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Sample records for arthritis bone erosions

  1. The specificity of ultrasound-detected bone erosions for rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zayat, Ahmed S; Ellegaard, Karen; Conaghan, Philip G;

    2015-01-01

    Bone erosion is one of the hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also seen in other rheumatic diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of ultrasound (US)-detected bone erosions (including their size) in the classical 'target' joints for RA....

  2. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the ability of two different dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. Methods: CR and two MRI examinations (using 0.2 T Esaote Artoscan and 0...... 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. Conclusions: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, in particular due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu unit detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan unit due to a lower average image quality and a smaller.......2 T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints of 15 patients with RA and 4 healthy controls were performed and evaluated blindly for bones being visible and for erosions. Results: In MCP joints, MagneVu visualised 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  3. Patterns of magnetic resonance imaging bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis--which bones are most frequently involved and show the most change?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller Døhn, Uffe; Duer-Jensen, A;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which bones in wrists and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints most frequently show bone erosions, and which most frequently demonstrate erosive progression, in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which bones in wrists and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints most frequently show bone erosions, and which most frequently demonstrate erosive progression, in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  4. Patterns of magnetic resonance imaging bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis - which bones are most frequently involved and show the most change?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Mikkel; Møller Døhn, Uffe; Duer-Jensen, Anne;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which bones in wrists and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints most frequently show bone erosions, and which most frequently demonstrate erosive progression, in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which bones in wrists and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints most frequently show bone erosions, and which most frequently demonstrate erosive progression, in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Intravenously delivered glucocorticoid liposomes inhibit osteoclast activity and bone erosion in murine antigen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofkens, Wouter; Grevers, Lilyanne C.; Walgreen, Birgitte; de Vries, Teun J.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Everts, Vincent; Storm, Gert; van den Berg, Wim B.; van Lent, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of systemic delivery of prednisolone phosphate (PLP) encapsulated within long circulating 'stealth' liposomes on bone erosion and osteoclast activity during experimental antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Liposomal PLP strongly suppressed knee jo

  6. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. METHODS: CR and 2 MRI-examinations (on 0.2T Esaote...... carpal bones. MagneVu and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (OMERACT-RAMRIS-score > 1 on Artoscan) in MCP-joints, and 69% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. CONCLUSIONS: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, particularly due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal...... Artoscan and 0.2T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and 2.-5. MCP-joints of 15 RA patients and 4 healthy controls were performed and blindedly evaluated for bones being visible and for erosions. RESULTS: In MCP-joints, MagneVu visualized 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  7. Detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist joints with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objectives of the present study were, with multidetector computed tomography (CT) as the reference method, to determine the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiography for the detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist bones, and to test whether...... measuring volumes of erosions on CT and MRI is reproducible and correlated to semiquantitative assessments (scores) of erosions on CT, MRI and radiography. METHODS: Seventeen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four healthy control individuals underwent CT, MRI and radiography of one wrist, performed on...... the same day. CT was performed on a Philips Mx8000IDT unit (voxel size 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm x 1 mm) and MRI was performed on a Philips Panorama 0.6T unit (voxel size 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm). Images were evaluated separately for erosions in all wrist bones and were scored according to the principles of...

  8. Pattern of bone erosion and bone proliferation in psoriatic arthritis hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Bird, P; Boonen, A; Wiell, C; Pedersen, S J; Sørensen, I J; Madsen, O R; Slot, O; Møller, Jakob Møllenbach; Bøyesen, P; Hasselquist, Maria; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    described and the imaging modalities compared. RESULTS: Ninety percent of bone erosions detected by CT were located in the metacarpal heads, and most frequently in the 2nd-3rd MCP joints. Radial (37%) and ulnar (31%) surfaces were more frequently eroded than dorsal (10%) and palmar (22%) sites. Using CT...

  9. New radiographic bone erosions in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging a median of two years earlier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, Michael; Stoltenberg, Michael;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a 5-year followup study, we investigated the temporal relationship between development of wrist joint erosions as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus conventional radiography (CR), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We also evaluated the risk of erosive...... progression on CR associated with the presence of MRI erosions. METHODS: In 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, MRI and CR of the dominant wrist were performed annually for 5 years. In each image set, each wrist bone (metacarpal bases, carpal bones, radius, and ulna) was assessed for the absence or...... presence of bone erosions. RESULTS: Nine bones showed radiographic erosions at baseline. Twenty-seven new radiographic erosions developed during the 5-year followup period. Of these 27 new erosions, 21 were detected 1-5 years earlier by MRI than by CR, 3 were simultaneously detected by both methods, 2 were...

  10. Conventional radiography requires a MRI-estimated bone volume loss of 20% to 30% to allow certain detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B.; Vestergaard, Aage Steen; Jacobsen, S.; Thomsen, H.S.; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ability of conventional radiography to detect bone erosions of different sizes in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the standard reference. A 0.2 T Esaote dedicated extremity...... MRI unit was used to obtain axial and coronal T1-weighted gradient echo images of the dominant 2nd to 5th MCP joints of 69 RA patients. MR images were obtained and evaluated for bone erosions according to the OMERACT recommendations. Conventional radiographs of the 2nd to 5th MCP joints were obtained...... in posterior-anterior projection and evaluated for bone erosions. The MRI and radiography readers were blinded to each other's assessments. Grade 1 MRI erosions (1% to 10% of bone volume eroded) were detected by radiography in 20%, 4%, 7% and 13% in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th MCP joint, respectively...

  11. Scoring of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions by MR imaging in clinically active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Sørensen, K;

    1995-01-01

    MRI-scores of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions of the RA-wrist are introduced. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiography (CR) of the wrist were performed in 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 3 healthy controls. A MRI-score of...... MRI and CR with respect to bone erosions. Bone erosions were detected by MRI in 14 wrists in contrast to only 6 wrists by CR. In all patients the erosions were more numerous on MRI. The introduced methods may be useful quantitative measures of synovitis and early joint destruction in RA....... synovial membrane hypertrophy was obtained by summation of gradings of synovial hypertrophy in 6 regions of the wrist. The score was significantly higher in wrists with than in wrists without clinical signs of active arthritis. The score was 0 in all healthy controls. Each bone of the wrist was assessed by...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, E.A.; Boyesen, P.; Østergaard, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    consecutive patients with RA with disease duration <1 year were enrolled. Patients were treated according to standard clinical practice, and evaluated at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months by core measures of disease activity, conventional radiographs of both hands and wrists and MRI of the dominant wrist. MR......OBJECTIVES: To examine the spectrum and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the predictive value of MRI findings for subsequent development of conventional radiographic (CR) damage and MRI erosions. METHODS: 84...... images were scored according to the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS), and conventional radiographs according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp score. RESULTS: MRI findings reflecting inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema and tenosynovitis) decreased during...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis bone erosion volumes on CT and MRI: reliability and correlations with erosion scores on CT, MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Døhn, Uffe; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria;

    2007-01-01

    controls underwent unilateral CT, MRI and radiography of second to fifth MCP joints in one hand. Erosion volumes (using OSIRIS software) and scores were determined from CT, MRI and radiography (scores only). RESULTS: CT, MRI and radiography detected 77, 62 and 12 erosions, respectively. On CT, the mean...

  14. Utility of combined high-resolution bone SPECT and MRI for the identification of rheumatoid arthritis patients with high-risk for erosive progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Sewerin, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.sewerin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Mattes-György, Katalin, E-mail: katalin.mattes@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg, E-mail: hans-joerg.wittsack@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Specker, Christof, E-mail: c.specker@kliniken-essen-sued.de [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Kliniken Essen-Sud, Propsteistrasse 2, D-45239 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm, E-mail: HansW.Mueller@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schneider@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Scherer, Axel, E-mail: scherer@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Ostendorf, Benedikt, E-mail: ostendorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of sequentially acquired, post hoc fused, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled disphosphonates (Tc99m-DPD) for the identification of finger joints with later erosive progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients. Methods: Ten consecutive ERA patients prospectively underwent MPH-SPECT and MRI of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints prior to and after 6 months methotrexate therapy. Tc99m-DPD uptake was measured at proximal and distal MCP sites using regional analysis. The course of joint pathologies was scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score (RAMRIS) criteria. Results: The frequency of increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, synovitis and bone marrow edemadecreased under MTX therapy; but the number of bone erosions increased. Joints with progressive and new erosions on follow-up had a higher baseline Tc99m-DPD uptake (2.64 ± 1.23 vs. 1.43 ± 0.91) (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Joints with erosive progression are characterized by an early increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, even in absence of MRI bone pathologies. Tc99m-DPD MPH-SPECT might thus be of additional value to morphological MRI for the identification of RA patients with a high risk for erosive progression.

  15. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller; Ejbjerg, Bo; Hetland, Merete; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2008-01-01

    previously validated Artoscan-unit as standard reference, MagneVu and CR had sensitivities of 0.82 and 0.55, respectively, in MCP-joint bones and 0.41 and 0.14 in wrist bones. Specificities of CR and MagneVu were comparable (0.82-0.99). MagneVu was particularly more sensitive than CR in metacarpal heads and...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ostergaard, Mikkel;

    2008-01-01

    consecutive patients with RA with disease duration <1 year were enrolled. Patients were treated according to standard clinical practice, and evaluated at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months by core measures of disease activity, conventional radiographs of both hands and wrists and MRI of the dominant wrist. MR......Objectives: To examine the spectrum and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the predictive value of MRI findings for subsequent development of conventional radiographic (CR) damage and MRI erosions. Methods: 84...... images were scored according to the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS), and conventional radiographs according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp score. Results: MRI findings reflecting inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema and tenosynovitis) decreased during...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ostergaard, Mikkel;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the spectrum and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the predictive value of MRI findings for subsequent development of conventional radiographic (CR) damage and MRI erosions. Methods: 84...... images were scored according to the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS), and conventional radiographs according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp score. Results: MRI findings reflecting inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema and tenosynovitis) decreased during...... favourable prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive method for detecting early inflammatory and structural abnormalities in RA joints. 2 - 8 Although studies from smaller cohorts of 25-42 patients have shown encouraging data, less is known about the predictive value of MRI synovitis...

  18. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame) was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

  19. Summary Findings of a Systematic Literature Review of the Ultrasound Assessment of Bone Erosions in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Terslev, Lene; Wakefield, Richard J; Backhaus, Marina; Balint, Peter V; Bruyn, George A W; Filippucci, Emilio; Gandjbakhch, Frederique; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Mandl, Peter; Möller, Ingrid; Naredo, Esperanza; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; d'Agostino, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    (MTP; 18 papers). The OMERACT definition of RA bone erosion on US was used most often (17 papers). Second and fifth MCP and fifth MTP were recommended as target joints. Conventional radiography was the most frequently used comparator (27 papers), then magnetic resonance imaging (17 papers) and computed...

  20. The X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein Inhibitor Embelin Suppresses Inflammation and Bone Erosion in Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak A. S. S. K. Dharmapatni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of Embelin, an inhibitor of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP, on inflammation and bone erosion in a collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA in mice. Methods. Four groups of mice (n=6 per group were allocated: CAIA untreated mice, CAIA treated with Prednisolone (10 mg/kg/day, CAIA treated with low dose Embelin (30 mg/kg/day, and CAIA treated with high dose Embelin (50 mg/kg/day. Joint inflammation was evaluated using clinical paw score and histological assessments. Bone erosion was assessed using micro-CT, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP staining, and serum carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX-1 ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect XIAP protein. TUNEL was performed to identify apoptotic cells. Results. Low dose, but not high dose Embelin, suppressed inflammation as reflected by lower paw scores (P<0.05 and lower histological scores for inflammation. Low dose Embelin reduced serum CTX-1 (P<0.05 and demonstrated lower histological score and TRAP counting, and slightly higher bone volume as compared to CAIA untreated mice. XIAP expression was not reduced but TUNEL positive cells were more abundant in Embelin treated CAIA mice. Conclusion. Low dose Embelin suppressed inflammation and serum CTX-1 in CAIA mice, indicating a potential use for Embelin to treat pathological bone loss.

  1. Altered Bone Biology in Psoriatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Homaira; Ritchlin, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is characterized by focal bone erosions mediated by osteoclasts at the bone–pannus junction. The bulk of research over the past decade has centered on mechanisms that underlie osteoclastogenesis along with new insights into osteoimmunology; however, recent advances that focus on steps that lead to new bone formation are beginning to emerge. New revelations about bone formation may have direct relevance to PsA given the presence of enthesophytes, syndesmophytes, and b...

  2. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  3. Computer-aided and manual quantifications of MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haitao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Chongqing (China); University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rivoire, Julien; Hoppe, Michael; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Srikhum, Waraporn [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Thammasat University, Department of Radiology, Pathumthani (Thailand); Imboden, John [San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, Department of Medicine, San Francisco and Division of Rheumatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-12-10

    To investigate the reliability and validity of computer-aided automated and manual quantification as well as semiquantitative analysis for MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the OMERACT-RAMRIS. Wrist MRI was performed at 3 T in 16 patients with RA. Synovial volume and perfusion, bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) volume, signal intensity and perfusion, and erosion dimensions were measured manually and using an in-house-developed automated software algorithm; findings were correlated with the OMERAC-RAMRIS gradings. In addition, a semiquantitative MRI cartilage loss score system was developed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test the reproducibility of these quantitative and semiquantitative techniques. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between lesion quantifications and RAMRIS and between the MRI cartilage score and radiographic Sharp van der Heijde joint space narrowing scores. The intra- and interobserver ICCs were excellent for synovial, BMEL and erosion quantifications and cartilage loss grading (all >0.89). The synovial volume, BMEL volume and signal intensity, and erosion dimensions were significantly correlated with the corresponding RAMRIS (r = 0.727 to 0.900, p < 0.05). Synovial perfusion parameter maximum enhancement (Emax) was significantly correlated with synovitis RAMRIS (r = 0.798). BMEL perfusion parameters were not correlated with the RAMRIS BME score. Cartilage loss gradings from MRI were significantly correlated with the Sharp joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.635, p = 0.008). The computer-aided, manual and semiquantitative methods presented in this study can be used to evaluate MRI pathologies in RA with excellent reproducibility. Significant correlations with standard RAMRIS were found in the measurements using these methods. (orig.)

  4. Computer-aided and manual quantifications of MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the reliability and validity of computer-aided automated and manual quantification as well as semiquantitative analysis for MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the OMERACT-RAMRIS. Wrist MRI was performed at 3 T in 16 patients with RA. Synovial volume and perfusion, bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) volume, signal intensity and perfusion, and erosion dimensions were measured manually and using an in-house-developed automated software algorithm; findings were correlated with the OMERAC-RAMRIS gradings. In addition, a semiquantitative MRI cartilage loss score system was developed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test the reproducibility of these quantitative and semiquantitative techniques. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between lesion quantifications and RAMRIS and between the MRI cartilage score and radiographic Sharp van der Heijde joint space narrowing scores. The intra- and interobserver ICCs were excellent for synovial, BMEL and erosion quantifications and cartilage loss grading (all >0.89). The synovial volume, BMEL volume and signal intensity, and erosion dimensions were significantly correlated with the corresponding RAMRIS (r = 0.727 to 0.900, p < 0.05). Synovial perfusion parameter maximum enhancement (Emax) was significantly correlated with synovitis RAMRIS (r = 0.798). BMEL perfusion parameters were not correlated with the RAMRIS BME score. Cartilage loss gradings from MRI were significantly correlated with the Sharp joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.635, p = 0.008). The computer-aided, manual and semiquantitative methods presented in this study can be used to evaluate MRI pathologies in RA with excellent reproducibility. Significant correlations with standard RAMRIS were found in the measurements using these methods. (orig.)

  5. 中医药阻止类风湿关节炎骨侵蚀作用研究进展%Development of Traditional Chinese Medicine Preventing Bone Erosion of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王云卿; 刘喜德; 王芳

    2011-01-01

    类风湿关节炎(Rheumatoid Arthritis,RA)是一种以慢性破坏性关节病变为主要变现的全身性自身免疫病,筛选具有阻止RA骨侵蚀作用的药物具有重要临床价值.中医药治疗RA有较好临床疗效.对近年中医药阻止RA骨侵蚀作用的临床及实验研究作一综述.%Rheumatoid Arthritis(RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease, the main manifestation of which is chronic and crosive arthritis. Screening the drug to prevent bone erosion of RA have important clinical value. The treatment with traditional Chinese medicine of RA has better clinical efficacy. This article summarized the clinical and experimental study on preventing the bone erosion of RA with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  6. Optimised, low cost, low field dedicated extremity MRI is highly specific and sensitive for synovitis and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B J; Narvestad, E; Jacobsen, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate a low field dedicated extremity MRI unit for detection of bone erosions, synovitis, and bone marrow oedema in wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, with a high field MRI unit as the standard reference.......To evaluate a low field dedicated extremity MRI unit for detection of bone erosions, synovitis, and bone marrow oedema in wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, with a high field MRI unit as the standard reference....

  7. Are bone erosions detected by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography true erosions? A comparison with computed tomography in rheumatoid arthritis metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Døhn, Uffe; Ejbjerg, B.; Court-Payen, M.; Hasselquist, M.; Narvestad, E.; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Møller, J.M.; Thomsen, H.S.; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    , represent true erosive changes. We included 17 RA patients with at least one, previously detected, radiographically invisible MCP joint MRI erosion, and four healthy control individuals. They all underwent CT, MRI, US and radiography of the 2nd to 5th MCP joints of one hand on the same day. Each imaging...

  8. The 'pre-erosive' radiologic signs of rheumatoid arthritis in soft tissue radiography of the hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft tissue radiography of the hands using the mammographic immersion technique was performed on 119 patients, having definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis, and on 123 controls of matching age, sex, and professional distribution. A total of 7744 finger joints and carpal borders were investigated for joint swelling, periarticular edema, pre-erosive and erosive bone changes, joint space narrowing, and osteoarthritic joint margin spurs. Slight joint swelling and pre-erosive bone changes were found in connection with osteoarthritic joint changes in elderly control patients. Periarticular edema and moderate to massive joint swelling were quite reliable signs for synovitis. The incidence of pre-erosive bone signs was significantly greater in the rheumatoid arthritis group than in the control group, especially in patients less than 60 years old. These signs can be regarded as suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis; probability diagnosis could be performed using these signs and the Bayesian approach. (orig.)

  9. Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis? A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high-resolution CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A; Ejbjerg, B; Albrecht-Beste, E;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography (CR) to identify bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints with CT scanning as the standard reference method. METHODS: 20 patients with RA and 5 controls...... underwent CR, CT and two E-MRI examinations (Esaote Biomedica Artoscan and MagneVu MV1000) of one hand during a 2-week period. In all modalities, each bone of the wrist and MCP joints was blindly evaluated for erosions. MagneVu images were also assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualised.......57, respectively; wrists: 0.50, 0.23 and 0.29). Corresponding specificities for detecting erosions were 0.94, 0.93 and 0.99, respectively, in the MCP joints and 0.92, 0.98 and 0.98 in the wrist. The MagneVu allowed visualisation of 1.5 cm of the ventral-dorsal diameter of the bone. In the wrist, 31.6% of bones...

  10. The application of quantitative MRI analysis in wrist bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis%磁共振定量分析在类风湿关节炎手腕部骨侵蚀中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖芳; 朱小春; 杜红卫; 吴红华; 蔡晓笑

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyse and evaluate the application of magnetic resonance quantitative analysis in wrist bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis, to provide reference for future clinical applications. METHODS Randomly sampled 108 cases with wrist scans by MRI from January 2007 to October 2011, after 1 week, patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis were as the research objects. All the research objects were grouped according to sex, age, course of disease, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and other indices, the used Mann-Whitney method to analyze the difference of bone erosion. RESULTS The results in this study showed 73 patients met the criteria as RA, accounted for about 67.59%; bone erosion scores in CRP positive/negative group, early/late period in RA group and ESR positive/negative groups were significantly different (P< 0.05); the bone erosion scores in CCP positive/negative groups were significantly different (P< 0.05). CONCLUSION MRI quantitative analysis provides an effective basis to diagnosis and prognosis of wrist bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis, and could be widely used in clinical work in the future.%目的 对磁共振定量分析在类风湿关节炎手腕部骨侵蚀中的应用进行分析与评价,为今后的临床应用提供参考.方法 随机抽取在2007年1月~2011年10月这段时间里采用MRI对手腕部进行扫描的临床患者病例108例,在1周之后均进行了实验室检查,将确诊为类风湿关节炎(RA)的患者作为本次研究的研究对象.将所有研究对象按照性别、年龄、病程、类风湿因子、抗环瓜氨酸肽、C反应蛋白、血沉等观察指标进行分组,采用Mann-Whimey方法对各组间骨侵蚀的差异进行分析.结果 在本次研究中所接受检查的108名患者中有73例符合RA标准,约占67.59%;对于CRp阳/阴性组、早期/中晚期RA组以及ESR阳/阴性组间的骨侵蚀评分之间存

  11. 类风湿关节炎手腕部骨侵蚀的磁共振定量分析%MRI quantitative analysis of bone erosions in wrists and hands in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周海燕; 刘鹏程; 王成林; 罗莉丽; 戚玉龙; 冯飞

    2011-01-01

    目的:通过类风湿关节炎手腕部骨侵蚀MRI表现及临床指标对照研究,探讨两者在评价类风湿关节炎诊断及预后中的价值。方法:随机选取行手腕部MRI扫描的患者80例,患者均在1周内行相关实验室检查,其中符合类风湿诊断标准的入选为研究对象。采用OMERACT的RA评分系统为类风湿关节炎骨质破坏的评分标准,对磁共振图像进行分析及评分。分别按性别、年龄、病程、晨僵、类风湿因子(RF)、抗环瓜氨酸肤(抗CCP)、抗“O”(ASO)、C反应蛋白(CRP)、血沉(ESR)予以分组,使用Mann-Whitney方法分析各组间骨侵蚀的差异。结果:符合RA诊断标准的共54例,共发现238处骨质侵蚀,最多的1例累及13处骨质。腕部骨侵蚀最常累及三角骨(36/54),其次为头状骨(31/54);手部最常累及第三掌骨头(7/54),其次为第二掌骨头(6/54)。早期/中晚期RA组、CRP阳/阴性组、ESR阳/阴性组间骨侵蚀评分差异具有高度统计学意义(P<0.01)。抗CCP阳/阴性组间的骨侵蚀评分差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。性别、年龄、晨僵、RF、ASO的组间骨侵蚀评分差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:MRI可为骨侵蚀的诊断及评估预后提供最直观的依据,抗CCP抗体、CRP、ESR可在一定程度上提示骨侵蚀。%Objective:To evaluate MRI,clinical manifestations and laboratory examination in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods:80 patients with hand or wrist pain were selected randomly in this study. All patients had laboratory examinations in a week before or after they accepted MRI examinations. Patients who met the diagnostic criteria would be scored corresponding to OMERACT system. Patients were divided by gender,age,disease duration,morning stiffness,RF, ACCP, ASO and ESR respectively. Bone erosion scores were analyzed using Mann-Whitney. Results:There were 238 bone erosions in 54 cases with RA. 13 bone

  12. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  13. Kinetics of gene expression and bone remodelling in the clinical phase of collagen induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja Caroline Marie; Litman, Thomas; Marstrand, Troels;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological bone changes differ considerably between inflammatory arthritic diseases and most studies have focused on bone erosion. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a model for rheumatoid arthritis, which, in addition to bone erosion, demonstrates bone formation at the time of...... clinical manifestations. The objective of this study was to use this model to characterise the histological and molecular changes in bone remodelling, and relate these to the clinical disease development. Methods: A histological and gene expression profiling time-course study on bone remodelling in CIA was...... declined and remodelling of formed bone dominated. Global gene expression profiling showed simultaneous upregulation of genes related to bone changes and inflammation in week 0 to 2 after onset of clinical disease. Furthermore, we observed time-dependent expression of genes involved in early and late...

  14. Blocking of interleukin-17 during reactivation of experimental arthritis prevents joint inflammation and bone erosion by decreasing RANKL and interleukin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, MI; Lubberts, E; Oppers-Walgreen, B; van den Bersselaar, L; Helsen, MM; Di Padova, FE; Boots, AMH; Gram, H; Joosten, LAB; van den Berg, WB

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by an intermittent course of disease with alternate periods of remission and relapse. T cells, and in particular the T-cell cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17), are expected to be involved in arthritic flares. Here, we report that neutralizing endogenous IL-17 durin

  15. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted

  16. Alteration In Bones Metabolism In Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength and integrity of the human skeleton depends on a delicate equilibrium between bone resorption and bone formation. Osteocalcin (OC) is synthesized by osteoblasts and is considered to be a marker of bone formation and helps in corporating calcium into bone tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory joint disease characterized by bone complication including bone pain, erosion and osteoporosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate some factors responsible in bone metabolism termed OC, vitamin D (vit. D), oncostatin M (OSM), ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase. Fifty pre-menopausal female patients with active RA and twenty healthy controls of the same age were included in the present study. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to estimate serum OC and active vitamin D. The quantitative determination of ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were carried out colorimetrically. OSM was measured by ELISA and serum levels of OC and active vitamin D were significantly decreased in RA patients as compared to those of the control group. On the other hand, the levels of serum OSM, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in the RA patients as compared to their healthy control subjects. The results of this study indicated that early investigation and therapy of disturbances of bone metabolism in active RA are necessary for better prognosis and exhibited the importance of OC as a diagnostic tool of alterations of bone metabolism in RA patients.

  17. Erosive progression is minimal, but erosion healing rare, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab. A 1 year investigator-initiated follow-up study using high-resolution computed tomography as the primary outcome measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Døhn, U; Boonen, A; Hetland, M L;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With computed tomography (CT) and radiography, to investigate if repair of bone erosions, defined as regression of erosion scores, occurs during adalimumab treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Fifty-two patients with RA, naïve to biological agents, with at least...

  18. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 2: Erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis late after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quanitification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists to this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. This first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  19. Location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions at the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early rheumatoid arthritis the location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions were investigated at 53 points of the wrist. On the level of the metacarpal bases, the distal and proximal row of the carpal bones more changes are seen in the oblique vd. and the lateral view than in the dv. view. At the distal bones of the forearm more changes are seen at the radius than at the ulnar styloid. The most often changes at all occur at the volar middle third of the triquetrum in the oblique view and at the distal volar articular facet of the scaphoid in the lateral view. Close relations between localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions do not exist. If the early bone changes at the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis are to be detected additional oblique and lateral view are prerequisite. (orig.)

  20. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Yu M; Østergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony;

    2009-01-01

    sequences. Scans were scored separately by two readers for bone erosion, oedema and proliferation using a PsA MRI scoring system. X-rays were scored for erosions and joint space narrowing. RESULTS: On MRI, 1013 bones were scored by both readers. Reliability for scoring erosions and bone oedema was high......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays of...... both hands and feet, 11 patients were classified as AM and 17 as non-AM (erosive psoriatic arthritis without bone lysis)by two observers. MRI scans (1.5T) of the dominant hand (wrist and fingers scanned separately) were obtained using standard contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and fat-saturated T2-weighted...

  1. MRI of the wrist and finger joints in inflammatory joint diseases at 1-year interval: MRI features to predict bone erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, Anette [Department of Rheumatology, Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Malmskov, Hanne; Graff, Lykke B.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Department of Rheumatology, Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nielsen, Henrik [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boesen, Jens [Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of MRI determined synovial volumes and bone marrow oedema to predict progressions in bone erosions after 1 year in patients with different types of inflammatory joint diseases. Eighty-four patients underwent MRI, laboratory and clinical examination at baseline and 1 year later. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints was performed in 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis less than 3 years (group 1) who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, 18 patients with reactive arthritis or psoriatic arthritis (group 2), 22 patients with more than 3 years duration of rheumatoid arthritis, who fulfilled the ACR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (group 3), and 20 patients with arthralgia (group 4). The volume of the synovial membrane was outlined manually before and after gadodiamide injection on the T1-weighted sequences in the finger joints. Bones with marrow oedema were summed up in the wrist and fingers on short-tau inversion recovery sequences. These MRI features was compared with the number of bone erosions 1 year later. The MR images were scored independently under masked conditions. The synovial volumes in the finger joints assessed on pre-contrast images was highly predictive of bone erosions 1 year later in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (groups 1 and 3). The strongest individual predictor of bone erosions at 1-year follow-up was bone marrow oedema, if present at the wrist at baseline. Bone erosions on baseline MRI were in few cases reversible at follow-up MRI. The total synovial volume in the finger joints, and the presence of bone oedema in the wrist bones, seems to be predictive for the number of bone erosions 1 year later and may be used in screening. The importance of very early bone changes on MRI and the importance of the reversibility of these findings remain to be clarified. (orig.)

  2. Erosive osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and pseudogout; a casual association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia; Alberioli, Enrico; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Oliviero, Francesca; Mattia, Elena; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    According to recent hypothesis, the inflammation has a pivotal role in the onset and progression of erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and chondrocalcinosis (CC)/pseudogout. Albeit, it has been recognised for years as an association between EHOA and radiographic evidence of CC, but there are few reports of coexistence of microcrystalline arthritis and PsA. This is the first report that described a clinical experience concerning two consecutive cases of patients presented with EHOA, PsA and pseudogout. Two Caucasian women of 71 and 85 years old with a history of OA and mild psoriasis are presented with tenderness and swelling of first interphalangeal (IP) and wrist joint, respectively. Arthrocentesis performed at the first IP and wrist joint, respectively, showed an inflammatory synovial fluid with presence of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals. X-rays of hands, feet and knees showed characteristic features of EHOA, PsA and CC. Furthermore, HLA typing evinces the presence of HLA C*06; DRB*01 07 and HLA C*07; DRB*01 *11 alleles, respectively, predisposing factors of these inflammatory diseases. The relationship between these aggressive rheumatic diseases along with their clinical, radiographic, laboratory and genetic features is discussed. PMID:25833145

  3. Validity of a computer-assisted manual segmentation software to quantify wrist erosion volume using computed tomography scans in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Ciapetti, Alessandro; Ariani, Alarico; Gasparini, Stefania; Grassi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the performance of conventional radiography (CR) for the detection of bone erosions of wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using multidetector computed tomography (CT) as the reference method and to evaluate the validity of a computer-assisted manual segmentation (outlining) technique to quantify erosion volume on CT scans. Methods Twenty five RA patients and six controls underwent CT and radiographic evaluation of the dominant wrist on the same day. CT was performed ...

  4. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hospital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rheumatology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2015-12-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  5. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  6. Optimised, low cost, low field dedicated extremity MRI is highly specific and sensitive for synovitis and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints: comparison with conventional high field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B.J; Narvestad, E; Jacobsen, S;

    2005-01-01

    were performed. In an initial low field MRI 'sequence selection phase', based on a subset of 10 patients and 10 controls, sequences for comparison with high field MRI were selected. RESULTS: With high field, spin echo MRI considered as the reference method, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a low field dedicated extremity MRI unit for detection of bone erosions, synovitis, and bone marrow oedema in wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, with a high field MRI unit as the standard reference. METHODS: In 37 patients with RA and 28 healthy controls MRI of the...... wrist and 2nd-5th MCP joints was performed on a low field MRI unit (0.2 T Esaote Artoscan) and a high field MRI unit (1.0 T Siemens Impact) on 2 subsequent days. MRI was performed and evaluated according to OMERACT recommendations. Additionally, conventional x ray, clinical, and biochemical examinations...

  7. Chronic erosive seropositive arthritis in a patient with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Ananjeva

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Joint syndrome evolution was prospectively followed up in a 49-year-old woman who had serum hepatitis in 1990. When she came to a rheumatologist for the first time in 1999 she complained of occasional joint pain. She did not have joint inflammatory changes at that time but chronic hepatitis С was revealed at the examination. Hepatitis С diagnosis was confirmed by morphological and repeated virological evaluations. During antiviral treatment the pt developed symmetrical polyarthritis involving hand joints. Elevation of cryoglobuline, rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies level was revealed. During the next year polyarthritis recurred and later acquired undulatory course with periods of exacerbation and stabilization. Attempts of treatment with sulfasalazine failed due to transaminase elevation. In 2006 ulnar deviation appeared and rheumatoid factor level remained elevated. MRI showed multiple erosions of carpal bones. Considering features of joint syndrome development joint damage in this pt was regarded as arthritis associated with chronic hepatitis C.

