether Amerindian genetic ancestry correlates with clinical and therapeutic variables in admixed individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from Latin America. Patients with RA (n = 1347) and healthy controls (n = 1012) from Argentina, Mexico, Chile, and Peru were included. Samples were genotyped for the Immunochip v1 using the Illumina platform. Clinical data were obtained through interviews or the clinical history. Percentage of Amerindian ancestry was comparable between cases and controls. Morning stiffness (p ancestry after Bonferroni correction. Higher Amerindian ancestry correlated only with weight loss (p Bonferroni ancestry correlated with higher doses of azathioprine (p ancestry protects against most major clinical criteria of RA, but regarding the association of RF with increased European ancestry, age, sex, and smoking are modifiers. Ancestry also correlates with the therapeutic profiles.

  9. Prevalence Of Lung Involvement Due To Rheumatoid Arthritis Based On Clinical, Radiographic And Pulmonary Functions Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighi N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary involvement is a common and serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis. This cross sectional study sought to determine the prevalence of pulmonary disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of history, physical examination, chest X-ray and PFT. Materials and Methods: 103 patients (81 Women, 22 Men fulfilling the ACR (American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA (Rheumatoid arthritis were consecutively included in a cross sectional study. Detailed medical (including respiratory symptoms and the disease activity symptoms and drug and occupational histories and smoking were obtained. All patients underwent a complete pulmonary and rheumatologic examination and conventional chest radiography. All patients underwent PFT that comprised spirometry and body plethysmography. Results for PFTs were expressed as percentage of predicted values for each individual adjusted for age, sex, and height. Results: On the basis of history: Their mean age was 43.3 ± 2.6 years (range: 17-74 and the mean duration of the disease was 69.3 ± 15.6 months. Rheumatoid factor was positive in% 61.2. No patients were 0.5Pack/Year smoker in whole life. Prevalence of pulmonary involvement based on radiographic and pulmonary function test detected in 41 patients (39/7%. The most frequent respiratory clinical finding was dyspnea (33%, (NYHA grade I in 17.5% and NYHA grade II in 15.5%, Cough (with or without sputum in 13.6 %, Crackle was the most sign in pulmonary examination (5.8%. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 13.3 % that the most common finding in this study was reticulonodular pattern in 20 patients (19.4 %, and pleural effusion detected in 7 patients (6.7%. PFT was abnormal in 30 patients (29.1 %. A significant decrease of FEF 25%-75% below 1.64 SD. Small airway involvements was the most abnormal finding of PFT. No relation between rheumatoid arthritis disease activity (ESR>30, Morning stiffness>30', Anemia, thrombocytosis with

  10. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  11. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common diseases affecting adults. It is the most common chronic disease in children in the United States today and the fifth most common chronic disease in the United States overall. AR is estimated to affect nearly 1 in every 6 Americans and generates $2 to $5 billion in direct health expenditures annually. It can impair quality of life and, through loss of work and school attendance, is responsible for as much as $2 to $4 billion in lost productivity annually. Not surprisingly, myriad diagnostic tests and treatments are used in managing this disorder, yet there is considerable variation in their use. This clinical practice guideline was undertaken to optimize the care of patients with AR by addressing quality improvement opportunities through an evaluation of the available evidence and an assessment of the harm-benefit balance of various diagnostic and management options. The primary purpose of this guideline is to address quality improvement opportunities for all clinicians, in any setting, who are likely to manage patients with AR as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The guideline is intended to be applicable for both pediatric and adult patients with AR. Children under the age of 2 years were excluded from the clinical practice guideline because rhinitis in this population may be different than in older patients and is not informed by the same evidence base. The guideline is intended to focus on a limited number of quality improvement opportunities deemed most important by the working group and is not intended to be a comprehensive reference for diagnosing and managing AR. The recommendations outlined in the guideline are not intended to represent the standard of care for patient management, nor are the recommendations intended to limit treatment or care provided to individual patients. The development group made a strong

  12. Septic arthritis of the knee: clinical and laboratory comparison of groups with different etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Partezani Helito

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To clinically and epidemiologically characterize a population diagnosed with and treated for septic arthritis of the knee, to evaluate the treatment results and to analyze the differences between patients with positive and negative culture results, patients with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial isolates and patients with S. aureus- and non-S. aureus-related infections. METHODS: One hundred and five patients with septic knee arthritis were included in this study. The clinical and epidemiological data were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed to compare patients with and without an isolated causative agent, patients with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens and patients with S. aureus-related and non S. aureus-related infections. RESULTS: Causative agents were isolated in 81 patients. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 65 patients and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated in 16 patients. The most commonly isolated bacterium was S. aureus. Comparing cases with an isolated pathogen to cases without an isolated pathogen, no differences between the studied variables were found except for the longer hospital stays of patients in whom an etiological agent was identified. When comparing Gram-positive bacteria with Gram-negative bacteria, patients with Gram-positive-related infections exhibited higher leukocyte counts. Patients with S. aureus-related infections were more frequently associated with healthcare-related environmental encounters. CONCLUSION: S. aureus is the most common pathogen of septic knee arthritis. Major differences were not observed between infections with isolated and non-isolated pathogens and between infections with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. S. aureus infections were more likely to be associated with a prior healthcare environment exposure.

  13. Applying Advanced Analytical Approaches to Characterize the Impact of Specific Clinical Gaps and Profiles on the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cordell, Karyn D; Joubin, Kathy; Haimowitz, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to add a predictive modeling approach to the meta-analysis of continuing medical education curricula to determine whether this technique can be used to better understand clinical decision making. Using the education of rheumatologists on rheumatoid arthritis management as a model, this study demonstrates how the combined methodology has the ability to not only characterize learning gaps but also identify those proficiency areas that have the greatest impact on clinical behavior. The meta-analysis included seven curricula with 25 activities. Learners who identified as rheumatologists were evaluated across multiple learning domains, using a uniform methodology to characterize learning gains and gaps. A performance composite variable (called the treatment individualization and optimization score) was then established as a target upon which predictive analytics were conducted. Significant predictors of the target included items related to the knowledge of rheumatologists and confidence concerning 1) treatment guidelines and 2) tests that measure disease activity. In addition, a striking demographic predictor related to geographic practice setting was also identified. The results demonstrate the power of advanced analytics to identify key predictors that influence clinical behaviors. Furthermore, the ability to provide an expected magnitude of change if these predictors are addressed has the potential to substantially refine educational priorities to those drivers that, if targeted, will most effectively overcome clinical barriers and lead to the greatest success in achieving treatment goals.

  14. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial for Reducing Arthritis Fatigue by clinical Teams (RAFT) using cognitive-behavioural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Ambler, N; Almeida, C; Blair, P S; Choy, E; Dures, E; Hammond, A; Hollingworth, W; Kirwan, J; Plummer, Z; Rooke, C; Thorn, J; Tomkinson, K; Pollock, J

    2015-08-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fatigue is distressing, leading to unmanageable physical and cognitive exhaustion impacting on health, leisure and work. Group cognitive-behavioural (CB) therapy delivered by a clinical psychologist demonstrated large improvements in fatigue impact. However, few rheumatology teams include a clinical psychologist, therefore, this study aims to examine whether conventional rheumatology teams can reproduce similar results, potentially widening intervention availability. This is a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial of a group CB intervention for RA fatigue self-management, delivered by local rheumatology clinical teams. 7 centres will each recruit 4 consecutive cohorts of 10-16 patients with RA (fatigue severity ≥ 6/10). After consenting, patients will have baseline assessments, then usual care (fatigue self-management booklet, discussed for 5-6 min), then be randomised into control (no action) or intervention arms. The intervention, Reducing Arthritis Fatigue by clinical Teams (RAFT) will be cofacilitated by two local rheumatology clinicians (eg, nurse/occupational therapist), who will have had brief training in CB approaches, a RAFT manual and materials, and delivered an observed practice course. Groups of 5-8 patients will attend 6 × 2 h sessions (weeks 1-6) and a 1 hr consolidation session (week 14) addressing different self-management topics and behaviours. The primary outcome is fatigue impact (26 weeks); secondary outcomes are fatigue severity, coping and multidimensional impact, quality of life, clinical and mood status (to week 104). Statistical and health economic analyses will follow a predetermined plan to establish whether the intervention is clinically and cost-effective. Effects of teaching CB skills to clinicians will be evaluated qualitatively. Approval was given by an NHS Research Ethics Committee, and participants will provide written informed consent. The copyrighted RAFT package will be freely available. Findings

  15. The comparative immunogenicity of biologic therapy and its clinical relevance in psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Alejandro; Lula, Sadiq; Marshall, Lisa; Szczypa, Piotr; Aikman, Laraine

    2018-03-20

    Biologic agents have demonstrated efficacy in treating patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Biologic agents also have an intrinsic capacity to induce an immune response in patients that could result in unwanted adverse events and/or treatment failure. Areas covered: In this systematic literature review, the authors document the incidence of immune responses, primarily anti-drug antibodies (ADA), to the biologic therapeutic agents currently in clinical practice for the treatment of PsA. The authors discuss the importance of these responses with respect to clinical practice. Expert opinion: Our evaluation of the published literature shows that the immune responses to the various biologic therapeutic agents currently being used to treat PsA are similar to those observed for these agents in other rheumatic diseases. Moreover, similar to observations in other rheumatic diseases, the incidence of ADA formation to biologic agents in patients with PsA is often decreased when patients are given concomitant treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. These data strongly suggest that the immune response is a characteristic of the biologic agent. Using therapeutic drug monitoring may be an approach to assess the immune response to the agent and to mitigate the potential impact on efficacy and safety, and consequently optimize treatment.

  16. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  17. Acute gouty arthritis and rapidly progressive renal failure as manifestation of multiple myeloma: clinical case description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Gudym

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a clinical case of multiple myeloma in 78-year-old man, its clinical onset was as an acute attack of gout. The patient was admitted to hospital due to the development of the first acute attack of gout. The attack was characterized by polyarthricular joint lesion of the upper and lower extremities, pronounced inflammatory reaction, insufficient response to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and a high level of hyperuricemia. The serum uric acid concentration ranged from 636 to 712 μmol/l. The study of the synovial fluid of the inflamed knee joint made it possible to reveal uric acid crystals and to confirm the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis. Simultaneously, the patient had significant renal impairment: creatinine was 574 μmol/l, urea — 39.9 mmol/l, glomerular filtration rate according to CKD-EPI — 8 ml/min. The daily proteinuria was 1.8 g. A retrospective assessment of laboratory parameters allowed to reveal completely normal indicators of renal function 6 months ago. Considering the development of acute gouty arthritis, its polyarticular nature, persistent course, rapid involvement of new joints, high uric acid levels during an acute attack exceeding 600 μmol/l (10 mg/dL, rapid development of renal failure within 6 months until the terminal stage, it was suggested the secondary nature of gout on the background of kidney damage by another pathological process. Further clinical, laboratory and instrumental studies allowed verifying multiple myeloma with renal damage. Bence Jones protein in the urine was not detected, there was also no evidence of hyperproteinemia. However, pain in the spine, ribs and chest was the basis for carrying out an X-ray study of the bones of the skeleton. Changes in the skeleton typical for multiple myeloma have been identified. Myelogram showed a high content of plasma cells (21.1 %, electrophoresis of blood proteins showed a high M-gradient (30.42 %, and a cytochemical

  18. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  19. Autologous stromal vascular fraction therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: rationale and clinical safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Jorge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancements in rheumatoid arthritis (RA treatment protocols and introduction of targeted biological therapies have markedly improved patient outcomes, despite this, up to 50% of patients still fail to achieve a significant clinical response. In veterinary medicine, stem cell therapy in the form of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF is an accepted therapeutic modality for degenerative conditions with 80% improvement and no serious treatment associated adverse events reported. Clinical translation of SVF therapy relies on confirmation of veterinary findings in targeted patient populations. Here we describe the rationale and preclinical data supporting the use of autologous SVF in treatment of RA, as well as provide 1, 3, 6, and 13 month safety outcomes in 13 RA patients treated with this approach.

  20. Antibodies to Infliximab and Adalimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eng, Grith P; Bendtzen, Klaus; Bliddal, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate if antibodies towards biological TNF-α inhibitors (anti-TNFi Abs) are present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission and to relate any anti-TNFi Abs to circulating level of TNF-α inhibitor (TNFi). Methods. Patients with RA, treated with infliximab....../44 patients (18%) treated with infliximab and 1/49 patients (2%) treated with adalimumab (p = 0.012). In the former group, anti-TNFi Abs corresponded with low levels of TNFi (p = 0.048). Anti-TNFi Ab-positive patients had shorter disease duration at initiation of TNFi therapy (p = 0.023) but were similar...... for the rest of the compared parameters. Conclusions. In RA patients in clinical remission, anti-TNFi Abs occur frequently in patients treated with infliximab, while they occur rarely in patients treated with adalimumab. Presence of anti-infliximab Abs is accompanied by low or undetectable levels of infliximab...

  1. Low vaccination rates among patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a German outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasselt, Marco; Ivanov, Jean-Philipp; Baerwald, Christoph; Seifert, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of acquiring infections due to two reasons: the disease itself and the immunosuppressive therapy. Vaccinations against preventable diseases are therefore of utmost importance for these group of patients. To estimate vaccination frequencies among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we studied patients in a survey and calculated vaccination rates based on their vaccination documents. Patients have been recruited from our outpatient clinic during one of their routine visits. For the statistical analysis, they have been divided by age (≥60 vs vaccination rates, in particular for the strongly recommended vaccines against Pneumococcus and Influenza (33 and 53%, respectively). Furthermore, protection rates for important basic vaccinations, e.g. against Pertussis, were found to be very low with 12% only. Beside these findings, we saw age-dependent differences for a variety of vaccines: while Pneumococcus and Influenza vaccines were more often given to patients ≥60 years, MMR, Pertussis, Diphtheria and Hepatitis were significantly more often applied to younger patients. Vaccination rates have to be improved among RA patients, in particular for vaccines protecting from respiratory tract infections such as Pneumococcus.

  2. Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 73 ... Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ...

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  4. Clinical significance of delta neutrophil index in the differential diagnosis between septic arthritis and acute gout attack within 24 hours after hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Jung Yoon; Kim, Dae Sik; Jung, Seung Min; Song, Jason Jungsik; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Sang-Won

    2017-07-01

    The most important differential diagnoses of acute monoarticular arthritis are septic arthritis and acute gout attack. Identifying infection is crucial in preventing the devastating outcome of septic arthritis. The delta neutrophil index (DNI) is a value that corresponds to the fraction of circulating immature granulocytes. As DNI reflects the burden of infection, we evaluated this index as a differentiating marker between septic arthritis and acute gout attack.The medical records of 149 patients with septic arthritis and 194 patients with acute gout attack were reviewed. A specific cell analyzer, ADVIA 2120, was used to measure DNI. Clinical and laboratory markers associated with predicting septic arthritis were assessed by using logistic regression.Patients with septic arthritis showed higher levels of DNI than those with acute gout attack (3.3 vs 0.6%, P septic arthritis. In the multivariate analysis, DNI was the most powerful independent value for predicting septic arthritis (odds ratio 14.003).This study showed the possibility of using DNI as a differentiating marker between septic arthritis and acute gout attack at the crucial early phase. DNI showed its relevance regardless of confirmation of MSU crystal deposition or serum level of uric acid.

  5. Clinical Practice Informs Secure Messaging Benefits and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie N; Hathaway, Wendy; Chavez, Margeaux; Antinori, Nicole; Vetter, Brian; Miller, Brian K; Martin, Tracey L; Kendziora, Lisa; Nazi, Kim M; Melillo, Christine

    2017-10-01

    Background Clinical care team members in Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) facilities nationwide are working to integrate the use of Secure Messaging (SM) into care delivery and identify innovative uses. Identifying best practices for proactive use of SM is a key factor in its successful implementation and sustained use by VA clinical care team members and veterans. Objectives A collaborative project solicited input from VA clinical care teams about their local practices using SM to provide access to proactive patient-centered care for veterans and enhance workflow. Methods This project implemented a single-item cross-sectional qualitative electronic survey via internal e-mail to local coordinators in all 23 Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISNs). Content analysis was used to manage descriptive data responses. Descriptive statistics described sample characteristics. Results VA clinical care team members across 15 of 23 VISNs responded to the questionnaire. Content analysis of 171 responses produced two global domains: (1) benefits of SM and (2) SM best practices. Benefits of SM use emphasize enhanced and efficient communication and increased access to care. Care team members incorporate SM into their daily clinical practices, using it to provide services before, during, and after clinical encounters as a best practice. SM users suggest improvements in veteran care, clinical team workflow, and efficient use of health resources. Clinical team members invested in the successful implementation of SM integrate SM into their daily practices to provide meaningful and useful veteran-centered care and improve workflow. Conclusion VA clinical care team members can use SM proactively to create an integrated SM culture. With adequate knowledge and motivation to proactively use this technology, all clinical team members within the VA system can replicate best practices shared by other clinical care teams to generate meaningful and useful interactions with SM

  6. Screening for amyloid in subcutaneous fat tissue of Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis : clinical and laboratory characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Mansoury, T.M.; Hazenberg, B. P. C.; Badawy, S. A. El; Ahmed, A.H.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Van Rijswijk, M.H.

    Objective: To screen for amyloid and to assess associated clinical and laboratory characteristics in Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Abdominal subcutaneous fat aspirates were consecutively collected from 112 patients (103 women, nine men) having RA for five years or more.

  7. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...

  8. Study of correlation between bone mineral density and clinical and laboratory indices of rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Gukasyan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study association between bone mineral density (BMD and clinical and laboratory indices of rheumatoid arthritis (RA activity Material and methods. 60 women with RA who had not received glucocorticoid and anti-osteoporotic therapy were included. 30 had unchanged menstrual cycle and 30 were postmenopausal. Lumbar spine BMD and proximal femur was studied with double radiological absorptiometry (QDR 1000 Hologic apparatus. W.Wilke indices were used to characterize activity and severity of RA. CRP level was evaluated with quantitative immunoenzyme method. Results. Significant negative association was revealed between spine and femoral neck BMD and RA severity so as between femoral neck BMD and CRP level in pts with unchanged menstrual cycle and in postmenopausal pts.

  9. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  10. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    was considered through literature searches combined with personal files. Treatments should generally not be chosen based only on evidence from observational studies or single randomised clinical trials. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis of all identifiable randomised clinical trials with Grading...... of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) assessment represent the highest level of evidence. Even though systematic reviews are trust worthier than other types of evidence, all levels of the evidence hierarchy are under threats from systematic errors (bias); design errors (abuse of surrogate...

  11. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz; Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice. Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fu...

  12. Opioid detoxification : from controlled clinical trial to clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Boukje A G; De Jong, Cor A J; Wensing, Michel; Krabbe, Paul F M; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2010-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials have high internal validity but suffer from difficulties in external validity. This study evaluates the generalizability of the results of a controlled clinical trial on rapid detoxification in the everyday clinical practice of two addiction treatment centers. The results

  13. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. METHODS: Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form......BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are considered to be essential for improving quality and safety of health care. However, interventions to promote implementation of guidelines have demonstrated only partial effectiveness and the reasons for this apparent failure are not yet fully understood....... Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective...

  14. Medical Genetics In Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-08-24

    Aug 24, 1974 ... Laboratory facilities for cytogenetic and biochemical investigation are an essential feature of such a genetic department. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical activities during 1973 of the Department of Human. Genetics, University of Cape Town, to present an analysis of the medical problems ...

  15. Social media in clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Meskó, Bertalan

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident. While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with ea

  16. Clinical Epidemiology of Septic Arthritis Caused byBurkholderia pseudomalleiand Other Bacterial Pathogens in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teparrukkul, Prapit; Nilsakul, Jiraphorn; Dunachie, Susanna; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2017-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a medical emergency, and if not treated appropriately, it can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Melioidosis, a serious infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei , is highly endemic in South and Southeast Asia and northern Australia. We reviewed the medical charts of adult patients admitted with bacterial septic arthritis at Sunpasitthiprasong Hospital, Ubon Ratchathani, northeast Thailand from January 2012 to December 2014. Bacterial septic arthritis was defined as one or more hot swollen joints with isolation of a pathogenic organism from an affected joint or from blood. A total of 154 patients with septic arthritis were retrospectively evaluated. The most common causes were B. pseudomallei (48%, N = 74), Streptococcus spp. (29%, N = 44), and Staphylococcus aureus (10%, N = 16). Prevalence of diabetes, bacteremia, and pneumonia was higher in B. pseudomallei septic arthritis than in septic arthritis caused by the other bacteria (all P septic arthritis is common and associated with high mortality in northeast Thailand. Emergence of Streptococcus arthritis is observed. Difficulty in diagnosing melioidosis and identifying B. pseudomallei in areas where health care workers are not familiar with the disease is discussed. In melioidosis-endemic regions, parenteral ceftazidime could be considered as empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients with septic arthritis and underlying diseases.

  17. Hepatic gammagraphy in clinic practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcon, S.; Torres, A. (Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima)

    1983-05-01

    Results from 91 patients submitted to hepatic gammagraphy are interpreted and the correlation with the clinic, the anatome-pathological exam and the laboratory is established. 22% were normal, 78% were not. Of the anomalous figures, 41% showed localized injuries, 37% were dispersed. When the anatome-pathological correlation was established, the sensibility was of 95%, the accuracy was 94% and the specificity 88% and when the correlation of the laboratory was made the gammagraphy showed 92% of good correlation meanwhile the alcaline phosphatase and the bilirubin were less appropriate (66 and 62% of good correlation, respectively).

  18. Neuropsychiatric Lupus in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alessi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs, characterized by the production of autoantibodies and the development of tissue injury. The etiology of SLE is partially known, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. As many as 50% of patients with SLE have neurological involvement during the course of their disease. Neurological manifestations are associated with impaired quality of life, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Nineteen neuropsychiatric syndromes have been identified associated with SLE, and can be divided into central and peripheral manifestations. This article reviews major neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with SLE and discusses their clinical features, radiological findings and treatment options.

  19. Genetic testing in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Steven W J; Uitterlinden, André G

    2009-01-01

    In the practice of internal medicine, the value of genetic testing in common (mono)genetic diseases such as familial hemochromatosis, hypercholesterolemia, Mediterranean fever, and thrombophilia is limited. The genotype insufficiently predicts the phenotype because of the powerful effects of other modifying genes, environmental influences, and lifestyle factors. Many common diseases, including diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease, have strong genetic influences but are called complex genetic traits. The underlying genetic factors are currently investigated using new molecular tools such as genome-wide association studies, analyzing up to 500,000 markers in huge numbers of patients. Many new (often unexpected) markers have been identified, and in many instances their functional significance is unknown. Genomic profiles play a rapidly growing role in the field of pharmacogenomics. A number of recently identified pharmacogenomic biomarkers are helpful to predict drug-related toxic effects.

  20. Apps for People With Rheumatoid Arthritis to Monitor Their Disease Activity: A Review of Apps for Best Practice and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Hermaleigh; White, Bonnie; Langlotz, Tobias; Taylor, William J

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis requiring long-term treatment with regular monitoring by a rheumatologist to achieve good health outcomes. Since people with RA may wish to monitor their own disease activity with a smartphone app, it is important to understand the functions and quality of apps for this purpose. Objective The aim of our study was to assess the features and quality of apps to assist people to monitor their RA disease activity by (1) summarizing the available apps, particularly the instruments used for measurement of RA disease activity; (2) comparing the app features with American College of Rheumatology and European League against Rheumatism (ACR and EULAR) guidelines for monitoring of RA disease activity; and (3) rating app quality with the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS). Methods Systematic searches of the New Zealand iTunes and Google Play app stores were used to identify all apps for monitoring of RA disease activity that could be used by people with RA. The apps were described by both key metadata and app functionality. App adherence with recommendations for monitoring of RA disease activity in clinical practice was evaluated by identifying whether apps included calculation of a validated composite disease activity measure and recorded results for future retrieval. App quality was assessed by 2 independent reviewers using the MARS. Results The search identified 721 apps in the Google Play store and 216 in the iTunes store, of which 19 unique apps met criteria for inclusion (8 from both app stores, 8 iTunes, and 3 Google Play). In total, 14 apps included at least one validated instrument measuring RA disease activity; 7 of 11 apps that allowed users to enter a joint count used the standard 28 swollen and tender joint count; 8 apps included at least one ACR and EULAR-recommended RA composite disease activity (CDA) measure; and 10 apps included data storage and retrieval. Only 1 app, Arthritis Power, included

  1. Clinical Practice Guidelines: Incorporating Input From a Patient Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Miller, Amy S; Turgunbaev, Marat; Guyatt, Gordon; Yates, Adolph; Springer, Bryan; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2017-08-01

    To describe the integral role of a Patient Panel in the development of the 2017 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) clinical practice guideline. We convened a Panel of 11 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, all of whom had undergone 1 or more arthroplasties, to review the evidence and provide guidance on recommendations for the 2017 ACR/AAHKS guideline to address the perioperative management of antirheumatic medication in patients with rheumatic diseases undergoing elective total hip or total knee arthroplasty. The guideline used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology that acknowledges the critical role of patient values and preferences when the quality of the evidence base is low or when there are important trade-offs between benefits and harms. The Patient Panel considered the relative importance of complications including perioperative infection versus rheumatic disease flare and voted on the recommendations. Before the Voting Panel's own discussion of the recommendations, they reviewed a summary of the Patient Panel's discussion, including their perioperative experience, the relative importance they placed on infections versus flares in the perioperative period, and their votes on the recommendations. The Patient Panel placed higher importance on avoiding an infection than a disease flare despite the far greater frequency of flares than infections. The decisions of the Voting Panel were concordant with those of the Patient Panel. For the 7 recommendations that both Panels voted on, the Panels agreed on the direction as well as the strength of recommendation (which was conditional for all recommendations). The Voting Panel considered the importance that the patients placed on risk of infection. The Patient Panel's values informed the direction and strength of the recommendations in the final 2017 ACR/AAHKS guideline. © 2017

  2. Clinical profile of 266 Filipino patients with rheumatoid arthritis included in the rheumatoid arthritis database and registry (RADAR) of the Philippine General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penserga, Ester G; Natividad, Therese Aileen L; Salido, Evelyn S

    2015-05-01

    To describe Filipino patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) entered in the Rheumatoid arthritis database and registry (RADAR) of the Philippine General Hospital. Cases entered to RADAR from 2010-2012 were included. All fulfilled the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of RA. Included cases gave written infomed consent. Data extracted were demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory tests, treatment and disease course. Means and proportions were used for population characteristics. Two hundred and sixty-six cases were included. Mean age was 44 years, with 9 : 1 female preponderance and mean diagnosis time of 5 years. There was symmetrical polyarthritis with high tender and swollen joint count and mean Disease Activity Score of 28 joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 5.27 (3.39, 8.13). Rheumatoid factor was positive in 2/3 of cases. Hypertension, tuberculosis and diabetes were important co-morbidities. Treatment included prednisone, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. At 12 months of treatment, evaluable cases (< 20%) showed improvement from high to moderate disease activity. Methotrexate average dose was 8.6 mg/week. Nine cases received biologic agents. Factors affecting treatment included access to rheumatology centers, low socioeconomic status, presence of co-morbid diseases and treatment adverse events. This study reports a cohort of Filipino RA patients seen in a government arthritis unit whose disease characteristics are similar to what is reported worldwide. This cohort differs from most studies in having a high female to male ratio, a long delay in diagnosis, and high attrition rate. Mean methotrexate dose was low and there was less access to biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Effects of cold mist shower on patients with inflammatory arthritis: a crossover controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkka, H; Väättänen, S; Ala-Peijari, S; Nummi, T

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and effects of a new home treatment method, a whole-body cold mist treatment, on patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Whole-body cold mist shower therapy was given to 121 voluntary patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in this crossover study during 1-week rehabilitation periods. Pain and sleep quality were assessed by a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Mental status was assessed by the Depression Scale (DEPS). Body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, use of occasional pain and sleep medication, and possible side-effects were recorded. The differences in pain (VAS) between treatment and control periods were significant (2.0 vs. 2.4, p = 0.006, paired t-test) in the last measurement, when assessing the pain of the past week as a whole. A trend could be seen of an increasing difference towards the end of the week. The treatment effect was statistically significant [likelihood ratio test (LRT), p < 0.0001] after controlling for period and sequence effects. There was an indication of better sleep quality (VAS) during the treatment period (2.3 vs. 2.7, p = 0.058 paired t-test) when assessing the past week as a whole. The mean DEPS scores showed no difference between the treatment periods (5.5 vs. 5.0, p = 0.1874 paired t-test, at start, and 4.5 vs. 4.1 p = 0.29 paired t-test, at the end). No significant side-effects were recorded. The new whole-body cold treatment method may offer a safe option for self-treatment of pain at home but further study is needed to determine the clinical significance of the effect after longer use.

  4. Computerization of clinical practice in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, G M; Johnston, J M; Ho, L M; Wong, F K; Cameo, S C

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the current level of computerization in clinical practice in Hong Kong through a population-based, physician survey conducted in 2000.A self-completed, 20-question, postal questionnaire was sent to 4850 randomly selected doctors in Hong Kong. We received 897 completed responses. Over one-third of doctors in the overall sample were already recording patient summaries, processing laboratory results and specialist reports, and preparing referral notes electronically. Patient registration (52.2%), billing systems (40.2%), appointment scheduling (39.9%), and payroll (36.9%), were the commonest administrative functions to have been computerized. Seventy per cent of doctors in solo or small-group ('individual') practices did not yet have any clinical function computerized compared with only 30.7% for those working in large, corporate organizations. Similarly, approximately two-thirds of administrative tasks in 'individual' clinics were not computerized, while corporate physicians reported a corresponding percentage of 39.3%. Younger age, male gender, specialist qualifications, more computers in the practice, higher numbers of administrative tasks already computerized, higher levels of knowledge about and positive attitudes towards computer applications in clinical practice were all positively associated with more clinical tasks already computerized in the practice. The present study has systematically documented the extent of clinical computer use in Hong Kong and identified areas for improvement as well as specific groups of physicians who might benefit from targeted efforts promoting computerization in practice.

  5. [Project REMISSION(PLUS): clinical and radiological remission : new treatment goals in the management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostendorf, B; Scherer, A; Kellner, H; Backhaus, M

    2008-12-01

    In a large number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic inflammatory processes cause joint changes and loss of function even in the early stages of disease. Early, targeted use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs [DMARDs and TNF-alpha blockers ("biologicals")] can significantly reduce the risk of aggressive progression and irreversible joint damage. Hence, early identification of disease-specific processes of joint inflammation and erosion - at the onset of disease or later - is of key importance for the patient's prognosis and therapeutic strategy. This can be achieved today with great precision and reliability through the use of modern imaging methods like arthrosonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The REMISSION(PLUS) initiative aspire to integrate modern imaging technologies as standard methods in the care and management of RA patients. The main areas on which this initiative will be focusing are the conceptualization and implementation of educational programs and training seminars on sonography and MRI, the development and establishment of case report forms for standardized documentation of findings, and the systematic monitoring of patients on treatment, with the aim of producing very precise documentation of structural change processes in RA and also, if possible, to document radiological remission or even progression. The REMISSION(PLUS) project also includes the setting up of specialized centers of excellence, which will network to support the implementation and access to the various imaging procedures at hospitals, rheumatology clinics and rheumatology practices nationwide.

  6. Managing Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Clinical Updates and Three Strategic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodara, Ann M; Wattiaux, Aimée; Bartels, Christie M

    2017-04-01

    ᅟ: The increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is well known; however, appropriate management of this elevated risk in rheumatology clinics is less clear. By critically reviewing literature published within the past 5 years, we aim to clarify current knowledge and gaps regarding CVD risk management in RA. We examine recent guidelines, recommendations, and evidence and discuss three approaches: (1) RA-specific management including treat-to-target and medication management, (2) assessment of comprehensive individual risk, and (3) targeting traditional CVD risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity) at a population level. Considering that 75% of US RA visits occur in specialty clinics, further research is needed regarding evidence-based strategies to manage and reduce CVD risk in RA. This review highlights clinical updates including US cardiology and international professional society guidelines, successful evidence-based population approaches from primary care, and novel opportunities in rheumatology care to reduce CVD risk in RA.

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: a clinical, radiological and genetic study of 58 Italian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabace, S; Cappellacci, S; Ciccarone, P; Liaskos, S; Polito, R; Zorzin, L

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that genetic heterogeneity and/or the complex interaction of several MCH-linked risk factors can explain the onset and the broad spectrum of Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) from the clinical point of view. Fifty-eight patients with PsA (Moll and Wright criteria), 35 men and 23 women, mean age of 45, 14, were studied; all the patients were assessed by both clinical and radiological examination, with particular attention to the sacroiliac joints. HLA typing of the patients confirmed the association between PsA and HLA-B39 (p = 0.0008) and Cw6 (p = 0.0011). In addition a significant increase in DQ2 antigen (p = 0.004) has been found. No correlation of any particular HLA antigen with clinical subsets (oligo-polyarticular peripheral PsA, axial PsA and axial with peripheral PsA) or erosive incidence of joint involvement-generally related to the duration of the disease--was found.

  8. Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated Mechanisms: A Systemic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this review is to investigate the detailed existing scientific information about the clinical efficacy of acupuncture on rheumatoid arthritis (RA conditions and to reveal the proposed mechanisms. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine, NCCAM (The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1974 to 2018. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 43 studies were recruited. Each research was analyzed for study design, subject characteristics, intervention, selected acupoints, assessment parameters, proposed mechanisms, and results/conclusions. Conclusions. In our review, we concluded that acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment modalities is beneficial to the clinical conditions of RA without adverse effects reported and can improve function and quality of life and is worth trying. Several important possible mechanisms were summarized including anti-inflammatory effect, antioxidative effect, and regulation of immune system function. However, there is still inconsistency regarding the clinical efficacy and lack of well-designed human/animal double-blinded RCTs. Future discussion for further agreement on taking traditional Chinese medicine (TCM theory into consideration as much as possible is a top priority.

  9. [Experience with a rheumatoid arthritis biobank: analysis of biological samples and clinical data of 204 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, Ildikó; Pusztai, Anita; Csomor, Péter; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2017-02-01

    A biobank is a registry, which is suitable for the storage of biological samples (e.g. tissues, DNA, protein), genetical abnormalities and clinical data. Several biobanks have been created worldwide, which contribute to research and the better understanding of disease pathogenesis, genetical polymorphisms. Biobanking also helps to improve the efficacy of therapies. Our purpose was to create an internet-based biobank, in which laboratory test results, genetic alterations and related disorders of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients can be registered. This biobank would be able to make the research easier and it can help to improve our knowledge about diseases and it can inhibit loss of data. We have biological samples from 204 RA patients and we have entered their data in the biobank which can be found on the website http://rheuma.biobank.eu . Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS20 statistical programme. By the creation of biobank that contains clinical data and biological samples of 204 RA patients, we have a database which can help to improve our knowledge about the disease and help to develop new treatment strategies. Biobanking is suitable to analyze blood samples and clinical data together. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(7), 270-277.