  8. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation

  9. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside-a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C Henrique; Farrell, Eric; Vis, Marijn; Colin, Edgar M; Lubberts, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Throughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast differentiation and activation, and chronic inflammation is a condition that initiates systemic bone loss. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease that is characterised by active synovitis and is associated with early peri-articular bone loss. Peri-articular bone loss precedes focal bone erosions, which may progress to bone destruction and disability. The incidence of generalised osteoporosis is associated with the severity of arthritis in RA and increased osteoporotic vertebral and hip fracture risk. In this review, we will give an overview of different animal models of inflammatory arthritis related to RA with focus on bone erosion and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a humanised endochondral ossification model will be discussed, which can be used in a translational approach to answer osteoimmunological questions. PMID:26634933

  10. Location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions at the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis. Results of low kV radiography in 3 views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1988-03-01

    In early rheumatoid arthritis the location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions were investigated at 53 points of the wrist. On the level of the metacarpal bases, the distal and proximal row of the carpal bones more changes are seen in the oblique vd. and the lateral view than in the dv. view. At the distal bones of the forearm more changes are seen at the radius than at the ulnar styloid. The most often changes at all occur at the volar middle third of the triquetrum in the oblique view and at the distal volar articular facet of the scaphoid in the lateral view. Close relations between localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions do not exist. If the early bone changes at the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis are to be detected additional oblique and lateral view are prerequisite.

  11. Periosteal ganglion: A cause of cortical bone erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases of periosteal ganglia of long bones are presented. These lesions are produced by mucoid degeneration and cyst formation of the periosteum to produce external cortical erosion and reactive periosteal new bone. They are not associated with a soft tissue ganglion or an intraosseous lesion. They may radiologically mimic other periosteal lesions or soft tissue neoplasms which erode bone. (orig.)

  12. Periosteal ganglion: A cause of cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F.; Matz, S.; Steiner, G.C.; Dorfman, H.D.

    1983-11-01

    Three cases of periosteal ganglia of long bones are presented. These lesions are produced by mucoid degeneration and cyst formation of the periosteum to produce external cortical erosion and reactive periosteal new bone. They are not associated with a soft tissue ganglion or an intraosseous lesion. They may radiologically mimic other periosteal lesions or soft tissue neoplasms which erode bone.

  13. Significant improvement in synovitis, osteitis, and bone erosion following golimumab and methotrexate combination therapy as compared with methotrexate alone: A magnetic resonance imaging study of 318 methotrexate-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of golimumab on inflammation/structural damage detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To evaluate the effects of golimumab on inflammation/structural damage detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  14. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. (Hahnemann Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  15. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of wrist and finger joints in healthy subjects occasionally shows changes resembling erosions and synovitis as seen in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo; Narvestad, Eva; Rostrup, Egill;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the presence of changes resembling rheumatoid arthritis erosions and synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints of healthy individuals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the MRI findings with conventional radiographic, clinical, and biochemical...... findings. METHODS: Twenty-eight healthy individuals were studied. Contrast-enhanced MRI and conventional radiography of the dominant wrist and second through fifth MCP joints were performed, coupled with standard clinical assessments and biochemical analyses. MR images were evaluated according to the...... latest OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials) recommendations with respect to synovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema. RESULTS: Conventional radiography revealed erosion-like changes in 1 of 224 MCP joint bones (0.4%) and in 1 of 420 wrist joint bones (0.2%). MRI depicted low...

  17. Bone Effects of Biologic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Addolorata Corrado; Anna Neve; Nicola Maruotti; Francesco Paolo Cantatore

    2013-01-01

    Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical pract...

  18. Quantification of synovial and erosive changes in rheumatoid arthritis with ultrasound-Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at

    2009-08-15

    Synovitis is a predictive factor of irreversible changes in the joints, tendons, and ligaments in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, the early demonstration of reversible, pre-erosive inflammatory features to diagnose RA, the monitoring of disease activity, and the response to therapy are of great importance. Technical developments in ultrasound now allow the quantification of synovitis and erosions, and enable the assessment and follow-up of disease activity. However, both the subjective and objective quantification techniques are associated with different problems. This review article highlights the advantages and disadvantages of sonographic quantification, and revisits the somewhat controversial positions apparent in the current literature. Familiarity with the imaging findings and the scoring systems used to characterize erosive changes are prerequisites for considerably improving the detection and monitoring of synovitis and erosions. The role of ultrasound in the diagnostic approach to RA, particularly in the quantification of synovial and erosive changes, will be explored and the current literature will be reviewed.

  19. Bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis compared with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    OpenAIRE

    van Soesbergen, R M; Lips, P.; van den Ende, A; van der Korst, J K

    1986-01-01

    Calcium and bone metabolism in 29 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were compared with those in 27 postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. Signs of vitamin D deficiency were found in 20 RA patients, including 12 who took recommended amounts of vitamin D in their diets and were exposed to sufficient sunlight, and in none of the osteoporotic patients. There were no signs of malabsorption. In six out of 15 patients we found increased liver enzyme activity, which may have a role in vitamin D metab...

  20. Microanatomic studies to define predictive factors for the topography of periarticular erosion formation in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGonagle, Dennis; Tan, Ai Lyn; Møller Døhn, Uffe;

    2009-01-01

    (n = 3) of 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were assessed by computed tomography (CT) to ascertain whether the topography of erosion formation in patients with RA corresponded to the cadaveric findings. RESULTS: Absence of a bare area was noted in cadaveric tissue at the periligamentous...... erosion-prone regions, especially in the distal MCP joints and both distal and proximal PIP joints. Nevertheless, these sites exhibited soft-tissue pathologic features and bony microdamage/cyst formation. Other significant findings included the presence of pannus without inflammatory changes in the...

  1. Physical bone changes in carragheenin-induced arthritis evaluated by quantitative computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repeated non-invasive measurements were performed in dogs to trabecular bone density (TBD), low density bone area (LDBA), and high density bone area (HDBA) in chronic arthritis using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Unilateral chronic arthritis of the knee had been induced by weekly instillation of 2 ml carragheenin into the right knee joint for 12 weeks with the left knee serving as a control. CT scanning of the distal femoral condyles was performed in 12 mature dogs with chronic arthritis. Another 6 dogs underwent a longitudinal CT study starting immediately prior to induction of arthritis. Indentation test and histomorphometric analyses confirmed the bone density changes as measured by CT. (orig./GDG)

  2. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: erosions or normal variants? A prospective case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Boavida, Peter [Homerton University Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Avenarius, Derk; Eldevik, Odd Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rhematology, Genoa (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Tanturri, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    Bony depressions at the wrist resembling erosions are frequently seen on MRI in healthy children. The accuracy of MRI in detecting early bony destruction is therefore questionable. We compared findings on MRI of the wrist in healthy children and those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to investigate markers for true disease. We compared the number and localisation of bony depressions at the wrist in 85 healthy children and 68 children with JIA, ages 5-15 years. The size of the wrist was assessed from a radiograph of the wrist performed on the same day as the MRI. No significant difference in the number of bony depressions in the carpal bones was seen between healthy children and children with JIA at any age. Depressions are found in similar locations in the two groups, except for a few sites, where bony depressions were seen exclusively in the JIA group, particularly at the CMC joints. The wrist was significantly smaller in children with JIA (P < 0.001). Using adult scoring systems and standard MR sequences in the assessment of bone destruction in children may lead to overstaging or understaging of disease. At present, standard MRI sequences cannot easily be used for assessment of early signs of erosions in children. (orig.)

  3. Study of the Relationship between Anti-CCP Antibody withAtherosclerosisand Bone Erosion in Rheumatoid Arthritis%抗 CCP 抗体与类风湿关节炎动脉粥样硬化及骨侵蚀的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白巧红; 张莉芸

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨抗 CCP 抗体在类风湿关节炎(Rheumatoid arthritis,RA)中的诊断价值,抗 CCP 抗体与动脉粥样硬化及骨侵蚀的关系。方法利用 Elasa 法检测 RA 患者及健康对照组的抗 CCP 抗体,高分辨率超声测量 RA 及健康对照组的颈动脉内膜中层厚度(Carotid artery intimamedia thickness,IMT),分析抗 CCP 抗体在RA 诊断中的敏感性及特异性,RA 患者的颈动脉粥样硬化情况。X 线评估 RA 患者双手关节的骨侵蚀情况,根据抗 CCP 抗体是否阳性将 RA 患者分为两组,抗 CCP抗体阳性组和抗 CCP 抗体阴性组,比较两组的颈动脉粥样硬化及骨侵蚀发生率。结果抗 CCP 抗体诊断 RA 的敏感性75%,特异性90%。与健康对照组相比,RA患者的颈动脉内膜中层厚度增加(P <0.05),动脉粥样硬化率增加(X2=5.19,P <0.05)。在 RA 患者中,与抗 CCP 抗体阴性组比较,抗 CCP 抗体阳性组的颈动脉内膜中层厚度增加(P <0.05),动脉粥样硬化率增加(X2=5.6,P <0.05),骨侵蚀率增加(X2=7.35,P <0.05)。结论抗 CCP 抗体阳性的 RA 患者更易发生动脉粥样硬化及骨侵蚀。%Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrulinated peptide(CCP) antibody in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the relationship between anti-CCP antibody with atherosclerosis and bone erosion. Methods To detection anti- CCP antibody titer of RA patients and healthy control group by using the method of Elasa, measure carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) of RA and healthy control group by high resolution ultrasound. To analysis the sensitivity and specificity of anti- CCP antibody in the diagnosis of RA, carotid atherosclerosis in RA patients. X-ray evaluation bone erosion of hands joint in RA patients. according to whether anti-CCP antibody was positive, the patients with RA were divided into two groups, anti-CCP antibody positive group and anti

  4. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis

  5. Ultrasonographic Assessment of Fifth Metatarsophalangeal Joint Erosion in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Which Aspect Is Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanc, Nevsun; Ozen, Gulsen; Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Kasapoglu-Gunal, Esen; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the best ultrasound (US) aspect for detection of fifth metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint erosions, the most frequently eroded joint, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is investigated. Forty-eight RA patients (F/M = 35/13, mean age and disease durations 50.3 ± 11.8 and 7.9 ± 6.9 y, respectively) were evaluated by B-mode US for erosion. Images were obtained from the dorsal, lateral and plantar aspect of the fifth MTP joint, in longitudinal and transverse scans. The fifth MTP erosions were detected in 36 of 48 patients (75%) and 67 of 96 feet (69.8%). Of the erosions, 15 (22.4%), 53 (79.1%) and 59 (88.0%) were observed at dorsal, lateral and plantar aspects, respectively. Despite not being statistically different, the detection rate of fifth MTP erosions was numerically higher in the plantar aspect than both the lateral and dorsal aspects. In conclusion, the fifth MTP erosions in RA patients are more commonly detected in the plantar aspect US than in dorsal and lateral assessments. PMID:26742892

  6. MR imaging of arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia have in common abnormal hyperplastic synovium leading to marginal bone erosion, articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone exposure, and dissolution and ultimately collapse of the affected joint. The authors examined children and young adults with juvenile arthritis and hemophilia by MR imaging and found that they could identify hyperplastic synovium, articular cartilage lesions, bone erosions, and joint effusions. This has therapeutic implications since identification of progressive synovial hyperplasia and/or early cartilage or marginal bone erosion may lead to earlier synovectomy in patients with hemophilia or switch to second line drugs in patients with juvenile arthritis, in an attempt to prevent progressive joint destruction

  7. Familial early onset sarcoidosis with bone cysts and erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early onset sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease which is characterized by synovitis, polyarthritis, skin and eye involvement. We report the skeletal features of one patient with a family history and clinical symptoms suggestive of early onset sarcoidosis (EOS) which was confirmed by skin biopsy. Radiographs reveal postarthritic deformities of the MCP joints, contractures, a coarsened trabecular pattern at the PIP joints and small bone cysts resembling osteitis cystoides multiplex. Similar lesions were described in radiographs of the older sister and an uncle of our patient. This is the first report demonstrating bone cysts and erosions which could be a diagnostic feature in this rare disease and may help to differentiate other rheumatoid disorders. (orig.)

  8. Regulation of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis through RANKL-RANK pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that osteoclasts, the primary cells responsible for bone resorption, are mainly involved in bone and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Recent progress in bone cell biology has revealed the molecular mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by mature osteoclasts. We highlight here the potential role of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-RANK pathways in bone destruction in RA and review recent cl...

  9. Bone status in rheumatoid arthritis assessed at peripheral sites by three different quantitative ultrasound devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O R; Suetta, C; Egsmose, C;

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by periarticular and generalized loss of bone mass. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) has been introduced as a method for the assessment of bone status and fracture risk. In this cross-sectional study bone status was assessed by QUS at different peripheral...

  10. Personalized Unicompartmental Knee Implant Treats Early Stage Arthritis While Preserving Bone

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Personalized Unicompartmental Knee Implant Treats Early Stage Arthritis while Preserving Bone (6:00pm CST) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the ...

  11. Vitamin D levels and bone mass in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brance, María L; Brun, Lucas R; Lioi, Susana; Sánchez, Ariel; Abdala, Marcelo; Oliveri, Beatriz

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease with high prevalence of osteoporosis. Previous evidence indicates an association between vitamin D deficiency and autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels, bone mineral density (BMD) and disease activity in RA patients living in Argentina. We studied 34 RA women and 41 healthy women as a control group. RA patients had lower 25(OH)D levels (20.4 ± 0.9 ng/ml) than controls (26.3 ± 1.9 ng/ml; p 3.2: 19.5 ± 0.88 ng/ml; DAS-28 ≤3.2: 23.7 ± 2.8 ng/ml (p = 0.047). After 1 year of vitamin D treatment 25(OH)D levels were increased while DAS-28 were decreased (n = 25; p < 0.05). We conclude that patients with RA had lower 25(OH)D levels than the control group. Low levels of 25(OH)D were associated with moderate-high disease activity suggesting the importance of optimal 25(OH)D levels in RA patients. Femoral neck BMD was lower in postM RA patients. No differences in lumbar BMD were found between preM and postM RA patients, suggesting that bone mass evaluation in RA patients should include femoral neck BMD regardless of age. PMID:24980067

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of unclassified arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Østergaard, M; Hørslev-Petersen, K;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the value in clinical practice of hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole body bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of patients with unclassified arthritis. METHODS: 41 patients with arthritis (> or = 2 swollen joints, > 6 months' duration) which...... joints of the most symptomatic hand and whole body bone scintigraphy were performed. Two rheumatologists agreed on the most likely diagnosis and the patients were treated accordingly. A final diagnosis was made by another specialist review 2 years later. RESULTS: Tentative diagnoses after MRI and bone...

  13. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F;

    2003-01-01

    Scoring erosions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one method of estimating damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it has limitations. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and inter-reader reliability of computer assisted erosion volume estimation in...... patients with RA. Intra-reader and inter-occasion reliability was also assessed, and different slice thicknesses were compared in terms of erosion volume estimation. A 3 mm slice thickness 3D gradient-echo sequence followed by a 1 mm sequence was performed at baseline and repeated within 24 h with...... volume estimation method was more time consuming, taking roughly 5 times as long as the scoring method. Computerized MRI erosion volume measurements are feasible, with high intra-observer and inter-occasion reliabilities. Despite high ICC, the inter-observer reliability is not sufficient for multicenter...

  14. Mediators of Inflammation-Induced Bone Damage in Arthritis and Their Control by Herbal Products

    OpenAIRE

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Brian Astry; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the...

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helliwell, P.S. [University of Leeds, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Porter, G. [Airedale Hospital NHS Trust, Keighley, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  17. The Diagnostic Utility of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Matrix Metalloproteinase-3, Rheumatoid Factor, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate, and C-reactive Protein in Patients with Erosive and Non-erosive Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Shovman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the diagnostic utility of laboratory variables, including matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP antibodies, rheumatoid factor (RF, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP in patients with erosive and non-erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  18. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  19. Early detection of bony alterations in rheumatoid and erosive arthritis of finger joints with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography, and differentiation between them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate high-resolution multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) for the detection of bony alterations in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), early osteoarthritis (EOA) of the fingers and healthy controls. The clinically dominant hands of 27 patients (13 ERA, nine EOA, five healthy controls) were examined by MPH-SPECT and bone scintigraphy. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in the ERA patients. Number of affected joints, localisation, pattern of tracer distribution and joint involvement were scored. Quantitative analysis was achieved by measurement of the region of interest (ROI) in all patients. The MPH-SPECT and MR images were fused in the ERA group. Bone scintigraphy detected fewer joints (26 joints,13/22 patients) with increased tracer uptake than did MPH-SPECT (80 joints, 21/22 patients). Bone scintigraphy did not show recognisable uptake patterns in any group of patients. With MPH-SPECT central tracer distribution was typical in ERA (10/13 patients, EOA 2/9). In contrast, an eccentric pattern was found predominantly in EOA (7/9, ERA 2/13). Normalised counts were 4.5 in unaffected joints and up to 222.7 in affected joints. The mean uptake values in affected joints were moderately higher in the EOA patients (78.75, and 62.16 in ERA). The mean tracer uptake in affected joints was approximately three-times higher than in unaffected joints in both groups (ERA 3.64-times higher, EOA 3.58). Correlation with MR images revealed that bone marrow oedema and erosions matched pathological tracer accumulation of MPH-SPECT in 11/13. MPH-SPECT demonstrated increased activity in 2/13 patients with normal bone marrow signal intensity and synovitis seen on MR images. MPH-SPECT is sensitive to early changes in ERA and EOA and permits them to be distinguished by their patterns of uptake. (orig.)

  20. Arthritis induces early bone high turnover, structural degradation and mechanical weakness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Vidal

    Full Text Available We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone.Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers.AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046. Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002 and bone volume (p = 0.0003 and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009 in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively in the arthritic group.We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness.

  1. Erosive arthritis and hepatic granuloma formation induced by peptidoglycan polysaccharide in rats is aggravated by prasugrel treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia E Garcia

    Full Text Available Administration of the thienopyridine P2Y12 receptor antagonist, clopidogrel, increased the erosive arthritis induced by peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS in rats or by injection of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum in mice. To determine if the detrimental effects are caused exclusively by clopidogrel, we evaluated prasugrel, a third-generation thienopyridine pro-drug, that contrary to clopidogrel is mostly metabolized into its active metabolite in the intestine. Prasugrel effects were examined on the PG-PS-induced arthritis rat model. Erosive arthritis was induced in Lewis rats followed by treatment with prasugrel for 21 days. Prasugrel treated arthritic animals showed a significant increase in the inflammatory response, compared with untreated arthritic rats, in terms of augmented macroscopic joint diameter associated with significant signs of inflammation, histomorphometric measurements of the hind joints and elevated platelet number. Moreover, fibrosis at the pannus, assessed by immunofluorescence of connective tissue growth factor, was increased in arthritic rats treated with prasugrel. In addition to the arthritic manifestations, hepatomegaly, liver granulomas and giant cell formation were observed after PG-PS induction and even more after prasugrel exposure. Cytokine plasma levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6, MIP1 alpha, MCP1, IL-17 and RANTES were increased in arthritis-induced animals. IL-10 plasma levels were significantly decreased in animals treated with prasugrel. Overall, prasugrel enhances inflammation in joints and liver of this animal model. Since prasugrel metabolites inhibit neutrophil function ex-vivo and the effects of both clopidogrel and prasugrel metabolites on platelets are identical, we conclude that the thienopyridines metabolites might exert non-platelet effects on other immune cells to aggravate inflammation.

  2. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine; Hyldstrup, Lars; Bach-Mortensen, Pernille; Bøyesen, Pernille; Thormann, Anja; Tarp, Ulrik; Bøhme, Wolfgang Peter; Lindegaard, Hanne; Poulsen, Uta Engling; Schlemmer, Annette; Graudal, Niels; Rødgaard, Anne; Espesen, Jakob; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte; Glintborg, Bente; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI...

  5. Measurement of streptococcal cell wall in tissues of rats resistant or susceptible to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderle, S K; Allen, J B; Wilder, R L; Eisenberg, R A; Cromartie, W J; Schwab, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The quantity of streptococcal cell wall localized in the joints of rats of strains which are either susceptible (Sprague-Dawley, LEW/N, M520/N) or resistant (Buffalo, WKY/N, F344/N) to cell wall-induced chronic erosive arthritis was measured after intraperitoneal injection of group A streptococcal cell wall fragments. Susceptibility or resistance was not associated with a difference in the amount of cell wall localized in limbs or other tissues. It is concluded that although localization of c...

  6. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements

  7. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. (Morristown Memorial Hospital, NJ (USA))

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  8. Short-Term Effects of TNF Inhibitors on Bone Turnover Markers and Bone Mineral Density in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini, Giovanni; Adami, Giovanni; Adami, Silvano; Viapiana, Ombretta; Idolazzi, Luca; Gatti, Davide; Rossini, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    TNFα inhibitors (TNFαI) exert positive effects on disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Bone involvement is a major determinant of functional impairment in this disease. Here we investigated the short-term effects of TNFαI therapy on bone metabolism and density. We studied 54 patients with RA starting a TNFαI biologic drug, in whom any factor known to interfere with bone metabolism was excluded or rigorously accounted for. We measured at baseline and after 6-month therapy bone turnover markers: N-propeptide of type I collagen (P1NP), and bone alkaline phosphates for bone formation and serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) for bone resorption. We also evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) at hip and lumbar by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All bone markers rose significantly and these changes were not dependent on steroid dosage. A significant decrease in femoral neck BMD was also observed. These results indicate that TNFαI therapy in RA over 6 months is associated with an early increase in bone turnover and a decline in hip BMD. PMID:26887973

  9. The radiographic features of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis is a separate and distinct articular disorder with specific radiographic manifestations occurring in a specific distribution. It manifests a severe erosive element, as well as a bone productive element. The erosive changes help to distinguish it from ankylosing spondylitis, and the bone productive changes, from rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of the changes, that is, preferential involvement of the hands, will help to distinguish it from Reiter's syndrome. In some patients, it is knowledge of the radiographic changes and distribution of these changes that establishes the correct diagnosis of psoriasis

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  12. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  13. The method for objective evaluation of the intensity of radial bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis using digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The semiquantitative methods used in everyday diagnostic practice for scoring the intensity of bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are susceptible to a subjective error. The paper describes the original algorithm for an image analysis as a method for quantitative and objective evaluation of the intensity of radiological lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. 75 plain radiograms of the hand of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, in various stages of bone pathology, were evaluated. The analysis focused on the signs of pathological rebuilding of the affected bone, especially in the distal epiphysis of the radial bone. The plain radiograms of the hand were digitally analysed based on the modified method, formerly used for quantitative assessment of bone trabeculation. The method allowed us to objectively verify various scoring systems of radiograms widely used in rheumatological diagnosis. (author)

  14. Icariin Prevents Cartilage and Bone Degradation in Experimental Models of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Wei, Chen; Qi Ping, Dai; Tian You, Fan; Yong Qiang, Chen; Tao, Che

    2016-01-01

    Background. Icariin (ICA) is an active compound extracted from Epimedium brevicornum Maxim. Previous reports have shown that icariin has a clinically significant therapeutic effect on rheumatoid arthritis. However, little is known about the mechanism by which icariin inhibits cartilage and bone degradation. Methods. New Zealand rabbits were immunized with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and treated with icariin. Joint tissues from rabbits were studied by histological analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and micro-CT. The expression levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in joint tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis. Results. Histological analysis and TEM sections of cartilage in the ICA treated group showed a low level of chondrocyte destruction. Micro-CT analysis showed that the bone mineral density value and bone structural level in ICA treated rabbits were significantly higher compared with those in the AIA group. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis showed that icariin treatment reduced RANKL expression and enhanced OPG expression levels, as compared to the AIA group. Conclusion. These data indicate that ICA suppresses articular bone loss and prevents joint destruction. This study also determined that ICA regulated articular bone loss in part by regulating RANKL and OPG expression. PMID:27199510

  15. IMPACT OF BIOLOGICAL THERAPY ON BONE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Dydykina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data currently available in the literature on the impact of biological agents (BA on bone mineral density, metabolism, and remodeling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. These agents, by virtue of their high efficacy, are widely used to treat patients with RA. Since localized and generalized bone resorption and destruction play a prominent role in its pathogenesis, an investigation of the effect of BA on bone may be of essential interest. Activated osteoclastogenesis occurs because of an interaction between the immune and bone systems under the influence of different proinflammatory cytokines. The inhibition of the latter has been ascertained to not only reduce joint inflammation, but also to prevent localized and generalized osteoporosis. This review discusses the results of these trials and the issues of further investigations.

  16. Interactions between smoking, increased serum levels of anti-CCP antibodies, rheumatoid factors, and erosive joint disease in patients with early, untreated rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krol, A; Garred, P; Heegaard, NHH;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine to what extent shared epitopes, smoking, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies are associated with disease activity and erosive disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at disease onset. Method: RA patients not previously treated with disease...

  17. Different expression of chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowska, Weronika J.; Radzikowska, Anna; Massalska, Magdalena A.; Burakowski, Tomasz; Kontny, Ewa; Słowińska, Iwona; Gasik, Robert; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to joint destruction. In addition to involvement of the joints, there is growing evidence that inflammatory/autoimmune processes take place in bone marrow, beginning the disease onset. Activated T and B cells accumulate in bone marrow, where also effective antigen presentation takes place. An increased number of activated T cells was observed in RA in comparison to osteoarthritis (OA) bone marrow. In the present study we analyzed the levels of chemokines that may be responsible for accumulation/retention of T-cells in the bone marrow of RA and OA patients. Material and methods Bone marrow samples were obtained from RA and OA patients during total hip replacement surgery, and bone marrow plasma was obtained by gradient centrifugation. Levels of the chemokines CX3CL1, CCL5, CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 were measured in bone marrow plasma by specific ELISAs. Comparison between the groups of patients and statistical significance were analyzed by the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Results Increased levels of CX3CL1 (818 ±431 pg/ml vs. 502 ±131 pg/ml, p < 0.0007) and CCL5 (5967 ±1680 pg/ml vs. 4878 ±2360 pg/ml, p < 0.05) respectively in bone marrow plasma from RA in comparison with OA patients were observed. In contrast, similar levels of CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 in RA and OA bone marrow suggest that these cytokines do not play a significant role in the observed T cell accumulation in RA bone marrow. Conclusions CX3CL1 and CCL5 overproduced in RA bone marrow may contribute to the accumulation of T cells observed in RA bone marrow. PMID:27407279

  18. Tinospora cordifolia inhibits autoimmune arthritis by regulating key immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannegowda, K M; Venkatesha, S H; Moudgil, K D

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints leading to tissue damage. Despite the availability of potent drugs including the biologics, many patients fail to respond to them, whereas others suffer adverse effects following long-term use of these drugs. Accordingly, the use of natural herbal products by RA patients has been increasing over the years. However, limited information about the mechanism of action of these natural products is a major shortcoming that prevents the widespread acceptance of herbal therapy by professionals and patients alike. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE) using the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human RA and elaborated the immune mechanisms underlying this effect. TCE treatment suppressed arthritic inflammation and bone and cartilage damage. The anti-inflammatory effect of TCE was mediated via reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as: IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17; the frequency of IL-17-producing T cells; and the production of chemokines such as RANTES. Furthermore, TCE treatment limited bone damage by shifting the balance of mediators of bone remodeling (e.g., receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand [RANKL] and MMP-9) in favor of anti-osteoclastic activity. Our results suggest that TCE and its bioactive components should be evaluated for their utility as therapeutic adjuncts to conventional drugs against RA. PMID:26467057

  19. Bone scan and joint scan of hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of joint scan and bone scan of hands and feet, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to localize the altered joints. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of joint scan were determined in comparison with clinical joint assessment. Fifteen patients (780 joints) were clinically examined (pain and synovitis); during the same day, a bone scan and a joint scan were realized by oxidronate 99mTc intravenous injection. Patients were scanned 5 minutes (tissual time, Tt) and 3 hours 1/4 (bone time, T0) after the administration. The uptake of the bi-phosphonate was evaluated with a qualitative method using a grey scale. The uptake of 99mTc oxidronate was quantitated using an extra-articular region of interest. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the scan at Tt were 46%, 96%, 85% et 78%. The same parameters were 75%, 66%, 53% and 84% for the scan realized at T0. The joint scan has showed 22% of false positive. These false positives could be a consequence of an earlier detection of joint alterations by scan. The joint scan should forecast the evolution of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  20. Erosive arthritis in a patient with pycnodysostosis: An experiment of nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainola, M.; Valleala, H.; Nykänen, P.; Risteli, J.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Konttinen, Y.T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The excellent poster painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is the most famous patient with cathepsin K-deficient pycnodysostosis. Cathepsin K is believed to play a major role in osteoclast-driven bone resorption. In this study we explored the role of cathepsin K in bone resorption in a patien

  1. Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect RA bone erosions? A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high resolution CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Ejbjerg, Bo; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different E-MRI units and conventional radiography (CR) to identify bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints, with computed tomography (CT) as standard reference method. METHODS: 20 RA patients and 5 controls...... underwent, within 2 weeks, CR, CT and two E-MRI (Esaote Biomedica; Artoscan and MagneVu; MV1000) examination of one hand. In all modalities each bone of wrist and (MCP) joints was blindedly evaluated for erosions. Furthermore, MagneVu images were assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualized......; wrists: 0.50, 0.23 and 0.29). Corresponding specificities for detecting erosions were 0.94, 0.93 and 0.99, respectively, in the MCP joints and 0.92, 0.98 and 0.98 in the wrist. The MagneVu allowed visualization of 1.5 cm of the ventral-dorsal diameter of the bone. In the wrist 31.6% of bones were...

  2. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  3. Early Metacarpal Bone Mineral Density Loss Using Digital X-Ray Radiogrammetry and 3-Tesla Wrist MRI in Established Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Longitudinal One-Year Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Early change in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterised by periarticular osteopenia. We investigated the relationship of early metacarpal digital X-ray radiogrammetry bone mineral density (DXR-BMD change rate (RC-BMD, mg/cm2/month to longitudinal changes in hand and feet radiographic and wrist MRI scores over 1 year. Materials and Methods. 10 RA patients completed the study and had wrist 3T-MRI and hand and feet X-rays at various time points over 1 year. MRI was scored by RAMRIS, X-ray was done by van der Heijde modified Sharp scoring, and RC-BMD was analysed using dxr-online. Results. There was good correlation amongst the two scorers for MRI measures and ICC for erosions: 0.984, BME: 0.943, and synovitis: 0.657. Strong relationships were observed between RC-BMD at 12-week and 1-year change in wrist marrow oedema (BME (r=0.78, P=0.035 but not with erosion, synovitis, or radiographic scores. Conclusion. Early RC-BMD correlates with 1-year wrist BME change, which is a known predictor of future erosion and joint damage. However, in our pilot study, early RC-BMD did not show relationships to MRI erosion or radiographic changes over 1 year. This may reflect a slower kinetic in the appearance of MRI/radiographic erosions, generating the hypothesis that RC-BMD may be a more sensitive and early structural prognostic marker in RA follow-up.

  4. [Potential of bone regenerative therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kunihiro

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell(MSC)exists throughout the body. The discovery of the immunosuppressive effect with low immunogenicity has led MSC as a new tool for cell therapy in various diseases. Within the arthritis animal model, periarticular implantation of bone marrow derived MSC with a scaffold has demonstrated treatment effect with low cell number whereas systemic administration had limited effect. Bone marrow derived MSC suppressed in vitro osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis of MSC was enhanced in the presence of IL-1β.On the other hand, experiments with adipose-derived MSC suggested the involvement in abnormal tissue calcification in the presence of IL-6. Therefore, MSC generated from the appropriate tissue and clarification of the major cytokines involved in pathogenesis is necessary when considering regenerative therapy for destructed joint in RA patients. PMID:27117623

  5. ASSESSMENT OF BONE TISSUE CONDITION BY METHOD OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN PTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A Raskina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate the bone mineral density (BMD in patients with dilVerent variants of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Materials and methods: The study included 65 patients with the acknowledged RA, who were not treated with corticosteroids, basic remedies and antiosteoporosis therapies. The group comprises 26 women оГ reproductive age (I group and 28 women in postmenopause period. The investigations were held with the computer tomograph “Tomoscan” Philips. Results: The comparative analysis of BMD disorders frequency in the studied groups shows that in RA women of postmenopause period osteopenia accounts for 57,1%, osteoporosis - for 32,1% of patients, which is twice as often as in premenopausal women period: 30,8% and 15,4% respectively. BMD levels in RA are correlated with rheumatoid lactor, destructive tendency in bones and high activity of disease.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of wrist and finger joints in healthy subjects occasionally shows changes resembling erosions and synovitis as seen in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo; Narvestad, Eva; Rostrup, Egill;

    2004-01-01

    latest OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials) recommendations with respect to synovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema. RESULTS: Conventional radiography revealed erosion-like changes in 1 of 224 MCP joint bones (0.4%) and in 1 of 420 wrist joint bones (0.2%). MRI depicted low......-grade erosion-like changes in 5 of 224 MCP joint bones (2.2%) and in 7 of 420 wrist joint bones (1.7%), but postcontrast enhancement within the lesion was detected in only 8.3% of these. MRI depicted low-grade synovitis-like changes in 10 of 112 MCP joints (8.9%) and in 8 of 84 assessed wrist areas (9.......5%), while only minimal early synovial enhancement was detected by dynamic MRI. Three subjects had elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, and these subjects displayed 44.5% of the synovitis-like changes and 41.7% of the erosion-like changes. Bone marrow edema-like changes were not found in any joints...

  7. No erosive progression revealed by MRI in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with etanercept, even in patients with persistent MRI and clinical signs of joint inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Skjødt, Henrik; Hetland, Merete; Vestergaard, Aage; Møller, Jakob M; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik; Thomsen, Henrik S; Hetland, Merete Lund; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the course of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints during etanercept treatment. MRI of the non-dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints was...... performed in five clinical active RA patients before and 4 and 16 weeks after initiation of etanercept treatment. MRI was evaluated according to the EULAR-OMERACT RA MRI reference image atlas. The median 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28; erythrocyte sedimentation rate based) was 5.6 (range 5...... patient showed erosive regression, while no patient showed erosive progression on MRI during 16 weeks of etanercept therapy; even though clinical and MRI signs of joint inflammation remained. This small study supports that erosive progression judged by MRI is minimal in RA patients treated with etanercept...

  8. Diagnostic Value Comparative Study of High-frequency Ultrasound and MRI on Bone Erosion of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis%高频超声与MRI对类风湿性关节炎腕关节骨质侵蚀的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓磊; 哈斯; 乔春梅; 张红

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨高频超声对类风湿关节炎(Rheumatoid Arthritis,RA)腕关节骨质侵蚀的诊断价值.方法 30例RA患者纳入研究组,对其60个腕关节分别做高频彩色多普勒超声与MRI检查,并与健康组对比分析.结果 高频彩色多普勒超声检出研究组腕关节中480块腕骨中81块出现骨侵蚀,占16.9%,300个掌腕关节面中69个掌骨底发生骨质侵蚀,占23.0%,其中第二掌骨底32个,占10.7%;第三掌骨底24个,占8.0%;第四掌骨底13个,占4.3%.MRI检出100块腕骨骨侵蚀,占20.8%,掌腕关节处71块掌骨底出现骨质侵蚀,占23.3%.其中第二掌骨底33个,占11.0%;第三掌骨底25个,占8.3%;第四掌骨底11个,占3.7%;第5掌骨底1个,占0.01%.尺骨远端骨质侵蚀1个,占1.7%.结论 高频彩色多普勒超声能准确显示RA腕关节骨质侵蚀.

  9. Comparison of bone and gallium-67 imaging in heroin users' arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine cases of primary septic arthritis in heroin addicts are reported. Fibrous and cartilaginous joint localizations are prominent (four sternoarticular, three sacroiliac, one sacroccocygeal, and one knee). In all patients but one, conventional roentgenographic studies were negative. In six cases the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus and in two cases, Candida albicans. In one case, it could not be determined. Our clinical observations, correlating the radioisotopic studies, suggest that in the first week of evolution the diagnostic procedure of choice is the [67Ga]citrate scintigram. Indeed, during this period the [99Tc]MDP bone scan is usually negative. The early demonstration and localization of the disease, together with the rapid bacteriologic diagnosis, allows for an early and more appropriate antibiotic treatment and better results

  10. Developing a magnetic resonance imaging scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona; Lassere, Marissa; Bird, Paul;

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy, and...

  11. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions. (orig.)

  12. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-02-01

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions.

  13. Wrist and finger joint MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P;

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elaborate the best MR imaging protocol for studies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the sensitivity and interobserver agreement with respect to detection of bone erosions (MR and radiography) and grading of synovial membrane hypertrophy (MR imaging only). MATERIAL AND...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  15. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Bash Dinners & Galas Healing Hands for Arthritis Bike Events Volunteer Search Events About Us Mission & Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Annual Report Financials Contact Us Privacy Policy Donate Make a Donation ...

  16. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphism disease activity and bone mineral metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether interleukin-1α and 1β gene polymorphism is associated with rheumatoid arthritis disease activity and bone mineral metabolism, and whether there is any relationship between IL-1β and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) motif gene. Methods IL-1 gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 65 RA patients who met American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria and 60 controls. From genomic DNA, 2 polymorphisms in each gene for IL1α-889 and IL-1β+3953 were typed by PCR-RFLP and HLA-DRB1 allele typing was also undertaken by PCR-SSOP. Some clinical and laboratory parameters were collected. The allelic frequencies and carriage rates were compared between RA patients and controls and between patients with active and quiescent disease. Comparison was also made between IL-1 polymorphism and parameters of bone mineral metabolism and between patients with the HLA-DRB1 RA motif plus IL-1β2 and patients without the two alleles. Fisher test and the analysis of variance was used to analyze the data.Results There was no significant difference in the frequency and carriage rate of IL-1α polymorphisms between RA patients and the controls. The β2/2 genotype of IL-1β was more common in female RA patients compared with controls (P=0.001). A lower carriage rate of IL-1β2 occurred in male RA patients (P=0.001). A higher carriage rate of IL-1α2 is associated with a higher ESR (P=0.008), HAQ score (P=0.03), and vit-D3 (P<0.001), but conversely a lower SJC (p=0.002), a lower RF (P=0.002) and a lower BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.001). A higher frequency of IL-1α1 is associated with a lower CRP value (P=0.009). An increased IL-1β2 carriage is associated with active rheumatoid disease as indicated by a higher CRP (P<0.001), ESR (P<0.001) and pain score (P=0.001) and a higher BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.007), lower vit-D3 and. Udpd/Crea level The presence of the HLA DRB1 RA motif and IL-1β allele 2 at same time did not contribute to disease activity

  17. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  18. Bone mineral density in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there is increasing interest in bone metabolism in patients with rheumatic disorders, few data exist on bone mineral density (BMD) in children with rheumatic disorders or on the association of BMD with disease-related variables. We determined BMD in Iranian children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) to evaluate the relationship between disease related variables and BMD. Twenty patients (13 girls and 7 boys) with SLE (n=5) and JRA (n=5) with a mean age of 13.10+-3.29 years (range, 6-17 years), attending a pediatric rheumatology clinic and 20 healthy controls (matched for age and sex with each patient) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study between 2001 and 2003. BMD (g/cm) of the femoral neck (BMD-F) and lumbar vertebrae (BMD-L) were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The correlation between BMD and cumulative dose of steroids, daily dose of steroid, disease duration, disease activity, height, weight and age was investigated. BMD in the patients (BMD-F=0.72+-0.15, BMD-L=0.70+-0.19) was significantly lower than controls (BMD-F=0.95+-0.17, BMD-L=0.98+-0.20, P<0.001). The severity of decreased BMD was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae than the femoral neck (P=0.04). None of the variables were consistently related to decrease in BMD. BMD was significantly lower in patients compared with controls. It was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae (trabecular bone). Although cumulative doses of steroids and disease duration appeared to have some influence on BMD, none were independently correlated with BMD. (author)

  19. Tuberculous arthritis and monoarticular rheumatoid arthritis in the knee : differential diagnosis using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the extent to which magnetic resonance(MR) imaging findings can help differentiate between tuberculous arthritis (TA) and rheumatoid arthritis(RA). This study involved sixteen patients with pathologically proven arthritis of the knee. In eight patients(mean age, 29.6 years; M:F=4:4) this was of the tuberculous variety, while eight (mean age, 47.5 years; M:F=2:6) suffered from the rheumatoid variety, which was monoarticular. For 14 patients, contrast enhancement studies were available. We retrospectively analyzed MR findings according to the demonstrated pattern of synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), bone erosion or abscess, bone marrow(BM) edema, the sites at which bursae were present, para-articular mass formation, and lymphadenopathy. In five of eight TA cases (62.5%), irregular and nodular enhanced synovial thickening was present, while in six of eight RA cases (75%), thickening was regular and even. Bone erosions or subarticular abscesses were found in six TA cases (75%) and small erosions in three cases (37.5%) of RA. BM edema surrounding the erosion was found in four cases of TA (50%) and two of RA (25%). In TA, edema was more extensive. In both TA and RA, all suprapatella bursae were distended while popliteal bursae were present in two cases of TA (25%) and four of RA (50%). Para-articular masses with rim like enhancement were found in six cases of TA (75%) and in one case of RA (12.5%). In particular, para-articular lymphadenopathy was seen in six cases of TA (75%), but not in RA. MR findings of irregular and nodular synovial thickening, extensive bone erosion, extensive BM edema, particular, para-articular abscess formation and lymphadenopathy, may help differentiate tuberculous arthritis of the knee from the rhumatoid variety

  20. Effect of fibromyalgia on bone mineral density in patients with fibromylagia and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Buyukbese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM may t cause a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD because of decreased mobility. The condition is relatively frequent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and RA patients with FM have more disability than those without FM. We evaluated the effect of FM on BMD and investigated the effect of FM on BMD in RA patients. Materials and Methods: We included age-matched 56 FM, 52 RA patients, and 37 healthy females as controls. Twenty three of all RA subjects met 1990 ACR FM criteria. Patients using the antiresorptive drugs, those on hormone replacement therapy, patients with thyroid or parathyroid dysfunction were excluded. Self-reported pain and fatigue severity, functional items of FM impact questionnaire were questioned in FM and RA patients. In all subjects, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur neck were determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry, and T-scores were recorded. Results: Self-reported pain and fatigue scores in FM subjects were significantly higher than in RA patients (P00.05. There was a significant negative correlation between self-reported pain score and lumbar spine BMD in FM subjects (r=–0.41, P=0.006. Conclusions: In spite of functional disability, FM does not cause a decrease in BMD. The presence of FM in RA patients does not result in a change in BMD.

  1. The roles of MR imaging in monitoring therapeutic effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis: preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult to determine objectively therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis. This study was carried out in order to assess the feasibility of MR imaging to determine disease status following antirheumatoid medication. Eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis underwent MR studies before treatment and approximately one year after the beginning of antirheumatoid medication. Coronal images were obtained, using a T1- and T2-weighted spin echo(n=8), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image(n=8) and dynamic contrast-enhanced image(n=4). Bone erosions, synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow enhancement in pre-and post-medication studies were compared. On dynamic study, enhancement ratio(E) of pannus was measured(E=SNR at 30sec/ SNR at precontrast). Changes of MRI findings and enhancement ratio between pre- and post-medication were compared with disease status as assessed by clinical index. In three patients, improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was noted, and in addition, there was no evidence of newly developed bone erosion. In two of these patients, complete remission was noted on the basis of the ARA criteria. In another three patients, despite improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy and improved clinical parameters including morning stiffness and ESR, discrete and newly developed bone erosions were noted. In one patient with a poor response to antirheumatoid medication, aggravation of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was seen, but no definite change in bone erosions was noted. In the remaining one patient, no remarkable changes were seen in bone marrow edema, synovial hypertrophy or bone erosion. Clinically this patient showed no morning stiffness or elevated ESR. The enhancement ratio of pannus decreased in all 4 cases, especially where there were complete remission. Synovial extent, bone marrow enhancement, bone erosions and enhancement ratio of pannus may be good parameters for monitoring disease activity in the

  2. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, H M; Vallø, J; Hørslev-Petersen, K;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of low-cost low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) to assess and predict erosive joint damage in the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 24 previously untreated patients with...... rheumatoid arthritis with joint symptoms for <1 year were evaluated at the time of diagnosis and after 6 and 12 months of methotrexate treatment with conventional clinical or biochemical examinations, x rays of both hands and wrists, and E-MRI of the dominant wrist and MCP joints. RESULTS: At baseline, all...... arthritis who were treated uniformly, baseline E-MRI erosions in MCP or wrist bones markedly increased the risk of x ray erosions at the 1-year follow-up. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity MRI is promising for assessment and prognostication of early rheumatoid arthritis....

  3. MRI assessment of bone marrow in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: intra- and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Pediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rava, Lucilla [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Epidemiology, Rome (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Bone marrow oedema (BMO) is included in MRI-based scoring systems of disease activity in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Similar systems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. To assess the reproducibility in a multi-centre setting of an MRI BMO scoring system in children with JIA. Seventy-six wrist MRIs were read twice, independently, by two experienced paediatric radiologists. BMO was defined as ill-defined lesions within the trabecular bone, returning high and low signal on T2- and T1-weighted images respectively, with or without contrast enhancement. BMO extension was scored for each of 14 bones at the wrist from 0 (none) to 3 (extensive). The intra-observer agreement was moderate to excellent, with weighted kappa ranging from 0.85 to 1.0 and 0.49 to 1.0 (readers 1 and 2 respectively), while the inter-observer agreement ranged from 0.41 to 0.79. The intra- and inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent and satisfactory, respectively. The scoring system was reliable and may be used for grading bone marrow abnormality in JIA. The relatively large variability in aggregate scores, particularly between readers, underscores the need for thorough standardisation. (orig.)

  4. Efficacy and safety of combination therapy for preventing bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Florenzo; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cantarini, Luca; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The main outcomes of the therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) must be preventing, or at least lessening, the development of structural damage. Biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs), targeting tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or other key steps (IL-1, IL-6, T cells, B cells) in the pathogenesis of RA, have given clues to be effective and safe as treatments for RA, being capable of improving disease activity, ameliorating functional ability and halting joint damage. A large body of evidence, stemming from randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and registries, has shown that the beneficial effects of the bDMARDs become optimal when combined with synthetic (s)-DMARDs, mainly methotrexate (MTX). Despite combination therapy is advocated by the international guidelines for the management of RA, data from the daily standard of care indicate that almost one third of RA patients are treated with bDMARDs as monotherapy. Many reasons may be taken into account to explain this gap from official recommendations, among which the fact that in real-life settings, the assessment of clinical outcomes is exclusively based on clinical indices, disregarding the evolution of bone damage. Furthermore, some bDMARDs have been launched in the market with the official approval to be used as monotherapy. But even for the latter, there is no conclusive proof that monotherapy regimen is comparable to co-therapy with MTX in preventing articular damage. In conclusion, the most recent published data show that combination therapy with bDMARDs and MTX represents the best therapeutic option for the treatment of RA since it can stop or at least slow the progression of disabling structural damage. PMID:26581205

  5. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Kun, Emily W; Cheng, Isaac T; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K; Zhu, Tracy Y; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients' group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (-2.918, [-6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  6. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: Current knowledge and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Mikael [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: parker@frh.regionh.dk; Ostergaard, Mikkel [Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre and Herlev University Hospitals, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A. [Department of Rheumatology, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Kubassova, Olga [Image Analysis LTD, Leeds (United Kingdom); Jensen, Karl Erik [Department of Radiology, MR section, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-08-15

    The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method for detecting and quantifying joint damage in RA. However, radiographs only show late disease manifestations as joint space narrowing and bone erosions, whereas it cannot detect synovitis and bone marrow oedema, i.e., inflammation in the synovium or the bone, which may be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) months to years before erosions develop. Furthermore, MRI allows earlier visualization of bone erosions than radiography. In order to allow early treatment initiation and optimal guidance of the therapeutic strategy, there is a need for methods which are capable of early detection of inflammatory joint changes. In this review, we will discuss available data, advantages, limitations and potential future of MRI in RA.

  7. Dosimetry, hematological toxicity and evaluation of chromosomal damage of Sm-153-EDTMP in patients with bone metastases and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarium-153-EDTMP has been successfully used for pain palliation in metastatic bone cancer to a lesser extend in rheumatoid arthritis. Were studied 110 patients, 90 with metastatic bone cancer and 20 with rheumatoid arthritis. Each patient received 37 MBq/kg (1mCi/kg) of Sm-153-EDTMP, intravenously injected. Urine samples were collected during 6 hours. Blood samples were collected before and one hour after the injection. The MIRD formalism was utilized for dosimetric calculations. The absorbed dose for red marrow, cortical and trabecular for patients with rheumatoid arthritis were respectively: 206±66,38 cGy; 544,04±171,31 cGy; 630,80±197,15 cGy. For the patients with metastatic bone cancer, the absorbed dose for red marrow was 319,07±94,06 cGy, cortical 841,58±236,12 cGy; trabecular 978,23± 264,05 cGy. The leukocyte counts decreased 48,5%±19%, the platelets 54,7%±26% and hemoglobin 13,7%±11%, from the baseline values. The principal kind of the structural aberrations observed were: acentric fragments, breaks, chromosomal gaps, centric ring and double minute. The number of the aberrations in blood cells, after the application of Sm-153-EDTMP, was 2,13 times bigger than the baseline. The absorbed dose radiation, the hematological and genetics effects established were in the limits accepted for this kind of treatment. (author)

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K.; Kun, Emily W.; Cheng, Isaac T.; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K.; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients’ group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (−2.918, [−6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  11. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  12. Suppression of proteoglycan-induced autoimmune arthritis by myeloid-derived suppressor cells generated in vitro from murine bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Kurkó

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are innate immune cells capable of suppressing T-cell responses. We previously reported the presence of MDSCs with a granulocytic phenotype in the synovial fluid (SF of mice with proteoglycan (PG-induced arthritis (PGIA, a T cell-dependent autoimmune model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the limited amount of SF-MDSCs precluded investigations into their therapeutic potential. The goals of this study were to develop an in vitro method for generating MDSCs similar to those found in SF and to reveal the therapeutic effect of such cells in PGIA.Murine bone marrow (BM cells were cultured for 3 days in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. The phenotype of cultured cells was analyzed using flow cytometry, microscopy, and biochemical methods. The suppressor activity of BM-MDSCs was tested upon co-culture with activated T cells. To investigate the therapeutic potential of BM-MDSCs, the cells were injected into SCID mice at the early stage of adoptively transferred PGIA, and their effects on the clinical course of arthritis and PG-specific immune responses were determined.BM cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-6, and G-CSF became enriched in MDSC-like cells that showed greater phenotypic heterogeneity than MDSCs present in SF. BM-MDSCs profoundly inhibited both antigen-specific and polyclonal T-cell proliferation primarily via production of nitric oxide. Injection of BM-MDSCs into mice with PGIA ameliorated arthritis and reduced PG-specific T-cell responses and serum antibody levels.Our in vitro enrichment strategy provides a SF-like, but controlled microenvironment for converting BM myeloid precursors into MDSCs that potently suppress both T-cell responses and the progression of arthritis in a mouse model of RA. Our results also suggest that enrichment of BM in MDSCs could improve the

  13. MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and MR imaging features of acute gouty arthritis and to define the characteristic findings that would be helpful for differentiating acute gouty arthritis from septic arthritis. The authors retrospectively studied seven patients who suffered from acute gouty arthritis. The MR imaging findings were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists who focused on joint effusion, subchondral bone erosion, bone marrow edema, synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), and the soft tissue changes (edema or abscess). The clinical records of the patients were reviewed with regard to age and gender, the clinical presentation and the laboratory findings (serum uric acid, WBC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and synovial fluid culture). The patients consisted of six men and one woman whose mean age was 41 years (age range:24-65 years). The joints involved were the knee (n=6), and ankle (n=1). Two patients had medical histories of gouty attacks that involved the first metatarsophalangeal joint. In six cases, the serum uric acid level during acute attacks was elevated. In all the patients, the affected joint became swollen, hot, erythematous and extremely tender, and this was accompanied by a high ESR and a high C-reactive protein level at the time of presentation. The results of Gram stain and culture of the synovial fluid were negative. In all patients, the MR images showed large amounts of joint effusion, thick irregular and nodular synovial thickening and soft tissue edema without subchondral bone erosions and soft tissue abscess. In one case, subchondral bone marrow edema of the medial femoral condyle was present. In five cases, there were multiple low signal foci in the joint on the spin-echo T2-weighted MR image. Even though the MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis are nonspecific, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis when a large amount of joint effusion

  14. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  15. Systemic immune markers characterizing early stages of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chalan, Paulina Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease occurring in ~1% of the world population. The main feature of the disease is ongoing joint inflammation, caused by immune cells and their soluble factors, leading to irreversible bone erosions and cartilage damage. Early treatment can halt progression of the disease and development of irreversible damage. Early recognition is therefore very important. Present research is geared at recognizing development of RA as early as possible by identi...

  16. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M;

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis are......, capitate, and a metacarpal base. In these bones, grades 0-3 of bone oedema are illustrated, and for bone erosion, grades 0-3 and examples of higher grades are presented. The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of wrist joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system...... illustrated in each of the three wrist joint areas defined in the scoring system-that is, the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, and the intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints. For reasons of feasibility, examples of bone abnormalities are limited to five selected bones: the radius, scaphoid, lunate...

  17. A multicenter reliability study of extremity-magnetic resonance imaging in the longitudinal evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Ejbjerg, Bo; Lassere, Marissa; Bird, Paul; Peterfy, Charles; Emery, Paul; McQueen, Fiona; Haavardsholm, Espen; O'Connor, Philip; Edmonds, John; Genant, Harry; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    There are limited data on the reliability of extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) in the longitudinal evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to assess the interreader reliability of the OMERACT RA MRI score in the assessment of change in disease activity and bone erosion sco...

  18. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: a 1-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, H.M.; Vallø, J.; Hørslev-Petersen, K.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of low-cost low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) to assess and predict erosive joint damage in the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 24 previously untreated patients with...... rheumatoid arthritis with joint symptoms for <1 year were evaluated at the time of diagnosis and after 6 and 12 months of methotrexate treatment with conventional clinical or biochemical examinations, x rays of both hands and wrists, and E-MRI of the dominant wrist and MCP joints. RESULTS: At baseline, all...... arthritis who were treated uniformly, baseline E-MRI erosions in MCP or wrist bones markedly increased the risk of x ray erosions at the 1-year follow-up. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity MRI is promising for assessment and prognostication of early rheumatoid arthritis. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Sep...

  19. The assessment of bee venom responses in an experimental model of mono-arthritis using Tc-99m DPD bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent studies have shown that bee venom (BV) has an anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect on arthritis. However, objective methods for evaluation of the therapeutic effect of BV is insufficient in animal studies and clinical trials. Our purpose was to determine the usefulness of bone scintigraphy using Tc-99m DPD (3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propan-dicarbonacid) about effects of BV applied to carrageenan-induced mono-arthritis (CIA) model. Mono-arthritis was induced by an intra-articular injection of carrageenan in Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of BV (0.8 mg/kg) was performed at 30 min before and at 4 h after the induction of mono-arthritis. We assigned rats to BV-before, BV-after, control-before and control-after groups and compared the results of each group by the weight-loading test and bone scintigraphy. The rats received an intravenous injection of 37 MBq of Tc-99m DPD by the tail vein and then scanning was performed at 4 and 24 h after the injection. Visual assessment and quantitative analysis were performed for both knees. The BV-before and BV-after groups were more improved than the control groups on the weight load test (p<0.05). Bone scintigraphy showed lower activity in the BV-before group than in the control-before group (p<0.05) on the 4 h imaging. However, a significant difference in the BV-before and BV-after groups was not observed on the 24 h imaging. BV had therapeutic effects by anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity in the CIA and bone scintigraphy performed on 4 h imaging provided visual and quantitative information for the assessment of the therapeutic response to BV as an objective method in mono arthritis model. (author)

  20. The performance of MRI in detecting subarticular bone erosion of sacroiliac joint in patients with spondyloarthropathy: A comparison with X-ray and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP sequence has high spatial resolution and short scanning time. • This is the first time this sequence was applied to detect bone erosion of SI joint. • Its performance was compared with other commonly used diagnostic methods. • Result shows that this sequence is better than X-ray and T1W in the detection of bone erosion. • This sequence can be considered an alternative to CT in showing erosion in SpA patients. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the sensitivity and specificity of detecting subarticular bone erosion of sacroiliac (SI) joint in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) using MRI three-dimensional water selective balanced steady-state free precession sequence (3D-WS-bSSFP) and T1-weighted (T1W) sequence. Materials and methods: Radiography, CT and MRI of SI joint from 43 SpA patients were retrospectively analyzed. MRI examination sequences include T1W, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and 3D-WS-bSSFP. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, independently determined bone erosion at bilateral sacral and iliac sides of the SI joint on radiography, CT, T1W and 3D-WS-bSSFP respectively. X2 test was used to compare the sensitivity of detecting bone erosion among different diagnostic methods. Results: Of the 86 sacral and 86 iliac articular surfaces from the 43 cases, radiography, CT, MRI T1W and 3D-WS-bSSFP showed the presence of bone erosion in 40, 74, 50 and 71 articular surfaces respectively. CT and MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP demonstrated similar sensitivity (x2 = 0.11, P = 0.74), and both were superior to radiography (x2 = 15.17, P < 0.01 and x2 = 12.78, P < 0.01, respectively) and T1W (x2 = 7.26, P < 0.01 and x2 = 5.62, P < 0.05). Using CT diagnosis as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting bone erosion for MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP and T1W sequences were 91.8%, 96.9%, and 60.8%, 94.9% respectively. Conclusion: MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP sequence is associated with short scanning time, zero ionizing radiation, high

  1. Research progress of bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis%类风湿关节炎骨代谢研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕伟; 厉小梅

    2012-01-01

    类风湿关节炎(Rheumatoid Arthritis,RA)是一种可导致骨和关节破坏的慢性疾病.在RA发生发展过程中,骨代谢异常可导致不同程度的骨量丢失和骨破坏.骨代谢的相关指标可以间接反映骨量丢失的严重程度.本文将对RA患者骨代谢的基本特点及骨量丢失相关因素的最新进展作一综述.%Rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) is a chronic disease which can lead to bone and joint destruction. During the pathogenesis of RA, abnormal bone metabolism may result in different degrees of bone loss and destruction. Relevant indicators of bone metabolism can reflect the severity of bone loss indirectly. This review focuses on the latest development of basic characteristics of bone metabolism and the factors of bone loss with RA.

  2. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Østergaard, Mikkel; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J

    2003-01-01

    patients with RA. Intra-reader and inter-occasion reliability was also assessed, and different slice thicknesses were compared in terms of erosion volume estimation. A 3 mm slice thickness 3D gradient-echo sequence followed by a 1 mm sequence was performed at baseline and repeated within 24 h with...... volume method was calculated, as well as the inter-occasion reliability, by comparing results from each reader from baseline to the followup scan. One reader performed repeat volume measurements on 5 patients to assess the intra-reader reliability. Five patients were included in the study. Expressed in...... terms of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), the inter-reader and inter-occasion reliability of the volume method were comparable to the existing OMERACT scoring system, but large systematic differences in volume estimations were found between readers. The intra-reader reliability was excellent...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in coccidioidal arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The authors assessed the MRI findings of appendicular coccidioidal arthritis. Design. T1- and T2-weighted MR images of affected joints, both with and without intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine, were performed in nine adult patients (ten studies) and evaluated by three masted readers, using a four-point certainty scale for: synovial abnormality, articular cartilage loss, subarticular bone loss, abnormal marrow signal, enhancement of osseous and articular structures, and assessment of disease activity. Findings were correlated with biopsy results or clinical course. Results. Eight patients had active and one had inactive arthritis, involving the knee (five patients), ankle (two patients), and elbow (one patient). Synovial complex was the most common finding in active arthritis (P<0.025). Cartilage and subarticular bone loss were seen 56% and 89% of patients with active disease, respectively. Abnormal marrow signal was uncommon (two patients). All cases showed synovial and/or osseus enhancement. Conclusions. MRI findings in coccidiodal arthritis are described. Enhancement of thickened synovium and erosions was seen after intravenous gadopentetate. (orig.). With 4 figs

  4. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  5. The Agreement Between Blood Pool - Delayed Bone Scintigraphy and Tc-99m Human Immunoglobulin G (HIG Scintigraphy in the Determination of the Presence and Severity of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulizar Kacar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, it was aimed to investigate the agreement between early phase of bone scintigraphy – human immunoglobulin scintigraphy (EPBS-HIG and late phase bone scintigraphy – HIG (LPBS-HIG in the determination of the presence and also the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (23 female, 5 male; between 19 to 80 years of age with inflammatory arthritis were included in the study. Tc-99m HIG and blood pool/late phase bone scintigraphies were performed in all patients. In scintigraphic examinations, the joints were scored with the degree of accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical by the semiquantitative analysis (0=Background activity, 1=Faint uptake, 2=Moderate uptake, 3=Marked uptake which is called as visually active joint score as severity index of the disease. To estimate the agreement between EPBS – HIG and LPBS - HIG in the determination of the presence and severity of inflammatory arthritis, 2x2 kappa coefficients were calculated. Results: Our results showed good agreement between EPBS - HIG for the presence of inflammation (kappa: 0.72 but not for the severity of the disease (kappa: 0.29, poor agreement between LPBS - HIG for both the presence (kappa: 0.51 and severity (kappa: 0.01 of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusion: The blood pool scintigraphy could be used in the investigation of the presence of inflammatory arthritis because the good agreement with HIG and the lower cost but not for the severity of the disease. (MIRT 2011;20:45-51

  6. Serum Heme Oxygenase-1 and BMP-7 Are Potential Biomarkers for Bone Metabolism in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tong-ling; Chen, Jin; Tong, Yan-li; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Liu, Yi; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to play a regulatory role in osteoclastogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways induce osteoblastic differentiation and bone remodeling. Aims. To identify serum levels of HO-1, BMP-7, and Runt related-transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate the relationships between HO-1, BMP-7, Runx2, and other common biomarkers for bone metabolism. Results. Serum levels of HO-1 and BMP-7 were revealed to be significantly higher in patients with RA or AS than in healthy controls (p < 0.01). In RA group, HO-1 was positively correlated with BMP-7, Runx2, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRAP-5b) (p < 0.05, resp.), BMP-7 was positively correlated with Runx2 and TRAP-5b (p < 0.05, resp.), and Runx2 was negatively correlated with N-terminal midfragment of osteocalcin (NMID) (p < 0.05). In AS group, we observed identical correlation between HO-1 and BMP-7, but opposite correlations between BMP-7 and TRAP-5b and between Runx2 and NMID, when comparing with the RA cohort. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that HO-1 and BMP-7 are potential biomarkers for bone metabolism in patients with RA and AS. The different correlations between the bone markers point to distinct differences in bone remodeling pathways in the two types of arthritis. PMID:27314037

  7. Technetium-99m human polyclonal immunoglobulin g studies and conventional bone scans to detect active joint inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic polyarthritis in which active inflammed joints coexist with joints in remission. We performed bone scans (99mTc-DPD) and 99mTc human polyclonal immunoglobulin G scans (99mTc-IgG) in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis to assess the uptake in actively inflammed joints and in joints in which remission after inflammation had occurred. A quantitative analysis of tracer uptake in each joint was performed on both scans. In 123 joints without current active inflammation, an increased 99mTc-DPD uptake was observed (2.31±1.27), whereas no 99mTc-IgG uptake was noted (1.18±0.32). Some 78 joints with mild pain or swelling exhibited increased 99mTc-DPD uptake (2.48±1.14) and increased 99mTc-IgG uptake (1.76±0.50; P99mTc-DPD uptake (2.39±0.93) and increased 99mTc-IgG uptake (1.79±0.51; P99mTc-IgG scans distinguish between joints with and without active inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, whereas bone scans do not. Thus, 99mTc-IgG scans may be useful in identifying joints with current active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  8. Erosion defined: back to basics

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Jonathan; Gravallese, Ellen M

    2013-01-01

    Current classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis allow its classification on the basis of the presence of erosions, in the absence of other indicators. Nevertheless, definition or quantitation of erosions was lacking. A European task force has now addressed this issue by analysing radiographic erosions in two cohorts of patients with early disease.