  10. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Figure 4 - Treatment Diagram PDF Arthritis - Base of the Thumb Related Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Osteoarthritis MP Joint Arthritis de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Other Links CME Mission Statement and Disclaimer Policies ...

  11. Hyponatraemia diagnosis and treatment clinical practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J.; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi; Gonzalez-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/l, is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from mild to severe or even life threatening, and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity

  12. Hormone Therapy in Clinical Equine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Patrick M

    2016-12-01

    A wide variety of hormone therapies are used in clinical practice in the reproductive management of horses. The goal of this article is to review therapeutic options for a variety of clinical indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Mission Statement The purpose of the Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice is to promote clinical and academic excellence in Medicine and Dentistry and allied sciences. To this end the Journal will publish its issues regularly and will ensure their prompt distribution to all subscribers and libraries ...

  14. European perspective on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: clinical utility of tofacitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalec P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paweł Kawalec,1 Katarzyna Śladowska,2 Iwona Malinowska-Lipień,3 Tomasz Brzostek,3 Maria Kózka4 1Drug Management Department, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Department of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biology and Earth Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; 3Department of Internal and Community Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 4Department of Clinical Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland Abstract: Xeljanz® (tofacitinib is an oral small-molecule inhibitor that reversibly inhibits Janus-activated kinase (JAK-dependent cytokine signaling, thus reducing inflammation. As a result of these mechanisms, effects on the immune system such as a moderate decrease in the total lymphocyte count, a dose-dependent decrease in natural killer (NK cell count, and an increase in B-cell count have been observed. Therefore, tofacitinib provides an innovative approach to modulating the immune and inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which is especially important in individuals who do not respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or show a loss of response over time. The aim of this article was to review studies on the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of tofacitinib in patients with RA. Tofacitinib has been shown to reduce symptoms of RA and improve the quality of life in the analyzed groups of patients. Moreover, it showed high efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in Phase III randomized clinical trials on RA and was the first JAK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA in the RA therapy, thus providing a useful alternative

  15. Voluntary informed consent and good clinical practice for clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most differences, shortcomings and contradictions regarding voluntary informed consent for participation in clinical research relate to the South African-specific guidance documents, i.e. South African Guidelines for Good Practice in the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Human Participants in South Africa (2006) and Ethics in ...

  16. Serum Vaspin Levels Are Associated with the Development of Clinically Manifest Arthritis in Autoantibody-Positive Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen I Maijer

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that overweight may increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA in autoantibody positive individuals. Adipose tissue could contribute to the development of RA by production of various bioactive peptides. Therefore, we examined levels of adipokines in serum and synovial tissue of subjects at risk of RA.Fifty-one individuals positive for immunoglobulin M rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF and/or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA, without arthritis, were included in this prospective study. Levels of adiponectin, vaspin, resistin, leptin, chemerin and omentin were determined in baseline fasting serum samples (n = 27. Synovial tissue was obtained by arthroscopy at baseline and we examined the expression of adiponectin, resistin and visfatin by immunohistochemistry.The development of clinically manifest arthritis after follow-up was associated with baseline serum vaspin levels (HR1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2; p = 0.020, also after adjustment for overweight (HR1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.5; p = 0.016. This association was not seen for other adipokines. Various serum adipokine levels correlated with BMI (adiponectin r = -0.538, leptin r = 0.664; chemerin r = 0.529 and systemic markers of inflammation such as CRP levels at baseline (adiponectin r = -0.449, omentin r = -0.557, leptin r = 0.635, chemerin r = 0.619, resistin r = 0.520 and ESR (leptin r = 0.512, chemerin r = 0.708, p-value<0.05. Synovial expression of adiponectin, resistin and visfatin was not associated with development of clinically manifest arthritis.In this exploratory study, serum adipokines were associated with an increased inflammatory state in autoantibody-positive individuals at risk of developing RA. Furthermore, serum vaspin levels may assist in predicting the development of arthritis in these individuals.

  17. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  18. Contemporary management of pericardial effusion: practical aspects for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Gaido, Luca; Battaglia, Alberto; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-03-01

    A pericardial effusion (PE) is a relatively common finding in clinical practice. It may be either isolated or associated with pericarditis with or without an underlying disease. The aetiology is varied and may be either infectious (especially tuberculosis as the most common cause in developing countries) or non-infectious (cancer, systemic inflammatory diseases). The management is essentially guided by the hemodynamic effect (presence or absence of cardiac tamponade), the presence of concomitant pericarditis or underlying disease, and its size and duration. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the aetiology, classification, diagnosis, management, therapy, and prognosis of PE in clinical practice.

  19. Attending and non-attending patients in a real-life setting of an early arthritis clinic: why do people leave clinics and where do they go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell-Duxneuner, Valerie; Rezende, Lucila Stange; Stamm, Tanja A; Duer, Mona; Smolen, Josef S; Machold, Klaus P

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatologist assessment as early as possible is considered essential for patients with inflammatory joint disease. In our Very Early Arthritis Clinic (VEAC), a substantial proportion of initially included and followed patients later stop attendance in the clinic. We questioned attending (AP) and non-attending patients (NAP) regarding current health status and satisfaction with care as well as reasons for discontinuation and current care received by NAP. VEAC patients first seen between 1996 and 2003 were included. Assessment included the RADAI, HAQ, and visual analogue scales for pain, disease activity, fatigue, satisfaction with current health care. Current (DMARD) treatment was recorded. Among AP, 87% had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 13% non-RA. Of NAP, 37% had RA, 23% non-RA and 40% no more rheumatic disease. Satisfaction with health care concerning rheumatic disease was better in AP than NAP. Likewise, most outcome parameters were better in AP. Substantially more RA patients in the AP than NAP group received DMARDs. Apart from the disappearance of arthritis, logistic reasons were given most frequently for discontinuation of attendance. Less than 10% of NAP indicated dissatisfaction with medical care. We found advantages in both disease activity measures and satisfaction with health care for patients receiving continuous care in a highly specialised Rheumatology clinic. Furthermore, different DMARD usage in RA in AP and NAP may indicate significant deficits in treatment quality outside specialist care. Logistic issues associated with access to continuous Rheumatology care for early arthritis patients need improvement.

  20. Melatonin influence on clinical and endocrine measures in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Pogozeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess melatonin (ML efficacy for correction of sleep disturbances, its influence on clinical symptoms and laboratory activity measures as well as cortisol level in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA Material and methods. Blind randomized placebo controlled study was performed. 38 women with RA fulfilling ACR criteria and disease duration not exceeding a year were included. Pts of the main group (n=19 received melatonin (Melaxen, Unifarm, USA 3 mg I hour before sleep, control group pts (n= 19 received placebo. All pts received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Clinico-laboratory measures of inflammatory activity, sleepless symptoms score, plasma cortisol and urine 6-sulphotoximelanotonin (6-STM levels with immuno-enzyme assay were evaluated. Results. To the end of study sleep quality improved and morning stiffness significantly decreased in the main group pts in comparison with placebo group. 20% decrease of morning stiffness was achieved in 90% of ML group and 44% of placebo group pts. Other clinical features of RA including DAS28 changes did not significantly differ between groups. Treatment with ML also induced endocrine status changes in RA pts: decrease of plasma cortisol and significant increase of urine 6-STM levels. Endocrine measures did not change in placebo group. Conclusion. ML efficacy in the treatment of sleep disturbances in pts with RA was confirmed. Decrease of cortisol blood level in such pts probably connected with shift of its peak to earlier hours providing decrease of morning stiffness.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Fiona; Proudman, Susanna

    2014-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation and, in a proportion of patients, extra-articular manifestations (EAM). Lung disease, either as an EAM of the disease, related to the drug therapy for RA, or related to comorbid conditions, is the second commonest cause of mortality. All areas of the lung including the pleura, airways, parenchyma, and vasculature may be involved, with interstitial and pleural disease and infection being the most common problems. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest forms the basis of investigation and when combined with clinical information and measures of physiology, a multidisciplinary team can frequently establish the diagnosis without the need for an invasive biopsy procedure. The most frequent patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD) are usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), with some evidence for the prognosis being better than for the idiopathic equivalents. Risk factors depend on the type of disease but for ILD (mainly UIP and NSIP) include smoking, male gender, human leukocyte antigen haplotype, rheumatoid factor, and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Citrullination of proteins in the lung, frequently thought to be incited by smoking, and the subsequent development of ACPA appear to play an important role in the development of lung and possibly joint disease. The biologic and nonbiological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have had a substantial impact on morbidity and mortality from RA, and although there multiple reports of drug-related lung toxicity and possible exacerbation of underlying ILD, overall these reactions are rare and should only preclude the use of DMARDs in a minority of patients. Common scenarios facing pulmonologists and rheumatologists are addressed using the current best evidence; these include screening the new patient; monitoring and choosing RA treatment in

  2. Clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and TNF-α levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qiling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and TNF-α levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: The serum concentration of TNF-α was determined with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and NO, NOS contents were determined with chemical methods in 36 eases of rheumatoid arthitis as well as 35 controls. Results: Serum concentration of NO, NOS and TNF-α during acute attack in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01). After treatment for one week, serum NO, NOS and TNF-α levels were markedly decreased but still remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum NO, NOS and TNF-α levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and were of important clinicals value. (authors)

  3. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael D; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Baker, Daniel G; Baker, Joshua F

    2017-10-01

    Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. This study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised clinical trials. Included patients had blinded clinical disease activity measures and MRI at baseline, 24 and 52 weeks. Synovitis, osteitis and total inflammation scores were determined using the RA MRI scoring system. Multivariable logistic regression analyses compared odds of achieving Disease Activity Score using 28 joints and C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) remission, low component measures, or low MRI inflammation measures at 24 weeks in patients with obesity versus no obesity. At 24 weeks, patients with obesity were significantly less likely to achieve DAS28(CRP) remission (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.92, p=0.03). In contrast, patients with obesity had similar odds of achieving low synovitis (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.51 to 1.72, p=0.84) and inflammation scores (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.61 to 2.22, p=0.64) and greater odds of achieving low osteitis scores (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.10 to 3.84, p=0.02) versus normal weight patients. Patients with RA and obesity have lower rates of DAS28 remission but similar rates of low MRI activity compared with patients without obesity, suggesting that obesity and its associated comorbidities can bias clinical disease activity measures. NCT00361335 and NCT00264550; Post-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Does clinical remission lead to normalization of EQ-5D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and is selection of remission criteria important?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    To compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to that of the general population and to investigate the association with disease activity, focusing on different clinical remission criteria.......To compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to that of the general population and to investigate the association with disease activity, focusing on different clinical remission criteria....

  5. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Daniël; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Wezel, Anouk; Launay, Pierre; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Bot, Ilze; Stoop, Jeroen N

    2016-06-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

  6. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  7. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana I; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y TecnologIa of the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic

  8. Midcarpal and Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Arthritis in Patients with Carpometacarpal Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Bielicka, Dierde; Shakir, Sameer; Fowler, John; Buterbaugh, Glenn A; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-06-01

    Carpometacarpal arthroplasty provides well-documented pain relief with preservation of thenar function in basal joint arthritis treatment. Nevertheless, some patients continue to have pain following surgery. The authors hypothesize that unrecognized midcarpal (capitolunate) arthritis is a contributor to persistent pain after carpometacarpal arthroplasty. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is unknown. This article establishes the radiographic prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with carpometacarpal arthritis. Patients with basal joint arthritis were identified from a search using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 716.94. Hand radiographs were reviewed and graded using the Eaton classification and Sodha classification for carpometacarpal arthritis. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis and midcarpal arthritis were graded using the Sodha classification for arthritis as follows: grade 1, no or nearly no arthrosis; grade 2, definite arthrosis but not severe; and grade 3, severe arthrosis. Eight hundred ninety-six radiographs were reviewed. The prevalence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis in this population was 64 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in this population was 23.5 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with radiologic evidence of carpometacarpal arthritis was 25.4 percent. The prevalence of severe midcarpal arthritis was 7 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is 24 percent. The presence of two locations of arthritis may explain persistent hand and wrist pain in this population despite carpometacarpal arthroplasty. Clinically, these data will allow hand surgeons to better educate patients with basal joint arthritis regarding the possibility of incomplete pain relief following carpometacarpal arthroplasty.

  9. [Demographic and clinical features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Piauí, Brazil--evaluation of 98 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria do Socorro Teixeira Moreira; Almeida, João Vicente Moreira; Bertolo, Manoel Barros

    2014-01-01

    Brazilian epidemiological studies on rheumatoid arthritis are scarce, mainly in the northeast; thus many data currently available originate from the international literature. To describe demographic, clinical and serological characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed-up by the same physician, in state of Piauí, Brazil. Data were collected between August 2010 and March 2013, in three health services of Piauí that provided health care in Rheumatology: a university-affiliated hospital, a public outpatient clinic and a private clinic. The numbers represent mean ± SD or percentage: 47.5±11.03 years-old non-Caucasian woman, non-smoker (59.2%), low educational level, mean disease duration of 7.7 years ± 7.6, and major extra-articular manifestations were rheumatoid nodules (19.4%) and sicca syndrome (46.9%). Features of rheumatoid arthritis obtained in this study are similar to those found in some national and international studies, but we observed higher female preponderance and illiteracy rate, in addition to a moderately severe erosive disease on average, with frequent sicca and other extra-articular manifestations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  11. Medical Ethics in Contemporary Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    John R. Williams

    2005-01-01

    This review article describes and analyzes ethical issues in medical practice, particularly those issues encountered by physicians in their relationships with their patients. These relationships often involve ethical conflicts between 2 or more interests, which physicians need to recognize and resolve. The article deals with 4 topics in clinical practice in which ethical conflicts occur: physicians' duty of confidentiality in a digital environment, their responsibilities for dealing with abus...

  12. Acute phase reactants add little to composite disease activity indices for rheumatoid arthritis: validation of a clinical activity score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletaha, Daniel; Nell, Valerie PK; Stamm, Tanja; Uffmann, Martin; Pflugbeil, Stephan; Machold, Klaus; Smolen, Josef S

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Frequent assessments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity allow timely adaptation of therapy, which is essential in preventing disease progression. However, values of acute phase reactants (APRs) are needed to calculate current composite activity indices, such as the Disease Activity Score (DAS)28, the DAS28-CRP (i.e. the DAS28 using C-reactive protein instead of erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI). We hypothesized that APRs make limited contribution to the SDAI, and that an SDAI-modification eliminating APRs – termed the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI; i.e. the sum of tender and swollen joint counts [28 joints] and patient and physician global assessments [in cm]) – would have comparable validity in clinical cohorts. Method Data sources comprised an observational cohort of 767 RA patients (average disease duration 8.1 ± 10.6 years), and an independent inception cohort of 106 patients (disease duration 11.5 ± 12.5 weeks) who were followed prospectively. Results Our clinically based hypothesis was statistically supported: APRs accounted only for 15% of the DAS28, and for 5% of the SDAI and the DAS28-CRP. In both cohorts the CDAI correlated strongly with DAS28 (R = 0.89–0.90) and comparably to the correlation of SDAI with DAS28 (R = 0.90–0.91). In additional analyses, the CDAI when compared to the SDAI and the DAS28 agreed with a weighted kappa of 0.70 and 0.79, respectively, and comparably to the agreement between DAS28 and DAS28-CRP. All three scores correlated similarly with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores (R = 0.45–0.47). The average changes in all scores were greater in patients with better American College of Rheumatology response (P < 0.0001, analysis of variance; discriminant validity). All scores exhibited similar correlations with radiological progression (construct validity) over 3 years (R = 0.54–0.58; P < 0.0001). Conclusion APRs add little information on

  13. A Clinical Study Evaluating the Effects of Fluvastatin on Serum Osteoprotegerin Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Sahar Kamal; El-Ghany El-Sayed, Salwa El-Morsy Abd; El-Hefnawy, Marwa El-Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, has been identified as a critical regulator of bone resorption. Considering the possible role of OPG in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the osteoclastogenesis suppression effects of statins, the present study aims to investigate the effects of fluvastatin on serum levels OPG and disease activity score (DAS) in patients with RA. Forty patients with RA were randomized in a placebo-controlled trial to receive 40 mg fluvastatin or placebo as an adjunct to existing disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy (methotrexate, leflunomide, hydroxychloroquine). Patients were followed up over 12 weeks. OPG and disease activity variables were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks, the OPG level was significantly increased in the fluvastatin group compared to the placebo group. DAS-28 was significantly decreased in the fluvastatin group compared to the placebo group. C-reactive protein (CRP), morning stiffness, swollen joint count (SJC), and tender joint count (TJC) were significantly decreased in the fluvastatin group compared to the placebo group; however, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ), and visual analogue screen (VAS) were not changed significantly. In conclusion, fluvastatin administration could increase the OPG levels and improve disease activity variables in patients with RA. Therefore, fluvastatin may serve a potential benefit in the treatment of RA patients. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. Genetic markers as therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis: A game changer in clinical therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A M Mohamed Thoufic; Vino, S

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multi-systemic autoimmune disease unremitted by genetic and environmental factors. The factors are crucial but inadequate in the development of disease; however, these factors can be representative of potential therapeutic targets and response to clinical therapy. Insights into the contribution of genetic risk factors are currently in progress with studies querying the genetic variation, their role in gene expression of coding and non-coding genes and other mechanisms of disease. In this review, we describe the significance of genetic markers architecture of RA through genome-wide association studies and meta-analysis studies. Further, it also reveals the mechanism of disease pathogenesis investigated through the mutual findings of functional and genetic studies of individual RA-associated genes, which includes HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPB1, PADI4, PTPN22, TRAF1-C5, STAT4 and C5orf30. However, the genetic background of RA remains to be clearly depicted. Prospective efforts of the post-genomic and functional genomic period can travel toward real possible assessment of the genetic effect on RA. The discovery of novel genes associated with the disease can be appropriate in identifying potential biomarkers, which could assist in early diagnosis and aggressive treatment.

  15. George Engel's Epistemology of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Fuks, Abraham; Boudreau, J Donald

    2014-01-01

    George Engel's (1913-1999) biopsychosocial model, one of the most significant proposals for the renewal of medicine in the latter half of the 20th century, has been understood primarily as a multi-factorial approach to the etiology of disease and as a call to re-humanize clinical practice. This common reading of Engel's model misses the central aspect of his proposal, that the biopsychosocial model is an epistemology for clinical work. By stating the simple fact that the clinician is not dealing directly with a body, but first, and inevitably, with a person, Engel challenged the epistemology implicit in the classical clinical method-a method predicated on the possibility of direct access to the body. Framed in epistemological terms, the issue at stake is not the need to complement medical science with humane virtues, but rather to acknowledge that the object of clinical practice is not the body but the patient.

  16. A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, F.

    1987-01-01

    The most important inflammations--rheumatic joint diseases of the vertebral column--are chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis) with involvement of cervical vertebral and atlanto-axial dislocation and ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew's disease) resp. the seronegative spondylarthritis. A decisive and important difference between both forms of disease is found in the region of the cervical part of the vertebral column. In case of a spondylarthritis (ASp.) the ankylopoietica type includes the cervical vertebrae but the chronic polyarthritis (RA) is usually limited to the cervical vertebral spine. The incidence in both types (RA) is usually limited to the cervical vertebral spine. The incidence in both types (RA and ASp.) of cervical involvement is about 30%. The authors present an account of the underlying disease process. A description of rheumatoid cervical arthritis is given. The destructive and dislocating arthritis of the cranio-cervical function (arthritis of the head and neck joints) is described

  17. Clinical manifestations and bacteriological features of culture-proven Gram-negative bacterial arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Lin

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Approximately 25% of cases of septic arthritis were due to GNB and resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents was common. Liver cirrhosis and concomitant bacteremia were significant risk factors for death.

  18. Leflunomide in active rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study in daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, E.N.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.; Mourad, L.; Houtman, P.M.; Bruyn, G.A.W.; Griep, E.N.; Wilffert, B.; Tobi, H.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: We prospectively studied the efficacy, incidence of adverse drug reactions and withdrawal from leflunomide in an outpatient population with rheumatoid arthritis in a setting of care-as-usual. Methods: In this prospective case series study, a standard dataset was collected from outpatient

  19. Leflunomide in active rheumatoid arthritis : a prospective study in daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, EN; Jansen, TLTA; Mourad, L; Houtman, PM; Bruyn, GAW; Griep, EN; Wilffert, B; Tobi, H; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Aims We prospectively studied the efficacy, incidence of adverse drug reactions and withdrawal from leflunomide in an outpatient population with rheumatoid arthritis in a setting of care-as-usual. Methods In this prospective case series study, from outpatient medical records a standard dataset was

  20. Ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis: clinical and economic consequences of the use of etanercept

    OpenAIRE

    Viola Sacchi; Orietta Zaniolo; Ignazio Olivieri

    2010-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is the name for a family of inflammatory rheumatic disease that can affect the spine and joints, ligaments and tendons. Spondyloarthritis disease include ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, the spondylitis associated with the inflammatory bowel diseases and the undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. The most common treatments prescribed for spondyloarthritis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) given in combination with disease-mo...

  1. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  2. Arthritis management in primary care - A study of physiotherapists' current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Siv Folkhammar; Bergman, Stefan; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Bremander, Ann

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis-related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence-based care. Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire. Sixty-four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p < 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p < 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA. PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Etanercept maintains the clinical benefit achieved by infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who discontinued infliximab because of side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Florenzo; Trotta, Francesco; Monteccuco, Carlomaurizio; Giacomelli, Roberto; Galeazzi, Mauro; Matucci‐Cerinic, Marco; Ferri, Clodoveo; Cutolo, Maurizio; Bambara, Lisa Maria; Triolo, Giovanni; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Valentini, Gabriele; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of switching to etanercept treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who already responded to infliximab, but presented side effects. Methods Charts of 553 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were retrospectively reviewed to select patients who responded to the treatment with infliximab and switched to etanercept because of occurrence of adverse effects. Clinical data were gathered during 24 weeks of etanercept treatment and for the same period of infliximab treatment before infliximab was stopped. Disease Activity Score computed on 44 joints (DAS‐44), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) 1st hour, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and C reactive protein (CRP) were assessed every 8 weeks. Results 37 patients were analysed. Adverse events to infliximab were mostly infusion reactions. No statistically significant difference between infliximab, before withdrawal, and etanercept, after 24 weeks, was detected in terms of DAS‐44 (2.7 and 1.9, respectively), HAQ (0.75 and 0.75, respectively), ESR (21 and 14, respectively) and CRP (0.5 and 0.3, respectively). VAS pain decreased significantly after switching to etanercept treatment (40 and 24, respectively; p<0.05). Conclusions Our study shows that etanercept maintains the clinical benefit achieved by infliximab, and suggests that a second tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α inhibitor can be the favourable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis when the first TNFα blocker has been withdrawn because of adverse events. PMID:16837489

  4. Novel algorithms for the pragmatic use of ultrasound in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Wakefield, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The absence of specific guidance on how to use ultrasound (US) to diagnose and manage patients with inflammatory arthritis, especially with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has hindered the optimal utilisation of US in clinical practice, potentially limiting its benefits for patient outcomes. In view of...

  5. South African Guidelines Excellence (SAGE): Clinical practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Without adherence to rigorous guideline development and reporting standards, the considerable time and effort put into ... the important role that CPGs play in setting standards of clinical practice in SA, and introduced a formalised ..... Almeida CM, Stine N, Stine AR, Wolfe SM. Financial conflict of interest disclosure and.

  6. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics ... of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Mar-Apr 2016 | Vol 6 | Issue 2 |. 75 countries ...

  7. Effects of aerobic exercise on hematologic indices of women with rheumatoid arthritis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Jafari Shapoorabadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the effects of moderate aerobic exercise on the hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell (RBC mass of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted at the Specialized Clinic of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan, during a 4-month period in 2014. We included patients with RA who did not have any malignancy and hematologic disorder. Two groups - one group receiving aerobic therapy along with medical therapy (N = 16 and the other group receiving medical therapy alone (N = 17 both for a period of 8 weeks. The levels of RBC mass, Hb, and HCT were measured before and after the intervention. The changes in these parameters were compared between the two study groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the two study groups regarding the baseline characteristics. The aerobic exercise resulted in increased RBC mass (P < 0.001, Hb (P < 0.001, and HCT (P < 0.001. However, those who received medical therapy alone did not experience any significant changes in these parameters. We found that the RBC mass (P = 0.581, Hb (P = 0.882, and HCT (P = 0.471 were comparable between the two study groups after 8 weeks of intervention. Conclusion: Although the aerobic exercise results in increased Hb, HCT, and RBC mass in patients with RA, the increase was not significant when compared to that in controls. Thus, the increase in the HB, HCT, and RBC could not be attributable to aerobic exercise.

  8. The practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development and practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia. Clinical Neuropsychology has shown rapid growth in Australia over the past three decades. Comprehensive and specialized training programs are producing high quality graduates who are employed in a broad range of settings or private practice. Australia now has a substantial number of clinical neuropsychologists with specialist training. Whilst the majority of Australian clinical neuropsychologists still undertake assessment predominantly, there are growing opportunities for clinical neuropsychologists in rehabilitation and in a broad range of research contexts. Cultural issues relating to the assessment of Indigenous Australians and immigrants from many countries present significant challenges. Some major contributions have been made in the realms of test development and validation across various age groups. Australian clinical neuropsychologists are also contributing significantly to research in the fields of traumatic brain injury, aging and dementias, epilepsy, memory assessment, rehabilitation, substance abuse, and other psychiatric disorders. Expansion of roles of clinical neuropsychologists, in domains such as rehabilitation and research is seen as essential to underpin continuing growth of employment opportunities for the profession.

  9. Policy-into-practice for rheumatoid arthritis: randomized controlled trial and cohort study of e-learning targeting improved physiotherapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fary, Robyn E; Slater, Helen; Chua, Jason; Ranelli, Sonia; Chan, Madelynn; Briggs, Andrew M

    2015-07-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a physiotherapy-specific, web-based e-learning platform, "RAP-el," in best-practice management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) and prospective cohort study. Australian-registered physiotherapists were electronically randomized into intervention and control groups. The intervention group accessed RAP-eL over 4 weeks. Change in self-reported confidence in knowledge and skills was compared between groups at the end of the RCT using linear regression conditioned for baseline scores by a blinded assessor, using intent-to-treat analysis. Secondary outcomes included physiotherapists' satisfaction with RA management and responses to RA-relevant clinical statements and practice-relevant vignettes. Retention was evaluated in a cohort study 8 weeks after the RCT. Eighty physiotherapists were randomized into the intervention and 79 into the control groups. Fifty-six and 48, respectively, provided baseline data. Significant between-group differences were observed for change in confidence in knowledge (mean difference 8.51; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 6.29, 10.73; effect size 1.62) and skills (mean difference 7.26; 95% CI 5.1, 9.4; effect size 1.54), with the intervention group performing better. Satisfaction in ability to manage RA, 4 of the 6 clinical statements, and responses to vignettes demonstrated significant improvement in the intervention group. Although 8-week scores showed declines in most outcomes, their clinical significance remains uncertain. RAP-eL can improve self-reported confidence, likely practice behaviors and satisfaction in physiotherapists' ability to manage people with RA, and improve their clinical knowledge in several areas of best-practice RA management in the short term. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  11. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential for new technologies in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Jane H; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2010-12-01

    Cost-effective neurorehabilitation is essential owing to financial constraints on healthcare resources. Technologies have the potential to contribute but without strong clinical evidence are unlikely to be widely reimbursed. This review presents evidence of new technologies since 2008 and identifies barriers to translation of technologies into clinical practice. Technology has not been shown to be superior to intensively matched existing therapies. Research has been undertaken into the development and preliminary clinical testing of novel technologies including robotics, electrical stimulation, constraint-induced movement therapy, assistive orthoses, noninvasive brain stimulation, virtual reality and gaming devices. Translation of the research into clinical practice has been impeded by a lack of robust evidence of clinical effectiveness and usability. Underlying mechanisms associated with recovery are beginning to be explored, which may lead to more targeted interventions. Improvements in function have been demonstrated beyond the normal recovery period, but few trials demonstrate lasting effects. Technologies, alone or combined, may offer a cost-effective way to deliver intensive neurorehabilitation therapy in clinical and community environments, and have the potential to empower patients to take more responsibility for their rehabilitation and continue with long-term exercise.

  13. Hyponatraemia diagnosis and treatment clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi; Gonzalez-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135mmol/l, is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from mild to severe or even life threatening, and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay. Despite this, the management of hyponatremia patients remains problematic. The prevalence of hyponatremia in a wide variety of conditions and the fact that hyponatremia is managed by clinicians with a broad variety of backgrounds have fostered diverse institution- and specialty-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. To obtain a common and holistic view, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA), represented by European Renal Best Practice (ERBP), have developed clinical practice guidelines on the diagnostic approach and treatment of hyponatremia as a joint venture of 3societies representing specialists with a natural interest in hyponatremia. In addition to a rigorous approach to the methodology and evaluation of the evidence, the document focuses on patient-positive outcomes and on providing a useful tool for clinicians involved in everyday practice. In this article, we present an abridged version of the recommendations and suggestions for the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatremia extracted from the full guide. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The Bobath concept in contemporary clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Julie Vaughan; Eustace, Catherine; Brock, Kim; Swain, Elizabeth; Irwin-Carruthers, Sheena

    2009-01-01

    Future development in neurorehabilitation depends upon bringing together the endeavors of basic science and clinical practice. The Bobath concept is widely utilized in rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological conditions. This concept was first developed in the 1950s, based on the neuroscience knowledge of those times. The theoretical basis of the Bobath concept is redefined based on contemporary neuroscience and rehabilitation science. The framework utilized in the Bobath concept for the analysis of movement and movement dysfunction is described. This framework focuses on postural control for task performance, the ability to move selectively, the ability to produce coordinated sequences of movement and vary movement patterns to fit a task, and the role of sensory input in motor behaviour and learning. The article describes aspects of clinical practice that differentiate this approach from other models of practice. Contemporary practice in the Bobath concept utilizes a problem-solving approach to the individual's clinical presentation and personal goals. Treatment is focused toward remediation, where possible, and guiding the individual towards efficient movement strategies for task performance. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical framework on which future research into the Bobath concept can be based.

  15. Development of a framework identifying domains and elements of importance for arthritis rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokkerud, Mari; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2012-01-01

    Rehabilitation is effective and beneficial for patients with arthritis. The lack of a common structure for describing the content of rehabilitation makes it difficult to compare, transfer and implement research evidence into clinical practice....

  16. Streptobacillus moniliformis septic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from rat-bite fever?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Samson SY

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptobacillus moniliformis is a zoonotic agent associated with rodent contacts. Although it is more commonly reported to cause rat-bite fever with reactive arthritides, it can also lead to pyogenic infection of the joints. Case presentation We present a lady with past history of osteoarthritis developing streptobacillary septic arthritides of the right knee and left wrist, and required antibiotic and arthrotomy for treatment. We also review 11 previously reported cases of streptobacillary septic arthritis to discuss the characteristics, treatment, prognosis of the infection, and illustrates the differences between streptobacillary rat-bite fever and septic arthritis. Among this patient population, most patients had potential contact with rats (91.6%. The knee is the most commonly affected joint (58.3%, and 83.3% patients having polyarticular involvement. As opposed to rat-bite fever, fever and rash was only present in 58.3% and 16.7% of patients respectively. S. moniliformis bacteremia is uncommon (8.4% and the prognosis is good. Conclusion Arthrocentesis is useful in distinguishing streptobacillary septic arthritis from reactive arthritis of rat-bite fever. The sole use of commercial media containing sodium polyanethol sulfonate may render the bacterial culture negative. A detailed history of possible exposure to rodents should be elicited from patients with arthritis in order to facilitate microbiologic diagnosis.

  17. Confronting the caring crisis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Li, Jiping; Zhu, Dan; Bai, Yangjuan; Song, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    In light of the call for humanistic caring in the contemporary health care system globally and in China, the issue of improving the caring skills that are essential to student success, high-quality nursing practice and positive patient outcomes is at the forefront of nursing education. The aim of this mixed-methods quantitative and qualitative study was to investigate baccalaureate nursing students' caring ability in the context of China and to explore the role of clinical practice learning in the development of students' caring skills. A two-phase, descriptive study utilising a mixed methodology consisting of a caring ability survey and focus group interviews was conducted. In the quantitative phase, 598 baccalaureate nursing students at two colleges in Yunnan Province in southwest China were surveyed using the Caring Ability Inventory (CAI). In the qualitative phase, 16 of the students who had participated in the quantitative phase were interviewed. Students obtained lower scores on the CAI than have been reported elsewhere by other researchers. In addition, students in the clinical stage of training scored lower than students in the pre-clinical stage. Three themes concerning facilitation by and three themes concerning the obstructive effects of clinical practice learning in the development of caring ability were identified. Themes pertaining to facilitation were: (i) promoting a sense of professional responsibility and ethics; (ii) providing an arena in which to practise caring, and (iii) learning from positive role models. Themes pertaining to obstruction were: (i) a critical practice learning environment; (ii) encountering inappropriate clinical teachers, and (iii) experiencing shock at the contrast between an idealised and the real environment. The key to developing students' ability to care lies in highlighting caring across the entire health care system. By diminishing exposure to negative role models, and adopting appropriate pedagogical ideas about

  18. Uses of internet technology in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, I.

    2001-01-01

    The practice of medicine has extended itself to vast areas and requires active clinicians to systematize and organize their workload through the use of the most up-to-date digital and computer communication technologies. Computerization and worldwide accessibility of information has especially provided great assistance in this regard. The explosive growth of medical information increases the need for the use of these new methods of organizing and accessing data. This article briefly summarizes a few of the vital tools that internet technology has provided clinical practice, with the aid of basic concepts of internet, database systems, hospital systems and data security and reliability. (author)

  19. Correlations between IL6 and the main clinical and biological parameters in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Chicu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cytokines are a family of complex peptide with hormone-like activity. They are soluble proteins without enzymatic activity and serves as the main intracellular mediators. Many cytokines achieves its effects by binding to special receptors membrane, and their adjustment is via soluble receptors. Cytokines are characterized by pleiotropism, overlapping and mutual adjustment. Proinflammatory cytokine involved in major rheumatoid arthritis are TNF, IL1α, IL1β, IL8.The biological effects of IL6 overlap in large part over those of TNF. If TNF is involved in induction of apoptosis or programmed cell death, IL6 is specifically associated with angiogenic factors activation and the occurrence of neovascularity to the synovium; favors articular cartilage degradation by increasing the release of MMP, decreasing PG, recruit osteoclasts, apoptosis of osteoblasts, release of degradative enzymes and the inflammatory mediators - iNOS, COX2 - TNF, IL6, IL8.Material and methods: Based on these data we proposed and realized – for the first time in Romania – the measurement of IL6 levels and the correlation with values of DAS28 score, HAQ, ESR, CRP, Hb and the immunological parameters too. The study was conducted on a group of 80 sick diagnosed with RA in various stages of evolution, under treatment with disease-modifying medication , type Methotrexate, Arava.Conclusions: Levels of IL-6 correlate a direct manner with those of acute phase reactants ,ESR, CRP and indirect values of Hb, IgG; the clinical parameters (number of tender and swollen joints, DAS28, HAQ are not influenced by values IL6.