  9. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  10. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A. [University of Oslo, Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O. [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2016-03-15

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  11. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  12. Arthritis Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connected Home » Arthritis Advice Heath and Aging Arthritis Advice Common Kinds of Arthritis Warning Signs Treating ... cause damage to your joints. Common Kinds of Arthritis Arthritis is one of the most common diseases ...

  13. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  14. Lipoma arborescens of the glenohumeral joint causing bone erosion: MRI features with gadolinium enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Eun Young; Chung, Hye Won; Shin, Myung Jin; Lee, Sang Hoon [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-08-15

    Lipoma arborescens is a rare benign intra-articular lesion that principally affects the knee joint. We present a case of lipoma arborescens involving the glenohumeral joint and associated with prominent large bony erosions. The gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this lesion are also described. The characteristic MRI findings permit precise preoperative diagnosis of this rare condition even if it occurs in an atypical location and there are confusing radiological findings. (orig.)

  15. Evaluación del daño estructural de manos mediante RM en pacientes con artritis reumatoidea temprana, sin evidencia de erosiones radiográficas Assessment of structural damage of hands by MRI in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, without evidence of erosions in radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Spina (h

    2009-12-01

    los pacientes presentaron sinovitis y 7 (70 %, edema óseo. Apesar de no observarse erosiones en la radiografía, 7 pacientes (70 % las mostraron en RM. La erosión representó el 26,25% del score total de RM. Conclusión: Tradicionalmente, el daño estructural de la AR se mide utilizando diferentes métodos de score radiológicos. Dado que la detección precoz de erosiones predice una enfermedad más agresiva, la RM debería ser considerada en pacientes con AR temprana para la evaluación del pronóstico. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar a un mayor número de pacientes para certificar esta observación.Introduction: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints, leading to destruction of articular cartilage and bone. Approximately 75% of RA patients develop joint erosions within the first two years of onset of symptoms. The presence of early erosions reveals more aggressive disease and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. It has been shown that erosion damage can be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI even before 6 months of the disease onset. This technique appears to be more sensitive than conventional radiology. MRI evaluation using the score of Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT / Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (RAMRIS allows semiquantitative assessment of bone edema, synovitis and erosions. Objective: To evaluate the characteristics of structural damage by MRI in patients with early RA (less than one year of progression, with no erosions of hands on the X-ray. Materials and methods: We selected 10 patients with RA according to the ACR criteria 1987, whose score showed radiographic Sharp / van der Heijde equal to 0 (zero for erosions. They underwent MRI of both hands. The Sharp / van der Heijde method was used to assess articular impingement, and the OMERACT-RAMRIS score to quantify joint lesions detected by MRI. The final scores obtained by both methods were compared

  16. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  17. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis

  18. Periarticular and generalised bone loss in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T W; Hansen, M S; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hyldstrup, L; Abrahamsen, B; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Zerahn, Bo; Pødenphant, J; Stengaard-Petersen, K; Junker, P; Ostergaard, M; Lottenburger, Tine; Ellingsen, Torkell Juulsgaad; Andersen, L S; Hansen, I; Skjødt, H; Pedersen, J K; Lauridsen, U B; Svendsen, A J; Tarp, U; Lindegaard, Hanne; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Vestergaard, Aage; Hetland, M L; group, the Cimestra study

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of alendronate and intra-articular betamethasone treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) changes in hand, lumbar spine and femoral neck during 1 year of a treat-to-target study (Cyclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA (CIMESTR...

  19. Rampant infections of bone marrow stem cell niches as triggers for spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Tropheryma Whipplei can induce rheumatism mimicking SpA or RA, but even more rampant bacterial/viral infections in epiphyseal bones could also contribute to the onset of RA and SpA. Indeed, as bone marrow stem cell niches are enriched in Tregs and myeloid derived suppressor cells, these areas are favourable for the persistence of quiescent viruses and/or dormant bacteria. This review focuses on the possibility that such silent infections of bone marrow stem cell niches might contribute to the pathogenesis of SpA and RA, at least during their onset. Some infections can affect the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which can transmit these pathogens to their progeny. Transient but repeated revivals of viruses or dormant bacteria could promote the conversion of marrow regulatory T cells into effector phenotypes, leading to autoimmunity in the epiphyseal bone marrow, entheses and adjacent synovium. This scenario would also fit the flares of rheumatic disorders and explain why some joints or enthuses can be severely involved whereas their neighbours remain intact. The efficiency of anti-TNF drugs does not rule out a role of persistent infections in SpA and RA. These drugs do not affect chlamydial clearance, or the reactivation of latent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice or Epstein-Barr virus in humans. Anti-TNF might even prevent, rather than foster, the revival of dormant bacteria and viruses in marrow stem cell niches. Indeed, anti-TNF enhance the maturation of the immunosuppressive immature myeloid cells around stem cells into dendritic cells and macrophages, thus restoring immune responses in these areas. PMID:26886813

  20. T helper 17 and T helper 1 cells are increased but regulatory T cells are decreased in subchondral bone marrow microenvironment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Shufeng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Kaining; Dong, Shixiao; Wang, Xiuhua; Liu, Xinguang; Ren, Yanjun; Zhang, Ming; Yan, Xinfeng; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study is to investigate the profiles of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in bone marrow of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Flow cytometry was used to analyze the frequencies of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in paired peripheral blood and bone marrow of 26 RA patients and 11 osteoarthritis (OA) patients, as well as 10 healthy controls. In addition, the disease activity was analyzed by the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28). Results: The frequencies of Th17 and Th1 cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow of RA patients. Importantly, Th17 and Th1 cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow compared with the matched peripheral blood from RA patients. However, Treg cells were significantly decreased in bone marrow of RA patients compared with the matched peripheral blood of RA patients and bone marrow of osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the frequencies of tumor necrosis factor-α-producing T cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow from RA patients. Additionally, Th17 and Th1 cells in bone marrow were positively correlated with DAS28, while Treg cells were negatively correlated with DAS28. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that Th17 and Th1 cells are markedly increased in bone marrow from RA patients. By contrast, Treg cells are significantly decreased in bone marrow from RA patients. These results suggest that local abnormality of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in bone marrow of RA patients may contribute to bone destruction in skeletal system.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and therapeutic efficacy of intrapulmonary administration of zoledronate for the prevention of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Mozume, Takunori; Yanagi, Shin-Ichiro; Hasei, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Tetsushi; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Zoledronate, a third-generation nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is a new therapeutic agent for the prevention of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to the poor oral absorption of zoledronate, the intravenous route has been the preferred method of administration. To evaluate whether the lung is a promising alternative route of zoledronate administration for the prevention of joint destruction in RA, we examined the pharmacokinetics, safety and therapeutic potential of zoledronate after intrapulmonary administration. The bioavailability of zoledronate was 55% after intrapulmonary administration in rats. In a collagen-induced RA mouse model, an intrapulmonary administration of zoledronate given 7 d before the 2nd collagen immunization effectively suppressed bone loss and joint destruction to a level similar to that achieved with intravenous injection at 21 d after the 2nd collagen immunization. Zoledronate only slightly affected lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 4 h after intrapulmonary administration of the therapeutic dose in rats. Moreover, zoledronate only slightly changed the plasma level of creatinine after intrapulmonary administration while creatinine significantly increased after intravenous injection of zoledronate in mice. These results indicate that the lung is a promising alternative route of zoledronate administration for the treatment and prevention of joint destruction in RA. PMID:26508267

  2. Interactions of the Immune System with Skin and Bone Tissue in Psoriatic Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Andrea; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Maverakis, Emanual

    2016-08-01

    Cutaneous psoriasis (e.g., psoriasis vulgaris (PsV)) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are complex heterogeneous diseases thought to have similar pathophysiology. The soluble and cellular mediators of these closely related diseases are being elucidated through genetic approaches such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), as well as animal and molecular models. Novel therapeutics targeting these mediators (IL-12, IL-23, IL-17, IL-17 receptor, TNF) are effective in treating both the skin and joint manifestations of psoriasis, reaffirming the shared pathophysiology of PsV and PsA. However, the molecular and cellular interactions between skin and joint disease have not been well characterized. Clearly, PsV and PsA are highly variable in terms of their clinical manifestations, and this heterogeneity can partially be explained by differences in HLA-associations (HLA-Cw*0602 versus HLA-B*27, for example). In addition, there are numerous other genetic susceptibility loci (LCE3, CARD14, NOS2, NFKBIA, PSMA6, ERAP1, TRAF3IP2, IL12RB2, IL23R, IL12B, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, TYK2) and geoepidemiologic factors that contribute to the wide variability seen in psoriasis. Herein, we review the complex interplay between the genetic, cellular, ethnic, and geographic mediators of psoriasis, focusing on the shared mechanisms of PsV and PsA. PMID:26780035

  3. RANK, RANKL and osteoprotegerin in arthritic bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Bezerra

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by the presence of inflammatory synovitis and destruction of joint cartilage and bone. Tissue proteinases released by synovia, chondrocytes and pannus can cause cartilage destruction and cytokine-activated osteoclasts have been implicated in bone erosions. Rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues produce a variety of cytokines and growth factors that induce monocyte differentiation to osteoclasts and their proliferation, activation and longer survival in tissues. More recently, a major role in bone erosion has been attributed to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL released by activated lymphocytes and osteoblasts. In fact, osteoclasts are markedly activated after RANKL binding to the cognate RANK expressed on the surface of these cells. RANKL expression can be upregulated by bone-resorbing factors such as glucocorticoids, vitamin D3, interleukin 1 (IL-1, IL-6, IL-11, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, prostaglandin E2, or parathyroid hormone-related peptide. Supporting this idea, inhibition of RANKL by osteoprotegerin, a natural soluble RANKL receptor, prevents bone loss in experimental models. Tumor growth factor-ß released from bone during active bone resorption has been suggested as one feedback mechanism for upregulating osteoprotegerin and estrogen can increase its production on osteoblasts. Modulation of these systems provides the opportunity to inhibit bone loss and deformity in chronic arthritis.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.)

  5. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Enteropathic Arthritis Learn About Spondylitis / Enteropathic Arthritis Overview For The ... Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Overview: Enteropathic Arthritis Enteropathic (en-ter-o-path-ic) arthritis is ...

  6. Bone marrow oedema assessment by magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Eshed, Iris; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the influence of different MRI unit field strengths, coil types and image resolutions on the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) of bone marrow oedema (BME) and image quality. METHODS: Forty-one patients and 12 healthy controls participated in this...... STIR image sets were anonymized and scored according to RAMRIS and parameters of image quality were measured. RESULTS: The BME sum scores were similar overall when comparing the different MRI units, coil types and voxel sizes, yet significantly higher at the higher resolution of 1.5T Extr compared with...... resolutions, suggesting that these are equally suited for assessment of BME in RA. However, parameters of image quality and intrareader reliability (favouring 0.6, 1.5 and 3T) should be considered when selecting the MRI acquisition strategy....

  7. Bone scan and joint scan of hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis; Scintigraphie osseuse et articulaire des mains et des pieds dans la polyarthrite rhumatoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, N.; Verbeke, S.; Perdrisot, R.; Grilo, R.M.; Quenesson, E.; Bonnet, C.; Vergne, P.; Treves, R.; Bertin, P.; Boutros-Toni, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Dupuytren, Faculte de Medecine, 87 - Limoges (France)

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of joint scan and bone scan of hands and feet, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to localize the altered joints. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of joint scan were determined in comparison with clinical joint assessment. Fifteen patients (780 joints) were clinically examined (pain and synovitis); during the same day, a bone scan and a joint scan were realized by oxidronate {sup 99m}Tc intravenous injection. Patients were scanned 5 minutes (tissual time, T{sub t}) and 3 hours 1/4 (bone time, T{sub 0}) after the administration. The uptake of the bi-phosphonate was evaluated with a qualitative method using a grey scale. The uptake of {sup 99m}Tc oxidronate was quantitated using an extra-articular region of interest. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the scan at Tt were 46%, 96%, 85% et 78%. The same parameters were 75%, 66%, 53% and 84% for the scan realized at T{sub 0}. The joint scan has showed 22% of false positive. These false positives could be a consequence of an earlier detection of joint alterations by scan. The joint scan should forecast the evolution of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  8. Ulnar variance in children - standard measurements for evaluation of ulnar shortening in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis and other bone or joint disorders in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements for radioulnar variance in adults cannot be used in children because the epiphyses are not fully ossified. We describe a method of determining ulnar variance in children by using the distance from the distal metaphysis of the radius to the distal metaphysis of the ulna. Standards for this measurement are presented for ages 1.5 to 15.5 years in boys and girls. These measurements change little with age and may be helpful in establishing shortening of the ulna which may be seen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis, or other bone and joint diseases with childhood onset. (orig.)

  9. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...... developed and validated by several groups. The OMERACT criteria require that outcome measures demonstrate adequate validity, discriminative power, and feasibility if they are to be useful in clinical trials. Specific performance targets for these criteria depend on the scientific, regulatory, logistical......, and financial context of the study in question. We review the extent to which MRI assessments of joint erosion, bone edema, and synovitis fulfil these criteria, particularly as they relate to proof-of-concept RA clinical trials....

  11. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  12. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta [University of Pisa, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (Italy); D' aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide [Radiology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  13. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  14. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  15. Validity and reliability of 3D US for the detection of erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using MRI as the gold standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, K; Bliddal, H; Møller Døhn, U;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the reliability and validity of a 3D US erosion score in RA using MRI as the gold standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: RA patients were examined with 3D US and 3 T MRI over the 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal joints. 3D blocks were evaluated by two investigators. The erosions were es...

  16. Serum levels of parathyroid hormone and markers of bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Relationship to disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tonny Joran; Hansen, M; Madsen, J C;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid (GC) treatment on serum parathyroid hormone (s-PTH) and bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, in patients with active RA, to examine the PTH secretion and Ca2+ set point before and...... after treatment with GC. METHODS: A range of biochemical markers of bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis were measured in 95 patients with definite RA stratified into groups according to disease activity and GC treatment. In a subgroup of 12 patients with active disease, initiating slow......-acting-anti-rheumatic-drugs (SAARDs) +/- GC, the PTH secretion and calcium set point were evaluated by use of the Cica clamp technique before and after 1 month of treatment. RESULTS: S-osteocalcin, s-total alkaline phosphatase (s-TAP) and s-carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (s-ICTP) were elevated in all...

  17. MRI bone oedema is the strongest predictor of subsequent radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis. Results from a 2 year randomized controlled trial (CIMESTRA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of radiographic progression in a 2-year randomized, double-blind clinical study (CIMESTRA) of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Early RA patients (N=130) were treated with methotrexate, intra-articular betamethasone and cyclosporine...... predictor of delta-TSS (wrist+MCP-group: coefficient=0.75 (95%CI: 0.56-0.97), p<0.00001; wrist-only-group: coefficient=0.56 (0.41-0.77), p<0.00001). Bone oedema score explained 41% of the variation in the progression of TSS (wrist+MCP-group), 25% in wrist-only-group, (Pearson's r=0.64 and r=0.......50, respectively). The results were confirmed by sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSION: In a RCT aiming at remission in early RA patients, baseline RAMRIS MRI bone oedema score of MCP and wrist joints (and of wrist only) was the strongest independent predictor of radiographic progression in hands, wrists and forefeet...

  18. SH3BP2 gain-of-function mutation exacerbates inflammation and bone loss in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Mukai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. Gain-of-function mutations in SH3BP2 cause cherubism, characterized by jawbone destruction. This study was aimed to examine the role of SH3BP2 in inflammatory bone loss using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model. METHODS: CIA was induced in wild-type (Sh3bp2(+/+ and heterozygous P416R SH3BP2 cherubism mutant knock-in (Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice, an SH3BP2 gain-of-function model. Severity of the arthritis was determined by assessing the paw swelling and histological analyses of the joints. Micro-CT analysis was used to determine the levels of bone loss. Inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in the joints were evaluated by quantitating the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast markers. Furthermore, involvement of the T- and B-cell responses was determined by draining lymph node cell culture and measurement of the serum anti-mouse type II collagen antibody levels, respectively. Finally, roles of the SH3BP2 mutation in macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis were determined by evaluating the TNF-α production levels and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophage (BMM cultures. RESULTS: Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice exhibited more severe inflammation and bone loss, accompanying an increased number of osteoclasts. The mRNA levels for TNF-α and osteoclast marker genes were higher in the joints of Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice. Lymph node cell culture showed that lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 production were comparable between Sh3bp2(+/+ and Sh3bp2(KI/+ cells. Serum anti-type II collagen antibody levels were comparable between Sh3bp2(+/+ and Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice. In vitro experiments showed that TNF-α production in Sh3bp2(KI/+ BMMs is elevated compared with Sh3bp2(+/+ BMMs and that RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis is enhanced in Sh3bp2(KI/+ BMMs associated with increased NFATc1 nuclear localization. CONCLUSION: Gain-of-function of

  19. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ≥80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  20. Smoking and polymorphisms of genes encoding mannose-binding lectin and surfactant protein-D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Malthe; Frisch, Morten; Madsen, Hans Ole; Garred, Peter; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in genes coding for mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and surfactant protein-D (SP-D) are associated directly or by interaction with smoking with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) positive RA, and erosive RA. MBL2 genotypes, SFTPD...... genotype at codon 11, and HLA-shared epitope were determined in 456 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 533 sex- and age-matched controls. Patients were grouped according to the presence of ACPA antibodies and RA-associated bone erosions and sub-stratified according to smoking status as never or ever...... with RA but with erosive RA by interaction with smoking. The genetic disposition for high MBL production was associated with ACPA positive RA irrespective of shared epitope. The findings need to be replicated but do as such offer further explanations for the clinical heterogeneity of RA....

  1. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  2. Changes in synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes after intraarticular methylprednisolone. Quantitative assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in arthritis by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P;

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate synovial membrane volumes, effusion volumes, and cartilage and bone erosion scores determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as markers of disease activity and severity in arthritis. METHODS: Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1...... effusion volumes and MRI scores of cartilage and bone erosions are reproducible and may be sensitive measures of disease activity and severity in RA. The synovial volume may rather than the effusion volume determine clinical appearance. Both are influenced by the present inflammatory activity. The...

  3. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M;

    2007-01-01

    resected bone. METHODS: Preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI scans were obtained in 11 RA patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery to the hands/wrists or feet. In 9, MRI scans were scored by 2 readers for bone oedema (RAMRIS system). Its distribution with respect to surgical site was investigated. In 4......OBJECTIVES: MRI bone oedema has been observed in early and advanced RA and may represent a cellular infiltrate (osteitis) in subchondral bone. We studied MRI scans from RA patients undergoing surgery, seeking to identify regions of bone oedema and examine its histopathological equivalent in...... patients, 7 bone samples were examined for a cellular infiltrate, and this was compared with MRI bone oedema, scored for spatial extent and intensity. RESULTS: Inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients for bone oedema were 0.51 (all sites) and 0.98 (bone samples for histology). Bone oedema was...

  4. The interleukin-20 receptor axis in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Nielsen, Morten Aagaard;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often characterized by the presence of rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, and bone erosions. Current therapies can compromise immunity, leading to risk of infection. The interleukin-20 receptor (IL-20R) axis comprising IL-19, IL-20...... RA synovial fluid compared with monocytes from both RA and healthy control peripheral blood. The plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 were increased in rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive compared with negative early RA patients (all P < 0.0001). Immune complexes...

  5. Fractalkine in rheumatoid arthritis: a review to date.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G

    2012-02-03

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by the expansion of the synovium, with infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells, neovascularization and an abundance of pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in tissue destruction and bone erosion. Fractalkine (FKN), a recently described chemokine, possesses chemotactic, angiogenic and adhesive functions that associates it with all of these destructive processes. In this review, we describe the research to date, which implicates FKN and its receptor in the pathogenesis of RA and propose that this molecule may represent a future therapeutic target for RA.

  6. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  7. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  8. Altered composition of bone as triggered by irradiation facilitates the rapid erosion of the matrix by both cellular and physicochemical processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E Green

    Full Text Available Radiation rapidly undermines trabecular architecture, a destructive process which proceeds despite a devastated cell population. In addition to the 'biologically orchestrated' resorption of the matrix by osteoclasts, physicochemical processes enabled by a damaged matrix may contribute to the rapid erosion of bone quality. 8w male C57BL/6 mice exposed to 5 Gy of Cs(137 γ-irradiation were compared to age-matched control at 2d, 10d, or 8w following exposure. By 10d, irradiation had led to significant loss of trabecular bone volume fraction. Assessed by reflection-based Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI, chemical composition of the irradiated matrix indicated that mineralization had diminished at 2d by -4.3±4.8%, and at 10d by -5.8±3.2%. These data suggest that irradiation facilitates the dissolution of the matrix through a change in the material itself, a conclusion supported by a 13.7±4.5% increase in the elastic modulus as measured by nanoindentation. The decline in viable cells within the marrow of irradiated mice at 2d implies that the immediate collapse of bone quality and inherent increased risk of fracture is not solely a result of an overly-active biologic process, but one fostered by alterations in the material matrix that predisposes the material to erosion.

  9. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of, and surgery for, bone and joint diseases. Physical therapists: Health professionals who work with patients to improve ... heart. Pericarditis can be caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Physical therapist. A health professional who works with patients to ...

  10. Radiographic visualisation of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis in Carriers of HLA-B27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurik, A.G.; Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1987-07-01

    A group of 11 B27-positive, seropositive patients with rheumatoid arthritis was compared with 11 matched B27-negative seropositive patients. The radiographs of all limb joints, the sacroiliac joints, and the cervical spine were read blindly. Ten patients in each group were radiographed 2-6 times during observation periods of 3-13 years; one patient in each group was only examined once. The prevailing picture of both groups was that of progressive erosive rheumatoid arthritis, although two small differences were found: Erosions of the apophyseal joints of the cervical spine and slight periosteal new bone formation of the shoulder, hip, and knee regions occurred more often in the B27-positive than in the B27-negative group.

  11. Diagnosis of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison between low-field magnetic resonance imaging, 3-phase bone scintigraphy and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides conventional X-rays, in the diagnostic work up of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 3-phase bone scintigraphy (3P-Sz) is as well established as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the newly developed low field MRI with the proven methods X-rays and 3P-Sz. Methods: 65 patients (47f, 18m; 20-86 yrs) were studied on a one day protocol with 3P-Sz (550 MBq Tc-99m DPD), MRI and X-rays of the hands. Images were visually analysed by two blinded nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists and classified as a) RA-typical, b) inflammatory, non-RA-typical and c) non inflammatory changes. All methods were compared to 3P-Sz as golden standard. Results: In comparison to 3P-Sz, low field MRI presents with almost equal sensitivity and specificity in rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes. Conventional X-rays revealed in arthritis-typical changes as well as in inflammatory changes a significantly lower sensitivity and also a lower negative predictive value while specificity equals the one of MRI. Quantitative analysis of 3P-Sz using ROI-technique unveiled significantly higher values in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with no inflammatory changes. Conclusion: MRI represents an equally sensitive method in the initial diagnosis of rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes in the region of the hands as compared to the 3P-Sz. Besides the basic diagnosis with conventional X-rays, 3P-Sz is still the recommended method of choice to evaluate the whole body when RA is suspected. Additionally, quantitative analysis of the 3P-Sz using the ROI technique in the region of the hands reveals statistically significant results and should therefore be taken into account in the assessment of inflammatory changes. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between C-reactive protein concentration, bone mineral density and cardiovascular disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Gavva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study relationship between serum level of hs-CRP, bone mineral density (BMD and cardiovascular disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 132 pts with RA with mean age 50 years (45-53 years and mean disease duration 132 months (48-216 months were examined. BMD was evaluated by dichroic X-ray densitometry in femur neck with Gologic apparatus. CRP concentration was assessed by high sensitivity nephelometric immunoassay with latex amplification with BN 100 analyzer (Dade Behring, Germany. Results. Mean BMD value in pts with RA was lower than in control group —1,4 SD and -0,45 SD respectively (p=0,00001. Normal BMD, osteoporosis and osteopenia were revealed in 38%, 47% and 15% of pts respectively. Clinical and subclinical signs of atherosclerosis in RA were more frequent than in control: coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke (ST in 25% and in 6% respectively (p=0,004, plaques (P and intima-media complex (IMC thickening in 65% and 35% respectively (p=0,003. In groups with osteopenia and osteoporosis ST and CHD revealed after RA development were more frequent, (p<0,05, RA duration was longer (p=0,02, hs CRP concentration was higher (p=0.001. Frequency of subclinical signs of atherosclerosis (P and IMC thickening in groups with normal and decreased BMD was similar. Pts with combination of osteopenia and osteoporosis (n=81 had higher frequency of CHD and high hs-CRP than pts with normal BMD (p<0,05. Mean hs-CRP level in RA was significantly higher than in control. Mean hs-CRP values in normal BMD, osteopenia and osteoporosis were 7,02 (2,4-14,5 mg/1, 9,3 (4,4-22 mg/1, 15,3 (8,6-36,2 mg/l respectively (p=0,001. 65 pts with mean hs- CRP level 3,9 (1,8-7,02 mg/l had higher BMD value than 67 pts with mean hs-CRP level 22 (12,6-34 mg/l (-1,75 SD and -1,0 SD respectively, p=0,016. Frequency of clinical, subclinical signs of atherosclerosis and traditional risk factors did not differ in different groups. The

  13. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane (Ed.); Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás de; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  14. Automated segmentation of knee and ankle regions of rats from CT images to quantify bone mineral density for monitoring treatments of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Francisco; Sevilla, Raquel; Zhu, Joe; Vanko, Amy; Lee, Jung Hoon; Dogdas, Belma; Zhang, Weisheng

    2014-03-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) obtained from a CT image is an imaging biomarker used pre-clinically for characterizing the Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) phenotype. We use this biomarker in animal studies for evaluating disease progression and for testing various compounds. In the current setting, BMD measurements are obtained manually by selecting the regions of interest from three-dimensional (3-D) CT images of rat legs, which results in a laborious and low-throughput process. Combining image processing techniques, such as intensity thresholding and skeletonization, with mathematical techniques in curve fitting and curvature calculations, we developed an algorithm for quick, consistent, and automatic detection of joints in large CT data sets. The implemented algorithm has reduced analysis time for a study with 200 CT images from 10 days to 3 days and has improved the robust detection of the obtained regions of interest compared with manual segmentation. This algorithm has been used successfully in over 40 studies.

  15. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  16. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  17. Psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  18. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  19. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. METHODS: Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. RESULTS: Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  20. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been widely used for the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, with only a minority of studies considering other types of arthritis. This review is concerned with an evaluation of the MRI appearance of peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Methods: A Medline search was performed to identify all publications from the years 1985 to 2006 concerning MRI of the peripheral joints and PsA. Additional papers were retrieved by scanning the references to the Medline-listed articles. Articles written in English, French, German, and Italian were included. Results: Most papers studied the hand and wrist, and only few of them were concerned with the knee, foot, temporomandibular joint, and elbow. Patients with PsA showed often, but not always, a pattern of joint inflammation which extended beyond the capsule into the extraarticular tissue. Bone oedema and erosions were less frequent than in RA. In particular, bone oedema at the entheseal junction was seen, especially in the knee. The degree of synovitis, assessed by dynamic MRI, was similar in PsA and RA. Discussion: Data on MRI of the peripheral joints in PsA are scanty. Only few studies were specifically designed to evaluate the pattern of arthritis in PsA, with most information deriving from papers where different types of arthritis were considered together. An enthesis-related origin of PsA has been proposed in contrast to the primarily synovial inflammation of RA. This pathogenic interpretation is likely to be true, but does not explain all cases of PsA, and needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  2. Fragility Fractures in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Costa, Luisa; Benigno, Carla; Del Puente, Aurora; Foglia, Francesca; Oriente, Alfonso; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can have peculiar effects on bone, including mechanisms of bone loss such as erosions, but also of bone formation, such as ankylosis or periostitis. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of fractures in patients with PsA as compared to healthy controls and to investigate determinants of fractures among cases. For both cases and controls, radiographs were read to identify vertebral fractures (VF), and the presence of femoral neck or other nonvertebral fractures was obtained from patients' medical history. The prevalence of fragility fractures on radiographic readings did not differ between cases and controls. The number of subjects showing a VF was 33 (36%) among PsA patients and 36 (36%) among controls, with a prevalence of severe VF of 8% among cases and 4% among controls. Controlling for covariates in a logistic model, the only variables showing a significant correlation with the presence of nonvertebral fractures (NVF) were disease duration (p=0.02), age (p=0.03), and bone mineral density at femoral neck (inverse correlation, p=0.04). Fractures should be carefully considered when evaluating the global picture of the patient with PsA for their contribution to the "fragility" profile. PMID:26523054

  3. A multicenter reliability study of extremity-magnetic resonance imaging in the longitudinal evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Ejbjerg, Bo; Lassere, Marissa;

    2007-01-01

    scores using 0.2 T E-MRI hand and wrist images from 2 timepoints, evaluated by 3 readers at different international centers. The intraclass correlation coefficients and smallest detectable difference results for the change scores were generally good for erosions and synovitis, but were not acceptable for......There are limited data on the reliability of extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) in the longitudinal evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to assess the interreader reliability of the OMERACT RA MRI score in the assessment of change in disease activity and bone erosion...... bone edema. Overall, E-MRI demonstrated ability to detect change comparable to that reported for high-field MRI for erosion and synovitis....

  4. Ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in neonatal hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate ultrasonographic findings of neonatal patients who confirmed and treated as hip joint septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. We retrospectively examined clinical feature and radiologic findings of 7 neonatal patients ranging from 8 to 28 days of age who were examined from January 1966 to December 1998 at nursery and were confirmed and treated on the diagnosis of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Clinical features of the patients were comparatively analyzed with radiologic findings including plain radiographs, ultrasonography, bone scan and MRI. We emphasized importance of ultrasonographic findings of these patients. Ultrasonography was performed first of all in all cases after the symptom onset. Other examinations were performed on the same day or a few days later after ultrasonography. Ultrasonography revealed abnormal finding in 85.7% (6/7) of all cases. Plain radiographs revealed abnormal findings in 28.6% (2/7). Bone scan revealed decreased uptake in 66.7%(2/3). MRI revealed abnormal signal intensity in 100%(3/3). Ultrasonographic findings of the patients were deep soft swelling in 85.7% (6/7) of all cases, periosteal elevation in 57.1% (4/7), synovial thickening in 42.8% (3/7), synovial effusion in 42.8%(3/7), echogenic debris or clot in 28.5% (2/7), cortical erosion in 28.5% (2/7), and subperiosteal abscess in 14.2% (1/7). Ultrasonography is a useful modality to diagnose septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in neonatal hip.