  20. International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip; Shea, Judy A; Gossec, Laure; Leung, Ying Ying; Tillett, William; Elmamoun, Musaab; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Campbell, Willemina; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Dures, Emma; Eder, Lihi; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna; Goel, Niti; Grieb, Suzanne Dolwick; Hewlett, Sarah; Hoejgaard, Pil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Lindsay, Chris; McHugh, Neil; Shea, Bev; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Strand, Vibeke; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-04-01

    To identify a core set of domains (outcomes) to be measured in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials that represent both patients' and physicians' priorities. We conducted (1) a systematic literature review (SLR) of domains assessed in PsA; (2) international focus groups to identify domains important to people with PsA; (3) two international surveys with patients and physicians to prioritise domains; (4) an international face-to-face meeting with patients and physicians using the nominal group technique method to agree on the most important domains; and (5) presentation and votes at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) conference in May 2016. All phases were performed in collaboration with patient research partners. We identified 39 unique domains through the SLR (24 domains) and international focus groups (34 domains). 50 patients and 75 physicians rated domain importance. During the March 2016 consensus meeting, 12 patients and 12 physicians agreed on 10 candidate domains. Then, 49 patients and 71 physicians rated these domains' importance. Five were important to >70% of both groups: musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, structural damage, pain and physical function. Fatigue and participation were important to >70% of patients. Patient global and systemic inflammation were important to >70% of physicians. The updated PsA core domain set endorsed by 90% of OMERACT 2016 participants includes musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, pain, patient global, physical function, health-related quality of life, fatigue and systemic inflammation. The updated PsA core domain set incorporates patients' and physicians' priorities and evolving PsA research. Next steps include identifying outcome measures that adequately assess these domains. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Clinical and functional evaluation of forefoot reconstruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the long-term results from reconstruction of the forefoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent arthrodesis of the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux, resection arthroplasty of the heads of the lateral metatarsals and correction of the deformities of the smaller toes through arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint or closed manipulation.METHODS: seventeen patients (27 feet who underwent forefoot reconstruction surgery by means of arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, resection of the heads of the lateral metatarsals and correction of the deformities of the smaller toes, were studied retrospectively. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-148 months; the mean age was 52 years (range: 20-75 months; and four patients were male and 13 were female.RESULTS: the results were classified as excellent in 17 feet, good in two, fair in four and poor in two. The mean score on the AOFAS scale was 70 points; 21 feet (78% were found to be asymptomatic; and six feet (22% presented some type of symptom. Three feet presented pseudarthrosis, and one of these successfully underwent revision of the arthrodesis. There was no significant difference in scoring on the AOFAS scale or in the consolidation rate, between using a plate and screws and using Kirschner wires for fixation of the arthrodesis.CONCLUSION: arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint with resection arthroplasty on the heads of the lateral metatarsals and correction of the deformities of the smaller toes, which was used in forefoot reconstruction in rheumatoid patients, showed good long-term results with a high satisfaction rate among the patients and clinical-functional improvement.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  3. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  4. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our position statement on health care transparency, patient representation and collaboration in finding shared solutions. The Role ... Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  5. COMPLEX CLINICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL EVALUATION OF LUNG INJURY IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Nesterovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage of the respiratory system is a quite common  extra-articular manifestation  of rheumatoid  arthritis (RA. It is important  to note that its clinical symptoms occur in only 20–30% of patients; however, subclinical forms identified by active screening are observed in 70–80% of patients.Objective: to compare the significance of pulmonary complaints,  the results of physical examination, and the data of instrumental  studies for the detection  of lung injury in patients with RA.Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 70 RA patients (63 women and 7 men aged 24 to 83 years. Only 10% of them had clinically evident lung injury associated with RA. Patients with other pulmonary diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, etc., were excluded. Physical examination, radiography/fluoroscopy, high-resolution computed  tomography (HRCT, single-photon emission computed  tomography (SPECT of the lung, and lung function testing (LFT with the determination of lung diffusion capacity.Results and discussion. The data of physical examination  were nonspecific and unconvincing.  Pulmonary  complaints (dyspnea, cough, expectoration were seen in 65% of the patients; an objective assessment revealed changes (vesiculotympanitic resonance,  harsh breathing, and pleural friction rub in 40%. The X-ray films/fluorograms  displayed abnormalities (pulmonary fibrosis, focal changes in only 10% of cases. 92% of the patients had lung HRCT  changes including moderate (bronchial  obstruction (40%, rheumatoid  nodules (10%, ground glass opacities (60%, bronchial thickening (20%, pleural effusion (10%, tree-in-bud opacities (3% and severe (pulmonary hypertension  (10%, bronchiectasis (10%, emphysema (5% and lung tissue fibrotic changes as the honeycomb lung (2% ones. SPECT showed local hypoperfusion in the mantle and mediastinal parts of the lungs in 80% of cases. LFT analysis demonstrated reduced lung diffusion capacity in 41% of

  6. Physical function continues to improve when clinical remission is sustained in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Helga; Alasti, Farideh; Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel

    2015-08-11

    To investigate the course of functional status assessed by health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with sustained clinical remission (REM). In recent RA clinical trials, we identified patients with subsequent visits of ≥24 weeks in clinical REM according to the disease activity score using 28-joint counts including C-reactive protein (DAS28) (≤2.6), or simplified disease activity index (SDAI) (≤3.3). Area under the curve (AUC) and mean HAQ scores throughout the time in sustained REM were compared using t test, analyses of variance (ANOVA) and adjusted general linear modeling (GLM) with repeated measures. In Cox regression analyses, the time to regain full physical function was modeled. Sensitivity analyses were performed in patients of sustained SDAI low disease activity (LDA; SDAI ≤11). A total of 610 out of 4364 patients achieved sustained DAS28 REM (14%) and 252 SDAI REM (5.8%). ANOVA testing for linear trend showed significant decrease of mean HAQ from week 0 (start of REM) to week 24, regardless of REM criteria used. AUC of HAQ throughout 24 weeks of REM was higher in DAS28 compared to SDAI REM (p ≤0.01). GLM adjusting for covariates showed significant decrease of monthly HAQ scores from week 0 to 24 (DAS28: 0.276, 0.243, 0.229, 0.222, 0.219, 0.209 to 0.199; p = 0.0001; SDAI: 0.147, 0.142, 0.149, 0.129, 0.123, 0.117 to 0.114; p = 0.029). Similarly, a decrease of HAQ over time was found in patients of sustained SDAI LDA. In DAS28 REM, the chance of regaining full physical function was higher for female (hazard ratio HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.41 [1.13-1.76]) and early RA patients (disease duration ≤2 years: HR 1.29 [1.01-1.65]); in SDAI REM no significant differences were found. Physical function continues to improve if the target of REM or LDA is sustained. The stringency of the remission criteria determines achievement of the best possible functional improvement.

  7. Heart Failure: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul

    2018-03-03

    "Heart failure: from research to clinical practice", a collection of selected reviews, which comes out also as a book, covers essentially all important aspects of heart failure, including the pathogenesis, clinical features, biomarkers, imaging techniques, medical treatment and surgical treatments, use of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and palliative care. The reviews include essential background information, state of the art, critical and in-depth analysis, and directions for future researches for elucidation of the unresolved issues. Everyone interested in heart failure is expected to find this compilation helpful for a deeper understanding of some of the complex issues.

  8. Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED.

  9. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of septic arthritis of the hip, 2006 to 2012, a seven-year review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Miyahara, Helder; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Oliva, Guilherme Batista; Aita, Paulo César; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To epidemiologically characterize the population treated at our orthopedic clinic with a diagnosis of septic arthritic of the hip between 2006 and 2012. METHODS: Fifteen patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the hip between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients' clinical and epidemiological characteristics were surveyed; a sensitivity profile relating to the microorganisms that caused the infections and the complications relating to the patients' treatment and evolution were identified. RESULTS: Septic arthritis was more common among males. Most diagnoses were made through positive synovial fluid cultures, after joint drainage was performed using the Smith-Petersen route. Among the comorbidities found, the most prevalent were systemic arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and human immunodeficiency virus. The pathological joint conditions diagnosed prior to joint infection were osteoarthrosis and developmental dysplasia of the hip. The infectious agent most frequently isolated was Staphylococcus aureus. From the clinical and laboratory data investigated, 53.33% of the cases presented with fever, and all except one patient presented with increased measures in inflammation tests. Gram staining was positive in only 26.66% of the synovial fluid samples analyzed. Six patients presented with joint complications after treatment was administered. CONCLUSION: S. aureus is the most common pathogen in acute infections of the hip in our setting. Factors such as clinical comorbidities are associated with septic arthritis of the hip. Because of the relatively small number of patients, given that this is a condition of low prevalence, there was no statistically significant correlation in relation to worse prognosis for the disease. PMID:25029577

  10. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of septic arthritis of the hip, 2006 to 2012, a seven-year review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder de Souza Miyahara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To epidemiologically characterize the population treated at our orthopedic clinic with a diagnosis of septic arthritic of the hip between 2006 and 2012.METHODS:Fifteen patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the hip between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients' clinical and epidemiological characteristics were surveyed; a sensitivity profile relating to the microorganisms that caused the infections and the complications relating to the patients' treatment and evolution were identified.RESULTS:Septic arthritis was more common among males. Most diagnoses were made through positive synovial fluid cultures, after joint drainage was performed using the Smith-Petersen route. Among the comorbidities found, the most prevalent were systemic arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and human immunodeficiency virus. The pathological joint conditions diagnosed prior to joint infection were osteoarthrosis and developmental dysplasia of the hip. The infectious agent most frequently isolated was Staphylococcus aureus. From the clinical and laboratory data investigated, 53.33% of the cases presented with fever, and all except one patient presented with increased measures in inflammation tests. Gram staining was positive in only 26.66% of the synovial fluid samples analyzed. Six patients presented with joint complications after treatment was administered.CONCLUSION:S. aureus is the most common pathogen in acute infections of the hip in our setting. Factors such as clinical comorbidities are associated with septic arthritis of the hip. Because of the relatively small number of patients, given that this is a condition of low prevalence, there was no statistically significant correlation in relation to worse prognosis for the disease.

  11. Wisdom in clinical reasoning and medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Ricca; Pearce, Jane; Woerner, Markus H

    2009-01-01

    Exploring informal components of clinical reasoning, we argue that they need to be understood via the analysis of professional wisdom. Wise decisions are needed where action or insight is vital, but neither everyday nor expert knowledge provides solutions. Wisdom combines experiential, intellectual, ethical, emotional and practical capacities; we contend that it is also more strongly social than is usually appreciated. But many accounts of reasoning specifically rule out such features as irrational. Seeking to illuminate how wisdom operates, we therefore build on Aristotle's work on informal reasoning. His account of rhetorical communication shows how non-formal components can play active parts in reasoning, retaining, or even enhancing its reasonableness. We extend this account, applying it to forms of healthcare-related reasoning which are characterised by the need for wise decision-making. We then go on to explore some of what clinical wise reasoning may mean, concluding with a case taken from psychotherapeutic practice.

  12. Medical Ethics in Contemporary Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Williams

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article describes and analyzes ethical issues in medical practice, particularly those issues encountered by physicians in their relationships with their patients. These relationships often involve ethical conflicts between 2 or more interests, which physicians need to recognize and resolve. The article deals with 4 topics in clinical practice in which ethical conflicts occur: physicians' duty of confidentiality in a digital environment, their responsibilities for dealing with abuses of the human rights of patients, their role in clinical research, and their relationships with commercial enterprises. The ethical policies of the World Medical Association provide the basis for determining appropriate physician conduct on these matters. The article concludes with reflections on the need for international standards of medical ethics.

  13. Medical ethics in contemporary clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John R

    2005-11-01

    This review article describes and analyzes ethical issues in medical practice, particularly those issues encountered by physicians in their relationships with their patients. These relationships often involve ethical conflicts between 2 or more interests, which physicians need to recognize and resolve. The article deals with 4 topics in clinical practice in which ethical conflicts occur: physicians' duty of confidentiality in a digital environment, their responsibilities for dealing with abuses of the human rights of patients, their role in clinical research, and their relationships with commercial enterprises. The ethical policies of the World Medical Association provide the basis for determining appropriate physician conduct on these matters. The article concludes with reflections on the need for international standards of medical ethics.

  14. Clinical Case of Tocilizumab Use in a Patient with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Spivakovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of using genetically engineered biopharmaceutical tocilizumab in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. On the initial stage, the treatment was characterized by resistance to high doses of glucocorticoids and cytostatic drugs. Successful termination of visceral and articular manifestations of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and normalization of laboratory indicators of disease activity in the setting of use of interleukin 6 receptor blocker were described. We observed stable improvement of the child’s condition during a year-long follow-up in the setting of the selected anti-inflammatory therapy pattern. 

  15. Pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition in clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lifschitz, Carlos H

    2002-01-01

    ... facts in molecular biology and genetics, as well as recently acquired clinical information, in conjunction with a practical approach to pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. The idea is to provide new information that seems to be here to stay, along with a comprehensive update on the management of nutritional and gastrointestinal problems that affect the pediatric population, from the newborn to the adolescent. We have also provided, when appropriate, a section on "what can go wrong." This section lists c...

  16. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform...... is an easy to use percutaneous circulatory support device which is increasingly used worldwide. During 2014, we established a working group of European physicians who have collected considerable experience with the Impella device in recent years. By critically comparing the individual experiences...

  17. Medical Malpractice Implications of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Douglas S; Siegal, Gil

    2017-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines aim to improve medical care by clarifying and making useful recommendations to providers. Although providers should account for patients' unique characteristics when determining a treatment plan, it is generally perceived as good practice to follow guidelines when applicable. This is of interest in malpractice litigation, where it is essential to establish a standard of care to evaluate the performances of providers. Although the opinions of expert witnesses are used to determine standards of care, guidelines are expected to play a leading role. Guidelines alone should not establish a legal standard but may help inform this discussion in the courtroom. Therefore, it is incumbent that excellent, practical, and timely guidelines are continually created and updated in a transparent way. These guidelines must be very clear and underscore the various strengths of recommendation based on the quality of available evidence.

  18. Septic Arthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Clinical and Functional Outcomes Based on Graft Retention or Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Brian R; Arroyo, William; Cotter, Eric J; Zacchilli, Michael A; Garcia, E'Stephan J; Owens, Brett D

    2018-03-01

    There remains a debate over whether to retain the index anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in the setting of septic arthritis. To evaluate and compare clinical outcomes for the treatment of septic arthritis after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) in those with and without early graft retention. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The Military Health System was queried for all ACLR procedures performed between 2007 and 2013. Inclusion criteria required active military status, primary ACLR with secondary septic arthritis, and minimum 24-month surveillance. Demographic, clinical, and surgical variables were evaluated using descriptive statistics and regression analysis for factors influencing selected outcomes. Of 9511 ACLR procedures, 31 (0.32%) were identified as having secondary septic arthritis requiring urgent arthroscopic irrigation and debridement and intravenous antibiotics (mean, 6.3 weeks). The majority (62%) were treated in the subacute (2 weeks to 2 months) setting. Index ACLR was performed with a hamstring autograft (n = 17, 55%), soft tissue allograft (n = 11, 35%), and patellar tendon autograft (n = 3, 10%). The graft was retained in 71% (n = 22) of patients, while 29% (n = 9) underwent early graft debridement. At a mean 26.9-month follow-up, 48% of patients (n = 15) had returned to the military. Graft removal was not predictive of return to active duty ( P = .29). The presence of postoperative complications, including symptomatic postinfection arthritis (22.6%) and arthrofibrosis (9.7%), was the only variable predictive of inability to return to duty (odds ratio, 27.5 [95% CI, 3.24-233.47]; P = .002). Seven of 9 patients who underwent graft debridement underwent revision ACLR, and all 7 had stable knees at final follow-up compared with 68% (15/22) in the graft retention group. Arthroscopic debridement with early graft removal and staged revision ACLR remains a viable option for restoring knee stability (100%), although the rate of return to active duty was

  19. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  1. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of unclassified arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Østergaard, M; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the value in clinical practice of hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole body bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of patients with unclassified arthritis. METHODS: 41 patients with arthritis (> or = 2 swollen joints, > 6 months' duration) which...... to psoriatic arthritis (RF negative + psoriasis); one to non-specific self-limiting arthritis). No patients classified as non-RA at baseline had fulfilled the ACR criteria after 2 years. The presence of MRI synovitis, MRI erosion and bone scintigraphic pattern compatible with RA showed 100% specificity...

  3. A European chart review study on early rheumatoid arthritis treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Solem, Caitlyn; Majer, Istvan; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Tarallo, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review aimed to provide a current, real-world overview of biologic usage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Germany, Spain, and the UK, and estimate clinical and healthcare utilization outcomes associated with early versus late treatment. Adults (≥18 years) with a confirmed RA diagnosis between January 2008 and December 2010, who received biologic treatment for ≥3 months and had ≥12 months of follow-up were included. Early treatment was receipt of biologic agent ≤1 year after RA diagnosis. Outcomes included 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) reduction of ≥1.2 from biologic start and remission (DAS28 < 2.6). Time to outcome was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Of 328 patients enrolled (Germany [n = 111], Spain [n = 106], UK [n = 111]), 58.2 % received early biologic (Germany: 55.0 %, UK: 55.9 %, Spain: 64.2 %; p = 0.321). First-line biologics were more frequent in Spain (26.4 %) and Germany (19.8 %) versus the UK (7.2 %; p < 0.001). Late-treated patients were hospitalized more often than early-treated patients (10.5 vs 2.9 % [p = 0.006] for 9.0 vs 5.4 mean inpatient days [p = 0.408]). DAS28 was 5.1 at biologic initiation (n = 310); 73.5 % of patients had a DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 and 44.5 % achieved remission. More patients had DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 (79.2 vs 65.9 %; p = 0.009) and remission (51.1 vs 35.6 %; p = 0.007) with early versus late treatment, with a significant difference in Kaplan-Meier curves when indexing on time since diagnosis (p < 0.001) and biologic start (p = 0.024). In RA patients receiving biologic therapy, over half received biologic therapy early. Early initiation was associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced hospitalization rates versus late treatment.

  4. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed.

  5. The enigma of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : Genetic, immunologic and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.J.W.

    2018-01-01

    Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a sight-threatening inflammation of the eye, affecting up to 30% of children with JIA. Despite the fact that the association of uveitis in JIA was already described by Ohm in 1910 and has a life-long impact, it remains a poorly

  6. Cachexia and adiposity in rheumatoid arthritis. Relevance for disease management and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challal, Salima; Minichiello, Emeline; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Altered body composition is a frequent finding in rheumatoid arthritis and is associated with the two major outcomes of the disease: disability and cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that up to two thirds of patients may be affected by loss of lean mass, the so-called rheumatoid cachexia. Hence, body weight being equal, the relative amount of lean mass is lower and that of body fat is higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients vs. healthy controls. Both disease-related factors and other factors, like drug treatments, physical activity and nutrition contribute to modify body composition in rheumatoid arthritis. The effect of pharmacological treatments, and notably of anti-TNF drugs, on body composition is controversial. Conversely, training programs to stimulate muscle growth can restore lean mass and reduce adiposity. There is good evidence that amelioration of body composition ameliorates function and reduces disability. Currently, there is no evidence that interventions that modify body composition can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Are Bicipital Synovial Cysts in Children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis still a Significant Clinical Challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Herlin, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large synovial cysts are rarely seen in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. When they do appear, they usually appear in the popliteal space (Baker’s cyst). Less commonly, they occur in the antecubital area or as bicipital synovial cysts. Bicipital synovial cysts present as a sudden-onset p...

  8. Periodontitis in established rheumatoid arthritis patients : A cross-sectional clinical, microbiological and serological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Menke de; Westra, Johanna; Vissink, Arjan; Doornbos-van der Meer, Berber; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is suggested to be linked to the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Colonization of P. gingivalis in the oral cavity of RA patients has been scarcely considered. To further explore whether the association

  9. Document control practices in 120 clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Paul N; Stankovic, Ana K; Souers, Rhona J; Schneider, Frank; Wagar, Elizabeth A

    2009-06-01

    A variety of document control practices are required of clinical laboratories by US regulation, laboratory accreditors, and standard-setting organizations. To determine how faithfully document control is being implemented in practice and whether particular approaches to document control result in better levels of compliance. Contemporaneous, structured audit of 8814 documents used in 120 laboratories for conformance with 6 generally accepted document control requirements: available, authorized, current, reviewed by management, reviewed by staff, and archived. Of the 8814 documents, 3113 (35%) fulfilled all 6 document control requirements. The requirement fulfilled most frequently was availability of the document at all shifts and locations (8564 documents; 97%). Only 4407 (50%) of documents fulfilled Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment requirements for being properly archived after updating or discontinuation. Policies and procedures were more likely to fulfill document control requirements than forms and work aids. Documents tended to be better controlled in some laboratory sections (eg, transfusion service) than in others (eg, microbiology and client services). We could not identify document control practices significantly associated with higher compliance rates. Most laboratories are not meeting regulatory and accreditation requirements related to control of documents. It is not clear whether control failures have any impact on the quality of laboratory results or patient outcomes.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dias Barranhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate and describe indications, mainly diagnoses and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings observed in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Retrospective and descriptive study of cardiac magnetic resonance performed at a private hospital and clinic in the city of Niterói, RJ, Brazil, in the period from May 2007 to April 2011. Results The sample included a total of 1000 studies performed in patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.2 years and predominance for male gender (57.2%. The majority of indications were related to assessment of myocardial perfusion at rest and under pharmacological stress (507/1000; 51%, with positive results in 36.2% of them. Suspected myocarditis was the second most frequent indication (140/1000; 14%, with positive results in 63.4% of cases. These two indications were followed by study of arrhythmias (116/1000; 12%, myocardial viability (69/1000; 7% and evaluation of cardiomyopathies (47/1000; 5%. In a subanalysis, it was possible to identify that most patients were assessed on an outpatient basis (58.42%. Conclusion Cardiac magnetic resonance has been routinely performed in clinical practice, either on an outpatient or emergency/inpatient basis, and myocardial ischemia represented the main indication, followed by investigation of myocarditis, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and myocardial viability.

  11. Narrative medicine in clinical genetics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M

    2012-08-01

    Over the last 30 years medicine has undergone a significant paradigm shift. Due to the tremendous advances of modern medicine more and more people are living longer with their illnesses. These people have stories to tell, and they want these stories to be heard: They are reclaiming their voices. As clinical geneticists we need to hear what these voices are telling us, especially so in our area of clinical care where cures are rare, and disease states can be permanent. Narrative medicine is an important new skill set that hones abilities to do just that.This article highlights how integral narrative medicine is to clinical genetics practice, how geneticists already employ many of its tools and how they practice it diligently every day. I will show how geneticists can further improve their abilities to hear and honor patients' stories by writing and sharing stories with patients and with each other as doctors, counselors, and nurses, social workers and chaplains. The review presents the skills of close reading and how they improve patient care and illustrates how geneticists can, by using reflective writing, reshape their emotions in order to understand them, to let them go, and to make room for more. It presents the major types of illness narratives whose recognition allows us to hear and understand patients' stories. When used, the tools of narrative medicine can result in better patient care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  13. Clinical responsiveness of self-report functional assessment measures for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing intraarticular corticosteroid injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G Ted; Wright, F Virginia; Lang, Bianca A; Birdi, Nina; Oen, Kim; Stephens, Derek; McComas, Joan; Feldman, Brian M

    2005-12-15

    The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), Juvenile Arthritis Functional Assessment Report (JAFAR), and Juvenile Arthritis Functional Status Index (JASI) are widely used functional measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that differ in content, format, and completion time. We compared the responsiveness and child-parent agreement of the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI in a prospective, multicenter study. Children and adolescents from 5 rheumatology centers were enrolled. Subjects were about to undergo therapy (intraarticular corticosteroid injections [IAS] and methotrexate or hip surgery (MTX/hip]) expected to produce a functional improvement. All subjects were studied before the intervention and at 6 weeks and 6 months posttreatment. At each study visit, the 3 measures were administered in randomized, balanced order to both parents and children. A total of 92 subjects (mean age 12.8 years) were enrolled in the study, 74 of which were in the IAS group. The responsiveness of all 3 measures was moderate to strong. The standardized response mean at 6 weeks for the IAS group on the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI was 0.41 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.18, 0.64), 0.70 (95% CI 0.47, 0.93), and 0.36 (95% CI 0.13, 0.59), respectively. The CHAQ was somewhat more responsive to change at 6 weeks (IAS group: relative efficiency 0.34 [JAFAR], 0.27 [JASI]), but less responsive at 6 months (MTX/hip group: relative efficiency 5.1 [JAFAR], 3.9 [JASI]). All 3 questionnaires showed acceptable parent-child agreement, and overall, there were few differences between the 3 questionnaires. The functional outcome measures currently used for JIA are all adequately responsive for use in trials or in the clinic setting. The choice of which measure to use should therefore be based on the time available for completion, the intended clinical/research use, and the depth of content required.

  14. How common is clinically inactive disease in a prospective cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis? The importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie J W; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2017-08-01

    Many criteria for clinically inactive disease (CID) and minimal disease activity (MDA) have been proposed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). It is not known to what degree each of these criteria overlap within a single patient cohort. This study aimed to compare the frequency of MDA and CID across different criteria in a cohort of children with JIA at 1 year following presentation. The Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study recruits children at initial presentation to paediatric or adolescent rheumatology in seven UK centres. Children recruited between October 2001 and December 2013 were included. The proportions of children with CID and MDA at 1 year were calculated using four investigator-defined and eight published composite criteria. Missing data were accounted for using multiple imputation under different assumptions. In a cohort of 1415 children and adolescents, 67% patients had no active joints at 1 year. Between 48% and 61% achieved MDA and between 25% and 38% achieved CID using published criteria. Overlap between criteria varied. Of 922 patients in MDA by either the original composite criteria, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) or clinical JADAS cut-offs, 68% were classified as in MDA by all 3 criteria. Similarly, 44% of 633 children with CID defined by either Wallace's preliminary criteria or the JADAS cut-off were in CID according to both criteria. In a large JIA prospective inception cohort, a majority of patients have evidence of persistent disease activity after 1 year. Published criteria to capture MDA and CID do not always identify the same groups of patients. This has significant implications when defining and applying treat-to-target strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinic identifies the following risk factors: family history, age, sex, previous join injury, and obesity (Mayo Clinic, 2011). How is arthritis treated? Treatments for arthritis vary; exercising, medication, natural remedies, nutrition, ...

  16. [Qualitative translational science in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Pei-Fan

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative translational research refers to the "bench-to-bedside" enterprise of harnessing knowledge from the basic sciences to produce new treatment options or nursing interventions for patients. Three evidence-based translational problems related to qualitative translational research discussed this year address the interfaces among the nursing paradigm, the basic sciences, and clinical nursing work. This article illustrates the definition of translational science and translational blocks of evidence-based practice; discusses the qualitative research perspective in evidence synthesis, evidence translation and evidence utilization; and discusses the research questions that must be answered to solve the problems of the three translational gaps from the qualitative research perspective. Qualitative inquiry has an essential role to play in efforts to improve current healthcare-provider nursing interventions, experiences, and contexts. Thus, it is vital to introduce qualitative perspectives into evidence-based practice from the knowledge discovery through to the knowledge implementation process.

  17. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  18. Patient questionnaires and formal education level as prospective predictors of mortality over 10 years in 97% of 1416 patients with rheumatoid arthritis from 15 United States private practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Theodore; Keysor, Julie; Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar; Callahan, Leigh F

    2004-02-01

    To prospectively analyze patient questionnaire scores concerning functional disability as well as formal education level as potential predictors of premature mortality over 10 years in 1416 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from 15 private practice rheumatology settings in 11 diverse cities in the United States. At baseline in 1985 and periodically over 10 years, patients completed mailed self-report multidimensional health assessment questionnaires (MDHAQ) that included functional disability scores, formal education level, and other demographic and clinical data. Vital status was determined 10 years after baseline. Potential predictors of 10 year mortality were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Cox proportional hazards models. Vital status was accounted for in 1378 patients, 97.3% of the cohort. The standard mortality ratio was 1.6, similar to most reported series of patients with RA, as 401 patients died versus 251 expected over 10 years. Evidence of "dose-response" relations was seen for age, formal education level, functional disability scores, and helplessness scores as predictors of mortality. In Cox proportional hazards models, age, sex, formal education level, functional disability, and helplessness scores remained significant independent predictors of 10 year mortality. Functional disability and low formal education level are significant predictors of premature mortality in people with RA under care in US private practice settings, as in most reported cohorts of patients with RA. This study shows that it is possible to account for more than 95% of patients over 10 years using mailed questionnaires to monitor patient status.

  19. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Rotator cuff surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: clinical outcome comparable to age, sex and tear size matched non-rheumatoid patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S J; Sun, J-H; Kekatpure, A L; Chun, J-M; Jeon, I-H

    2017-09-01

    Aims This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of rotator cuff repair in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with those of patients who have no known history of the disease. We hypothesised that the functional outcomes are comparable between patients and without rheumatoid arthritis and may be affected by the level of disease activity, as assessed from C-reactive protein (CRP) level and history of systemic steroid intake. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective review of the institutional surgical database from May 1995 to April 2012. Twenty-nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had rotator cuff repair were enrolled as the study group. Age, sex, and tear size matched patients with no disease who were selected as the control group. The mean duration of follow-up was 46 months (range 24-92 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire, Constant score and visual analogue scale (VAS). All data were recorded preoperatively and at regular postoperative follow-up visits. CRP was measured preoperatively as the disease activity marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Medication history was thoroughly reviewed in the study group. Results In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, all shoulder functional scores improved after surgery (ASES 56.1-78.1, Constant 50.8-70.5 and VAS 5.2-2.5; P rheumatoid arthritis was comparable to that of the control group (difference with control: ASES 78.1 vs. 85.5, P = 0.093; Constant 70.5 vs. 75.9, P = 0.366; VAS 2.5 vs. 1.8, P = 0.108). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had an elevated CRP level (> 1 mg/dl) showed inferior clinical outcomes than those with normal CRP levels. Patients with a history of systemic steroid intake showed inferior functional outcomes than those who had not taken steroids. Conclusions Surgical intervention for rotator cuff tear in patients with rheumatoid arthritis improved the shoulder functional outcome comparable to that in

  1. [Breaking bad news in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Andrea; Ríos, Matías; Manríquez, José Manuel; Rojas, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex task that requires multiple communication skills from health professionals. Clinical practice demands to communicate all type of bad news, from a diagnosis of cancer to adverse effects of a treatment. On the other hand, since the beginning of the health reform in 2003, the need to improve the quality of services was proposed, among which the concern about the rights and duties of patients stands out. Therefore, the health care provider-patient relationship becomes again the subject of discussion and study, and a topic of great importance for clinical work. We revise the consequences of breaking bad news for the patient and for the health care provider, as well as the current protocols available for this purpose. The importance of developing communication skills both for future health professionals as for those who currently work in the area is emphasized.

  2. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  3. The discrepancy between clinical and ultrasonographic remission in rheumatoid arthritis is not related to therapy or autoantibody status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Amelia; Sandri, Gilda; Carpenito, Giacomo; Belletti, Lorenza; Mascia, Maria Teresa

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical remission by means of power Doppler ultrasonographic (PDUS) monitoring in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission (DAS28 therapy with DMARDS, anti-TNF, or no therapy in clinical remission according to ACR criteria and DAS 28 therapy with anti-TNF or other therapies showed similar US assessment without significant statistical differences. Among eleven patients that presented swollen and tender joints at the latest physical examination, which preceded US exam, just 5 patients had an US confirmation too. In the other patients, the PDUS did not confirm the presence of inflammation in the corresponding swollen and tender joints or showed a positive ultrasonographic assessment in other locations. The remission state is a great therapy target and not only through the biological therapy. Synovial inflammation could persist independently from type of therapy or autoantibody status.

  4. EULAR definition of erosive disease in light of the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bingham, Clifton O.; Burmester, Gerd R.; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Felson, David; Knevel, Rachel; Kvien, Tore K.; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Lukas, Cédric; McInnes, Iain; Silman, Alan J.; Smolen, Josef S.; Stanislawska-Biernat, Ewa; Zink, Angela; Combe, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report was to propose a definition for erosive disease in the context of inflammatory arthritis in light of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) criteria for use in clinical practice and studies. A EULAR

  5. Subclinical Synovitis Measured by Ultrasound in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Clinical Remission Induced by Synthetic and Biological Modifying Disease Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Marcos; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Bonett, Natalí; Rivas, Juan C

    2017-10-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with disease in clinical remission might show subclinical synovitis, which can be related to the progress of structural joint damage. To determine and compare the degree of synovial inflammation by ultrasound (US) in patients with RA in clinical remission, treated with DMARD or combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF. Hospital-based cross-sectional study of 58 patients with RA in sustained remission for at least 6 months by DAS28 <2.6, who attended the Rheumatology Service at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Patients underwent clinical, functional, and laboratory assessments. Ultrasound was performed in hands measuring synovial effusion, synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal; using a semiquantitative 4-point scale of 0=none to 3=severe. Chi-square and t-test were used to compare the clinical, functional, laboratory and US assessments between the DMARD (N=37) and combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF (N=21) groups. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of 58 patients, 25.9% had remission by US and 74.1% had synovial effusion or hypertrophy or positive power Doppler signal. Non-significant differences in US synovitis between the two groups were found. Persistent US activity was evident in a high percentage of rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by DAS28. No differences in subclinical synovitis measured by US were found between patients with DMARD and anti-TNF-induced clinical remission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Grape polyphenols and propolis mixture inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human leukocytes and reduces clinical scores in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossalayi, M D; Rambert, J; Renouf, E; Micouleau, M; Mérillon, J M

    2014-02-15

    Polyphenols from red fruits and bee-derived propolis (PR) are bioactive natural products in various in vitro and in vivo models. The present study shows that hematotoxicity-free doses of grape polyphenols (GPE) and PR differentially decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated human peripheral blood leucocytes. While GPE inhibited the monocytes/macrophage response, propolis decreased both monokines and interferon γ (IFNγ) production. When used together, their distinct effects lead to the attenuation of all inflammatory mediators, as supported by a significant modulation of the transcriptomic profile of pro-inflammatory genes in human leukocytes. To enforce in vitro data, GPE+PR were tested for their ability to improve clinical scores and cachexia in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Extracts significantly reduced arthritis scores and cachexia, and this effect was more significant in animals receiving continuous low doses compared to those receiving five different high doses. Animals treated daily had significantly better clinical scores than corticoid-treated rats. Together, these findings indicate that the GPE+PR combination induces potent anti-inflammatory activity due to their complementary immune cell modulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Anorectal Manometry in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic assessment of the anorectum and pelvic floor by anorectal manometry and balloon expulsion testing provides important insights into the pathologic processes underlying defecatory disorders and guides treatment, specifically the use of biofeedback for the treatment of dyssynergic defecation and the identification of possible structural abnormalities of the pelvic floor. While symptoms and digital rectal examination may suggest pelvic floor dysfunction to the clinician, only pelvic floor testing provides definitive diagnoses of these often treatable abnormalities. The use of anorectal manometry in clinical practice is currently limited by substantial variation in performance of the test and interpretation of the results, but anorectal manometry with the addition of balloon expulsion test to improve specificity provides the best current modality for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation. With the introduction of high-resolution and three-dimensional, high-definition probes, our ability to characterize the structure and function of the anorectum has never been better, though further research is still needed to improve our ability to diagnose pelvic floor dysfunction and refer appropriate patients to treatment. In areas where the availability of anorectal manometry (ARM) is limited, a thorough digital rectal exam performed by an experienced clinician plus the balloon expulsion test alone may identify appropriate patients to refer for additional testing. This review describes the appropriate indications for and appropriate performance of anorectal manometry in clinical practice with an eye toward the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation in patients with chronic constipation, fecal incontinence, and chronic proctalgia.