  5. Juvenile chronic arthritis and imaging: comparison of different techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cervini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare imaging findings obtained with different techniques in a patient with juvenile chronic arthritis. Methods: The patient was a 12 years-old child with a 7-months history of arthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the right foot. The involved area was explored with the following imaging techniques: X-ray, technetium bone scintigraphy, magnetic resonance, gray-scale and power-Doppler ultrasonography. Results: No abnormalities were detected with conventional X-ray. Scintigraphy showed an abnormal uptake of the radionuclide in the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the right foot. Magnetic resonance without contrast revealed clearly evident features of an active process of synovitis. Ultrasonography was able to detect the presence of joint effusion, synovial proliferation, bone erosion of the first metatarsal head. Power-Doppler examination revealed evident signs of soft tissue hyperemia. Conclusions: Comparative assessment of different imaging techniques in this patient with recent-onset juvenile chronic arthritis indicates that high resolution ultrasonography provides the most detailed evaluation of the joint involvement with respect to the other imaging techniques.

  6. Erosive progression is minimal, but erosion healing rare, in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with adalimumab. A 1 year investigator-initiated follow-up study using high-resolution computed tomography as the primary outcome measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Døhn, Uffe; Boonen, Annelies; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2008-01-01

    -grade radiographic erosions in the wrist or metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in the same (index) hand, initiated adalimumab 40 mg sc. eow. Thirty-five patients completed the study (median age 61 years (range 19-86), disease duration 8 years (0-36)). CT of index wrist and MCP2-5 and radiographs of hands and forefeet...... were obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Images were evaluated blinded to chronology and clinical data, and assessed according to Sharp/van der Heijde (radiographs) and OMERACT RA MRI scoring (CT) methods. RESULTS: All investigated parameters of disease activity had decreased at 6 and 12 months (P<0...

  7. A comparative study of the value of four imaging methods for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shoulder joint becomes involved later than the peripheral joints of the lower and upper limb in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the current study is to determine the value of plain radiography (PR), ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting bone erosions and soft tissue changes of the shoulder joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 27 patients - 21 women and 6 men, mean age 59 years (range 39 - 78) with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis and a painful shoulder are included in the study. The mean duration of the disease is 10 years and the mean duration of the shoulder symptoms is 4 years. In every patient all the imaging modalities were performed within 30 days. PR shows depicted changes in 20 patients (74%), US - in 25 patients (93%), CT - in 23 patients (85%) and MRI - in 26 patients (96%). US and MRI are more sensitive than CT in depicting small erosions of the humeral head and soft tissue changes. MRI and CT are the best methods for the diagnosis of subchondral and intraosseous bone lesions. The traditionally used PR is less sensitive than the other methods, especially in the evaluation of the soft tissues and the small erosions. (authors)

  8. Spinal Epidural Abscess with Pyogenic Arthritis of Facet Joint Treated with Antibiotic-Bone Cement Beads - A Case Report -

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bong-Jin; Lee, Sung-Rak; Kim, Seong-Tae; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Most epidural abscesses are a secondary lesion of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. An epidural abscess associated with pyogenic arthritis of the facet joint is quite rare. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report of the use of antibiotic-cement beads in the surgical treatment of an epidural abscess. This paper reports a 63-year-old male who sustained a 1-week history of radiating pain to both lower extremities combined with lower back pain. MRI revealed space-occupying lesions, which were l...

  9. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu, E-mail: uzari02@hotmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rull-Gabayet, Marina, E-mail: rull.marina@gmail.com [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge, E-mail: docjvlradiologo@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pascual-Ramos, Virginia, E-mail: virtichu@gmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with {<=}12 months of disease duration, {>=}3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 {+-} 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  10. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with ≤12 months of disease duration, ≥3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 ± 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  11. Three-dimensional morphological condylar and mandibular changes in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Farronato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement is common but usually delayed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We describe the case of a JIA patient with bilateral TMJ involvement, mandibular retrognathia, bone erosion, and severely restricted mouth opening. The use of cone beam computed tomography and a 3D diagnostic protocol in young patients with JIA provides reliable, accurate and precise quantitative data and images of the condylar structures and their dimensional relationships. Analgesics and conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were ineffective, but interdisciplinary treatment with etanercept and a Herbst functional appliance improved functional TMJ movement and bone resorption.

  12. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  14. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  16. No erosive progression revealed by MRI in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with etanercept, even in patients with persistent MRI and clinical signs of joint inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Skjødt, Henrik; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the course of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints during etanercept treatment. MRI of the non-dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints was...... performed in five clinical active RA patients before and 4 and 16 weeks after initiation of etanercept treatment. MRI was evaluated according to the EULAR-OMERACT RA MRI reference image atlas. The median 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28; erythrocyte sedimentation rate based) was 5.6 (range 5.......0-6.8) at baseline and 3.5 (1.5-4.1) at week 16 (decreased in all patients compared to baseline, Wilcoxon-Pratt, p < 0.05). The median MRI synovitis score was 18 (14-21), 18 (10-20) and 16 (10-20) at baseline, week 4 and 16, respectively (decreased in all patients compared to baseline, Wilcoxon-Pratt, p < 0...

  17. Role of endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones in arthritis and osteoporosis development in B10.Q-ncf1*/* mice with collagen-induced chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjertsson Inger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA is an often-used murine model for human rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Earlier studies have shown potent anti-arthritic effects with the female sex hormone estradiol and the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM raloxifene in CIA in DBA/1-mice. B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice are B10.Q mice with a mutated Ncf1 gene. In B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice, CIA develops as a chronic relapsing disease, which more accurately mimics human RA. We investigated the role of endogenous and exogenous sex steroids and raloxifene in the course of this model of chronic arthritis. We also examined whether treatment would prevent the development of inflammation-triggered generalized osteoporosis. Methods Female B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice were sham-operated or ovariectomized, and CIA was induced. 22 days later, when 30% of the mice had developed arthritis, treatment with raloxifene, estradiol or vehicle was started, and the clinical disease was evaluated continuously. Treatment was continued until day 56 after immunization. At termination of the experiment (day 73, bone mineral density (BMD was analyzed, paws were collected for histological examination, and sera were analyzed for markers of cartilage turnover and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results Raloxifene and estradiol treatment, as well as endogenous estrogen, decreased the frequency of arthritis, prevented joint destruction and countered generalized osteoporosis. These effects were associated with lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Conclusions This is the first study to show that raloxifene and estradiol can ameliorate established erosive arthritis and inflammation-triggered osteoporosis in this chronic arthritis model. We propose that treatment with raloxifene could be a beneficial addition to the treatment of postmenopausal RA.

  18. Cartilage destruction in small joints by rheumatoid arthritis: assessment of fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MR pulse sequences in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of different MR sequences for the detection of articular cartilage abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis. Design and patients. Ten metacarpophalangeal joints and 10 metatarsophalangeal joints (specimens from arthritis patients undergoing ablative joint surgery) were examined with a fat-suppressed (FS) 3D FLASH, a FS 3D FISP, a FS 2D fast spin-echo T2-weighted, and a 2D FS spin-echo T1-weighted sequence. Each cartilage lesion and each cortical lesion was graded from 0 to 4 (modified Outerbridge staging system). Subsequently, the results of each sequence were compared with the macroscopic findings and statistically tested against each other. Results. The study shows that 3D gradient-echo sequences with fat suppression were best for imaging and grading of cartilage lesions in arthritis of the small joints of the hands and feet. Using 3D techniques, all grade 2, grade 3, and grade 4 lesions of cartilage or cortical bone were detected. Conclusion. FS 3D gradient-echo techniques were best for the detection and grading of hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. MRI has a great potential as an objective method of evaluating cartilage damage and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  19. MR imaging of tuberculous arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively, the MR imaging in 6 patients with tuberculous arthritis was reviewed to determine its MR characteristics. Tuberculous arthritis involved the hip (n=4), knee (n=1) and pubic symphysis (n=1). The affected thick synovial tissue was homogeneously hypointense on T1WI and had mixed signal intensity on T2WI. Enhanced T1WI showed irregular contrast enhancement of the abnormal synovium. MRI demonstrated clearly that the thick synovial tissue involved contiguously articular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular bodies as hypointense nodules on both T1 and T2WI within increased joint effusion. The MR appearances of tuberculous arthritis are not specific. However, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis because it can provide added information about intraarticular abnormalities. (author)

  20. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  1. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    (BME), synovitis and erosion scores were estimated on the basis of the rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS). Mixed models were used for the statistical analyses. Parsimony was achieved by omitting covariates with P > 0.1 from the statistical model. RESULTS: Tissue samples from...... associations found in our present study have different implications for synovial mediator releases and corresponding imaging signs. For example, MCP-1 and IL-6 were associated with both general inflammation and bone destruction, in contrast to MIP-1β, which was involved solely in general synovitis. The lack of...

  2. The state of art of MRI research on the wrist in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for improving the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). New MRI and new scoring system, making precise and quantitative diagnosis and evaluation of RA, can be complementary to laboratory test. Wrist, metacarpophalangeal joint, carpometacarpal joint and interphalangeal joint are most often affected in RA. Early MRI features of RA include synovitis, bone marrow edema. erosions and cartilage loss. MRI can detect early signs of RA in wrist with high sensitivity and accuracy, and can easily and quantitatively monitor lesion response to the treatments. In this review, we summarized values of the wrist MRI in early diagnosis, quantitative analysis and prognosis of RA. (authors)

  3. Development of a Vibration Based Countermeasure to Inhibit the Bone Erosion and Muscle Deterioration That Parallels Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Tamara; Qin, Yi-Xian; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton

    2003-01-01

    The extent of bone and muscle loss in astronauts on missions longer than 30 days poses significant acute and chronic health risks. Recent work in a variety of species has revealed that low magnitude, high frequency (25-90 Hz) mechanical stimulation is anabolic and may inhibit hypothesis that short-term, low-intensi(y mechanical in the lower limb that parallels extended exposure to microgravity. If this experiment is selected for flight, 12 right leg serves as a contralateral control. Each astronaut will undergo treatment for 10 minutes per day, five days Pre- and post-flight bone and muscle testing will be used to assess efficacy as well as intra-subject comparison of the experimental leg to the control leg.

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  6. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  7. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  9. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, S R; Wala, S M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund's adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc.) that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals) which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage) and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease. PMID:25121375

  10. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: Animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Naik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund′s adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc. that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease.

  11. Cloxacillin control of experimental arthritis induced by SEC(+) Staphylococcus aureus is associated with downmodulation of local and systemic cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavite, Priscila Maria; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; Oliveira, Larissa Ragozo Cardoso de; França, Thaís Graziela Donegá; da Rosa, Larissa Camargo; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Vieira, Andreia Espíndola; Francisconi, Carolina Fávaro; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Sartori, Alexandrina

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common agent of septic arthritis (SA) that is a severe, rapidly progressive and erosive disease. In this work we investigated the clinical, histopathological and immunological characteristics of the SA triggered by an enterotoxin C producer S. aureus strain. The effect of a β-lactamic antibiotic over disease evolution and cytokine production was also evaluated. After confirmation that ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain preserved its ability to produce enterotoxin C, this bacteria was used to infect C57BL/6 male mice. Body weight, clinical score and disease prevalence were daily evaluated during 14 days. Cytokine production by splenocytes, cytokine mRNA expression in arthritic lesions, transcription factors mRNA expression in inguinal lymph nodes and histopathological analysis were performed 7 and 14 days after infection. ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain caused a severe arthritis characterized by weight loss, high clinical scores and a 100% disease prevalence. Histopathological analysis revealed inflammation, pannus formation and bone erosion. Arthritis aggravation was associated with elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, higher local mRNA expression of these cytokines and also higher mRNA expression of T-bet, ROR-γ and GATA-3. Disease control by cloxacillin was associated with decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not of IL-10. These findings indicate that the ATCC 19095 SEC(+) strain is able to initiate a severe septic arthritis in mice associated with elevated cytokine production that can be, however, controlled by cloxacillin. PMID:26695535

  12. Association between condylar morphology and inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint TMJ arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Stoustrup, Peter bangsgaard; Küseler, Annelise;

      Background: In juvenile idiopathic arthritis involvement of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) is often associated with severe mandibular growth deviations. The relation between condylar growth deviations, inflammation severity, the micro-architectural composition, and the bone quality has...... arthritis treated with intraarticular saline, intra-articular etanercept (an anti-TNF-α drug) or subcutaneous etanercept. One TMJ from each animal was scanned using micro-computed tomography and structural parameters were calculated. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the mandibular condyle were scored......: Abnormal morphology was seen in 15 of 32 animals available for data analysis and was strongly related to the degree of inflammation. However, no differences in trabecular structural parameters or mineral apposition rate were seen according to treatment. Erosions were an uncommon finding. Abnormal condylar...

  13. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  14. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  15. Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scanning provides information on the extent of primary bone tumors, on possible metastatic disease, on the presence of osteomyelitis prior to observation of roentgenographic changes so that earlier therapy is possible, on the presence of collagen diseases, on the presence of fractures not disclosed by x-ray films, and on the evaluation of aseptic necrosis. However, the total effect and contribution of bone scanning to the diagnosis, treatment, and ultimate prognosis of pediatric skeletal diseases is, as yet, unknown. (auth)

  16. Kohler’s Disease Secondary to Tarsal Pyogenic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Tagarro; Julia Yebra; Martina Steiner; Nuria Bonsfills; José Carmelo Albillos; Aida Sánchez; Lorena Cid; Alfonso Cañete

    2011-01-01

    Kohler’s disease is an osteochondrosis of the tarsal navicular bone. The exact causes of osteochondrosis remain unknown. We report a 4-year-old girl with a haematogenous tarsal arthritis who developed a Köhler’s disease immediately after the infection. It is hypothesised that avascular necrosis of the navicular bone was developed secondary to pyogenic arthritis.

  17. Microcirculation of the juvenile knee in chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, Cody; Bülow, J; Tøndevold, E;

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis was....... The growth plates formed borders for the extension of these changes. The increased permeability and surface area between blood and bone in arthritis may accelerate the resorption and subsequent destruction of subchondral bone in chronic arthropathies of the juvenile knee....

  18. A study comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the appearances of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI, and compare MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA. Methods: Fifty patients, fulfilled 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, and 10 age-matched healthy controls entered the study. T1-weighted spin echo, short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were performed in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical date, including swollen joint, patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score. Results: In 50 patients, all had pannus on MRI of wrists, 38 patients had enhanced signal intensity for pannus, 21 patients had bone marrow edema, 37 patients had joint effusion, and 37 patients had bone erosions. There were significant difference in the ESR, HAQ, AIMS as well as swollen joint count between patients with bone marrow edema and patients without bone marrow edema (P2=5.06, P=0.025; χ2=5.59, P=0.018). Number of patients with MRI erosion of wrists was associated with the number of patients without MRI bone marrow edema of wrists (χ2=5.11, P=0.024). Conclusion: MRI can find the appearances of wrists with RA. Comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA, authors can assess and evaluate the role of MRI on RA

  19. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.;

    2014-01-01

    progression of radiographic joint erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and Findings: The following combination drug therapies compared versus single DMARD were investigated: Double DMARD: 2 DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, injectable gold, cyclosporine, chloroquine...

  20. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  1. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  2. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  3. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirshafiey Abbas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease associated with painful joints that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and for which no effective cure is available. It is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion. Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, aging, and cancer. TNF-α overproduction is thought to be the main contributor to increased ROS release in patients with RA. Increased ROS production leads to tissue damage associated with inflammation. The prevailing hypothesis that ROS promote inflammation was recently challenged when polymorphisms in Neutrophil cytosolic factor 1(Ncf1, that decrease oxidative burst, were shown to increase disease severity in mouse and rat arthritis models. It has been shown that oxygen radicals might also be important in controlling disease severity and reducing joint inflammation and connective tissue damage. In this review article, our aim is to clarify the role of ROS in immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Autoantibodies against interleukin 1alpha in rheumatoid arthritis: association with long term radiographic outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N A; Svenson, M; Tarp, Ulrik; Garred, P; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Bendtzen, K

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Boekhorst, Bernard C M; Jensen, Linda B; Colombo, Stefano;

    2012-01-01

    lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. The severity of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice was assessed by paw scoring and compared to the degree of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-quantified joint effusion and bone marrow edema. Two intra-articular treatments per joint with......Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by systemic inflammation of synovial joints leading to erosion and cartilage destruction. Although efficacious anti-tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) biologic therapies exist, there is an unmet medical need for safe and more efficient treatment regimens for...... nanoparticles loaded with TNF-a siRNA (1µg) resulted in a reduction in disease activity, evident by a significant decrease of the paw scores and joint effusions, as compared to treatment with PLGA nanoparticles loaded with non-specific control siRNA, whereas the degree of bone marrow edema in the tibial and...

  6. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Summary of OMERACT 6 MR Imaging Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J;

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning is a new method for imaging and quantifying joint inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over the past 4 years, the OMERACT MR Imaging Group has been developing and testing the RA-MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) for use in RA. The OMERACT filter...... space narrowing, reflecting cartilage damage, has also been excluded as reliability was low at the small joints of the hands. Anatomical coverage of the score is currently restricted to the wrists and hands but can provide a basis for a more comprehensive score. The MR measurement of synovitis...... correlates closely with histological evidence and work continues on validating MR erosions with reference to radiographic techniques. The RAMRIS has demonstrated good reliability for bone erosion and synovitis at the wrists and metacarpophalangeal joints subject to reader training, with slightly lower levels...

  7. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA. PMID:26511861

  8. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to ... fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes ...

  10. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Arthritis What is Arthritis? Arthritis, in general terms, is inflammation and swelling of ... an increase in the fluid in the joints. Arthritis has multiple causes; just as a sore throat ...

  11. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging for early rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Y Pogozeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess possibility of magnetic resonance image (MRI application for rheu- matoid arthritis (RA activity and severity assessment.Material and methods. 100 pts with RA who fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria with disease duration less than 12 months were included. Standard clinical examination with evaluation of tender and swollen joint counts, acute phase markers, hand and foot X-ray and hand MRI with 0,2 T Artoscan apparatus (ESAOTE Biomedica, Italy were performed.Results. MRI showed hand joint synovitis in 94,5%, erosions – in 67,3% of cases. X-ray examination revealed erosions in only 20,8% of pts. Localization of erosions revealed by X-ray and MRI coincided in 36,4% of cases and in 61,8% of pts erosions were detected only by MRI. MRI confirmed clinical conclusion about presence or absence of metacarpophalangeal and wrist joint synovitis in 64,5% and 74,5% of cases respectively. In8,2% and 21,8% MRI revealed signs of synovitis in clinically intact joints. MRI synovitis score correlated with clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity – DAS 28 (r=0,37, p=0,001, CRP(r=0,30, p=0,001, ESR (r=0,42, p=0,001, HAQ (r=0,24, p=0,001. Weak correlation was revealed between ESR and presence of erosions (r=0,29, CRP, ESR and MRI signs of bone marrow edema (r=0,27, p=0,005 and r=0,29, p=0,002 respectively. Relationship between laboratory and clinical features was weaker and referred only to CRP level and swollen joint count (p=0,05.Conclusion. MRI signs may be used as additional and independent measures of inflammatory activity (particularly synovitis score and severity of RA

  12. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  13. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  14. Psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  15. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of ...

  19. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 3: an international multicenter reliability study using the RA-MRI Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassere, M; McQueen, F; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2003-01-01

    We examined inter-reader agreement of the revised OMERACT 5 Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score (RAMRIS v3). Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 10 sets of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints 2-5 and 8 sets of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrists [1.5 T, coronal and axial T1 and T2 spin-echo, +/- fat saturation......ICC 0.58, avICC 0.89, %SDD +/- 27), wrist bone erosion scores (0.72, 0.94, +/- 31%), the wrist synovitis global (0.74, 0.94, +/- 32%), and synovial maximal thickness (0.6, 0.94, +/- 32%) met these conditions. MCP joint synovitis global (0.76, 0.95, +/-35%), MCP joint bone edema (0.63, 0.91, +/- 34......%), and wrist bone edema (0.78, 0.95, +/- 38%) performed marginally less well. Bone defects performed poorly (MCP joint 0.18, 0.46, +/- 56%; wrist 0.06, 0.24, +/- 55%). The revised OMERACT 5 RAMRIS has acceptable inter-reader reliability for measures of disease activity (synovitis global and bone edema...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  4. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  6. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...... arthritic disease development in a DTHA model strengthening the rationale of C5aR-blockade as a treatment strategy for RA, especially during the early stages of arthritis flare.......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...... and rapid disease onset driven by T-cells, immune complexes and neutrophils. We show that a reduction in paw swelling, bone erosion, cartilage destruction, synovitis and new bone formation is apparent as little as 60 h after administration of a single dose of a blocking, non-depleting anti-mouse C5a...

  7. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases.

  8. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  9. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  10. Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteo-arthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatric patients as follows: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 4 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases and other different diseases 9 cases

  11. Bile salt-stimulated lipase plays an unexpected role in arthritis development in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Lindquist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis that bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL, in addition to being a key enzyme in dietary fat digestion during early infancy, plays an important role in inflammation, notably arthritis. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA in rodents are commonly used experimental models that reproduce many of the pathogenic mechanisms of human rheumatoid arthritis, i.e. increased cellular infiltration, synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, and erosion of cartilage and bone in the distal joints. We used the CIA model to compare the response in BSSL wild type (BSSL-WT mice with BSSL-deficient 'knock-out' (BSSL-KO and BSSL-heterozygous (BSSL-HET littermates. We also investigated if intraperitoneal injection of BSSL-neutralizing antibodies affected the development or severity of CIA and PIA in mice and rats, respectively. RESULTS: In two consecutive studies, we found that BSSL-KO male mice, in contrast to BSSL-WT littermates, were significantly protected from developing arthritis. We also found that BSSL-HET mice were less prone to develop disease compared to BSSL-WT mice, but not as resistant as BSSL-KO mice, suggesting a gene-dose effect. Moreover, we found that BSSL-neutralizing antibody injection reduced both the incidence and severity of CIA and PIA in rodents. CONCLUSION: Our data strongly support BSSL as a key player in the inflammatory process, at least in rodents. It also suggests the possibility that BSSL-neutralizing agents could serve as a therapeutic model to reduce the inflammatory response in humans.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes Office of the Director 27 Institutes and Centers that make up the NIH About Mission The NIH ... arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about 1.3 million adults, and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in the joints. Several ...

  13. Study of vitamin D status of rheumatoid arthritis patients Rationale and design of a cross-sectional study by the osteoporosis and metabolic bone diseases study group of the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antonelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of Vitamin D has been long known in regulating calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. An increased contribution of Vitamin D was recently described in association with a lower incidence of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA. This must not be surprising, as the immunomodulating effects of Vitamin D are clear, which have been attributed protective effects in autoimmune disorders such as some chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. An interaction was suggested between Vitamin D metabolism and inflammation indexes through mediation of TNF-a which is also especially involved in osteoclastic resorption and therefore in bone loss processes. Some preliminary data would indicate an association between seasonal changes of Vitamin D serum levels, latitude and disease activity (DAS28 in RA patients. Consequently, the Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases Study Group of SIR believes that there are grounded reasons for assessing the Vitamin D status of RA patients in order to investigate whether this is to be related to physiopathological and clinical aspects of disease other than those of bone involvement. Primary end point of the study will be to assess the levels of 25 OH Vitamin D in RA patients. Secondary endpoints will include correlation with disease activity, densitometry values and bone turnover. The cross-sectional study will enrol patients of both sex genders, age ranging between 30 and 75 years according to the 1988 ACR criteria, onset of symptoms at least 2 years prior to study enrollment. Patients will be excluded suffering from osteometabolic diseases, liver and kidney insufficiency and those administered Vitamin D boli in the previous 12 months. Disease activity will be evaluated with the HAQ. Haematochemical tests and femoral and lumbar bone densitometry will be performed, unless recently undergone by patients. Blood levels of 25 OH C Vitamin D and PHT and of the two bone remodeling markers

  14. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  15. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Exacerbates the Severity of Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (ONJ) in Mice. A Randomized, Prospective, Controlled Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Hsu, Chingyun; Bezouglaia, Olga; Dry, Sarah M; Pirih, Flavia Q; Soundia, Akrivoula; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Aghaloo, Tara L; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune inflammatory disorder, results in persistent synovitis with severe bone and cartilage destruction. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are often utilized in RA patients to reduce bone destruction and manage osteoporosis. However, BPs, especially at high doses, are associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Here, utilizing previously published ONJ animal models, we are exploring interactions between RA and ONJ incidence and severity. DBA1/J mice were divided into four groups: control, zoledronic acid (ZA), collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), and CIA-ZA. Animals were pretreated with vehicle or ZA. Bovine collagen II emulsified in Freund's adjuvant was injected to induce arthritis (CIA) and the mandibular molar crowns were drilled to induce periapical disease. Vehicle or ZA treatment continued for 8 weeks. ONJ indices were measured by micro-CT (µCT) and histological examination of maxillae and mandibles. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, and by µCT and histology of interphalangeal and knee joints. Maxillae and mandibles of control and CIA mice showed bone loss, periodontal ligament (PDL) space widening, lamina dura loss, and cortex thinning. ZA prevented these changes in both ZA and CIA-ZA groups. Epithelial to alveolar crest distance was increased in the control and CIA mice. This distance was preserved in ZA and CIA-ZA animals. Empty osteocytic lacunae and areas of osteonecrosis were present in ZA and CIA-ZA but more extensively in CIA-ZA animals, indicating more severe ONJ. CIA and CIA-ZA groups developed severe arthritis in the paws and knees. Interphalangeal and knee joints of CIA mice showed advanced bone destruction with cortical erosions and trabecular bone loss, and ZA treatment reduced these effects. Importantly, no osteonecrosis was noted adjacent to areas of articular inflammation in CIA-ZA mice. Our data suggest that ONJ burden was more pronounced in ZA treated CIA mice and that RA could

  17. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  18. The knee joint in early juvenile idiopathic arthritis: An ROC study for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) remains difficult due to unspecific clinical and laboratory findings, especially in early stages of the disease. The purpose of our study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging in diagnosing JIA of the knee joints. Forty children (3 - 17 years old) clinically diagnosed with JIA (follow-up >1 year) of a knee joint and a control group of 40 children with painful knee joints (MR diagnosis: bone bruise of the knee (n=7), normal knee joint (n=12), osteomyelitis (n=6), septic arthritis (n=2), bone tumor (n=7) and miscellaneous bone lesions (n=6)) were examined using a 1.5 T MR unit. T1-weighted spin-echo (SE), T2-weighted fast SE, contrast-enhanced Tz1-weighted SE and 2D gradient echo sequences were performed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves evaluation was conducted by 5 independent radiologists. The positive criteria for diagnosing JIA were joint effusions (n=40), contrast-enhancing synovitis (n=39), cartilage lesions (n=15), subchondral erosions and bony destruction (n=1). Sensitivity and specificity were 93.5% and 92.5%, respectively. Both cases of septic arthritis were misdiagnosed as JIA by all radiologists. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging seems to be a highly sensitive tool in establishing the diagnosis of JIA

  19. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic arthritis can develop slowly with mild symptoms, or it ... severe. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis can help prevent or limit extensive joint damage ...

  20. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Treating Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment for psoriatic arthritis can relieve pain, reduce swelling, help keep joints ... recommend treatments based on the type of psoriatic arthritis, its severity and your reaction to treatment. Download ...

  1. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  2. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to complications from the flu? 1. What is arthritis? The word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, but ... for you. 2. Who is at risk for arthritis? Certain factors are associated with a greater risk ...

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  4. Mechanism and Therapeutic Strategies of Ailamode in the Treatment of RA-induced Bone Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) caused by exceed bone absorption than osteogenesis and the subsequent osteoporosis (bone loss) around joints and in entire body, is the most commonly seen bone disease in clinic, which is induced by inlfammatory factors and corticosteroid therapies, while RA-induced bone loss is believed to be associated with the decreased osteogenesis because of the increased bone absorption and low osterix expression by reason of over-expressions of TNF-α, IL-1, Il-6 and RANKL, etc.. Ailamode (ALMD, T-614) is a new anti-RA agent (DMARDs) and a regulator for immunity and bone metabolism. Research showed that T-614 could eliminate bone absorption and up-regulate osterix expression to improve osteogenesis by inhibiting some inlfammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1 and Il-6), so as to reduce bone and joint damages. And several clinical evidences have proved that T-614 is safe in treating RA and has synergistic effect with methotrexate (MTX), which could strengthen the efifcacy and decrease bone erosion. Therefore, it is considered to be the most valuable agent in the treatment of RA and RA-induced bone loss at present.

  5. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  6. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  7. Arthritis severity locus Cia4 is an early regulator of IL-6, IL-1β, and NF-κB activators' expression in pristane-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Max; Laragione, Teresina; Gulko, Pércio S

    2013-07-01

    Cia4 is a locus on rat chromosome 7 that regulates disease severity and joint damage in models of rheumatoid arthritis, including pristane-induced arthritis (PIA). To identify molecular processes regulated by Cia4, synovial tissues from MHC-identical DA (severe erosive) and DA.F344(Cia4) congenics (mild nonerosive) rats were collected at preclinical and recent onset stages following the induction of PIA and analyzed for gene expression levels. Il6 levels were significantly higher in DA compared with congenics on day 10 (135-fold) after PIA induction (preclinical stage) and remained increased on days 14 (47.7-fold) and 18 (29.41-fold). Il6 increased before Il1b suggesting that Il6 could be driving Il1b expression and early synovial inflammation; 187 genes had significantly different expression levels and included inflammatory mediators increased in DA such Slpi (10.94-fold), Ccl7 (5.17-fold), and Litaf (2.09-fold). Syk or NF-κB activating and interacting genes, including Cd74 Ccl21, were increased in DA; 59 genes implicated in cancer-related phenotypes were increased in DA. Genes involved in cell metabolism, transport across membranes, and tissue protection such as Dgat1, Dhcr7, and Slc1a1 were increased in DA.F344(Cia4) congenics; 21 genes differentially expressed or expressed in only one of the strains were located within the Cia4 interval and could be the gene accounting for the arthritis effect. In conclusion, the Cia4 interval contains at least one new arthritis gene that regulates early Il6, Il1b expression, and other inflammatory mediators. This gene regulates the expression of cancer genes that could mediate the development of synovial hyperplasia and invasion, and cartilage and bone destruction. PMID:23695883

  8. Increasing feasibility and patient comfort of MRI in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jan van Breemen Institute, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but has practical limitations. Optimizing the scanning protocol is, therefore, necessary to increase feasibility and patient comfort. To determine the feasibility of bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore MRI of knees and to assess the presence of literature-based MRI features in unsedated children with JIA. Children were classified into two clinical subgroups: active arthritis (group 1; n = 29) and inactive disease (group 2; n = 18). MRI features were evaluated using a literature-based score, comprising synovial hypertrophy, cartilage lesions, bone erosions, bone marrow changes, infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity, effusion, tendinopathy and popliteal lymphadenopathy. The MRI examination was successfully completed in all 47 children. No scan was excluded due to poor image quality. Synovial hypertrophy was more frequent in group 1 (36.2%), but was also seen in 19.4% of the knees in group 2. Infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity was more prevalent in group 2 (86.1%; P = 0.008). Reproducibility of the score was good (Cohen kappa, 0.49-0.96). Bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore knee MRI is feasible in the assessment of disease activity in unsedated children with JIA. Signs differing among children with active and inactive disease include infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity and synovial hypertrophy. (orig.)

  9. Increasing feasibility and patient comfort of MRI in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but has practical limitations. Optimizing the scanning protocol is, therefore, necessary to increase feasibility and patient comfort. To determine the feasibility of bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore MRI of knees and to assess the presence of literature-based MRI features in unsedated children with JIA. Children were classified into two clinical subgroups: active arthritis (group 1; n = 29) and inactive disease (group 2; n = 18). MRI features were evaluated using a literature-based score, comprising synovial hypertrophy, cartilage lesions, bone erosions, bone marrow changes, infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity, effusion, tendinopathy and popliteal lymphadenopathy. The MRI examination was successfully completed in all 47 children. No scan was excluded due to poor image quality. Synovial hypertrophy was more frequent in group 1 (36.2%), but was also seen in 19.4% of the knees in group 2. Infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity was more prevalent in group 2 (86.1%; P = 0.008). Reproducibility of the score was good (Cohen kappa, 0.49-0.96). Bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore knee MRI is feasible in the assessment of disease activity in unsedated children with JIA. Signs differing among children with active and inactive disease include infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity and synovial hypertrophy. (orig.)