  8. Normal serum matrix metalloproteinase-3 levels can be used to predict clinical remission and normal physical function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yosuke; Kida, Daihei; Kaneko, Atsushi

    2017-09-22

    This study aimed to evaluate whether normal serum matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) levels can be used to predict clinical remission and normal physical function at a single time point when treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in daily practice settings. Subjects were all 1321 RA patients who were treated at our hospital. The accuracy of serum MMP-3 levels was larger than those of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels for predicting clinical remission [Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3], normal function [Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-DI) ≤ 0.5], and both in clinical remission and with normal function (clinical remission + normal function) using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Serum MMP-3 levels were significantly correlated with CRP levels [r 0.229 (men), r 0.476 (women)] using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Among patients with normal CRP levels (n = 807), the percentage of patients in clinical remission, with normal function, and with clinical remission + normal function having normal serum MMP-3 levels was significantly higher than those with abnormal serum MMP-3 levels. In addition, among patients with the 28-point count Disease Activity Score-CRP (DAS28-CRP) remission (DAS28-CRP normal function, and with clinical remission + normal function having normal serum MMP-3 levels was significantly higher than those with abnormal serum MMP-3 levels. Our findings suggest that normal serum MMP-3 levels, in combination with CRP levels or disease activity, are useful for predicting clinical remission and normal physical function in patients with RA.

  9. Clinical Observation of Employment of Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, known as Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis in children aged under 17. It may cause sequelae due to lack of effective treatment. The goal of this study is to explore the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs for JIA. Ten JIA patients were treated with UC-MSCs and received second infusion three months later. Some key values such as 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28, TNF-α, IL-6, and regulatory T cells (Tregs were evaluated. Data were collected at 3 months and 6 months after first treatment. DAS28 score of 10 patients was between 2.6 and 3.2 at three months after infusion. WBC, ESR, and CRP were significantly decreased while Tregs were remarkably increased and IL-6 and TNF-α were declined. Similar changes of above values were found after 6 months. At the same time, the amount of NSAIDS and steroid usage in patients was reduced. However, no significant changes were found comparing the data from 3 and 6 months. These results suggest that UC-MSCs can reduce inflammatory cytokines, improve immune network effects, adjust immune tolerance, and effectively alleviate the symptoms and they might provide a safe and novel approach for JIA treatment.

  10. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  11. Evaluation of several ultrasonography scoring systems for synovitis and comparison to clinical examination: results from a prospective multicentre study of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougados, Maxime; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Mistretta, Frederic; d'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Backhaus, Marina; Bentin, Jacques; Chalès, Gérard; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Conaghan, Philip; Etchepare, Fabien; Gaudin, Philippe; Grassi, Walter; van der Heijde, Désirée; Sellam, Jérémie; Naredo, Esperanza; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Wakefield, Richard; Saraux, Alain

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate different global ultrasonographic (US) synovitis scoring systems as potential outcome measures of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) filter. To study selected global scoring systems, for the clinical, B mode and power Doppler techniques, the following joints were evaluated: 28 joints (28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)), 20 joints (metacarpophalangeals (MCPs) + metatarsophalangeals (MTPs)) and 38 joints (28 joints + MTPs) using either a binary (yes/no) or a 0-3 grade. The study was a prospective, 4-month duration follow-up of 76 patients with RA requiring anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy (complete follow-up data: 66 patients). Intraobserver reliability was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), construct validity was evaluated using the Cronbach alpha test and external validity was evaluated using level of correlation between scoring system and C reactive protein (CRP). Sensitivity to change was evaluated using the standardised response mean. Discriminating capacity was evaluated using the standardised mean differences in patients considered by the doctor as significantly improved or not at the end of the study. Different clinimetric properties of various US scoring systems were at least as good as the clinical scores with, for example, intraobserver reliability ranging from 0.61 to 0.97 versus from 0.53 to 0.82, construct validity ranging from 0.76 to 0.89 versus from 0.76 to 0.88, correlation with CRP ranging from 0.28 to 0.34 versus from 0.28 to 0.35 and sensitivity to change ranging from 0.60 to 1.21 versus from 0.96 to 1.36 for US versus clinical scoring systems, respectively. This study suggests that US evaluation of synovitis is an outcome measure at least as relevant as physical examination. Further studies are required in order to achieve optimal US scoring systems for monitoring patients with RA in clinical trials and in clinical

  12. Impact of certolizumab pegol on patient-reported outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis and correlation with clinical measures of disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Janet; Bingham, Clifton O; Fleischmann, Roy M; Dougados, Maxime; Massarotti, Elena M; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Duncan, Benjamin; Coteur, Geoffroy; Weinblatt, Michael E

    2015-11-27

    The effect of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) was investigated in 1063 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the REALISTIC trial (double-blind, placebo-controlled to week 12, open-label to week 28; randomized 4:1 [CZP:placebo]). Correlations between PROs and RA signs and symptoms, and the relative efficacy of these measures, were examined. Adults with RA and an inadequate response to at least one disease-modifying antirheumatic drug were enrolled. PROs assessed included physical function (using the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index), pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, Patient Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3), and Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI). Early significant and clinically meaningful improvements in all PROs were observed to week 12 with CZP vs. placebo and were maintained to the end of the trial (week 28). At week 12, up to one-third more CZP patients showed improvements compared with placebo that were greater than or equal to the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in fatigue, sleep problems, pain, PtGA, RADAI, and RAPID3. The changes in PROs were correlated with clinical measures of disease activity, including the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using C-reactive protein as well as tender and swollen joint counts. Rapid improvements in PROs were seen in patients with RA treated with CZP. The magnitude of improvement exceeded the MCID in multiple domains and demonstrated that CZP improves aspects of health-related quality of life that are meaningful to patients and superior to placebo. PROs provide information complementary to clinical outcomes in assessment of treatment benefits. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00717236 . Registered on 15 July 2008.

  13. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  14. Clinical and radiological outcomes of 5-year drug-free remission-steered treatment in patients with early arthritis: IMPROVED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Gülşah; Heimans, Lotte; Bergstra, Sytske Anne; Goekoop, Robbert J; van Oosterhout, Maikel; van Groenendael, Johannes H L M; Peeters, André J; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M; Lard, Leroy R; de Sonnaville, Peter B J; Grillet, Bernard A M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Allaart, Cornelia F

    2018-01-01

    To determine the 5-year outcomes of early remission induction therapy followed by targeted treatment aimed at drug-free remission (DFR) in patients with early arthritis. In 12 hospitals, 610 patients with early (arthritis (RA) or undifferentiated arthritis (UA) started on methotrexate (MTX) 25 mg/week and prednisone (60 mg/day tapered to 7.5 mg/day). Patients not in early remission (Disease Activity Score 25 points in 5 years. Five years of DFR-steered treatment in patients with early RA resulted in almost normal functional ability without clinically relevant joint damage across treatment groups. Patients who achieved early remission had the best clinical outcomes. There were no differences between the randomisation arms. SDFR is a realistic treatment goal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. [Guidelines in clinical practice. Bioethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, D

    2000-06-01

    The adoption of guidelines in clinical practice raises questions that can be answered against a background in which professional conduct is compared with deontology, law, and the specific sociocultural context and health policies of institutions. In the scientific community, doubts are raised regarding the relationships between the general recommendations laid down in the Guidelines and the specific nature of every clinical condition; between the "duty of adhering" to Guidelines and the doctor's autonomy, as well as between the adoption, discrepancy and non-adoption of Guidelines and the juridical evaluation of medical liability. The information and individual consent of patients and citizens is of particular importance both with regard to clinical procedures and choices of allocation. In the light of these comments, the authors conclude that Guidelines should not be reduced to a form of automated procedure lacking any responsibility, but should represent a correct synthesis between the objective nature of scientific findings, the subjective condition of the patient and the doctor's autonomy. The application of correctly formulated Guidelines shared by the community means acting in such a way that the "right to health" and "freedom of treatment" can be exercised in respect of shared bioethical principles based on beneficence, autonomy and justice.

  16. Ultrasonography of the metatarsophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging, conventional radiography, and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Narvestad, Eva; Klarlund, Mette

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare ultrasonography (US) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional radiography, and clinical examination in the evaluation of bone destruction and signs of inflammation in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two...... hundred MTP joints of 40 patients with RA and 100 MTP joints of 20 healthy control subjects were assessed with B-mode US, contrast-enhanced MRI, conventional radiography, and clinical examination for signs of bone destruction and joint inflammation. RESULTS: With MRI considered the reference method......, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of US for the detection of bone erosions were 0.79, 0.97, and 0.96, respectively, while the corresponding values for radiography were 0.32, 0.98, and 0.93. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of US for the detection of synovitis were 0.87, 0.74, and 0.79, while...

  17. [Study of echocardiographic parameters of rheumatoid arthritis black African without clinically evident cardiovascular manifestations: A cross-sectional study of 73 cases in Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodo-Siddo, M N; Diao, M; Ndiaye, M B; Ndongo, S; Kane, A; Mbaye, A; Bodian, M; Sarr, S A; Sarr, M; Ba, S; Diop, T M

    2016-04-01

    Research of cardiac involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis can prevent complications and place in a logical secondary prevention. The objective of this study was to investigate the echocardiographic parameters in a population of Senegalese patients with rheumatoid arthritis without clinically evident cardiovascular manifestations. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study, which included prospectively from outpatients in the internal medicine department of university hospital center Aristide Le Dantec in Dakar, Senegal, with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis without clinically evident cardiovascular disease. It focused on a sample of 73 patients of both sexes aged at least 18 years. Following clinical examination, we conducted laboratory tests (CRP, fibrinogen, ESR, rheumatoid factors: Latex and Waaler-Rose, anti-CCP, antinuclear factors and anti-ENA antibodies), ECG, echocardiography standard. Data were analyzed using a descriptive study of the different variables with the calculation of proportions for categorical variables, and the positional parameters and dispersion for quantitative variables. A total of 73 patients with rheumatoid arthritis without obvious cardiac events and meeting the criteria of definition of the ACR 1987 were included in the study. The mean age was 44.17±14.43 years with extremes of 18 and 75 years. The mean duration of RA was 5.93±4.78 years. The concept of family inflammatory arthritis was reported in 35.60% of cases and almost one in six patients had at least a factor of cardiovascular risk (16.96%). The abnormalities found in Doppler echocardiography were dominated by diastolic LV dysfunction (42.46%), increased left ventricular mass in 35.61%. Valvular leaks of variable grades were highlighted regarding all orifices but were rarely significant. The realization of echocardiography in patients with rheumatoid arthritis without clinically evident cardiovascular manifestations helps to highlight cardiovascular

  18. The Bobath concept - a model to illustrate clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Marc; Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Holland, Ann; Magri, Alba; Suzuki, Mitsuo

    2017-12-17

    The model of Bobath clinical practice provides a framework identifying the unique aspects of the Bobath concept in terms of contemporary neurological rehabilitation. The utilisation of a framework to illustrate the clinical application of the Bobath concept provides the basis for a common understanding with respect to Bobath clinical practice, education, and research. The development process culminating in the model of Bobath clinical practice is described. The use of the model in clinical practice is illustrated using two cases: a client with a chronic incomplete spinal cord injury and a client with a stroke. This article describes the clinical application of the Bobath concept in terms of the integration of posture and movement with respect to the quality of task performance, applying the Model of Bobath Clinical Practice. Facilitation, a key aspect of Bobath clinical practice, was utilised to positively affect motor control and perception in two clients with impairment-related movement problems due to neurological pathology and associated activity limitations and participation restrictions - the outcome measures used to reflect the individual clinical presentation. Implications for Rehabilitation The model of Bobath clinical practice provides a framework identifying the unique aspects of the Bobath-concept. The model of Bobath clinical practice provides the basis for a common understanding with respect to Bobath clinical practice, education, and research. The clinical application of the Bobath-concept highlights the integration of posture and movement with respect to the quality of task performance. Facilitation, a key aspect of Bobath clinical practice, positively affects motor control, and perception.

  19. Comparison of seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis with regard to some clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Izairi, Remzi; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with regard to some clinical characteristics. The studied group consisted of RA seronegative patients with titters lower then 1:64 defined by Rose-Waaler test, while the control group consisted of RA seropositive patients with titters of 1:64 or higher. Examinees all belonged to the 2nd and 3rd functional classes according to ARA criteria, were between 25-60 years of age (Xb = 49.96), with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xbox = 6.41). In the disease onset most frequently affected joints were metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the hands, almost equally represented with regard to sero-status and sex. During the examination seropositive patients showed a higher presence of inflamation of peripheral joints of hand and foot, but only the presence of PIP of the hands was statistically significant (chi2 = 15.63, p < 0.01). Knees, talocrural joints and elbows were more frequently affected in seropositive patients, whereas humeroscapular, coxofemoral and sacroiliacal joints were more frequently affected in seronegative patients, but without significant statistical difference with regard to sero-status. The presence of affected PIP of the hands (chi2 = 9.96, p < 0.01) and knees (chi2 = 4.17, p < 0.05) with regard to sex was statistically significant in seropositive female patients, as well as the presence of atacked PIP of the hands (chi2 = 6.08, p < 0.05), and cervical vertebrae (chi2 = 6.00, p < 0.05) in seropositive male patients. There were some differences between groups with regard to sex in metatarsophalangealjoints (MTP), PIP of the foot, and other joints, but without any statistical significance. In both subsets statistically significant domination was found in affected second (chi2 = 20.85, p < 0.01) and third (chi2 = 15.70, p < 0.01) fingers of the PIP level of hands and third finger (chi2

  20. [Clinical judgment and decision, pedagogy and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacronique, J F

    1987-01-01

    The interactive systems of logical interference represent but one of the computer applications to medicine. While the potential of computers in medical practice is beyond question, their actual use is not widespread. After the stage of practical demonstration of the working features of the hardware, one needs to define accurately the purpose to which the computer is intended in order to perform efficiently in its everyday use. To a certain extent, this unavoidable specialisation contrasts with the ubiquitous presence of computers and the availability of software the use of which does not, in principle, require particular training. A teaching experience directed to a number of different user groups in various fields has prompted us to examine the bases of the difficulties we met with. While some of them are related to cultural (or even religious) grounds, other, being of more technical nature, are more readily amendable to a methodological inquiry. Briefly, this analysis has led us to suggest a revision of various computer applications, including the interactive systems of logical interference, in the field of clinical research. A minimal theoretical training is essential in order to prevent delusions caused by an improvident autodidactic approach. The formal analysis of decision making appears as an excellent teaching guideline since it allows to refresh the elementary statistical concepts and then to approach economical aspects of health management (especially the cost/benefit and cost/effectiveness studies), as well as the sciences of administration as applied to health problems. Oncology represents a particularly suitable field of application on several accounts. It covers various and complex clinical domains, constant conceptual developments and finally, owing to the need for a systematic organisation of the data collection, it offers persuasive applications whose lasting features should warrant the necessary initial effort of investment.

  1. Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W; Yang, Mini; Park, Sunmin

    2016-08-01

    Although turmeric and its curcumin-enriched extracts have been used for treating arthritis, no systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to evaluate the strength of the research. We systemically evaluated all RCTs of turmeric extracts and curcumin for treating arthritis symptoms to elucidate the efficacy of curcuma for alleviating the symptoms of arthritis. Literature searches were conducted using 12 electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Korean databases, Chinese medical databases, and Indian scientific database. Search terms used were "turmeric," "curcuma," "curcumin," "arthritis," and "osteoarthritis." A pain visual analogue score (PVAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were used for the major outcomes of arthritis. Initial searches yielded 29 articles, of which 8 met specific selection criteria. Three among the included RCTs reported reduction of PVAS (mean difference: -2.04 [-2.85, -1.24]) with turmeric/curcumin in comparison with placebo (P turmeric/curcumin treatment (mean difference: -15.36 [-26.9, -3.77]; P = .009). Furthermore, there was no significant mean difference in PVAS between turmeric/curcumin and pain medicine in meta-analysis of five studies. Eight RCTs included in the review exhibited low to moderate risk of bias. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. In conclusion, these RCTs provide scientific evidence that supports the efficacy of turmeric extract (about 1000 mg/day of curcumin) in the treatment of arthritis. However, the total number of RCTs included in the analysis, the total sample size, and the methodological quality of the primary studies were not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Thus, more rigorous and larger studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic efficacy of turmeric for arthritis.

  2. Radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis related to some clinical and laboratory parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 188 patients followed for 3 to 12 years, the radiologic course of rheumatoid arthritis was assessed in 20 joint groups. A severe course in most joints was related to the presence of rheumatoid factor and to high values of the ESR. Granulocyte-specific antinuclear antibodies were related to a severe course in most joints. The presence of nodules, the Rose-Waaler titre and the presence of organ non-specific antinuclear antibodies were generally unrelated to the course of the disease. (Auth.)

  3. Clinical Understanding of Spasticity: Implications for Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Bhimani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a poorly understood phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of spasticity on daily life and identify bedside strategies that enhance patient’s function and improve comfort. Spasticity and clonus result from an upper motor neuron lesion that disinhibits the tendon stretch reflex; however, they are differentiated in the fact that spasticity results in a velocity dependent tightness of muscle whereas clonus results in uncontrollable jerks of the muscle. Clinical strategies that address function and comfort are paramount. This is a secondary content analysis using a qualitative research design. Adults experiencing spasticity associated with neuromuscular disorder were asked to participate during inpatient acute rehabilitation. They were asked to complete a semistructured interview to explain and describe the nature of their experienced spasticity on daily basis. Spasticity affects activities of daily living, function, and mobility. Undertreated spasticity can lead to pain, immobility, and risk of falls. There were missed opportunities to adequately care for patients with spasticity. Bedside care strategies identified by patients with spasticity are outlined. Uses of alternative therapies in conjunction with medications are needed to better manage spasticity. Patient reports on spasticity are important and should be part of clinical evaluation and practice.

  4. Code of practice for clinical proton dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vynckier, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this document is to make recommendations for the determination of absorbed dose to tissue for clinical proton beams and to achieve uniformity in proton dosimetry. A Code of Practice (CoP) has been chosen, providing specific guidelines for the choice of the detector and the method of determination of absorbed dose for proton beams only. This CoP is confined specifically to the determination of absorbed dose and is not concerned with the biological effects of proton beams. It is recommended that dosimeters be calibrated by comparison with a calorimeter. If this is not available, a Faraday cup, or alter-natively, an ionization chamber, with a 60 Co calibration factor should be used. Physical parameters for determining the dose from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber measurements are given together with a worksheet. It is recommended that calibrations be carried out in water at the centre of the spread-out-Bragg-peak and that dose distributions be measured in a water phantom. It is estimated that the error in the calibrations will be less than +-5 per cent (1 S.D.) in all cases. Adoption and implementation of this CoP will facilitate the exchange of clinical information. (author). 34 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. Risk assessment instruments in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Gilles; Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the items in one of the most widely validated instruments of violence risk assessment, the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20 (HCR-20), are used in review board hearings to assess the risk of violence by people found Not Criminally Responsible on account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD). This study was conducted from October 2004 to August 2006 in Quebec's sole forensic psychiatric hospital and 2 large civil psychiatric hospitals designated for the care of people declared NCRMD in the Montreal metropolitan area. The risk assessments presented by clinicians at annual review board hearings and the boards' rationale for the release or detention of people found NCRMD were contrasted with the risk assessments conducted by the research team using the HCR-20. The final sample was comprised of 96 men. Very few of the risk factors identified by prior research (HCR-20 items) were mentioned in the hearing process, whether in clinical reports, discussions during the hearing, or in the disposition justification. The findings confirm that there remains a significant gap between research evidence and risk assessment practice.

  6. Clinical response, pharmacokinetics, development of human anti-chimaeric antibodies, and synovial tissue response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, R. M.; Teng, O.; Vos, K.; Gerlag, D. M.; Aarden, L.; Stapel, S. O.; van Laar, J. M.; Tak, P. P.; Wolbink, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    To analyse whether persistence of synovial B lineage cells and lack of clinical response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with low rituximab serum levels and anti-rituximab antibody (ARA) formation. Fifty-eight patients with RA were treated with

  7. Clinical response, pharmacokinetics, development of human anti-chimaeric antibodies, and synovial tissue response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, R.M.; Teng, O.; Vos, K.; Gerlag, D.M.; Aarden, L.; Stapel, S.O.; van Laar, J.M.; Tak, P.P.; Wolbink, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse whether persistence of synovial B lineage cells and lack of clinical response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with low rituximab serum levels and anti-rituximab antibody (ARA) formation. Methods: Fifty-eight patients with RA

  8. Body mass does not impact the clinical response to intravenous abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Analysis from the "pan-European registry collaboration for abatacept (PANABA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iannone, Florenzo; Courvoisier, Delphine S; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric

    2017-01-01

    Some evidences suggest that obesity impairs the effectiveness of TNF inhibitors. We examined the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the clinical effectiveness of abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This is a pooled analysis of 10 prospective cohorts of RA patients. All patients with ...

  9. Transaminase Levels and Hepatic Events During Tocilizumab Treatment: Pooled Analysis of Long-Term Clinical Trial Safety Data in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genovese, Mark C.; Kremer, Joel M.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Alten, Rieke; Scali, Juan Jose; Kelman, Ariella; Dimonaco, Sophie; Brockwell, Laura

    2017-01-01

    To investigate liver enzyme abnormalities and hepatic adverse events (AEs) during long-term tocilizumab treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical trials. Data were pooled from patients who received intravenous tocilizumab (4, 8, or 10 mg/kg with or without disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

  10. Relationship between serum trough infliximab levels, pretreatment C reactive protein levels, and clinical response to infliximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolbink, G. J.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Lems, W. F.; de Groot, E.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; Tak, P. P.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.; Aarden, L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum trough infliximab levels and clinical response to infliximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Disease activity and serum trough infliximab levels before and 2, 6, and 14 weeks after initiation of infliximab

  11. Scoring of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions by MR imaging in clinically active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Sørensen, K

    1995-01-01

    MRI-scores of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions of the RA-wrist are introduced. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiography (CR) of the wrist were performed in 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 3 healthy controls. A MRI......-score of synovial membrane hypertrophy was obtained by summation of gradings of synovial hypertrophy in 6 regions of the wrist. The score was significantly higher in wrists with than in wrists without clinical signs of active arthritis. The score was 0 in all healthy controls. Each bone of the wrist was assessed...

  12. INFLIXIMAB EFFECT ON CLINICAL AND LABORATORY ACTIVITY PARAMETERS IN CASES OF VARIOUS JUVENILE ARTHRITIS VARIANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses efficiency and safety of using mono clone antibodies for tumor necrosis factor (infliximab for children with system (n = 21 and articular (n = 59 juvenile arthritis (JA. Infliksimab was injected intravenously (average dose of 6,8 ± 2,3 mg/kg/per injection by a standard scheme (0, 2, 6, and each 8 following weeks. Together with antibcytokine therapy children still received immunity depressants (cyclosporine, methotraksat, leflunomid, peroral glucocorticoids. Research results prove that infliximab has pronounced hormone like anti-inflammatory effect after first injection for both patients with early and delayed articular JA variants. It reserved articular syndrome, reduced laboratory activity parameters, reduced degree of invalidity, improved quality of patients' lives. At the same time after three first infusions 88% of patients with system JA the effect was neutralized, articular syndrome activity increased, laboratory activity parameters increased, systematic indicators recurred. On the contrary, patients with both early and delayed JA variant the medication quickly and efficiently reduced activity of articular syndrome, personal estimations of pain levels and disease activity. Index of life quality was significantly improved, much like the selfbservice ability. Medication effect was registered after the first injection and remained over the whole period of observation (up to two years in 61% cases of delayed and 93% of early articular ja variant. Thus, infliximab therapy is a reasonable, efficient and safe treatment of patients with both early and delyed articular JA.Key words: juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  14. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  15. INFLIXIMAB IN TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Nikishina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion to the clinical practice of genetically engineered biological medications opens new opportunities in treatment of juvenile arthritis. The article summarizes an experience of treatment of juvenile arthritis with infliximab in children’s department of Scientific Center of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The analysis included 55 patients (16 children had systemic type, 23 — polyarticular type of juvenile arthritis, and 16 patients had juvenile spondylarthritis, treated with infliximab in 2002–2009 years. Infliximab was administrated in patients with high activity of the disease refractory to the modern basic therapy. Patients received intravenous infliximab 3–5 mg/kg daily according to the standard scheme (on 0, 2, 6 weeks and further every 8 weeks. Therapy with this drug was estimated as effective (improvement on 30% and more according ACRpedi in 80% of patients: 16% achieved ACR30, 29% — ACR50, 26% — ACR70, and 9% — ACR90. Unfavorable effects (infusion reactions were detected in 16% of cases. Infections, including one case of disseminated tuberculosis, developed in 20% of patients. Thus, treatment with infliximab is effective and has good «risk–benefit» ratio in treatment of patients with refractory juvenile arthritis. Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:142-149

  16. Teaching. A skill in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, B J

    1983-10-01

    I surveyed by questionnaire a random sample of 585 physical therapists and the administrators of all accredited and developing entry-level educational programs on record with the American Physical Therapy Association in March 1981 to determine attitudes toward, involvement in, and preparation for teaching as a skill in physical therapy. Results were based on responses from 367 (63%) of the physical therapists who spent at least 50 percent of their workday in direct patient-care activities and 95 (93%) of the administrators of the educational programs. Although 99 percent of the physical therapists believed that teaching was an important skill in their practice, only 34 percent had received instruction in teaching as part of their basic preparation. Ninety-eight percent were involved in teaching patients, but only 30 percent taught students in the clinic. Educational skills considered important by the clinicians included the ability to adapt teaching to individual needs, to teach by demonstration, to give and receive feedback, and to assess learner expectations. Sixty-five percent of the administrators responding to the questionnaire reported that training in educational theories and methodologies was required either as a separate course or as part of one or more other courses in the curriculum. Educational skills most frequently taught were writing learning objectives, planning the learning experience, understanding the role of the physical therapist as an educator, and teaching by lecture. Physical therapists consider teaching an important skill in physical therapy practice, but not all physical therapy programs include preparation in this area. Agreement on which skills are important is limited.

  17. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... infliximab and adalimumab. METHODS: 69 patients with RA fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria and about to start treatment with infliximab or adalimumab, were enrolled consecutively. All patients had active disease (28-joint count Disease Activity Score >3.2). Infliximab was given...... intravenously at 3 mg/kg at baseline and after 2, 6 and 14 weeks. Adalimumab was administered as 40 mg biweekly subcutaneously. Concomitant drug treatment was monitored and continued at constant dosage during the study. All serum samples were tested for infliximab/adalimumab levels and anti...

  18. Arthritis Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression symptoms but also arthritis pain. It's no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on ... Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy ...

  19. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a clinical practice audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Adil, M.; Ashraf, F.; Aqil, A.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic cholecystectomy by a clinical practice audit at Military Hospital, Rawalpindi. Study Design: Prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department Military Hospital from Jul 2011-Dec 2013. Material and Methods: A total of 1020 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute or chronic cholecystitis and gallstone pancreatitis were included in our study while those who had previously undergone abdominal surgeries, those with high risk for general anesthesia, immunocompromised patients, with age greater than 70 years and having comorbidities like cardiac insufficiency, severe asthma, chronic liver disease with ascites and compromised renal functions were excluded from the study. Patients demographic data, operative time, intra-operative findings, intra-operative difficulties, post-operative complications, conversion rate to open cholecystectomy and post-operative recovery time were recorded. Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 21. Results: Out of 1020 patients 907 were females while 113 were males with male to female ratio of 1:8.02. Age range was 20-70 with mean age of 50 ± 10.456 years. 44.7% patients presented with the clinical features of acute cholecystitis, 540 (52.94%) with chronic cholecystitis and 23 (2.28%) with acute pancreatitis. Mean operative time was 20 minutes in asymptomatic patients, while 40 minutes in acute cholecystitis and 35 minutes in chronic gallstone disease. Gall bladder perforation, bleeding from cystic artery and bile spillage were mostly encountered per-operative difficulties. Only 37 (3.6%) patients were converted to open cholecystectomy. Post-operative complications occur in only 122 (12%) patients. 938 (92%) patients were discharged within 48 hours. of surgery. Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our setup has comparable results to the data available from other surgical facilities around the world and it has become a gold standard technique for the treatment of non

  20. Endobronchial ultrasound: Practical aspects and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Bugalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS has become a major advance in bronchoscopy. Substantial scientific evidence has confirmed its usefulness in lung cancer diagnosis and staging, as well as in other clinical settings. It is of growing importance that endoscopists perform and interpret this imaging method accurately, in order to optimize diagnosis and treatment of their patients.The present article provides a practical and comprehensible review of the two EBUS systems currently available and its main clinical indications. Resumo: A ecoendoscopia brônquica constitui, na área da broncologia, um dos maiores avanços tecnológicos dos últimos anos. Existe, no presente momento, evidência científica que confirma a sua utilidade não só no diagnóstico e estadiamento do cancro do pulmão, como também noutras patologias. É fundamental que o broncologista execute e interprete este método de imagem correctamente, de forma a optimizar o diagnóstico e o tratamento dos seus doentes. O presente artigo faculta uma revisão de cariz eminentemente prático dos dois sistemas de ecoendoscopia actualmente disponíveis, abordando, igualmente, as suas principais indicações clínicas. Key-words: Endobronchial ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasonography, lung cancer, lymph node, staging, fine needle aspiration biopsy, Palavras-chave: Ecoendoscopia brônquica, ecografia endoscópica, cancro do pulmão, gânglio linfático, estadiamento, punção aspirativa transbrônquica

  1. Clinical features and treatment outcomes of septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium massiliense associated with intra-articular injection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haekyung; Hwang, Dohui; Jeon, Minchul; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Taehyong; Yu, Shi Nae; Kim, Yongbeom; Lee, Byung-Ill

    2016-09-15

    There are increasing reports on nosocomial Mycobacterium massiliense infection, but septic arthritis and osteomyelitis because of that microorganism is rare. This report focuses on the clinical aspects of M. massiliense arthritis outbreak concurrent with soft tissue infection. An outbreak of septic arthritis among patients who had been injected at a single clinic occurred in South Korea between April and September 2012. This may be associated with repeated injection of triamcinolone contaminated with M. massiliense. Nine of the Korean patients visited our hospital complaining of painful swelling of the knees. During treatment course, patients are suffered from soft tissue abscess around the injection site. Acid-fast bacilli culture for infected tissue was positive in five patients, and polymerase chain reaction for non-tuberculous mycobacteria was positive in four patients. They were treated with antibiotics, repeated arthroscopic surgeries, incision and drainage for a long time. All patients were eventually cured but three patients have suffered from a decreased range of motion. Early clinical suspicion and microbiological diagnosis are key factors in reducing morbidity since septic arthritis with M. massiliense manifests late after the injection and treatment of it is a laborious process.

  2. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  3. Management of sarcoidosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Jeny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause with very diverse presentation, outcome, severity and need for treatments. While some presentations may be very typical, for many patients, the presentation is nonspecific, with shared associations with other diseases at times being by far more frequent or misleading, which can be a cause of significant delay and often several consultations before a diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be confirmed. This is particularly the case when pulmonary manifestations are in the forefront. The diagnosis relies on three well-known criteria. In clinical practice, these criteria are not easily implemented, particularly by physicians without expertise in sarcoidosis, which can lead to a risk of either under- or over-diagnosis. Qualifying the presentation according to sarcoidosis diagnosis is essential. However, it is often not easy to classify the presentation as typical versus compatible or compatible versus inconsistent. Further investigations are needed before any other hypothesis is to be considered. It is important to detect events and to determine whether or not they are indicative of a flare of sarcoidosis. Eventually, treatment needs to be related to the correct indications. The evaluation of the efficacy and safety of treatments is crucial. To address such issues, we present five emblematic cases that illustrate this.

  4. Clinical practice guideline: Otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Culpepper, Larry; Doyle, Karen J; Grundfast, Kenneth M; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kenna, Margaret A; Lieberthal, Allan S; Mahoney, Martin; Wahl, Richard A; Woods, Charles R; Yawn, Barbara

    2004-05-01

    The clinical practice guideline on otitis media with effusion (OME) provides evidence-based recommendations on diagnosing and managing OME in children. This is an update of the 1994 clinical practice guideline "Otitis Media With Effusion in Young Children," which was developed by the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). In contrast to the earlier guideline, which was limited to children aged 1 to 3 years with no craniofacial or neurologic abnormalities or sensory deficits, the updated guideline applies to children aged 2 months through 12 years with or without developmental disabilities or underlying conditions that predispose to OME and its sequelae. The American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians, and American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery selected a subcommittee composed of experts in the fields of primary care, otolaryngology, infectious diseases, epidemiology, hearing, speech and language, and advanced practice nursing to revise the OME guideline. The subcommittee made a strong recommendation that clinicians use pneumatic otoscopy as the primary diagnostic method and distinguish OME from acute otitis media (AOM). The subcommittee made recommendations that clinicians should (1) document the laterality, duration of effusion, and presence and severity of associated symptoms at each assessment of the child with OME; (2) distinguish the child with OME who is at risk for speech, language, or learning problems from other children with OME and more promptly evaluate hearing, speech, language, and need for intervention in children at risk; and (3) manage the child with OME who is not at risk with watchful waiting for 3 months from the date of effusion onset (if known), or from the date of diagnosis (if onset is unknown). The subcommittee also made recommendations that (4) hearing testing be conducted when OME persists for 3 months or longer, or at any time that

  5. Adherence to EBM guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafizianova, R Kh; Burykin, I M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate and rational pharmacotherapy is an important element of rehabilitation of patients with myocardial infarction. Orders of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, domestic and international guidelines, and scientific publications - all contain a complete algorithm for rational pharmacotherapy [1, 2]. These documents are based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and help practicing physicians to carry out individualized and rational pharmacotherapy. However, clinical studies have shown low adherence of physicians to clinical guidelines. In the Russian Federation the death rate from cardiovascular diseases is higher than in developed countries. Thus, studies of the causes of high cardiovascular mortality are needed. To assess adherence of practicing physicians to principles of evidence-based medicine in treating patients after myocardial infarction at the stage of rehabilitation. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases of patients in rehabilitation after myocardial infarction for the years 2006 and 2009 was undertaken.We analyzed the list of drugs, prescribed to patients during the period of rehabilitation, drug combinations, regimens and pharmacoepidemiological parameters. We used the following rehabilitation criteria: blood pressure control, smoking cessation, and weight control. Recommendations of controlled physical activities have also been studied. Patient care was compared with the guideline recommendations. Statistical analysis was performed using the OLAP system. 65 patients with myocardial infarction received rehabilitation therapy in 2006, and 92 - in 2009. It was found, that in 2006 physicians prescribed an average of 4.5 drugs per patient, and in 2009 - 4.6 drugs per patient. The average number of cardiovascular drugs (category C of ATC classification) per patient was 2.9 in 2006, and 2.6 - in 2009. Polypharmacy was found in half of the patients.In terms of evidence-based medicine, an important element in the rehabilitation

  6. Guidelines for the management of people with foot health problems related to rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of their use in podiatry practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anita E; Graham, Andrea S; Davies, Samantha; Bowen, Catherine J

    2013-06-18

    In the last decade there has been a significant expansion in the body of knowledge on the effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the foot and the management of these problems. Aligned with this has been the development of specialist clinical roles for podiatrists. However, despite being recommended by national guidelines, specialist podiatrists are scarce. In order to inform non-specialist podiatrists of the appropriate interventions for these foot problems, management guidelines have been developed and disseminated by a group of specialist podiatrists. The aim of this survey was to investigate the use of these guidelines in clinical practice. Following ethical approval an online questionnaire survey was carried out. The questions were formulated from a focus group and comprised fixed response and open response questions. The survey underwent cognitive testing with two podiatrists before being finalised. An inductive approach using thematic analysis was used with the qualitative data. 245 questionnaires were completed (128-non-specialist working in the private sector, 101 non-specialists working in the NHS and 16 specialist podiatrists). Overall, 97% of the non-specialists (n = 222) had not heard of the guidelines. The non-specialists identified other influences on their management of people with RA, such as their undergraduate training and professional body branch meetings. Three main themes emerged from the qualitative data: (i) the benefits of the foot health management guidelines, (ii) the barriers to the use of guidelines generally and (iii) the features of useable clinical guidelines. This study has revealed some crucial information about podiatrists' level of engagement with the foot health management guidelines and the use of guidelines in general. Specifically, the non-specialist podiatrists were less likely to use the foot health management guidelines than the specialist podiatrists. The positive aspects were that for the specialist practitioners

  7. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  8. Role of vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kostik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with impaired immune system performance. The specific features of JIA may be genetically determined.Objective: to assess JIA activity in children with vitamin D receptor (VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphism genotypes.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 71 patients with JIA. When included in the investigation, all the patients were in an active state of disease. JIA activity was assessed using the most commonly used clinical and laboratory indicators, including the Ritchie articular index (RAI, JADAS10, JADAS27, JADAS71, CDAI, DAS, and DAS28. Molecular genetic studies determined VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction, followed by restriction analysis.Results. The boys who were carriers of a bb BsmI polymorphic marker in the VDR gene had a significantly higher activity of JIA measured by RAI (p=0.03, DAS (p<0.05, JADAS10 (p=0.04, JADAS27 (p=0.04, and JADAS71 (p=0.04 than those who were carriers of B allele (BB + Bb genotypes.Conclusion. The carriage of the VDR gene bb BsmI genotype of the polymorphic marker is associated with high JIA activity, which may be regarded as a marker of poor prognosis in boys with JIA.

  9. Treatment patterns in rheumatoid arthritis after discontinuation of methotrexate: data from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative (OBRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Janet E; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Movahedi, Mohammad; Cesta, Angela; Li, Xiuying; Couto, Sandra; Sampalis, John S; Bombardier, Claire

    2017-10-23

    In active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX), guidelines support adding or switching to another conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (csDMARD) and/or a biologic DMARD (bDMARD). The purpose of this analysis was to describe treatment practices in routine care and to evaluate determinants of regimen selection after MTX discontinuation. Biologic-naïve patients in the Ontario Best Practice Research Initiatives registry discontinuing MTX due to primary/secondary failure, adverse events, or patient/physician decision were included. Of 313 patients discontinuing MTX, 102 (32.6%) were on MTX monotherapy, 156 (49.8%) on double, and 55 (17.6%) on multiple csDMARDs. Patients on MTX monotherapy were older than patients on double or multiple csDMARDs (p=0.013), less likely to have joint erosions (p=0.009) and had lower patient global assessment (p=0.046) at MTX discontinuation. Post-MTX discontinuation, 169 (54.0%) transitioned to, or added new DMARD(s) (new csDMARD(s): 139 [44.4%]; bDMARD: 30 [9.6%]), and 144 (46.0%) opted for no new DMARD treatment. Patients on MTX monotherapy transitioning monotherapy, whereas patients on combination csDMARDs switched more to new csDMARDs and bDMARD combination therapy. Early RA (adjOR [95%CI]: 3.07 [1.40-6.72]) and treatment with multiple csDMARDs vs. MTX monotherapy (4.15 [1.35-12.8]) at MTX discontinuation were significant predictors of transitioning to or adding new csDMARD(s)/bDMARD treatment versus opting for no new DMARD treatment. Differences in subsequent treatment patterns exist between patients discontinuing MTX when used as monotherapy versus in combination with other csDMARDs where the former are more likely to use a subsequent monotherapy treatment.

  10. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans.

  11. Pareto fronts in clinical practice for pinnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Tomas; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène; van Vliet, Corine

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI(95%)) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V(65 Gy) by 1.1% (P=.008). We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle(3). Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pareto Fronts in Clinical Practice for Pinnacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Tomas; Kesteren, Zdenko van; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène; Vliet, Corine van

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. Methods and Materials: To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle 3 (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Results: Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI 95% ) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V 65 Gy by 1.1% (P=.008). Conclusions: We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle 3 . Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT

  13. Applying ‘science’ in chiropractic clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Jennifer R

    1990-01-01

    The chiropractic profession is increasingly expressing the sentiment that chiropractic clinical intervention should rest upon a scientific foundation. Before ‘scientific research’ can become meaningful in chiropractic clinical practice, it is necessary that field practitioners be conversant with research terminology. If chiropractic clinical practice is to achieve credibility as a scientific mode of health care and if the benefits of a ‘scientific’ practice model are to enhance patient care, ...

  14. The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on foot function in the early stages of disease: a clinical case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emery Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot involvement occurs early in rheumatoid arthritis but the extent to which this impacts on the structure and function leading to impairment and foot related disability is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical disease activity, impairment, disability, and foot function in normal and early rheumatoid arthritis (RA feet using standardised clinical measures and 3D gait analysis. Methods Twelve RA patients with disease duration ≤2 years and 12 able-bodied adults matched for age and sex underwent 3D gait analysis to measure foot function. Disease impact was measured using the Leeds Foot impact Scale (LFIS along with standard clinical measures of disease activity, pain and foot deformity. For this small sample, the mean differences between the groups and associated confidence intervals were calculated using the t distribution Results Moderate-to-high foot impairment and related disability were detected amongst the RA patients. In comparison with age- and sex-matched controls, the patients with early RA walked slower (1.05 m/s Vs 1.30 m/s and had a longer double-support phase (19.3% Vs 15.8%. In terminal stance, the heel rise angle was reduced in the patients in comparison with normal (-78.9° Vs -85.7°. Medial arch height was lower and peak eversion in stance greater in the RA patients. The peak ankle plantarflexion power profile was lower in the patients in comparison with the controls (3.4 W/kg Vs 4.6 W/kg. Pressure analysis indicated that the RA patients had a reduced lesser toe contact area (7.6 cm2 Vs 8.1 cm2, elevated peak forefoot pressure (672 kPa Vs 553 kPa and a larger mid-foot contact area (24.6 cm2 Vs 19.4 cm2. Conclusion Analysis detected small but clinically important changes in foot function in a small cohort of RA patients with disease duration

  15. Evaluation of the TMJ by means of Clinical TMD Examination and MRI Diagnostics in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Witulski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study included 30 patients with diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA and 30 test subjects without RA (control group. The objective of the study was to examine both groups for the presence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and morphological changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. All individuals were examined using a systematic detailed clinical TMD examination as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The clinical TMD examination yielded significant differences between the RA patients and the control group concerning crepitus of the TMJ, and palpation tenderness of the masticatory muscles as well as the unassisted mandibular opening. The evaluation of the MRI images for the RA group showed significantly more frequent deformations of the condyle, osteophyte formations and erosions in the condylar compacta, and degenerative changes in the spongiosa. Increased intra-articular accumulation of synovial liquid and signs of inflammatory changes of the spongiosa were only found in the RA group. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between crepitus and specific osteoarthrotic changes (MRI, respectively, and between crepitus and a complete anterior disk displacement without reduction (MRI. The duration of the RA disease correlated neither with the anamnestic and clinical dysfunction index by Helkimo nor with RA-specific MRI findings.

  16. Improvement in latent variable indirect response joint modeling of a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-02-01

    Improving the quality of exposure-response modeling is important in clinical drug development. The general joint modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress on the latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate, when modeling a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint, the level of improvement achievable by joint modeling in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters for the individual endpoints, guided by the appropriate representation of drug and placebo mechanism. This was illustrated with data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered mAb X for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70) disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. The joint modeling framework led to a parsimonious final model with reasonable performance, evaluated by visual predictive check. The results showed that, compared with the more common approach of separately modeling the endpoints, it is possible for the joint model to be more parsimonious and yet better describe the individual endpoints. In particular, the joint model may better describe one endpoint through subject-specific random effects that would not have been estimable from data of this endpoint alone.

  17. Imaging in the diagnosis and management of peripheral psoriatic arthritis-The clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eder, Lihi; Christiansen, Sara Nysom

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterised by the presence of arthritis and often enthesitis and/or spondylitis in patients with psoriasis. However, it presents a wide range of disease manifestations in various patterns. Imaging is an important part of management of ...

  18. Multicenter study of radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical outcome in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis; Multizenterstudie zur Radiosynoviorthese: Klinische Ergebnisse bei aktivierten Arthrosen und anderen Gelenkerkrankungen mit chronischer Synovialitis im Vergleich zur rheumatoiden Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, H.; Lohmann, K.; Spitz, J. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, am Staedtischen Klinikum Wiesbaden (Germany); Franke, C. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Hamburg (Germany); Goretzki, G. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Bielefeld (Germany); Lemb, M.A. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Bremen (Germany); Mueller, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Kantonspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Panholzer, P.J. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Endokrinologie, PET-Zentrum, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria); Stelling, E. [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Aim: evaluation of the effectiveness of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis versus rheumatoid arthritis by means of a standardized questionnaire. Patients, methods: 803 RSO treatments were monitored in 691 patients by standardized questionnaires of 7 centers in 3 countries. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to their age (20-40, 41-60, 61-80 years). Additionally, the data were analyzed separately for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (group A) and those with osteoarthritis, psoriasis arthritis, pigmental villonodular synovitis or persistent effusions after joint replacement (group B). Results: ameliorations of joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility were found in 80% of group A and 56% of group B (p <0.01). Quality of life improved in 78% of group A and 59% of group B (p <0.01). The response rate was similar for small- and large-sized joints in group A, but significantly higher for large-sized joints in group B (p <0.01). The positive effects on joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility lasted longer in group A (p <0.01). Repeated RSOs were as effective as initial ones. The clinical outcome was neither influenced by age, nor gender, nor transient immobilisation for 48 hours after RSO. Conclusion: although slightly more efficient in rheumatoid arthritis, RSO represents an effective treatment option also in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Effektivitaetsvergleich der Radiosynoviorthese (RSO) bei aktivierter Arthrose und anderen Gelenkerkrankungen mit chronischer Synovialitis versus rheumatoider Arthritis. Ueberpruefung der Eignung eines standardisierten Fragebogens fuer Multizenterstudien. Patienten, Methoden: Bei 691 Patienten wurden 803 RSO-Behandlungsverlaeufe von 7 Zentren in 3 Laendern mit Hilfe eines standardisierten Fragebogens erfasst. Die Patienten wurden 3 Alterskategorien (20-40, 41-60 und 61-80 Jahre) zugeordnet. Ausserdem wurden

  19. Septic arthritis as a severe complication of elective arthroscopy:clinical management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imhoff Andreas B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infection of a peripheral joint following arthroscopic surgery presents with an incidence of approximately 0.42% an extremely rare entity. However, septic arthritis is a serious situation possibly leading to an irreparable joint damage. Especially at delayed diagnosis patients' safety can be endangered severely. Only few precise statements regarding diagnosis and therapy have been published so far. Besides an accurate analysis of the patient's anamnesis and the assessment of the C-reactive protein especially arthrocentesis is required for diagnostic workup. For early stage infections arthroscopic therapy is proven to be of value. In addition a calculated and consecutive germ-adjusted antibiotic therapy is essential. In case of persisting signs of infection the indication for re-arthroscopy or conversion to open revision has to be stated in time. The number of necessary revisions is dependent on the initial stage of infection. For pain therapy postoperative immobilization of the affected joint is occasionally essential, if otherwise possibly early mobilization of the joint should be performed.

  20. Analysis of foot structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical evaluation by validated measures and serological correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bartoloni Bocci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to characterize structural alterations in patients with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP antibody-positive and -negative disease. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with RA with foot pain were consecutively enrolled. The Manchester Hallux Valgus (MHV rating scale was used to evaluate the hallux valgus deformity degree. The Foot Posture Index (FPI6, a novel, foot-specific outcome measure, was adopted in order to quantify variation in the position of the foot. The findings were correlated with disease duration and presence or absence of anti-CCP antibodies. Results: About 84.6% patients had different degrees of hallux valgus and 65.4% subjects had a pronated foot. These two foot alterations were prevalently found in patients with long-standing disease and circulating anti-CCP antibodies. On the contrary, RA patients without anti-CCP and early disease essentially displayed a supinated foot without relevant hallux valgus deformity. Conclusion: Our findings allowed to identify different anatomic foot alterations in RA patients according to disease duration and negative prognostic factors such as anti-CCP antibodies. Our findings support the role of an accurate analysis of foot structural damage and may suggest the usefulness of a correct plantar orthosis prescription also in early phases of the disease.

  1. Formative research in clinical trial development: attitudes of patients with arthritis in enhancing prevention trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Holly A; Sugarman, Jeremy; Pisetsky, David S; Bathon, Joan

    2007-01-01

    In preparation for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA), formative research was conducted to enhance the design of such trials. The objectives of this research were to (1) determine patients' educational needs as they relate to the necessary elements of informed consent; and (2) assess patients' interest in enrolling in a hypothetical prevention trial. In‐depth interviews were conducted with nine patients. Seven patients were women and all but one white. The mean age was 48 years. During the 4‐month enrolment period, only three patients with EIA were identified; six patients with longer duration of symptoms were also interviewed. Most patients were able to express the primary aim of a hypothetical prevention trial presented. Factors cited by patients favouring enrolment were potential for direct medical benefit and knowledge that they would be withdrawn from the trial if they developed symptoms. Factors cited by patients against enrolment were the inclusion of a placebo and general uncertainty regarding treatment required by the RCT design. Pending larger‐scale empirical projects to explore patients' attitudes about prevention trials, small‐scale formative research in advance of such trials ought to be conducted. PMID:16984939

  2. Clinical and ultrasound evaluation of the response to tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epis, Oscar; Filippucci, Emilio; Delle Sedie, Andrea; De Matthaeis, Anna; Bruschi, Eleonora

    2014-05-01

    This case series evaluates the clinical and ultrasound response to tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Six patients with active RA (DAS28 ≥ 3.2) for ≥6 months, refractory to conventional DMARDs or anti-TNF agents, received tocilizumab 8 mg/kg every 4 weeks, as monotherapy or in combination with DMARDs, for 6 months. The following clinical parameters were assessed monthly: number of tender joints (28 and 44 joints), number of swollen joints (28 and 44 joints), DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, VAS score, global health status, health assessment questionnaire, patient global assessment of disease activity, physician global assessment of disease activity, functional assessment of chronic illness therapy (FACIT), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP). All patients also underwent a gray-scale ultrasonography (US) assessment with power Doppler evaluation at each visit. All clinical parameters improved during the study, versus baseline. This improvement was statistically significant for most parameters 2 months following tocilizumab initiation and was sustained to the end of the observation period. The number of tender joints (44-joint evaluation), the FACIT score, and ESR and CRP concentrations were significantly improved versus baseline values after the first month of tocilizumab treatment. The course of US evaluations mirrored that of clinical parameters; a faster and more evident response was observed for foot joints, with respect to hand joints. This case series suggested the rapid clinical benefit of tocilizumab. Ultrasound assessment showed that the onset of this effect was faster in the foot joints than in the hand joints.

  3. Preventing progression from arthralgia to arthritis: targeting the right patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, Hanna W; da Silva, José A Pereira; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2018-01-01

    Early treatment is associated with improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting that a 'window of opportunity', in which the disease is most susceptible to disease-modifying treatment, exists. Autoantibodies and markers of systemic inflammation can be present long before clinical arthritis, and maturation of the immune response seems to coincide with the development of RA. The pre-arthritis phase associated with symptoms such as as joint pain without clinical arthritis (athralgia) is now hypothesized to fall within the aforementioned window of opportunity. Consequently, disease modulation in this phase might prevent the occurrence of clinically apparent arthritis, which would result in a persistent disease course if untreated. Several ongoing proof-of-concept trials are now testing this hypothesis. This Review highlights the importance of adequate risk prediction for the correct design, execution and interpretation of results of these prevention trials, as well as considerations when translating these findings into clinical practice. The patients' perspectives are discussed, and the accuracy with which RA development can be predicted in patients presenting with arthralgia is evaluated. Currently, the best starting position for preventive studies is proposed to be the inclusion of patients with an increased risk of RA, such as those identified as fulfilling the EULAR definition of 'arthralgia suspicious for progression to RA'.

  4. Underuse of Methotrexate in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A National Analysis of Prescribing Practices in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Melanie K; Mikuls, Ted R; Cohen, Stanley B; Thorne, J Carter; O'Dell, James R

    2017-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the anchor drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to its effectiveness, tolerability, and cost. This study examines MTX prescribing practices in the US from 2009 to 2014. Symphony Health Solutions, which covers 274 million patients in the US, was used to identify patients diagnosed with RA who were naive to MTX in 2009 and 2012. Data were collected, including medication use and doses, demographics, and medical comorbidities. Of the patients who had 5-year followup data available, oral MTX was started in 35,640 in 2009, and 44% continued taking this dose during the followup. Of the 20,041 patients who changed therapy during the study period, 87% had the addition of or switched to a biologic agent, while 13% were changed from oral to subcutaneous (SC) MTX. The mean oral dose prior to the start of a biologic agent was 15.3 ± 5 mg/week. A comparison of 2009 with 2012 showed a modest increase in the mean dose of oral MTX from 15.3 mg/week to 15.9 mg/week, as well as a small but statistically significant (P < 0.0001) increase in the use of SC MTX after failure of oral MTX from 13% to 16% of patients. MTX is underutilized in the treatment of RA with suboptimal dosing, inadequate duration of therapy, and failure to use SC administration. The comparison of MTX use between the 2009 and the 2012 cohorts demonstrates only a marginal increase in the dose of oral MTX and the use of SC MTX. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis ...

  7. Clinical practice: neonatal resuscitation. A Dutch consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, F.A.M.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; Mulder, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The updated Dutch guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation assimilate the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the 2004 guidelines and controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed, and recommendations for daily practice are provided and

  8. Cancer vaccines: from research to clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bot, Adrian; Obrocea, Mihail; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    ..., for both solid and blood borne cancers. Cancer Vaccines: Challenges and Opportunities in Translation is the first text in the field to bring immunotherapy treatments from the laboratory trial to the bedside for the practicing oncologist. Cancer Vaccines...

  9. Temporomandibular joint involvement in a cohort of patients with Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis and evaluation of the effect induced by functional orthodontic appliance: clinical and radiographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, M; Matarese, G; Militi, A; Logiudice, G; Nucera, R; Lucchese, A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess possible correlations between the clinical parameters of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis and pathologic MRI findings of the TMJ in patients affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and the effect of a functional orthodontic therapy on the evolution of TMJ disorders. A prospective clinical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigation was conducted on a sample of 53 patients (41 female, 12 male) with JIA, treated for 24 months with an Andresen appliance. The involvement of TMJ was defined by clinical and radiological signs. NMR assessments were performed in closed and maximum opening mouth position before (T0) and at the end of functional orthodontic therapy (T1). Fifteen patients showed physical and radiologic TMJ abnormalities. Changes were not uniformly distributed among the different JIA subtypes. Patients with poliarticular JIA (≥5 peripheral joints affected) showed more destructive bony changes. No correlation existed between clinical symptoms and NMR alterations. Approximately one half of the patients experienced significant improvement of the TMJ and muscular pain using the Andresen appliance. The prevalence of TMJ involvement in patients suffering of JIA, and the improvement of TMJ and muscular pain associated with the use of functional appliance found in the present study, suggest an alert for TMJ dysfunction in patients with JIA and demonstrate the utility of functional orthodontic therapy in preventing the morbidities associated with TMJ arthritis in JIA.

  10. The Challenges of Clinical Practice as Experienced by First Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nursing students internalise the art of nursing through clinical practice. The study was exploratory-descriptive and sought to answer the question, "what are the clinical practice experiences and coping strategies of first year general nursing students" ?. The objectives of the study were to: identify the students' ...

  11. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  12. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory analysis were used to develop a theoretical understanding of clinical nurse leader practice that can facilitate systematic and replicable implementation across health-care settings. The core phenomenon of clinical nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership, which involves four fundamental activities: facilitating effective ongoing communication; strengthening intra and interprofessional relationships; building and sustaining teams; and supporting staff engagement. Clinical nurse leaders continuously communicate and develop relationships within and across professions to promote and sustain information exchange, engagement, teamwork and effective care processes at the microsystem level. Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming health-care quality. Managers can use this study's findings to frame an implementation strategy that addresses theoretical domains of clinical nurse leader practice to help ensure practice success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug usage, prescribing patterns and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients in community-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, K; Gingold, M; Boers, A; Littlejohn, G

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the spectrum of disease activity and usage of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients seen over a period of 12 months in community-based rheumatology practice. Data were prospectively collected on 1059 consecutive RA patients who attended two private, community-based rheumatology clinics from 1 May 2007 to 1 May 2008. Information on patient demographics, medication history and disease activity was collected. Life table graphs were developed to track medication retention over time. Statistical significance was determined by log-rank tests. One thousand and fifty-nine patients with RA were entered into the database over a 12-month period. Eight hundred and twenty-six patients (85%) were treated with single or combination conventional DMARD compared with 159 patients (15%) on a biologic DMARD either alone or in combination. Methotrexate monotherapy was the most commonly prescribed DMARD, used in 41% of patients studied. Almost half (47%) were on combination DMARD therapy. Methotrexate and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors had the highest retention rate over 12 and 30 months since first prescription. A large proportion of patients (47%) had moderate disease activity. Rates of biologic DMARD usage were similar to other studies and the predominance of methotrexate use was also in keeping with current recommendations for management of RA. There appears to be a significant unmet need for improved disease control among RA patients with moderate disease activity, which requires further investigation. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Seborrheic dermatitis: a clinical practice snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer A

    2011-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring skin disorder that has no cure.Current clinical research has implicated Malassezia yeast in the etiology. Using a clear, concise clinical picture and a thorough patient history, even the novice NP can formulate an effective treatment plan.

  15. The clinical and pathogenetic value of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory cells (Tregs play a key role in the immune system due to the suppression of a hyperimmune response to autoantigens and opportunistic enteric microorganisms. In recent years, there has been evidence that Tregs can suppress various immunoinflammatory responses to a wide range of physiological and pathological stimuli, including microorganisms, tumor cells, allogeneic grafts, and fetal cells.Tregs express a broad spectrum of membrane molecules that determine their functional activity and make it possible to identify these cells; however, none has discovered a universal surface marker that would distinguish this cell subpopulation from a pool of T lymphocytes. The most specific intracellular marker for Tregs is the nuclear transcription factor Foxp3 that is of fundamental importance in the development of Tregs and their inhibitory function.The results of the vast majority of studies indicate that there are increased numbers of Tregs in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; however, the data on the level of this cell population in their peripheral blood are very contradictory. The majority of investigators have observed a decrease in the percentage of circulating Tregs while other studies have revealed its increase or no differences from the corresponding value of healthy donors or patients with osteoarthritis. It is believed that a quantitative defect in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD127 regulatory cells is especially characteristic of early RA and associated with the risk of the latter in asymptomatic patients positive for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic agents is accompanied by a certain change in the level and functional activity of Tregs, which is responsible for the therapeutic effect of the medicaments.Thus, an important part is assigned to Tregs in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases, RA in particular. The decrease in the level

  16. Current referral practices and adolescent transition to Adult clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-02

    Feb 2, 2016 ... below. Table 3: Reasons for refusal of referral to adult clinic. Discussion. This study highlights the current practice of paediatri- cians with patient referral both within and outside the department. It also highlights the current mode of ado- lescent to adult care transition practice. Practically all respondents do ...

  17. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The value of power Doppler ultrasound in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in clinical remission: Reclassifying disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Facundo; Ruta, Santiago; Rosa, Javier; Marín, Josefina; García-Mónaco, Ricardo; Soriano, Enrique R

    2017-03-18

    The aim of the present study was to describe the ultrasound (US) findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission, and to evaluate the ability of power Doppler (PD) US to reclassify disease activity in these patients. We included consecutive patients with RA according to 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria, who were in clinical remission by the Disease Activity Score (DAS28<2.6). Twenty joints of both hands were assessed by US. PD signal was evaluated on a semi-quantitative scale from 0 to 3. Three different US-modified DAS28 (US-DAS28) were constructed, replacing the clinical swollen joint count by the PD US joint count using PD score ≥1, ≥2 or ≥3, respectively. Eighty-six patients were included. Twenty-three (26.7%) patients had at least one joint with abnormal US-positive PD signal. Thirteen percent of patients were reclassified to low disease activity by applying the US-DAS28 when joints were considered active with a PD signal ≥1; 12%, when a PD signal ≥2 was considered, and 2% of the patients were reclassified when a PD score of 3 was considered. No patients were reclassified to a level of moderate or high activity applying US-DAS28. Although around a quarter of patients with RA in clinical remission showed PD US features indicating residual activity, only a small percentage were reclassified to a state of low activity and none to a level of moderate or high activity, applying the proposed US-DAS28. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Synovial features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in clinical and ultrasound remission differ under anti-TNF therapy: a clue to interpret different chances of relapse after clinical remission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Tolusso, Barbara; Petricca, Luca; Bui, Laura; Di Sante, Gabriele; Peluso, Giusy; Benvenuto, Roberta; Fedele, Anna Laura; Federico, Franco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-07-01

    To define the synovial characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in clinical and ultrasound remission achieved by combination therapy with methotrexate (MTX) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Patients with RA in remission (n=25) (disease activity score (DAS)<1.6 for at least 6 months), patients with RA in low disease activity (LDA) (n=10) (1.6

  20. Changing Professional Practice: Theory and Practice of Clinical Guidelines Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thorkil; Mäkelä, M.

    1999-01-01

    vejledninger. Bogen beskriver metoder og giver værdifuld information til brug for dem, som er ansvarlige for at formidle kliniske vejledninger, eller som skal undersøge effekten af en sådan formid-ling. Den henvender sig ligeledes til sundhedspolitiske beslutnings-tagere og klinikere.Bogen, der er på engelsk......, er skrevet af forskere, som har deltaget i et europæisk forsknings-samarbejdsprojekt med titlen Changing Professional Practice, som blev koordineret af DSI Institut for Sundhedsvæsen. Kommentarer:Rapporten er på engelsk...

  1. Integration of technology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    It is an exciting time in clinical microbiology. New advances in technology are revolutionizing every aspect of the microbiology laboratory, from processing of specimens to bacterial identification; as a result, the microbiology laboratory is rapidly changing. With this change comes the challenge of selecting and implementing the technology that is most appropriate for each laboratory and clinical setting. This review focuses on issues surrounding implementation of new technology such that the improvements to clinical care are maximized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aggressive combination therapy with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections and conventional DMARDs in early rheumatoid arthritis Two Year Clinical and Radiographic Results From The CIMESTRA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Junker, Peter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether clinical and radiographic disease control can be achieved and maintained in patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the 2nd year of aggressive treatment with conventional DMARD and intraarticular corticosteroid. This paper presents the result...... years, and the radiographic erosive progression was minimal. Addition of cyclosporine during the first 76 weeks resulted in significantly better ACR20 and ACR50 responses, but did not have any additional effect on remission rate and radiographic outcome....

  3. Computer applications in clinical practice: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews computer applications in clinical and nuclear medicine. Specifically discussed are: Diagnostic uses of computerized tomography; hyperthermia; research programs on x-radiation and medicine, and data acquisition systems of radiology

  4. Value of FFR in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Mehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional flow reserve is an important tool in the cardiac catheterization lab to assess the physiological significance of coronary lesions. This article discusses the basic concepts about FFR and its utility in clinical decision making.

  5. Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W.; Yang, Mini

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although turmeric and its curcumin-enriched extracts have been used for treating arthritis, no systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to evaluate the strength of the research. We systemically evaluated all RCTs of turmeric extracts and curcumin for treating arthritis symptoms to elucidate the efficacy of curcuma for alleviating the symptoms of arthritis. Literature searches were conducted using 12 electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Korean databases, Chinese medical databases, and Indian scientific database. Search terms used were “turmeric,” “curcuma,” “curcumin,” “arthritis,” and “osteoarthritis.” A pain visual analogue score (PVAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were used for the major outcomes of arthritis. Initial searches yielded 29 articles, of which 8 met specific selection criteria. Three among the included RCTs reported reduction of PVAS (mean difference: −2.04 [−2.85, −1.24]) with turmeric/curcumin in comparison with placebo (P < .00001), whereas meta-analysis of four studies showed a decrease of WOMAC with turmeric/curcumin treatment (mean difference: −15.36 [−26.9, −3.77]; P = .009). Furthermore, there was no significant mean difference in PVAS between turmeric/curcumin and pain medicine in meta-analysis of five studies. Eight RCTs included in the review exhibited low to moderate risk of bias. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. In conclusion, these RCTs provide scientific evidence that supports the efficacy of turmeric extract (about 1000 mg/day of curcumin) in the treatment of arthritis. However, the total number of RCTs included in the analysis, the total sample size, and the methodological quality of the primary studies were not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Thus, more rigorous and larger studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic efficacy

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for insomnia disorder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    promoting memory consolidation. However, many individuals are affected with sleep disorders. Untreated sleep disorders can increase the risk of heart disease, memory problems, motor vehicle accidents, and impaired .... sleep hygiene practices and with careful use of sedative- hypnotics. In patients presenting with an ...

  7. Pediatric Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nicole I; Epps, Howard R

    2017-04-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a condition with the potential for joint destruction, physeal damage, and osteonecrosis, which warrants urgent identification and treatment. The organism most frequently responsible is Staphylococcus aureus; however, our understanding of pathogens continues to evolve as detection methods continue to improve. MRI has improved our ability to detect concurrent infections and is a useful clinical tool where available. The treatment course involves intravenous antibiotics followed by transition to oral antibiotics when clinically appropriate. The recommended surgical treatment of septic arthritis is open arthrotomy with decompression of the joint, irrigation, and debridement and treatment of concurrent infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-Esterified Fatty Acids Profiling in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Associations with Clinical Features and Th1 Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodríguez-Carrio

    Full Text Available Since lipid compounds are known to modulate the function of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages, we hypothesize that altered levels of serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA may underlie rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis.Serum levels of NEFA (palmitic, stearic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, γ-linoleic, arachidonic -AA-, linolenic, eicosapentaenoic -EPA- and docosahexaenoic -DHA- were quantified by LC-MS/MS after methyl-tert-butylether (MTBE-extraction in 124 RA patients and 56 healthy controls (HC. CD4+ phenotype was studied by flow cytometry. TNFα, IL-8, VEGF, GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-17, CCL2, CXCL10, leptin and resistin serum levels were quantified by immunoassays. The effect of FA on IFNγ production by PBMC was evaluated in vitro.Lower levels of palmitic (p<0.0001, palmitoleic (p = 0.002, oleic (p = 0.010, arachidonic (p = 0.027, EPA (p<0.0001 and DHA (p<0.0001 were found in RA patients, some NEFA being altered at onset. Cluster analysis identified a NEFA profile (hallmarked by increased stearic and decreased EPA and DHA overrepresented in RA patients compared to HC (p = 0.002, being associated with clinical features (RF, shared epitope and erosions, increased IFNγ expression in CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.002 and a Th1-enriched serum milieu (IFNγ, CCL2 and CXCL10, all p<0.005. In vitro assays demonstrated that imbalanced FA could underlie IFNγ production by CD4+ T-cells. Finally, changes on NEFA levels were associated with clinical response upon TNFα-blockade.An altered NEFA profile can be found in RA patients associated with clinical characteristics of aggressive disease and enhanced Th1 response. These results support the relevance of lipidomic studies in RA and provide a rationale for new therapeutic targets.