  10. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  11. Bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal joints in early rheumatoid arthritis. Comparison of MRI and high-resolution SPECT; Knoecherne Pathologien der Metacarpophalangeal-Gelenke bei frueher rheumatoider Arthritis. Vergleich zwischen MRT und hochaufloesender SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Blondin, D.; Reichelt, D.; Moedder, U. [Radiologie, Heinrich-Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Wirrwar, A.; Mattes-Gyoergy, K.; Mueller, H.W. [Nuklearmedizin, Heinrich-Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Schneider, M. [Rheumatologie, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie, Diabetologie und Rheumatologie, Heinrich-Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Ostendorf, B. [Radiologie, Heinrich-Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Rheumatologie, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie, Diabetologie und Rheumatologie, Heinrich-Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Aim: comparison of MRI with a newly developed high-resolution multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) regarding the detection of bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). Materials and methods: the clinically dominant hand of 15 patients with ERA (disease duration 6 months) was examined using MRI and MPH-SPECT. The evaluation of MRI was achieved according to RAMRIS criteria and for the MPH SPECT regarding pathological tracer uptake and distribution. Image fusions of MRI and MPH-SPECT were provided and the two methods were compared. Results: in MRI 12 of 15 patients showed arthritic joint pathologies, while 8 patients exhibited soft tissue and bony changes. 4 patients had only soft tissue inflammation (synovitis) with a normal bone signal. In MPH-SPECT 10 of 15 patients showed pathologically increased bone metabolism. The fusion images presented a high agreement of the pathological changes in both methods, while areas with increased bone metabolism were not only present in the case of erosions, but also in the case of bone edema. In 2 patients increased bone metabolism was detectable in areas of MR tomographic normal bone, while a clear surrounding synovitis was present in each case here. (orig.)

  12. Arthritis in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schidlow, D V; Goldsmith, D P; Palmer, J; Huang, N N

    1984-01-01

    We have confirmed previous observations of a transient, non-disabling recurrent arthritis in patients with cystic fibrosis. This arthritis differs from classic rheumatoid arthritis, is frequently associated with skin arthritis lesions, and its occurrence is unrelated to the severity of lung disease.

  13. Bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal joints in early rheumatoid arthritis. Comparison of MRI and high-resolution SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: comparison of MRI with a newly developed high-resolution multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) regarding the detection of bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). Materials and methods: the clinically dominant hand of 15 patients with ERA (disease duration 6 months) was examined using MRI and MPH-SPECT. The evaluation of MRI was achieved according to RAMRIS criteria and for the MPH SPECT regarding pathological tracer uptake and distribution. Image fusions of MRI and MPH-SPECT were provided and the two methods were compared. Results: in MRI 12 of 15 patients showed arthritic joint pathologies, while 8 patients exhibited soft tissue and bony changes. 4 patients had only soft tissue inflammation (synovitis) with a normal bone signal. In MPH-SPECT 10 of 15 patients showed pathologically increased bone metabolism. The fusion images presented a high agreement of the pathological changes in both methods, while areas with increased bone metabolism were not only present in the case of erosions, but also in the case of bone edema. In 2 patients increased bone metabolism was detectable in areas of MR tomographic normal bone, while a clear surrounding synovitis was present in each case here. (orig.)

  14. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  15. RESULTS FROM LATARJET SURGERY FOR TREATING TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BONE EROSION IN THE GLENOID CAVITY, AFTER MINIMUM FOLLOW-UP OF ONE YEAR

    OpenAIRE

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovisky, Joel; Nascimento, Luis Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luiz Henrique Oliveira; Strose, Eric; Helmer, Fábio Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the results from the Latarjet procedure in patients with anterior recurrent dislocation of the shoulder who present bone loss of the glenoid cavity greater than 25%. Methods: Twenty six male patients underwent the Latarjet procedure, The bone loss was evaluated by means of radiography using the Bernageau view and by means of CAT scan. The patients were evaluated with regard to range of motion, using the Rowe and UCLA scales, before and after the operation, and by radiograp...

  16. Inhibition of bone resorption by Tanshinone VI isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Nicolin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, a more detailed knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in osteoclastogenesis has driven research efforts in the development and screening of compound libraries of several small molecules that specifically inhibit the pathway involved in the commitment of the osteoclast precursor cells. Natural compounds that suppress osteoclast differentiation may have therapeutic value in treating osteoporosis and other bone erosive diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or metastasis associated with bone loss. In ongoing investigation into anti-osteoporotic compounds from natural products we have analyzed the effect of Tanshinone VI on osteoclasts differentiation, using a physiologic three-dimensional osteoblast/bone marrow model of cell co-culture. Tanshinone VI is an abietane diterpene extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Labiatae, a Chinese traditional crude drug, ‘’Tan-Shen’’. Tashinone has been widely used in clinical practice for the prevention of cardiac diseases, arthritis and other inflammation-related disorders based on its pharmacological actions in multiple tissues. Although Tanshinone VI A has been used as a medicinal agent in the treatment of many diseases, its role in osteoclast-related bone diseases remains unknown. We showed previously that Tanshinone VI greatly inhibits osteoclast differentiation and suppresses bone resorption through disruption of the actin ring; subsequently, we intended to examine the precise inhibitory mechanism of Tanshinone VI on osteoclast differentiating factor. This study shows, for the first time, that Tanshinone VI prevents osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting RANKL expression and NFkB induction.

  17. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Receiving DMARDs Therapy: Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Elham; Mowla, Karim; Ghorbani, Ali; Bahadoram, Sara; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Dargahi-Malamir, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a symmetric peripheral polyarthritis of unknown etiology that, untreated or if unresponsive the therapy, typically leads to deformity and destruction of joints due to erosion of cartilage and bone. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce morning stiffness, the number of tender joints and swollen joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This study is designed for evaluation of omega-3 effects on disease activity and remission of rheumatoid arthritis in DMARDs treated patients and on weight changes and reduction of analgesic drugs consumption versus placebo. Methods: Sixty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (49 female and 11 male) underwent rheumatologist examination and disease activity score were calculated. Then patients were enrolled in this 12 week, double blind, randomized, placebo- controlled study. The patients in both groups continued their pre study standard treatment. The patients were visited every 4 weeks, 4 times and data were recorded. Results: Significant improvement in the patient’s global evaluation and in the physician’s assessment of disease was observed in those taking omega-3. The proportions of patients who improved and of those who were able to reduce their concomitant analgesic medication were significantly greater with omega-3 consumption. There were no weight changes. Conclusion: Daily supplementation with omega-3 results has significant clinical benefit and may reduce the need for concomitant analgesic consumption without weight changes. PMID:26925896

  18. Value of nuclide bone imaging forecasting the effect of 99Tc-MDP treating rheumatoid arthritis%核素骨显像预测99Tc-MDP治疗类风湿关节炎效果的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高利霞; 刘鹏; 钟彩玲; 陈艳; 夏天; 何国荣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of nuclide bone imaging forecasting the effect of 99Tc-MDP treating rheumatoid arthritis. Methods From June 2012 to October 2014,39 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed clearly were taken images for affected joints by radionuclide bone imaging agent (99mTc-MDP) before 99Tc-MDP treat-ment.The uptake ratio (T/N) of affected joints was calculated by region of interest (ROI) technique.Before 99Tc-MDP treatment and after 6-week therapy,joint tenderness number,joint swelling number,time of morning stiffness,erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR),and C-reactive protein (CRP) were recorded.They were divided into effective markedly group, effective group and ineffective group.T/N value among three groups was compared.According to T/N value,they were di-vided into high uptake group and low uptake group,in which the therapeutic effect was compared. Results There was a statistical difference of T/N value in different therapeutic group (P<0.05),and T/N value in effective markedly group was highest,and lowest in the ineffective group.There was a statistical difference of curative effect between high uptake group and low uptake group,and the curative effect in high uptake group was better than that of low uptake group (P<0.05). Conclusion Nuclide bone imaging has higher clinical value in forecasting effect of 99Tc-MDP treating rheumatoid arthritis and has a better guidance role for clinicians optimizing therapeutic regimen.%目的:探讨核素骨显像预测99Tc-MDP治疗类风湿关节炎效果的临床价值。方法2012年6月~2014年10月,选取诊断明确的39例活动性类风湿关节炎患者在99Tc-MDP治疗前采用放射性核素骨骼显像剂(99mTc-MDP)对病变关节进行显像,利用感兴趣区(ROI)技术计算病变关节摄取比值(T/N)。99Tc-MDP治疗前及治疗后6周记录患者的关节压痛数、关节肿胀数、晨僵时间,红细胞沉降率(ESR)、C反应蛋白(CRP),将患者分为显

  19. A Standardized Protocol for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Hand and Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Makarova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to develop a standardized protocol for description of the results of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods. The results of 112 hand and wrist CBCT examinations (n=56 were analyzed in patients aged from 36 to 67 with medium-active seropositive rheumatoid arthritis in anamnesis. The hand and wrist CBCT was carried out using a NewTom 5G cone-beam computed unit (QR s.r.l., Italy having a 200×250 mm flat-panel detector, 180×160 mm field of view (maximum, and a 360° gantry rotation around the region of interest. The hand and wrist scanning was carried out from the distal metaphysis of the forearm bones to the nail ends of the distal phalanges of the fingers. Scan mode — patient scan (exposure time — 3.6 s, X-ray tube boosting voltage — 110 kW, current — 0.6‒0.8 mA, scan pattern — regular scan, scan time — 18 s. The CBCT examinations of the wrists and hands were performed using special-purpose setups allowing complete coverage of the region of interest. Results. A standardized protocol was designed for the description of hand and wrist cone-beam examination that documents all the major changes resulting from rheumatoid arthritis: soft tissue thickening, erosions and cystic-like changes, osteoporosis, narrowing of the joint spaces, incomplete dislocations, bone deformities and areas of osteolysis. Significant changes are recorded in point form, according to the Sharp or SENS methods. Application of the standardized protocol allows unification of the structuring of the examination description, and facilitates X-ray assessment of changes in the hand and wrist during CBCT in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. High-resolution MRI of the wrist and finger joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to compare magnetic resonance (MR) image quality at different field strengths for evaluating lesions in wrist and finger joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in order to determine whether the higher field strength provides diagnostic gain. The hand mainly affected in 17 RA patients was examined at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T with comparable MR imaging (MRI) protocols. MR images were reviewed twice by two experienced radiologists using the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) of the OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials) group. Image quality was rated on a five-point scale using Friedmann's test and Kendall's W-test for statistical analysis. Image comparison revealed better image quality at higher field strength. Image quality of T1-weighted images was rated 14-22% better at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T by both readers. Moreover, the rating for the T2-weighted-images acquired at 3.0 T was one point better in the five-point scale used. Inter-reader correlation for image quality, bone erosions/defects, edema and synovitis ranged between 0.6 and 0.9 at 3.0 T and between 0.6 and 0.8 at 1.5 T. Intra-reader correlation for these parameters was high at 0.8-1.0. MRI image quality of RA hands is superior at 3.0 T, while an acceptable image quality is achieved at 1.5 T, which improves the evaluation of extent of bone edema, synovitis and identification of small bone erosions. (orig.)

  1. High-resolution MRI of the wrist and finger joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieners, Gero [Otto-von-Guericke-University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicin, Magdeburg (Germany); Detert, Jacqueline; Burmester, Gerd; Backhaus, Marina [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Berlin (Germany); Streitparth, Florian; Fischbach, Frank; Bruhn, Harald [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke-University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicin, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The goal of this study was to compare magnetic resonance (MR) image quality at different field strengths for evaluating lesions in wrist and finger joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in order to determine whether the higher field strength provides diagnostic gain. The hand mainly affected in 17 RA patients was examined at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T with comparable MR imaging (MRI) protocols. MR images were reviewed twice by two experienced radiologists using the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) of the OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials) group. Image quality was rated on a five-point scale using Friedmann's test and Kendall's W-test for statistical analysis. Image comparison revealed better image quality at higher field strength. Image quality of T1-weighted images was rated 14-22% better at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T by both readers. Moreover, the rating for the T2-weighted-images acquired at 3.0 T was one point better in the five-point scale used. Inter-reader correlation for image quality, bone erosions/defects, edema and synovitis ranged between 0.6 and 0.9 at 3.0 T and between 0.6 and 0.8 at 1.5 T. Intra-reader correlation for these parameters was high at 0.8-1.0. MRI image quality of RA hands is superior at 3.0 T, while an acceptable image quality is achieved at 1.5 T, which improves the evaluation of extent of bone edema, synovitis and identification of small bone erosions. (orig.)

  2. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taken of the unaffected limb, or of a child's growth plate (where new bone is forming), for ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Arthritis X- ...

  4. Role of ultrasound in assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews imaging methods used for diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis, with emphasis on the role of ultrasonography. Traditionally, conventional radiography has been useful in detecting and monitoring the extent of joint destruction in rheumatic disease. However, it is particularly difficult to detect pathological joint changes in the early stages. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to detect inflammation of the synovial membrane and erosions but is limited by cost and availability. Ultrasound has recently emerged as a useful and potentially reliable method for assessing the degree of joint inflammation and erosion in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

  5. Lyme disease in the differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karadağ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinically, there are some differences between rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Lyme disease. Although Lyme arthritis exhibits marked differences from RA, it can cause erosion at joint due to chronic proliferative synovitis as similar to RA. In the literature, a case was reported where both entities were seen together. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with symmetric arthritis at small hand joints and arthralgia at wrist that mimicked RA but diagnosed as Lyme disease by history, clinical presentation and laboratory findings, and successfully treated.

  6. Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatrics patients as follow: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 7 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases, and other different diseases 9 cases

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions psoriatic arthritis psoriatic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Psoriatic arthritis is a condition involving joint inflammation (arthritis) that ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  11. Differential association of the N-propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and collagen II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) with synovitis and erosions in early and longstanding rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Lottenburger, T; Lindegaard, H;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to study the association with collagen II degradation assessed by its C-telopeptide (CTX-II), x-ray status and disease activity measures. METHODS: Two cohorts of RA......-ray progression (p=0.84). There was no correlation between PIIANP and CTX-II. CONCLUSION: Declining PIIANP with increasing RA duration and persistently increased CTX-II indicate that cartilage anabolic and degradative pathways are unbalanced from clinical RA onset. Furthermore, that collagen II depletion in RA is...... both mediated by anti-anabolic effects unassociated with synovitis (decreased PIIANP) and by excess collagen II degradation linked to synovitis (increased CTX-II)....

  12. Targeted delivery of low-dose dexamethasone using PCL-PEG micelles for effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Jiang, Jiayu; Chen, Wenfei; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2016-05-28

    Glucocorticoid (GC) is the cornerstone therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, but high doses are associated with serious adverse effects. In an effort to improve the efficacy of low-dose GC therapy, we developed a micelle system for targeted delivery to inflamed joints and validated the approach in a rat model of arthritis. Micelles loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) self-assembled from the amphipathic poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG) polymer via film dispersion, and they were injected intravenously at a dose of only 0.8mg/kg into rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. The micelles persisted for a relatively long time in the circulation, and they accumulated preferentially in inflamed joints. Micelle-delivered Dex potently reduced joint swelling, bone erosion, and inflammatory cytokine expression in both joint tissue and serum. PCL-PEG micelles caused only moderate adverse effects on body weight, lymphocyte count and blood glucose concentration, and they weakly activated the host complement system. These results suggest that encapsulating Dex in PCL-PEG micelles may allow for safe and effective low-dose GC therapy targeting inflammatory disorders. PMID:27057749

  13. Radiological imaging in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; Radiologische Fruehdiagnostik der rheumatoiden Arthritis. Stellenwert von Ultraschall und Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzgummer, H.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [AKH, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    For optimal therapy management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) specific and sensitive diagnostic methods are essential for assessment of disease activity. In addition to projection radiography, imaging techniques, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) are becoming increasingly more important for the early diagnosis of RA. The MRI and US techniques play a key role in the early imaging diagnostics of RA. Measurement of inflammation activity represents the basis of therapeutic decision-making and can be quantitatively and qualitatively determined with MRI and US. Synovitis and bone marrow edema are predictors of erosion. (orig.) [German] Fuer das optimale Therapiemanagement bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis (RA) sind spezifische und sensible diagnostische Methoden zur Beurteilung der Krankheitsaktivitaet unerlaesslich. Neben der Projektionsradiographie gewinnen die bildgebenden Methoden zur Fruehdiagnostik der RA, insbesondere die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und der Ultraschall (US), zunehmend an Bedeutung. MRT und US spielen eine Schluesselrolle in der bildgebenden Fruehdiagnostik der RA. Die Messung der Entzuendungsaktivitaet stellt die Basis fuer die Therapieentscheidung dar. Sie kann mit dem US und der MRT quantitativ und semiquantitativ bestimmt werden. Synovialitis und Knochenmarkoedem sind Praediktoren fuer Erosionen. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative microfocal radiography accurately detects joint changes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Carmichael, I.; Walker, S R

    1986-01-01

    Microfocal radiography, producing x5 magnified images of the wrist and hands with a high spacial resolution (25 microns) in the film, permitted direct measurement of erosion area and joint space width in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The magnitude of errors relating to direct measurement, repositioning the wrist and hand on successive x ray visits, repeated identification of erosions and their area calculation were assessed. The coefficients of variation for length and area measurements...

  15. The diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI in the assessment of joint abnormalities in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of MRI without contrast enhancement in the evaluation of JIA knee joint abnormalities. JIA patients with clinically active knee involvement were prospectively studied using an 1-T open-bore magnet. MRI features were independently evaluated by two readers using the JAMRIS system. The first reading included unenhanced images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. Imaging findings from 73 patients were analysed. Agreement between Gd-enhanced (+Gd) and Gd-unenhanced (-Gd) MRI scores of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions was good concerning sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value. Inter-observer agreement was good for both -Gd and +Gd scores (ICC = 0.91-1.00, 0.93-1.00, respectively). Regarding the assessment of synovial hypertrophy, specificity of -Gd was high (0.97), but the sensitivity of unenhanced MRI was only 0.62. Inter-reader agreement for +Gd MRI was ICC = 0.94; however, omitting post-Gd acquisitions increased inter-reader variation (ICC = 0.86). If Gd-enhanced MRI is the reference standard, omitting Gd contrast medium is irrelevant for the assessment of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions as joint abnormalities in JIA. Omitting intravenous Gd in the MRI assessment of joints in JIA is inadvisable, because it decreases the reliability of detecting synovial disease. circle Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to assess juvenile idiopathic arthritis. circle Synovial hypertrophy, a marker of JIA activity, is well shown by MRI. (orig.)

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI in the assessment of joint abnormalities in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (G1-235), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Veenendaal, Mira van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (G1-235), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of MRI without contrast enhancement in the evaluation of JIA knee joint abnormalities. JIA patients with clinically active knee involvement were prospectively studied using an 1-T open-bore magnet. MRI features were independently evaluated by two readers using the JAMRIS system. The first reading included unenhanced images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. Imaging findings from 73 patients were analysed. Agreement between Gd-enhanced (+Gd) and Gd-unenhanced (-Gd) MRI scores of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions was good concerning sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value. Inter-observer agreement was good for both -Gd and +Gd scores (ICC = 0.91-1.00, 0.93-1.00, respectively). Regarding the assessment of synovial hypertrophy, specificity of -Gd was high (0.97), but the sensitivity of unenhanced MRI was only 0.62. Inter-reader agreement for +Gd MRI was ICC = 0.94; however, omitting post-Gd acquisitions increased inter-reader variation (ICC = 0.86). If Gd-enhanced MRI is the reference standard, omitting Gd contrast medium is irrelevant for the assessment of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions as joint abnormalities in JIA. Omitting intravenous Gd in the MRI assessment of joints in JIA is inadvisable, because it decreases the reliability of detecting synovial disease. circle Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to assess juvenile idiopathic arthritis. circle Synovial hypertrophy, a marker of JIA activity, is well shown by MRI. (orig.)

  17. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  18. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Arthritis is the wearing away of the cartilage at ...

  19. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  1. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis; Radiographische Veraenderungen am Fersenbein im Rahmen der chronischen Polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakits, A. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Haller, J. [Hanusch-Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Roentgenabteilung; Steiner, E. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Stenzel, I. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Schneider, B. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Dokumentation; Czembirek, H. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Smolen, J. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). 2. Medizinische Abt. (Rheumatologie)

    1994-02-01

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Nativroentgenaufnahmen des Fersenbeins von 768 Patienten mit gesicherter chronischer Polyarthritis wurden retrospektiv hinsichtlich des Auftretens entzuendlich-rheumatischer Veraenderungen beurteilt. 42 Patienten (5,5%) zeigten eine Erosion der hinteren oberen Fersenbeinkante im Sinne eines Achillobursitisdefektes. Bei drei Patienten gelangte zusaetzlich eine plantare Erosion zur Darstellung. Der Achillobursitisdefekt war in 50% der Faelle beidseitig ausgebildet, wobei das bilaterale Auftreten bei Patienten in den Stadien II und III nach Steinbrocker ueberwog. Bei bilateralem Befall waren die Laesionen allerdings in der Mehrzahl der Faelle (62%) hinsichtlich Groesse und/oder Form asymmetrisch ausgebildet. Unsere Beobachtungen belegen, dass eine Fersenbeinbeteiligung im Rahmen der chronischen Polyarthritis nicht selten auftritt, weshalb routinemaessig Roentgenaufnahmen des Fersenbeins bei Patienten mit

  2. Ultrasound Doppler Score Correlates with OMERACT RAMRIS Bone Marrow Oedema and Synovitis Score in the Wrist Joint of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M; Ellegaard, K; Boesen, L;

    2012-01-01

    low-field MRI scores with the US Doppler measurements in the wrist joint of patients with RA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty consecutive patients with RA (46 women & 4 men) completed both low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-scan®, Esaote) and a high-end US (Sequioa®, Siemens) imaging of the wrist before......PURPOSE: MRI is considered the standard of reference for advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, in daily clinical practice ultrasound (US) imaging with Doppler information is more versatile and often used for fast and dynamic assessment of joint inflammation. The aim was to compare...... initiating either biological treatment (n = 26) or intraarticular injection of Depomedrole® (n = 24). Mean age was 56 years (range 21 - 83 years); mean disease duration 87.2 months (range 4 - 349 months), mean DAS 28 4,8 (range 2 - 7). MRI was scored according to the OMERACT RAMRIS recommendations and US...

  3. A multireader reliability study comparing conventional high-field magnetic resonance imaging with extremity low-field MRI in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, Paul; Ejbjerg, Bo; Lassere, Marissa;

    2007-01-01

    The use of extremity low-field magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) is increasing, but relatively few data exist on its reproducibility and accuracy in comparison with high-field MRI, especially for multiple readers. The aim of this multireader exercise of rheumatoid arthritis wrist and...... metacarpophalangeal joints was to assess the intermachine (high vs low-field) agreement and to assess the interreader agreement on high and low-field images. Study findings suggested that E-MRI performs similarly to conventional high-field MRI regarding assessment of bone erosions. However, for synovitis and bone...... edema, considerable intermachine and interreader variability was found. Further studies are needed before recommendations on multireader E-MRI assessment of these pathologies can be given....

  4. When is arthritis reactive?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdulay, S. S.; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and gen...

  5. Genetic epidemiology: Psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Anne C

    2002-01-01

    The existence of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct clinical entity remains a topic of debate; some authors propose that it is simply the co-occurrence of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis. However, a distinct entity is likely to have distinct susceptibility factors in addition to those that contribute to psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis alone. These aetiological factors may be genetic and/or environmental, and in this review, the evidence for distinct psoriatic arthritis genetic suscep...

  6. Arthritis in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, L.; Meyers, O L; Gordon, W.; Briggs, B

    1981-01-01

    A group of 61 unselected patients with psoriasis attending a dermatology clinic were studied to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis. On defined criteria arthritis was present in 41.6%. Peripheral arthritis was present in 15.5%, and sacroiliitis in 43%. A strong association of distal interphalangeal arthritis with psoriasis and nail dystrophy was confirmed. Tissue typing showed a strong association of B23, 17, in Caucasoid psoriatics, while the haplotype A1/B8 was increased in mixe...

  7. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  8. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of wrist as a useful diagnostic tool in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Dewan

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: DCE-MRI produces sensitive information regarding diagnosing and scoring synovitis (1–3 in early RA. Furthermore, it provides studying bone marrow edema which is the strongest predictor of bone erosion in early RA. Hence we conclude that DCE-MRI has a diagnostic and prognostic value in predicting bone erosion development later on.

  9. The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Huan; Tong, Qiang; Qu, Wenchun; Mao, Chen-Mei; Dai, Sheng-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Since the discovery of the endogenous receptor for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, a main constituent of marijuana, the endocannabinoid system (comprising cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, as well as the enzymes involved in their metabolic processes) has been implicated as having multiple regulatory functions in many central and peripheral conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease that is associated with the involvement of many kinds of cells (such as fibroblastlike synoviocytes [FLSs], osteoclasts, T cells, B cells, and macrophages) and molecules (such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs], and chemokines). Increasing evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system, especially cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), has an important role in the pathophysiology of RA. Many members of the endocannabinoid system are reported to inhibit synovial inflammation, hyperplasia, and cartilage destruction in RA. In particular, specific activation of CB2 may relieve RA by inhibiting not only the production of autoantibodies, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs, but also bone erosion, immune response mediated by T cells, and the proliferation of FLSs. In this review, we will discuss the possible functions of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of RA, which may be a potential target for treatment. PMID:25791728

  10. Monitoring anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody treatment for rheumatoid arthritis by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the hand and power Doppler ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanimura, Kazuhide; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Narita, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuko [Hokkaido Medical Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Sapporo (Japan); Kon, Yujiro [St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Kosaka, Naoki [Tokeidai Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Atsumi, Tatsuya [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    To compare quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) with conventional measures of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with the anti-interleukin 6 (anti-IL 6) receptor antibody tocilizumab in terms of responsiveness at a few months to disease activity and ability to predict structural damage at 1 year. A cohort of patients with RA (n = 29) was evaluated clinically including disease activity score 28 (DAS28) and by semiquantitative (SQ-) and quantitative (Q-) PDUS (bilateral metacarpophalangeal joints) and MRI (one hand and wrist) at initiation of treatment with anti-IL 6 receptor antibody agents and after 2 and 5 months. Conventional radiography for both hands and wrists was performed at baseline and at 12 months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Areas under the curve (AUC) for measures at baseline, 2 and 5 months were correlated with structural damage at 1 year. Among the laboratory and clinical parameters, DAS28-ESR was the most responsive with a large effect size of SRM. Structural damage progressions for radiography and MR erosion were correlated with AUC of MR bone erosion and Q-PDUS, respectively. In the evaluation of disease activity in RA patients in the first few months after starting anti-IL 6 receptor antibody tocilizumab treatment, the semiquantitative MR bone erosion score of the hand and quantitative value for power Doppler signal in the finger joint were both responsive and predictive of structural damage progression at 1 year. (orig.)

  11. Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A.; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Miller, Andy O.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Lortholary, Olivier; Thomas J Walsh

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Candida arthritis is a debilitating form of deeply invasive candidiasis. However, its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome are not well understood. Methods.  Cases of Candida arthritis were reviewed from 1967 through 2014. Variables included Candida spp in joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Results.  Among 112 evaluable cases, 62% were males and...

  12. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ)

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  14. The effect of hip replacement in the treatment of elderly patients with dysplasia of hip joint combined with bone arthritis%髋关节置换术对老年髋关节发育不良继发骨关节炎的应用效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭军

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of hip replacement in the treatment of elderly patients with dysplasia of hip joint combined with bone arthritis.Methods:108 elderly patients with dysplasia of hip joint combined with bone arthritis were selected. They were treated with total hip replacement.We observed the clinical efficacy and postoperative complications.Results:After treatment,patients with limb activity ability were significantly improved;the Harris function score was significantly higher than before treatment;no patient had serious complications.Conclusion:Total hip replacement in the treatment of elderly patients with dysplasia of hip joint combined with bone arthritis can effectively reconstruct the acetabulum and prosthesis,protect the normal limbs activities,and improve the quality of life.%目的:探讨全髋关节置换术在老年髋关节发育不良继发骨关节炎中的应用效果。方法:收治老年髋关节发育不良继发骨关节炎患者108例,采用全髋关节置换术治疗,观察临床疗效及术后并发症。结果:治疗后,患者肢体活动能力均明显提升,Harris功能评分明显高于治疗前,所有患者无严重并发症发生。结论:全髋关节置换术治疗老年髋关节发育不良继发骨关节炎,能有效重建髋臼和假体,保障正常的四肢活动,提高生活质量。

  15. Osteoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors presented the results of clinical, X-ray and osteoscintigraphic investigations of 133 psoriasic arthritis patients and 72 patients with common psoriasis. Osteoscintigraphy was performed using a routine method with 99mTc-pyrophos (USSR) and 99mTc-phosphone (Hungary) on gamma-camera LFOV (Nuclear-Chicago, USA). X-ray signs of the involvement of the osteoarticular system were noted in 69 (51%) patients with psoriasic arthritis and in 16 (22%) patients with common psoriasis. The method permitted the detection of the foci of RP hyperfixation in 129 (97%) potients with psoriasic arthritis and in 51 (70.8%) patients with common psoriasis. They were observed mostly in large and small limb joints, less frequently-in the vertebral column, cranial bones, thorax, and ribs. Thus, osteoscintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for the detection of active inflammatory foci of the osteoarticular system in psoriasis at all stages of arthritis development. It makes it possible to detect the spreading of arthritis and its preclinical forms

  16. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  3. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  6. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale;

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the Rfactor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and conti...

  7. When is arthritis reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis as a modifier of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves

    2007-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic tissue-destructive condition in which the tooth-supporting collagen fibers of ligament and bone are broken down mainly by the host s overreactive immune inflammatory response. The relation between periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory destructive diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been dealt with in some studies because, in spite of their different etiologies, similar mechanisms of tissue destruction have been described in thes...

  9. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N;

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow...

  10. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.)

  11. Mapping erosion from space

    OpenAIRE

    Vrieling, A

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is the most important land degradation problem worldwide. Spatial information on erosion is required for defining effective soil and water conservation strategies. Satellite remote sensing can provide relevant input to regional erosion assessment. This thesis comprises a review on how satellite data have been used previously for evaluating water erosion. Options include erosion detection and the assessment of controlling factors such as topography, soil, and vegetation. ...