  9. Clinical audit of foot problems in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated at Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalbeth Nicola

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At diagnosis, 16% of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients may have foot joint involvement, increasing to 90% as disease duration increases. This can lead to joint instability, difficulties in walking and limitation in functional ability that restricts activities of daily living. The podiatrist plays an important role in the multidisciplinary team approach to the management of foot problems. The aim of this study was to undertake a clinical audit of foot problems in patients with RA treated at Counties Manukau District Health Board. Methods Patients with RA were identified through rheumatological clinics run within CMDHB. 100 patients were eligible for inclusion. Specific foot outcome tools were used to evaluate pain, disability and function. Observation on foot lesions were noted and previous history of foot assessment, footwear/insoles and foot surgery were evaluated. Results The median age of the cohort was 60 (IQR: 51–64 years old with median disease duration of 15 (IQR: 7.3–25 years. Over 85% presented with foot lesions that included corns and callus over the forefoot region and lesser toe deformities. Moderate to high disability was noted. High levels of forefoot structural damage were observed. 76% had not seen a podiatrist and 77% reported no previous formal foot assessment. 40% had been seen at the orthotic centre for specialised footwear and insoles. 27% of RA patients reported previous foot surgery. A large proportion of patients wore inappropriate footwear. Conclusion This clinical audit suggests that the majority of RA patients suffer from foot problems. Future recommendations include the provision of a podiatrist within the current CMDHB multidisciplinary rheumatology team to ensure better services for RA patients with foot problems.

  10. Factors affecting Korean nursing student empowerment in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yang-Heui; Choi, Jihea

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of nursing student empowerment in clinical practice is important. Investigating the cognition of empowerment and identifying predictors are necessary to enhance nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. To identify empowerment predictors for Korean nursing students in clinical practice based on studies by Bradbury-Jones et al. and Spreitzer. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. This study was performed in three nursing colleges in Korea, all of which had similar baccalaureate nursing curricula. Three hundred seven junior or senior nursing students completed a survey designed to measure factors that were hypothesized to influence nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. Data were collected from November to December 2011. Study variables included self-esteem, clinical decision making, being valued as a learner, satisfaction regarding practice with a team member, perception on professor/instructor/clinical preceptor attitude, and total number of clinical practice fields. Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression analyses. All of the hypothesized study variables were significantly correlated to nursing student empowerment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that clinical decision making in nursing (t=7.59, ppractice fields (t=2.06, p=0.040). The explanatory power of these predictors was 35% (F=40.71, ppractice will be possible by using educational strategies to improve nursing student clinical decision making. Simultaneously, attitudes of nurse educators are also important to ensure that nursing students are treated as valued learners and to increase student self-esteem in clinical practice. Finally, diverse clinical practice field environments should be considered to enhance experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sterilization and Disinfection Practices in Selected Dental Clinics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the sterilization and disinfection practices in selected dental clinics in Cameroon. The study conducted in the second half of 2009 included 41 dental clinics in 4 out of the 10 provinces in Cameroon. Questionnaire was used to obtain information about the ownership and location of the clinic, washing and packing ...

  12. Treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, V.

    1986-01-01

    Current practices in treating severe rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed, including remarks on controlled trials of methotrexate, total lymphatic irradiation trials at Stanford and Harvard, and total body irradiation trials. U.K

  13. Brief report: genotype, phenotype, and clinical course in five patients with PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidowich, Andrew P; Freeman, Alexandra F; Kuhns, Douglas B; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Gallin, John I; Turner, Maria L; Kastner, Daniel L; Holland, Steven M

    2012-06-01

    To describe the genotypes, phenotypes, immunophenotypes, and treatments of PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), a rare autoinflammatory disease, in 5 patients. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and through interviews with 5 patients from 4 kindreds. PSTPIP1 (CD2BP1) exon 10 and exon 11 sequencing was performed in each patient. Neutrophil granule content and cytokine levels were determined in plasma and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and controls. We identified 2 previously described PAPA syndrome-associated PSTPIP1 mutations, A230T and E250Q, and a novel change, E250K. Disease penetrance was incomplete, with variable expressivity. The cutaneous manifestations included pathergy, cystic acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and circulating neutrophil granule enzyme levels were markedly elevated in patients compared to those in controls. PBMC stimulation studies demonstrated impaired production of IL-10 and enhanced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Good resolution of pyoderma gangrenosum was achieved in 3 patients with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) blockade treatment. This analysis of 5 patients demonstrates that mutations in PSTPIP1 are incompletely penetrant and variably expressed in the PAPA syndrome. Neutrophil granule proteins are markedly elevated ex vivo and in the plasma, and elevated levels might be compatible with a diagnosis of PAPA syndrome. TNFα blockade appears to be effective in treating the cutaneous manifestations of PAPA syndrome. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Oxidative Stress Indices in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghef-Mehrabany, Elnaz; Homayouni-Rad, Aziz; Alipour, Beitullah; Sharif, Sakineh-Khatoun; Vaghef-Mehrabany, Leila; Alipour-Ajiry, Serour

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that causes great pain and disability and increasing oxidative stress in patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of probiotics-live microorganisms with many health benefits, including antioxidant properties-on oxidative stress indices of patients with RA. This study is a secondary analysis from a previously published study Methods: In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 46 patients with RA were assigned to one of two groups; patients in the probiotic group received a daily capsule containing 10(8) colony forming units (CFUs) of Lactobacillus casei 01 (L. casei 01), while those in the placebo group took identical capsules containing maltodextrin, for 8 weeks. In the baseline and at the end of the study, anxiety, physical activity levels, and dietary intakes were assessed. Anthropometric parameters, serum malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured. There was no significant difference between the two groups for demographic characteristics, anthropometric parameters, physical activity, anxiety levels, or dietary intakes, throughout the course of the study. No significant within- and between-group differences were observed for MDA, TAC, or CAT. SOD activity decreased only in the probiotic group and GPx activity decreased in both study groups (p 0.05). No significant effect of L. casei 01 supplementation was observed on the oxidative status of patients with RA, compared to placebo.

  15. Impact of vitamin D deficiency on clinical parameters in treatment-naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wen, Hongyan

    2018-02-19

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at risk of vitamin D deficiency and whether the levels of vitamin D are correlated with clinical parameters in RA. A total of 280 treatment-naïve RA patients, and 140 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. Serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ), the active form of vitamin D, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Concentrations of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 less than 25 ng/mL were defined as insufficient. Linear regression was performed to evaluate correlations as (modifying and) confounding factors were controlled. The levels of serum 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 in RA individuals (12.24 ± 6.68 ng/ml) were significantly lower than in healthy controls (21.08 ± 7.14 ng/ml; p CCP)-positive patients with RA were lower than in the anti-CCP-negative RA patients (10.86 ng/ml versus 15.98 ng/ml; t = -3.08, p CCP antibody in RA patients.

  16. Development and clinical application in arthritis of a new immunoassay for serum type IIA procollagen NH2 propeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Jean-Charles; Sandell, Linda J; Delmas, Pierre D; Garnero, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Type II collagen, the most abundant protein of cartilage matrix, is synthesized as a procollagen molecule including the N-(PIINP) and C-(PIICP) propeptides at each end. Type II procollagen is produced in two forms as the result of alternative RNA splicing. One form (IIA) includes and the other form (IIB) excludes a 69-amino acid cysteine-rich globular domain encoded by exon 2 in PIINP. During the process of synthesis, these N-propeptides are removed by specific proteases and released in the circulation, and their levels are believed to reflect type II collagen synthesis. In this chapter we describe the development of a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the measurement of the IIA form of PIINP (PIIANP) in serum based on a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human exon 2 fusion protein of type II procollagen. We show that this ELISA is highly specific for circulating PIIANP and has adequate technical precision. In patients with knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, serum PIIANP was decreased by 53% (p type IIA collagen synthesis is altered in these arthritic diseases. The measurement of serum PIIANP may be useful for the clinical investigation of patients with joint diseases.

  17. Clinical effectiveness and safety of leflunomide in inflammatory arthritis: a report from the RAPPORT database with supporting patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Morgan; Keeling, Stephanie O; Katz, Steven J; Maksymowych, Walter P; Eurich, Dean T; Hall, Jill J

    2017-07-01

    Leflunomide is indicated for the treatment of adults with rheumatoid arthritis, yet is underutilized. Given the cost of biologic therapy, understanding real-life effectiveness, safety, and sustainability of leflunomide, particularly in patients who have failed methotrexate, would be of value. The primary objective was to assess the proportion of patients achieving clinically meaningful benefit following an adequate trial of leflunomide. A retrospective analysis of a cohort supplemented with patient self-reported data using a standardized questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, with a database multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of leflunomide response. Of the cohort available (N = 2591), 1671 patients with confirmed leflunomide use were included in the retrospective analysis, of whom 249 were incident users. Low disease activity (DAS-28 reported by 29% of incident users and after 1 year, 45% remained on leflunomide. Achievement of "minimal or no joint symptoms" was reported by 34% in the 661 analyzable survey responses (39% response rate). AE were reported by 55%, with nuisance (hair loss, nausea, stomach pain) AE and diarrhea being most common. Leflunomide was discontinued by 67% of responders within 1 year. An important proportion of patients, the majority of whom had previously failed methotrexate, achieved disease response with leflunomide with a low risk of serious adverse effects, suggesting that a trial of leflunomide may be a reasonable and cost-effective strategy prior to biologic therapy.

  18. Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Consensus Clinical Treatment Plans for Juvenile Dermatomyositis with Persistent Skin Rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Adam M; Kim, Susan; Reed, Ann M; Carrasco, Ruy; Feldman, Brian M; Hong, Sandy D; Kahn, Philip; Rahimi, Homaira; Robinson, Angela Byun; Vehe, Richard K; Weiss, Jennifer E; Spencer, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common form of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy in children. While outcomes are generally thought to be good, persistence of skin rash is a common problem. The goal of this study was to describe the development of clinical treatment plans (CTP) for children with JDM characterized by persistent skin rash despite complete resolution of muscle involvement. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance, a North American consortium of pediatric rheumatologists and other healthcare providers, used a combination of Delphi surveys and nominal group consensus meetings to develop CTP that reflected consensus on typical treatments for patients with JDM with persistent skin rash. Consensus was reached on patient characteristics and outcome assessment. Patients should have previously received corticosteroids and methotrexate (MTX). Three consensus treatment plans were developed. Plan A added intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) if it was not already being used. Plan B added mycophenolate mofetil, while Plan C added cyclosporine. Continuation of previous treatments, including corticosteroids, MTX, and IVIG, was permitted in plans B and C. Three consensus CTP were developed for use in children with JDM and persistent skin rash despite complete resolution of muscle disease. These CTP reflect typical treatment approaches and are not to be considered treatment recommendations or standard of care. Using prospective data collection and statistical methods to account for nonrandom treatment assignment, it is expected that these CTP will be used to allow treatment comparisons, and ultimately determine the best treatment for these patients.

  19. Estradiol RIA kit in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, W.; Lisse, K.; Bienert, R.; Flentje, H.; Koerner, H.; Wilken, T.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin-Buch. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1985-01-01

    First clinical experience with a estradiol RIA kit developed in the Central Institute for Isotope- and Radiation Research is reported. The kit was used for the daily control of estradiol level in patients, which were treated within the program for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. The time of incubation could be shortened by means of a double antibody technique and by use of a precipitation mixture to 2 h. The intraassay variation is 9.2%, the interassay variation is 15.1%, the recovery rate is 94%. The sensitivity of the test (B 0 -3SD) is about 120 pmol/l. The estradiol RIA kit satisfies clinical requirements. (author)

  20. Serum hyaluronic acid levels are elevated in arthritis patients, but normal and not associated with clinical data in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Egon; Jäkel, Hans-Peter; Müller, Annette; Fischer, Heinrich; Fiehn, Walter; Eich, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a disease with widespread chronic pain and many nonspecific symptoms. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a disputed marker for the diagnosis of FM. The aim of the study is to clarify the discrepant results reported so far. Serum concentrations of HA were measured with a radiometric assay (Pharmacia & Upjohn, Sweden) in 41 patients with FM (38 females), 48 with arthritis (35 females) and 31 control subjects (28 females). Correlations of HA levels with clinical parameters (duration of disease, age, gender, medication) and scores of disease severity (e.g. depression and pain) were calculated. If appropriate, partial correlations and analysis of covariance adjusted for confounding variables (e.g. age) were used. HA levels were confirmed to be age-related in the whole study group (r(s) = 0.54; P subgroup. Association between HA levels and gender, drug therapy, clinical or psychometric data could not be demonstrated in patients suffering from FM. Analyzing all study participants, HA levels were correlated with the pain disability index (PDI) (r(tau) = 0.27; P < 0.02) and, in arthritis patients only, with duration of disease (r(tau) = 0.82; P < 0.001). Moreover, analysis of covariance revealed that patients with FM had normal HA values as compared with control subjects and only patients with arthritis had significantly higher levels than both other groups. The present study with a quite large cohort including patients with arthritis and FM demonstrates that serum levels of HA in FM are neither elevated nor associated with any relevant clinical data of this disease and, therefore, have no diagnostic or prognostic value in Germans.

  1. Breast tomosynthesis in clinical practice: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teertstra, Hendrik J.; Loo, Claudette E.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Muller, Sara H.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.; Tinteren, Harm van; Rutgers, Emiel J.T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential value of tomosynthesis in women with an abnormal screening mammogram or with clinical symptoms. Mammography and tomosynthesis investigations of 513 woman with an abnormal screening mammogram or with clinical symptoms were prospectively classified according to the ACR BI-RADS criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of both techniques for the detection of cancer were calculated. In 112 newly detected cancers, tomosynthesis and mammography were each false-negative in 8 cases (7%). In the false-negative mammography cases, the tumor was detected with ultrasound (n=4), MRI (n=2), by recall after breast tomosynthesis interpretation (n=1), and after prophylactic mastectomy (n=1). Combining the results of mammography and tomosynthesis detected 109 cancers. Therefore in three patients, both mammography and tomosynthesis missed the carcinoma. The sensitivity of both techniques for the detection of breast cancer was 92.9%, and the specificity of mammography and tomosynthesis was 86.1 and 84.4%, respectively. Tomosynthesis can be used as an additional technique to mammography in patients referred with an abnormal screening mammogram or with clinical symptoms. Additional lesions detected by tomosynthesis, however, are also likely to be detected by other techniques used in the clinical work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  2. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: a BARFOT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Samuelson, Karin; Hagell, Peter; Fridlund, Bengt; Forslind, Kristina; Svensson, Björn; Thomé, Bibbi

    2017-09-01

    To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used. Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services. Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way. A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  4. Can imaging be used for inflammatory arthritis screening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    ), ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and they are generally part of the early examination program in arthritis.Computed tomography visualizes calcified tissue with high resolution but is rarely used unless radiography is unclear and MRI unavailable......A.Thus radiography, MRI, and/or US should be used in clinical practice to contribute to the diagnostic work-up in suspected, but not definite, inflammatory joint disease and early unclassified inflammatory joint disease, and they are also useful in establishing a specific diagnosis of RA. Radiography...

  5. Clinical reliability and validity of elbow functional assessment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Y.A. de; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Eygendaal, D.; Jolie, I.M.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.; Rozing, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To investigate the measurement characteristics of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Mayo Clinic elbow assessment instruments, utilizing methodological criteria including feasibility, reliability, validity, and discriminative ability; and (2) to develop an efficient and

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed in this paper the radiographic characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis, making emphasis in the more common involved joints. We present a select but complete set of film as a result of our practice for many years in the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, HSJD, Bogota

  7. Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014) article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative…

  8. Novel approach to utilizing electronic health records for dermatologic research: developing a multi-institutional federated data network for clinical and translational research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Reddy, Shalini B; Garg, Amit

    2012-05-15

    The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the United States has created new opportunities for research using automated data extraction methods. A large amount of information from the EHR can be utilized for clinical and translational research. To date, a number of institutions have the capability of extracting clinical data from EHR to create local repositories of de-identified data amenable to research queries through the Informatics for Integrated Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) platform. Collaborations among institutions sharing a common i2b2 platform hold exciting opportunities for research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. With the automated extraction of patient-level data from multiple institutions, this novel informatics network has the ability to address high-priority research questions. With commitment to high-quality data through applied algorithms for cohort identification and validation of outcomes, the creation of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Integrated Research Data Network (PIONEER) will make a significant contribution to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis research.

  9. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  10. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karimzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran during 2014–2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t-tests were used for data analysis. Results: The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2% (P < 0.001. In sonography, rotator cuff tendonitis is the most common periarthritis. Other findings in sonography were biceps tendinitis (10 cases, wrist tendonitis (13 cases, olecranon bursitis (9 cases, golfers elbow (4 cases, tennis elbow (4 cases, trochanteric bursitis (6 cases, anserine bursitis (6 cases, prepatellar bursitis (11 cases, and ankle tendonitis (7 cases. Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography (P < 0.001 and 34% through Doppler sonography (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  11. Imaginary Worlds and the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER Evidence Report: Targeted Immune Modulators for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In April 2017, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER issued its evidence report on the value of targeted immune modulators (TIMs in rheumatoid arthritis. The report made the case that for the TIMs to be accepted for formulary placement in the US, where notional willingness-to-pay thresholds are the ICER gateway criteria, manufacturers should be prepared to offer substantial unit price discounts. The purpose of this commentary is to make the case that the methodology underpinning the ICER claims for value assessment does not meet the required standards of normal science. None of the claims made for clinical and comparative cost-effectiveness are credible, evaluable and replicable. As such, formulary committees have no idea whether ICER recommendations are right or even if they are wrong. They are, in fact, immune to failure and should be rejected. Utilizing ICER claims generated by simulated projections, this review points out that it is entirely possible to justify the current WAC or net pricing structure of TIMS. The review concludes that if ICER is to contribute to the successful formulary placement of drugs and devices the methodology for pricing recommendation should be re-assessed. As it stands, questions must be raised regarding recommendations for, possibly unnecessary, price discounts. ICER needs to develop an assessment framework that focuses on developing claims for competing therapies that are robust, evaluable and replicable together with recommendations on how these claims are to be evaluated in a timeframe meaningful to health care decision makers.   Type: Commentary

  12. Prediction of Methotrexate Clinical Response in Portuguese Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Implication of MTHFR rs1801133 and ATIC rs4673993 Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aurea; Monteiro, Joaquim; Bernardes, Miguel; Sousa, Hugo; Azevedo, Rita; Seabra, Vitor; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Methotrexate (MTX), the most used drug in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment, showing variability in clinical response, is often associated with genetic polymorphisms. This study aimed to elucidate the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and aminoimidazole carboxamide adenosine ribonucleotide transformylase (ATIC) T675C polymorphisms and clinicopathological variables in clinical response to MTX in Portuguese RA patients. Methods. Study included 233 RA patients treated with MTX for at least six months. MTHFR C677T and ATIC T675C polymorphisms were genotyped and clinicopathological variables were collected. Statistical analyses were performed and binary logistic regression method adjusted to possible confounding variables. Results. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that MTHFR 677TT (OR = 4.63; P = 0.013) and ATIC 675T carriers (OR = 5.16; P = 0.013) were associated with over 4-fold increased risk for nonresponse. For clinicopathological variables, noncurrent smokers (OR = 7.98; P = 0.001), patients positive to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (OR = 3.53; P = 0.004) and antinuclear antibodies (OR = 2.28; P = 0.045), with higher health assessment questionnaire score (OR = 2.42; P = 0.007), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users (OR = 2.77; P = 0.018) were also associated with nonresponse. Contrarily, subcutaneous administration route (OR = 0.11; P < 0.001) was associated with response. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MTHFR C677T and ATIC T675C genotyping combined with clinicopathological data may help to identify patients whom will not benefit from MTX treatment and, therefore, assist clinicians in personalizing RA treatment. PMID:24967362

  13. Prediction of Methotrexate Clinical Response in Portuguese Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Implication of MTHFR rs1801133 and ATIC rs4673993 Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Lima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Methotrexate (MTX, the most used drug in rheumatoid arthritis (RA treatment, showing variability in clinical response, is often associated with genetic polymorphisms. This study aimed to elucidate the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and aminoimidazole carboxamide adenosine ribonucleotide transformylase (ATIC T675C polymorphisms and clinicopathological variables in clinical response to MTX in Portuguese RA patients. Methods. Study included 233 RA patients treated with MTX for at least six months. MTHFR C677T and ATIC T675C polymorphisms were genotyped and clinicopathological variables were collected. Statistical analyses were performed and binary logistic regression method adjusted to possible confounding variables. Results. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that MTHFR 677TT (OR = 4.63; P=0.013 and ATIC 675T carriers (OR = 5.16; P=0.013 were associated with over 4-fold increased risk for nonresponse. For clinicopathological variables, noncurrent smokers (OR = 7.98; P=0.001, patients positive to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (OR = 3.53; P=0.004 and antinuclear antibodies (OR = 2.28; P=0.045, with higher health assessment questionnaire score (OR = 2.42; P=0.007, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users (OR = 2.77; P=0.018 were also associated with nonresponse. Contrarily, subcutaneous administration route (OR = 0.11; P<0.001 was associated with response. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MTHFR C677T and ATIC T675C genotyping combined with clinicopathological data may help to identify patients whom will not benefit from MTX treatment and, therefore, assist clinicians in personalizing RA treatment.

  14. A Simple Step Test to Estimate Cardio-Respiratory Fitness Levels of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients in a Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Exercise tests represent an important clinical tool to evaluate cardio-respiratory fitness and to predict future adverse cardiovascular events. However, use of such tests in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA is relatively uncommon despite well-established evidence that low exercise capacity and high CVD mortality are features of this disease. Therefore, this study examined the validity and reliability of a sub-maximal step test for use in RA patients. Methods. Thirty patients (24 females (mean ± SD age 53±10 years performed a sub-maximal step test on two occasions to estimate the criterion measure of cardio-respiratory fitness (V.O2max. A further maximal cycling test provided a direct fitness measurement (V.O2 peak. Pearson correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, Bland and Altman plots, and 95% limits of agreement (LOA were used to determine the validity and reliability of the sub-maximal test. Results. Estimated V.O2max correlated well with directly measured V.O2 peak (r=0.79, LoA ±5.7 mL·kg−1·min−1. Test-retest reproducibility for estimated V.O2max was excellent (ICC=0.97, LoA ±2.2 mL·kg−1·min−1. Conclusion. The sub-maximal step test studied here represents a valid and reproducible method to estimate cardio-respiratory fitness in RA patients. This test may be useful for the assessment and management of CVD risk in a clinical setting.

  15. A simple step test to estimate cardio-respiratory fitness levels of rheumatoid arthritis patients in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Jennifer K; Moore, Jonathan P; Ahmad, Yasmeen A; Jones, Jeremy G; Lemmey, Andrew B; Casanova, Francesco; Maddison, Peter J; Thom, Jeanette M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Exercise tests represent an important clinical tool to evaluate cardio-respiratory fitness and to predict future adverse cardiovascular events. However, use of such tests in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is relatively uncommon despite well-established evidence that low exercise capacity and high CVD mortality are features of this disease. Therefore, this study examined the validity and reliability of a sub-maximal step test for use in RA patients. Methods. Thirty patients (24 females) (mean ± SD age 53 ± 10 years) performed a sub-maximal step test on two occasions to estimate the criterion measure of cardio-respiratory fitness ([Formula: see text]). A further maximal cycling test provided a direct fitness measurement ([Formula: see text]). Pearson correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland and Altman plots, and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were used to determine the validity and reliability of the sub-maximal test. Results. Estimated [Formula: see text] correlated well with directly measured [Formula: see text] (r = 0.79, LoA ±5.7 mL·kg(-1) ·min(-1)). Test-retest reproducibility for estimated [Formula: see text] was excellent (ICC = 0.97, LoA ±2.2 mL·kg(-1) ·min(-1)). Conclusion. The sub-maximal step test studied here represents a valid and reproducible method to estimate cardio-respiratory fitness in RA patients. This test may be useful for the assessment and management of CVD risk in a clinical setting.

  16. The association of body mass index with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mirpourian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of obesity in clinical curse of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is not clear. We investigated the association of obesity and adiposity with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in RA patients. Materials and Methods: Active RA patients with the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28 > 2.6 were studied. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured and body mass index (BMI and waist to hip ratio were calculated. Patients were treated with methotrexate (7.5 to 10 mg/week plus hydroxychloroquine (200 to 400 mg/day and prednisolone (2.5 to 10 mg/day and were followed by DAS28 for up to 24 weeks. Results: One hundred and six patients were studied; age = 48.5 ± 13.8 years, 87.7% female, disease duration = 4.4 years [SE = 0.48]. DAS28 was decreased from 4.5 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.4 (P < 0.001 after 24 weeks of treatment. Only in patients with disease duration of ≤2 years, BMI (r = -0.415, P = 0.005 and waist circumference (r = -0.296, P = 0.05 were correlated with baseline DAS28. Although BMI (r = -0.337, P = 0.025 and waist circumference (r = -0.315, P = 0.038 were correlated with change in DAS28 after therapy, these correlations were disappeared after controlling for baseline DAS28. Conclusion: Obesity and adiposity are associated with less severe disease activity in early stage of RA, but are not associated with response to combination therapy with methotrexate plus hydroxychloroquine in RA patients.

  17. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Hadi; Seyedbonakdar, Zahra; Mousavi, Maryam; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) during 2014-2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t -tests were used for data analysis. The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2%) ( P < 0.001). In sonography, rotator cuff tendonitis is the most common periarthritis. Other findings in sonography were biceps tendinitis (10 cases), wrist tendonitis (13 cases), olecranon bursitis (9 cases), golfers elbow (4 cases), tennis elbow (4 cases), trochanteric bursitis (6 cases), anserine bursitis (6 cases), prepatellar bursitis (11 cases), and ankle tendonitis (7 cases). Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography ( P < 0.001) and 34% through Doppler sonography ( P < 0.001). The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  18. The association of body mass index with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpourian, Maryam; Salesi, Mansour; Abdolahi, Hadi; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Karimzadeh, Hadi

    2014-06-01

    The role of obesity in clinical curse of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not clear. We investigated the association of obesity and adiposity with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in RA patients. Active RA patients with the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) > 2.6 were studied. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured and body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio were calculated. Patients were treated with methotrexate (7.5 to 10 mg/week) plus hydroxychloroquine (200 to 400 mg/day) and prednisolone (2.5 to 10 mg/day) and were followed by DAS28 for up to 24 weeks. One hundred and six patients were studied; age = 48.5 ± 13.8 years, 87.7% female, disease duration = 4.4 years [SE = 0.48]. DAS28 was decreased from 4.5 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.4 (P < 0.001) after 24 weeks of treatment. Only in patients with disease duration of ≤2 years, BMI (r = -0.415, P = 0.005) and waist circumference (r = -0.296, P = 0.05) were correlated with baseline DAS28. Although BMI (r = -0.337, P = 0.025) and waist circumference (r = -0.315, P = 0.038) were correlated with change in DAS28 after therapy, these correlations were disappeared after controlling for baseline DAS28. Obesity and adiposity are associated with less severe disease activity in early stage of RA, but are not associated with response to combination therapy with methotrexate plus hydroxychloroquine in RA patients.

  19. Clinical remission in patients with active psoriatic arthritis treated with adalimumab and correlations in joint and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bosch, Filip; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Kron, Martina; Kupper, Hartmut; Mease, Philip J

    2015-06-01

    Adalimumab (ADA) was evaluated for its efficacy in patients with moderate to severely active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and for the presence of correlations in disease change variables. Patients with inadequate response to standard PsA therapy were given 40 mg of ADA every other week for up to 12 weeks or 20 weeks. Outcome variables encompassed tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), physician's global assessment (PGA) of psoriasis, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), patient's global assessment (PtGA) of disease activity and pain, C-reactive protein, as well as composite measures of disease activity. Patients with inactive skin disease symptoms at baseline were excluded from the remission analyses. Of 268 patients with active baseline joint and skin disease and data available at Week 12 following open-label ADA therapy, 73 achieved joint remission (27.2%, TJC ≤ 1 + SJC ≤ 1) and 144 achieved skin remission criteria (53.7%, PGA = clear/almost clear). Simultaneous joint and skin remission criteria were achieved in 16.0% and 24.8% of patients at weeks 12 and 20, respectively. In patients who did not achieve skin and/or joint remission, 12-week ADA treatment improved mean clinical and functional scores. Joint remission was more frequently associated with achieving clinically relevant outcomes including HAQ, PtGA disease activity, and PtGA pain compared to skin remission. No correlation between improvement in skin and joint disease was observed. ADA was effective in achieving strict criteria for remission in joint or skin disease in many patients with active PsA within 12 weeks and sustained through 20 weeks. (NCT00235885).

  20. Clinical, autoimmune, and psychiatric parameters correlate with sleep disturbance in patients with systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Gian Luca; Fiorenza, Alessia; Cordova, Francesca; Roberts, William Neal; Moore, Charles; Greco, Domenica; Monaco, Claudia; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria Anna; Bruno, Antonio; Zoccali, Rocco; Bagnato, Gianfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an important contributor to poor quality of life in rheumatic disorders. This study aims to test whether clinical, autoimmune and psychological factors are associated with sleep disturbance in systemic sclerosis (SSc) compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and controls. 101 female subjects (SSc=33, RA=34, healthy controls=34) participated in this observational, cross-sectional, parallel group study. Sleep disturbance was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Other assessments included the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Clinical parameters, therapeutic regimen, and serologic status were recorded. In SSc patients, PSQI scores were higher than in RA patients and controls. Linear regression analysis showed that in SSc patients PSQI scores was associated with BDI, disease duration, modified Rodnan skin score and VAS, while DAS28 and BDI were associated with PSQI scores in RA patients. Anti-Scl70 and ANA positive SSc patients showed higher PSQI scores compared to those ANA positive only, while no differences were observed in RA patients classified according to rheumatoid factor positivity. SSc patients treated with immunosuppressants had lower PSQI scores compared to those not on therapy, whereas only corticosteroid treatment was significantly associated with higher PSQI scores in RA patients. RA patients with disease activity higher than moderate (DAS28≥3.2) had higher PSQI scores than those with lower than moderate (DAS28<3.2). Longitudinal studies are needed to identify disease-specific patterns associated with sleep disturbances and the influence on sleep function induced by immunosuppressive therapy among rheumatic patients.

  1. Humor During Clinical Practice: Analysis of Recorded Clinical Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kari A; Singh Ospina, Naykky; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Branda, Megan; Montori, Victor

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about humor's use in clinical encounters, despite its many potential benefits. We aimed to describe humor during clinical encounters. We analyzed 112 recorded clinical encounters. Two reviewers working independently identified instances of humor, as well as information surrounding the logistics of its use. Of the 112 encounters, 66 (59%) contained 131 instances of humor. Humor was similarly frequent in primary care (36/61, 59%) and in specialty care (30/51, 59%), was more common in gender-concordant interactions (43/63, 68%), and was most common during counseling (81/112, 62%). Patients and clinicians introduced humor similarly (63 vs 66 instances). Typically, humor was about the patient's medical condition (40/131, 31%). Humor is used commonly during counseling to discuss the patient's medical condition and to relate to general life events bringing warmth to the medical encounter. The timing and topic of humor and its use by all parties suggests humor plays a role in the social connection between patients and physicians and allows easier discussion of difficult topics. Further research is necessary to establish its impact on clinicians, patients, and outcomes. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  2. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-986142 in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis enhances efficacy of agents representing clinical standard-of-care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Gillooly

    Full Text Available Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK regulates critical signal transduction pathways involved in the pathobiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other autoimmune disorders. BMS-986142 is a potent and highly selective reversible small molecule inhibitor of BTK currently being investigated in clinical trials for the treatment of both RA and primary Sjögren's syndrome. In the present report, we detail the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of BMS-986142 and show this agent provides potent and selective inhibition of BTK (IC50 = 0.5 nM, blocks antigen receptor-dependent signaling and functional endpoints (cytokine production, co-stimulatory molecule expression, and proliferation in human B cells (IC50 ≤ 5 nM, inhibits Fcγ receptor-dependent cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and blocks RANK-L-induced osteoclastogenesis. Through the benefits of impacting these important drivers of autoimmunity, BMS-986142 demonstrated robust efficacy in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, including collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA. In both models, robust efficacy was observed without continuous, complete inhibition of BTK. When a suboptimal dose of BMS-986142 was combined with other agents representing the current standard of care for RA (e.g., methotrexate, the TNFα antagonist etanercept, or the murine form of CTLA4-Ig in the CIA model, improved efficacy compared to either agent alone was observed. The results suggest BMS-986142 represents a potential therapeutic for clinical investigation in RA, as monotherapy or co-administered with agents with complementary mechanisms of action.

  3. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging signs and clinical findings in follow-up examinations in children and juveniles with temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussler, A.; Schroeder, R.J.; Allozy, B.; Landau, H.; Kallinich, T.; Trauzeddel, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the extent to which pathological findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up examinations are correlated with clinical symptoms in patients with TMJ involvement in juvenile ideopathic arthritis (JIA) over time. Data from 34 patients with TMJ involvement in JIA was retrospectively examined. Shortly after two clinical examinations, the first MRI and the follow-up MRI were performed. The MRI examinations took place with 1.5 T MRI. In both MRI examinations alterations on the condyle (MRI1: 88 %, MRT2: 91 %) and contrast enhancement (MRT1: 76 %, MRT2 65 %) were found most frequently. TMJ pain (65 %) and lower mouth opening capacity (65 %) were the number one finding in the first clinical examination. A statistically significant correlation was found between the alterations on the condyle and TMJ pain (p = 0.025) and between the alterations on the condyle and lower mouth opening capacity (p = 0.019). By comparing the results of the first MRI with the results of the follow-up MRI, we identified a trend towards a progression of TMJ arthritis, while the clinical follow-up showed an improvement in most patients. We found a discrepancy between the progressive or stable trends of pathological findings in follow-up MRI and the decrease in clinical symptoms over time. Therefore, follow-up examination by MRI shows important information for correct evaluation about the stage of TMJ arthritis and about the need for treatment. Consequently, follow-up examination by MRI is an appropriate addition to clinical examination in the therapeutic concept. (orig.)

  4. [Obsessions before Freud: history and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The article analyses the significance of the concept of "obsession" in nineteenth-century alienism. From a clinical point of view, Esquirol's description was completed by other authors (Jules Falret, Legrand du Saulle). In the area of psychopathological studies, French alienism, with Morel's emotional delirium or Janet's psychasthenia, defended the emotional theory, as opposed to the intellectual disorder proposed by German doctors. Lastly, the importance of the cultural framework is stressed in the appearance of obsessive symptoms and their interpretation. Along these lines, the article discusses the relationship of religious scruples to melancholy or the appearance of diagnostic categories subject to fin de siècle codes and mentalities.

  5. Bovine neosporosis: clinical and practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, S; López-Gatius, F

    2013-10-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite with a wide host range but with a preference for cattle and dogs. Since the description of N. caninum as a new genus and species in 1988, bovine neosporosis has become a disease of international concern as it is among the main causes of abortion in cattle. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. This review focuses on the epidemiology of the disease and on prospects for its control in cattle. Finally, based on the implications of clinical findings reported to date, a set of recommendations is provided for veterinarians and cattle farmers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving clinical practices for children with language and learning disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G

    2014-04-01

    This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions, components of language therapy, grammar goals, and goal prioritization for students with language and learning difficulties. The gaps that exist between current knowledge about learning, language development, and clinical practice often do not receive as much attention as the gaps in the evidence base that addresses the efficacy and effectiveness of language intervention practices and service delivery models. Fortunately, clinicians do not have to wait for future intervention studies to apply their knowledge of learning and language development to clinical practices.

  7. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  8. A qualitative needs assessment of clinical practice guidelines: final report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    The study was conducted as the result of the wish of the Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with Health Canada, to determine the levels of awareness and use of clinical practice guidelines...

  9. Orienting Nursing Students to Cost Effective Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessner, Muriel W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes five principles for cost-effective clinical practice: efficient use of self, efficient use of equipment and supplies, delegation of work, critical path method, and organization of the environment. (SK)

  10. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion...... and lower endoscopies and colorectal cancer METHODS In Study I, survey data from more than 400 GPs and 4000 consultations were combined with registry data on serious disease. Study II and Study III were based only on registry data. RESULTS In Study I, we saw that a suspicion of cancer or another serious...... are randomised to a more liberal access to lower endoscopies. Alongside this, we need to keep on exploring alternative approaches including the use of iFOBT in symptomatic patients. Overall, this thesis indicates that the role of GPs in the diagnosis of cancer should be strengthened through easy access...

  11. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  12. Efficacy and safety of Tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to conventional therapy: Preliminary results of an open-label clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Luchikhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which are associated with the use of biological anti-rheumatic drugs, the problemof effective treatment of RA is not still solved. Inclusion of new methods in treatment strategies, in particular the so-called «small molecules», i.e. synthetic compounds acting on intracellular signaling pathways, such as Tofacitinib (TOFA approved for use in rheumatologic practice, is very important.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (s-DMARDs, primarily methotrexate (MTX in in patients with active RA in real clinical practice.Subjects and methods. This ongoing open-label trial is a part of the scientific program «Russian Investigation of Methotrexate and Biologics in Early Active Inflammatory Arthritis» (REMARCA that explores the possibility of adapting the «treat-to-target» strategy in real prac-tice in Russia. The study included RA patients with moderate to high disease activity despite treatment with MTX or other DMARDs. A total of 41 patients with RA were included (8 males, 33 females; mean age 52.6±14.2 years, disease duration 47.2±49.7 months, 82.9% RF+ and 80.5% anti-CCP+,DAS28-ESR 5.45±0.95, SDAI 30.2±12.2. All the patients had previously received s-DMARDs; 12 (29.3% patients also had biological DMARDs (1 to 4 biologics. Oral TOFA 5 mg in combination with MTX or leflunomide was administered twice daily to 40 and 1 patients, respectively, with the possibility of increasing the dose up to 10 mg BID. To date, 37 and 12 patients received TOFA for 3 and 6 months, respectively.Results. TOFA was used as a second-line drug (after s-DMARDs failure in 29 (70.7%, as a third line drug (after s-DMARDs and biologics failure in 12 (29.3% patients. The dose was escalated to 10 mg BID in 13 (31.2% patients, on the average, 11.2±1.7 weeks after treatment initiation. TOFA was not

  13. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...... questions to ensure selection of the appropriate test, adherence to good clinical and laboratory practices (e.g., minimization of the risk of incorrect patient and/or specimen identification, tube type, or timing), use of internationally standardized and well-characterized methods, careful adherence...... and laboratory users, and regulatory agencies. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of these recommendations, adapted to local practice, should encourage optimization of the clinical use of tumor markers....

  14. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idi...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  15. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  16. Diagnostic potential of inflammatory markers in septic arthritis and periprosthetic joint infections: a clinical study with 719 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Scherer, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which markers in serum and in the synovial fluid have the highest diagnostic potential for predicting septic arthritis and periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs). The likelihood ratio assesses the diagnostic utility of a diagnostic test and the likelihood that a patient has a disease. The levels of inflammatory markers in serum [white blood cells, C-reactive protein (CRPS)] and synovial fluid [synovial fluid white blood cell count (SFWBC), percentage of polymorphonuclear cells (%PMN), lactic acid, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose, total protein] of patients suffering from septic arthritis (n = 114), PJI (n = 67), non-infectious joint diseases (n = 495) and arthralgia after total joint arthroplasty (n = 43) were determined. The arithmetical means, cut-off values, sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratios (+ LR, -LR), interval likelihood ratios and receiver operating characteristic curves with corresponding area under the curve (AUC) of inflammatory markers were calculated. The parameters with the highest diagnostic potential for differing between septic arthritis and non-infectious arthritis were the SFWBC (AUC = 0.850, cut-off value = 6.7 × 10(3)/μl, sensitivity = 81.8%, specificity = 76.5%,+ LR = 3.41, -LR = 0.24), CRPS (AUC = 0.797), %PMN (AUC = 0.766) and synovial lactate (AUC = 0.760). The highest diagnostic potential for predicting a PJI was shown by LDH (AUC = 0.833) and the SFWBC (AUC = 0.828). The SFWBC, CRPS, %PMN and synovial lactate were the best inflammatory markers in predicting septic arthritis. Synovial lactate levels > 10 mmol/l or an SFWBC > 50 × 10(3)/μl substantially increased disease probability, while SFWBC septic arthritis considerably. An SFWBC 20 × 10(3)/μl or %PMN > 86% increased the post-test probability of a PJI. The use of the corresponding interval likelihood ratios could help physicians to estimate the probability of septic arthritis and PJI more accurately.

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline for Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites have clinical significance because they play a critical function in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Although not all of the pathologic mechanisms have been adequately described, vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as measured by low levels of 25-OH vitamin D, are associated with a variety of clinical conditions including osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly, decreased immune function, bone pain, and possibly colon cancer and cardiovascular health.2 Apart from inadequate dietary intake, patients may present with low levels of vitamin D if they receive inadequate sunlight. The astronaut population is potentially vulnerable to low levels of vitamin D for several reasons. Firstly, they may train for long periods in Star City, Russia, which by virtue of its northern latitude receives less sunlight in winter months. Secondly, astronauts are deprived of sunlight while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In addition, ISS crew members are exposed to microgravity for prolonged durations and are likely to develop low bone mineral density despite the use of countermeasures. Therefore, closely monitoring and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels is important for the astronaut corps.

  18. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  19. Nutritional aspects of detoxification in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, John C

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a vital cellular task that, if lacking, can lead to early morbidity and mortality. The process of detoxification involves the mobilization, biotransformation, and elimination of toxicants of exogenous and endogenous origin. This article discusses the phase I and phase II detoxification and biotransformation pathways and promotes using food to support these highly complex processes. The author identifies the comprehensive elimination diet as a useful therapeutic tool for clinicians and patients to use to achieve detoxification. Using this diet, the patient removes the most common allergenic foods and beverages from the diet and replaces them with nonallergenic choices for a period of 4 wk, gradually adding back the eliminated foods and observing their effects. Another effective clinical tool that the author discusses is the detox-focused core food plan, which identifies the variety of foods required to supply key nutrients that can maximize the effectiveness of detoxification. Finally, the author provides a case study in which these tools were used to help a patient suffering from major, debilitating illnesses that resulted from exposure to malathion, including severe vomiting and diarrhea, headaches, night sweats, severe arthralgias and myalgias, episcleritis, and shortness of breath. The article details the interventions used and the clinical results (ie, successful resolution of most issues after 3 mo).

  20. Is There a Renaissance of Glucocorticoids in Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J R; Gunasekera, Wma

    2017-10-01

    The first therapeutic use of glucocorticoids was in a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis and the symptomatic benefit was astounding. Adverse effects from increasingly large doses led to them being overshadowed, dismissed as inappropriate treatment, and ignored for 20 years - but in the last 2 decades, the accumulating evidence and clinical practice suggest there is a justified renaissance in their use as a first-line treatment. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Sabbatical leaves for nurse-midwives in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, K C

    1993-01-01

    The demands of clinical practice seldom allow for time to pursue academic writing, teaching, or the development of individual advanced skills. The burnout rate in professions such as nurse-midwifery cannot be ignored. This article describes how one nurse-midwifery clinical practice implemented a short, rotating sabbatical; specific goals and guidelines are presented. It concludes that a sabbatical leave can be considered as one of many job-related benefits.

  2. Analysis of Closed Claims in the Clinical Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Otaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of malpractice claims associated with RA management, including the high frequency of medication-related allegations, breakdowns in the assessment process, and high claim numbers among patients older than 60 years, suggest the importance of caution exercised by physicians when administering immunosuppressants for the clinical treatment of RA.

  3. Comparative study of a therapeutic program of goldsalts v.s. D-Penicillamin controlled by scintigraphic, clinical and laboratory dates in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerwald, K.; Krebber, K.; Kriegel, W.

    1978-01-01

    The hand joints of 22 rheumatoid arthritis patients were examined by means of a scintigraphic investigation, introducing 99 mTc-pyrophosphate at the beginning of, and end of a sixth month period during which a therapy of goldsalts, respectively D-Penicillamine was given. To compare the chenges of activity, during therapy, we used a quantitative scintigraphic method of local tracer accumulation, conparing laboratory and clinical results. The quantitative analysis of the scintigraphic results correlated with the clinical findings, which allowed a measurable course of observation. Differences in the effect of this therapy did not arise. The MCP-joints of the finger were more frequently afflicted. (orig.) [de

  4. Five-year Safety Data from 5 Clinical Trials of Subcutaneous Golimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jonathan; Fleischmann, Roy; Keystone, Edward; Hsia, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Benjamin; Zhou, Yiying; Goldstein, Neil; Braun, Jürgen

    2016-12-01

    Assess 5-year golimumab (GOL) safety in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Subcutaneous (SC) GOL (50 mg or 100 mg every 4 weeks) was evaluated in phase 3 trials of patients with active RA, PsA, and AS. Safety data through Year 5 were pooled across 3 RA trials [1 each evaluating methotrexate (MTX)-naive, MTX-experienced, and antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-experienced patients], 1 PsA trial, and 1 AS trial. Data summarized was derived from both placebo-controlled (through weeks 24-52) and uncontrolled study periods. For adverse events (AE) of special interest [serious infections (SI), opportunistic infections (OI), deaths, malignancies, demyelination, tuberculosis (TB)], incidence per 100 patient-years (pt-yrs) was determined. Across all trials, 639 patients received placebo and 2228 received SC GOL 50 mg only (n = 671), 50 mg and 100 mg (n = 765), or 100 mg only (n = 792). Safety followup extended for averages of 28.5 and 203.2 weeks for placebo and GOL, respectively. Respective placebo and GOL AE incidence/100 pt-yrs (95% CI) through Year 5 were 4.86 (2.83-7.78) and 3.29 (2.92-3.69) for SI, 0.00 (0.00-0.86) and 0.23 (0.14-0.35) for TB, 0.00 (0.00-0.86) and 0.22 (0.13-0.34) for OI, 0.00 (0.00-0.86) and 0.10 (0.05-0.20) for lymphoma, 0.00 (0.00-0.86) and 0.08 (0.03-0.17) for demyelination, and 0.29 (0.01-1.59) and 0.41 (0.29-0.57) for death. TB, OI, lymphoma, and demyelination incidence appeared to be higher among patients receiving GOL 100 mg only. SC GOL safety through Year 5 remained consistent with previously reported Year 3 findings and with other TNF antagonists. Numerically higher incidences of TB, OI, lymphoma, and demyelination were observed with 100 mg versus 50 mg. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: NCT00264537 (GO-BEFORE), NCT00264550 (GO-FORWARD), NCT00299546 (GO-AFTER), NCT00265096 (GO-REVEAL), and NCT00265083 (GO-RAISE).

  5. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  6. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ray

    2017-09-27

    Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  7. NEUROSYPHILIS IN THERAPEUTIC PRACTICE: CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a clinical case of neurosyphilis diagnosed in a therapeutic inpatient facility.Materials and methods. Female patient T., 61, was hospitalized in the therapeutic department of a general hospital with referral diagnosis of “Stage II hypertensive heart disease, risk 4. Hypertensive crisis of 03.12.2015” with complaints of general fatigue, episodes of transient memory loss with full recovery, unstable blood pressure level. The patient was examined: She underwent treponemal and nontreponemal serological tests for antibodies against Treponema рallidum, hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus; electrocardiogram; angiography of carotid and vertebral arteries; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI  of the brain with contrast; serological and microscopic examinations of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.Results. The patient»s medical history described episodes of transient global amnesia with full memory recovery, more frequent in the last year; arterial hypertension; chronic urinary tract infection; and chronic cholecystitis with frequent courses of antibacterial therapy (ceftriaxone. Since 1986, a positive serological reaction for syphilis was observed (Wassermann reaction (WR +++ due to a history of primary syphilis. Considering reliable history of syphilis, positive serum confirmation tests for syphilis (nontreponemal: rapid plasma reagin test 3+; treponemal: passive hemagglutination reaction 4+, antibodies against T. pallidum (total – present, history of neuropsychological symptoms (transient amnesia and acute neurological symptoms before hospitalization (transient ischemic attack, brain MRI data (2 lesions of cerebral circulation disorders of ischemic type in the cortical branches of left and right mesencephalic arteries, a diagnosis of neurosyphilis was proposed, and lumbar puncture was performed for confirmation. Inflammatory characteristics of the CSF (cytosis 19/3, neutrophilia up to 12 cells, insignificant lymphocytosis up

  8. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  9. Variation in clinical practice: forests and trees revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Christopher J D; Naylor, C David; Detsky, Allan S

    2017-09-01

    Variations in clinical practice are commonly viewed as a sign of uneven quality of care and attributed to provider self-interest. However, patient preferences, physician practice patterns, and diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainty also cause variations. Greater attention to both doctor-patient interactions and limits to the available evidence might enable more effective assessment and improvement of health-care quality.

  10. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  11. Topical steroids in the current clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Belousova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues related to current criteria for selection of glucocorticosteroids for external use as the basic therapy for a great number of allergic and inflammatory skin diseases. The authors emphasize that non-fluorinated GCSs having the best efficacy-to-safety ratio must be the drugs of first choice. The article provides data on a positive clinical experience of using a non-halogenated glucocorticosteroid for external use - hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (Laticort - for treatment of steroid-sensitive dermatoses in children and adults. The drug has a high anti-inflammatory action and minimum risk of the development of side effects, which is sufficient for using it in sensitive areas of skin (face, neck, folds, genitals both in children and in adults. The availability of three forms of the drug (solution, cream and ointment ensures the expedience and convenience of its application at any stage of the inflammatory process and for any localization.

  12. Ketamine use in current clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mei; Rejaei, Damoon; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    After nearly half a century on the market, ketamine still occupies a unique corner in the medical armamentarium of anesthesiologists or clinicians treating pain. Over the last two decades, much research has been conducted highlighting the drug's mechanisms of action, specifically those of its enantiomers. Nowadays, ketamine is also being utilized for pediatric pain control in emergency department, with its anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects being revealed in acute and chronic pain management. Recently, new insights have been gained on ketamine's potential anti-depressive and antisuicidal effects. This article provides an overview of the drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics while also discussing the potential benefits and risks of ketamine administration in various clinical settings. PMID:27018176

  13. Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yuka; Tan, Jerry; Baibergenova, Akerke; Barankin, Benjamin; Cochrane, Chris L; Humphrey, Shannon; Lynde, Charles W; Marcoux, Danielle; Poulin, Yves; Rivers, Jason K; Sapijaszko, Mariusz; Sibbald, R Gary; Toole, John; Ulmer, Marcie; Zip, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic facial inflammatory dermatosis characterized by background facial erythema and flushing and may be accompanied by inflammatory papules and pustules, cutaneous fibrosis and hyperplasia known as phyma, and ocular involvement. These features can have adverse impact on quality of life, and ocular involvement can lead to visual dysfunction. The past decade has witnessed increased research into pathogenic pathways involved in rosacea and the introduction of novel treatment innovations. The objective of these guidelines is to offer evidence-based recommendations to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis and management of rosacea. These guidelines were developed by an expert panel of Canadian dermatologists taking into consideration the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the quality of supporting evidence, the values and preferences of patients, and the costs of treatment. The 2015 Cochrane review "Interventions in Rosacea" was used as a source of clinical trial evidence on which to base the recommendations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. [Lymphedema of the head in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, K

    1993-08-01

    In the Feldberg clinic Dr. Asdonk in St. Blasien we treat primary and secondary lymphedemas of the head with the "Manual lymphdrainage according to Vodder-Asdonk." Secondary lymphedemas are a result of cancer therapy or are caused of tumors or their metastases respectively. A successful therapy is possible at primary lymphedemas of head or lymphedemas following an inflammation or an injury. If the cancer increases unstoppable the so-called "malignant lymphedema" not always decreases. Nevertheless we should treat with manual lymphdrainage therapy because if we do it not the lymphedema increases also unstoppable and it means a disaster for the patient. The manual lymphdrainage therapy is the only treatment we can do. Diuretics are only an indication in the final phase of the malignant lymphedema of the head because they do not take away the protein out of the interstitial tissue and so the edema becomes all the more.

  15. Clinical practice in BNCT to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Our concept of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is to selectively destroy tumour cells using the high LET particles yielded from the 10B(n,α)7Li reactions. The effort of clinical investigators has concentrated on how to escalate the radiation dose at the target point. BNCT in Japan combines thermal neutrons and BSH (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH). The radiation dose is determined by the neutron fluence at the target point and the boron concentration in the tumour tissue. According to the recent analysis, the ratio of boron concentration (BSH) in tumour tissue and blood is nearly stable at around 1.2 to 1.69. Escalation of the radiation dose was carried out by means of improving the penetration of the thermal neutron beam. Since 1968, 175 patients with glioblastoma (n=83), anaplastic astrocytoma (n=44), low grade astrocytoma (n=16) or other types of tumour (n=32) were treated by BNCT at 5 reactors (HTR n=13, JRR-3 n=1, MulTR n=98, KUR n=30, JRR-2 n=33). The retrospective analysis revealed that the important factors related to the clinical results and QOL of the patients were minimum tumour volume radiation dose, more than 18Gy of physical dose and maximum vascular radiation dose (less than 15Gy) in the normal cortex. We have planned several trials to escalate the target radiation dose. One trial makes use of a cavity in the cortex following debulking surgery of the tumour tissue to improve neutron penetration. The other trial is introduction of epithermal neutron. KUR and JRR-4 were reconstructed and developed to be able to irradiate using epithermal neutrons. The new combination of surgical procedure and irradiation using epithermal neutrons should remarkably improve the target volume dose compared to the radiation dose treated by thermal neutrons. (author)

  16. Investigators' perspectives on translating human microbiome research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slashinski, M J; Whitney, S N; Achenbaum, L S; Keitel, W A; McCurdy, S A; McGuire, A L

    2013-01-01

    Human microbiome research has the potential to transform the practice of medicine, fundamentally shifting the ways in which we think not only about human health, illness and disease, but also about clinical practice and public health interventions. Drawing from a larger qualitative study on ethical, legal and social dimensions of human microbiome research, in this article, we document perspectives related to the translation of human microbiome research into clinical practice, focusing particularly on implications for health, illness and disease. We conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews (2009-2010) with 63 researchers and National Institutes of Health project leaders ('investigators') involved with human microbiome research. The interviews explored a range of ethical, legal and social implications of human microbiome research, including investigators' perspectives on potential strategies for translating findings to clinical practice. Using thematic content analysis, we identified and analyzed emergent themes and patterns. We identified 3 themes: (1) investigators' general perspectives on the clinical utility of human microbiome research, (2) investigators' perspectives on antibiotic use, overuse and misuse, and (3) investigators' perspectives concerning future challenges of translating data to clinical practice. The issues discussed by investigators concerning the clinical significance of human microbiome research, including embracing a new paradigm of health and disease, the importance of microbial communities, and clinical utility, will be of critical importance as this research moves forward. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Investigators’ Perspectives on Translating Human Microbiome Research into Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slashinski, Melody J.; Whitney, Simon N.; Achenbaum, Laura S.; Keitel, Wendy A.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.; McGuire, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human microbiome research has the potential to transform the practice of medicine, fundamentally shifting the ways in which we think not only about human health, illness, and disease, but also about clinical practice and public health interventions. Drawing from a larger qualitative study on ethical, legal, and social dimensions of human microbiome research, in this article we document perspectives related to the translation of human microbiome research into clinical practice, focusing particularly on implications for health, illness, and disease. Methods We conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews (2009–2010) with 63 researchers and National Institutes of Health project leaders (“investigators”) involved with human microbiome research. Interviews explored a range of ethical, legal, and social implications of human microbiome research, including investigators’ perspectives on potential strategies for translating findings to clinical practice. Using thematic content analysis, we identified and analyzed emergent themes and patterns. Results We identified three themes: (1) Investigators’ general perspectives on the clinical utility of human microbiome research, (2) Investigators’ perspectives on antibiotic use, overuse, and misuse, and (3) Investigators’ perspectives concerning future challenges of translating data to clinical practice. Conclusion The issues discussed by investigators concerning the clinical significance of human microbiome research, including embracing a new paradigm of health and disease, the importance of microbial communities, and clinical utility, will be of critical importance as this research moves forward. PMID:23615375

  18. Epidemiological profile of colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a specialized care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Fernández-Avila, Daniel; Jiménez, Ruth; Cardozo, Rosa; Marín, Andrés; Soler, María Del Pilar; Gómez, Olga; Ruiz, Oscar

    Few studies report the epidemiological profile of RA patients attending clinics for comprehensive care. We describe the clinical, socio-demographic characteristics and comorbidities of a cohort of patients with RA. Cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients according to ACR criteria/EULAR 2010 classification who have entered to the AR clinic since October 2012 until May 2014, referred from primary care. Frequencies for socio-demographic, comorbidity, state of disease activity, functional status, biomarkers and therapeutic modalities variables are described. In total, 1652 patients were included with a mean age of 58 years and a duration of 9 years. Rheumatoid factor was positive in 80% and anti-citrullinated peptide antibody in 63% of patients. In total, 43.6% of patients had comorbidities: Hypertension (20.4%), osteoporosis (17.3%) and Sjögren's syndrome (10.4%). Fifty percent of the patients had moderate and high disease activity level measured by DAS-28 score, and the mean HAQ score was 0.64 (DS 1.12). Seventy three percent of patients were treated with oral disease modified anti rheumatic treatment and 63.6% of them were with methotrexate. 42.4% of the patients were treated with glucocorticoids (mean dose 6.3mg). The epidemiological behavior of a group of RA patients is reported. The presence of comorbidities is significant affecting the risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The definition of the epidemiological profile of this population will allow the design of research questions to resolve outstanding problems in the clinical context of this pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Peripheral blood leptin and resistin levels as clinical activity biomarkers in Mexican Rheumatoid Arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Rivera-Bahena, Carolina; Xibillé-Friedmann, Daniel-Xavier; González-Christen, Judith; Carrillo-Vázquez, Sandra Miriam; Montiel-Hernández, José Luis

    To evaluate the association between the clinical activity of RA patients and serum adipocytokines (Leptin, Adiponectin and Resistin) and inflammatory cytokines. All RA patients fulfilled ACR 1987 criteria and were treated with DMARDs. Adipocytokine and inflammatory cytokine levels were evaluated using ELISA. 121 patients were included in the study. Stratifying according to DAS28 (low, moderate and high activity), there were significant differences for Leptin, Resistin, IL-6 and IL-17, however, no differences were seen for Adiponectin, TNFα or IL-1β. Clinical activity positively correlated with Leptin, Resistin, IL-17 and IL-6 levels, but not with Adiponectin, TNFα or IL-1β. Adiponectin levels negatively correlated with TNFα and positively correlated with IL-1β. IL-1β positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with TNFα and IL-17. Circulating Leptin, Resistin, IL-6 and IL-17 levels positively correlate with RA clinical activity in a manner independent of the subject's BMI. Complex relationships between inflammatory cytokines were observed in RA patients suggesting that other metabolic or inflammatory factors could be involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  1. Complex rehabilitation and the clinical condition of working rheumatoid arthritis patients: does cryotherapy always overtop traditional rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna; Pacholec, Anna; Jędryka-Góral, Anna; Bugajska, Joanna; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Kowalik, Katarzyna; Pawłowska-Cyprysiak, Karolina; Łastowiecka-Moras, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    traditional approach showed decreased disease activity following the initial 3-week period; however, this improvement did not sustain to the end of follow-up, 3 months later. Complex rehabilitation in RA has a positive effect on patients' clinical condition. The rehabilitation programme that includes cryotherapy overtops traditional rehabilitation, particularly as regards improvement in locomotor function, disease activity and sustaining willingness to continue working and exerts long-lasting effect. Rehabilitation using cryotherapy is more effective in improving locomotor function, decreasing disease activity and sustaining willingness to continue working compared to traditional rehabilitation. Rehabilitation using cryotherapy significantly reduces the intensity of pain experienced by patients with RA, and this positive effect is maintained at 3 months post-rehabilitation. Complex rehabilitation, particularly treatment using cryotherapy, improves patients' subjective assessment of their overall well-being and perception of their disease. Complex rehabilitation in rheumatoid arthritis has a positive effect on patients' clinical condition.

  2. [Direct clinical practice: conceptual analysis. Central competence for the development of advanced nursing practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardavila Belio, Miren Idoia; Vivar, Cristina G; Canga Armayor, Navidad

    2013-05-01

    The recent implementation in Spain of post degree in nursing has made possible the emergence of new advanced profiles, which direct clinical practice is the core competence. To analyse and clarify the term of direct clinical practice. A conceptual analysis was carried out based on Rogers's evolutionary approach. A review of the literature was made in the following data bases: PubMed, CINAHL, ISI Web of Knowledge, Psych INFO (Ovid) and Cochrane Library. Furthermore, five books about advanced practice nursing were revised. 7 articles and 4 books based on the inclusion criteria were selected. After their analysis the concept of direct clinical practice is defined. This paper clarifies the concept of direct clinical practice and helps to have a stronger base of knowledge. This will serve as foundation to improve and perfect the conceptualization of this term.

  3. Pasteurella multocida infectious arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, P J

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small gram-negative rod, is a domestic animal saprophyte that occasionally causes disease in humans. Infectious arthritis may develop from a superficial animal bite or scratch. Nine previous cases of infectious arthritis due to this organism have been documented in the literature, and a tenth case is reported here. Most patients had recent animal exposure, and half the patients had underlying chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical signs of inflammation were consistently present; however, systemic infection was infrequent. The lack of positive synovial fluid gram-stain smears may make differentiation from other forms of infectious arthritis difficult. Penicillin in moderate doses is effective therapy, with osteomyelitis developing in only two patients. The tendency for this syndrome to affect patients with rheumatoid arthritis may reflect deficient local defense mechanisms, chronic steroid therapy, or increased ownership of pets. The mechanism of spread of infection to the joint space appears to be through contiguous spread from a skin site rather than by the hematogenous route in most cases.

  4. Detection and clinical significance of rheumatoid factor, anti -CCP antibody , immunoglobulin and cytokines in serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ya Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the content of rheumatoid factor, ring citrulline peptide antibody (CCP, immunoglobulin (Ig and cytokines in serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and explore the clinical application value of serum indexes for RA diagnosis, treatment and prognostic.Methods: A total of 98 patients with RA were selected, of which 52 cases in the activity and 46 patients in remission, 65 healthy people as controls. Contents of serum RF and Ig (IgM, IgG, IgA in every group were detected by methods of immune scattering turbidimetry respectively; the content of serum anti-CCP antibody and cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 were measured by methods of enzyme-linked immunosorbent respectively. Change of detection index levels between groups were compared and the correlation between cytokines and RF, anti CCP, Ig and DAS28 score in patients with RA were analyzed. Results: The contents of serum RF, CCP antibody, Ig (IgM and IgG, IgA of RA group (activity and remission were respectively significantly higher than that of the control group (P0.05. The levels of cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ were positively correlated with RF, CCP antibody, Ig and DAS28 scores in RA activity while which were only positively correlated with DAS28 scores of RA in remission, and the IL-4 level had no significant correlation with other indicators. Conclusions: The detection of levels of RF, CCP antibody, Ig and cytokine for the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of RA has important reference value.

  5. Long term outcomes following achievement of clinically inactive disease in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie Jw; Verstappen, Suzanne Mm; McDonagh, Janet E; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, W; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2018-04-12

    Potential targets for treat-to-target strategies in JIA are minimal disease activity (MDA) and clinically inactive disease (CID). Short and long-term outcomes following achievement of MDA and CID on the cJADAS10 and CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria were compared. Children recruited to the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study, a UK multicentre inception cohort, were selected if recruited prior to January 2011 and diagnosed with oligoarthritis or rheumatoid factor negative or positive polyarthritis. At one year following diagnosis, children were assessed for MDA on the cJADAS10 and CID on both Wallace's preliminary criteria and the cJADAS10. Associations were tested between these disease states and i) functional ability, ii) absence of limited joints, iii) psychosocial health and v) pain at one year and annually to five years. Of 832 children, 70% were female and the majority had oligoarthritis (68%). At one year, 21% had achieved CID according to both definitions, 7% on Wallace's preliminary criteria only, 16% on cJADAS10 only and 56% on neither. Only 10% of children in the entire cohort achieved MDA without also having CID. Achieving either early CID state was associated with greater absence of limited joints. However, only CID on cJADAS10 was associated with improved functional ability and psychosocial health. Achieving CID was superior to MDA in terms of short and long-term pain and the absence of limited joints. CID on the cJADAS10 may be a preferable treatment target to CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria in terms of both feasibility of application and long-term outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, controlled clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei; Xiao, Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu

    2008-07-15

    To assess the efficacy and safety of chicken type II collagen (CCII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a prospective, 24-week, followup, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study of CCII (0.1 mg/day) versus MTX (10 mg/week) in patients with active RA. Clinical assessments were performed at screening and at 12, 18, and 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 236 RA patients were included; 211 patients (89.4%) completed the 24-week followup. In both groups there was a decrease in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire score, and investigator and patient assessment of function; all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level decreased. Rheumatoid factor did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 68.57% of patients in the CCII group and 83.02% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20), and 40.95% and 57.54%, respectively, met the ACR50 criteria. The ACR20 and ACR50 response rates in the CCII group were lower than those in the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in both groups. There were fewer and milder side effects in the CCII group than the MTX group. The difference in incidence of adverse events between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CCII is effective in the treatment of RA. CCII is well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events of CCII is lower than that of MTX.

  7. South African clinical practice guidelines: A landscape analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. South Africa (SA) is in the process of implementing National Health Insurance (NHI), which will require co-ordination of health provision across sectors and levels of care. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are tools for standardising and implementing care, and are intended to influence clinical ...

  8. Conducting research in clinical psychology practice: Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirsten V; Thew, Graham R

    2017-09-01

    The combination of clinical psychologists' therapeutic expertise and research training means that they are in an ideal position to be conducting high-quality research projects. However, despite these skills and the documented benefits of research to services and service users, research activity in practice remains low. This article aims to give an overview of the advantages of, and difficulties in conducting research in clinical practice. We reviewed the relevant literature on barriers to research and reflected on our clinical and research experiences in a range of contexts to offer practical recommendations. We considered factors involved in the planning, sourcing support, implementation, and dissemination phases of research, and outline suggestions to improve the feasibility of research projects in post-qualification roles. We suggest that research leadership is particularly important within clinical psychology to ensure the profession's continued visibility and influence within health settings. Clinical implications Emerging evidence suggests that clinical settings that foster research are associated with better patient outcomes. Suggestions to increase the feasibility of research projects in clinical settings are detailed. Limitations The present recommendations are drawn from the authors' practical experience and may need adaptation to individual practitioners' settings. This study does not attempt to assess the efficacy of the strategies suggested. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  9. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    taking place in clinical practice and try to align the educational efforts in school and clinical settings for the benefit of the students PERSPECTIVES It is known that students in medical education find that clinical learning experiences do not reinforce the communication skills they learn pre......-clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important......BACKGROUND The course was initiated by the midwifery department at University College North Denmark in cooperation with the leaders of the maternity units where the affiliated students have their clinical education. The purpose of the course was to enhance the quality of communication education...