  12. No evidence of pathogenic involvement of cathelicidins in patient cohorts and mouse models of lupus and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienhöfer, D; Hahn, J; Schubert, I; Reinwald, C; Ipseiz, N; Lang, S C; Borràs, È Bosch; Amann, K; Sjöwall, C; Barron, A E; Hueber, A J; Agerberth, B; Schett, G; Hoffmann, M H

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP-/-) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP-/- mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP-/- mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP-/- mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by extensive

  13. MR findings of tuberculous arthritis; significance of tuberculoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of tuberculous arthritis, and the frequency-in such cases-with which tuberculoma occurs. MR images of 26 patients (M;F, 14;12: mean age, 46.2 years) with pathologically proven tuberculous arthritis were retrospectively reviewed. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral erosion, synovial proliferation and soft tissue abscess, and whether the inner wall of this abscess was smooth, were assessed. In particular, we determined whether a nodular lesion which showed low SI on T1WI, central low SI with peripheral hjigh SI on T2WI, and rim enhancement on contrast study, was a tuberculoma. The joints involved were those of the knee (n=7), hip (n=7), shoulder (n=4), sacroiliac region (n=3), elbow (n=3), and ankle (n=2). Joint effusion was noted in 15 cases (58%), and subchondral erosion in 24 (92%). synovial proliferation was found in 23 cases (88%), and soft tissue abscess in 24 (92%). The inner wall of this abscess was irregular in 17 cases (71%). A tuberculoma was present in intra-or extra-or extra-articular soft tissue in 18 cases (69%). The MR findings of tuberculous arthritis were subchondral erosion, synovial proliferation, and soft tissue abscess. The presence of a tuberculoma in intra-or extra-articular soft tissue, a specific finding in tuberculous arthritis, was noted in 69% of our cases

  14. Reducing invasiveness, duration, and cost of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis by omitting intravenous contrast injection -- Does it change the assessment of inflammatory and destructive joint changes by the OMERACT RAMRIS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G;

    2009-01-01

    . We explored to what extent RA joint pathologies in wrists and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints can be reliably assessed by unenhanced MRI images compared with Gd-enhanced MRI as the reference method. METHODS: MRI data sets from 2 RA substudies were scored according to preliminary OMERACT RA MRI...... images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. RESULTS: Gd contrast injection appeared unimportant to MRI scores of bone erosions and bone edema in RA wrist and MCP joints. However, when post-Gd MRI was considered the standard reference, MRI without Gd provided only moderate......OBJECTIVE: Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides highly sensitive assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints, but intravenous (IV) Gd injection prolongs examination time and increases cost, invasiveness, and patient discomfort...

  15. Cicatricial Pemphigoid in Accompany with Rheumatoid Arthritis: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Wu; Li-ming Zhang; Ying Jiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ CICATRICIAL pemphigoid (CP, also known as benign mucous membrane pemphigoid) is a rare chronic autoimmune subepithelial blister-ing disease, with an incidence of 1 per million, characterized by erosive lesions of mucous membranes and skin that result in scarring.1,2 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a symmetric inflammatory arthritis that mainly affects the small joints of hands and feet, with a prevalence of 0.3% in China. In this case report we described the diagnosis of and treatment for a patient developing CP 18 years after the onset of RA, a combination rarely en-countered or reported so far.

  16. New aspects of the X-ray pathology of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraosseal pseudocyst(s) were observed in 16 cases out of 205 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The pseudocysts were localized most frequently in the bones of the proximal joints of the hands; their occurence in the tarsal bones was extremely rare. All cases exhibited positive rheumatoid factor. On the basis of the radio-morphological characteristics demonstrated on the radiograms the term ''poliarthritis chronica progressiva granularis-pseudocystica'' is suggested for this special form of rheumatoid arthritis. (L.E.)

  17. The contemporary imaging methods of arthritis of the knee: algorithm of radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthritis is a common term used for over 50 different joint diseases. Arthritis of the knee from the data of traumatologists takes about 16-22% of all arthritis. The precise diagnosis in early stage is very important to prevent such severe complications of arthritis as ankylosis and others because certain problems require immediate attention and prompt treatment. The aim of the study was to create an algorithm for precise diagnosis of arthritis in early stage taking in account clinics, possible cause of the arthritis and potentialities and informatively of the new radiological equipment. There were analysed 43 conventional radiograms, 10 ultra sonograms, 5 computer tomograms, 3 magnetic resonance and 7 radionuclide images of the patients with different stages and causes of the arthritis of the knee. The findings were correlated with literature data. From data of the study authors conclude that in the early stage of the arthritis the conventional radiology findings can be negative. If arthritis goes with excess fluid or cysts in the joint and also in paediatric praxis it might be more convenient to start examinations with ultrasonography. If there is clinical suspicion of bone marrow, tendon or cartilage structures involvement must be used magnetic resonance. To detect more precise destructive cavities or localisation of squirmiest the computer tomography should be performed. According to analysis for precise early radiological diagnosis and for follow up of the arthritis of the knee its treatment, authors made up algorithm for the patients with arthritis of the knee depending of the clinics and radiological findings

  18. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  19. MR imaging of transient synovitis: differentiation from septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient synovitis is the most common cause of acute hip pain in children. However, MR imaging findings in transient synovitis and the role of MR imaging in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis have not been fully reported. To describe the MR findings of transient synovitis and to determine whether the MR characteristics can differentiate this disease entity from septic arthritis. Clinical findings and MR images of 49 patients with transient synovitis (male/female 36/13, mean age 6.1 years) and 18 patients with septic arthritis (male/female 10/8, mean age 4.9 years) were retrospectively reviewed. MR findings of transient synovitis were symptomatic joint effusion, synovial enhancement, contralateral joint effusion, synovial thickening, and signal intensity (SI) alterations and enhancement in surrounding soft tissue. Among these, SI alterations and enhancement in bone marrow and soft tissue, contralateral joint effusion, and synovial thickening were statistically significant MR findings in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis. The statistically significant MR findings in transient synovitis are contralateral (asymptomatic) joint effusions and the absence of SI abnormalities of the bone marrow. It is less common to have SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissues. The statistically significant MR findings in septic arthritis are SI alterations of the bone marrow, and SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissue. Ipsilateral effusion and synovial thickening and enhancement are present in both diseases

  20. [Genetics and genomics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Elías, Ana Karen; Maldonado-Murillo, Karina; López-Mendoza, Luis Fernando; Ramírez-Bello, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects approximately 0.5-1% of the general population and leads to chronic synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone, and disability. The heritability of rheumatoid arthritis has been estimated to be about 60%, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37%. Other genes, such as PTPN22, STAT4, CTLA4, TRAF1, PADI4, IRF5, FCRL3, TNFIP3, TNF-α, miRNAs, CD28, CD40, TYK2, etc., have been associated with susceptibility, severity, activity, and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of gene variants located in immune system genes associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27160622

  1. Circulating Dickkopf-1 and osteoprotegerin in patients with early and longstanding rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-ying; LONG Li; WANG Shi-yao; GUO Jian-ping; YE Hua; CUI Liu-fu; YUAN Guo-hua; LI Zhan-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane, leading to invasion of synovial tissue into the adjacent cartilage matrix with degradation of articular cartilage and bone as a consequence. Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been demonstrated to be key molecules involved in bone erosion and bone remodeling. The aim of this study was to explore the potential role of DKK-1 and OPG in different stage of RA.Methods The protein levels of DKK-1 and OPG were detected by ELISA. The serum samples were collected from 300 patients with RA and 60 healthy controls. Of which, 150 RA patients were defined as early RA (disease duration ≤1 year), and other 150 RA patients were defined as longlasting RA (disease duration ≥5 years). At the time of serum sampling, various clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed. The correlations of DKK-1 or OPG and clinical/laboratory parameters were analyzed.Results The serum level of DKK-1 was elevated in patients with longstanding RA compared with healthy controls, while no significant difference was observed between the two groups in the level of OPG.In contrast, in early RA patients, the circulating OPG was elevated, while there was no significant difference between the two groups in expression of DKK-1. The serum DKK-1 was correlated with Sharp score and DAS28 in longstanding RA patients. In early RA, age was the only parameter that was significantly related to serum OPG.Conclusions There was a cross-talk between DKK-1 and OPG,which involved in bone destruction in RA. In different stage of RA, DKK-1 and OPG may play different roles in the pathogenesis of RA.

  2. Reducing Erosion and Runoff

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane

    2009-01-01

    By caring for and improving your soil, you will help it absorb water more readily, reducing runoff and erosion as well as improving plant health. This publication gives the homeowner tips to help prevent runoff and erosion on their property.

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low bone mass is a serious health problem mostly seen in postmeno-pausal women with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and some related risk factors in postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.Methods: The data for this descriptive analytical study was extracted from the medical records of 98 postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis who had attended the 5th of Azar Teaching Hospital affiliated to Gorgan University of Medical Sciences, in Iran, in 2009.Results: The mean durations of menopause and rheumatoid arthritis were 9.39 and 5.13 years, respectively. The overall prevalence of osteoporosis was 13.3%. We found a significant correlation between age, disease duration, and duration of menopause with bone mineral density (P<0.05.Conclusion: Our results indicate a high prevalence of osteoporosis at the lumbar spine of postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    OpenAIRE

    Berthelot, J M

    2011-01-01

    There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38%) were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) (3%), 177 (14%) as undifferentiated arthritis (UA), and 266 (21%) as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) (1). Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with...

  5. Value of bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Chikashi; Nakata, Hajime; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Nakayama, Takashi; Yokomizo, Yu (University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    We performed bone scintigraphy on 16 cases of psoriasis to evaluate its possible value in this disease and obtained the following results: 1) Bone scintigraph was abnormal in 15 of 16 cases and the frequent association of arthritis in psoriasis was confirmed. 2) Abnormal uptake on bone scintigraph was noted in various joints including peripheral joints of extremities, sternoclavicular joint, shoulder and rib. Abnormality of sacroiliac joint or ankle was less frequent than previously reported. 3) Findings of bone scintigraph were not necessarily related with clinical symptoms or laboratory data. Abnormal uptake was also noted in many joints whose X-ray examinations were negative. Bone scintigraphy thus seems to be useful in early detection of arthritis and to become an initial therapeutic indicator of arthritis in psoriasis.

  6. Value of bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed bone scintigraphy on 16 cases of psoriasis to evaluate its possible value in this disease and obtained the following results: 1) Bone scintigraph was abnormal in 15 of 16 cases and the frequent association of arthritis in psoriasis was confirmed. 2) Abnormal uptake on bone scintigraph was noted in various joints including peripheral joints of extremities, sternoclavicular joint, shoulder and rib. Abnormality of sacroiliac joint or ankle was less frequent than previously reported. 3) Findings of bone scintigraph were not necessarily related with clinical symptoms or laboratory data. Abnormal uptake was also noted in many joints whose X-ray examinations were negative. Bone scintigraphy thus seems to be useful in early detection of arthritis and to become an initial therapeutic indicator of arthritis in psoriasis. (author)

  7. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  8. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  9. Epidemiology of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Salvarani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies on psoriatic arthritis have long been hampered by the absence of widely accepted classification criteria. The development of the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria has recently provided the framework for conducting epidemiological studies in psoriatic arthritis using uniform recruitment criteria. However, so far, only a minority of studies have adopted such criteria. In addition to the lack of shared classification criteria, differences in study settings, designs, and ascertainment methods have contributed to yield substantial disparities in the estimates of the incidence (from 3,02 to 23,1 cases per 100,000 people and prevalence (from 49,1 to 420 cases per 100,000 people of psoriatic arthritis around the globe. Overall, the available data suggests that the prevalence of psoriasis in the general population is approximately 2-3%, with about a third of patients with psoriasis having arthritis. Therefore, psoriatic arthritis may affect 0,3- 1,0% of the population, a frequency not dissimilar from that of rheumatoid arthritis. Future epidemiological studies should be carried out in larger numbers of patients diagnosed using consistent criteria.

  10. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Pineda, C.J.; Weisman, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.).

  12. Relationship between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Vilana Maria Adriano Araújo; Iracema Matos Melo; Vilma Lima

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immunoinflammatory diseases where leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory mediators induce alveolar bone loss, synovitis, and joint destruction, respectively. Thus, we reviewed the relationship between both diseases considering epidemiological aspects, mechanical periodontal treatment, inflammatory mediators, oral microbiota, and antibodies, using the keywords “periodontitis” and “rheumatoid arthritis” in PubMed database between January 201...

  13. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Become Lifelong Learners Featured Website: GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery Links Rheumatoid Arthritis Osteoarthritis Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Feeling Out of Joint: The Aches of Arthritis CONTACT ...

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and small joints of the legs and arms, as well as the jaw and neck. Pauciarticular JIA involves 4 or less ...

  15. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit this page to Yahoo! Buzz '); document.write(' Rank this page on Digg '); document.write(' Bookmark this ... her normal activities. What Are Researchers Trying to Learn About Juvenile Arthritis? Scientists are looking for the ...

  16. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen, it's known as a "flare" or a "flare-up." JIA often causes only minor problems, but in ... was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids (like ...

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... providers, including the primary care physician, rheumatologist, and physical therapist, will work together to develop the best method ... the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities and ...

  19. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  20. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 1: Synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis long after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs, there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and a need to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques, and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  1. Influence of disease activity and treatment on rate of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    D V Goryachev; O A Krichevskaya; A. P. Zornyak; N V Chichasova; Sh. F. Erdes

    2008-01-01

    Severity of hands and feet joint destruction is the most objective marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) progression determining functional disability. The main aim of RA treatment is suppression of joint destruction. Objective. To study dependence of joint erosions forming speed on disease modifying anti-rhcumatic drugs (DMARD) administration and RA activity. Material and methods. Retrospective analysis of 451 cases of RA treatment was performed. Erosions were counted according to modified Sha...

  2. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  3. The effect of X-rays on the experimental arthritis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of low doses of X-rays on different in-vivo models of monoarticular arthritis which have been developed for the investigation of anti-inflammatory drugs. Zymosan or heat-inactivated mycobacterium tuberculosis was injected into 1 knee joint of Wistar rats to produce, via different pathogenetic mechanisms, an acute monoarticular arthritis. Five days later, the amount of joint swelling, bone destruction and cartilage catabolism were measured. Immediately after arthritis induction, the knees were irradiated with a single dose of 5 Gy or with 4 daily fractions of 1 Gy. X-irradiation with daily doses of 1 Gy significantly reduced bone loss and cartilage degradation in Zymosan-induced arthritis and joint swelling in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. However, a single high radiation dose significantly increased bone loss in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. These data confirm the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of low radiation doses which so far has been based only on clinical experience. By using an established model of monoarticular arthritis we have now the opportunity to study the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory radiation effect in comparison to that of anti-inflammatory drugs. This way, we hope to provide a scientific basis for the use of radiotherapy in various painful degenerative joint disorders. (orig.)

  4. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  5. 99mTc-DPD uptake in juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unilateral arthritis of the knee was induced in mongrel puppies by intraarticular injections of 1% Carragheenan. Bone metabolism was studied by a scintimetric technique on static 99mTc-diphosphonate bone scans every 2nd week during the induction of arthritis for 3 months and monthly in a postarthritic phase of another 3 months. Changes in uptake of radionuclide were present after 2 weeks. The induction phase was characterized by a decreased uptake in the calcification layer of the juxta-articular growth plates and a moderately increased epiphyseal uptake. The postarthritic phase was characterized by normalization of growth plate uptake and a marked increase in epiphyseal uptake. Using contact autoradiography, the epiphyseal uptake was seen mainly in a narrow subchondral and subsynovial bone layer, around bone cysts and osteophytes, whereas central epiphyseal bone was osteopenic with decreased uptake of tracer. The study suggests that the early scintigraphic appearance of juvenile non-suppurative arthritis may be an overall decrease in uptake of 99mTc-diphosphonate due to a depression of growth plate metabolism. (author)

  6. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  7. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  8. Dental erosion - literature update

    OpenAIRE

    PICOS, ALINA M.; Andrea M. Chisnoiu; Jean F. Lasserre; Aurelia Spinei; Radu M.Chisnoiu; Andrei Picos

    2013-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex, pluri-factorial process that must be taken into account in clinical practice. The main mechanisms typically related to dental wear are: abrasion, attrition, erosion and wear by fatigue. The dramatic increase in the frequency of erosive lesions, especially in younger age groups determined us to give a synthesis of the most recent scientific literature on the specific problem of erosion. Attention is drawn to the excessive consumption of acidic beverages in chi...

  9. Modeling of Polymer Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Göpferich, Achim; Langer, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    The erosion of bioerodible polymers depends on many factors including the polymer chain length, bond cleavage velocity, swellability, crystallinity, and water diffusivity in the polymer matrix. This multitude of parameters makes modeling of erosion difficult. Only a few models exist that describe morphological changes of polymers during erosion qualitatively. In the present approach the polymer matrix was represented as the sum of small individual polymer matrix parts. The factors that determ...

  10. Saliva and dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf; Angélicas Reis Hannas; Melissa Thiemi Kato

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the re...

  11. Fluoride in dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, A C; Wiegand, A.; Rios, D.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.; Lussi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective l...

  12. Impacts of soil erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Dorren, Luuk; De la Rosa, Diego; Theocharopoulos, Sid. P.

    2004-01-01

    3.1 Definition of soil functions, soil quality and quality targets The identification of soil functions, properties and processes which are affected by soil erosion is needed to evaluate the impacts of erosion on the soil system. Definition of soil loss tolerance according to soil types and environmental characteristics. 3.2 Development of criteria and indicators to assess soil sustainable use and soil protection measures What are the impacts of soil erosion on soil...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of RA is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in ... Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  18. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more! Email * Zipcode Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis Physical activity plays an important role in overall well-being. If you have psoriatic arthritis, moderate exercise may offer specific benefits, including improved ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  1. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. Van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis on functional performance and social part...

  2. MRI features of Lyme arthritis of the hips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosing Lyme arthritis without a history of travel to endemic regions or erythema migrans can be a challenge. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings are nonspecific for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. We present the MRI features of Lyme disease of the hip in a 4-year-old boy who presented with hip pain and was found to have Lyme disease by Western blot. Our findings include bilateral hip effusions and synovial enhancement, normal bone marrow signal intensity without enhancement, minimal adjacent muscular and soft-tissue edema, and bilateral inguinal lymph nodes measuring up to 1 cm. (orig.)

  3. MRI features of Lyme arthritis of the hips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Behrang [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Geller, Matthew D. [New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY (United States); Mathew, Manesh; Gerard, Perry [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Diagnosing Lyme arthritis without a history of travel to endemic regions or erythema migrans can be a challenge. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings are nonspecific for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. We present the MRI features of Lyme disease of the hip in a 4-year-old boy who presented with hip pain and was found to have Lyme disease by Western blot. Our findings include bilateral hip effusions and synovial enhancement, normal bone marrow signal intensity without enhancement, minimal adjacent muscular and soft-tissue edema, and bilateral inguinal lymph nodes measuring up to 1 cm. (orig.)

  4. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Tak, Paul Peter; Bay-Jensen, Anne Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP-degraded vimentin and MMP degraded C-reactive protein. We evaluated if biomarkers measuring serum levels of specific sequences of the mentioned fragments would provide further information of diagnostic and/or prognostic processes in early arthritis. Methods Ninety-two early arthritis patients (arthritis duration<1 year, DMARD naïve) were enrolled. Patients either fulfilled the ACR/EULAR2010 criteria for RA (n = 60) or had unclassified arthritis (UA) (n = 32). Patients fulfilling the RA criteria after 2 years follow-up were classified into non-erosive (n = 25), or erosive disease (n = 13). Concentrations of the biomarkers: C1M, C2M, C3M, VICM and CRPM were measured in baseline serum. Results C1M, C3M and CRPM were able to discriminate between the UA and RA baseline diagnosis in 92 patients with an AUROC of 0.64 (95%CI 0.517 to 0.762), 0.73 (95%CI 0.622 to 0.838) and 0.68 (95%CI 0.570 to 0.795). C2M showed a potential for discrimination between non-erosive and erosive disease in 38 patients with an AUROC of 0.75 (95%CI 0.597 to 0.910). All of the applied biomarkers correlated with one or more of the disease activity parameters: DAS28, ESR, CRP, SJC66, TJC68 and/or HAQ. Conclusion This is the first study evaluating the applied biomarkers at this early stage of arthritis. C1M, C3M, CRPM might be the best diagnostic marker, whereas high levels of C2M indicated progression of disease at follow-up in early RA patients. PMID:27019199

  5. Frequency of pathology in a large natural sample from Natural Trap Cave with special remarks on erosive disease in the Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Rothschild

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for the antiquity of erosive arthritis was the subject of an international conference (1. Although isolated examples have been reported from the anthropologic record (2, 3, systemic population studies have represented a newer approach (4. Recognition of erosive disease, osteoarthritis and DISH, as isolated observations, does not allow perspective with respect to population significance...

  6. RESULTS OF AN OPEN CLINICAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF LEFLUNOMIDE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I M Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion. The new basic drug leflunomide is as effective as the gold standard methotrexate, at the same time it allows clinical improvement to be more rapidly achieved. Leflunomide also slows down the rate of progression of erosive arthritis and it is well tolerated.

  7. RESULTS OF AN OPEN CLINICAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF LEFLUNOMIDE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I M Marusenko

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion. The new basic drug leflunomide is as effective as the gold standard methotrexate, at the same time it allows clinical improvement to be more rapidly achieved. Leflunomide also slows down the rate of progression of erosive arthritis and it is well tolerated.

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  9. Principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the basic principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, which have been elaborated by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR jointly with the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society (PreS. These principles will render certain assistance to practitioners in diagnosing and treating patients with JIA. Undoubtedly, there have been no answers to many questions so far. This primarily applies to the necessity of understanding the standards for the possibility to interpret the pathological process, to harmonize the respective MRI protocols, to identify bone marrow edema, erosions, and synovitis, and to determine the suitability of these or those examinations in order to reveal changes in individual joints. There are considerable conceptual differences in approaches to diagnostic techniques in adults and children. The EULAR-PReS experts assume that some studies may be impracticable or economically inaccessible and this may hinder their introduction into clinical practice. However, most techniques, including ultrasonography, are quite affordable. The practical application of these techniques certainly requires a high professionalism of specialists in functional diagnosis and other instrumental studies.

  10. MRI assessment of early response to certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Jacobsson, L T H; Schaufelberger, C;

    2015-01-01

     mg every 2 weeks at weeks 0-4; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 6-16) or placebo→CZP (placebo at weeks 0-2; CZP loading dose at weeks 2-6; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 8-16). Contrast-enhanced MRI of one hand and wrist was acquired at baseline (week 0) and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16. All six time......OBJECTIVES: To identify the first time point of an MRI-verified response to certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Forty-one patients with active RA despite disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy were randomised 2:1 to CZP (CZP loading dose 400...... points were read simultaneously, blinded to time, using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI scoring system. Primary outcome was change in synovitis score in the CZP group; secondary outcomes were change in bone oedema (osteitis) and erosion scores and clinical outcome measures...

  11. Inflammatory arthritis-like and other MR findings in wrists of asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects that might be confused with pathologic findings. MR examination of the dominant wrist was performed in 30 asymptomatic volunteers aged 22-49 years using pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in the coronal and axial planes. The bases of the metacarpals, the carpus and the distal radius and ulna were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists for lesions, notches, blood vessels and synovial enhancement. There were 24 bright osseous lesions (erosions, intraosseous ganglia, oedema or cysts) in 14 subjects. Intraosseous blood vessels were seen in all but one wrist examined, most commonly in the capitate and lunate bones. Enhancement was present in 26 of 27 notches identified at the base of the second metacarpal and less commonly in the capitate, hamate and triquetral notches. A small joint effusion was present in 14 subjects. Joint or soft-tissue enhancement was identified in 16 wrists. Many MR abnormalities and variants may be detected in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects. Many of these could be confused with pathologic findings usually associated with inflammatory arthritis. (orig.)

  12. Interleukin-21 induces migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, R; Jin, Y; Sun, L; Yang, L; Li, C; Li, Z; Liu, X; Zhao, J

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial fibroblast hyperplasia and bone erosion. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) play a pivotal role in RA pathogenesis through aggressive migration and matrix invasion, and certain proinflammatory cytokines may affect synoviocyte invasion. Whether interleukin (IL)-21 influences this process remains controversial. Here, we evaluated the potential regulatory effect of IL-21 on the migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in RA-FLS. We found that IL-21 promoted the migration, invasion and MMP (MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13) production in RA-FLS. Moreover, IL-21 induced activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathways, and blockage of these pathways [PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor LY294002, STAT-3 inhibitor STA-21 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059] attenuated IL-21-induced migration and secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-21 promotes migration and invasion of RA-FLS. Therefore, therapeutic strategies targeting IL-21 might be effective for the treatment of RA. PMID:26646950

  13. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with 74 MBq) and erbium- 169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc- HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovectomy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra-articular fraction or intraarticular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilization (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymph edema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee, a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for pulmonary embolism. The radiation absorbed dose to the patients are low because a low leakage rate from the treated joint (lymphogenic uptake of 1.8%ID (0.45 to 4.78). These leads to a radiation exposure to the testis of 0.1mSv (0.05 to 0.18) and to the ovary of 0.2 mSv (0.1 to 0.38). Significantly is the radiation exposure of the physician, here especially at the finger pulp. A high beta dose of 22.1 μSv/MBq for the forefinger was observed using only a syringe protection in treatments of knees (90Y), this resulted in a annual radiation

  14. Focal adhesion kinase is required for synovial fibroblast invasion, but not murine inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Shelef, Miriam A; Bennin, David A.; Yasmin, Nihad; Warner, Thomas F; Ludwig, Thomas; Beggs, Hilary E.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Synovial fibroblasts invade cartilage and bone, leading to joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms that regulate synovial fibroblast invasion are not well understood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in cellular invasion in several cell types, and FAK inhibitors are in clinical trials for cancer treatment. Little is known about the role of FAK in inflammatory arthritis, but, given its expression in synovial tissue, its known role in invas...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane volume as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M;

    1999-01-01

    -modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy alone (11 patients) or DMARDs in combination with oral prednisolone (15 patients), were followed up for 1 year with contrast-enhanced MRI of the dominant wrist (months 0, 3, 6, and 12), conventional radiography (months 0 and 12), and clinical and biochemical examinations. Bone......, or with prednisolone treatment. In none of 5 wrists with baseline volumes <5 cm3, but in 8 of 10 wrists with baseline volumes > or =10 cm3, erosive progression was found by MRI and/or radiography, indicating a predictive value of synovial membrane volumes. MRI was more sensitive than radiography for......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease...

  16. Characteristics of Rheumatoid Arthritis relative to HLA-DR in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to determine the clinical characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia in relation to human leukocyte antigen type. A group of 91 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 72 females and 19 males were studied for the various clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters along with human leukocyte antigen-DR phenotypes. Since human leukocyte antigen-DR10 was most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis in our population, we compared those patients with human leukocyte antigen-DR10 to those without. The comparison yielded differences in the presence of rheumatoid nodules, erosions, corticosteroid treatment, and joint involvement at presentation, hemoglobin levels, and white cell count. Only the last 3 parameters showed a statistical significance. Human leukocyte antigen type of Saudi patients with rheumatoid arthritis influenced the course of the disease but only to a limited extent. (author)

  17. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and psoriatic arthritis. Email * Zipcode The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. Copyright © 1996-2015 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA Bottom Menu About NPF About Us Annual ...

  18. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  19. Sets resilient to erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Pegden, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    The erosion of a set in Euclidean space by a radius r>0 is the subset of X consisting of points at distance >/-r from the complement of X. A set is resilient to erosion if it is similar to its erosion by some positive radius. We give a somewhat surprising characterization of resilient sets, consisting in one part of simple geometric constraints on convex resilient sets, and, in another, a correspondence between nonconvex resilient sets and scale-invariant (e.g., 'exact fractal') sets.

  20. Erosion Negril Beach

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Ham, D.; Henrotte, J.; Kraaijeveld, R.; Milosevic, M.; Smit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing erosion of the Negril Beach has become worse the past decade. In most places along the coast line, the beach will be gone in approximately 10 years. This will result in a major decrease of incomes that are made by the local tourist sector. To prevent the erosion this study has been performed to find a feasible and affordable solution. An important part of the study is the literature research since several other parties had investigated different aspects of the erosion problem rece...

  1. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  2. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  3. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    are better tolerated and have increased efficacy, as compared with palpation guidance, and should thus be included in rheumatologic practice. Different methods such as three-dimensional US, contrast-enhanced US and fusion imaging methods are all possible US approaches that may be used in treatment of......Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use of an...... atlas for US scoring has shown excellent reliability. Several scores are shown to be responsive to medical treatment, but the optimal joint/tendon score is to be explored. Doppler activity may be quantified by use of pixel counts and flow may be examined by use of resistive index. US-guided injections...

  4. Bone imaging in sports medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikare S

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased participation in sports by the general public leads to increase in sports induced injuries including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis and host of musculotendenous maladies. We have studied twenty patients referred from sports clinic for bone scanning to evaluate clinically difficult problems. It showed stress fracture in twelve patients, bilateral shin splint in five patients and normal bone scan in three patients. Present study highlights the utility of bone imaging for the diagnosis of various sports injuries in sports medicine.

  5. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, K.; Thiers, G.; Eissner, D.; Holzmann, H.

    1980-08-01

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones.

  6. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones. (orig.)

  7. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  8. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  9. Biomechanical behaviour of cancellous bone on patellofemoral arthroplasty with journey prosthesis : a finite element study

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, André; Completo, António; Simões, José A.; Flores, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Isolated patellofemoral (PF) arthritis of the knee is a common cause of anterior knee pain and disability. Patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) is a bone conserving solution for patients with PF degeneration. Failure mechanisms of PFA include growing tibiofemoral arthritis and loosening of components. The implant loosening can be associated with bone resorption, or fatigue-failure of bone by overload. This research work aims at determining the structural effects of the implantation of PF prosthe...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  12. Numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion during Hole Erosion Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, F.; S. Bonelli; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F; Philippe, P.; Borghi, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion of a cohesive soil by a turbulent flow in axisymmetrical geometry, with application to the Hole Erosion Test (HET). The numerical model is based on adaptive remeshing of the water/soil interface to ensure accurate description of the mechanical phenomena occurring near the soil/water interface. The erosion law governing the interface motion is based on two erosion parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion co...

  13. Lupeol acetate ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis of mice through improvement of microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hsun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hui; Chen, Wun-Ke; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Lupeol has been shown with anti-inflammation and antitumor capability, however, the poor bioavailability limiting its applications in living subjects. Lupeol acetate (LA), a derivative of lupeol, shows similar biological activities as lupeol but with better bioavailability. Here RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were treated with 0-80μM of LA, and assayed for TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, MCP-1 using Western blotting. Moreover, osteoclatogenesis was examined with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. For in vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA)-bearing DBA/1J mice were randomly separated into three groups: vehicle, LA-treated (50mg/kg) and curcumin-treated (100mg/kg). Therapeutic efficacies were assayed by the clinical score, expression levels of serum cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET/CT and histopathology. The results showed that LA could inhibit the activation, migration, and formation of osteoclastogenesis of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In RA-bearing mice, the expressions of inflammation-related cytokines were suppressed, and clinical symptoms and bone erosion were ameliorated by LA. The accumulation of (18)F-FDG in the joints of RA-bearing mice was also significantly decreased by LA. The results indicate that LA significantly improves the symptoms of RA by down-regulating expressions of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27044833

  14. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  15. 超声对类风湿关节炎患者腕关节病变的诊断价值%The Diagnostic Value of Ultrasound for Wrist Arthropathy of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓英; 田力; 陈荣杰; 安超

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨超声对类风湿关节炎患者腕关节病变的诊断价值。方法:随机选取类风湿关节炎患者55例作为观察组,30例健康成年人作为对照组,分别进行腕关节超声检查,并抽取30例观察组患者对其行MRI检查。结果:超声可观察到类风湿关节炎患者腕关节不同程度滑膜增生、关节积液、肌腱腱鞘炎情况,其阳性检出率与MRI相比,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),具有很高的一致性。MRI对类风湿关节炎患者腕关节骨侵蚀的检出率高于超声检查。结论:超声在诊断类风湿关节炎患者腕关节病变中,发挥着与MRI近乎相等的作用,可为临床对类风湿关节炎患者腕关节病变的诊断提供一种更简单经济的检查方法。%Objective:To investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasound for the wrist arthropathy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.Methods:55 cases with rheumatoid arthritis were randomly selected as the observation group and 30 healthy adults were selected as the control group.The wrist ultrasound examination was made for them all to observe the thickness of synovium,blood lfow,joint effusion,tendons and bone cortex. 30 cases out of the observation group were selected for MRI examination.Results:Ultrasound could be used to observe synovium hyperplasia with different degree,joint effusion and tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.The difference between the positive rate and the MRI was not significant (P > 0.05),while with great consistency.The detection rate of MRI for carpal bone erosion was higher than that of the ultrasonography. Conclusion:Ultrasound in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis patients with carpal lesions played almost the same effect as MRI examination,which could provide a more simple and economic method for clinical diagnosis of wrist joint lesions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Ossicular Erosion in Patients Requiring Surgery for Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Mohammadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the condition of the ossicular chain in patients requiring surgery for cholesteatoma.  Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis, the destruction of the individual and combined bony structures of the ear was described in 166 patients with cholesteatoma who went through surgery in our Otology Center between 2003 and 2009.  Results: Total (55.4% or partial (30.7% erosion of the incus was the most common pathology. In some cases, the long process (25.9% and the body of incus (4.8% were also involved. Erosion of the stapes superstructure occurred more commonly than a total loss of the bone (40.9% vs. 25.9%. Erosion of the malleus was least common. Completely intact ossicles were present in 5.5% of cases. Total ossicular erosion with an intact footplate (18.7% and incudostapedial erosion (18% was the most common combination of ossicular erosion. All patients with incudostapedial erosion had advanced disease (85% with multiple site involvement.  Conclusion: Widespread cholesteatoma results in greater ossicular erosion and poor hearing outcomes.

  17. Rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Klik, Andreas; Rousseva, Svetla; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Michaelides, Silas; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Beguería, Santiago; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1), with the highest values (>1000 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also the highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods

  18. Regulation of proteoglycan-specific immune responses in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Berlo, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Many cells of the immune system are involved in this chronic inflammatory process. The primary target organs are the joints although as the disease progresses systemic manifestations often also appear. As a consequence of the inflammatory process, RA patients generally develop a progressive loss of cartilage and bone in joints, resulting in painful joints and impaired functional status. Understa...

  19. Arthritis Associated with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A controlled prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence and characteristic features of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, ankylosing spondylitis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a group of patients with Crohn's disease, and to define the relationship of such arthritides with disease site, duration and activity. Peripheral arthritis occurred in 14.5% of the patients; it was not seen in the control group. This arthritis, which tended to be pauciarticular, was more common i...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus triggered reactive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siam, A R; M. Hammoudeh

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report two patients who developed reactive arthritis in association with Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODS--A review of the case notes of two patients. RESULTS--Two adult female patients have developed sterile arthritis in association with Staph aureus infection. The first patient has had two episodes of arthritis; the first followed olecranon bursitis, the second followed infection of a central venous catheter used for dialysis. The second patient developed sterile arth...

  1. CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Atteno; Peluso, R.; R. Scarpa

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a spondyloarthropathy, which occurs in patients with skin and/or nail psoriasis. Basing its characterization on morphological purposes, several types of arthritis have been described. Alternatively, we propose a simplified classification into three subsets, focusing on the levels of expression of cutaneous and articular elements which devise this syndrome. The first is established psoriatic arthritis which occurs in patients with evident or remittent skin and/or nail ps...

  2. Enthesopathic reactions at the wrist in psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Results of low-kV radiographs in three views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six sites of muscle and ligament attachment around the wrist were evaluated for enthesopathic proliferative bone changes in psoriatic arthritis (PA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Proliferations were found to be most frequent, most irregular, and largest in PA, followed in declining order by RA and DISH. In PA only, the bony proliferations and the underlying bone often had the appearance of mineralized woven bone, though smooth proliferations with a regular bone structure do occur in PA as well as in RA. The entheses of the trapezium, scaphoid and the radial styloid process are most frequently affected, followed by the bases of the first and fifth metacarpals and the pisiform. It is exceptional for huge bony proliferations to be observed at the entheses in DISH. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging of hands in early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on different MR imaging techniques (T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted with and without fat suppression, spoiled GRASS with fat suppression before and after intravenous administration of GD-DTPA) that were analyzed in 15 patients to evaluate the use of MR imaging in demonstrating early rheumatoid arthritis pathology. Erosions were best seen on T1-weighted images without fat suppression. Inflammation was best seen on spoiled GRASS images with fat suppression after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. Cartilage could be best visualized on unenhanced spoiled GRASS or T1-weighted images with fat suppression, although increased resolution is needed for imaging cartilage destruction in hands with rheumatoid arthritis

  4. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subdiaphragmatic lymphoid radiation was used as an alternative to cytotoxic drug therapy to treat six patients with progressive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. All were previously unresponsive to conventional therapy. Radiation (4,000 rad) was given to subdiaphragmatic lymphoid tissues in fractionated doses of 150 to 250 rad each. Three of the six patients demonstrated long-lasting clinical improvement with a decrease in synovitis and morning stiffness and an increase in joint function. All six patients showed a profound depression in the peripheral blood lymphocyte count which persisted for at least six months. The irradiation was well tolerated; there have been no serious complications due to radiotherapy with follow-up ranging from 13 to 36 months. The substantial efficacy in some patients and the lack of severe toxicity in all suggests that radiotherapy deserves further study as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research ... Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals ...

  6. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  7. Differences in MRI findings between subgroups of recent-onset childhood arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Riise, Oeystein [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Pediatrics, Oslo (Norway); Reiseter, Tor [Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-04-15

    MRI is sensitive for joint inflammation, but its ability to separate subgroups of arthritis in children has been questioned. Infectious arthritis (IA), postinfectious arthritis (PA), transient arthritis (TA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are subgroups that may need early, different treatment. To determine whether MRI findings differ in IA, PA/TA and JIA in recent-onset childhood arthritis. Fifty-nine children from a prospective study of incidence of arthritis (n = 216) were, based on clinical and biochemical criteria, examined by MRI. Joint fluid, synovium, bone marrow, soft tissue and cartilage were scored retrospectively and analysed by Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Fifty-nine children had MRI of one station. IA was suggested by bone marrow oedema (OR 7.46, P = 0.011) and absence of T1-weighted and T2-weighted low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 0.06, P = 0.015). Furthermore, soft-tissue oedema and reduced contrast enhancement in the epiphyses were more frequent in children with IA. JIA correlated positively with low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 13.30, P < 0.001) and negatively with soft-tissue oedema (OR 0.20, P = 0.018). No significant positive determinants were found for PA/TA, but bone marrow oedema, soft-tissue oedema, irregular thickened synovium and low signal intensity synovial tissue was less frequent than in IA/JIA. In children with high clinical suspicion of recent onset arthritis, there was a significant difference in the distribution of specific MRI features among the diagnostic groups. (orig.)

  8. Differences in MRI findings between subgroups of recent-onset childhood arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI is sensitive for joint inflammation, but its ability to separate subgroups of arthritis in children has been questioned. Infectious arthritis (IA), postinfectious arthritis (PA), transient arthritis (TA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are subgroups that may need early, different treatment. To determine whether MRI findings differ in IA, PA/TA and JIA in recent-onset childhood arthritis. Fifty-nine children from a prospective study of incidence of arthritis (n = 216) were, based on clinical and biochemical criteria, examined by MRI. Joint fluid, synovium, bone marrow, soft tissue and cartilage were scored retrospectively and analysed by Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Fifty-nine children had MRI of one station. IA was suggested by bone marrow oedema (OR 7.46, P = 0.011) and absence of T1-weighted and T2-weighted low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 0.06, P = 0.015). Furthermore, soft-tissue oedema and reduced contrast enhancement in the epiphyses were more frequent in children with IA. JIA correlated positively with low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 13.30, P < 0.001) and negatively with soft-tissue oedema (OR 0.20, P = 0.018). No significant positive determinants were found for PA/TA, but bone marrow oedema, soft-tissue oedema, irregular thickened synovium and low signal intensity synovial tissue was less frequent than in IA/JIA. In children with high clinical suspicion of recent onset arthritis, there was a significant difference in the distribution of specific MRI features among the diagnostic groups. (orig.)

  9. Patterns of radiographic changes in hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to characterize the pattern of radiographic changes in the hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi patients. The radiographs of hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics of King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period extending from March to June 2001, were examined and reported for the presence of osteopenia, joint space narrowing, and erosions. Fifty-six rheumatoid arthritis patients were studied. Their mean age was 50 + 1.9 years, and mean disease duration was 9.07 + 0.84 years. Generalized osteopenia was seen in 16/56 (29%) and periarticular osteopenia in 38/56 (68%). Joint space narrowing was present in 9/56 (16%) of feet and 35/56 (63%) of hand x-rays. Erosions were seen in 3/56 (6%) of feet and in 22/56 (39%) of hand x-rays. Significant correlation was seen between joints space narrowing, joint erosions, and disease duration. Radiographic changes in hands and feet of Saudi rheumatoid arthritis patients are less severe than those reported from the West, and the pattern is also different with less affection of the feet. (author)

  10. Clotrimazole in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtulewski, J. A.; Gow, P J; Walter, J; Grahame, R; Gibson, T.; Panayi, G S; Mason, J.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in an 8-week controlled study in which clotrimazole was compared with a standard nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, ketoprofen. Although clotrimazole was shown to be effective in the treatment of the disease and superior to ketoprofen in certain measurements, if was also responsible for a high incidence of adverse effects. Improvement with clotrimazole took place more slowly but was more sustained than with ketoprofen. A signi...

  11. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  12. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  13. X-ray diagnosis of mutilating arthritis in patients with psoriatic arthritis Smirnov A.V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Smirnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The typical X-ray symptoms of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in joints of hands and distal sections of feet (asymmetric lesions; isolated lesion of distal interphalangeal joints (DIJ of hands with no changes in other small joints of hands; axial lesion of three joints in a single finger; transverse lesion of joints of the hand at the same level; destruction of distal phalanges; narrowing of the distal epiphysis of hand finger phalanges and metacarpal bones; cup-shaped deformity of the proximal portion of hand finger phalanges and narrowing of distal epiphysis; osseous ankyloses; multiple osteolytic lesions and destruction of bone epiphysis and joint deformities; inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joints; and typical degenerative changes in the spine are described. It is especially important to know X-ray manifestations of PsA when there are no typical cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis. 

  14. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study

  15. Erosive polyarthritis associated with Mycoplasma gateae in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeugswetter, Florian; Hittmair, Katharina M; de Arespacochaga, Abigail G; Shibly, Sarina; Spergser, Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Erosive polyarthritis was diagnosed in an 11-month-old neutered male Egyptian Mau-cross cat with concurrent glucocorticoid-responsive dermatitis. Clinical signs, synovial fluid analysis, serological tests and radiographic appearance could not differentiate between immune-mediated and infective arthritis. Mycoplasma gateae was isolated by strictly anaerobic culture of the synovial fluid. Treatment with Enrofloxacin led to a rapid improvement of the cat's condition. Two months later the cat was euthanased because of severe glomerulonephritis and direct Coombs' test positive anaemia, possibly caused by mycoplasma infection. M gateae could not be isolated at post-mortem examination. PMID:17175189

  16. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  17. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between sh

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kaas; Valérie Tóthová; Lukáš Martinek

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustio...

  19. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis with Concomitant Features of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tsitsami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 13-year-old girl with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO who developed severe arthritis in four different joints within the first year from the onset of the disease. Her multiple vertebrae lesions showed significant amelioration after a 2-month treatment with prednisolone. In parallel, the initial severe symmetrical arthritis of both knees showing overt synovitis and joint effusion, in the absence of lesions in the metaphyses of the femur or the tibia, responded remarkably well in intra-articular triamcinolone hexacetonide injections. However, upon discontinuation of prednisolone, the patient developed severe arthritis of her right ankle and the proximal interphalangeal joint of her right middle finger. Thus, prednisolone was reinitiated combined with methotrexate, and the patient went into remission, which persists one year after prednisolone tapering. The appearance of arthritis in both knees in the absence of bone lesions and the emergence of severe arthritis of the ankle after remission of spinal bone lesions suggest that CRMO and juvenile idiopathic arthritis may coexist and be causally related.

  20. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  1. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  2. INTENSIVE THERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: IS IT REAL EFFICIENCY OR A NEED IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY ALTERNATIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion. Addition of IT to the complex management of RA rapidly reduces the activity of RA and alleviates its systemic manifestations, the effect of IT persisting for 6 months on average. However, the application of programs for intensification of treatment with GC and cytostatics in high doses cannot retard the progression of erosive arthritis.

  3. INTENSIVE THERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: IS IT REAL EFFICIENCY OR A NEED IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY ALTERNATIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion. Addition of IT to the complex management of RA rapidly reduces the activity of RA and alleviates its systemic manifestations, the effect of IT persisting for 6 months on average. However, the application of programs for intensification of treatment with GC and cytostatics in high doses cannot retard the progression of erosive arthritis.

  4. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  5. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis as a distinct disease entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Y

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by joint inflammation associated with cutaneous psoriasis. For many years, the amount of attention directed to PsA had been less than that for various other arthropathies. With the advances in understanding its pathogensis, it is now recognized as a distinct disease entity with characteristic features. Psoriatic arthritis has a greater tendency towards asymmetric oligoarticular involvement, distal interphalangeal involvement and spondylitis. Associated features such as enthesitis and dactylitis are more common. Specific radiological features include ankylosis and bone resorption. With the availability of potent new therapeutic agents for psoriasis and PsA, interest in research and clinical care for these conditions has been reinvigorated. Anti-TNF therapy has achieved encouraging efficacy in both the joints and skin disease, improving function and quality of life and inhibiting radiological progression measured in patients with PsA and psoriasis. Biologic agents may have the potential in addressing the unmet medical need in patients with PsA.

  7. Oral administration of curcumin suppresses production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis: inhibition of the PKCdelta/JNK/c-Jun pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Jie Wan; Ko, Na Young; Kim, Do Kyun; Lee, Beob Yi; Kim, Bokyung; Won, Hyung Sik; Shin, Hwa-Sup; Han, Jeung-Whan; Lee, Hoi Young; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2009-09-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of curcumin suppressed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and its effect and mechanism on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 production in CIA mice, RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), and chondrocytes. CIA in mice was suppressed by oral administration of curcumin in a dose-dependent manner. Macroscopic observations were confirmed by histological examinations. Histological changes including infiltration of immune cells, synovial hyperplasia, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion in the hind paw sections were extensively suppressed by curcumin. The histological scores were consistent with clinical arthritis indexes. Production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were inhibited by curcumin in CIA hind paw sections and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-stimulated FLS and chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. As for the mechanism, curcumin inhibited activating phosphorylation of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta) in CIA, FLS, and chondrocytes. Curcumin also suppressed the JNK and c-Jun activation in those cells. This study suggests that the suppression of MMP-1 and MMP-3 production by curcumin in CIA is mediated through the inhibition of PKCdelta and the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. PMID:19763044

  8. MRI features of rheumatoid arthritis and diagnostic value of MRI%类风湿性关节炎的MRI表现及其临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永强; 涂大有; 叶秋菊

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the MRI findings of rheumatoid arthritis and diagnostic value of MRI. Methods: MRI materials were analyzed retrospectively in 56 cases with clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis. Of which,5 cases had contrast enhancement. Results: Of the 56 cases, the joints involved included knee (n=31) , wrist (n= 18) , metacarpophalangeal joints (n=7), All of the invaded joints had diffuse synovial membrane thickening, appeared as slight hypo-intensity on T1 WI,slight hyper-or hyper-intensity on T2WI,slight hyper-intensity on fat-suppressed T2WI. Enhanced MRI was useful in differentiating articular effusion and synovial membrane thickening. Bone marrow edema occurred in 13 patients,appeared as osseous patchy slight hyper-intensity on T2WI and slight hypo-intensity on T1WI, slight hyper-intensity on fat-suppressed T2WI,with unclear boundary. Cartilage and bone erosion could be revealed in 30 patients, which showed decreased or increased signal intensities of cartilage on T1WI and on fat-suppressed T2WI. Bone erosion appeared as hypo-intensity on T1WI,hypo- to hyper-intensity on T2WI and fat-suppressed T2WI. 50 patients had ligaments,meniscus and tendon involvement, appeared as increased signal intensities on T1WI and T2WI, showing blurred boundary with the adjacent thickened synovial membrane. Conclusion:Certain characteristic MRI manifestations could be revealed in rheumatoid arthritis, MRI is an important technique in the detection of rheumatoid arthritis.%目的:探讨类风湿性关节炎的MRI表现及其临床价值.方法:回顾性分析56例经临床诊断的类风湿性关节炎病例的MRI资料,其中5例行增强扫描.结果:56例患者中膝关节受累31例,腕关节受累18例,掌指关节7例.所有受累关节滑膜弥漫性增厚,表现为稍长T1、稍长或长T2信号,T2WI压脂序列呈稍高信号,增强扫描可鉴别关节积液与增厚滑膜.骨髓水肿13例,表现为骨质斑片状稍长T2稍长T1信号,T2WI压脂序列呈稍

  9. The utility of bone scans in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Bone scans are the commonest diagnostic imaging services requested by Australian rheumatologists. Medicare figures suggest that an average rheumatologist orders about $50 000 (AUS) of bone scans annually. Aims: To ascertain the reasons why rheumatologists request bone scans and how it affects their patient management. Methods: A two-part prospective survey was administered before and after every bone scan ordered by four rheumatologists over a six-month period in 1996. Results: A total of 136 bone scans were requested (66.2% whole body; 33.8% regional; 6% SPECT). The primary indications for scanning were (1) to confirm a clinical diagnosis (38%); (2) to exclude a diagnosis (34%); (3) to localize site of pain (17%); and (4) to assist in management (6%). The common diseases that rheumatologists were attempting to confirm/exclude with bone scanning were inflammatory arthritis, malignancy, and fracture. However, the commonest provisional and final diagnosis was soft tissue rheumatism (18%) followed by inflammatory arthritis (15%) and osteoarthritis (11%). In 24% of patients with a provisional diagnosis of soft tissue rheumatism the diagnosis was changed by the bone scan. The scan was successful in excluding a diagnosis in 88 per cent where this was the primary indication for the test. It was successful in confirming a diagnosis in 79 per cent where this was the primary indication. In 32 per cent the bone scan altered the clinical diagnosis and in 43 per cent it altered management. The bone scan result prevented further investigations in 60 per cent. Conclusions: The commonest pre-scan and post-scan diagnosis is soft tissue rheumatism. Rheumatologists predominantly request bone scanning to confirm or exclude their clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis, malignancy, and fracture. Bone scans were successful in achieving these objectives in at least 79 per cent of cases

  10. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    N M Kosheleva; E. V. Matyanova

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of thes...

  11. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  12. Therapeutic gene transfer for rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Boissier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common and severe disease. Its prevalence in adults is about 0.5%. It not only causes joint pain and severe disability but also increases mortality. RA is an inflammatory autoimmune disease whose the inciting stimulus is unknown, but the cascade of immunological and inflammatory reactions has been elucidated. These reactions produce inflammatory synovitis promptly followed by irreversible joint and bone destruction (1. Available treatments for RA fail to provide long-lasting control of the symptoms or disease progression. The beneficial effects of conventional second-line therapy are incomplete and usually short-lived, despite the progress brought by the introduction of methotrexate in the 1980s....

  13. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting...

  14. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Mikael [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: parker@frh.regioh.dk; Jensen, Karl Erik [State Hospital, Department of Radiology, MRI Division, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: karl.erik.Jensen@rh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A. [Rheumatologic Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa (Italy)], E-mail: cimmino@unige.it; Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg/ml), 0.5 ml Lidocaine (5 mg/ml) and 0.15 ml gadolinium (Omniscan 0.5 mmol/ml). The drug solution was placed in the central proximal part of the wrist between the distal radius and the lunate bone. Coronal and axial MRI sequences were performed after the injection to visualize the distribution. Carpal distribution (radio-carpal, inter-carpal, and carpo-metacarpal) as well as radio-ulnar distribution was recorded. Full distribution in one compartment was given the value 1, partial distribution 0.5 and no distribution 0. A sum of the total distribution for all four compartments was calculated and correlated to the clinical parameters and the MRI OMERACT scores. Results: No uniform pattern was seen in the distribution of the contrast. Only two patients had full contrast distribution to all four compartments, and the mean distribution count for all patients was 2.4 (range 0.5-4). The distribution count correlated with the MRI OMERACT synovitis score (r = 0.60, p = 0.014), but not with the erosions, bonemarrow oedema scores or any clinical parameters. Conclusion: The distribution of contrast on MRI showed patient specific and random patterns after IA injections in active RA wrist joints. The degree of distribution increased with the MRI synovitis score, while no association was found with the erosion- and bonemarrow oedema score. These results indicate that a single injection into a standard injection site in the proximal part of the wrist cannot be assumed to distribute - and treat - the whole joint.

  15. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Data drawn from a global compilation of studies quantitatively confirm the long-articulated contention that erosion rates from conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1–2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production, erosion under native vegetation, and long-term geological erosion. The general equivalence of the latter indicates that, considered globally, hillslope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic and climate forcing, whereas conventional plow-bas...

  16. Study of cliff shoreline erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Pina, Gregorio; Muñoz-Perez, Juan J.; Figueres, Miguel; Garrido, Joaquin; Ponce de León, Daniel; Perez, Angela; Velasco, Marta; Lizondo, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the cliff shoreline erosion on the coastline between Punta Montijo and the Chipiona Port (Cadiz, Spain) is studied. The reasons which cause this erosive phenomenon and the future erosive tendency of these cliffs are estimated, obtaining magnitudes of recession and the rate at which it will occur. Analysis of the current situation has been carried out by determining its plan shape, the study of the theoretical erosion profile of the cliffs and the verification of their failure. T...

  17. Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Miller, Andy O; Petraitiene, Ruta; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Candida arthritis is a debilitating form of deeply invasive candidiasis. However, its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome are not well understood. Methods.  Cases of Candida arthritis were reviewed from 1967 through 2014. Variables included Candida spp in joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Results.  Among 112 evaluable cases, 62% were males and 36% were pediatric. Median age was 40 years (range, osteomyelitis was present in 30% of cases. Candida albicans constituted 63%, Candida tropicalis 14%, and Candida parapsilosis 11%. Most cases (66%) arose de novo, whereas 34% emerged during antifungal therapy. Osteolysis occurred in 42%, joint-effusion in 31%, and soft tissue extension in 21%. Amphotericin and fluconazole were the most commonly used agents. Surgical interventions included debridement in 25%, irrigation 10%, and drainage 12%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 96% and relapse in 16%. Conclusion.  Candida arthritis mainly emerges as a de novo infection in usually non-immunosuppressed patients with hips and knees being most commonly infected. Localizing symptoms are frequent, and the most common etiologic agents are C albicans, C tropicalis, and C parapsilosis. Management of Candida arthritis remains challenging with a clear risk of relapse, despite antifungal therapy. PMID:26858961

  18. Influence of disease activity and treatment on rate of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Goryachev

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Severity of hands and feet joint destruction is the most objective marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA progression determining functional disability. The main aim of RA treatment is suppression of joint destruction. Objective. To study dependence of joint erosions forming speed on disease modifying anti-rhcumatic drugs (DMARD administration and RA activity. Material and methods. Retrospective analysis of 451 cases of RA treatment was performed. Erosions were counted according to modified Sharp method. Erosions forming speed was counted as ratio of erosion number increase to a year’s time space. Averaged disease activity was calculated as arithmetic mean for all DAS28 values obtained during disease course. Considering close relationship between disease activity and DMARD administration two-factor analysis was used. DMARD administration (>3 months and mean activity of RA were considered as factors. Results. Variance analysis (ANOVA with covariant showed that mean RA activity is a significant factor influencing erosions forming speed (F=12,5; p=4xl0 4. Character of DMARD, fact of its administration and disease duration did not significantly influence erosions forming speed considering disease activity covariant. Regression model with inclusion disease duration factor mean disease activity and DMARD administration at the moment of assessment allowed to explain 42% of dispersion (determination coefficient. Conclusion. Activity of RA is the main factor influencing erosions forming speed. Therapy not decreasing activity of RA does not change erosions forming speed

  19. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  20. Early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints damage and loss of the function. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Consequently, early diagnosis and treatment is important, but predictive markers for RA are still confined to auto- antibodies and also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sonography do not appear to sufficiently distinguish between early RA and non RA. Evidence shows that substantial and irreversible joint damage already occurs within the first 2 years after disease onset. This “window of opportunity” hypothesis for therapeutic intervention in RA is based on the existence of a time frame within which there is a potential for a greater response to therapy, resulting in sustained benefits or, perhaps most important, a chance of cure. There is increasing evidence for beneficial effects of early DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs therapy over delayed treatment in patients who present with arthritis of recent onset. However, no universal consensus exists concerning the choice of initial drug or whether single drug or combination should be given as initial treatments. Most studies demonstrated superiority of aggressive over conventional approaches. Because the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors have proved to stop joint damage progression in severe progressive RA, the achievement of these agents in early RA are currently of great interest.

  1. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  2. MR对早期类风湿性关节炎的诊断价值%Diagnosis value of MR for rheumatoid arthritis at early stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶石保; 庄宇; 陈宇航; 吕志芬; 谭志明

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the value of MRI in early diagnostic of rheumatoid arthritis.Methods MRI and radiography materials were analyzed retrospectively in 56 cases with clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis.Results Sixty patients which diagnosis rheumatoid arthritis, MRI examination were performed on both wrists in 52 of 60 patients, performed on one wrist in 8 of 60 patients. Radiography examination were performed on both wrists in 32 of 60 patients, performed on one wrist in 3 of 60 patients. Significant differences were found between radiography and MRI(P<0.05). In 60 patients, 117 carpal erosive foci were demonstrated by radiography and 274 foci were revealed by MRI.MRI was able to reveal all foci which found by radiography. And MRI could found the synovitis,joint effusion and bone marrow edema which could not be found in radiography.Conclusion MRI is a useful modality for evaluation of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis.%目的:探讨MRI对早期类风湿性关节炎(RA)的诊断价值。方法回顾性分析60例临床诊断RA患者的手腕关节X线和MRI图像。结果在60例诊断RA的患者MRI扫描有52例双侧腕关节均可见骨质侵蚀改变,8例可见单侧腕关节骨质侵蚀改变。而X线检查中只有32例双侧腕关节显示明确骨质侵蚀改变,3例显示单侧腕关节骨质侵蚀改变。X线与MRI比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。从检出病灶总数观察,60例患者X线平片仅可检出骨质侵蚀病灶117处,而双手MR中可检出骨质侵蚀病灶共274处。其中X线所见的骨侵蚀病变均可在MRI影像上加以显示。另外,MR还可显示X线所不能显示的滑膜炎、关节积液和骨髓水肿的改变。结论 MRI是诊断早期RA的有力工具。

  3. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA. (orig.)

  5. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenoenen, M.

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA.

  6. [99mTc]diphosphonate uptake and hemodynamics in arthritis of the immature dog knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between [99mTc]diphosphonate uptake and bone hemodynamics was studied in canine carrageenan-induced juvenile chronic arthritis. Blood flow was determined with microspheres, plasma and red cell volumes were measured by labeled fibrinogen and red cells, and the microvascular volume and mean transit time of blood were calculated. Normal femoral epiphyses had lower central and higher subchondral blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values. Epiphyseal vascular volume was uniform, resulting in a greater transit time of blood centrally. In arthritis, blood flow and diphosphonate uptake were increased subchondrally and unaffected centrally, while epiphyseal vascular volume was increased throughout, leading to prolonged transit time centrally. The normal metaphyses had low blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values in cancellous bone and very high values in growth plates, but a large vascular volume throughout. The mean transit time therefore was low in growth plates and high in adjacent cancellous bone. Arthritis caused decreased blood flow and diphosphonate uptake in growth plates but increased vascular volume and transit time of blood. Diphosphonate uptake correlated positively with blood flow and plasma volume and negatively with red cell volume in a nonlinear fashion. Thus, changes in diphosphonate uptake and microvascular hemodynamics occur in both epiphyseal and metaphyseal bone in chronic synovitis of the immature knee. The [99mTc]diphosphonate bone scan seems to reflect blood flow, plasma volume, and red cell volume of bone

  7. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  8. Toothpaste and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, Carolina; Schulze, Katja; Schlueter, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Dental erosion develops from the chronic exposure to non-bacterial acids resulting in bulk mineral loss with a partly demineralised surface of reduced micro-hardness. Clinical features are loss of surface structures with shallow lesions on smooth surfaces and cupping and flattening of cusps; already in early stages, coronal dentine often is exposed. Not only enamel, but also dentine is therefore an important target tissue for anti-erosion strategies. The main goal of active ingredients against erosion is to increase the acid resistance of tooth surfaces or pellicles. The challenge with toothpastes is that abrasives, otherwise beneficial in terms of cleaning properties, may counteract the effects of active ingredients. Fluoride toothpastes offer a degree of protection, but in order to design more effective formulations, active ingredients in addition to, or other than, fluorides have been suggested. Polyvalent metal cations, Ca/P salts in nano-form, phosphates, proteins, and various biopolymers, e.g. chitosan, are substances under study. The complex combined action of active ingredients and abrasives on the dental hard tissues, and the role of excipients of complex toothpaste formulations are not yet fully understood. Current evidence is flawed by the diversity of experimental designs, and there is no knowledge from clinical studies with patients so far. However, research results indicate that there is potential to develop effective toothpastes in this field. As the prevalence of initial erosive lesions particularly in younger age groups is high in some countries, such strategies would be of great importance for maintaining oral health. PMID:23817062

  9. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis: Radiological changes in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to describe the radiographic cervical spine changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Forty-nine patients (37 females and 12 males ) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between June 1998 and December 2000, were studied for their radiographic cervical spine changes . Their mean age at disease onset was 41.4+ 13.4 years (range of 18-73)and mean duration of disease was 9.1+-6.28 years (range of 2-34). Their demographic data including rheumatoid factor status was obtained. Standard conventional radiographs cervical spine were obtained to study the cervical spine changes. Cervical radiographic changes were found in 34 patients (27 females and 7 males) 10 had subluxation (7 with atlanto-axial subluxation,2 with sub-axial subluxation,and one with lateral subluxation ). No vertical impaction was seen. Erosion of odontoid process was seen in one patient .All were rheumatoid seropositive Cervical spine changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are common, in particular subluxation in the upper cervical spine. Our study showed somewhat lesser prevalence of these changes. These were clinically correlated with disease duration, female sex, and rheumatoid factor, but were not clinically significant. (author)

  11. Rainfall erosivity map for Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly rainfall data, spanning over a period of more than thirty years, were used to compute rainfall erosivity indices for various stations in Ghana, using the Fournier index, c, defined as p2/P, where p is the rainfall amount in the wettest month and P is the annual rainfall amount. Values of the rainfall erosivity indices ranged from 24.5 mm at Sunyani in the mid-portion of Ghana to 180.9 mm at Axim in the south western coastal portion. The indices were used to construct a rainfall erosivity map for the country. The map revealed that Ghana may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The middle sector of Ghana is generally in the low erosion risk zone; the northern sector is in the moderate to severe erosion risk zone, while the coastal sector is in the severe to extreme severe erosion risk zone. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. A multi-biomarker disease activity score for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shintaro Hirata,1 Nadine Defranoux,2 Kentaro Hanami,1 Kunihiro Yamaoka,3 Yoshiya Tanaka1 1The First Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan; 2Crescendo Bioscience, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease that affects the synovium and results in cartilage degradation, bone erosions, and joint deformities. RA-associated pain, decreased mobility, fatigue, and comorbidities lead to functional disability, impaired quality of life, and shortened life expectancy by 5–10 years. According to the US Centers for Disease Control, RA ranked as the 42nd highest contributor to global disability, with a prevalence of 1.5 million in the USA and 1.24 million in Japan. Synthetic and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs have improved patient health and disease outcomes. Early diagnosis and intervention to control and decrease disease activity have led to improved patient outcomes. Furthermore, the emergence of a treat-to-target strategy and the definition of remission criteria by the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatology have provided a new framework for physicians to achieve better patient outcomes based on regular evaluation of disease activity and assessment of the response to treatment. Improvement is needed, however, in facilitating disease activity assessment and identifying patients at higher risk of radiographic progression and those with smoldering disease who could benefit from more aggressive intervention. An objective disease activity test based on biomarkers measured in the blood that reflects the underlying biological events in addition to information on risk of radiographic progression would fulfill this need. Such a test would provide

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you receive ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  16. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  17. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  18. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  19. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Atzeni; P Sarzi- Puttini; Lubrano, E

    2011-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massag...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...