  10. Mite allergen extracts and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Iraola, Víctor; Cho, Seong H; Esch, Robert E

    2017-03-01

    To provide physicians, researchers, and other interested health care professionals with information about how mite source materials and allergen extracts are manufactured, including the critical process parameters that can affect the final composition of allergenic extracts available for clinical use. A PubMed search was performed using focused keywords combined with relevant regulatory documents and industry guidelines. The information obtained through literature and specialized books was evaluated and combined with the personal expertise and experience of the authors. Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus are the primary species responsible for allergen sensitizations and allergy symptoms in genetically predisposed individuals. Storage mites belonging to the families Glycyphagidae, Echimyopodidae, and Acaridae can also be relevant sources of indoor mite allergens. The cultivation and purification processes used to produce mite raw materials play a critical role in the final composition of mite allergen extracts. Mite extract standardization in the United States is based on total allergenic activity with respect to a single national standard, whereas in Europe consistency is ensured by in-house standards and international references. Because of the limitation of allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy for patients with severe allergic rhinitis and asthma, house dust mite subcutaneous immunotherapy or sublingual immunotherapy can be an invaluable treatment option for them. Differences in manufacturing processes and extract standardization approaches may lead to differences in extract quality and potency. Physicians should be aware of these potential sources of mite extract variability. Use of well-standardized house dust mite extracts would be critical for success in the diagnosis and treatment of house dust mite allergy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  11. Multicenter study of radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical outcome in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, H.; Lohmann, K.; Spitz, J.; Franke, C.; Goretzki, G.; Lemb, M.A.; Mueller, J.; Panholzer, P.J.; Stelling, E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: evaluation of the effectiveness of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis versus rheumatoid arthritis by means of a standardized questionnaire. Patients, methods: 803 RSO treatments were monitored in 691 patients by standardized questionnaires of 7 centers in 3 countries. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to their age (20-40, 41-60, 61-80 years). Additionally, the data were analyzed separately for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (group A) and those with osteoarthritis, psoriasis arthritis, pigmental villonodular synovitis or persistent effusions after joint replacement (group B). Results: ameliorations of joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility were found in 80% of group A and 56% of group B (p [de

  12. American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism Preliminary Definition of Remission in Rheumatoid Arthritis for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T.; Smolen, Josef S.; Wells, George; Zhang, Bin; van Tuyl, Lilian H. D.; Funovits, Julia; Aletaha, Daniel; Allaart, Renée; Bathon, Joan; Bombardieri, Stefano; Brooks, Peter; Brown, Andrew; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Choi, Hyon; Combe, Bernard; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Furst, Dan; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Hawker , Gillian; Keystone, Edward; Khanna, Dinesh; Kirwan, John; Kvien, Tore; Landewé, Robert; Listing, Joachim; Michaud, Kaleb; Mola, Emilio Martin; Montie, Pam; Pincus, Ted; Richards, Pam; Siegel, Jeff; Simon, Lee; Sokka, Tuulikki; Strand, Vibeke; Tugwell, Peter; Tyndall, Alan; van der Heijde, Desirée; Verstappen, Suzan; White, Barbara; Wolfe, Fred; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Background With remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) an increasingly attainable goal, there is no widely used definition of remission that is stringent but achievable and could be applied uniformly as an outcome in clinical trials. Methods A committee consisting of members of the American College of Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Initiative (OMERACT) met to guide the process and review prespecified analyses from clinical trials of patients with RA. The committee requested a stringent definition (little, if any, active disease) and decided to use core set measures to define remission including at least joint counts and an acute phase reactant. Members were surveyed to select the level of each core set measure consistent with remission. Candidate definitions of remission were tested including those that constituted a number of individual measures in remission (Boolean approach) as well as definitions using disease activity indexes. To select a definition of remission, trial data were analyzed to examine the added contribution of patient reported outcomes and the ability of candidate measures to predict later good x-ray and functional outcomes. Results Survey results for the definition of remission pointed to indexes at published thresholds and to a count of core set measures with each measure scored as 1 or less (e.g. tender and swollen joint counts, CRP and global assessments on 0-10 scale). Analyses suggested the need to include a patient reported measure. Examination of 2 year follow-up data suggested that many candidate definitions performed comparably in terms of predicting later good x-ray and functional outcomes, although DAS28 based measures of remission did not predict good radiographic outcomes as well as did the other candidate definitions. Given these and other considerations, we propose that a patient be defined as in remission based on one of two definitions : 1: When their scores on the

  13. Use of clinical practice guidelines to promote best practice when managing clinical interventions for liver transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Maree

    2009-06-01

    Limited organ availability and an increasing demand for organ transplantation has extended transplant waiting times and thus increased morbidity and mortality for potential recipients on waiting lists. The Queensland Liver Transplant Service identified use of clinical practice guidelines developed from evidence-based practice as a strategic clinical management/workflow tool that could improve clinical outcomes for patients awaiting liver transplant. An extensive review of publications related to the management of advanced liver disease in potential transplant recipients was undertaken and the supporting evidence was identified. In all stages of development of the guidelines, the multidisciplinary collaborative team of clinicians used recommended principles from The Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation collaboration. The liver transplant recipient coordinator acted as facilitator for the project, identifying positive factors and resolving obstacles. Key focus areas in optimizing medical management before liver transplant were identified with the aim of preventing disease progression and complications that would jeopardize patients' outcome. Clinical practice guidelines were developed for each key area to optimize care by promoting appropriate timing of clinical interventions. Practices that required change to comply with identified best practice were investigated, and clinical practice for the outpatient medical management of potential liver transplant recipients with chronic liver disease were developed collaboratively. These guidelines have been accepted and are being implemented within the gastroenterology and hepatology department at the Princess Alexandra Hospital.

  14. Machine learning on Parkinson's disease? Let's translate into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasa, Antonio

    2016-06-15

    Machine learning techniques represent the third-generation of clinical neuroimaging studies where the principal interest is not related to describe anatomical changes of a neurological disorder, but to evaluate if a multivariate approach may use these abnormalities to predict the correct classification of previously unseen clinical cohort. In the next few years, Machine learning will revolutionize clinical practice of Parkinson's disease, but enthusiasm should be turned down before removing some important barriers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Practical Approach for the Clinical Use of Dopamine Transporter Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine transporter imaging is useful in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and the most successful technique in the clinical use of neuroreceptor imaging. Recently, several radiopharmaceuticals including I-123 FP-CIT, Tc-99m TRODAT, and F-18 FP-CIT for dopamine transporter imaging have been approved for the routine clinical use in several European countries, Taiwan and Korea, respectively. This review summarized the practical issue for the routine clinical examination of dopamine transporter imaging

  16. Clinical learning spaces: Crucibles for practice development in physiotherapy clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Narelle; Higgs, Joy; Smith, Megan

    2018-08-01

    This paper, through a deep examination of clinical workplaces as learning spaces, uses a holistic interpretation of clinical education and offers a practice development crucible metaphor as a useful way to deepen how clinical education can be conceptualized. An in-depth conceptualization of clinical education is needed if educators are able to develop wise educational practice and optimize the time students spend in clinical learning settings. The research reported here was undertaken in the qualitative paradigm guided by philosophical hermeneutics. Data collection strategies included observation, semi-structured interviews, focus groups and photo-elicitation. Twenty-four undergraduate physiotherapy students and twelve physiotherapy clinical supervisors participated in this research. Consistent with hermeneutic principles of dialogue of question and answer and hermeneutic circle, data analysis was achieved through an iterative process of reading, interpreting and re-reading the transcripts resulting in the emergence of a deeper understanding of clinical education that is represented for the reader. Clinical education has been revealed as a multidimensional learning space where workplace influences, engagement in professional practices, clinical supervisors' intentions and actions in combination with students' dispositions interact to shape and challenge students' clinical learning. A practice development crucible metaphor has been introduced as a way to represent this complexity and conceptualize clinical education, not as a set of techniques or supervision ratios but as a relational, fluid, complex space where learning is catalyzed. Importantly, the crucible metaphor assists academics, clinical supervisors and students to harness the power of clinical education to facilitate learning during clinical placements.

  17. Exchange students crossing language boundaries in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, K

    2011-12-01

    This article examines challenges and learning outcomes for nursing students from a Central European university of applied sciences who completed 3 months of clinical practice in Norway. The clinical practice was supervised in English by Norwegian nurses and nursing teachers. English is not the primary language in any of the countries. Increases in global migration have contributed to the need for an international dimension in nursing education. Personal mobility is a crucial part of the European Union's goal of becoming a knowledge society. Clinically based experiences pose challenges that are additional to and often more complex than traditional course-based experiences. Students who come from a non-English-speaking country for clinical practice in Norway face challenges regarding language. Accepting incoming students is a way of achieving higher quality and more relevant education in nursing. The study shows that clinical practice in a foreign country gives added value compared with clinical practice at home. Greater self-confidence and understanding of core concepts in nursing is described by the participants. Language differences are not regarded as a problem but as a way of developing personal and professional competence. The ability to compare healthcare systems in the two counties is important in developing competencies in nursing. © 2011 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  20. Clinical Guidelines and Implementation into Daily Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliz Nigar Guncu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to assess the extent of the familiarity, attitude and perceptions of dental professionals regarding clinical dental guidelines and their implementation into daily dental practice. Material and Methods: For this purpose, a questionnaire which was developed by the members of the World Dental Federation, European Regional Organization Working Group − ‘Relation Between Dental Practitioner and Universities’, was implemented by the National Dental Associations of six European Regional Organization-zone countries (Georgian Stomatological Association - Georgia, Associazione Nazionale Dentisti Italiani - Italy, Portuguese Dental Association - Portugal, Russian Dental Association - Russia, Swiss Dental Association - Switzerland, and Turkish Dental Association - Turkey. The questionnaire was filled by a total of 910 dental professionals who are members of one of these national dental associations and who voluntarily wanted to participate to this survey. Results: Most of the survey participants were familiar with clinical dental guidelines (68%, claimed that they implemented them into daily practice (61.7%, and generally acknowledged their benefits (81.8%. Many participants believed that clinical dental guidelines could help to improve the clinical treatment plan (50.6 % and the accuracy of diagnosis (39.4%; which increased with age and years of practice (p < 0.05. The most frequently perceived barrier to the effective implementation of clinical dental guidelines was expressed as ‘lack of awareness’, while participants suggested a role for national dental associations in spreading clinical dental guidelines. Discussion: A better understanding of the perceptions and attitudes of dentists towards clinical dental guidelines and the potential impact of factors affecting such perceptions and attitudes may be of particular importance for attempts aiming at overcoming the barriers for effective implementation of

  1. Can experiential-didactic training improve clinical STD practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisbach, Susan; Devine, Sharon; Fitch, John; Anderson, Teri; Lee, Terry; Rietmeijer, Cornelis; Corbett, Kitty K

    2011-06-01

    High rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) present an ongoing costly public health challenge. One approach to reduce STD transmission is to increase the number of clinicians adopting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's STD Treatment Guidelines. This evaluation assesses the effectiveness of a 3-day experiential and didactic training to translate recommendations into practice by increasing clinician knowledge and skills and helping participants anticipate and overcome barriers to implementation. Between 2001 and 2004, 110 direct care clinicians from 10 states participated in one of 27 standardized 3-day interactive trainings offered by the Denver STD/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Prevention Training Center. STD/HIV knowledge and clinical skills were measured before, immediately after, and 6 months after training. Practice patterns were assessed before training and after 6 months. Structural barriers to implementation were identified 6 months post-training. Trainees demonstrated significant post-training gains in mean knowledge scores immediately post-training (P STD risk assessment, clinical examination, diagnosis, and treatment. Self-reported improvement in practice patterns was significant for 23 of 35 practices (P STD/HIV training can modestly improve knowledge, clinical skills, and implementation of STD recommended practices 6 months after training. Further research is needed to identify the impact of improved clinical practices on STD/HIV transmission.

  2. Public health interventions for arthritis: expanding the toolbox of evidence-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Teresa J; Jernick, Susan L; Hootman, Jennifer M; Sniezek, Joseph E

    2009-12-01

    Since 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Arthritis Program has worked to improve the quality of life for people with arthritis, in part by funding state health departments to disseminate physical activity (PA) and self-management education (SME) interventions. Initially, only one SME and two PA interventions were considered evidence-based and appropriate for people with arthritis. The purposes of this article are to describe the processes and criteria used to screen new or existing intervention programs and report the results of that screening, including an updated list of recommended intervention programs. A series of three sets of screening criteria was created in consultation with subject matter experts: arthritis appropriateness, adequacy of the evidence base, and implementability as a public health intervention. Screening interventions were categorized as Recommended, Promising Practices, Watch List, Future Possibility, or Unlikely to Meet criteria based on how well the intervention met the screening criteria. A total of 15 packaged PA interventions and six SME interventions were screened. Three PA and three SME interventions met all three sets of criteria and were added to the list of recommended public health interventions for use by CDC-funded state arthritis programs. An additional two SME interventions are developing the infrastructure for public health dissemination and were categorized as Promising Practices, and six PA interventions have evaluations underway and are on the Watch List. The CDC Arthritis Program identified arthritis-appropriate interventions that can be used effectively and efficiently in public health settings to improve the quality of life of people with arthritis. The screening criteria used offer a guide to intervention developers on necessary characteristics of interventions for use in public health settings. The expanded menu of interventions is beneficial to clinical care and public health professionals

  3. Leflunomide for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: Incidence and severity of hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, Eric N.; Jansen, Tim L.Th.A.; Houtman, Nella M.; Spoelstra, Piet; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Leflunomide is a novel disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Because of reports on possible hepatotoxicity and adaptations in the recommendations for monitoring liver function during leflunomide treatment, we conducted a study to evaluate the incidence and severity of

  4. Measurement error in the assessment of radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials: the smallest detectable change (SDC) revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Compán, V.; van der Heijde, D.; Ahmad, Harris A.; Miller, Colin G.; Wolterbeek, R.; Landewé, R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate if the mean smallest detectable change (SDC) of multiple time intervals using the Bland & Altman (B&A) levels of agreement (LoA) method is an appropriate surrogate for the generalisability analysis method for estimating the overall SDC of radiological progression in rheumatoid arthritis

  5. Serum Vaspin Levels Are Associated with the Development of Clinically Manifest Arthritis in Autoantibody-Positive Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijer, Karen I.; Neumann, Elena; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Drop, Daniël A. C. A. D.; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H.; Choi, Ivy Y. K.; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Tak, Paul P.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that overweight may increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in autoantibody positive individuals. Adipose tissue could contribute to the development of RA by production of various bioactive peptides. Therefore, we examined levels of adipokines in serum and

  6. Exploring a new ultrasound score as a clinical predictive tool in patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting abatacept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Boers, Maarten; Wakefield, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether changes in a composite ( power Doppler/greyscale ultrasound (PDUS)) synovitis score, developed by the OMERACT-EULAR-Ultrasound Task Force, predict disease activity outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA who were methotrexate inadequate resp...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  10. Falls and their association with physical tests, functional capacity, clinical and demographic factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Almeida Lourenço

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the occurrence of falls reported by rheumatoid arthritis patients and its relation to disease activity, functional capacity and physical fitness. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study constituted by a sample of 97 rheumatoid arthritis patients from the city of Marília (SP from 2012 to 2013, were assessed for disease activity. Instruments validated for Brazilian population in order to evaluate physical and functional capacity were used. Data analysis was carried out with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, considering p < 0.05. Results: 88.7% were female subjects with a mean age of 56 (±11.7 years. The median duration of rheumatoid arthritis was 10 years (P25 = 6 and P75 = 17 and the mean of disease activity was 3.6 (±1.3, what was considered a moderate activity. In the last 12 months 37.1% of patients experienced at least one fall, with a total of 52 episodes, and fear of falling was reported by 74.2% of them, but this was not associated to the occurrence of a fall (χ 2 = 1.19, p = 0.27. Gender, number of medications, age, disease activity, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, functional capacity, and physical tests showed no associations with history of falls in the past year. Conclusion: It was observed that the occurrence of falls and the fear of falling are quite common in this population. The occurrence of falls in this sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients bears no relation to disease activity, functional capacity, or physical fitness tests.

  11. Falls and their association with physical tests, functional capacity, clinical and demographic factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Mariana de Almeida; Roma, Izabela; Assis, Marcos Renato de

    To evaluate the occurrence of falls reported by rheumatoid arthritis patients and its relation to disease activity, functional capacity and physical fitness. A cross-sectional study constituted by a sample of 97 rheumatoid arthritis patients from the city of Marília (SP) from 2012 to 2013, were assessed for disease activity. Instruments validated for Brazilian population in order to evaluate physical and functional capacity were used. Data analysis was carried out with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, considering p<0.05. 88.7% were female subjects with a mean age of 56 (±11.7) years. The median duration of rheumatoid arthritis was 10 years (P25=6 and P75=17) and the mean of disease activity was 3.6 (±1.3), what was considered a moderate activity. In the last 12 months 37.1% of patients experienced at least one fall, with a total of 52 episodes, and fear of falling was reported by 74.2% of them, but this was not associated to the occurrence of a fall (χ 2 =1.19, p=0.27). Gender, number of medications, age, disease activity, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, functional capacity, and physical tests showed no associations with history of falls in the past year. It was observed that the occurrence of falls and the fear of falling are quite common in this population. The occurrence of falls in this sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients bears no relation to disease activity, functional capacity, or physical fitness tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. EFFICACY OF ETANERCEPT IN TREATMENT OF VARIOUS TYPES OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Konopel'ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess efficacy and safety of etanercept in treatment of various types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children under conditions of real clinical practice. Patients and methods: 52 children were included into the study, among them 16 were with systemic and 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. Results: etanercept treatment was the most efficient in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. In 6 and 12 months of the treatment 50 and 70% improvement according to the ACRpedi criteria were established in 31/36 (86% and 28/36 (78% of the patients, respectively. In 24 months in 5 (29% of 17 children remained in the study remission stage of the diseases was confirmed. Conclusions: etanercept treatment was not associated with significant unfavorable effects, which allows to recommend this drug for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvent and resistant to standard anti-rheumatic therapy.

  13. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.; Fleischmann, D.; Kiener, H.P.; Wiesmayr, M.N.; Herold, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Clinical education in private practice: an interdisciplinary project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubt, Lorna; Paterson, Margo; O'Riordan, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Education of rehabilitation professionals traditionally has occurred in acute care hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and other publicly funded institutions, but increasing numbers of rehabilitation professionals are now working in the community in private agencies and clinics. These privately owned clinics and community agencies represent underutilized resources for the clinical training of students. Historically, private practitioners have been less likely to participate in clinical education because of concerns over patient satisfaction and quality of care, workload, costs, and liability. Through a program funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario, we conducted a series of interviews and focus groups with private practitioners, which identified that several incentives could potentially increase the numbers of clinical placements in private practices, including participation in the development of student learning objectives related to private practice, professional recognition, and improved relationships with the university departments. Placement in private practices can afford students skills in administration, business management, marketing and promotion, resource development, research, consulting, networking, and medical-legal assessments and processes. This paper presents a discussion of clinical education issues from the perspective of private practitioners, based on the findings of a clinical education project undertaken at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and previous literature.

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain: Tips for Protecting Your Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis pain: Tips for protecting your joints Use these joint protection techniques to help you stay in control of your rheumatoid arthritis pain. By Mayo Clinic Staff Joint protection is ...

  16. 'Pastoral practices' for quality improvement in a Kenyan clinical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Gerry; Nzinga, Jacinta; English, Mike

    2017-12-01

    We explain social and organisational processes influencing health professionals in a Kenyan clinical network to implement a form of quality improvement (QI) into clinical practice, using the concept of 'pastoral practices'. Our qualitative empirical case study, conducted in 2015-16, shows the way practices constructing and linking local evidence-based guidelines and data collection processes provided a foundation for QI. Participation in these constructive practices gave network leaders pastoral status to then inscribe use of evidence and data into routine care, through championing, demonstrating, supporting and mentoring, with the support of a constellation of local champions. By arranging network meetings, in which the professional community discussed evidence, data, QI and professionalism, network leaders also facilitated the reconstruction of network members' collective professional identity. This consequently strengthened top-down and lateral accountability and inspection practices, disciplining evidence and audit-based QI in local hospitals. By explaining pastoral practices in this way and setting, we contribute to theory about governmentality in health care and extend Foucauldian analysis of QI, clinical networks and governance into low and middle income health care contexts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  18. Diabetes and pregnancy: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Ian; Hadar, Eran; Hadden, David R; Jovanovič, Lois; Mestman, Jorge H; Murad, M Hassan; Yogev, Yariv

    2013-11-01

    Our objective was to formulate a clinical practice guideline for the management of the pregnant woman with diabetes. The Task Force was composed of a chair, selected by the Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, 5 additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. One group meeting, several conference calls, and innumerable e-mail communications enabled consensus for all recommendations save one with a majority decision being employed for this single exception. Using an evidence-based approach, this Diabetes and Pregnancy Clinical Practice Guideline addresses important clinical issues in the contemporary management of women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes preconceptionally, during pregnancy, and in the postpartum setting and in the diagnosis and management of women with gestational diabetes during and after pregnancy.

  19. THE RESULTS OF A PHASE III COMPARATIVE CLINICAL TRIAL OF RITUXIMAB (ACELLBIA® AND MABTHERA® IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (THE BIORA STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nasonov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the results of an international multicenter randomized clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of the brand-name drug rituximab (MabThera, a monoclonal antibody against CD20 antigen of B cells, and its biosimi-lar drug (Acellbia® (the BIORA study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA refractory to therapy with tumor necrosis factor-а inhibitors.Objective: to provide evidence for the therapeutic equivalence of Acellbia® and MabThera® and also to assess their interchangeability.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled adult patients with active seropositive RA, who were randomized into two groups (1:1: 1 the patients who received Acellbia® 1000 mg intravenously on days 1 and 15; 2 those who had MabThera® in a similar way. When RA activity persisted at 24 weeks, there was re-randomization (1:1 with a partial overlap: Group 1 patients were randomized into group AA (the drug of the second therapy cycle was Acellbia® or Group AM (that was MabThera®, the similar methodology was followed in Group 2 (Groups MM and MA. Throughout the study, the patients received methotrexate at a stable dose of 7.5—25 mg/week and folic acid at a dose of 5 mg/week. The follow-up lasted 48 weeks.Results and discussion. 24 weeks after treatment initiation, the ACR20 response was observed in 84.1% of the patients in the Acellbia® group (95% CI, 74.75—90.50 and in 87% in the MabThera® group (95% CI, 77.71—92.79%; p = 0.773, which suggests that the drugs are therapeutically equivalent. In the second phase of the study, the efficiency of therapy remained high; there were no differences in Groups AA/MM, AA/AM and MM/MA. In both phases, the safety profile of the drugs was comparable; the immunogenicity of treatment remained low. The findings suggest that the brand-name MabThera® and its biosimilar drug Acellbia® are equivalent. Switching from the biosimilar drug to the brand-name one and vice versa has no negative impact on treatment

  20. Clinical neuropsychology in Israel: history, training, practice and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli; Hoofien, Dan

    2016-11-01

    This is an invited paper for a special issue on international perspectives on training and practice in clinical neuropsychology. We provide a review of the status of clinical neuropsychology in Israel, including the history of neuropsychological, educational, and accreditation requirements to become a clinical neuropsychologist and to practice clinical neuropsychology. The information is based primarily on the personal knowledge of the authors who have been practicing clinical neuropsychology for over three decades and hold various administrative and academic positions in this field. Second, we conducted three ad hoc surveys among clinical and rehabilitation psychologists; heads of academic programs for rehabilitation and neuropsychology; and heads of accredited service providers. Third, we present a literature review of publications by clinical neuropsychologists in Israel. Most of the clinical neuropsychologists are graduates of either rehabilitation or clinical training programs. The vast majority of neuropsychologists are affiliated with rehabilitation psychology. The training programs (2-3 years of graduate school) provide solid therapeutic and diagnostic skills to the students. Seventy-five percent of the participants in this survey are employed at least part-time by public or state-funded institutions. Israeli neuropsychologists are heavily involved in case management, including vocational counseling, and rehabilitation psychotherapy. Conclusions and future goals: Although clinical neuropsychologists in Israel are well educated and valued by all health professionals, there are still several challenges that must be addressed in order to further advance the field and the profession. These included the need for Hebrew-language standardized and normalized neuropsychological tests and the application of evidence-based interventions in neuropsychological rehabilitation.

  1. A model for ethical practices in clinical phonetics and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of clinical phonetics and linguistics as an area of scientific inquiry gives rise to the need for guidelines that define ethical and responsible conduct. The diverse membership of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association (ICPLA) and the readership of this journal are uniquely suited to consider ethical issues from diverse perspectives. Accordingly, this paper introduces a multi-tiered six-factor model for ethical practices to stimulate discussion of ethical issues.

  2. Long-term outcomes of treat-to-target strategy in established rheumatoid arthritis: a daily practice prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Nicole Pamplona Bueno; da Silva Chakr, Rafael Mendonça; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; Viecceli, Daniela; Correa, Ricardo Henrique Bilycz; de Oliveira Filho, Cilomar Martins; Brenol, Claiton Viegas

    2017-06-01

    To examine disease activity and physical function after implementation of treat-to-target (T2T) strategy in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over a long-term period. Patients with RA were started on a T2T strategy in 2005 and followed through 2014. Patients were seen every 3-4 months until remission/low disease activity was achieved and every 6 months thereafter. Disease activity was measured by the DAS28 and CDAI, and physical function by the HAQ-DI. Results were presented as all observed data, without imputation for missing values. Changes in disease activity and physical function were evaluated by generalized estimating equations (GEE). Two hundred and twenty-nine patients were included, with a mean (SD) disease duration of 10.6 (7.4) years. Significant improvements were seen in both composite scores during the follow-up period, as demonstrated by DAS28 (β coefficient = 0.19; 95% CI = 0.16-0.21; p rheumatoid arthritis from 2005 to 2014. Implementation of new therapeutic options, in the scenario of T2T strategy, was associated with improvement in disease activity and physical function.

  3. Clinical exome sequencing reports: current informatics practice and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Huang, Yungui; Astbury, Caroline; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara; Miller, Katherine; Cole, Justin; Bartlett, Christopher; Lin, Simon

    2017-11-01

    The increased adoption of clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) has improved the diagnostic yield for patients with complex genetic conditions. However, the informatics practice for handling information contained in whole exome reports is still in its infancy, as evidenced by the lack of a common vocabulary within clinical sequencing reports generated across genetic laboratories. Genetic testing results are mostly transmitted using portable document format, which can make secondary analysis and data extraction challenging. This paper reviews a sample of clinical exome reports generated by Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified genetic testing laboratories at tertiary-care facilities to assess and identify common data elements. Like structured radiology reports, which enable faster information retrieval and reuse, structuring genetic information within clinical WES reports would help facilitate integration of genetic information into electronic health records and enable retrospective research on the clinical utility of WES. We identify elements listed as mandatory according to practice guidelines but are currently missing from some of the clinical reports, which might help to organize the data when stored within structured databases. We also highlight elements, such as patient consent, that, although they do not appear within any of the current reports, may help in interpreting some of the information within the reports. Integrating genetic and clinical information would assist the adoption of personalized medicine for improved patient care and outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Intuition in Clinical Decision Making: Differences Among Practicing Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Hill, Pamela D

    2017-08-01

    To examine the relationships and differences in the use of intuition among three categories of practicing nurses from various clinical units at a medical center in the Midwest. Descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional, prospective design. Three categories of nurses were based on the clinical unit: medical/surgical nurses ( n = 42), step-down/progressive care nurses ( n = 32), and critical care nurses ( n = 24). Participants were e-mailed the Rew Intuitive Judgment Scale (RIJS) via their employee e-mail to measure intuition in clinical practice. Participants were also asked to rate themselves according to Benner's (novice to expert) proficiency levels. Nurses practicing at higher self-reported proficiency levels, as defined by Benner, scored higher on the RIJS. More years of clinical experience were associated with higher self-reported levels of nursing proficiency and higher scores on the RIJS. There were no differences in intuition scores among the three categories of nurses. Nurses have many options, such as the nursing process, evidence-based clinical decision-making pathways, protocols, and intuition to aid them in the clinical decision-making process. Nurse educators and development professionals have a responsibility to recognize and embrace the multiple thought processes used by the nurse to better the nursing profession and positively affect patient outcomes.

  5. Stressors for Spanish nursing students in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Garcia, Jose-Maria; Maestro-Gonzalez, Alba; Zuazua-Rico, David; Sánchez-Zaballos, Marta; Mosteiro-Diaz, Maria-Pilar

    2018-05-01

    Clinical practice is critical for nursing students to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to properly develop professionally. The presence of stress in clinical practice may negatively affect their training. To understand the extent to which clinical practice can be stressful for nursing students at a Spanish university and to determine the main stressors associated with the practice. Cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study conducted in 2016 at the two nursing colleges of the University of Oviedo, located in Oviedo and Gijón in the Principality of Asturias, Spain. A total of 450 nursing students at a Spanish university served as participants in this study from January to April 2016. A data collection sheet was developed to track different sociodemographic variables, and was distributed together with the KEZKAK questionnaire, a validated scale adapted to Spanish nursing students. It is composed of 41 items using a 4-point Likert scale, rating how much the described situation worries them from 0 ("Not at all") to 3 ("A lot"). Students were most concerned about issues relating to causing harm to patients and lack of competence. Women found clinical practice to be more stressful than men did, both in general terms (p < 0.001) and with respect to all individual factors included in the questionnaire. In addition, there were associations between the "lack of competence" factor and having a job simultaneously (p = 0.011), the "contact with suffering" factor and the school year (p = 0.018), and the "being harmed by the relationship with patients" factor and the age group (p = 0.013). Nursing students, particularly women, see clinical practice as "rather stressful", with the main stressors being those related to causing harm to patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sick leave and disability pension before and after initiation of antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neovius, M; Simard, J F; Klareskog, L; Askling, J

    2011-08-01

    To investigate sick leave and disability pension in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to the initiation of biological and non-biological antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice. Patients aged 19-60 years initiating non-biological mono (n=2796) or combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy (n=973), or biological agents (n=4787) were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register between 1999 and 2007. Sick leave and disability pension data (1995-2010) were retrieved from national registers. During the year before the start of mono DMARD, combination DMARD and biological treatment, 10%, 12% and 43% of patients received disability pension benefits, respectively. The corresponding combined annual sick leave and disability pension days were 78 (54+25), 132 (105+27) and 190 (79+111). Irrespective of treatment type, initiators were characterised by a history of increasing sick leave and disability pension. Treatment start was associated with a break in this trajectory: sick leave decreased while disability pension increased, resulting in a net stabilisation of total days. Higher levels of days on sick leave and disability pension at treatment start were observed in patients initiating biologics in 1999 (236 days/year) compared with 2007 (150 days/year; pleave and disability pension increased rapidly before the initiation of antirheumatic therapy, which was associated with a halt but not a reversal of this development. Work ability is a metric of importance for clinical practice, signalling large remaining needs in the RA population, and the need for intervention earlier in the disease process.

  7. Enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects assessed by ‘head-to-toe’ whole-body MRI and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Eshed, Iris; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the ability of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to detect axial and peripheral enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and in healthy subjects (HS). Furthermore, to develop MRI enthesitis indices based on WBMRI and validate...... these by use of clinical measures of disease activity. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional study of patients with PsA (n=18) and axSpA (n=18) with moderate to high disease activity, and HS (n=12). Enthesitis at 35 individual sites located at upper and lower limbs, chest and pelvis were evaluated by WBMRI...... and clinical examination, and compared. Three new WBMRI enthesitis indices were developed. RESULTS: WBMRI allowed evaluation of 888 (53%) of 1680 sites investigated, and 19 (54%) of 35 entheses had a readability >70%. The percentage agreement between WBMRI and clinical enthesitis was 49-100%, when compared...

  8. Advanced practice nurses' scope of practice: a qualitative study of advanced clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Anna-Lena; Mannevaara, Bodil; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2011-12-01

    To describe and explore Advanced Practice Nurses' clinical competencies and how these are expressed in clinical practice. Discussion concerning advanced clinical practice has been ongoing in the USA since the 1960s and in the UK since the late 1980s. Approximately 24 countries, excluding the USA, have implemented the role of Advance Practice Nurse (APN). In the Nordic countries, especially Sweden and Finland, APNs have been introduced in some organizations but their competency domains have not yet been clearly defined. The study's theoretical framework emanates from Aristotle's three-dimensional view of knowledge that is epistêmê, technê, and phronesis. Between October 2005 and January 2006, focus group interviews of Clinical Nurse Specialists who provide expert functions in pediatric, internal medicine, and surgical units (n = 26) and APN students (n = 8) were conducted. The data material was analyzed using inductive content analysis. Grouped into five main themes, the study results indicate that APNs possess advanced level clinical competencies in: (A) assessment of patients' caring needs and nursing care activities, (B) the caring relationship, (C) multi-professional teamwork, (D) development of competence and nursing care, and (E) leadership in a learning and caring culture. Clinical competencies consist of advanced skills, which typify an expanding role that offers new possibilities for holistic patient care practice. APNs' scope of practice is characterized by responsibility and competence in making autonomous judgments based on expanded clinical competence. On an advanced level, clinical competence consists not merely of advanced skills for assessing and meeting the needs of patients but also the creation of safe and trustful relationships with patients and collaboration with colleagues. APNs can realize advanced skills in their actions through their manner of knowing, doing, and being. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011

  9. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  10. Using Exenatide Twice Daily or Insulin in Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, Chantal; Ostenson, Claes-Göran; Matthaei, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    their first injectable, glucose-lowering therapy [exenatide twice daily (BID) or insulin] in clinical practice in six European countries and evaluated outcomes during the study. METHODS: CHOICE was a 24-month, prospective, noninterventional observational study. Patients were invited to participate in CHOICE...... only after their treating physician had made the clinical decision to initiate first injectable therapy with either exenatide BID or insulin. Clinical data were collected at initiation of first injectable therapy and after approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. RESULTS: A total of 2,515 patients...

  11. Decision making in clinical veterinary practice | Anene | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decision making in clinical veterinary practice. BM Anene. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  12. Clinical Practice Guideline Selection, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Dispositions 1. 391 Normal Newborn 606 2. 373 Vaginal Delivery w/o Complications 502 3. 630 Neonate, Birth weight 2499G 165 4. 372 Vaginal Delivery w...Esophagitis, gastroent & 44 15. 358 Uterine & Adnexa Proc f 43 16. 138 Cardiac Arrhythmia & co 39 17. 204 Disorders of Pancreas 37 Clinical Practice

  13. From Paper Based Clinical Practice Guidelines to Declarative Workflow Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a field study of oncology workflow, involving doctors, nurses and pharmacists at Danish hospitals and discuss the obstacles, enablers and challenges for the use of computer based clinical practice guidelines. Related to the CIGDec approach of Pesic and van der Aalst we then describe how...

  14. Is photodynamic diagnosis ready for introduction in urological clinical practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordeiro, Ernesto R.; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Bus, Mieke T. J.; Alivizatos, Gerasimos; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date review of the available literature on photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) for nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer, to present the technique in a comprehensive approach and, finally, to discuss the relevance of PDD in clinical practice in terms of

  15. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Vol 19, No 4 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. ... Effects of alpha‑tocopherol on gingival expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the rats with experimental periodontitis and diabetes · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Hatipoğlu, NÖ Alptekin, MC ...

  16. Improving clinical practice through simulation: A case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acquisition of knowledge and skills by nursing students before real-life practice is a familiar nursing education challenge. The use of clinical simulation in nursing education provides many opportunities for students to learn and apply theoretical principles of nursing care in a safe environment. The purpose of this study was ...

  17. Core outcome sets for research and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Ostelo, Raymond W.; Turk, Dennis C.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Boers, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Background This masterclass introduces the topic of core outcome sets, describing rationale and methods for developing them, and providing some examples that are relevant for clinical research and practice. Method A core outcome set is a minimum consensus-based set of outcomes that should be

  18. The role of hypnotherapy in evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M J

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss the place of hypnotherapy in a modern medical world dominated by so-called evidence-based clinical practice. Hypnosis is an easily learned technique that is a valuable adjuvant to many medical, dental and psychological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Multifunction laser systems in clinical and resort practice

    OpenAIRE

    Zabulonov, Yuriy; Vladimirov, Alexander; Chukhraiev, Nikolay; Elmehsenawi, Yousry; Zukow, Walery

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYKNATIONALMEDICALACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION UKRAINIANSOCIETY OFPHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE RADOM UNIVERSITY Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow MULTIFUNCTION LASER SYSTEMS IN CLINICAL AND RESORT PRACTICE Edited by Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow ...

  20. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Vol 16, No 4 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern and clinical profile of children with complex cardiac anomaly at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku‑Ozalla, Enugu State, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL ... Perception of patients attending a tertiary hospital in Nigeria about good dental practice: A pilot study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT