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Sample records for arterial wave reflection

  1. Arterial wave reflection decreases gradually from supine to upright

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Bogaard, Bas; Westerhof, Berend E; Best, Hendrik;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND. An increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR) usually increases arterial wave reflection. During passive head-up tilt (HUT), however, arterial wave reflection decreases with increasing TPR. This study addressed whether arterial wave reflection gradually decreases during HUT. METHODS...... was quantified as the augmentation index (AIx) and the reflection magnitude (RM). RESULTS. During HUT, heart rate increased (p TPR increased...... represented as AIx and RM gradually decreases in the presence of increasing TPR....

  2. Distal shift of arterial pressure wave reflection sites with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-11-01

    An early return of reflected waves, the backward propagation of the arterial pressure wave from the periphery to the heart, is associated with the augmentation of central pulse pressure and cardiovascular risks. The locations of arterial pressure wave reflection, along with arterial stiffening, have a major influence on the timing of the reflected wave. To determine the influence of aging on the location of a major reflection site, arterial length (via 3D artery tracing of MRI) and central (carotid-femoral) and peripheral (femoral-ankle) pulse wave velocities were measured in 208 adults varying in age. The major reflection site was detected by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the reflected wave transit time (via carotid arterial pressure wave analysis). The length from the aortic valve to the major reflection site (eg, effective reflecting length) significantly increased with aging. The effective reflecting length normalized by the arterial length demonstrated that the major reflection sites were located between the aortic bifurcation and femoral site in most of the subjects. The normalized effective reflecting length did not alter with aging until 65 years of age and increased remarkably thereafter in men and women. The effective reflecting length was significantly and positively associated with the difference between central and peripheral pulse wave velocities (r=0.76). This correlation remained significant even when the influence of aortic pulse wave velocity was partial out (r=0.35). These results suggest that the major reflection site shifts distally with aging partly because of the closer matching of impedance provided by central and peripheral arterial stiffness.

  3. White coat hypertension is more risky than prehypertension: important role of arterial wave reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Ting, Chih-Tai; Lakatta, Edward G; Yin, Frank C P; Chou, Pesus; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2013-06-01

    Arterial aging may link cardiovascular risk to white coat hypertension (WCH). The aims of the present study were to investigate the role of arterial aging in the white coat effect, defined as the difference between office and 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressures, and to compare WCH with prehypertension (PH) with respect to target organ damage and long-term cardiovascular mortality. A total of 1257 never-been-treated volunteer subjects from a community-based survey were studied. WCH and PH were defined by office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressures. Left ventricular mass index, carotid intima-media thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, amplitude of the reflection pressure wave, and 15-year cardiovascular mortality were determined. Subjects with WCH were significantly older and had greater body mass index, blood pressure values, intima-media thickness, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, amplitude of the backward pressure wave, and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate than PH. Amplitude of the backward pressure wave was the most important independent correlate of the white coat effect in multivariate analysis (model r(2)=0.451; partial r(2)/model r(2)=90.5%). WCH had significantly greater cardiovascular mortality than PH (hazard ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-7.91), after accounting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio. Further adjustment of the model for amplitude of the backward pressure wave eliminated the statistical significance of the WCH effect. In conclusion, the white coat effect is mainly caused by arterial aging. WCH carries higher risk for cardiovascular mortality than PH, probably via enhanced wave reflections that accompany arterial aging.

  4. Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Wave Reflection in Young Adult Heterozygous Sickle Cell Carriers

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    Tünzale Bayramoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulse wave velocity (PWV and aortic augmentation index (AI are indicators of arterial stiffness. Pulse wave reflection and arterial stiffness are related to cardiovascular events and sickle cell disease. However, the effect of these parameters on the heterozygous sickle cell trait (HbAS is unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate the arterial stiffness and wave reflection in young adult heterozygous sickle cell carriers. METHODS: We enrolled 40 volunteers (20 HbAS cases, 20 hemoglobin AA [HbAA] cases aged between 18 and 40 years. AI and PWV values were measured by arteriography. RESULTS: Aortic blood pressure, aortic AI, and brachial AI values were significantly higher in HbAS cases compared to the control group (HbAA (p=0.033, 0.011, and 0.011, respectively. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between aortic pulse wave velocity and mean arterial pressure, age, aortic AI, brachial AI, weight, and low-density lipoprotein levels (p=0.000, 0.017, 0.000, 0.000, 0.034, and 0.05, respectively in the whole study population. Aortic AI and age were also significantly correlated (p=0.026. In addition, a positive correlation between aortic PWV and systolic blood pressure and a positive correlation between aortic AI and mean arterial pressure (p=0.027 and 0.009, respectively were found in HbAS individuals. Our study reveals that mean arterial pressure and heart rate are independent determinants for the aortic AI. Mean arterial pressure and age are independent determinants for aortic PWV. CONCLUSION: Arterial stiffness measurement is an easy, cheap, and reliable method in the early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in heterozygous sickle cell carriers. These results may depend on the amount of hemoglobin S in red blood cells. Further studies are required to investigate the blood pressure changes and its effects on arterial stiffness in order to explain the vascular aging mechanism in the HbAS trait population.

  5. Arterial stiffness and wave reflections in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemogoum, Daniel; Van Bortel, Luc; Najem, Boutaina; Dzudie, Anasthase; Teutcha, Charles; Madu, Ernest; Leeman, Marc; Degaute, Jean-Paul; van de Borne, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lower blood pressure and increased vasodilatation reported in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients with hemoglobin SS genotype (SS) are translated by lower arterial stiffness determined by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wave reflections assessed by augmentation index (AI). We enrolled 20 SS (8 females; 12 male) patients closely matched for age, gender, height, and body mass index to 20 subjects with hemoglobin AA genotype (AA). Carotid-femoral PWV (PWV(CF)) and carotid-radial PWV (PWV(CR)) were recorded with the Complior device. Aortic AI was derived from pressure wave analysis (SphygmocoR). PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) were lower in SS than in AA (4.5+/-0.7 m/s versus 6.9+/-0.9 m/s, P<0.0001 and 6.6+/-1.2 m/s versus 9.5+/-1.4 m/s, P<0.0001, respectively). AI was lower in SS than in AA (2+/-14% versus 11+/-8%, P=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that both PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) were negatively associated with hemoglobin SS type and positively related to mean arterial pressure (MAP), whereas AI was positively associated with MAP and total cholesterol (all P<0.0001). Multivariate analysis restricted to SS indicated a positive association between PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) with age but a negative association with MAP (R2=0.57 and 0.51, respectively, both P<0.001), whereas MAP and heart rate were independently associated with AI (R2=0.65, P<0.001). This study provides the first evidence that SCD is associated with both lower arterial stiffness and wave reflections. SS patients have a paradoxical negative association between PWV and MAP, suggesting that low MAP does not protect them against arterial stiffness impairment.

  6. Serum Uric Acid Level and Diverse Impacts on Regional Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection

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    Suyan Bian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both increased arterial stiffness and hyperuricaemia are associated with elevated cardiovascular risks. Little is known about the relations of serum uric acid (UA level to regional arterial stiffness and wave reflection. The aim of the study was to investigate the gender-specific association of serum UA and indices of arterial function in a community-based investigation in China.Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2374 adults (mean age 58.24 years who underwent routine laboratory tests, regional pulse wave velocity (PWV and pulse wave analysis measurements were analyzed in a gender-specific manner. None of the participants had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory disease, gout, or were under treatment which would affect serum UA level.Results: Men had higher serum UA level than women. Subjects with hyperuricaemia had significantly higher carotid-ankle PWV in both genders (P< 0.05, and the carotid-femoral PWV (PWVc-f was higher in women (P< 0.001 while the augmentation index was marginally lower in men (P = 0.049. Multiple regression analysis showed that serum UA was an independent determinant only for PWVc-f in women (β = 0.104, P = 0.027 when adjusted for atherogenic confounders. No other independent relationship was found between UA level and other surrogates of arterial stiffness.Conclusions: Serum UA levels are associated with alterations in systemic arterial stiffness that differ in men and women. Women might be more susceptible to large vascular damage associated with hyperuricaemia.

  7. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

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    Luca Faconti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this “excess risk” in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from “risk” to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role.

  8. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faconti, Luca; Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this "excess risk" in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from "risk" to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role.

  9. Plasma homocysteine is associated with aortic arterial stiffness but not wave reflection in Chinese hypertensive subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkai Xiao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy acts synergistically with hypertension to exert a multiplicative effect on cardiovascular diseases risk. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between tHcy concentration and blood pressure, and to evaluate the role of plasma tHcy in arterial stiffness and wave reflection in hypertension. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a community-based sample of 1680 subjects (mean age 61.6 years was classified into four groups according to tHcy level (<21.6 vs. ≥ 21.6 µmol/l and blood pressure (hypertensive vs. normotensive. Levels of plasma tHcy and other biochemical parameters (e.g., lipids, glucose were determined. Central arterial blood pressure, reflected pressure wave, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV were assessed by tonometry within 2 days of obtaining the blood specimen. RESULTS: Neither peripheral nor central blood pressure differed according to tHcy levels in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Differences in cf-PWV according to tHcy were observed only in hypertensive subjects; differences in cf-PWV in normotensive subjects were not significant after adjusting for confounding factors. Central augmentation index did not differ according to tHcy level in either normotensive or hypertensive subjects. Results of univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between blood pressure parameters and tHcy concentration only among normotensive subjects; however, these correlations were not significant in a partial correlation analysis. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that plasma tHcy levels were independently correlated with cf-PWV in hypertensive subjects (β = 0.713, P = 0.004. The independent relationship between tHcy and central augmentation index was not significant by further multiple analyses in normotensive or hypertensive individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma tHcy level is strongly and independently correlated with arterial

  10. Increased wave reflection and ejection duration in women with chest pain and nonobstructive coronary artery disease: ancillary study from the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation.

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    Nichols, Wilmer W; Denardo, Scott J; Johnson, B Delia; Sharaf, Barry L; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Pepine, Carl J

    2013-07-01

    Wave reflections augment central aortic SBP and increase systolic pressure time integral (SPTI) thereby increasing left ventricular (LV) afterload and myocardial oxygen (MVO2) demand. When increased, such changes may contribute to myocardial ischemia and angina pectoris, especially when aortic diastolic time is decreased and myocardial perfusion pressure jeopardized. Accordingly, we examined pulse wave reflection characteristics and diastolic timing in a subgroup of women with chest pain (Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation, WISE) and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Radial artery BP waveforms were recorded by applanation tonometry, and aortic BP waveforms derived. Data from WISE participants were compared with data from asymptomatic women (reference group) without chest pain matched for age, height, BMI, mean arterial BP, and heart rate. Compared with the reference group, WISE participants had higher aortic SBP and pulse BP and ejection duration. These differences were associated with increased augmentation index and reflected pressure wave systolic duration. These modifications in wave reflection characteristics were associated with increased SPTI and wasted LV energy (Ew) and a decrease in pulse pressure amplification, myocardial viability ratio, and diastolic pressure time fraction. WISE participants with no obstructive CAD have changes in systolic wave reflections and diastolic timing that increase LV afterload, MVO2 demand, and Ew with the potential to reduce coronary artery perfusion. These alterations in cardiovascular function contribute to an undesirable mismatch in the MVO2 supply/demand that promotes ischemia and chest pain and may contribute to, or increase the severity of, future adverse cardiovascular events.

  11. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  12. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  13. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  14. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors effect on arterial stiffness and wave reflections: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Yousef; Khan, Junaid Alam; Chetter, Ian

    2012-03-01

    Several studies have assessed the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on arterial stiffness and wave reflections as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), respectively. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate this effect in comparison to placebo and to other antihypertensive agents. Additionally, we investigated this effect when ACEIs are combined with other antihypertensive agents and in comparison to a combination of antihypertensive agents. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched from inception to May 2011 on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which assessed the effect of ACEIs on arterial stiffness vs. placebo or no treatment and ACEIs vs. angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), β-blockers and diuretics. RCTs which assessed the effect of ACEIs combined with other antihypertensives or compared ACEIs with a combination of antihypertensives were also sought. Data from included RCTs were pooled with use of fixed and random effects meta-analysis of the weighted mean change differences between the comparator groups. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the I(2) statistic. In 5 trials including 469 patients, treatment with ACEIs (n=227) vs. placebo (n=216) significantly reduced PWV (pooled mean change difference -1.69, 95% C.I. -2.05, -1.33, pACEIs (n=178) insignificantly reduced PWV when compared with other antihypertensives (ARBs, CCBs, β-blockers, diuretics and a combination of ACEI and ARB) (n=220) (pooled mean change difference -0.19, 95% C.I. -0.59, 0.21, p=0.36, I(2)=0%). ACEI effect on AIx in comparison to placebo was assessed in 7 trials. Treatment with ACEIs significantly reduced AIx (pooled mean change difference -3.79, 95% C.I. -5.96, -1.63, p=0.0006) with significant heterogeneity. In 7 trials, treatment with ACEIs significantly reduced AIx when compared with other antihypertensives (pooled mean change

  15. Beneficial effects on arterial stiffness and pulse-wave reflection of combined enalapril and candesartan in chronic kidney disease--a randomized trial.

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    Marie Frimodt-Møller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensinsystem (RAS in hypertension causes differential effects on central and brachial blood pressure (BP, which has been translated into improved outcome. The objective was to examine if a more complete inhibition of RAS by combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI and an angiotensin receptor antagonist (ARB compared to monotherapy has an additive effect on central BP and pulse-wave velocity (PWV, which are known markers of CVD. METHODS: Sixty-seven CKD patients (mean GFR 30, range 13-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 participated in an open randomized study of 16 weeks of monotherapy with either enalapril or candesartan followed by 8 weeks of dual blockade aiming at a total dose of 16 mg candesartan and 20 mg enalapril o.d. Pulse-wave measurements were performed at week 0, 8, 16 and 24 by the SphygmoCor device. RESULTS: Significant additive BP independent reductions were found after dual blockade in aortic PWV (-0.3 m/s, P<0.05 and in augmentation index (-2%, P<0.01 compared to monotherapy. Furthermore pulse pressure amplification was improved (P<0.05 and central systolic BP reduced (-6 mmHg, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Dual blockade of the RAS resulted in an additive BP independent reduction in pulse-wave reflection and arterial stiffness compared to monotherapy in CKD patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical trial.gov NCT00235287.

  16. A review of wave mechanics in the pulmonary artery with an emphasis on wave intensity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J; Hilberg, O; Howard, L; Simonsen, U; Hughes, A D

    2016-12-01

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remain the most common haemodynamic measures to evaluate the severity and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension. However, PVR only captures the non-oscillatory component of the right ventricular hydraulic load and neglects the dynamic compliance of the pulmonary arteries and the contribution of wave transmission. Wave intensity analysis offers an alternative way to assess the pulmonary vasculature in health and disease. Wave speed is a measure of arterial stiffness, and the magnitude and timing of wave reflection provide information on the degree of impedance mismatch between the proximal and distal circulation. Studies in the pulmonary artery have demonstrated distinct differences in arterial wave propagation between individuals with and without pulmonary vascular disease. Notably, greater wave speed and greater wave reflection are observed in patients with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models exposed to hypoxia. Studying wave propagation makes a valuable contribution to the assessment of the arterial system in pulmonary hypertension, and here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge of the methods used to evaluate arterial waves in the pulmonary artery.

  17. Reproducibility of arterial stiffness and wave reflections in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the contribution of lung hyperinflation and a comparison of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Ian S; John, Leonette; Petersen, Steffen E; Barnes, Neil C

    2013-11-01

    Significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality exists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arterial stiffness is raised in COPD and may be a mechanistic link. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness has the potential to be a surrogate outcome measure, although no reproducibility data exists in COPD patients. Two studies (23 and 33 COPD patients) were undertaken to 1) assess the Vicorder reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and Augmentation index in COPD; 2) compare it to SphygmoCor; and 3) assess the contribution of lung hyperinflation to measurement variability. There were excellent correlations and good agreement between repeat Vicorder measurements for carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (r = 0.96 (p lung hyperinflation (as measured by residual volume percent predicted, total lung capacity percent predicted or the ratio of inspiratory capacity to residual volume) and variability of measurements in either study. In COPD, measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is highly reproducible, not affected by lung hyperinflation and suitable as a surrogate endpoint in research studies. Day-to-day variation in augmentation index highlights the importance of such studies prior to the planning and undertaking of clinical COPD research.

  18. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  19. Quantification of wave reflection using peripheral blood pressure waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Fazeli, Nima; McMurtry, M Sean; Finegan, Barry A; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel minimally invasive method for quantifying blood pressure (BP) wave reflection in the arterial tree. In this method, two peripheral BP waveforms are analyzed to obtain an estimate of central aortic BP waveform, which is used together with a peripheral BP waveform to compute forward and backward pressure waves. These forward and backward waves are then used to quantify the strength of wave reflection in the arterial tree. Two unique strengths of the proposed method are that 1) it replaces highly invasive central aortic BP and flow waveforms required in many existing methods by less invasive peripheral BP waveforms, and 2) it does not require estimation of characteristic impedance. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined in an experimental swine subject under a wide range of physiologic states and in 13 cardiac surgery patients. In the swine subject, the method was comparable to the reference method based on central aortic BP and flow. In cardiac surgery patients, the method was able to estimate forward and backward pressure waves in the absence of any central aortic waveforms: on the average, the root-mean-squared error between actual versus computed forward and backward pressure waves was less than 5 mmHg, and the error between actual versus computed reflection index was less than 0.03.

  20. Wave Reflection in 3D Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, Barbara; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent experiments carried out in wave basin on breakwaters with armour layer of rocks and cubes, this paper examines the dependence of the reflection coefficient on wave directional spreading and obliquity. Results suggest that long-crested and short-crested waves give similar reflectio...

  1. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  2. Conversion from surface wave to surface wave on reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the reflection and transmission of an incident surface wave to a pure surface wave state at another interface. This is allowed only for special media parameters: at least one of the media must be magnetic. We found such material characteristics that the obliquely incident surface wave...... can be transmitted without changing its direction (nevertheless the amplitude varies). For other media parameters, only normally incident surface waves can be converted to surface waves. We propose applications of the predicted conversion as a beam splitter and polarization filter for surface waves....

  3. Pulse Wave Velocity in the Carotid Artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jensen, Julie Brinck; Udesen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the carotid artery (CA) has been estimated based on ultrasound data collected by the experimental scanner RASMUS at DTU. Data is collected from one test subject using a frame rate (FR) of 4000 Hz. The influence of FRs is also investigated. The PWV is calculated from...... distension wave forms (DWF) estimated using cross-correlation. The obtained velocities give results in the area between 3-4 m/s, and the deviations between estimated PWV from two beats of a pulse are around 10%. The results indicate that the method presented is applicable for detecting the local PWV...

  4. Wave potential and the one-dimensional windkessel as a wave-based paradigm of diastolic arterial hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2014-08-01

    Controversy exists about whether one-dimensional wave theory can explain the "self-canceling" waves that accompany the diastolic pressure decay and discharge of the arterial reservoir. Although it has been proposed that reservoir and wave effects be treated as separate phenomena, thus avoiding the issue of self-canceling waves, we have argued that reservoir effects are a phenomenological and mathematical subset of wave effects. However, a complete wave-based explanation of self-canceling diastolic expansion (pressure-decreasing) waves has not yet been advanced. These waves are present in the forward and backward components of arterial pressure and flow (P ± and Q ±, respectively), which are calculated by integrating incremental pressure and flow changes (dP ± and dQ ±, respectively). While the integration constants for this calculation have previously been considered arbitrary, we showed that physiologically meaningful constants can be obtained by identifying "undisturbed pressure" as mean circulatory pressure. Using a series of numeric experiments, absolute P ± and Q ± values were shown to represent "wave potential," gradients of which produce propagating wavefronts. With the aid of a "one-dimensional windkessel," we showed how wave theory predicts discharge of the arterial reservoir. Simulated data, along with hemodynamic recordings in seven sheep, suggested that self-canceling diastolic waves arise from repeated and diffuse reflection of the late systolic forward expansion wave throughout the arterial system and at the closed aortic valve, along with progressive leakage of wave potential from the conduit arteries. The combination of wave and wave potential concepts leads to a comprehensive one-dimensional (i.e., wave-based) explanation of arterial hemodynamics, including the diastolic pressure decay.

  5. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  6. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  7. A review of wave mechanics in the pulmonary artery with an emphasis on wave intensity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Junjing; Hilberg, Ole; Howard, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remain the most common haemodynamic measures to evaluate the severity and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension. However, PVR only captures the non-oscillatory component of the right ventricular hydraulic load and neglects...... reflection are observed in patients with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models exposed to hypoxia. Studying wave propagation makes a valuable contribution to the assessment of the arterial system in pulmonary hypertension, and here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge of the methods used...

  8. Asymptotic theory for spiral wave reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Langham, Jacob; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as point-like objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly non-specular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small and large-core spiral waves. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved fa...

  9. Wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2011-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion using a gradient optimization method is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated within the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. No travel-time picking is needed and no high-frequency approximation is assumed. The mathematical derivation and the numerical examples are presented to partly demonstrate its efficiency and robustness. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Algorithms of wave reflective critical angle on interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YongGang; Zhang, JianXue; Jiao, Lin; Li, Qinghong

    2017-02-01

    This article is in connection with calculating of reflection critical angle on interface, author has found that reflective wave have a quarter wavelength effects and deduced both absolute and relative reflection critical Angle calculation formulas. The two formulas can easy solve the question of reflection critical angle on interface of one side of the air where it is not calculated by Snell's law. Snell's law only reveals that rate of the wave velocity projected to the interface, the methods of this paper reveal the normal component of wave velocity on the interface relationship. The methods will be widely used in various fields such as light, electromagnetic waves, sound waves and water waves etc.

  11. Terahertz wave reflective sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hua

    Sensing and imaging technologies using terahertz (THz) radiation have found diverse applications as they approach maturity. Since the burgeoning of this technique in the 1990's, many THz sensing and imaging investigations have been designed and conducted in transmission geometry, which provides sufficient phase and amplitude contrast for the study of the spectral properties of targets in the THz domain. Driven by rising expectations that THz technology will be a potential candidate in the next generation of security screening, remote sensing, biomedical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT), most THz sensing and imaging modalities are being extended to reflection geometry, which offers unique and adaptive solutions, and multi-dimensional information in many real scenarios. This thesis takes an application-focused approach to the advancement of THz wave reflective sensing and imaging systems: The absorption signature of the explosive material hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5triazine (RDX) is measured at 30 m---the longest standoff distance so far attained by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The standoff distance sensing ability of THz-TDS is investigated along with discussions specifying the influences of a variety of factors such as propagation distance, water vapor absorption and collection efficiency. Highly directional THz radiation from four-wave mixing in laser-induced air plasmas is first observed and measured, which provides a potential solution for the atmospheric absorption effect in standoff THz sensing. The simulations of the beam profiles also illuminate the underlying physics behind the interaction of the optical beam with the plasma. THz wave reflective spectroscopic focal-plane imaging is realized the first time. Absorption features of some explosives and related compounds (ERCs) and biochemical materials are identified by using adaptive feature extraction method. Good classification results using multiple pattern recognition methods are

  12. Theory of reflection reflection and transmission of electromagnetic, particle and acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lekner, John

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the reflection of electromagnetic and particle waves by interfaces. The interfaces can be sharp or diffuse. The topics of the book contain absorption, inverse problems, anisotropy, pulses and finite beams, rough surfaces, matrix methods, numerical methods,  reflection of particle waves and neutron reflection. Exact general results are presented, followed by long wave reflection, variational theory, reflection amplitude equations of the Riccati type, and reflection of short waves. The Second Edition of the Theory of Reflection is an updated and much enlarged revision of the 1987 monograph. There are new chapters on periodically stratified media, ellipsometry, chiral media, neutron reflection and reflection of acoustic waves. The chapter on anisotropy is much extended, with a complete treatment of the reflection and transmission properties of arbitrarily oriented uniaxial crystals. The book gives a systematic and unified treatment reflection and transmission of electromagnetic and particle...

  13. FPGA-based design and implementation of arterial pulse wave generator using piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Lisheng; Zhao, Dazhe; Yao, Yang; Song, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Because arterial pulse waves contain vital information related to the condition of the cardiovascular system, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of pulse waves in recent years. Accurate acquisition is essential to investigate arterial pulse waves. However, at the stage of developing equipment for acquiring and analyzing arterial pulse waves, specific pulse signals may be unavailable for debugging and evaluating the system under development. To produce test signals that reflect specific physiological conditions, in this paper, an arterial pulse wave generator has been designed and implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA), which can produce the desired pulse waves according to the feature points set by users. To reconstruct a periodic pulse wave from the given feature points, a method known as piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting is also proposed in this paper. Using a test database that contains four types of typical pulse waves with each type containing 25 pulse wave signals, the maximum residual error of each sampling point of the fitted pulse wave in comparison with the real pulse wave is within 8%. In addition, the function for adding baseline drift and three types of noises is integrated into the developed system because the baseline occasionally wanders, and noise needs to be added for testing the performance of the designed circuits and the analysis algorithms. The proposed arterial pulse wave generator can be considered as a special signal generator with a simple structure, low cost and compact size, which can also provide flexible solutions for many other related research purposes.

  14. Long Wave Reflection and Transmission over A Sloping Step

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsien-Kuo CHANG; Jin-Cheng LIOU

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examines long wave reflection and transmission induced by a sloping step. Bellman and Kalaba's(1959) invariant imbedding is introduced to find wave reflection. An alternative method matching both the surface elevation and its surface slope of each region at the junction is applied to the determination of wave reflection and transmission.The proposed methods are compared with the accurate numerical results of Porter and Porter (2000) and those of Mei(1983) for a vertical step. The wave reflection obtained for a mildly sloping step differs significantly from the result of Mei. The wave reflection is found to fluctuate owing to wave trapping for the mild sloping step. The height and the face slope of the step are important for determining wave reflection and transmission coefficients.

  15. The Configuration of Shock Wave Reflection for the TSD Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we mainly study the nonlinear wave configuration caused by shock wave reflection for the TSD (Transonic Small Disturbance) equation and specify the existence and nonexistence of various nonlinear wave configurations.We give a condition under which the solution of the RR (Regular reflection) for the TSD equation exists.We also prove that there exists no wave configuration of shock wave reflection for the TSD equation which consists of three or four shock waves.In phase space,we prove that the TSD equation has an IR (Irregular reflection) configuration containing a centered simple wave.Furthermore,we also prove the stability of RR configuration and the wave configuration containing a centered simple wave by solving a free boundary value problem of the TSD equation.

  16. A note on reflection of spherical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraldsen, Gunnar

    2005-06-01

    In 1909 Sommerfeld gave an exact solution for the reflection of a spherical wave from a plane surface in terms of an oscillatory integral and also presented an asymptotic solution for the case where both source and receiver are at the boundary. Weyl (1919) presented an alternative solution and also an asymptotic solution for the case where the source is at the boundary. It is known that the general case is solved if a general solution for the case where the source is at the boundary is known. Here it is demonstrated that it is sufficient to have the general solution for the case where both source and receiver are at the boundary. This is mainly of theoretical interest, but may have practical applications. As an example it is demonstrated that Sommerfeld's approximate solution gives Ingard's (1951) approximate solution which is valid for arbitrary source and receiver heights. .

  17. Wave speed and reflections proximal to aneurism and stenosis of flexible tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacham, Wisam S; Abdulla, Najdat N; Salam Al-Ammri, A; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-08-01

    Arterial aneurism and stenosis are disorders that lead to circulation malfunction. Stenosis often leads to hypoxia of the organ depending on the affected artery, whilst aneurism can lead to dissection with known lethal consequences. On both cases, the pulse wave produced by the contracting heart is reflected at these discontinuities, and estimating the size of these reflected waves using wave intensity analysis (WIA) is the main aim of this work. We also aim to measure wave speed, or pulse wave velocity (PWV) as more commonly known within the discontinuities. We manufactured 4 stenosis and 4 aneurism silicon sections, connected one at a time to a mother tube, and tested in vitro. Pressure and flow were measured proximal to the discontinuity and were used to calculate WIA. PWV was calculated using the foot to foot technique and also the classical Moens-Korteweg and Bramwell-Hill equations. Wave speed in an aneurism decreases, whereas it increases in a stenosis, all compared to the values determined in a standard mother tube. Presence of aneurisms resulted in a backward expansion whilst the presence of stenosis resulted in a backward compression wave, which related linearly to the size of the discontinuity. Larger aneurisms and smaller stenosis cause an increase in wave reflection.

  18. Using wave intensity analysis to determine local reflection coefficient in flexible tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2016-09-06

    It has been shown that reflected waves affect the shape and magnitude of the arterial pressure waveform, and that reflected waves have physiological and clinical prognostic values. In general the reflection coefficient is defined as the ratio of the energy of the reflected to the incident wave. Since pressure has the units of energy per unit volume, arterial reflection coefficient are traditionally defined as the ratio of reflected to the incident pressure. We demonstrate that this approach maybe prone to inaccuracies when applied locally. One of the main objectives of this work is to examine the possibility of using wave intensity, which has units of energy flux per unit area, to determine the reflection coefficient. We used an in vitro experimental setting with a single inlet tube joined to a second tube with different properties to form a single reflection site. The second tube was long enough to ensure that reflections from its outlet did not obscure the interactions of the initial wave. We generated an approximately half sinusoidal wave at the inlet of the tube and took measurements of pressure and flow along the tube. We calculated the reflection coefficient using wave intensity (RdI and RdI(0.5)) and wave energy (RI and RI(0.5)) as well as the measured pressure (RdP) and compared these results with the reflection coefficient calculated theoretically based on the mechanical properties of the tubes. The experimental results show that the reflection coefficients determined by all the techniques we studied increased or decreased with distance from the reflection site, depending on the type of reflection. In our experiments, RdP, RdI(0.5) and RI(0.5) are the most reliable parameters to measure the mean reflection coefficient, whilst RdI and RI provide the best measure of the local reflection coefficient, closest to the reflection site. Additional work with bifurcations, tapered tubes and in vivo experiments are needed to further understand, validate the method

  19. On reflection of Alfven waves in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulec, M.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R. L.; Nerney, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of propagation of toroidal and linear Alfven waves formulated by Heinemann and Olbert (1980) to compare WKB and non-WKB waves and their effects on the solar wind. They considered two solar wind models and showed that reflection is important for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one day and longer, and that non-WKB Alfven waves are no more effective in accelerating the solar wind than WKB waves. There are several recently published papers which seem to indicate that Alfven waves with periods of the order of several minutes should be treated as non-WKB waves and that these non-WKB waves exert a stronger acceleration force than WKB waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the origin of these discrepancies by performing parametric studies of the behavior of the waves under a variety of different conditions. In addition, we want to investigate two problems that have not been addressed by Heinemann and Olbert, namely, calculate the efficiency of Alfven wave reflection by using the reflection coefficient and identify the region of strongest wave reflection in different wind models. To achieve these goals, we investigated the influence of temperature, electron density distribution, wind velocity and magnetic field strength on the waves. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that Alfven wave reflection is strongly model dependent and that the strongest reflection can be expected in models with the base temperatures higher than 10(exp 6) K and with the base densities lower than 7 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3). In these models as well as in the models with lower temperatures and higher densities, Alfven waves with periods as short as several minutes have negligible reflection so that they can be treated as WKB waves; however, for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one hour or longer reflection is significant, requiring a non-WKB treatment. We also show that non-WKB, linear Alfven waves are always less effective in accelerating the

  20. Abnormal Wave Reflections and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Late After Coarctation of the Aorta Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Michael A.; Short, Rebekah; Pandya, Bejal; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Khushnood, Abbas; Taylor, Andrew M.; Segers, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Patients with repaired coarctation of the aorta are thought to have increased afterload due to abnormalities in vessel structure and function. We have developed a novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol that allows assessment of central hemodynamics, including central aortic systolic blood pressure, resistance, total arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, and wave reflections. The main study aims were to (1) characterize group differences in central aortic systolic blood pressure and peripheral systolic blood pressure, (2) comprehensively evaluate afterload (including wave reflections) in the 2 groups, and (3) identify possible biomarkers among covariates associated with elevated left ventricular mass (LVM). Fifty adult patients with repaired coarctation and 25 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Ascending aorta area and flow waveforms were obtained using a high temporal-resolution spiral phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance flow sequence. These data were used to derive central hemodynamics and to perform wave intensity analysis noninvasively. Covariates associated with LVM were assessed using multivariable linear regression analysis. There were no significant group differences (P≥0.1) in brachial systolic, mean, or diastolic BP. However central aortic systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in patients compared with controls (113 versus 107 mm Hg, P=0.002). Patients had reduced total arterial compliance, increased pulse wave velocity, and larger backward compression waves compared with controls. LVM index was significantly higher in patients than controls (72 versus 59 g/m2, Pcoarctation of the aorta repair, including abnormal wave reflections that are associated with elevated LVM. PMID:28115510

  1. ANALYSE OF PULSE WAVE PROPAGATION IN ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yi-shan; JIA Xiao-bo; CUI Chang-kui; XIAO Xiao-chun

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the blood vessel of being regarded as the elasticity tube, and that the tissue restricts the blood vessel wall, the rule of pulse wave propagation in blood vessel was studied. The viscosity of blood, the elastic modulus of blood vessel, the radius of tube that influenced the pulse wave propagation were analyzed. Comparing the result that considered the viscosity of blood with another result that did not consider the viscosity of blood, we finally discover that the viscosity of blood that influences the pulse wave propagation can not be neglected; and with the accretion of the elastic modulus the speed of propagation augments and the press value of blood stream heightens; when diameter of blood vessel reduces, the press of blood stream also heightens and the speed of pulse wave also augments. These results will contribute to making use of the information of pulse wave to analyse and auxiliarily diagnose some causes of human disease.

  2. Wave reflection quantification based on pressure waveforms alone--methods, comparison, and clinical covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hametner, Bernhard; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Kropf, Johannes; Mayer, Christopher; Holzinger, Andreas; Eber, Bernd; Weber, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Within the last decade the quantification of pulse wave reflections mainly focused on measures of central aortic systolic pressure and its augmentation through reflections based on pulse wave analysis (PWA). A complementary approach is the wave separation analysis (WSA), which quantifies the total amount of arterial wave reflection considering both aortic pulse and flow waves. The aim of this work is the introduction and comparison of aortic blood flow models for WSA assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed modeling approaches (Windkessel, triangular and averaged flow), comparisons against Doppler measurements are made for 148 patients with preserved ejection fraction. Stepwise regression analysis between WSA and PWA parameters are performed to provide determinants of methodological differences. Against Doppler measurement mean difference and standard deviation of the amplitudes of the decomposed forward and backward pressure waves are comparable for Windkessel and averaged flow models. Stepwise regression analysis shows similar determinants between Doppler and Windkessel model only. The results indicate that the Windkessel method provides accurate estimates of wave reflection in subjects with preserved ejection fraction. The comparison with waveforms derived from Doppler ultrasound as well as recently proposed simple triangular and averaged flow waves showed that this approach may reduce variability and provide realistic results.

  3. Analysis of Directional Spectra and Reflection Coefficients in Incident and Reflected Wave Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳淑学; 俞聿修

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the modified Bayesian method for the analysis of directional wave spectra and reflection coefficients is verified by numerical and physical simulation of waves. The results show that the method can basically separate the incident and reflected directional spectra. In addition, the effect of the type of wave gage arrays, the number of measured wave properties, and the distance between the wave gage array and the reflection line on the resolution of the method are investigated. Some suggestions are proposed for practical application.

  4. SH-wave refraction/reflection and site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Street, R.L.; Woolery, E.W.; Madin, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, nonintrusive techniques used to characterize soils have been based on P-wave refraction/reflection methods. However, near-surface unconsolidated soils are oftentimes water-saturated, and when groundwater is present at a site, the velocity of the P-waves is more related to the compressibility of the pore water than to the matrix of the unconsolidated soils. Conversely, SH-waves are directly relatable to the soil matrix. This makes SH-wave refraction/reflection methods effective in site characterizations where groundwater is present. SH-wave methods have been used extensively in site characterization and subsurface imaging for earthquake hazard assessments in the central United States and western Oregon. Comparison of SH-wave investigations with geotechnical investigations shows that SH-wave refraction/reflection techniques are viable and cost-effective for engineering site characterization.

  5. Wave Reflection Caused by Wave Overtopping and Sloping Top of Spructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李炎保; 谷汉斌; 张绍松

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the theoretical analysis and experimental studies are employed to investigate the reflection characteris-tics of partial standing waves caused by wave overtopping and sloping top of structures. Based on the principle of conser-vation of wave energy flux, the third-order Stokes wave theory is used to formulate the reflection coefficient at wave over-topping; the calculation results are regressed into an applied expression. A series of experiments of wave reflection for avertical-wall structure with chanffered and overhanging upper sections are carried out to investigate the influence of topslope on wave reflection. The regularity of variation of wave reflection in this ease is analysed based on the experimentalresults.

  6. Nonlinear reflection of internal gravity wave onto a slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Keshav; Sommeria, Joel; Staquet, Chantal; Leclair, Matthieu; Grisouard, Nicolas; Gostiaux, Louis

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of internal waves on sloping topography is one of the processes that cause mixing and transport in oceans. The mixing caused by internal waves is considered to be an important source of energy that is needed to bring back deep, dense water from the abyss to the surface of the ocean, across constant density surfaces. Apart from the vertical transport of heat (downwards) and mass (upwards), internal waves are also observed to irreversibly induce a mean horizontal flow. Mixing and wave induced mean flow may be considered as the processes that transfer wave induced energy to smaller and larger scales respectively. The process of mixing has been a subject of intense research lately. However, the process of wave induced mean flow and their dynamic impact await thorough study. The present study involves this wave induced mean flow, its generation and energetics. The nonlinear subcritical reflection of internal waves from a sloping boundary is studied using laboratory experiments carried out on the Coriolis Platform at Grenoble and, 2D and 3D numerical simulations done using a non-hydrostatic code. In the experiment, a plane wave is produced using a wave generator and is made to reflect normally on a sloping bottom in a uniformly stratified fluid. We consider both rotating and non-rotating cases. The numerical simulation mimicks the laboratory setup with an initial condition of an analytical plane wave solution in a vertical plane limited by a smooth envelope to simulate the finite wave generator. The interaction of the incident and reflected waves produce, apart from higher harmonics, an irreversible wave induced mean flow which grows in time and is localised in the interacting region. The finite extent of the wave generator allows the mean flow to recirculate in the horizontal plane, resulting in a dipolar potential vorticity field. Moreover, the generation of mean flow and higher harmonics, along with dissipative effects, diminishes the amplitude of

  7. Boundary-reflected waves and ultrasonic coda waves in rock physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bo-Ye; Fu, Li-Yun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yan

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic coda waves are widely used to study high-frequency scattering. However, ultrasonic coda waves are strongly affected by interference from by boundary-reflected waves. To understand the effect of boundary-reflected waves, we performed ultrasonic experiments using aluminum and shale samples, and the rotating staggered-mesh finite-difference method to simulate the wavefield. We analyzed the wavefield characteristics at the different receiving points and the interference characteristics of the boundary-reflected waves with the ultrasonic coda wave, and the effect of sample geometry on the ultrasonic coda waves. The increase in the aspect ratio of the samples delays the interference effect of the laterally reflected waves and reduces the effect on the ultrasonic coda waves. The main waves interfering with the ultrasonic coda waves are laterally reflected PP-, PS-, PPP-, and PPS-waves. The scattering and attenuation of the high-frequency energy in actual rocks can weaken the interference of laterally reflected waves with the ultrasonic coda waves.

  8. Reflection of bending Waves from Border of the Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belubekyan M.V.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To problems of the reflection of the bending waves from flat border of the ambience dedicated to the multiple studies. Relatively little works are connected with questions of the reflection curved waves from flat edge of the thin plate. In this work happen to the decisions of the problem of the plate under different border condition. For partial case of the free edge, as limiting case of the absence of the reflected wave, is got decision of the problem localized curved variations.

  9. [24-hour systolic wave increment index monitoring in patients with low-renin arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valieva, Z S; Chikhladze, N M; Rogoza, A N; Iarovaia, E B; Bosykh, E G; Chazova, I E

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and daily reflected wave values in patients with low-renin hypertension with normal and elevated aldosterone production. The investigation included 66 patients. 24-hour BP monitoring was carried out and arterial wall rigidity and reflected wave values were assessed in all the patients. The patients with hyperaldosteronemia were found to have not only statistically significant severer hypertension, impaired circadian rhythms of BP, but also impaired augmentation index (Aix)--mainly its nocturnal increase. A positive correlation was found between nocturnal Aix and resting plasma aldosterone concentrations (r = -0.31; p = 0.002). The findings suggest the expediency of 24-hour systolic wave increment index monitoring in hypertensive patients ofthis category.

  10. Reflection and Transmission of Acoustic Waves at Semiconductor - Liquid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of reflection and transmission characteristics of acoustic waves at the interface of a semiconductor halfspace underlying an inviscid liquid has been carried out. The reflection and transmission coefficients of reflected and transmitted waves have been obtained for quasi-longitudinal (qP wave incident at the interface from fluid to semiconductor. The numerical computations of reflection and transmission coefficients have been carried out with the help of Gauss elimination method by using MATLAB programming for silicon (Si, germanium (Ge and silicon nitride (Si3N4 semiconductors. In order to interpret and compare, the computer simulated results are plotted graphically. The study may be useful in semiconductors, seismology and surface acoustic wave (SAW devices in addition to engines of the space shuttles.

  11. High-speed imaging of dynamic shock wave reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic shock wave reflection generated by a rapidly pitching wedge in a steady supersonic free stream has been studied with numerical simulation previously. An experimental facility was developed for the investigation of these dynamic phenomena...

  12. Topology optimization problems for reflection and dissipation of elastic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to topology optimization problems for elastic wave propagation. The objective of the study is to maximize the reflection or the dissipation in a finite slab of material for pressure and shear waves in a range of frequencies. The optimized designs consist of two or three mate...

  13. Shock wave diffraction and reflection around a dusty square cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王柏懿; 王超; 戚隆溪

    2001-01-01

    The diffraction and reflection of planar shock wave around a dusty square cavity is investigated nuerically, which is embedded in the flat bottom surface of a two-dimensional channel, and the induced gas-particle twophase flow. The wave patterns at different times are obtained for three different values of the particle diameter. The computational results show that the existence of particles affects appreciably the shock wave diffraction and cavity flow.

  14. Reflection and refraction of flexural waves at geometric boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A; Levine, Alex J

    2013-07-19

    We present a theory of flexural wave propagation on elastic shells having nontrivial geometry and develop an analogy to geometric optics. The transport of momentum within the shell itself is anisotropic due to the curvature, and as such complex classical effects such as birefringence are generically found. We determine the equations of reflection and refraction of such waves at boundaries between different local geometries, showing that waves are totally internally reflected, especially at boundaries between regions of positive and negative Gaussian curvature. We verify these effects by using finite element simulations and discuss the ramifications of these effects for the statistical mechanics of thin curved materials.

  15. Wave dissipation in flexible tubes in the time domain: in vitro model of arterial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Long, Q; Khir, A W

    2007-01-01

    Earlier work of wave dissipation in flexible tubes and arteries has been carried out predominantly in the frequency domain and most of the studies used the measured pressure waveform for presenting the results. In this work we investigate the pattern of wave dissipation in the time domain using the separated forward and backward travelling waves in flexible tubes. We tested four sizes of latex tubes of 2m in length each, where a single semi-sinusoidal in shape, pressure wave, was produced at the inlet of each tube. Simultaneous measurements of pressure and flow waveforms were recorded every 5cm along the tubes and wave speed was determined using the pressure-velocity loop method (PU-loop). The measured data and wave speed were used to separate the pressure waveform and wave intensity, into their forward and backward directions, using wave intensity analysis (WIA). Also, the energy carried by the wave was calculated by integrating the relevant area under the wave intensity curve. The peak of the measured pressure waveform increased downstream, however, the peak of the separated forward pressure waveform decreased exponentially along the tube. Wave intensity and energy also dissipated exponentially along the travelling distance. The peaks of the separated pressure and wave intensity decreased in the forward in a similar exponential way to that in the backward direction in all four tube sizes. Also, the smaller the size of the tube the greater wave dissipation it caused. We conclude that wave separation is useful in studying wave dissipation in elastic tubes, and WIA provides a convenient method for determining the dissipation of the energy carried by the wave along the travelled distance. The separated pressure waveform, wave intensity and wave energy dissipate exponentially with the travelling distance, and wave dissipation varies conversely with the diameter of elastic tubes.

  16. Beta Value Coupled Wave Theory for Nonslanted Reflection Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Neipp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a modified coupled wave theory to describe the properties of nonslanted reflection volume diffraction gratings. The method is based on the beta value coupled wave theory, which will be corrected by using appropriate boundary conditions. The use of this correction allows predicting the efficiency of the reflected order for nonslanted reflection gratings embedded in two media with different refractive indices. The results obtained by using this method will be compared to those obtained using a matrix method, which gives exact solutions in terms of Mathieu functions, and also to Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory. As will be demonstrated, the technique presented in this paper means a significant improvement over Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory.

  17. Quantitative Estimation of Transmitted and Reflected Lamb Waves at Discontinuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    For the application of Lamb wave to structural health monitoring(SHM), understanding its physical characteristic and interaction between Lamb wave and defect of the host structure is an important issue. In this study, reflected, transmitted and mode converted Lamb waves at discontinuity of a plate structure were simulated and the amplitude ratios are calculated theoretically using Modal decomposition method. The predicted results were verified comparing with finite element method(FEM) and experimental results simulating attached PZTs. The result shows that the theoretical prediction is close to the FEM and the experimental verification. Moreover, quantitative estimation method was suggested using amplitude ratio of Lamb wave at discontinuity

  18. ESTIMATION OF DIRECTIONAL SPECTRUM AND REFLECTED COEFFICIENT OF INCIDENT AND REFLECTED WAVE IN PHASE-LOCKED WAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Li-min; YU Zhi-liang; YUAN Qun-zhe; YU Yu-xiu

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses and compares the property of the Modified Bayesian Directional spectrum analysis Method (MBDM) and the Modified Maximum Likelihood Method (MMLM) that can be used to estimate directional spectrum and reflected coefficient of phase-locked wave field overlapped by multi-directional irregular incident and reflected waves.The numerical test verifies the results under different wave conditions, different measurement systems, and different reflection features.The computation speed and stability of the two methods is also compared.The analysis addresses that the MBDM is better than the MMLM for directional spectrum estimating, while the MMLM is better than the MBDM for reflected coefficient estimation and calculating speed and stability.

  19. Gravity wave reflection: Case study based on rocket data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Since gravity waves significantly influence the atmosphere by transporting energy and momentum, it is important to study their wave spectrum and their energy dissipation rates. Besides that, knowledge about gravity wave sources and the propagation of the generated waves is essential. Originating in the lower atmosphere, gravity waves can move upwards; when the background wind field is equal to their phase speed a so-called critical layer is reached. Their breakdown and deposition of energy and momentum is possible. Another mechanism which can take place at critical layers is gravity wave reflection. In this paper, gravity waves which were observed by foil chaff measurements during the DYANA (DYnamics Adapted Network for the Atmosphere) campaign in 1990 in Biscarrosse (44°N, 1°W)--as reported by Wüst and Bittner [2006. Non-linear wave-wave interaction: case studies based on rocket data and first application to satellite data. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68, 959-976]--are investigated to look for gravity wave reflection processes. Following nonlinear theory, energy dissipation rates according to Weinstock [1980. Energy dissipation rates of turbulence in the stable free atmosphere. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 38, 880-883] are calculated from foil chaff cloud and falling sphere data and compared with the critical layer heights. Enhanced energy dissipation rates are found at those altitudes where the waves' phase speed matches the zonal background wind speeds. Indication of gravity wave trapping is found between two altitudes of around 95 and 86 km.

  20. WAVE TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTION DUE TO A THIN VERTICAL BARRIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A numerical method, the boundary fitted coordinate method (BFC),was used to investigate the transmission and reflection of water waves due to a rigid thin vertical barrier descending from the water surface to a depth, i. e. , a curtain-wall type breakwater. A comparison between the present computed results and previous experimental and analytical results was carried out which verifies the prediction of the BFC method. Wave transmission and reflection due to the barrier were computed, and the transmission and refiection coefficients were given in a figure.

  1. Energy Relations for Plane Waves Reflected from Moving Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, P.; Gruenberg, Harry

    1967-01-01

    When a plane wave is obliquely incident from vacuum on a semi-infinite moving medium, the energy flow carried by the incident wave, is in general, not carried away by the reflected and transmitted waves. This is only the case when the medium velocity is parallel to its vacuum interface. Otherwise...... there is a net inflow or outflow of electromagnetic energy, which can be accounted for by the change of stored energy in the system, and the work done by the mechanical forces acting on the medium. A detailed energy balance is drawn up for two different media moving normal to their vacuum interfaces: (a...

  2. Optical method for inspecting LSI patterns using reflected diffraction waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S; Suda, K; Hase, S; Munakata, C

    1988-03-15

    An optical inspection method has been developed for finding defects in LSI lithographic patterns. A focused He-Ne laser beam scans the patterns on a wafer. The reflected diffraction waves around the wafer are observed. These diffraction waves indicate whether the patterns contain defects. To implement this judgment rapidly, signals of the waves characterizing the patterns are input directly into the address lines of random access memories. The system can detect a defect of ~0.8-microm diameter and inspect a 1-cm(2) chip in 9 s.

  3. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.

    2017-05-26

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive and linearly related to the low-wavenumber model perturbation. Therefore, building initial P and S wave velocity models for EFWI by using elastic wave-equation reflections traveltime inversion (WERTI) would be effective and robust, especially for the deeper part. In order to distinguish the reflection travletimes of P or S-waves in elastic media, we decompose the surface multicomponent data into vector P- and S-wave seismogram. We utilize the dynamic image warping to extract the reflected P- or S-wave traveltimes. The P-wave velocity are first inverted using P-wave traveltime followed by the S-wave velocity inversion with S-wave traveltime, during which the wave mode decomposition is applied to the gradients calculation. Synthetic example on the Sigbee2A model proves the validity of our method for recovering the long wavelength components of the model.

  4. Reflection in variational models for linear water waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopman, Gert; Dingemans, Maarten W.

    2010-01-01

    The reflection characteristics are analysed for a series of Hamiltonian water-wave models. These variational models have been derived by applying a Boussinesq-like approach to the vertical flow-structure. Both parabolic and hyperbolic-cosine approximations to the vertical structure are considered. M

  5. Indices of vascular stiffness and wave reflection in relation to body mass index or body fat in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Adamska, Karolina; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Wysocki, Henryk

    2007-10-01

    1. Obesity appears to influence vascular stiffness, an important cardiovascular risk factor. An accurate picture of arterial stiffness may be obtained when a combination of various techniques is used. 2. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the body mass index (BMI) and body fat content obtained by bioimpedance were of equal value in estimating the influence of body fatness on various indices of vascular stiffness and wave reflection. 3. A total of 175 healthy subjects was studied. Anthropometric measurements and total body bio-impedance analysis were performed to assess fat mass as a proportion of total body composition. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were assessed using digital volume pulse analysis and tonometric measurement of the wave reflection indices and central haemodynamics. 4. Significant differences in the stiffness index (SI(DVP); P < 0.0001), peripheral augmentation index (pAI(x); P < 0.0001), central augmentation index (cAI(x); P < 0.0001), peripheral pulse pressure (pPP; P = 0.026) and central pulse pressure (cPP; P < 0.0001) were found when the population examined was divided accordingly to tertile of body fat content. However, subdividing various indices of arterial stiffness according to the tertile of BMI did not reveal any significant differences between groups, except for pPP and cPP. 5. Body fat content was significantly correlated with SI(DVP), pAI(x), cAI(x), pPP and cPP. The BMI correlated weakly with SI(DVP), pPP and cPP. 6. In conclusion, the BMI is not very useful in predicting changes in arterial stiffness and wave reflection due to obesity. However, stiffness and wave reflection indices derived from digital volume pulse analysis, the characteristics of radial and aortic pressure waveforms and peripheral and aortic pulse pressure are all related to body fat content, as estimated by bioimpedance.

  6. Wave dynamic processes in cellular detonation reflection from wedges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongmin Hu; Zonglin Jiang

    2007-01-01

    When the cell width of the incident deto-nation wave (IDW) is comparable to or larger than theMach stem height,self-similarity will fail during IDWreflection from a wedge surface.In this paper,the det-onation reflection from wedges is investigated for thewave dynamic processes occurring in the wave front,including transverse shock motion and detonation cellvariations behind the Mach stem.A detailed reactionmodel is implemented to simulate two-dimensional cel-lular detonations in stoichiometric mixtures of H2/O2diluted by Argon.The numerical results show that thetransverse waves,which cross the triple point trajec-tory of Mach reflection,travel along the Mach stem andreflect back from the wedge surface,control the size ofthe cells in the region swept by the Mach stem.It is theenergy carried by these transverse waves that sustainsthe triple-wave-collision with a higher frequency withinthe over-driven Mach stem.In some cases,local wavedynamic processes and wave structures play a dominantrole in determining the pattern of cellular record,lead-ing to the fact that the cellular patterns after the Machstem exhibit some peculiar modes.

  7. Data-Domain Wave Equation Reflection Traveltime Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Feng; Huazhong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of an accurate macro velocity model plays an important role in seismic imag-ing and model parameter inversion. Full waveform inversion (FWI) is the classical data-domain inver-sion method. However, the misfit function of FWI is highly nonlinear, and the local optimization cannot prevent convergence of the misfit function toward local minima. To converge to the global minimum, FWI needs a good initial model or reliable low frequency component and long offset data. In this article, we present a wave-equation-based reflection traveltime tomography (WERTT) method, which can pro-vide a good background model (initial model) for FWI and (least-square) pre-stack depth migration (LS-PSDM). First, the velocity model is decomposed into a low-wavenumber component (background velocity) and a high-wavenumber component (reflectivity). Second, the primary reflection wave is pre-dicted by wave-equation demigration, and the reflection traveltime is calculated by an automatic pick-ing method. Finally, the misfit function of the l2-norm of the reflection traveltime residuals is mini-mized by a gradient-based method. Numerical tests show that the proposed method can invert a good background model, which can be used as an initial model for LS-PSDM or FWI.

  8. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  9. Reflection and refraction of hydromagnetic waves at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzariu, P.

    1973-01-01

    Reflection and transmission coefficients of MHD waves are obtained at a stable, plane interface which separates two compressible, perfectly conducting media in relative motion to each other. The coefficients are evaluated for representative conditions of the quiet-time, near-earth magnetopause. The transmission coefficient averaged over a hemispherical distribution of incident waves is found to be 1-2%. Yet the magnitude of the energy flux deposited into the magnetosphere in a day averaged over a hemispherical distribution of waves having amplitudes of say 2-3 gamma, is estimated to be of the order 10 to the 22-nd power erg. Therefore the energy input of MHD waves must contribute significantly to the energy budget of the magnetosphere. The assumption that the boundary surface is a tangential discontinuity with no curvature limits the present theory to hydromagnetic frequencies higher than about .1 Hz.

  10. Reflection and absorption of millimeter waves by thin absorbing films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    2000-05-01

    Reflection, transmission, and absorption of mm-waves by thin absorbing films were determined at two therapeutic frequencies: 42. 25 and 53.57 GHz. Thin filter strips saturated with distilled water or an alcohol-water solution were used as absorbing samples of different thicknesses. The dependence of the power reflection coefficient R(d) on film thickness (d) was not monotonic. R(d) passed through a pronounced maximum before reaching its steady-state level [R(infinity)]. Similarly, absorption, A(d), passed two maximums with one minimum between them, before reaching its steady-state level [A(infinity)]. At 42.25 GHz, A(d) was compared with absorption in a semi-infinite water medium at a depth d. When d reflection, transmission, and absorption on d and allowed the determination of the refractive index (n), dielectric constant (epsilon), and penetration depth (delta) of the absorbing medium for various frequencies. For water samples, epsilon was found to be 12.4-19.3j, delta = 0.49 mm at 42.25 GHz, and epsilon = 9.0-19.5j, delta = 0.36 mm at 53.57 GHz. The calculated power density distribution within the film was strongly dependent on d. The measurements and calculations have shown that the reflection and absorption of mm-waves by thin absorbing layers can significantly differ from the reflection and absorption in similar semi-infinite media. The difference in reflection, absorption, and power density distribution in films, as compared to semi-infinite media, are caused by multiple internal reflections from the film boundaries. That is why, when using thin phantoms and thin biological samples, the specifics of the interaction of mm-waves with thin films should be taken into account. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Reflection and Ducting of Gravity Waves Inside the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves excited by overshoot at the bottom of the convection zone can be influenced by rotation and by the strong toroidal magnetic field that is likely to be present in the solar tachocline. Using a simple Cartesian model, we show how waves with a vertical component of propagation can be reflected when traveling through a layer containing a horizontal magnetic field with a strength that varies with depth. This interaction can prevent a portion of the downward-traveling wave energy flux from reaching the deep solar interior. If a highly reflecting magnetized layer is located some distance below the convection zone base, a duct or wave guide can be set up, wherein vertical propagation is restricted by successive reflections at the upper and lower boundaries. The presence of both upward- and downward-traveling disturbances inside the duct leads to the existence of a set of horizontally propagating modes that have significantly enhanced amplitudes. We point out that the helical structure of these ...

  12. 隐蔽性高血压患者中心动脉压及增强指数与动脉弹性的相关性%Relationship between central blood pressure and its reflected wave with arterial elasticity in masked hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡小亮; 路方红; 刘振东; 赵颖馨; 孙尚文; 王舒健; 李俊

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨隐蔽性高血压患者中心动脉压及增强指数与动脉弹性的关系.方法 选择临床诊断血压正常者360例及高血压患者100例监测24 h动态血压,根据监测结果将受试者分为隐蔽性高血压组(n=135)、血压正常组(n=225)及高血压组(n=100).应用大动脉测量仪测量中心动脉压及其反射波;应用脉搏波传导速度测定仪测定颈桡动脉脉搏波传导速度(crPWV).结果 隐蔽性高血压组中心动脉收缩压(CSP)、舒张压(CDP)、中心脉压(CPP)、平均收缩压(CMSP)、平均舒张压(CMDP)、收缩末压(CESP)、增强压(AUG)、crPWV均高于血压正常组,低于高血压组(P<0.01或P<0.05).校正性别和年龄后,多元线性回归分析显示CSP、CPP、总胆固醇是crPWV的影响因素(B值分别为0.043,0.085,0.792;均P<0.01).结论 隐蔽性高血压患者动脉粥样硬化和中心动脉压相关,CSP和CPP是影响动脉硬化程度的独立危险因素.%Objective To investigate if central blood pressure and its reflected wave augmentation index are associated with arterial elasticity in masked hypertensives. Methods Three hundred sixty adults normotensives (office blood pressurereflected wave were measured noninvasively with SphygmoCor device, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) was detected by Complior. Results Central systolic pressure (CSP), central diastolic pressure (CDP), central pulse pressure (CPP), central mean systolic (CMSP), central mean diastolic (CMDP), central end systolic pressure (CESP), PI Height, augmentation pressure (AUG) and the values of crPWV were higher in masked

  13. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT OF REFLECTED SHOCK WAVE BY USING CHEMICAL INDICATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Jiping; He Yuzhong; Wang Su; Wang Jing; Fan Bingcheng

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for measuring the temperature of the gas behind the reflected shock wave in shock tube,corresponding to the reservoir temperature of a shock tunnel,based on the chemical reaction of small amount of CF4 premixed in the test gas.The final product C2F4 is used as the temperature indicator,which is sampled and detected by a gas chromatography in the experiment.The detected concentration of C2F4 is correlated to the temperature of the reflected shock wave with the initial pressure P1 and test time γas parameters in the temperature range 3300K<T<5600K,pressure range 5kPa<P1<12kPa andγ≈0.4ms.

  14. Spatial Kramers-Kronig relations and the reflection of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    When a planar dielectric medium has a permittivity profile that is an analytic function in the upper or lower half of the complex position plane x = x‧ + ix″ then the real and imaginary parts of its permittivity are related by the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations. We find that such a medium will not reflect radiation incident from one side, whatever the angle of incidence. Using the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations, one can derive a real part of a permittivity profile from some given imaginary part (or vice versa) such that the reflection is guaranteed to be zero. This result is valid for both scalar and vector wave theories and may have relevance for designing materials that efficiently absorb radiation or for the creation of a new type of anti-reflection surface.

  15. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Painter Page R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV. The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. Methods An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. Results For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for

  16. An Inexpensive Arterial Pressure Wave Sensor and its application in different physiological condition

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Sur, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    Arterial Blood Pressure wave monitoring is considered to be important in assessment of cardiovascular system. We developed a novel pulse wave detection system using low frequency specific piezoelectric material as pressure wave sensor. The transducer detects the periodic change in the arterial wall diameter produced by pressure wave and the amplified signal after integration represents the pressure wave. The signal before integration is proportional to the rate of change of pressure wave and it not only reproduces the pressure waveform faithfully, but also its sharper nature helps to reliably detect the heart period variability (HPV). We have studied the position-specific (e.g. over carotid or radial artery) nature of change of this pulse wave signal (shape and amplitude) and also the changes at different physiological states.

  17. A Three-Point Method for Separating Incident and Reflected Waves over A Sloping Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Hsien-Kuo

    2002-01-01

    This study presents a three-point method for separating incident and reflected waves to explain normally incident waves' propagating over a sloping bed. Linear wave shoaling is used to determine changes in wave amplitude and phase in response to variations of bathymetry. The wave reflection coefficient and incident amplitude are estimated from wave heights measured at three fixed wave gauges with unequal spacing. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the proposed method can predict the reflection and amplitude of waves over a sloping bed more accurately than the two-point method.

  18. In vivo noninvasive method for measuring local wave velocity in femoral arteries of pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Kinnick, Randall; Pislaru, Cristina; Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James

    2005-09-01

    We have proposed generating a bending wave in the arterial wall using ultrasound radiation force and measuring the wave velocity along the arterial wall [Zhang et al., IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 52, 642-652 (2005)]. Here, we report the results of in vivo studies on pigs. The pig was anesthetized, and a micromanometer tip catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure luminal pressure. A water bath was created on the animal's groin to allow unimpeded access of the ultrasound beams to the femoral artery. The femoral artery was first located using a 13-MHz linear-array transducer. Then, a vibro-acoustography image was obtained to ensure precise positioning of the excitation force relative to the artery. The artery was excited by the force transducer and the resulting vibration of the arterial wall was measured by a sensing Doppler transceiver. Measured wave velocity was 3.1 m/s at 300 Hz. With this new method wave velocity over a distance of 5 mm, and therefore stiffness of arteries, can be measured locally and non-invasively. Measurement time is short in a few tens of milliseconds, which allows pressure dependence and pharmacological effect on the wall properties to be measured at different cardiac times.

  19. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period. Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (−3.2 mmHg, p < 0.005 and −2.6 mmHg, p < 0.0001; respectively and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p < 0.0001. Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  20. Wave intensity amplification and attenuation in non-linear flow: implications for the calculation of local reflection coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Jonathan; Penny, Daniel J; Smolich, Joseph J

    2008-12-05

    Local reflection coefficients (R) provide important insights into the influence of wave reflection on vascular haemodynamics. Using the relatively new time-domain method of wave intensity analysis, R has been calculated as the ratio of the peak intensities (R(PI)) or areas (R(CI)) of incident and reflected waves, or as the ratio of the changes in pressure caused by these waves (R(DeltaP)). While these methods have not yet been compared, it is likely that elastic non-linearities present in large arteries will lead to changes in the size of waves as they propagate and thus errors in the calculation of R(PI) and R(CI). To test this proposition, R(PI), R(CI) and R(DeltaP) were calculated in a non-linear computer model of a single vessel with various degrees of elastic non-linearity, determined by wave speed and pulse amplitude (DeltaP(+)), and a terminal admittance to produce reflections. Results obtained from this model demonstrated that under linear flow conditions (i.e. as DeltaP(+)-->0), R(DeltaP) is equivalent to the square-root of R(PI) and R(CI) (denoted by R(PI)(p) and R(CI)(p)). However for non-linear flow, pressure-increasing (compression) waves undergo amplification while pressure-reducing (expansion) waves undergo attenuation as they propagate. Consequently, significant errors related to the degree of elastic non-linearity arise in R(PI) and R(CI), and also R(PI)(p) and R(CI)(p), with greater errors associated with larger reflections. Conversely, R(Delta)(P) is unaffected by the degree of non-linearity and is thus more accurate than R(PI) and R(CI).

  1. Clinical review: Interpretation of arterial pressure wave in shock states

    OpenAIRE

    Lamia, Bouchra; Chemla, Denis; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    In critically ill patients monitored with an arterial catheter, the arterial pressure signal provides two types of information that may help the clinician to interpret haemodynamic status better: the mean values of systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressures; and the magnitude of the respiratory variation in arterial pressure in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. In this review we briefly discuss the physiological mechanisms responsible for arterial pressure generation, with specia...

  2. Effective wave identification and interference analysis of the seismic reflection method in mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yun-bing; WU Yan-qing; KANG Hou-qing

    2009-01-01

    Through discussion of the time-distance curve characteristics of the direct wave and from the front, side and rear of the reflection waves of the seismic reflection method for advanced exploration in mines, and analysis of several major interference waves in mines, the differences in time-distance curve, frequency, apparent velocity between the effective wave and interference wave in the seismic reflection method for advanced ex-ploration are obtained. According to the differences, the effective wave is extracted and the interference wave is filtered and the system's precision and accuracy is improved.

  3. Effects of cardiac timing and peripheral resistance on measurement of pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hanguang; Butlin, Mark; Tan, Isabella; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the effects of heart rate (HR), left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and wave reflection on arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), a pulse wave propagation simulation system (PWPSim) based on the transmission line model of the arterial tree was developed and was applied to investigate pulse wave propagation. HR, LVET, arterial elastic modulus and peripheral resistance were increased from 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm), 0.1 to 0.45 seconds, 0.5 to 1.5 times and 0.5 to 1.5 times of the normal value, respectively. Carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were calculated by intersecting tangent method (cfPWVtan and baPWVtan), maximum slope (cfPWVmax and baPWVmax), and using the Moens-Korteweg equation ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Results showed cfPWV and baPWV increased significantly with arterial elastic modulus but did not increase with HR when using a constant elastic modulus. However there were significant LVET dependencies of cfPWVtan and baPWVtan (0.17 ± 0.13 and 0.17 ± 0.08 m/s per 50 ms), and low peripheral resistance dependencies of cfPWVtan, cfPWVmax, baPWVtan and baPWVmax (0.04 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.04, 0.06 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.07 m/s per 10% peripheral resistance), respectively. This study demonstrated that LVET dominates the effect on calculated PWV compared to HR and peripheral resistance when arterial elastic modulus is constant.

  4. Pulse-wave timing between the cervical carotid and intracranial arteries by means of wavelet transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, HL; de Jonge, AB; Hamoen, DJ; Smit, A; van Bruggen, AC; Mooij, JJA; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet Transform (WT) is applied in a method for timing the blood pulse wave between the internal carotid artery: and one of the intracranial arteries. The required accuracy is a few milliseconds. In contrast to the Fourier Transform (FT), WT is an appropriate technique for the detection of

  5. Tests and Applications of An Approach to Absorbing Reflected Waves Towards Incident Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪生; 王炎; 许春辉; 商辉; 于小伟

    2013-01-01

    If the upstream boundary conditions are prescribed based on the incident wave only, the time-dependent numerical models cannot effectively simulate the wave field when the physical or spurious reflected waves become significant. This paper describes carefully an approach to specifying the incident wave boundary conditions combined with a set sponge layer to absorb the reflected waves towards the incident boundary. Incorporated into a time-dependent numerical model, whose governing equations are the Boussinesq-type ones, the effectiveness of the approach is studied in detail. The general boundary conditions, describing the down-wave boundary conditions are also generalized to the case of random waves. The numerical model is in detail examined. The test cases include both the normal one-dimensional incident regular or random waves and the two-dimensional oblique incident regular waves. The calculated results show that the present approach is effective on damping the reflected waves towards the incident wave boundary.

  6. Development of pneumatic actuator with low-wave reflection characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Jwo, C. S.; Chiang, J. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study aims at the development of a less reflective electromagnetic pneumatic actuator often used in the anechoic chamber. Because a pneumatic actuator on the market is not appropriate for use in such a chamber and a metallic one has high dielectric constant which generates reflective electromagnetic waves to influence test parameters in the chamber. The newly developed pneumatic actuator is made from low dielectric constant plastics with less reflective of electromagnetic. A turbine-type air motor is used to develop the pneumatic actuator and a employ Prony tester is used to run the brake horsepower test for the performance test of pneumatic actuator. Test results indicate that the pneumatic actuator in the minimal starting flow is 17 l/min, and it generates a brake horsepower of 48 mW; in the maximum flow is 26 l/min, it generates a brake horsepower of 108 mW. Therefore, it works with a torque between 0.24 N-m and 0.55 N-m, and such a torque will be sufficient to drive the target button.

  7. Variational modelling of extreme waves through oblique interaction of solitary waves: application to Mach reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno; Kalogirou, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we model extreme waves that occur due to Mach reflection through the intersection of two obliquely incident solitary waves. For a given range of incident angles and amplitudes, the Mach stem wave grows linearly in length and amplitude, reaching up to 4 times the amplitude of the incident waves. A variational approach is used to derive the bidirectional Benney-Luke equations, an asymptotic equivalent of the three-dimensional potential-flow equations modelling water waves. This nonlinear and weakly dispersive model has the advantage of allowing wave propagation in two horizontal directions, which is not the case with the unidirectional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation used in most previous studies. A variational Galerkin finite-element method is applied to solve the system numerically in Firedrake with a second-order Störmer-Verlet temporal integration scheme, in order to obtain stable simulations that conserve the overall mass and energy of the system. Using this approach, we are able to get close to the 4-fold amplitude amplification predicted by Miles.

  8. A new technique for assessing arterial pressure wave forms and central pressure with tissue Doppler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluska, Brian A; Jeffriess, Leanne; Mottram, Phillip M; Carlier, Stephane G; Marwick, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    Background Non-invasive assessment of arterial pressure wave forms using applanation tonometry of the radial or carotid arteries can be technically challenging and has not found wide clinical application. 2D imaging of the common carotid arteries is routinely used and we sought to determine whether arterial waveform measurements could be derived from tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) of the carotid artery. Methods We studied 91 subjects (52 men, age 52 ± 14 years) with and without cardiovascular disease. Tonometry was performed on the carotid artery simultaneously with pulsed wave Doppler of the LVOT and acquired digitally. Longitudinal 2D images of the common carotid artery with and without TDI were also acquired digitally and both TDI and tonometry were calibrated using mean and diastolic cuff pressure and analysed off line. Results Correlation between central pressure by TDI and tonometry was excellent for maximum pressure (r = 0.97, p < 0.0001). The mean differences between central pressures derived by TDI and tonometry were minimal (systolic 5.36 ± 5.5 mmHg; diastolic 1.2 ± 1.2 mmHg). Conclusion Imaging of the common carotid artery motion with tissue Doppler may permit acquisition of a waveform analogous to that from tonometry. This method may simplify estimation of central arterial pressure and calculation of total arterial compliance. PMID:17266772

  9. Chasing the reflected wave back into the heart: a new hypothesis while the jury is still out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codreanu I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion Codreanu1,2, Matthew D Robson2, Oliver J Rider2, Tammy J Pegg2, Bernd A Jung3, Constantin A Dasanu4, Kieran Clarke1, Cameron J Holloway1,21Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics, University of Oxford; 2University of Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Oxford, UK; 3Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital, Freiburg, Germany; 4Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT, USABackground: Arterial stiffness directly influences cardiac function and is independently associated with cardiovascular risk. However, the influence of the aortic reflected pulse pressure wave on left ventricular function has not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information on regional ventricular wall motion patterns corresponding to the propagation of the reflected aortic wave on ventricular segments.Methods: Left ventricular wall motion was investigated in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 14, age 23 ± 3 years, using cardiac magnetic resonance navigator-gated tissue phase mapping. The left ventricle was divided into 16 segments and regional wall motion was studied in high temporal detail.Results: Corresponding to the expected timing of the reflected aortic wave reaching the left ventricle, a characteristic “notch” of regional myocardial motion was seen in all radial, circumferential, and longitudinal velocity graphs. This notch was particularly prominent in septal segments adjacent to the left ventricular outflow tract on radial velocity graphs and in anterior and posterior left ventricular segments on circumferential velocity graphs. Similarly, longitudinal velocity graphs demonstrated a brief deceleration in the upward recoil motion of the entire ventricle at the beginning of diastole.Conclusion: These results provide new insights into the possible influence of the reflected aortic waves on ventricular segments. Although the association with the reflected wave

  10. Assessment of arterial stiffness among schizophrenia-spectrum disorders using aortic pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Flynn, Sean W; Fredrikson, Diane; Lang, Donna J

    2014-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness provides a non-invasive indication of cardiovascular disease risk. To date, arterial stiffness, which has been shown to have independent predictive value for CVD morbidity and mortality, has not been evaluated in this population. We aimed to examine aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as large and small artery compliance (Comp1 and Comp2) in patients being treated for schizophrenia, compared to healthy volunteers. Ten patients and 10 age and gendermatched volunteers underwent a comprehensive evaluation of arterial stiffness including: aPWV, Comp1, Comp2, stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Patient aPWV was significantly elevated compared to healthy volunteers (9.1 ± 4.11 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4, P=0.03). Increased age, blood pressure, heart rate, and cigarettes/day were associated with reduced arterial health in patients. This is the first time aPWV has been described in those treated for schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness is increased in this population. Measuring arterial stiffness is a non-invasive, sensitive and effective tool for evaluating CVD risk in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Photon reflection by a quantum mirror: a wave function approach

    CERN Document Server

    Corrêa, Raul

    2016-01-01

    We derive from first principles the momentum exchange between a photon and a quantum mirror upon reflection, by considering the boundary conditions imposed by the mirror surface on the photon wave equation. We show that the system generally ends up in an entangled state, unless the mirror position uncertainty is much smaller than the photon wavelength, when the mirror behaves classically. Our treatment leads us directly to the conclusion that the photon momentum has the known value hk/2{\\pi}. This implies that when the mirror is immersed in a dielectric medium the photon radiation pressure is proportional to the medium refractive index n. Our work thus contributes to the longstanding Abraham-Minkowski debate about the momentum of light in a medium. We interpret the result by associating the Minkowski momentum (which is proportional to n) with the canonical momentum of light, which appears naturally in quantum formulations.

  12. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network

    CERN Document Server

    Brault, A; Lucor, D

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is utilized to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of critical uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Resorting to a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the spatial sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of th...

  13. Reflection of a converging cylindrical shock wave segment by a straight wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B.; Skews, B.

    2017-01-01

    As a converging cylindrical shock wave propagates over a wedge, the shock wave accelerates and the angle between the shock wave and the wedge decreases. This causes the conditions at the reflection point to move from what would be the irregular reflection domain for a straight shock wave into the regular reflection domain. This paper covers a largely qualitative study of the reflection of converging shock wave segments with Mach numbers between 1.2 and 2.1 by wedges inclined at angles between 15° and 60° from experimental and numerical results. The sonic condition conventionally used for predicting the type of reflection of straight shock waves was found to also be suitable for predicting the initial reflection of a curved shock wave. Initially regular reflections persisted until the shock was completely reflected by the wedge, whereas the triple point of initially irregular reflections was observed to return to the wedge surface, forming transitioned regular reflection. After the incident shock wave was completely reflected by the wedge, a shock wave focusing mechanism was observed to amplify the pressure on the surface of the wedge by a factor of up to 100 for low wedge angles.

  14. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  15. Wave reflection in a reaction-diffusion system: breathing patterns and attenuation of the echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, M A; Ivanitsky, G R; Zemskov, E P

    2014-05-01

    Formation and interaction of the one-dimensional excitation waves in a reaction-diffusion system with the piecewise linear reaction functions of the Tonnelier-Gerstner type are studied. We show that there exists a parameter region where the established regime of wave propagation depends on initial conditions. Wave phenomena with a complex behavior are found: (i) the reflection of waves at a growing distance (the remote reflection) upon their collision with each other or with no-flux boundaries and (ii) the periodic transformation of waves with the jumping from one regime of wave propagation to another (the periodic trigger wave).

  16. Phase difference and inter ference between reflected cylindrical wave and head wave at a liquid/solid interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reflected field of pulsed cylindrical waves from a liquid-solid interface is studied by the numerical method and the experimental method. The reflected field is calculated and shown in gray pictures. The calculated incident angles θn (n=1, 2, 3, ...) of a series of minimums (or nulls) on the reflected wavefront are presented. The measured angle of the minimum from Schlieren photograph is consistent with that by calculation. The appearance of minimums is explained by the interference between the refiected wave and the head wave, and by the radiated dissipation of the head wave. The leading phase angle of the head wave to the reflected wave is proved to be about 3π/4 by the numerical calculation.``

  17. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  18. A Kind of Discrete Non-Reflecting Boundary Conditions for Varieties of Wave Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-min Shao; Zhi-ling Lan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of discrete non-reflecting boundary conditions is developed. It can be used for a variety of wave equations such as the acoustic wave equation, the isotropic and anisotropic elastic wave equations and the equations for wave propagation in multi-phase media and so on. In this kind of boundary conditions, the composition of all artificial reflected waves, but not the individual reflected ones, is considered and eliminated. Thus, it has a uniform formula for different wave equations. The velocity CA of the composed reflected wave is determined in the way to make the reflection coefficients minimal, the value of which depends on equations. In this paper, the construction of the boundary conditions is illustrated and CA is found, numerical results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the boundary conditions.

  19. REFLECTION OF OBLIQUE INCIDENT WAVES BY PERFORATED CAISSONS WITH TRAVERSE WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-cheng; LIU Hong-jie; DONG Guo-hai

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of oblique incident waves with infinite number of perforated caissons is investigated. The fluid domain is divided into infinite sub-domains by the caissons, and eigen-function expansion is applied to expand velocity potentials in each domain. A phase relation is introduced for wave oscillation in each caisson, and the structure geometry is considered in constructing the models of reflection waves. The reflected waves with the present analysis include all of the waves traveling in different directions when incident wave period is short. Numerical examinations show that velocities at the inner and outer sides of the front walls of caissons are close to each other, and reflection coefficients satisfy the energy conservation relation very well when porous effect parameter is infinite. Numerical results show that the reflection coefficients of oblique incident waves are smaller for shorter caissons at low frequency, and decrease with the increase of wave incident angle.

  20. The damping of seismic waves and its determination from reflection seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, L.

    1979-01-01

    The damping in theoretical waveforms is described phenomenologically and a classification is proposed. A method for studying the Earth's crust was developed which includes this damping as derived from reflection seismograms. Seismic wave propagation by absorption, attenuation of seismic waves by scattering, and dispersion relations are considered. Absorption of seismic waves within the Earth as well as reflection and transmission of elastic waves seen through boundary layer absorption are also discussed.

  1. Reflection of retrograde waves within the cochlea and at the stapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shera, C.A.; Zweig, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (United States))

    1991-03-01

    A number of people have argued that backward-traveling waves, in striking contrast to waves traveling forward towards the helicotrema, suffer appreciable reflection as they move through the basal turns of the cochlea. Such reflection, if present, would have important consequences for understanding the nature and strength of otoacoustic emissions. The apparent asymmetry in reflection of cochlear waves is shown, however, to be an artifact of the boundary condition those authors impose at the stapes: conventional cochlear models are found not to generate reflections of waves traveling in either direction even when the wavelength changes rapidly and the WKB approximation breaks down. Although backward-traveling waves are not reflected by the secular variation of the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the cochlea, they are reflected when they reach the stapes. The magnitude of that boundary reflection is computed for the cat and shown to be a large, rapidly varying function of frequency.

  2. A Time-Domain Method for Separating Incident and Reflected Irregular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    In the hydraulic laboratory environment a seperation of an irregular wave field into incident waves propagating towards a structure, and reflected waves propagating away from the structure is often wanted. This is due to the fact that the response of the structure to the incident waves is target...... of the model test. Goda and Suzuki (1976) presented a frequency method for estimation of irregular incident and reflected waves in random waves. Mansard and Funke (1980) improved this method uaing a least squares technique. In the following, a time-domain method for seperating the incident waves...... and the reflected waves (SIRW-method), is presented. the method is based on the use of digital filters and can seperate the waves fields in real time....

  3. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: Blood pressure (BP measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV. Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH, secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD is reversed by recombinant human (rh GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two infl ammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rh

  4. Three-wave mixing of ordinary and backward electromagnetic waves: extraordinary transients in the nonlinear reflectivity and parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabko, Vitaly V; Popov, Alexander K; Tkachenko, Viktor A; Myslivets, Sergey A

    2016-09-01

    Three-wave mixing of ordinary and backward electromagnetic waves in a pulsed regime is investigated in the metamaterials that enable the coexistence and phase-matching of such waves. It is shown that the opposite direction of phase velocity and energy flux in backward waves gives rise to extraordinary transient processes due to greatly enhanced optical parametric amplification and frequency up- and down-shifting nonlinear reflectivity. The differences are illustrated through comparison with the counterparts in ordinary, co-propagating settings.

  5. Reflection of plane electromagnetic waves from the surface of a perfect conductor moving in an arbitrary direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reflection of plane electromagnetic waves (TE wave and TM wave) from a perfect conductor which moves in an arbitrary direction is investigated. Based on Maxwell's equations and the boundary conditions for moving boundary, the relation between the field vectors of reflected and incident waves, and the reflection coefficient are derived. The energy balance between incident and reflected waves, the force exerted by electromagnetic waves to the moving conductor are also discussed and some new conclusions are suggested for notice.

  6. Black tea lowers blood pressure and wave reflections in fasted and postprandial conditions in hypertensive patients: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-02-04

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (ptea consumption (pBlack tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (-3.2 mmHg, pBlack tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  7. Observations and modeling of forward and reflected chorus waves captured by THEMIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Agapitov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF chorus emissions are the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in the radiation belts of the Earth's magnetosphere. Chorus emissions, whistler-mode wave packets propagating roughly along magnetic field lines from a well-localized source in the vicinity of the magnetic equator to polar regions, can be reflected at low altitudes. After reflection, wave packets can return to the equatorial plane region. Understanding of whistler wave propagation and reflection is critical to a correct description of wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts. We focus on properties of reflected chorus emissions observed by the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms spacecraft Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM and Electric Field Instrument (EFI at ELF/VLF frequencies up to 4 kHz at L≥8. We determine the direction of the Poynting flux and wave vector distribution for forward and reflected chorus waves. Although both types of chorus waves were detected near the magnetic equator and have similar, discrete structure and rising tones, reflected waves are attenuated by a factor of 10–30 and have 10% higher frequency than concurrently-observed forward waves. Modeling of wave propagation and reflection using geometrical optics ray-tracing allowed us to determine the chorus source region location and explain observed propagation characteristics. We find that reflected wave attenuation at a certain spatial region is caused by divergence of the ray paths of these non-ducted emissions, and that the frequency shift is caused by generation of the reflected waves at lower L-shells where the local equatorial gyrofrequency is larger.

  8. Numerical Simulated Study on the Separation of Oblique Incident and Reflected Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵利民; 俞聿修

    2001-01-01

    The Goda's method of separating the frequency spectrum of the unidirectional incident and reflected waves is improved. The proposed method can be applied to the separation of oblique incident and reflected waves and the two wave gauges can be arranged in an arbitrary angle in front of a structure. When the projected distance of the two probes on the incident wave direction is the multiple ofthe half length of the incident waves, the singular problem will emerge by using the method. It is advised that when the projected distance of the two measured points on the incident wave direction is 0.05~0.45 times the wave length of peak frequency wave, good results can be obtained. The simulated resultant waves are separated by the method of numerical simulation and the separated wave spectra are basically corresponding to the target spectra input. The wave trains calculated by the separated incident and reflected wave frequency spectrum are approximated to the input wave trains and the reflected coefficient can be derived correctly. Therefore, the method proposed in this paper is reliable.

  9. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  10. Harmonics tracking of intracranial and arterial blood pressure waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Considering cardiorespiratory interaction and heart rate variability, a new approach is proposed to decompose intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure to their different harmonics. The method is based on tracking the amplitudes of the harmonics by a Kalman filter based tracking algorithm. The algorithm takes benefit of combined frequency estimation technique which uses both Fast Fourier Transform and RR-interval detection. The result would be of use in intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure waveform analysis as well as other investigations which need to estimate contribution of specific harmonic in above mentioned signals such as Pressure-Volume Compensatory Reserve assessment.

  11. Reflection and transmission of ocean wave spectra by a band of randomly distributed ice floes

    CERN Document Server

    Montiel, Fabien; Bennetts, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through an arbitrary finite array of circular ice floes, where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by wave scattering effects. The model is applied to characterise the wave reflection and transmission properties of a strip of ice floes, such as an ice edge band. A method is devised to extract the reflected and transmitted directional wave spectra produced by the array. The method builds upon an integral mapping from polar to Cartesian coordinates of the scattered wave components. Sensitivity tests are conducted for a row of floes randomly perturbed from a regular arrangement. Results for random arrays are generated using ensemble averaging. A realistic ice edge band is then reconstructed from field experiments data. Simulations show a good qualitative agreement with the data in terms of transmitted wave energy and directional spreading. In particular, it is observed that short waves ...

  12. Reflection of semi-guided plane waves at angled thin-film transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çivitci, Fehmi; Hammer, Manfred; Hoekstra, Hugo J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of thin-film guided, in-plane unguided plane optical waves, and their partial or total reflection at transitions between regions with different film thickness, is considered. The properties of reflected and refracted waves can be predicted reasonably by readily available Helmholtz- a

  13. Wave speed in human coronary arteries is not influenced by microvascular vasodilation: implications for wave intensity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandi, M Cristina; De Silva, Kalpa; Lumley, Matthew; Lockie, Timothy P E; Clapp, Brian; Spaan, Jos A E; Perera, Divaka; Siebes, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Wave intensity analysis and wave separation are powerful tools for interrogating coronary, myocardial and microvascular physiology. Wave speed is integral to these calculations and is usually estimated by the single-point technique (SPc), a feasible but as yet unvalidated approach in coronary vessels. We aimed to directly measure wave speed in human coronary arteries and assess the impact of adenosine and nitrate administration. In 14 patients, the transit time Δt between two pressure signals was measured in angiographically normal coronary arteries using a microcatheter equipped with two high-fidelity pressure sensors located Δs = 5 cm apart. Simultaneously, intracoronary pressure and flow velocity were measured with a dual-sensor wire to derive SPc. Actual wave speed was calculated as DNc = Δs/Δt. Hemodynamic signals were recorded at baseline and during adenosine-induced hyperemia, before and after nitroglycerin administration. The energy of separated wave intensity components was assessed using SPc and DNc. At baseline, DNc equaled SPc (15.9 ± 1.8 vs. 16.6 ± 1.5 m/s). Adenosine-induced hyperemia lowered SPc by 40 % (p DNc remained unchanged, leading to marked differences in respective separated wave energies. Nitroglycerin did not affect DNc, whereas SPc transiently fell to 12.0 ± 1.2 m/s (p < 0.02). Human coronary wave speed is reliably estimated by SPc under resting conditions but not during adenosine-induced vasodilation. Since coronary wave speed is unaffected by microvascular dilation, the SPc estimate at rest can serve as surrogate for separating wave intensity signals obtained during hyperemia, thus greatly extending the scope of WIA to study coronary physiology in humans.

  14. Reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2002-03-01

    In the present investigation, it is shown that there exists five basic waves in a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The problem of reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid half-space is studied. The energy ratios for various reflected waves are obtained for aluminium- epoxy composite as a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The variations of the energy ratios with the angle of incidence are shown graphically. The microstretch effect is shown on various reflected waves.

  15. Acoustoelectric effects in reflection of leaky-wave-radiated bulk acoustic waves from piezoelectric crystal-conductive liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimeika, Romualdas; Čiplys, Daumantas; Jonkus, Vytautas; Shur, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The leaky surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating along X-axis of Y-cut lithium tantalate crystal strongly radiates energy in the form of an obliquely propagating narrow bulk acoustic wave (BAW) beam. The reflection of this beam from the crystal-liquid interface has been investigated. The test liquids were solutions of potassium nitrate in distilled water and of lithium chloride in isopropyl alcohol with the conductivity varied by changing the solution concentration. The strong dependences of the reflected wave amplitude and phase on the liquid conductivity were observed and explained by the acoustoelectric interaction in the wave reflection region. The novel configuration of an acoustic sensor for liquid media featuring important advantages of separate measuring and sensing surfaces and rigid structure has been proposed. The application of leaky-SAW radiated bulk waves for identification of different brands of mineral water has been demonstrated.

  16. Non-specular reflections in a macroscopic system with wave-particle duality: Spiral waves in bounded media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langham, Jacob; Barkley, Dwight

    2013-03-01

    Spiral waves in excitable media possess both wave-like and particle-like properties. When resonantly forced (forced at the spiral rotation frequency) spiral cores travel along straight trajectories, but may reflect from medium boundaries. Here, numerical simulations are used to study reflections from two types of boundaries. The first is a no-flux boundary which waves cannot cross, while the second is a step change in the medium excitability which waves do cross. Both small-core and large-core spirals are investigated. The predominant feature in all cases is that the reflected angle varies very little with incident angle for large ranges of incident angles. Comparisons are made to the theory of Biktashev and Holden. Large-core spirals exhibit other phenomena such as binding to boundaries. The dynamics of multiple reflections is briefly considered.

  17. Reflection and transmission of full-vector X-waves normally incident on dielectric half spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X-Waves incident normally on a planar interface between two lossless dielectric half-spaces are investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of transmission and reflection is carried out via a straightforward but yet effective method: First, the X-Wave is decomposed into vector Bessel beams via the Bessel-Fourier transform. Then, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beams are obtained in the spectral domain. Finally, the transmitted and reflected X-Waves are obtained via the inverse Bessel-Fourier transform carried out on the X-wave spectrum weighted with the corresponding coefficient. © 2011 IEEE.

  18. Arterial waveguide model for shear wave elastography: implementation and in vitro validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri Astaneh, Ali; Urban, Matthew W.; Aquino, Wilkins; Greenleaf, James F.; Guddati, Murthy N.

    2017-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is found to be an early indicator of many cardiovascular diseases. Among various techniques, shear wave elastography has emerged as a promising tool for estimating local arterial stiffness through the observed dispersion of guided waves. In this paper, we develop efficient models for the computational simulation of guided wave dispersion in arterial walls. The models are capable of considering fluid-loaded tubes, immersed in fluid or embedded in a solid, which are encountered in in vitro/ex vivo, and in vivo experiments. The proposed methods are based on judiciously combining Fourier transformation and finite element discretization, leading to a significant reduction in computational cost while fully capturing complex 3D wave propagation. The developed methods are implemented in open-source code, and verified by comparing them with significantly more expensive, fully 3D finite element models. We also validate the models using the shear wave elastography of tissue-mimicking phantoms. The computational efficiency of the developed methods indicates the possibility of being able to estimate arterial stiffness in real time, which would be beneficial in clinical settings.

  19. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly conducting transversely isotropic solid half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh; Anand Kumar Yadav

    2013-08-01

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy ratios for reflected qP and qSV waves are derived and computed numerically for a particular material. Effects of the initial stress and magnetic field are shown graphically on these reflection coefficients and energy ratios.

  20. Reflection of acoustic wave from the elastic seabed with an overlying gassy poroelastic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyun; Wang, Zhihua; Zhao, Kai; Chen, Guoxing; Li, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    Based on the multiphase poroelasticity theory, the reflection characteristics of an obliquely incident acoustic wave upon a plane interface between overlying water and a gassy marine sediment layer with underlying elastic solid seabed are investigated. The sandwiched gassy layer is modelled as a porous material with finite thickness, which is saturated by two compressible and viscous fluids (liquid and gas). The closed-form expression for the amplitude ratio of the reflected wave, called reflection coefficient, is derived theoretically according to the boundary conditions at the upper and lower interfaces in our proposed model. Using numerical calculation, the influences of layer thickness, incident angle, wave frequency and liquid saturation of sandwiched porous layer on the reflection coefficient are analysed, respectively. It is revealed that the reflection coefficient is closely associated with incident angle and sandwiched layer thickness. Moreover, in different frequency ranges, the dependence of the wave reflection characteristics on moisture (or gas) variations in the intermediate marine sediment layer is distinguishing.

  1. An ultrasound-based method for determining pulse wave velocity in superficial arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabben, Stein Inge; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Hellevik, Leif Rune; Smiseth, Otto A; Slørdahl, Stig; Urheim, Stig; Angelsen, Bjørn

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method for estimating local pulse wave velocity (PWV) solely from ultrasound measurements: the area-flow (QA) method. With the QA method, PWV is estimated as the ratio between change in flow and change in cross-sectional area (PWV = dQ/dA) during the reflection-free period of the cardiac cycle. In four anaesthetized dogs and 21 human subjects (age 23-74) we measured the carotid flow and cross-sectional area non-invasively by ultrasound. As a reference method we used the Bramwell-Hill (BH) equation which estimates PWV from pulse pressure and cross-sectional area. Additionally, we therefore measured brachial pulse pressure by oscillometry in the human subjects, and central aortic pulse pressure by micro-manometry in the dogs. As predicted by the pressure dependency of arterial stiffness, the estimated PWV decreased when the aortic pressure was lowered in two of the dogs. For the human subjects, the QA and BH estimates were correlated (R=0.43, pBH method increased with age (pBH method, indicating different precisions for the two methods. This study illustrates that the simple equation PWV = dQ/dA gives estimates correlated to the PWV of the reference method. However, improvements in the basic measurements seem necessary to increase the precision of the method.

  2. Microvolt T-wave alternans in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoueiry, G; Abdallah, M; Shariff, M; Kowalski, M; Lafferty, J

    2015-01-01

    We designed a prospective observational study targeting a selective population of patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting with normal systolic function. In this study we looked at the prevalence of pre-operative microvolt T-wave alternans and if it predicts atrial fibrillation after surgery. The inclusion criteria included all patients referred to the cardiothoracic outpatient clinic for elective bypass, who can perform aerobic exercise, with a recent exercise stress test exercising at least to 85% of the maximal predicted heart rate (220 - age) and with non-limiting chest pain at maximal exercise. Twenty patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria between May 2008 and February 2010. The hospital course of those patients was followed, and in-hospital events were recorded. Nine out twenty (45%) of patients had a non-negative microvolt T-wave alternans tracing. Six patients (30%) developed new onset atrial fibrillation post surgery. Patients with non-negative microvolt level T-wave alternans are more likely to develop atrial fibrillation post coronary artery bypass grafting then patients with negative microvolt level T-wave alternans (p=0.05). This pilot study provides the first clinical evidence that patients with ischemic heart disease and normal systolic function have a high prevalence of abnormal microvolt T-wave alternans and might be at higher risk of sudden cardiac death. In addition our results show that microvolt level T-wave alternans predicts post coronary artery bypass grafting new onset atrial fibrillation.

  3. Pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function in conscious man: impact of pulmonary vascular disease, respiration and dynamic stress tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junjing; Manisty, Charlotte; Simonsen, Ulf; Howard, Luke S; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2017-08-17

    Wave travel plays an important role in cardiovascular physiology. However, many aspects of pulmonary arterial wave behaviour remain unclear. Wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery in subjects with and without pulmonary hypertension during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Arterial wave energy decreased during expiration and Valsalva manoeuvre due to decreased ventricular preload. Wave energy also decreased during handgrip exercise due to increased heart rate. In pulmonary hypertension patients, the asymptotic pressure at which the microvascular flow ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by waves increased. The reservoir and excess pressures decreased during Valsalva manoeuvre but remained unchanged during handgrip exercise. This study provides insights into the influence of pulmonary vascular disease, spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests on pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function. Detailed haemodynamic analysis may provide novel insights into the pulmonary circulation. Therefore, wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery to characterize changes in wave propagation and reservoir function during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Right heart catheterization was performed using a pressure and Doppler flow sensor tipped guidewire to obtain simultaneous pressure and flow velocity measurements in the pulmonary artery in control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at rest. In controls, recordings were also obtained during Valsalva manoeuvre and handgrip exercise. The asymptotic pressure at which the flow through the microcirculation ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by arterial waves increased in PAH patients compared to controls. The systolic and diastolic rate constants

  4. External iliac artery injury secondary to indirect pressure wave effect from gunshot wound

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Eugene; Choong, Andrew MTL

    2016-01-01

    In patients presenting with gunshot wounds, a high clinical suspicion of injury to vasculature and viscera remote from the projectile track is paramount. We present a case of a 17 year old male who sustained a gunshot wound to his abdomen and subsequently developed a right external iliac artery contusion requiring surgery as an indirect effect of the pressure wave from the bullet.

  5. Clinical characteristic of pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics of pulse wave velocity,arterial compliance and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods A total of 363 patients were selected and divided into 4 groups:diabetic group,diabetic

  6. Wave Reflection on a Two-Slope Steep Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    surveys taken during cross-shore transport study experiment. .....................................12  Figure 7.  Sea kayak with echo sounder and...Suhayda, 1974) Natural beaches are composed of complicated slopes and encounter a wide spectrum of wave frequencies, amplitudes, and directions. Suhayda...1974) conducted a field experiment investigating standing waves on a natural beach. He expanded on the theoretical results of Lamb (1932

  7. Reflection of P and SV waves from free surface of an elastic solid with generalized thermodiffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2005-04-01

    The governing equations for generalized thermodiffusion in an elastic solid are solved. There exists three kinds of dilatational waves and a Shear Vertical (SV) wave in a two-dimensional model of the solid. The reflection phenomena of P and SV waves from free surface of an elastic solid with thermodiffusion is considered. The boundary conditions are solved to obtain a system of four non-homogeneous equations for reflection coefficients. These reflection coefficients are found to depend upon the angle of incidence of P and SV waves, thermodiffusion parameters and other material constants. The numerical values of modulus of the reflection coefficients are presented graphically for different values of thermodiffusion parameters. The dimensional velocities of various plane waves are also computed for different material constants.

  8. Increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is associated with impaired endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dong-hong; TAO Jun; WANG Yan; LIAO Xin-xue; XU Ming-guo; WANG Jie-mei; YANG Zhen; CHEN Long; L(U) Ming-de; LU Kun

    2006-01-01

    Background Pulse wave velocity and flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) are widely used as noninvasive modalities for evaluating atherosclerosis. However, it is not known whether pulse wave velocity is related to FMD in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the alteration in brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and endothelial function in CAD patients.Methods Thirty-three patients with CAD and thirty control subjects were recruited for this study. baPWV was measured non-invasively using a VP 1000 automated PWV/ABI analyzer (PWV/ABI, Colin Co. Ltd., Komaki,Japan). Endothelial function as reflected by FMD in the brachial artery was assessed with a high-resolution ultrasound device.Results baPWV was increased in CAD patients compared with control subjects [(1756.1±253.1) cm/s vs(1495.3 ± 202.3) cm/s, P<0.01]. FMD was significantly reduced in CAD patients compared with control subjects[(5.2±2.1) % vs (11.1 ±4.4) %, P<0.01]. baPWV correlated with FMD (r =-0.68, P<0.001). The endothelium-independent vasodilation induced by sublingual nitroglycerin in the brachial artery was similar in the CAD group compared with the control group.Conclusions CAD is associated with increased baPWV and endothelial dysfunction. Increased baPWV parallels diminished endothelial function. Our data therefore suggest that baPWV can be used as a noninvasive surrogate index in clinical evaluation of endothelial function.

  9. Experimental Researches on Reflective and Transmitting Performances of Quarter Circular Breakwater Under Regular and Irregular Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yan-jiao; WU Mi-ling; JIANG Xue-lian; LI Yan-bao

    2011-01-01

    A series of regular and irregular wave experiments are conducted to study the reflective and transmitting performances of quarter circular breakwater (QCB) in comparison with those of semi-circular breakwater (SCB).Based on regular wave tests,the reflection and transmission characteristics of QCB are analyzed and a few influencing factors are investigated.Then,the wave energy dissipation as wave passing over the breakwater is discussed based on the hydraulic coefficients of QCB and SCB.In irregular wave experiments,the reflection coefficients of QCB and their spectrums are studied.Finally,the comparisons between the experimental results and numerical simulations for QCB under regular and irregular wave conditions are presented.

  10. Modelling of Random Waves over Submerged Breakwaters and Its Application to Reflection Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIH Ruey-Syan; CHOU Chung-Ren; YIM John-Z

    2006-01-01

    Reflection and transmission of random waves from submerged obstacles under various conditions are investigated in this study by means of the boundary element method. The algorithm is based on the Lagrangian description with finite difference adopted for the approximation of time derivative. The accuracy of the model is confirmed by a previous study of the transmission of irregular waves in a water tank without any obstacle, under which sets of submerged breakwaters are located. To reduce the effect of reflection from the wall, a sponge zone is employed at the other end of the flume as an artificial absorbing beach. The power spectrum of Bretschneider-Mitsuyasu type defined by significant wave height, H1/3, and period, T1/3, is employed for the condition of incident waves chosen for the generation of irregular waves. Time histories of water elevations are measured with numerous pseudo wave gages on the free water surface. With reference to the method for the estimation of irregular incident and reflected waves in random sea presented by Goda and Suzuki (1976), the dissipation efficiency of the breakwaters is investigated. Gauges in different positions are tested for their suitability for the estimation of reflection coefficients for irregular waves. The present results demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimation of reflection coefficient for random waves, and indicate the feasibility of the numerical model.

  11. Effects of transmural pressure and muscular activity on pulse waves in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachev, A I

    1980-05-01

    Propagation of small amplitude harmonic waves through a viscous incompressible fluid contained in an initially stressed elastic cylindrical tube is considered as a model of the pulse wave propagation in arteries. The nonlinearity and orthotropy of the vascular material is taken into account. Muscular activity is introduced by means of an "active" tension in circumferential direction of the vessel. The frequency equation is obtained and it is solved numerically for the parameters of a human abdominal aorta. Conclusions concerning pressure-dependence, age-dependence, and muscular activation-dependence of the wave characteristics are drawn which are in accord with available experimental data.

  12. Propagation, reflection, and transmission of SH-waves in slightly compressible, finitely deformed elastic media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. CHATTERJEE; A. CHATTOPADHYAY

    2015-01-01

    The propagation, reflection, and transmission of SH waves in slightly com-pressible, finitely deformed elastic media are considered in this paper. The dispersion relation for SH-wave propagation in slightly compressible, finitely deformed layer over-lying a slightly compressible, finitely deformed half-space is derived. The present paper also deals with the reflection and refraction (transmission) phenomena due to the SH wave incident at the plane interface between two distinct slightly compressible, finitely deformed elastic media. The closed form expressions for the amplitude ratios of reflection and refraction coefficients of the reflected and refracted SH waves are obtained from suit-able boundary conditions. For the numerical discussions, we consider the Neo-Hookean form of a strain energy function. The phase speed curves, the variations of reflection, and transmission coefficients with the angle of incidence, and the plots of the slowness sections are presented by means of graphs.

  13. Broad-angle negative reflection and focusing of elastic waves from a plate edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Istvan A.; Grünsteidl, Clemens; Stobbe, David M.; Murray, Todd W.

    2016-05-01

    Guided elastic waves in plates, or Lamb waves, generally undergo reflection and mode conversion upon encountering a free edge. In the case where a backward-propagating Lamb wave is mode-converted to a forward-propagating wave or vice versa, the mode-converted wave is reflected on the same side of the surface normal as the incident wave. In this paper, we study such negative reflection and show that this effect can be achieved over a broad angular range at a simple plate edge. We demonstrate, through both numerical and experimental approaches, that a plate edge can act as a lens and focus a mode-converted Lamb wave field. Furthermore, we show that as the wave vectors of the incident and mode-converted Lamb waves approach each other, the mode-converted field nearly retraces the incident field. We propose that broad-angle negative reflection may find application in the nondestructive testing of structures supporting guided waves and in the development of new acoustic devices including resonators, lenses, and filters.

  14. Understanding the power reflection and transmission coefficients of a plane wave at a planar interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qian; Jiang, Yikun; Lin, Haoze

    2017-03-01

    In most textbooks, after discussing the partial transmission and reflection of a plane wave at a planar interface, the power (energy) reflection and transmission coefficients are introduced by calculating the normal-to-interface components of the Poynting vectors for the incident, reflected and transmitted waves, separately. Ambiguity arises among students since, for the Poynting vector to be interpreted as the energy flux density, on the incident (reflected) side, the electric and magnetic fields involved must be the total fields, namely, the sum of incident and reflected fields, instead of the partial fields which are just the incident (reflected) fields. The interpretation of the cross product of partial fields as energy flux has not been obviously justified in most textbooks. Besides, the plane wave is actually an idealisation that is only ever found in textbooks, then what do the reflection and transmission coefficients evaluated for a plane wave really mean for a real beam of limited extent? To provide a clearer physical picture, we exemplify a light beam of finite transverse extent by a fundamental Gaussian beam and simulate its reflection and transmission at a planar interface. Due to its finite transverse extent, we can then insert the incident fields or reflected fields as total fields into the expression of the Poynting vector to evaluate the energy flux and then power reflection and transmission coefficients. We demonstrate that the power reflection and transmission coefficients of a beam of finite extent turn out to be the weighted sum of the corresponding coefficients for all constituent plane wave components that form the beam. The power reflection and transmission coefficients of a single plane wave serve, in turn, as the asymptotes for the corresponding coefficients of a light beam as its width expands infinitely.

  15. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV, arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV, peripheral vascular resistances (PVR, and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15 years, 49 females, who were obese (OB or had normal weight (NW. Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph. With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV.

  16. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Juan M.; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  17. Shock wave configurations and reflection hysteresis outside a planar Laval nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Dan; Yu Yong

    2015-01-01

    When the pressure ratio increases from the perfectly expanded condition to the third lim-ited condition in which a normal shock is located on the exit plane, shock wave configurations out-side the nozzle can be further assorted as no shock wave on the perfectly expanded condition, weak oblique shock reflection in the regular reflection (RR) pressure ratio condition, shock reflection hys-teresis in the dual-solution domain of pressure ratio condition, Mach disk configurations in the Mach reflection (MR) pressure ratio condition, the strong oblique shock wave configurations in the corresponding condition, and a normal shock forms on the exit plane in the third limited con-dition. Every critical pressure ratio, especially under regular reflection and Mach reflection pressure ratio conditions, is deduced in the paper according to shock wave reflection theory. A hysteresis phenomenon is also theoretically possible in the dual-solution domain. For a planar Laval nozzle with the cross-section area ratio being 5, different critical pressure ratios are counted in these con-ditions, and numerical simulations are made to demonstrate these various shock wave configura-tions outside the nozzle. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are made to get a more detailed understanding about the shock wave structures outside a Laval nozzle and the RRMMR transition in the dual-solution domain.

  18. SHAPE RESTORATIONS OF OBJECT SURFACE ON POLARIZATION STRUCTURE OF REFLECTED ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem of electromagnetic wave backscattering on a chosen 3D object is solved. A differential equation which is linked change of polarization coefficient of reflected wave with variation of matrix elements of object scattering is ob- tained. Obtained relation enables to develop algorithms of fast numerical solution of inverse problem of scattering on this object that is determination of complex function of object surface scattering and restoration of unknown object shape on phase distribution of reflected wave. The method uses ray representation of scattering fields based on principle Huygens- Fresnel. The algorithm of object shape restoration on phase of reflected wave allows to restore not only smooth surfaces, but also object surfaces with smaller roughness than a wave length.

  19. Goos-Hänchen shifts of reflected terahertz wave on a COC-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingmei; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2013-03-11

    Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of terahertz wave reflected on the Cyclo-Olefin Copolymer (COC)-air interface was investigated in simulation and experiment. The relationship between the GH shifts with the incident angle and the frequency of incident wave were calculated to get a reference for the simulation and experiment. The reflected GH shift was measured on the COC-air interface when a terahertz wave with the frequency of 0.206 THz was incident to a COC double-prism. By changing the thickness of the air layer we find experimentally and simulatively that the GH shift and the energy of the reflected wave increases with the increase of the air layer thickness. The study of GH shift can provide useful information for applications of THz waves in sensor and power delivery systems.

  20. Stresses and strains developed by the reflection of seismic waves at a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, J.R.; Ellett, D.M.; Mehl, C.R.; Dean, F.F.

    1978-07-01

    Exact and approximate equations have been derived for the stresses and strains beneath a free surface when an incoming longitudinal wave and an incoming shear wave reflect from the surface. Results of the approximate solution for depths much less than the wave length of the incoming wave are given in tabular form and are graphed for Poisson's ratios of 0.25, 0.3, and 0.333. The results should be of use in categorizing the magnitude of near-surface stresses and strains resulting from seismic waves produced by deeply buried explosives or earthquakes.

  1. New imaging method for seismic reflection wave and its theoretical basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some new imaging formulas for seismic reflection wave and theirtheoretical basis are given. Phenomena of wave propagation should be characterized by instantaneous spectrum and expressed by complex function of three variables (time, space and frequency) in mathematics. Various physical parameters of medium are also complex functions of two variables (space and frequency). The relationship between reflection coefficient of medium and spectrum of reflected wave is given. Multi-reflection and filter of formations are considered in inversion formulas. Prob-lems in classical convolution model and wave equation are illustrated. All these inversion formulas can be used to image underground medium by wavelet transform and method of "3-basic colors". Different colors mean different media.

  2. Independent Controls of Differently-Polarized Reflected Waves by Anisotropic Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui Feng; Wang, Gui Zhen; Kong, Gu Sheng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a kind of anisotropic planar metasurface, which has capacity to manipulate the orthogonally-polarized electromagnetic waves independently in the reflection mode. The metasurface is composed of orthogonally I-shaped structures and a metal-grounded plane spaced by a dielectric isolator, with the thickness of about 1/15 wavelength. The normally incident linear-polarized waves will be totally reflected by the metal plane, but the reflected phases of x- and y-polarized waves can be controlled independently by the orthogonally I-shaped structures. Based on this principle, we design four functional devices using the anisotropic metasurfaces to realize polarization beam splitting, beam deflection, and linear-to-circular polarization conversion with a deflection angle, respectively. Good performances have been observed from both simulation and measurement results, which show good capacity of the anisotropic metasurfaces to manipulate the x- and y-polarized reflected waves independently. PMID:25873323

  3. Background velocity inversion by phase along reflection wave paths

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    A background velocity model containing the correct lowwavenumber information is desired for both the quality of the migration image and the success of waveform inversion. We propose to invert for the low-wavenumber part of the velocity model by minimizing the phase difference between predicted and observed reflections. The velocity update is exclusively along the reflection wavepaths and, unlike conventional FWI, not along the reflection ellipses. This allows for reconstructing the smoothly varying parts of the background velocity model. Tests with synthetic data show both the benefits and limitations of this method.

  4. Partial reflections of radio waves from the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Tanenbaum, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to partial reflection experiments is discussed, and some advantages of measuring electron density this way are pointed out. The additional information obtained reduces the requirement for an accurate predetermination of collision frequency. Calculations are also made to estimate the errors expected in partial-reflection experiments due to the assumption of Fresnel reflection and to the neglect of coupling between modes. In both cases, the errors are found to be of the same order as known errors in the measurements due to current instrumental limitations.

  5. High resolution wavenumber analysis for investigation of arterial pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Masakazu; Irie, Takasuke

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of the pulse wave along the artery is relatively fast (several m/s), and a high-temporal resolution is required to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a regional segment of the artery. High-frame-rate ultrasound enables the measurement of the regional PWV. In analyses of wave propagation phenomena, the direction and propagation speed are generally identified in the frequency-wavenumber space using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. However, the wavelength of the pulse wave is very long (1 m at a propagation velocity of 10 m/s and a temporal frequency of 10 Hz) compared with a typical lateral field of view of 40 mm in ultrasound imaging. Therefore, PWV cannot be identified in the frequency-wavenumber space owing to the low resolution of the two-dimensional Fourier transform. In the present study, PWV was visualized in the wavenumber domain using phases of arterial wall acceleration waveforms measured by high-frame-rate ultrasound.

  6. RELATIONS BETWEEN DAIRY FOOD INTAKE AND ARTERIAL STIFFNESS: PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND PULSE PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Modifiable risk factors, such as diet, are becomingly increasingly important in the management of cardiovascular disease, one of the greatest major causes of death and disease burden. Few studies have examined the role of diet as a possible means of reducing arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity, an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dairy food intake is associated with measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. A cross-sectional analysis of a subset of the Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study sample was performed. A linear decrease in pulse wave velocity was observed across increasing intakes of dairy food consumption (ranging from never/rarely to daily dairy food intake). The negative linear relationship between pulse wave velocity and intake of dairy food was independent of demographic variables, other cardiovascular disease risk factors and nutrition variables. The pattern of results was very similar for pulse pressure, while no association between dairy food intake and lipid levels was found. Further intervention studies are needed to ascertain whether dairy food intake may be an appropriate dietary intervention for the attenuation of age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:22431583

  7. Reflection and transmission of Lamb waves at an imperfect joint of plates

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Naoki; Biwa, Shiro; Hayashi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of Lamb waves at an imperfect joint of plates are analyzed numerically by the modal decomposition method and the hybrid finite element method. The joint is modeled as a spring-type interface characterized by distributed normal and tangential stiffnesses. The analysis is focused on a low-frequency range where the lowest-order symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb waves are the only propagating modes. The frequency-dependent reflection and transmission characteristics...

  8. An Analogue Model for Teaching Reflection and Refraction of Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Harry E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a concrete model for teaching the concepts of reflection and refraction without the use of formal mathematics. The model has been tested in five sections of a physics course for nonscience majors at Towson State University, Baltimore, Maryland. (HM)

  9. Reflection of P-Wave and Sv-Wave in a Generalized Two Temperature Thermoelastic Half-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santra S.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work the theory of two temperature generalized thermoelasticity has been used to investigate the problem of reflection of P-wave and SV-wave in a half space when the surface is i thermally insulated or ii isothermal. The ratios of the reflection coefficient to that of the incident coefficient for different cases are obtained for P-wave and SV-waves. The results for various cases for the conductive and dynamical temperature have been compared. The results arrived at in the absence of the thermal field (elastic case have also been compared with those in the existing literature. Finally, the results for various cases have been analyzed and depicted in graphs.

  10. Reflection of and SV waves at the free surface of a monoclinic elastic half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarva Jit Singh; Sandhya Khurana

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic elastic medium possessing monoclinic symmetry is discussed. The expressions for the phase velocity of qP and qSV waves propagating in the plane of elastic symmetry are obtained in terms of the direction cosines of the propagation vector. It is shown that, in general, qP waves are not longitudinal and qSV waves are not transverse. Pure longitudinal and pure transverse waves can propagate only in certain specific directions. Closed-form expressions for the reflection coefficients of qP and qSV waves incident at the free surface of a homogeneous monoclinic elastic half-space are obtained. These expressions are used for studying numerically the variation of the reflection coefficients with the angle of incidence. The present analysis corrects some fundamental errors appearing in recent papers on the subject.

  11. Forward Modeling of Azimuthal Anisotropy to the Reflected P Wave of Coal Seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-gong; DONG Shou-hua; YUE Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    Under the condition of weak anisotropy, the relation of P-wave anisotropy in direction to fractures of coal seams was researched in order to forecast the density and the direction of the fractures. Although the approximate solution by Rüger is suitable for thick reservoirs, it has some limitations for the composite reflected wave from both roofs and floors of coal seams, as well as multiple reflections. So first, the phase velocity and group velocity as well as their travel time were calculated about the reflected P-wave of the coal seam. Then, the anisotropic coefficients of both roofs and floors were calculated by Rüger formulae and last, the section versus azimuth in fixed offset can be gotten by convolution. In addition, the relation of amplitude of the composite reflected wave to azimuth angle was discussed. The forward modelling results of the coal azimuth anisotropy show these: 1) the coal seam is the strong reflecting layer, but the change of the reflectivity caused by the azimuth anisotropy is smaller; 2) if the azimuth angle is parallel to the crack strike, the reflectivity reaches up to the maximum absolute value, however, if the azimuth angle is perpendicular to the crack strike, the absolute value of the reflection coefficient is minimum; and 3)the reflection coefficient is the cosine function of the azimuth angle and the period is π.

  12. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far fie...

  13. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness-coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Antoine; Dumas, Laurent; Lucor, Didier

    2016-12-10

    This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is used to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of significant uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance, which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Making use of a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude over the arterial tree with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of the prescribed inlet flow in the proximal aorta can lead to potent variation of both the mean value and standard deviation of blood flow velocity and pressure dynamics due to the interaction of different wave propagation and reflection features. Lack of accurate knowledge in the stiffness properties of the aorta, resulting in uncertainty in the pulse wave velocity in that region, strongly modifies the statistical response, with a global increase in the variability of the quantities of interest and a spatial redistribution of the regions of higher sensitivity. These results will provide some guidance in clinical data acquisition and future coupling of arterial pulse wave propagation reduced-order model with more complex beating heart models.

  14. Reflection of retrograde waves within the cochlea and at the stapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, C A; Zweig, G

    1991-03-01

    A number of authors [de Boer and Viergever, Hear. Res. 13, 101-112 (1984); de Boer et al., in Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1986); Hear. Res. 23, 1-7 (1986); Viergever, in Auditory Frequency Selectivity (Plenum, New York, 1986), pp. 31-38; Kaernbach et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 81, 408-411 (1987)] have argued that backward-traveling waves, in striking contrast to waves traveling forward towards the helicotrema, suffer appreciable reflection as they move through the basal turns of the cochlea. Such reflection, if present, would have important consequences for understanding the nature and strength of otoacoustic emissions. The apparent asymmetry in reflection of cochlear waves is shown, however, to be an artifact of the boundary condition those authors impose at the stapes: conventional cochlear models are found not to generate reflections of waves traveling in either direction even when the wavelength changes rapidly and the WKB approximation breaks down. Although backward-traveling waves are not reflected by the secular variation of the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the cochlea, they are reflected when they reach the stapes. The magnitude of that boundary reflection is computed for the cat and shown to be a large, rapidly varying function of frequency.

  15. Measurements of wave speed and reflected waves in elastic tubes and bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khir, A W; Parker, K H

    2002-06-01

    Wave intensity analysis is a time domain method for studying waves in elastic tubes. Testing the ability of the method to extract information from complex pressure and velocity waveforms such as those generated by a wave passing through a mismatched elastic bifurcation is the primary aim of this research. The analysis provides a means for separating forward and backward waves, but the separation requires knowledge of the wave speed. The PU-loop method is a technique for determining the wave speed from measurements of pressure and velocity, and investigating the relative accuracy of this method is another aim of this research. We generated a single semi-sinusoidal wave in long elastic tubes and measured pressure and velocity at the inlet, and pressure at the exit of the tubes. In our experiments, the results of the PU-loop and the traditional foot-to-foot methods for determining the wave speed are comparable and the difference is on the order of 2.9+/-0.8%. A single semi-sinusoidal wave running through a mismatched elastic bifurcation generated complicated pressure and velocity waveforms. By using wave intensity analysis we have decomposed the complex waveforms into simple information of the times and magnitudes of waves passing by the observation site. We conclude that wave intensity analysis and the PU-loop method combined, provide a convenient, time-based technique for analysing waves in elastic tubes.

  16. Clinical usefulness of carotid arterial wave intensity in assessing left ventricular systolic and early diastolic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohte, Nobuyuki; Narita, Hitomi; Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Okada, Takashi; Harada, Akimitsu; Hayano, Junichiro; Kimura, Genjiro

    2003-07-01

    Wave intensity (WI) is a novel hemodynamic index, which is defined as (d P/d t) x (d U/d t) at any site of the circulation, where d P/d t and d U/d t are the derivatives of blood pressure and velocity with respect to time, respectively. However, the pathophysiological meanings of this index have not been fully elucidated in the clinical setting. Accordingly, we investigated this issue in 64 patients who underwent invasive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function. WI was obtained at the right carotid artery using a color Doppler system for blood velocity measurement combined with an echo-tracking method for detecting vessel diameter changes. The vessel diameter changes were automatically converted to pressure waveforms by calibrating its peak and minimum values by systolic and diastolic brachial blood pressures. The WI of the patients showed two sharp positive peaks. The first peak was found at the very early phase of LV ejection, while the second peak was observed near end-ejection. The magnitude of the first peak of WI significantly correlated with the maximum rate of LV pressure rise (LV max. d P/d t) (r = 0.74, P WI significantly correlated with the time constant of LV relaxation (r = -0.77, P WI reflects LV contractile performance, and the amplitude of the second peak of WI is determined by LV behavior during the period from late systole to isovolumic relaxation. WI is a noninvasively obtained, clinically useful parameter for the evaluation of LV systolic and early diastolic performance at the same time.

  17. Robust pulse wave velocity estimation by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness and may permit continuous, non-invasive, and cuff-less monitoring of blood pressure. Here, robust PWV estimation was sought by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms. In this approach, the system that optimally couples the proximal waveform to the distal waveform is identified, and the time delay of this system is then used to calculate PWV. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, a standard identification technique was applied to non-invasive impedance cardiography and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from six humans subjected to progressive reductions in central blood volume induced by lower body negative pressure. This technique estimated diastolic pressure with an overall root-mean-squared-error of 5.2 mmHg. For comparison, the conventional detection method for estimating PWV yielded a corresponding error of 8.3 mmHg.

  18. Source regions and reflection of infragravity waves offshore of the U.S.s Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric

    2015-09-01

    Infragravity waves are oceanic surface gravity waves but with wavelengths (tens of km) and periods (>30 s) much longer than wind waves and swell. Mostly studied in shallow water, knowledge of infragravity waves in deep water has remained limited. Recent interest in deep water infragravity waves has been motivated by the error they may contribute to future high-resolution satellite radar altimetry measurements of sea level. Here deep water infragravity waves offshore of the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. were studied using differential pressure gauges which were deployed as part of the Cascadia Initiative array from September 2012 to May 2013. Cross correlation of the records revealed direction of infragravity wave propagation across the array, from which source regions were inferred. The dominant source was found to be the coastline to the east, associated with large wind waves and swell incident on the eastern side of the basin. The source shifted southward during northern-hemisphere summer, and on several days in the record infragravity waves arrived from the western side of the Pacific. Asymmetry of cross-correlation functions for five of these westerly arrivals was used to calculate the ratio of seaward to shoreward propagating energy, and hence estimate the strength of infragravity wave reflection at periods of 100-200 s. Reflection of these remote arrivals from the west appeared to be strong, with a lower bound estimate of r = 0.49 ± 0.29 (reflection coefficient ± standard error) and an upper bound estimate of r = 0.74 ± 0.06. These results suggest that reflection at ocean boundaries may be an important consideration for infragravity waves in the deep ocean.

  19. External iliac artery injury secondary to indirect pressure wave effect from gunshot wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugene Ng; Andrew MTL.Choong

    2016-01-01

    In patients presenting with gunshot wounds,a high clinical suspicion of injury to vasculature and viscera remote from the projectile track is paramount.We present a case of a 17 year old male who sustained a gunshot wound to his abdomen and subsequently developed a right external iliac artery contusion requiring surgery as an indirect effect of the pressure wave from the bullet.

  20. Acoustoelastic analysis of reflected waves in nearly incompressible, hyper-elastic materials: forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirohito; Vanderby, Ray

    2007-02-01

    Many materials (e.g., rubber or biologic tissues) are "nearly" incompressible and often assumed to be incompressible in their constitutive equations. This assumption hinders realistic analyses of wave motion including acoustoelasticity. In this study, this constraint is relaxed and the reflected waves from nearly incompressible, hyper-elastic materials are examined. Specifically, reflection coefficients are considered from the interface of water and uni-axially prestretched rubber. Both forward and inverse problems are experimentally and analytically studied with the incident wave perpendicular to the interface. In the forward problem, the wave reflection coefficient at the interface is evaluated with strain energy functions for nearly incompressible materials in order to compute applied strain. For the general inverse problem, mathematical relations are derived that identify both uni-axial strains and normalized material constants from reflected wave data. The validity of this method of analysis is demonstrated via an experiment with stretched rubber. Results demonstrate that applied strains and normalized material coefficients can be simultaneously determined from the reflected wave data alone if they are collected at several different (but unknown) levels of strain. This study therefore indicates that acoustoelasticity, with an appropriate constitutive formulation, can determine strain and material properties in hyper-elastic, nearly incompressible materials.

  1. Reflection and transmission of normally incident full-vector X waves on planar interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-12-23

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X waves normally incident on planar half-spaces and slabs are studied. For this purpose, X waves are expanded in terms of weighted vector Bessel beams; this new decomposition and reconstruction method offers a more lucid and intuitive interpretation of the physical phenomena observed upon the reflection or transmission of X waves when compared to the conventional plane-wave decomposition technique. Using the Bessel beam expansion approach, we have characterized changes in the field shape and the intensity distribution of the transmitted and reflected full-vector X waves. We have also identified a novel longitudinal shift, which is observed when a full-vector X wave is transmitted through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition. The results of our studies presented here are valuable in understanding the behavior of full-vector X waves when they are utilized in practical applications in electromagnetics, optics, and photonics, such as trap and tweezer setups, optical lithography, and immaterial probing. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  2. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  3. The effect of disturbances of lower ionospheric parameters by powerful radio waves on partially reflected signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, S. I.; Chernogor, L. F.

    The interaction of intense pulsed short-wave radiation with ionospheric plasma in the D region is studied. Also considered is the effect of the disturbances caused by this radiation on the characteristics of the partially reflected radio signals used in the method of partial reflections. Calculations are carried out showing that present installations designed for the method of partial reflections can have a significant effect on the parameters of the lower ionosphere. Recommendations are made for the maximum power of these installations.

  4. Continuous non-invasive finger arterial pressure monitoring reflects intra-arterial pressure changes in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, C.M.; Lemson, J.; Hemelaar, A.E.A.; Settels, J.J.; Schraa, O.; Singh, S.K.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Scheffer, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous non-invasive measurement of finger arterial pressure (FAP) is a reliable technology in adults. FAP is measured with an inflatable cuff around the finger and simultaneously converted to a reconstructed brachial artery pressure waveform (reBAP) by the Nexfin device. We assessed

  5. Numerical study of three-dimensional sound reflection from corrugated surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Youngmin; Song, H C; Seong, Woojae

    2016-10-01

    When a sound wave propagates in a water medium bounded by a smooth surface wave, reflection from a wave crest can lead to focusing and result in rapid variation of the received waveform as the surface wave moves [Tindle, Deane, and Preisig, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 66-72 (2009)]. In prior work, propagation paths have been constrained to be in a plane parallel to the direction of corrugated surface waves, i.e., a two-dimensional (2-D) propagation problem. In this paper, the azimuthal dependence of sound propagation as a three-dimensional (3-D) problem is investigated using an efficient, time-domain Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral formulation. When the source and receiver are in the plane orthogonal to the surface wave direction, the surface wave curvature vanishes in conventional 2-D treatments and the flat surface simply moves up and down, resulting in minimal temporal variation of the reflected signal intensity. On the other hand, the 3-D propagation analysis reveals that a focusing phenomenon occurs in the reflected signal due to the surface wave curvature formed along the orthogonal plane, i.e., out-of-plane scattering.

  6. Retrieval of the P wave reflectivity response from autocorrelation of seismic noise: Jakarta Basin, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Lumley, David

    2017-01-01

    We autocorrelate the continuously recorded seismic wavefield across a dense network of seismometers to map the P wave reflectivity response of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia. The proximity of this mega city to known active faults and the subduction of the Australian plate, especially when the predominance of masonry construction and thick sedimentary basin fill are considered, suggests that it is a hot spot for seismic risk. In order to understand the type of ground motion that earthquakes might cause in the basin, it is essential to obtain reliable information on its seismic velocity structure. The body wave reflections are sensitive to the sharp velocity contrasts, which makes them useful in seismic imaging. Results show autocorrelograms at different seismic stations with reflected-wave travel time variations, which reflect the variation in basement depth across the thick sedimentary basin. We also confirm the validity of the observed autocorrelation waveforms by conducting a 2-D full waveform modeling.

  7. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; He, Shitang

    2008-12-05

    This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41(o) YX LiNbO₃ with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM) was used to determine the optimal design parameters of the reflective delay line structured by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and shorted grating reflectors. Using the network analyzer, the fabricated Love wave reflective delay line was characterized, high signal noise ratio (S/N), sharp reflection peaks, and few spurious noise between the peaks were found, and the measured result agrees well with the simulated one. Also, the optimal guiding layer thickness of 1.5~1.8μm was extracted experimentally, and it is consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  8. Continuous non-invasive finger arterial pressure monitoring reflects intra-arterial pressure changes in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofhuizen, C M; Lemson, J; Hemelaar, A E A; Settels, J J; Schraa, O; Singh, S K; van der Hoeven, J G; Scheffer, G J

    2010-10-01

    Continuous non-invasive measurement of finger arterial pressure (FAP) is a reliable technology in adults. FAP is measured with an inflatable cuff around the finger and simultaneously converted to a reconstructed brachial artery pressure waveform (reBAP) by the Nexfin™ device. We assessed the adequacy of a prototype device (Nexfin-paediatric), designed for a paediatric population, for detecting rapid arterial pressure changes in children during cardiac surgery. Thirteen anaesthetized children with a median age of 11 months (2 months-7 yr) undergoing congenital cardiac surgery were included in the study. reBAP and intra-arterial pressure (IAP) were recorded simultaneously during the surgical procedure. To assess the accuracy of reBAP in tracking arterial pressure changes, the four largest IAP variations within a 5 min time interval were identified from each procedure. These variations were compared offline with reBAP during a 10 s control period before and a 10 s period after an arterial pressure change had occurred. In 10 out of 13 children, a non-invasive arterial pressure recording could be obtained. Therefore, recordings from these 10 children were eligible for further analysis, resulting in 40 data points. The correlation coefficient between reBAP and IAP in tracking mean arterial pressure (MAP) changes was 0.98. reBAP followed changes in IAP with a mean bias for systolic, diastolic arterial pressure, and MAP of 0.0 mm Hg (sd 5.8), 0.1 (sd 2.8), and 0.19 (sd 2.7), respectively. The prototype device closely follows arterial pressure changes in children. However, in a considerable number of attempts, obtaining a signal was time-consuming or unsuccessful. This technique seems promising but requires further technical development.

  9. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  10. Large Blast and Thermal Simulator Reflected Wave Eliminator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    been used, its area variation with time would not be preprogrammed, but instead flow sensors and feedback would be used to automatically update the area...the ability to quickly analyze sensor data and make good, real time judgments as to the correct area seting to minimize the reflection. For larger shock...the LB/TS. Engineering of a conceptoal design for side venting has not yet been undertaken but is recommended as a priority item now that side venting

  11. Reflection and transmission of light waves from the air-magnetoplasma interface: Spatial and angular Imbert-Fedorov shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borhanian, Jafar, E-mail: borhanian@uma.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P. O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    We have investigated the reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave from the air-magnetoplasma interface. The reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained for an arbitrary polarized incident wave. The spatial and angular Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts are discussed. The numerical results are presented to study the dependence of the reflection and transmission coefficients and IF shifts on relevant parameters of the system. The plasma and wave parameters can be used to control the reflection coefficients and IF shifts.

  12. Effects of watermelon supplementation on aortic blood pressure and wave reflection in individuals with prehypertension: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope M; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2011-01-01

    Oral L-citrulline is efficiently converted to L-arginine, the precursor for endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Oral L-arginine supplementation reduces brachial blood pressure (BP). We evaluated the effects of watermelon supplementation on aortic BP and arterial function in individuals with prehypertension. Heart rate (HR), brachial systolic BP (bSBP), brachial pulse pressure (bPP), aortic SBP (aSBP), aortic PP (aPP), augmentation index (AIx), AIx adjusted for HR of 75 beats/min (AIx@75), amplitude of the first (P1) and second (P2) systolic peaks, reflection time (Tr), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) were evaluated in the supine position in nine subjects (four men/five women, age 54 ± 3 years) with prehypertension (134/77 ± 5/3 mm Hg). Subjects were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of watermelon supplementation (L-citrulline/L arginine, 2.7 g/1.3 g/day) or placebo followed by a 4-week washout period and then crossover. There was a significant treatment effect (change in the value of watermelon minus placebo from baseline to 6 weeks) on bPP (-8 ± 3 mm Hg, P 0.05) on bSBP, brachial diastolic BP (DBP), aortic DBP, Tr, P1, HR, and carotid-femoral PWV. This pilot study shows that watermelon supplementation improves aortic hemodynamics through a decrease in the amplitude of the reflected wave in individuals with prehypertension.

  13. An innovative method to measure the peripheral arterial elasticity: spring constant modeling based on the arterial pressure wave with radial vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ching-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we propose an innovative method for the direct measurement of the peripheral artery elasticity using a spring constant model, based on the arterial pressure wave equation, vibrating in a radial direction. By means of the boundary condition of the pressure wave equation at the maximum peak, we can derive the spring constant used for evaluating peripheral arterial elasticity. The calculated spring constants of six typical subjects show a coincidence with their proper arterial elasticities. Furthermore, the comparison between the spring constant method and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was investigated in 70 subjects (21-64 years, 47 normotensives and 23 hypertensives). The results reveal a significant negative correlation for the spring constant vs. PWV (correlation coefficient = -0.663, p constant method to assess the arterial elasticity is carefully verified, and it is shown to be effective as well as fast. This method should be useful for healthcare, not only in improving clinical diagnosis of arterial stiffness but also in screening subjects for early evidence of cardio-vascular diseases and in monitoring responses to therapy in the future.

  14. Eplerenone attenuates pulse wave reflection in chronic kidney disease stage 3-4--a randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Boesby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity associated with increased arterial stiffness. Plasma aldosterone levels are increased in CKD, and aldosterone has been found to increase vascular inflammation and fibrosis. It was hypothesized that aldosterone receptor inhibition with eplerenone could reduce arterial stiffness in CKD stage 3-4. STUDY DESIGN: The design was randomized, open, parallel group. Measurements of arterial stiffness markers were undertaken at weeks 1 and 24. INTERVENTION: 24 weeks of add-on treatment with 25-50 mg eplerenone or standard medication. OUTCOMES: Primary outcome parameter was carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV. Secondary outcomes were augmentation index (AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and urinary albumin excretion. RESULTS: Fifty-four CKD patients (mean eGFR 36 mL/min/1.73 m(2, SD 11 were randomized. Forty-six patients completed the trial. The mean difference in cfPWV changes between groups was 0.1 m/s (95%CI: -1.0, 1.3, P = 0.8. The mean difference in AIx changes between groups was 4.4% (0.1, 8.6, P = 0.04. AASI was unchanged in both groups. The ratio of change in urinary albumin excretion in the eplerenone group compared to the control was 0.61 (0.37, 1.01, P = 0.05. Four patients were withdrawn from the eplerenone group including three because of possible side effects; one was withdrawn from the control group. Mild hyperkalemia was seen on three occasions and was easily managed. LIMITATIONS: The full planned number of patients was not attained. The duration of the trial may have been too short to obtain full effect of eplerenone on the arteries. CONCLUSIONS: Add-on treatment with eplerenone in CKD stage 3-4 did not significantly reduce cfPWV. There may be beneficial vascular effects leading to attenuated pulse wave reflection. Treatment was well-tolerated. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.govNCT01100203.

  15. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  16. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patnaik Amar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. Methods In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Results and Discussion Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88–0.90 with (p Conclusion The new device "PeriScope" based on oscillometric technique has been found to be a simple, non-invasive and reproducible device for the assessment of pulse wave velocity and can be used to determine arterial stiffness in large population based studies.

  17. Simulation of Lamb wave reflections at plate edges using the semi-analytical finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Z A B; Gabbert, U

    2012-09-01

    In typical Lamb wave simulation practices, effects of plate edge reflections are often not considered in order to simplify the wave signal interpretations. Methods that are based on infinite plates such as the semi-analytical finite element method is effective in simulating Lamb waves as it excludes the effect of plate edges. However, the inclusion of plate edges in a finite plate could render this method inapplicable, especially for transient response simulations. Here, by applying the ratio of Lamb mode reflections at plate edges, and representing the reflection at plate edges using infinite plate solutions, the semi-analytical finite element method can be applied for transient response simulation, even when the plate is no longer infinite.

  18. Pervasive seismic wave reflectivity and metasomatism of the Tonga mantle wedge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingcai; Lay, Thorne; Flanagan, Megan P; Williams, Quentin

    2007-05-11

    Subduction zones play critical roles in the recycling of oceanic lithosphere and the generation of continental crust. Seismic imaging can reveal structures associated with key dynamic processes occurring in the upper-mantle wedge above the sinking oceanic slab. Three-dimensional images of reflecting interfaces throughout the upper-mantle wedge above the subducting Tonga slab were obtained by migration of teleseismic recordings of underside P- and S-wave reflections. Laterally continuous weak reflectors with tens of kilometers of topography were detected at depths near 90, 125, 200, 250, 300, 330, 390, 410, and 450 kilometers. P- and S-wave impedances decreased at the 330-kilometer and 450-kilometer reflectors, and S-wave impedance decreased near 200 kilometers in the vicinity of the slab and near 390 kilometers, just above the global 410-kilometer increase. The pervasive seismic reflectivity results from phase transitions and compositional zonation associated with extensive metasomatism involving slab-derived fluids rising through the wedge.

  19. Characterization of Ion-Acoustic Wave Reflection Off A Plasma Chamber Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Rogers, Anthony; Skiff, Fred

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental characterization of the ion acoustic wave reflection coefficient off a plasma chamber wall. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional with typical conditions: n ~ 1010cm-3 Te ~ 3 eV and B ~ 1 kG. The main diagnostics are laser-induced fluorescence and Langmuir probe measurements. A survey of the ion velocity distribution function's zeroth and first order as well as density fluctuations at different wave excitation frequencies is obtained. Analysis of the reflection coefficient's dependence on the phase velocity and frequency of the wave is done through the characterization of waves utilizing Case-Van Kampen modes and the use of Morrison's G-transform. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under grant No. DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  20. Ocean wave transmission and reflection between two connecting viscoelastic ice covers: An approximate solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley H.

    2013-11-01

    An approximate solution for wave transmission and reflection between open water and a viscoelastic ice cover was developed earlier, in which both the water and the ice cover were treated as a continuum, each governed by its own equation of motion. The interface conditions included matching velocity and stresses between the two continua. The analysis provided a first step towards modeling the wave-in-ice climate on a geophysical scale, where properties of the ice cover change with time and location. In this study, we derive the wave transmission and reflection from one viscoelastic material to another. Only two modes of the dispersion relation are considered and the horizontal boundary conditions are approximated by matching the mean values. The reflection and transmission coefficients are first determined for simplified cases to compare with earlier theories. All results show reasonable agreement when the same physical parameters are used. Behaviors of the transmission and reflection coefficients are then obtained for a range of viscoelastic covers. A mode switching phenomenon with increasing ice shear modulus is found. This phenomenon was pointed out in the study of wave propagation from open water to a viscoelastic cover. For two connecting viscoelastic covers, such mode switching is found to terminate with increasing viscosity. Together with an earlier investigation of wave dispersion in a viscoelastic ice cover, the present study provides a way to implement theoretical results in a numerical model for wave propagation through a heterogeneous ice cover. In discretizing a continuously changing ice cover over the geophysical scale, on top of the energy advection, energy transmission between computational cells due to the heterogeneity can be estimated using the present method, while the attenuation and wave speed within each cell are from the previously obtained dispersion relation. In addition, on floe scales, this study provides a way to determine wave

  1. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application

    OpenAIRE

    Shitang He; Wen Wang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41o YX LiNbO3 with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM) was used to determine the optimal design parameters o...

  2. Study on 3D simulation of wave fields in acoustic reflection image logging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The borehole acoustic reflection imaging logging is a newly developed acoustic logging method that has attracted many interests. These converted and reflected waves for imaging are usually mixed up with borehole guided waves and therefore difficult to be clearly identified. To improve the downhole tool design and develop more sophisticate data processing and interpretation algorithms,studies on precisely numerical modeling of the wave fields in the acoustic reflection imaging logging are neces-sary and critical. This paper developed a parallelized scheme of 3D finite difference (3DFD) with non-uniform staggered grid and PML absorbing boundary to simulate the acoustic wave fields in isotropic and anisotropic formations. Applications of this scheme to the typical cases of isotropic and anisot-ropic formations and comparison with the results from published analytical solutions have demon-strated the validation and efficiency of the scheme. Higher accuracy and lower computation cost (3.5 times faster than the conventional schemes) have been achieved with this scheme for modeling such a complex wave fields of 60 dB dynamic range with higher frequency (10 kHz). This simulating program provides a quantitative analytical means for studying acoustic reflection imaging tool and development of the data processing and interpretation methods.

  3. Ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves in anisotropic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, A G; Maznev, A A

    2010-05-01

    This paper examines the conditions for, and provides examples of, ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) in elastically anisotropic solids at straight obstacles such as edges, surface breaking cracks, and interfaces between different solids. The concern here is not with the partial scattering of an incident SAW's energy into bulk waves, but with the occurrence of more than one SAW ray in the reflected and/or transmitted wave fields, by analogy with birefringence in optics and mode conversion of bulk elastic waves at interfaces. SAW ray splitting is dependent on the SAW slowness curve possessing concave regions, which within the constraint of wave vector conservation parallel to the obstacle allows multiple outgoing SAW modes for certain directions of incidence and orientation of obstacle. The existence of pseudo-SAW for a given surface provides a further channel for ray splitting. This paper discusses some typical material configurations for which SAW ray splitting occurs. An example is provided of mode conversion entailing backward reflection or negative refraction. Experimental demonstration of ray splitting in the reflection of a laser generated SAW in GaAs(111) is provided. The calculation of SAW mode conversion amplitudes lies outside the scope of this paper.

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  5. Resonance reflection of acoustic waves in piezoelectric bi-crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, Alexander N; Weihnacht, Manfred

    2005-05-01

    The paper studies the bulk wave reflection from internal interfaces in piezoelectric media. The interfaces of two types have been considered. Infinitesimally thin metallic layer inserted into homogeneous piezoelectric crystal of arbitrary symmetry. Rigidly bonded crystals whose piezoelectric coefficients differ by sign but the other material constants are identical. Analytic expressions for the coefficients of mode conversion have been derived. An analysis has been carried out of specific singularities arising when the angle of incidence is such that the resonance excitation of leaky interface acoustic waves occurs. The conditions for the resonance total reflection have been established. The computations performed for lithium niobate (LiNbO3) illustrate general conclusions.

  6. A large aperture reflective wave-plate for high-intensity short-pulse laser experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Aurand, Bastian; Zhao, Huanyu; Kuschel, Stephan; Wünsche, Martin; Jäckel, Oliver; Heyer, Martin; Wunderlich, Frank; Kaluza, Malte C; Paulus, Gerhard G; Kuehl, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report on a reflective wave-plate system utilizing phase-shifting mirrors (PSM) for a continuous variation of elliptical polarization without changing the beam position and direction. The scalability of multilayer optics to large apertures and the suitability for high-intensity broad-bandwidth laser beams make reflective wave-plates an ideal tool for experiments on relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Our measurements confirm the preservation of the pulse duration and spectrum when a 30-fs Ti:Sapphire laser beam passes the system.

  7. Comparison of arterial waves derived by classical wave separation and wave intensity analysis in a model of aortic coarctation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, J.P.H.M.; Siebes, M.; Westerhof, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta may develop during fetal life and impair quality of life in the adult because upper body hypertension and aneurysm formation in the descending aorta may develop. We used our computational model of the young adult arterial circulation, incorporated aorta coarctation over a ra

  8. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-05-26

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. To mitigate this problem and avoid the need to fit amplitudes in the data, we have developed a wave-equation method that inverts the traveltimes of reflection events, and so it is less prone to the local minima problem. Instead of a waveform misfit function, the penalty function was a crosscorrelation of the downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the trial image point. The time lag, which maximized the crosscorrelation amplitude, represented the reflection-traveltime residual (RTR) that was back projected along the reflection wavepath to update the velocity. Shot- and angle-domain crosscorrelation functions were introduced to estimate the RTR by semblance analysis and scanning. In theory, only the traveltime information was inverted and there was no need to precisely fit the amplitudes or assume a high-frequency approximation. Results with synthetic data and field records revealed the benefits and limitations of wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion.

  9. Effect of end reflections on conversion efficiency of coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yan; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the effect of end reflections on the operation of the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO). It is found that the considerable enhancement of the end reflection at one end increases the conversion efficiency, but excessively large end reflections at both ends weaken the asynchronous wave-beam interaction and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. Perfect reflection at the post end significantly improves the interaction between the electron beam and the asynchronous harmonic so that the conversion efficiency is notably increased. Based on the theoretical research, the diffraction-CRBWO with the generated microwave diffracted and output through the front end of the coaxial slow wave structure cavity is proposed. The post end is conductively closed to provide the perfect reflection. This promotes the amplitude and uniformity of the longitudinal electric field on the beam transmission line and improves the asynchronous wave-beam interaction. In numerical simulations under the diode voltage and current of 450 kV and 5.84 kA, microwave generation with the power of 1.45 GW and the conversion efficiency of 55% are obtained at the frequency of 7.45 GHz.

  10. Wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun

    2016-08-01

    This study gives an analytical solution for wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar based on linear potential theory. The whole study domain is divided into multiple sub-regions in relation to the structures. The velocity potential in each sub-region is written as a series solution by the separation of variables. A partially reflecting boundary condition is used to describe the partial reflection of a vertical wall. Unknown expansion coefficients in the series solutions are determined by matching velocity potentials among different sub-regions. The analytical solution is verified by an independently developed multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) solution and experimental data. The wave run-up and wave force on the partially reflecting vertical wall are estimated and examined, which can be effectively reduced by the submerged porous bar. The horizontal space between the vertical wall and the submerged porous bar is a key factor, which affects the sheltering function of the porous bar. The wave resonance between the porous bar and the vertical wall may disappear when the vertical wall has a low reflection coefficient. The present analytical solution may be used to determine the optimum parameters of structures at a preliminary engineering design stage.

  11. Effect of end reflections on conversion efficiency of coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yan; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Xiaolong [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2015-11-07

    This paper theoretically investigates the effect of end reflections on the operation of the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO). It is found that the considerable enhancement of the end reflection at one end increases the conversion efficiency, but excessively large end reflections at both ends weaken the asynchronous wave-beam interaction and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. Perfect reflection at the post end significantly improves the interaction between the electron beam and the asynchronous harmonic so that the conversion efficiency is notably increased. Based on the theoretical research, the diffraction-CRBWO with the generated microwave diffracted and output through the front end of the coaxial slow wave structure cavity is proposed. The post end is conductively closed to provide the perfect reflection. This promotes the amplitude and uniformity of the longitudinal electric field on the beam transmission line and improves the asynchronous wave-beam interaction. In numerical simulations under the diode voltage and current of 450 kV and 5.84 kA, microwave generation with the power of 1.45 GW and the conversion efficiency of 55% are obtained at the frequency of 7.45 GHz.

  12. Estimation of local pulse wave velocity using arterial diameter waveforms: Experimental validation in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, S.; Craiem, D.; Barra, J. G.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Estimation of arterial stiffness using local pulse wave velocity (PWV) promises to be very useful for noninvasive diagnosis of arteriosclerosis. In this work we estimated in an instrumented sheep, the local aortic pulse wave velocity using two sonomicrometry diameter sensors (separated 7.5 cm) according to the transit time method (PWVTT) with a sampling rate of 4 KHz. We simultaneously measured aortic pressure in order to determine from pressure-diameter loops (PWVPDLoop), the "true" local aortic pulse wave velocity. A pneumatic cuff occluder was implanted in the aorta in order to compare both methods under a wide range of pressure levels. Mean pressure values ranged from 47 to 101 mmHg and mean proximal diameter values from 12.5. to 15.2 mm. There were no significant differences between PWVTT and PWVPDLoop values (451±43 vs. 447±48 cm/s, p = ns, paired t-test). Both methods correlated significantly (R = 0.81, p<0.05). The mean difference between both methods was only -4±29 cm/s, whereas the range of the limits of agreement (mean ± 2 standard deviation) was -61 to +53 cm/s, showing no trend. In conclusion, the diameter waveforms transit time method was found to allow an accurate and precise estimation of the local aortic PWV.

  13. Numerical Study for Hysteresis Phenomena of Shock Wave Reflection in Overexpanded Axisymmetric Supersonic Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Ken Matsuoka; Hideo Kashimura; Shigeru Matsuo; Toshiaki Setoguchi

    2006-01-01

    When the high-pressure gas is exhausted to the vacuum chamber from the supersonic nozzle, the overexpanded supersonic jet is formed at specific condition. In two-dimensional supersonic jet, furthermore, it is known that the hysteresis phenomena for the reflection type of shock wave in the flow field is occurred under the quasi-steady flow and for instance, the transitional pressure ratio between the regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) is affected by this phenomenon. Many papers have described the hysteresis phenomena for underexpanded supersonic jet, but this phenomenon under the overexpanded axisymmetric jet has not been detailed in the past papers. The purpose of this study is to clear the hysteresis phenomena for the reflection type of shock wave at the overexpanded axisymmetric jet using the TVD method and to discuss the characteristic of hysteresis phenomena.

  14. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  15. Warped Wigner-Hough Transform for Defect Reflection Enhancement in Ultrasonic Guided Wave Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca De Marchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the defect detectability of Lamb wave inspection systems, the application of nonlinear signal processing was investigated. The approach is based on a Warped Frequency Transform (WFT to compensate the dispersive behavior of ultrasonic guided waves, followed by a Wigner-Ville time-frequency analysis and the Hough Transform to further improve localization accuracy. As a result, an automatic detection procedure to locate defect-induced reflections was demonstrated and successfully tested by analyzing numerically simulated Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate. The proposed method is suitable for defect detection and can be easily implemented for real-world structural health monitoring applications.

  16. Reflection of Oblique Incident Waves by Breakwaters with Partially-Perforated Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉成; 刘洪杰; 滕斌; 孙大鹏

    2002-01-01

    The reflection of oblique incident waves from breakwaters with a partially-perforated front wall is investigated. Thefluid domain is divided into two sub-domains and the eigenfunction expansion method is applied to expand velocity poten-tials in each domain. In the eigen-expansion of the velocity potential, evanescent waves are included. Numerical resultsof the present model are compared with experimental data. The effect of porosity, the relative chamber width, the relativewater depth in the wave absorbing chamber and the water depth in front of the structure are discussed.

  17. Reflection and transmission of regular waves at a surface-pitching slotted barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The interactions between regular surface waves and a surface-pitching slotted barrier are investigated both analytically and experimentally.A quasi-linear theory is developed using the eigenfunction expansion method.The energy dissipation within the barriers is modeled by a quadratic friction factor, and an equivalent linear dissipation coefficient, which is depth-varying, wave-height dependent, is introduced to linearize the matching condition at the surface-pitching barrier.By comparing the theoretical results with laboratory experiments, it is shown that the present method can satisfactorily predict the variation of the reflection and transmission coefficients with wave height.

  18. Energy Flux and Density of Nonuniform Electromagnetic Waves with Total Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Analytic expressions are obtained for the energy flux and density of refracted nonuniform waves produced during total reflection at the boundary between two isotropic media for the general case of elliptically polarized incident light. The average values are determined as functions of the parameters of the adjoining media and the angle of incidence. The cases of linearly and circularly polarized incident waves are examined in detail. An explicit general expression relating the energy fl ux and density of these waves for arbitrarily polarized incident light is obtained.

  19. Reflection and dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves in interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, C; Galli, D; Velli, M

    2012-01-01

    Context: Supersonic nonthermal motions in molecular clouds are often interpreted as long-lived magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The propagation and amplitude of these waves is affected by local physical characteristics, most importantly the gas density and the ionization fraction. Aims: We study the propagation, reflection and dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves in molecular clouds deriving the behavior of observable quantities such as the amplitudes of velocity fluctuations and the rate of energy dissipation. Methods: We formulated the problem in terms of Els\\"asser variables for transverse MHD waves propagating in a one-dimensional inhomogeneous medium, including the dissipation due to collisions between ions and neutrals and to a nonlinear turbulent cascade treated in a phenomenological way. We considered both steady-state and time-dependent situations and solved the equations of the problem numerically with an iterative method and a Lax-Wendroff scheme, respectively. Results: Alfv\\'en waves incident on overdens...

  20. Basilar-membrane interference patterns from multiple internal reflection of cochlear traveling waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, Christopher A; Cooper, Nigel P

    2013-04-01

    At low stimulus levels, basilar-membrane (BM) mechanical transfer functions in sensitive cochleae manifest a quasiperiodic rippling pattern in both amplitude and phase. Analysis of the responses of active cochlear models suggests that the rippling is a mechanical interference pattern created by multiple internal reflection within the cochlea. In models, the interference arises when reverse-traveling waves responsible for stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) reflect off the stapes on their way to the ear canal, launching a secondary forward-traveling wave that combines with the primary wave produced by the stimulus. Frequency-dependent phase differences between the two waves then create the rippling pattern measurable on the BM. Measurements of BM ripples and SFOAEs in individual chinchilla ears demonstrate that the ripples are strongly correlated with the acoustic interference pattern measured in ear-canal pressure, consistent with a common origin involving the generation of SFOAEs. In BM responses to clicks, the ripples appear as temporal fine structure in the response envelope (multiple lobes, waxing and waning). Analysis of the ripple spacing and response phase gradients provides a test for the role of fast- and slow-wave modes of reverse energy propagation within the cochlea. The data indicate that SFOAE delays are consistent with reverse slow-wave propagation but much too long to be explained by fast waves.

  1. Reflection of a strong magnetic-gas-dynamic shock wave from an elliptical cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachev, L.P.; Sokolov, V.B.

    1977-10-01

    A study is made of a strong, plane shock wave with uniform parameters propagating in a gas with infinite electric conductivity when a homogeneous magnetic field is present tangential to the leading edge of the shock wave when the wave encounters an elliptical cylinder which is stationary in the direction of propagation of the shock wave. The generatrix of the cylinder is parallel to the magnetic field, and the shock wave moves along one of the semiaxes of the ellipse in the perpendicular cross section of the cylinder. Expressions are derived for the flow parameters of the gas beyond the reflected shock wave, ignoring the viscosity and heat conductivity of the gas and assuming the Hall effect to be slight. As t ..-->.. infinity steady supersonic flow is established around the cylinder and the velocity D of the reflected shock wave with respect to the cylinder drops toward zero. A graph shows the results of calculation of the pressure on the surface of the cylinder. 7 references, 1 figure.

  2. Generalized Vector Laws of Reflection and Refraction of Forward and Backward Waves in the Presence of a Metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Vector formulations of laws of reflection and refraction of plane electromagnetic waves from the plane metasurface that separates two isotropic media and is characterized by phase gradients are obtained and analyzed. The media support the forward or backward normal waves that differ by identifiers. Critical angles of total internal reflection are presented, and conditions of occurrence of negative refraction and negative reflection are specified. Retroreflection and special cases of wave refraction are considered, and restrictions on the metasurface parameters are given.

  3. Multi-Octave Metamaterial Reflective Half-Wave Plate for Millimetre and Sub-Millimetre wave Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Ade, Peter A R; de Bernardis, Paolo; De Maagt, Peter; Ellison, Brian; Henry, Manju; Ng, Ming Wah; Schortt, Brian; Tucker, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The quasi-optical modulation of linear polarization at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths can be achieved by using rotating half wave plates (HWPs) in front of polarization sensitive detectors. Large operational bandwidths are required when the same device is meant to work simultaneously across different frequency bands. Previous realizations of half wave plates, ranging from birefringent multi-plate to mesh-based devices, have achieved bandwidths of the order of 100%. Here we present the design and the experimental characterization of a reflective HWP able to work across bandwidths of the order of 150%. The working principle of the novel device is completely different from any previous realization and it is based on the different phase-shift experienced by two orthogonal polarizations respectively reflecting off an electric conductor and off an artificial magnetic conductor.

  4. Multi-octave metamaterial reflective half-wave plate for millimeter and sub-millimeter wave applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Maffei, Bruno; Ade, Peter A R; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Maagt, Peter; Ellison, Brian; Henry, Manju; Ng, Ming Wah; Schortt, Brian; Tucker, Carole

    2016-12-20

    The quasi-optical modulation of linear polarization at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths can be achieved by using rotating half-wave plates (HWPs) in front of polarization-sensitive detectors. Large operational bandwidths are required when the same device is meant to work simultaneously across different frequency bands. Previous realizations of half-wave plates, ranging from birefringent multi-plates to mesh-based devices, have achieved bandwidths of the order of 100%. Here we present the design and experimental characterization of a reflective HWP able to work across bandwidths of the order of 150%. The working principle of the novel device is completely different from any previous realization, and it is based on the different phase-shift experienced by two orthogonal polarizations reflecting, respectively, off an electric conductor and an artificial magnetic conductor.

  5. Reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in an initially stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic magnetoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, S.; Pal, P. C.; Kumar, S.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in two semi-infinite anisotropic magnetoelastic media. The lower half-space is considered as initially stressed and inhomogeneous. The density of lower half-space is taken exponentially varying with depth. The solutions for half-spaces are obtained analytically. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficient are obtained in the closed form subject to continuity conditions at the interfaces of anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces and the Snell's law. It is found that these coefficients depend on the initial stress, inhomogeneity parameter, the magnetoelastic coupling parameter, and the angle at which wave crosses the magnetic field of the half-spaces. Numerical computations are performed for these coefficients for a specific model of two different anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces. The numerical results are illustrated by the graph of reflection and transmission coefficient versus the angle of incidence. In general, as the initial stress increases the reflection and transmission coefficient increases, the affect is more prominent for more than 10 GPa. Inhomogeneity in the density of the material also increases the reflection and transmission coefficient. The anisotropic magnetoelastic parameter and the angle at which the wave crosses the magnetic field for both the half-spaces have a quite significant effect on the reflection and transmission coefficient.

  6. Reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in an initially stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic magnetoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, S.; Pal, P. C.; Kumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in two semi-infinite anisotropic magnetoelastic media. The lower half-space is considered as initially stressed and inhomogeneous. The density of lower half-space is taken exponentially varying with depth. The solutions for half-spaces are obtained analytically. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficient are obtained in the closed form subject to continuity conditions at the interfaces of anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces and the Snell's law. It is found that these coefficients depend on the initial stress, inhomogeneity parameter, the magnetoelastic coupling parameter, and the angle at which wave crosses the magnetic field of the half-spaces. Numerical computations are performed for these coefficients for a specific model of two different anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces. The numerical results are illustrated by the graph of reflection and transmission coefficient versus the angle of incidence. In general, as the initial stress increases the reflection and transmission coefficient increases, the affect is more prominent for more than 10 GPa. Inhomogeneity in the density of the material also increases the reflection and transmission coefficient. The anisotropic magnetoelastic parameter and the angle at which the wave crosses the magnetic field for both the half-spaces have a quite significant effect on the reflection and transmission coefficient.

  7. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Madireddy Umamaheshwar Rao; Reddy, Budda Muralidhar; Yashmaina, Sridhar; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Rani, Pingali Usha

    2005-08-23

    Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88-0.90) with (p wave velocity were also significantly correlated (r = 0.71-0.98) (P wave velocity was found to correlate significantly with heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index values. Reproducibility of our method was good with very low variability in both interobserver and interperiod analysis. The new device "Peri

  8. ABSENCE OF SEPTAL Q WAVES: An Important Predictor of Significant Coronary Artery Disease and Mainly Proximal Stenosis of the Left Anterior Descending Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Anthony; Kallab, Kamal; Kharma, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Data concerning the correlation between the absence of septal q waves and significant stenosis of proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery shows conflicting results. This retrospective study was conducted to show that absence of septal q waves in leads V5-V6 could be of value in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) and mainly significant proximal LAD coronary artery stenosis. Our study included 500 consecutive patients who had coronary angiography, retrospectively chosen, excluding patients with acute coronary syndromes, and patients with abnormal ECGs (abnormal QRS duration, pathological q waves and hemiblocks). ECG and angiography films were reviewed. For the 2x2 tables analysis, a chi-square test was used. Of the 500 patients, 386 had significant CAD defined as 70% luminal stenosis, and 260 had no septal q wave. Of the 386 patients with significant CAD, 233 (60%) did not have septal q waves. Of 260 who did not have septal q wave, 192 (73%) had significant stenosis of proximal LAD. Statistical analysis shows that significant CAD correlates with the absence of septal q waves, with a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 76%, and that stenosis of proximal LAD could be predicted by absence of septal q waves in leads V5-V6 with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 74%. The absence of septal q waves in leads V5-V6 on the ECG correlates with the presence of significant CAD and is of highly predictive value in those with significant stenosis of proximal LAD (p < 0.0001).

  9. Reflection of regular and irregular waves from a partially perforated caisson breakwater with a rock-filled core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; LI Yucheng; TENG Bin; MA Baolian

    2007-01-01

    The reflection of regular and irregular waves from a partially perforated caisson breakwater with a rock-filled core is examined. The present mathematical model is developed by means of the matched eigenfunction method. Numerical results of the present model are compared with the experimental data of different researchers. Numerical examples are given to examine the effect of rock fill on the reflection coefficient. The differences between regular and irregular waves are also investigated by means of theoretical and experimental results. It is found that the minimum reflection coefficient of irregular waves is larger than that of corresponding regular waves, but the contrary is the case for the maximum reflection coefficient.

  10. Forward Modeling of the Relationship Between Reflection Coefficient and Incident Angle of the P Wave in a Coal Seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the Zoeppritz equation is suitable for a single interface in a thick deposit, it has some limitations for composite reflection waves from both the floor and the roof of coal seams. Based on the ray model, the relationship of the overall reflection coefficient of composite reflection P waves, from coal seam versus incidence angle (AVO), is discussed. The result shows that: 1) the overall reflection coefficient of composite reflection waves from coal seams is a negative value and is determined mainly by the lithology of roof and floor, which is different from the reflection coefficient of a single interface; 2) if the incidence angle ranges from 0° to 6°, the reflection coefficient of composite waves of a coal seam does not change with the incidence angle and 3) if the incidence angle ranges from 6-60° , the reflection coefficient increases monotonically.

  11. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  12. Favorable effect of aerobic exercise on arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity during stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatz, Florian; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Reinhard G

    2015-07-01

    Increased central pulse wave velocity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The favorable influence of exercise on arterial stiffness (AS) and blood pressure (BP) has been reported exclusively at rest. The present study investigated the influence of a single bout of acute cycling on AS and BP during recovery and, moreover, during cold pressor stress testing. 32 healthy men (33.7 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2.5 kg/m²) performed a 60 minute endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer (45 % VO2max). Before and after exercise aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as central and peripheral BP were measured non-invasively at rest and at the end of a 2 minute cold pressor test (CPT). Even after 60 minutes of recovery aPWV (- 0.22 ± 0.3 m / sec) was significantly reduced (p testing.

  13. Wave constraints for Titan's Jingpo Lacus and Kraken Mare from VIMS specular reflection lightcurves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, Christophe; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Stephan et al. (Stephan, K. et al. [2010]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, 7104-+.) first saw the glint of sunlight specularly reflected off of Titan's lakes. We develop a quantitative model for analyzing the photometric lightcurve generated during a flyby in which the specularly reflected light flux depends on the fraction of the solar specular footprint that is covered by liquid. We allow for surface waves that spread out the geographic specular intensity distribution. Applying the model to the VIMS T58 observations shows that the waves on Jingpo Lacus must have slopes of no greater than 0.15??, two orders of magnitude flatter than waves on Earth's oceans. Combining the model with theoretical estimates of the intensity of the specular reflection allows a tighter constraint on the waves: model cannot reproduce. Points just 1. min apart vary in flux by more than a factor of two. The present dataset does not uniquely determine the mechanism causing these rapid changes. We suggest that changing wind conditions, kilometer-wavelength waves, or moving clouds could account for the variability. Future specular observations should be designed with a fast cadence, at least 6 points per minute, in order to differentiate between these hypotheses. Such new data will further constrain the nature of Titan's lakes and their interactions with Titan's atmosphere. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Reflection of Electromagnetic Waves by a Nonuniform Plasma Layer Covering a Metal Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-Mei; FA Peng-Ting

    2008-01-01

    Reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves in a nonuniform plasma layer with electrons, positive ions and negative ions, covering a metal surface are investigated by using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It is shown that the reflection coefficients are influenced greatly by the density gradient on the layer edge, layer thickness and electron proportion, i.e., the effect of the negative ions. It is also found that low reflection or high attenuation can be reached by properly choosing high electron proportion, thick plasma layer, and smooth density gradient in the low frequency regime, but sharp density gradient in the high frequency regime.

  15. Global Solutions of Shock Reflection by Wedges for the Nonlinear Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuemei DENG; Wei XIANG

    2011-01-01

    When a plane shock hits a wedge head on,it experiences a reflection-diffraction process and then a self-similar reflected shock moves outward as the original shock moves forward in time.In this paper,shock reflection by large-angle wedges for compressible flow modeled by the nonlinear wave equation is studied and a global theory of existence,stability and regularity is established.Moreover,C0,1 is the optimal regularity for the solutions across the degenerate sonic boundary.

  16. Dissipation of Alfven wave pulses propagating along dipole magnetic tubes with reflections at the ionosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkaev, NV; Shaidurov, VA; Semenov, VS; Biernat, HK; Heidorn, D; Lakhina, GS

    2006-01-01

    A ratio of the maximal and minimal cross sections of the magnetic tube (contraction ratio) is a crucial parameter which affects very strongly on reflections of MHD wave pulses propagating along a narrowing magnetic flux tube. In cases of large contraction ratios of magnetospheric magnetic tubes, the

  17. Does wave reflection explain the increase in blood pressure during leg crossing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthoven, M.H. van; Holewijn, S.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Thien, Th.; Deinum, J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of crossing legs at the knee level on wave reflection, as measured by the augmentation index. METHODS: Forty-two participants crossed their legs at the knee level (popliteal fossa over the suprapatellar bursa) in the sitting position for 12 min. One trained investigat

  18. An Improved Time Domain Procedure For Separating Incident And Reflected Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans Falk; Matsumoto, A.; Tayasu, M.;

    2002-01-01

    Impulse responses of digital filters for use in separating incident and reflected water waves in a time domain are improved by using a nonlinear least square formulation. The applicability and limitations of the method are discussed. Trial computations using a set of analytical examples with know...

  19. Angle-domain Migration Velocity Analysis using Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2012-11-04

    The main difficulty with an iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in a local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly non-linear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. The residual movemout analysis in the angle-domain common image gathers provides a robust estimate of the depth residual which is converted to the reflection traveltime residual for the velocity inversion. We present numerical examples to demonstrate its efficiency in inverting seismic data for complex velocity model.

  20. Impact of age on aortic wave reflection responses to metaboreflex activation and its relationship with leg lean mass in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Jaime, Salvador J; Johnson, Sarah A; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Campbell, Jeremiah C; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-10-01

    Wave reflection (augmentation pressure [AP] and index [AIx]) is greater in older women than men. Resting AP is a better wave reflection index than AIx in older adults. The negative relationship between wave reflection and lean mass (LM) has been inconsistent. We investigated the impact of age and LM on aortic hemodynamic responses to metaboreflex activation in post-menopausal women. Post-menopausal women, younger and older (n=20 per group) than 60 years, performed 2-min isometric handgrip at 30% of maximal force followed by 3-min post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI). We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and femoral-ankle PWV (faPWV) at rest, and aortic systolic blood pressure (aSBP), pulse pressure (aPP), AP, AIx, and AIx-adjusted for heart rate (AIx@75) at rest and during PEMI using tonometry. Arm and leg LM were measured by DEXA. Resting cfPWV, aSBP, and aPP were higher, while AIx@75 and leg LM were lower in older than younger women. aSBP and aPP increased similarly during PEMI in both groups. Increases in AP (Ppost-menopausal women. Our findings suggest that the increased AP response to PEMI is related to leg arterial stiffness and muscle loss in older women.

  1. A hybrid scheme for absorbing edge reflections in numerical modeling of wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2010-03-01

    We propose an efficient scheme to absorb reflections from the model boundaries in numerical solutions of wave equations. This scheme divides the computational domain into boundary, transition, and inner areas. The wavefields within the inner and boundary areas are computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation, respectively. The wavefields within the transition area are determined by a weighted combination of the wavefields computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation to obtain a smooth variation from the inner area to the boundary via the transition zone. The results from our finite-difference numerical modeling tests of the 2D acoustic wave equation show that the absorption enforced by this scheme gradually increases with increasing width of the transition area. We obtain equally good performance using pseudospectral and finite-element modeling with the same scheme. Our numerical experiments demonstrate that use of 10 grid points for absorbing edge reflections attains nearly perfect absorption. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. New imaging method for seismic reflection wave and its theoretical basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Guangyuan

    2001-01-01

    [1]Huang Guangyuan, Principle of "3-Basic Colors" for imaging from reflected seismic wave, Acta Geophysica Sinica (in Chinese), 2000, 43(1): 138.[2]Huang Guangyuan, Revisions of convolution model of reflected seismic wave, Chinese Physics Letters, 1998, 15(11): 851.[3]Charles, K. C., An Introduction to Wavelets, San Diego: Academic Press, Inc., 1992.[4]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Weiqian, Revision wave expression and wave equation, Abstracts of Chinese Sci. & Tech. (Letters) (in Chinese), 1999, 5(3): 335.[5]Silvia, M. T., Deconvolution of geophysical time series in the exploration for oil and natural gas, Amsterdam-Oxford-New York: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, 1973.[6]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Xiaojun, Inverse Problems in Mathematical Physics (in Chinese), Jinan: Shandong Sci. & Tech. Press, 1993.[7]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Xiaojun, Discussion of several mathematical inverse models in seismic prospecting, CT Theory and Application (in Chinese), 1992, 1(2): 8.[8]Huang Guangyuan, The second discussion on acoustic velocity inversion from wave equation, CT Theory and Application (in Chinese), 1993, 2(3): 14[9]Huang Guangyuan, Dynamic revision of classical laws in physics from the viewpoint of system science, Systems Science and Systems Engineering, 1993, 2(1): 15[10]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Wave in Layered Media, San Diego: Academic Press, 1980.

  3. Resonance reflection of elastic waves at the interface between two crystals with sliding contact: I. Plane waves in structures with arbitrary anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshits, V.I.; Darinskii, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Radovich, A. [Kielce Technological Univ., Kielce (Poland)

    1995-05-01

    The theory of resonance reflection is formulated for elastic waves at the interface between two anisotropic media under conditions of sliding contact. The phenomenon under study arises in the close vicinity of a certain incidence angle for which the tangential wave vector component of the bulk wave is equal to the real part of the wave vector for the leaky mode. The relations presenting the behavior of wave-response parameters near the leaky mode resonance are derived for arbitrary crystal anisotropy. In particular, the behavior of reflection, transmission, and transformation of the bulk mode to the nonuniform one is discussed. 18 refs.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency

  5. Reflection of drill-string extensional waves at the bit-rock contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Flavio; Malusa, Massimo

    2002-06-01

    Downward propagating extensional waves are partially reflected at the bit-rock contact. The evaluation of the reflection coefficient is important to obtain while drilling information about the acoustic properties of the formations. The scope of this work is to estimate the bit-rock reflection coefficient, assuming a flat drill bit in perfect contact with the formation. Using the low-frequency approximation, which holds when the wavelength is much larger than the lateral dimensions of the borehole, the drill-string is assumed to be a laterally free rod, and the formation an homogeneous and isotropic medium. This work shows that the reflection coefficient of the extensional waves depends, along with the elastic properties of the formation, on the ratio of the cross sections of the drill-string and borehole. The impedance of the drilled rock can be calculated from the measured reflection coefficient, which is related to the amplitude of waves produced in the string and in the formation by a working drill-bit.

  6. Observation of Strong Reflection of Electron Waves Exiting a Ballistic Channel at Low Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Canute I.; Liu, Changze; Campbell, Jason P.; Ryan, Jason T.; Southwick, Richard G.; Gundlach, David; Oates, Anthony S.; Huang, Ru; Cheung, Kin. P.

    2016-01-01

    Wave scattering by a potential step is a ubiquitous concept. Thus, it is surprising that theoretical treatments of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices, from quantum point contacts to ballistic transistors, assume no reflection even when the potential step is encountered upon exiting the device. Experiments so far seem to support this even if it is not clear why. Here we report clear evidence of coherent reflection when electron wave exits the channel of a nanoscale transistor and when the electron energy is low. The observed behavior is well described by a simple rectangular potential barrier model which the Schrodinger's equation can be solved exactly. We can explain why reflection is not observed in most situations but cannot be ignored in some important situations. Our experiment also represents a direct measurement of electron injection velocity - a critical quantity in nanoscale transistors that is widely considered not measurable. PMID:27882264

  7. Simulation of the reflected blast wave from a C-4 charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. Michael; Kuhl, Allen L.; Tringe, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 μm per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 7 ranges (GR = 0, 5.08, 10.16, 15.24, 20.32, 25.4, and 30.48 cm) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 5 cm), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  8. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  9. Reflection for three-dimensional plane waves in triclinic crystalline medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of three-dimensional plane waves at a traction free boundary of a half-space composed of triclinic crystalline material is discussed. A method has been developed to find the analytical expressions of all the three phase velocities of quasi-P (qP), quasi-SV (qSV) and quasi-SH (qSH) in three dimensions. Closed form expressions in three dimensions for the amplitude ratios of reflection coefficients of qP, qSV and qSH waves in a triclinic medium are obtained. These expressions are used for numerically studying the variation of the reflection coefficients with the angle of incidence. The graphs are drawn for different polar angle and azimuth. Numerical results presented indicate that the anisotropy affect the reflection coefficients significantly in the three dimensional case compared to the two-dimensional case.

  10. Transcranial Doppler-determined change in posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocity does not reflect vertebral artery blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Takuro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2017-02-10

    We examined whether a change in posterior cerebral artery flow velocity (PCAv) reflected the posterior cerebral blood flow, in healthy subjects, during both static and dynamic exercise. PCAv and vertebral artery (VA) blood flow, as an index of posterior blood flow, were continuously measured during an exercise trial, using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Static handgrip exercise significantly increased both PCAv and VA blood flow. Increasing intensity of dynamic exercise further increased VA blood flow from moderate exercise, while PCAv decreased to almost resting level. During both static and dynamic exercise, the PCA cerebrovascular conductance (CVC) index significantly decreased from rest (static and high intensity dynamic exercise; -11.5 ± 12.2% and -18.0 ± 16.8%; mean ± SD, respectively), despite no change in the CVC of VA. These results indicate that vasoconstriction occurred at PCA but not VA during exercise-induced hypertension. This discrepancy in vascular response to exercise between PCA and VA may be due to different cerebral arterial characteristics. Therefore, to determine the effect of exercise on posterior cerebral circulation, at least, we need to consider carefully which cerebral artery to measure, regardless of exercise mode.

  11. Effect of Heart Rate on Arterial Stiffness as Assessed by Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Isabella; Butlin, Mark; Spronck, Bart; Xiao, Huanguang; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-24

    Vascular assessment is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, clinical assessment of arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is gaining increased interest due to the recognition of PWV as an influential factor on the prognosis of hypertension as well as being an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Whilst age and blood pressure are established as the two major determinants of PWV, the influence of heart rate on PWV measurements remains controversial with conflicting results being observed in both acute and epidemiological studies. In a majority of studies investigating the acute effects of heart rate on PWV, results were confounded by concomitant changes in blood pressure. Observations from epidemiological studies have also failed to converge, with approximately just half of such studies reporting a significant blood-pressure-independent association between heart rate and PWV. Further to the lack of consensus on the effects of heart rate on PWV, the possible mechanisms contributing to observed PWV changes with heart rate have yet to be fully elucidated, although many investigators have attributed heart-rate related changes in arterial stiffness to the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall. With elevated heart rate being an independent prognostic factor of cardiovascular disease and its association with hypertension, the interaction between heart rate and PWV continues to be relevant in assessing cardiovascular risk. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 {\\AA}) arcade loops observed by the SDO/AIA. The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare, near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060-760 km/s within ~3-4 minute. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km/s, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  13. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  14. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  15. MODELING OF REFLECTIVE PROPAGATING SLOW-MODE WAVE IN A FLARING LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s{sup −1} in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  16. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 6078471 (Japan)

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  17. Negative reflection of Lamb waves at a free edge: Tunable focusing and mimicking phase conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérardin, Benoît; Laurent, Jérôme; Prada, Claire; Aubry, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    The paper studies the interaction of Lamb waves with the free edge of a plate. The reflection coefficients of a Lamb mode at a plate free edge are calculated using a semi-analytical method, as a function of frequency and angle of incidence. The conversion between forward and backward Lamb modes is thoroughly investigated. It is shown that, at the zero-group velocity (ZGV) frequency, the forward $S_1$ Lamb mode fully converts into the backward $S_{2b}$ Lamb mode at normal incidence. Besides, this conversion is very efficient over most of the angular spectrum and remains dominant at frequencies just above the ZGV-point. This effect is observed experimentally on a Duralumin plate. Firstly, the $S_1$ Lamb mode is selectively generated using a transducer array, secondly the $S_{2b}$ mode is excited using a single circular transducer. The normal displacement field is probed with an interferometer. The free edge is shown to retro-focus the incident wave at different depths depending on the wave number mismatch between the forward and backward propagating modes. In the vicinity of the ZGV-point, wave numbers coincide and the wave is retro-reflected on the source. In this frequency range, the free edge acts as a perfect phase conjugating mirror.

  18. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qi, E-mail: q.zhou@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Diamessis, Peter J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  19. A reflected wave superposition method for vibration and energy of a travelling string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E. W.; Luo, Q.; Ferguson, N. S.; Lu, Y. M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper considers the analytical free time domain response and energy in an axially translating and laterally vibrating string. The domain of the string is either a constant or variable length, dependent upon the general initial conditions. The translating tensioned strings possess either fixed-fixed or fixed-free boundaries. An alternative analytical solution using a reflected wave superposition method is presented for a finite translating string. Firstly, the cycles of vibration for both constant and variable length strings are provided, which for the latter are dependent upon the variable string length. Each cycle is divided into three time intervals according to the magnitude and the direction of the translating string velocity. Applying d'Alembert's method combined with the reflection properties, expressions for the reflected waves at the two boundaries are obtained. Subsequently, superposition of all of the incident and reflected waves provides results for the free vibration of the string over the three time intervals. The variation in the total mechanical energy of the string system is also shown. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method are confirmed numerically by comparison to simulations produced using a Newmark-Beta method solution and an existing state space function representation of the string dynamics.

  20. Investigation of the telescope back-reflection for space-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aaron Dean

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) represents a class of space-based gravitational wave observatories that will attempt to measure gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.01 mHz to 1 Hz. These missions are all characterized by a constellation of three spacecraft housing proof masses in heliocentric orbits. Using laser interferometry, changes in the distances between these proof masses that are induced by gravitational waves can be measured with pm precision. A reflecting telescope is used to transfer the lasers between adjacent spacecraft. Using an on-axis telescope design with the secondary and primary mirror axially aligned would be ideal to save volume and mass onboard the spacecraft, however there exists concerns about light reflected directly back from the secondary mirror to the optical bench. This light must be attenuated or it can corrupt the measurement signal. This thesis details a number of different attenuation schemes for the back-reflected light using anti-reflective regions at the center of the secondary mirror. Several secondary prototypes were manufactured and an experimental testbed was built to measure the back-re ected distributions from these prototypes.

  1. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank.

  2. A Love Wave Reflective Delay Line with Polymer Guiding Layer for Wireless Sensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shitang He

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal design for a Love wave reflective delay line on 41o YX LiNbO3 with a polymer guiding layer for wireless sensor applications. A theoretical model was established to describe the Love wave propagation along the larger piezoelectric substrate with polymer waveguide, and the lossy mechanism from the viscoelastic waveguide was discussed, which results in the optimal guiding layer thickness. Coupling of modes (COM was used to determine the optimal design parameters of the reflective delay line structured by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and shorted grating reflectors. Using the network analyzer, the fabricated Love wave reflective delay line was characterized, high signal noise ratio (S/N, sharp reflection peaks, and few spurious noise between the peaks were found, and the measured result agrees well with the simulated one. Also, the optimal guiding layer thickness of 1.5~1.8μm was extracted experimentally, and it is consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  3. Analysis of Wave Reflection from Wave Energy Converters Installed as Breakwaters in Harbour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, B.; Margheritini, Lucia; Gambles, L.

    2009-01-01

    Amplification and renovation of harbours, none the last for the need of straitening existing structures because of the increased storminess due to climate change, is a practice that is repeating itself all around the world. To this purpose, integration of breakwaters and Wave Energy Converters...... (WECs) based on two different technologies, one based on the overtopping principle and the other of Oscillating Water Column (OWC) type, revealed to be suitable with different advantages compared to offshore installations, among the others: sharing of costs, cheaper accessibility and maintenance, lower...

  4. Numerical Simulation of Bragg Reflection Based on Linear Waves Propagation over A Series of Rectangular Seabed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih-Chung WEN; Li-Hung TSAI

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model, Evolution Equation of Mild-Slope Equation (EEMSE) developed by Hsu et al. (2003), was applied to study the Bragg reflection of water waves over a series of rectangular seabed. Three key parameters of the Bragg reflection including the peak coefficient of primary Bragg reflection, its corresponding relative wavelength, and the bandwidth, have shown to be effective in describing the characteristics of the primary Bragg reflection. The characteristics of the Bragg reflection were investigated under the various conditions comprising number, height, and spacing interval of a series of rectangular seabed. The results reveal that the peak of Bragg reflection increases with the increase of rectangular seabed height and number, the bandwidth and the shift value of the Bragg reflection depend on the increase of the rectangular seabed height as well as the decrease of rectangular seabed number, and the relative rectangular seabed spacing in the rang of 3 and 4 could produce higher Bragg reflection. Finally, a correlative and regressive analysis is performed by use of the calculated data. Based on the results of the analysis, empirical equations were established. Our study results can provide an appropriate choice of a series of rectangular seabed field for a practical design.

  5. Reflection of Plane Waves in Generalized Thermoelastic Half Space under the Action of Uniform Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narottam Maity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection of longitudinal displacement waves in a generalized thermoelastic half space under the action of uniform magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field is applied in such a direction that the problem can be considered as a two-dimensional one. The discussion is based on the three theories of generalized thermoelasticity: Lord-Shulman (L-S, Green-Lindsay (G-L, and Green-Naghdi (G-N with energy dissipation. We compute the possible wave velocities for different models. Amplitude ratios have been presented. The effects of magnetic field on various subjects of interest are discussed and shown graphically.

  6. Damage localization in metallic plate structures using edge-reflected lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, A.; Dubuc, B.; Salamone, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a model-based guided ultrasonic waves imaging algorithm, in which multiple ultrasonic echoes caused by reflections from the plate’s boundaries are leveraged to enhance imaging performance. An analytical model is proposed to estimate the envelope of scattered waves. Correlation between the estimated and experimental data is used to generate images. The proposed method is validated through experimental tests on an aluminum plate instrumented with three low profile piezoelectric transducers. Different damage conditions are simulated including through-thickness holes. Results are compared with two other imaging localization methods, that is, delay and sum and minimum variance.

  7. Ignition of partially shattered liquid fuel drops in a reflected shock wave environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzba, A. S.; Kauffman, C. W.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the ignition of individual fuel drops after their interaction with an incident and a reflected shock wave near the end wall of a shock tube has been carried out. The influence of the aerodynamic shattering of the fuel drop by the convective flow on the ignition characteristics has been examined by varying the drop-end wall separation distance. Data are presented which show the ignition delay times to be a function of the various experimental conditions encountered in this study. A comparison is made with previous investigations concerning the ignition of a liquid fuel drop due only to the interaction with an incident shock wave.

  8. Tunable terahertz wave Goos-Hänchen shift of reflected terahertz wave from prism-metal-polymer-metal multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiu-Sheng; Wu, Jing-fang; Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to manipulate the Goos-Hänchen shift of a terahertz wave reflected from the prism-metal-polymer-metal interface via external voltage bias. By adjusting the external voltage bias, the refractive index of the nonlinear polymer can be changed, so the lateral Goos-Hänchen shift is dynamically tuned. The relation among the Goos-Hänchen shift, prism and the nonlinear polymer is investigated in theory analysis and simulation. Using this scheme, the Goos-Hänchen shift can be tuned without changing the original structure of the proposed device. Numerical calculation results further indicate that the proposed structure has the potential application for the integrated terahertz wave switch.

  9. Quantum reflection of bright solitary matter-waves from a narrow attractive potential

    CERN Document Server

    Marchant, A L; Yu, M M H; Rakonjac, A; Helm, J L; Polo, J; Weiss, C; Gardiner, S A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of quantum reflection from a narrow, attractive, potential using bright solitary matter-waves formed from a 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. We create narrow potentials using a tightly focused, red-detuned laser beam, and observe reflection of up to 25% of the atoms, along with the trapping of atoms at the position of the beam. We show that the observed reflected fraction is much larger than theoretical predictions for a narrow Gaussian potential well; a more detailed model of bright soliton propagation, accounting for the generic presence of small subsidiary intensity maxima in the red-detuned beam, suggests that these small intensity maxima are the cause of this enhanced reflection.

  10. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  11. Infragravity Wave Generation and Reflection Off the Coast at Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, J. F.; Harmon, N.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Extremely low frequency seismic noise, known as earth's "seismic hum", is generated by the very long wavelength, low frequency infragravity waves of the ocean which transfer their energy to the solid earth. Infragravity waves are generated along coastlines by the non-linear interaction of incoming ocean swells and can travel long distances across ocean basins with relatively little attenuation. They have been implicated in the break-up of ice shelves (Bromirski et al, Geophys. Res. Lett. 2010) and are important for coupling processes between the ocean, atmosphere, and earth (Rhie and Romanowicz, Nature 2004), but their spatial and temporal variably remains poorly studied. We investigate the characteristics of the infragravity wave band in the north-east Pacific using co-located ocean bottom seismometers and differential pressure gauges deployed in deep water as part of the Cascadia Initiative array. Using cross correlation techniques and backprojection of the noise correlation function (Harmon et al, Geophys. Res. Lett. 2012) we have found that infragravity wave energy propagates offshore for the majority of the year, indicating that the Oregon coastline is a net producer of infragravity waves. On rare occasions, infragravity wave energy is observed to propagate onshore. In January 2013, a particularly strong event occurred where energy propagated onshore with normal incidence to the coastline. We use this event to investigate the feasibility of estimating coastline reflection coefficients from cross correlation of differential pressure gauge records.

  12. Eisenmenger syndrome and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension: do parenchymal lung changes reflect aetiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, N. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: nyreegriffin@hotmail.com; Allen, D. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Wort, J. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Rubens, M. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Aim: To document the pulmonary vascular changes on thin-section computed tomography (CT) in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and to determine whether there is any correlation with pulmonary arterial pressures or the aetiology of pulmonary hypertension. Material and methods: From the National Pulmonary Hypertension Database, we identified eight patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and 20 patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (secondary to a ventriculoseptal defect) who had also undergone contrast-enhanced thin-section CT. CT studies were reviewed for the presence of centrilobular nodules, mosaicism, neovascularity, and bronchial artery hypertrophy. Haemodynamic data were also reviewed. Results: Centrilobular nodules, mosaicism, and neovascularity were seen in both patient groups (p > 0.05). A significantly higher number of enlarged bronchial arteries were seen in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. There was no correlation with pulmonary arterial pressures. Conclusion: Patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome demonstrated similar pulmonary vascular changes on CT. These changes did not predict the underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension or its severity.

  13. Optical device for thermal diffusivity determination in liquids by reflection of a thermal wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, C.; De León-Hernández, A.; García-Cadena, C.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we present a device for determination of the thermal diffusivity using the oblique reflection of a thermal wave within a solid slab that is in contact with the medium to be characterized. By using the reflection near a critical angle under the assumption that thermal waves obey Snell's law of refraction with the square root of the thermal diffusivities, the unknown thermal diffusivity is obtained by simple formulae. Experimentally, the sensor response is measured using the photothermal beam deflection technique within a slab that results in a compact device with no contact of the laser probing beam with the sample. We describe the theoretical basis and provide experimental results to validate the proposed method. We determine the thermal diffusivity of tridistilled water and glycerin solutions with an error of less than 0.5%.

  14. Optical device for thermal diffusivity determination in liquids by reflection of a thermal wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, C; De León-Hernández, A; García-Cadena, C

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we present a device for determination of the thermal diffusivity using the oblique reflection of a thermal wave within a solid slab that is in contact with the medium to be characterized. By using the reflection near a critical angle under the assumption that thermal waves obey Snell's law of refraction with the square root of the thermal diffusivities, the unknown thermal diffusivity is obtained by simple formulae. Experimentally, the sensor response is measured using the photothermal beam deflection technique within a slab that results in a compact device with no contact of the laser probing beam with the sample. We describe the theoretical basis and provide experimental results to validate the proposed method. We determine the thermal diffusivity of tridistilled water and glycerin solutions with an error of less than 0.5%.

  15. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  16. Manipulating of Different-Polarized Reflected Waves with Graphene-based Plasmonic Metasurfaces in Terahertz Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Wu, Yongle; Zhang, Chen; Hong, Weijun; Peng, Biao; Zhu, Jianfeng; Li, Shufang

    2017-09-05

    A graphene-based plasmonic metasurface which can independently control different polarized electromagnetic waves with reasonably small losses in terahertz regime is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. This metasurface is composed of graphene based elements. Owing to anisotropic plasmonic resonance of the graphene-based elements, the reflected phases and magnitudes of orthogonally polarized waves can be independently controlled by varying dimensions of the element. Four types of graphene-based plasmonic metasurfaces with different reflected phases distributions are synthesized and simulated, exhibiting diverse functions such as polarized beam splitting, beam deflection, and linear-to-circular polarization conversion. The simulation results demonstrate excellent performances as theoretical expectation. The proposed graphene-based plasmonic metasurface can be applied to realize extremely light-weight, ultra-compact, and high-performances electromagnetic structures for diverse terahertz applications.

  17. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali

    2016-09-06

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations, referred to as reflection-waveform inversion (RWI), can mitigate nonlinearity-related inversion issues. Here, we extend RWI to acoustic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. To minimize trade-offs between the model parameters, we employ a new hierarchical two-stage approach that operates with the P-wave normal-moveout velocity and anisotropy coefficents ζ and η. First, is estimated using a fixed perturbation in ζ, and then we invert for η by fixing the updated perturbation in . The proposed 2D algorithm is tested on a horizontally layered VTI model.

  18. Effects of pressure-dependent segmental arterial compliance and postural changes on pulse wave transmission in an arterial model of the human upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P

    2011-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effect of postural changes on arterial blood pressure and vascular properties, it is important to understand effects of pressure-dependent arterial compliance. This study investigates effects of pressure-dependent compliance on pulse wave velocity (PWVar), pressure wave shape, and transmission characteristics in an arterial model of the human arm from heart to radial artery from supine to standing. Estimated central pressure waveform was used as the input for the model, calculated using a validated transfer function (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical) from recorded radial pulses in 10 healthy male subjects (53.8 ± 7.9 years) during 0, 30, 60 and 90 degree head-up tilt. A 5-segment linear model was optimized using estimated central and recorded radial arterial pulse; each segment represented by an equivalent inductance, resistance and capacitance (compliance (C)) Pressure-dependent compliance (C(P)=a · e(b · P) was added to develop a nonlinear model, and the radial pulse calculated. Comparison of the radial pulse calculated by the linear and nonlinear models showed no statistical difference in systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure in any position of tilt. However, waveform shape was increasingly divergent at higher angles of tilt (RMS error 2.3 ± 1.2 mmHg supine, 6.5 ± 3.0 mmHg standing) as was PWVar (0% increase from supine to standing in the linear model, 16.7% increase in nonlinear model). Fourier analysis demonstrated peak amplitude of transmission being at higher frequencies and phase delay being lower in the nonlinear model relative to the linear model. Pressure-dependent arterial compliance, whilst having no effect on peak values of pressure, has significant effects on waveform shape and transmission speed, especially with a more upright position.

  19. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle; Sauvan, Pierre-Emmanuel; Trelat, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    International audience; To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the...

  20. Imaging of lateral heterogeneity by using reflected surface waves. Hansha hyomenha wo mochiita suihei hoko no chika kozo fukinshitsusei no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Y. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Kobayashi, Y. (Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1991-06-01

    Surface wave holography was applied to the reflected surface waves obtained on the Uji ground, Kyoto University. Clear reflected surface waves were confirmed in the records of waves and it was found possible to detect the surface waves generated by an artificial hypocenter. The reflected waves consisted of two groups having different frequency zones, which were the reflected waves from two different reflectors. It is clear from this result that in the case of the reflected wave groups due to the multiple scatterers, the surface wave holography enables to determine the corresponding locations of respective scatterers. The combination of the back projection method using the reflected wave envelopes and the other method such as incident angles to the array is most effective as the analyzing method. The surface wave holography can be used sufficiently to detect the lateral heterogeneity. 17 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. On the reflection of Alfv\\'en waves and its implication for Earth's core modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Cardin, Philippe; Marie, Drouard

    2011-01-01

    Alfv\\'en waves propagate in electrically conducting fluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Their reflection properties depend on the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the magnetic diffusivity of the fluid, also known as the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. In the special case Pm=1, there is no reflection on an insulating, no-slip boundary, and the wave energy is entirely dissipated in the boundary layer. We investigate the consequences of this remarkable behaviour for the numerical modeling of torsional Alfv\\'en waves (also known as torsional oscillations), which represent a special class of Alfv\\'en waves, in rapidly rotating spherical shells. They consist of geostrophic motions and are thought to exist in the fluid cores of planets with internal magnetic field. In the geophysical limit Pm 0.3, which is the range of values for which geodynamo numerical models operate. As a result, geodynamo models with no-slip boundary conditions cannot exhibit torsional oscillation normal modes.

  2. Structural Health Monitoring Using Lamb Wave Reflections and Total Focusing Method for Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Aurelia; Robertson-Welsh, Bradley; Gaydecki, Patrick; Gresil, Matthieu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-04-01

    This investigation aimed to adapt the total focusing method (TFM) algorithm (originated from the synthetic aperture focusing technique in digital signal processing) to accommodate a circular array of piezoelectric sensors (PZT) and characterise defects using guided wave signals for the development of a structural health monitoring system. This research presents the initial results of a broader study focusing on the development of a structural health monitoring (SHM) guided wave system for advance carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. The current material investigated was an isotropic (aluminium) square plate with 16 transducers operating successively as emitter or sensor in pitch and catch configuration enabling the collection of 240 signals per assessment. The Lamb wave signals collected were tuned on the symmetric fundamental mode with a wavelength of 17 mm, by setting the excitation frequency to 300 kHz. The initial condition for the imaging system, such as wave speed and transducer position, were determined with post processing of the baseline signals through a method involving the identification of the waves reflected from the free edge of the plate. The imaging algorithm was adapted to accommodate multiple transmitting transducers in random positions. A circular defect of 10 mm in diameter was drilled in the plate, which is similar to the delamination size introduced by a low velocity impact event in a composite plate. Images were obtained by applying the TFM to the baseline signals, Test 1 data (corresponding to the signals obtained after introduction of the defect) and to the data derived from the subtraction of the baseline to the Test 1 signals. The result shows that despite the damage diameter being 40 % smaller than the wavelength, the image (of the subtracted baseline data) demonstrated that the system can locate where the waves were reflected from the defect boundary. In other words, the contour of the damaged area was

  3. Structural Health Monitoring Using Lamb Wave Reflections and Total Focusing Method for Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Aurelia; Robertson-Welsh, Bradley; Gaydecki, Patrick; Gresil, Matthieu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-11-01

    This investigation aimed to adapt the total focusing method (TFM) algorithm (originated from the synthetic aperture focusing technique in digital signal processing) to accommodate a circular array of piezoelectric sensors (PZT) and characterise defects using guided wave signals for the development of a structural health monitoring system. This research presents the initial results of a broader study focusing on the development of a structural health monitoring (SHM) guided wave system for advance carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. The current material investigated was an isotropic (aluminium) square plate with 16 transducers operating successively as emitter or sensor in pitch and catch configuration enabling the collection of 240 signals per assessment. The Lamb wave signals collected were tuned on the symmetric fundamental mode with a wavelength of 17 mm, by setting the excitation frequency to 300 kHz. The initial condition for the imaging system, such as wave speed and transducer position, were determined with post processing of the baseline signals through a method involving the identification of the waves reflected from the free edge of the plate. The imaging algorithm was adapted to accommodate multiple transmitting transducers in random positions. A circular defect of 10 mm in diameter was drilled in the plate, which is similar to the delamination size introduced by a low velocity impact event in a composite plate. Images were obtained by applying the TFM to the baseline signals, Test 1 data (corresponding to the signals obtained after introduction of the defect) and to the data derived from the subtraction of the baseline to the Test 1 signals. The result shows that despite the damage diameter being 40 % smaller than the wavelength, the image (of the subtracted baseline data) demonstrated that the system can locate where the waves were reflected from the defect boundary. In other words, the contour of the damaged area was

  4. Noninvasive pulse wave analysis for the determination of central artery stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrock, Marc; Scholze, Alexandra; Compton, Friederike;

    2009-01-01

    Central artery stiffness predicts cardiovascular structural damage and clinical outcome. It is controversial whether central artery stiffness can be determined by noninvasive measurements. We compared noninvasive determination of central artery stiffness obtained from applanation tonometry of the...

  5. Simultaneous generation of high-efficiency broadband asymmetric anomalous refraction and reflection waves with few-layer anisotropic metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhancheng; Liu, Wenwei; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Jieying; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-10-20

    Optical metasurfaces consisting of single-layer nanostructures have immensely promising applications in wavefront control because they can be used to arbitrarily manipulate wave phase, and polarization. However, anomalous refraction and reflection waves have not yet been simultaneously and asymmetrically generated, and the limited efficiency and bandwidth of pre-existing single-layer metasurfaces hinder their practical applications. Here, a few-layer anisotropic metasurface is presented for simultaneously generating high-efficiency broadband asymmetric anomalous refraction and reflection waves. Moreover, the normal transmission and reflection waves are low and the anomalous waves are the predominant ones, which is quite beneficial for practical applications such as beam deflectors. Our work provides an effective method of enhancing the performance of anomalous wave generation, and the asymmetric performance of the proposed metasurface shows endless possibilities in wavefront control for nanophotonics device design and optical communication applications.

  6. Reflection and Transmission of the Level Step to the Waves in a Linear and Continuous Layer Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Xiao-ning; LI Qiang

    2006-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of the level step to the water waves in the linear and continuous layer liquid were studied in this paper. Based on the matching method of the eigenfunction and a Boussinesq approximation, the analytical expression of the diffraction was obtained and the computing methods of the reflection and transmission energy of the level step were proposed. For the incident wave with a frequency greater than that of the flotage, there is only one mode of plane traveling wave in the flow field. In the range of this greater frequency, the linear and continuous delamination effect will affect the reflection and transmission energy of the floating rectangular box. When the frequency of the incident wave is less than the flotage frequency, the energy of the plane traveling wave with infinite modes in the flow field will change into the energy of different modes for each incident wave of different modes.

  7. Resonance reflection of elastic waves at the interface between two crystals with sliding contact: II. Plane waves and acoustic beams in structures with hexagonal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshits, V.I.; Darinskii, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Radovich, A. [Kielce Technological Univ., Kielce (Poland)

    1995-05-01

    The specific features of acoustic wave reflection are analyzed at the interface between two hexagonal crystals with a sliding contact between them. Attention is focused on the angles of incidence corresponding to excitation of the leaky wave. The conditions supporting the existence of leaky waves are found. The expressions illustrating the behavior of plane wave transformation coefficients for reflection, refraction, and excitation of interfacial oscillations are found in analytic form. In addition, the features of nonmirror reflection are studied for a slightly diverging acoustic beam having initially a rectangular profile. The study deals with the case when the tangential projection of the {open_quotes}mean{close_quotes} wavevector for the beam is close to or coincides with the real part of the wavevector of the leaky wave. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Superluminal reflection and transmission of light pulses via resonant four-wave mixing in cesium vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qichang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Dan; Ahrens, Sven; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhu, Shiyao

    2016-10-17

    We report the experimental manipulation of the group velocities of reflected and transmitted light pulses in a degenerate two-level atomic system driven by a standing wave, which is created by two counter-propagating light beams of equal frequencies but variable amplitudes. It is shown that the light pulse is reflected with superluminal group velocity while the transmitted pulse propagates from subluminal to superluminal velocities via changing the power of the backward coupling field. We find that the simultaneous superluminal light reflection and transmission can be reached when the power of the backward field becomes closer or equal to the forward power, in this case the periodical absorption modulation for photonic structure is established in atoms. The theoretical discussion shows that the anomalous dispersion associated with a resonant absorption dip within the gain peak due to four-wave mixing leads to the superluminal reflection, while the varying dispersion from normal to anomalous at transparency, transparency within absorption, and electromagnetically induced absorption windows leads to the subluminal to superluminal transmission.

  9. Modeling Transmission and Reflection Mueller Matrices of Dielectric Half-Wave Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Maria; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple analytical model describing multiple reflections in dielectric and optically active waveplates, for both normal and slant incidence, including absorption. We compute from first principles the transmission and reflection Mueller matrices of the waveplate. The model is used to simulate the performance of a Stokes polarimeter for mm-waves, in the framework of current attempts to precisely measure the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We study the spectral response of these optical devices, taking into account band and angle averaging effects and confirm the presence of a much richer spectral dependence than in an ideal phase retarder. We also present the matrix elements for the reflection matrix, which is useful to estimate systematic effects in some polarimeter configurations. The formulas we have derived can be used to quickly simulate the performance of future CMB polarimeters.

  10. Detection and Analysis of Partial Reflections of HF Waves from the Lower Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, A.; Moore, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    On the afternoon of August 27, 2011, the western half of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program's (HAARP's) HF transmitter repeatedly broadcast a low-power (1 kW/Tx), 4.5-MHz, X-mode polarized, 10 microsecond pulse. The HF beam was directed vertically, and the inter-pulse period was 20 milliseconds. HF observations were performed at Oasis (62° 23' 30" N, 145° 9' 03" W) using two crossed 90-foot folded dipoles. Observations clearly indicate the detection of a ground wave and multiple reflections from different sources at F-region altitudes, which is consistent with digisonde measurements at 4.5 MHz. Additional reflections were detected at a virtual altitude of 90-110 km, and we interpret these reflections as partial reflections from the rapid conductivity change at the base of the ionosphere. We compare these observations with the predictions of a new finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) plasma model. The model is a one-dimensional, second-order accurate, cold plasma FDTD model of the ionosphere extending from ground through the lower F-region. The model accounts for a spatially varying plasma frequency, cyclotron frequency, and electron-neutral collision frequency. We discuss the possibility to analyze partial reflections from the base of the ionosphere as a function of frequency to characterize the reflecting plasma.

  11. Comparison of P-Wave and S-Wave Reflection Surveying Effectiveness for Detection of Mine-Related Subsidence Activity Beneath a Heavily Traveled Roadway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, E. D.; Daniels, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    We acquired high-resolution multicomponent seismic reflection data along an undermined 2200 ft (671 m) section of Interstate highway 70 (I-70) in eastern Ohio, in order to identify areas of active subsidence or soil piping into subsurface collapse features. This paper presents results from research conducted: 1) to investigate potential advantages and disadvantages associated with near-surface P- and S-wave reflection surveys, and 2) to determine the subsidence detection potential of common-mode P- and S-wave data components acquired in the study area. P-wave data have traditionally been acquired during shallow reflection surveys, however, the number of reports concerning shallow S-wave surveys is relatively small, and very few reports concerning the concurrent acquisition and analysis of P- and S-wave reflection data exist. Although S-wave reflections from the top-of-bedrock (located above the coal mine and targeted for subsidence detection purposes) were consistently observed in both XX component (inline-inline, SV-SV) and YY component (crossline-crossline, SH-SH) data, surface wave noise resulted in the optimum reflection window of XX data being relatively narrow. Stacks produced using YY data had a higher signal-to-noise ratio and better imaged the target horizon than those produced using XX data. Whereas S-waves were relatively insensitive to changes in overburden moisture content, P-wave reflections from the top-of-saturated-overburden (located above bedrock) were recorded in ZZ component (vertical-vertical, P-P) data. The arrival times of P-wave reflections and the characteristics of the recorded noise modes made it difficult to process and use P-wave reflections from this interface. P-wave events from deeper impedance contrasts were not observed in field data due to several factors: surface wave and air wave noise, a high P-wave reflection coefficient at the top-of-saturated-overburden, low P-wave reflection coefficients at deeper interfaces, and

  12. Phase mixing of Alfvén waves propagating in non-reflective magnetic plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael S.; Petrukhin, Nikolai S.

    2017-04-01

    The ability of phase mixing to provide efficient damping of Alfvén waves even in weakly dissipative plasmas made it a popular mechanism for explaining the solar coronal heating. Initially it was studied in the equilibrium configurations with the straight magnetic field lines and the Alfvén speed only varying in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Later the analysis of the Alfvén wave phase mixing was extended in various directions. In particular it was studied in two-dimensional planar magnetic plasma equilibria. Analytical investigation was carried out under the assumption that the wavelength is much smaller than the characteristic scale of the background quantity variation. This assumption enabled using the Wentzel, Kramers, and Brillouin (WKB) method. When it is not satisfied the study was only carried out numerically. In general, even the wave propagation in a one-dimensional inhomogeneous equilibrium can be only studied numerically. However there is one important exception, so-called non-reflective equilibria. In these equilibria the wave equation with the variable phase speed reduces to the Klein-Gordon equation with constant coefficients. In this paper we apply the theory of non-reflective wave propagation to studying the Alfvén wave phase mixing in two-dimensional planar magnetic plasma equilibria. Using curvilinear coordinates we reduce the equation describing the Alfvén wave phase mixing to the equation that becomes a one-dimensional wave equation in the absence of dissipation. This equation is further reduced to the equation which is the one-dimensional Klein-Gordon equation in the absence of dissipation. Then we show that this equation has constant coefficients when a particular relation between the plasma density and magnetic field magnitude is satisfied. Using the derived Klein-Gordon-type equation we study the phase mixing in various non-reflective equilibria. We emphasise that our analysis is valid even when the wavelength is

  13. Diffraction and reflection of irregular waves in a harbor employing a spectral model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Violante-Carvalho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWAN wave model is widely used in coastal waters and the main focus of this work is on its application in a harbor. Its last released version - SWAN 40.51 - includes an approximation to compute diffraction, however, so far there are few published works that discuss this matter. The performance of the model is therefore investigated in a harbor where reflection and diffraction play a relevant role. To assess its estimates, a phase-resolving Boussinesq wave model is employed as well, together with measurements carried out at a small-scale model of the area behind the breakwater. For irregular, short-crested waves with broad directional spreading, the importance of diffraction is relatively small. On the other hand, reflection of the incident waves is significant, increasing the energy inside the harbor. Nevertheless, the SWAN model does not achieve convergence when it is set to compute diffraction and reflection simultaneously. It is concluded that, for situations typically encountered in harbors, with irregular waves near reflective obstacles, the model should be set without the diffraction option.O modelo de ondas SWAN é amplamente empregado em simulações na região costeira e o presente trabalho investiga sua aplicação dentro de um porto. A última versão disponibilizada para a comunidade - SWAN 40.51 - inclui uma aproximação para computar a difração, embora, até o momento, poucos trabalhos abordando este tema foram publicados. O desempenho do modelo é estudado em um porto onde os fenômenos de reflexão e difração são importantes. Para avaliar suas estimativas, um modelo do tipo Boussinesq também é empregado, juntamente com medições realizadas em um modelo em escala reduzida da área atrás do quebramar. Para ondas irregulares, com cristas curtas e espalhamento direcional mais amplo, a importância da difração é relativamente menor. Contudo, o modelo SWAN não alcança convergência quando programado para estimar

  14. Broadband millimeter-wave anti-reflection coatings on silicon using pyramidal sub-wavelength structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Karl; Wen, Qi; Hanany, Shaul; Imada, Hiroaki; Koch, Jürgen; Matsumura, Tomotake; Suttmann, Oliver; Schütz, Viktor

    2017-06-01

    We used two novel approaches to produce sub-wavelength structure anti-reflection coatings on silicon for millimeter and sub-millimeter wave bands: picosecond laser ablation and dicing with beveled saws. We produced pyramidal structures with both techniques. The diced sample, machined on only one side, had a pitch and a height of 350 μm and 972 μm, respectively. The two laser ablated samples had a pitch of 180 μm and heights of 720 μm and 580 μm; only one of these samples was ablated on both sides. We present measurements of shape and optical performances and comparisons to the optical performance predicted using finite element analysis and rigorous coupled wave analysis. By extending the measured performance of the one-sided diced sample to the two-sided case, we demonstrate a 25% band averaged reflectance of less than 5% over a bandwidth of 97% centered on 170 GHz. Using the two-sided laser ablation sample, we demonstrate a reflectance of less than 5% over a bandwidth of 83% centered on 346 GHz.

  15. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail.

  16. Investigation on bragg reflection of surface water waves induced by a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huei-Tau; Chen, Kue-Hong; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The water wave characteristics of Bragg reflections from a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters was studied numerically. A numerical model of boundary discretization type was developed to calculate the wave field. The model was verified by comparing to analytical data in literature and good agreements were achieved. Series of parametric studies were conducted systematically to investigate the dependence of the reflected coefficients by the Bragg scattering on the design variables, including the spacing between the breakwaters, the total number of installed breakwaters, the draft and width do the breakwater, and wave length. Certain wave characteristics of the Bragg reflections were observed and discussed in details which might be of help for practical engineering applications in shoreline protection from incident waves.

  17. Comparison of high-resolution P- and SH-wave reflection seismic data in alluvial and pyroclastic deposits in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyono, Wiyono; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    Seismic reflection is one of the stable methods to investigate subsurface conditions. However, there are still many unresolved issues, especially for areas with specific and complex geological environments. Here, each location has an own characteristic due to material compounds and the geological structure. We acquired high-resolution, P-and SH-wave seismic reflection profiles at two different locations in Indonesia. The first location was in Semarang (Central Java) and the second one was in Tiris (East Java). The first region is located on an alluvial plain with thick alluvial deposits of more than 100 m estimated thickness, and the second location was located on pyroclastic deposit material. The seismic measurements for both locations were carried out using a 48-channel recording system (14-Hz P-wave, 10-Hz SH-wave geophones) with geophone intervals of 5 m (P-waves) and 1 m (SH-waves), respectively. The seismic source for the P-wave was a ca. 4 kg sledge hammer which generated a seismic signal by by hitting on an aluminum plate of 30x30 cm, whereas the SH-wave source was a mini-vibrator ELVIS (Electrodynamic Vibrator System), version 3. Thirteen seismic profiles at Semarang and eighth profiles at Tiris were acquired. The results of seismic data in Semarang show fair to good seismic records for both P-and SH-waves. The raw data contain high signal-to-noise-ratio. Many clear reflectors can be detected. The P-wave data shows reflectors down to 250 ms two-way time while the SH-wave records show seismic events up to 600 ms two-way time. This result is in strong contrast to the seismic data result from the Tiris region. The P-wave data show very low signal to noise ratio, there is no reflection signal visible, only the surface waves and the ambient noise from the surrounding area are visible. The SH-waves give a fair to good result which enables reflector detection down to 300 ms two-way time. The results from the two seismic campaigns show that SH-wave reflection

  18. Non-Reflecting Regions for Finite Difference Methods in Modeling of Elastic Wave Propagation in Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishoni, Doron; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    Solution of the wave equation using techniques such as finite difference or finite element methods can model elastic wave propagation in solids. This requires mapping the physical geometry into a computational domain whose size is governed by the size of the physical domain of interest and by the required resolution. This computational domain, in turn, dictates the computer memory requirements as well as the calculation time. Quite often, the physical region of interest is only a part of the whole physical body, and does not necessarily include all the physical boundaries. Reduction of the calculation domain requires positioning an artificial boundary or region where a physical boundary does not exist. It is important however that such a boundary, or region, will not affect the internal domain, i.e., it should not cause reflections that propagate back into the material. This paper concentrates on the issue of constructing such a boundary region.

  19. Longitudinal acoustic waves in layered media: Comparative study of Raman scattering and reflection delay time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Boudouti, E H; Zelmat, R; Bailich, R [LDOM, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed I, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Hassouani, Y El [Universite de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Mecanique Physique, Talence F-33405 (France); Djafari-Rouhani, B, E-mail: elboudouti@yahoo.f [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-03-01

    Using a Green's function method, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of acoustic waves in multilayer structures. The structure studied consists of a finite superlattice (SL) made of a periodic repetition of N unit cells deposited on a substrate. Such a structure exhibits extended modes constituting the allowed bands separated by forbidden bands where localized modes associated to free surfaces, defect layers, ... may exist. These modes can be observed either by Raman scattering when an incident light is launched from vacuum towards the multilayer, or by the reflection delay time when an incident acoustic wave is launched from the substrate. Specific applications of our results are given for some available experiments in the literature (e.g., Si/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}, GaSb-AlSb) and a good agreement has been obtained between our theoretical results and the experimental data.

  20. A partial reconstruction scheme for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography with reflection geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-01-01

    Image quality and photon measurement with good SNR (signal to noise ratio) in continuous wave diffuse optical tomography depend on the source detector density and sensitivity of photo detector. For large volume objects, it is difficult to obtain detectable light intensity with good SNR over the whole boundary. As an alternative, instead of the full boundary, the measurements are taken over a semi circle as in reflection geometry and a partial reconstruction scheme for the same is proposed in this paper. The cross-sectional optical parameters are reconstructed for different half of the sample with modified boundary conditions and finally the average of all the reconstructions are considered as the final reconstructed image. Simulation and experimental results have been illustrated to validate the proposed method. The main advantage of this scheme is to improve signal to noise ratio which controls the quality of reconstruction in actual phantoms. The use of continuous wave measurement makes the system cost effective as well.

  1. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-09-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  2. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  3. A method based on reflection theory to test the attenuation performance of an absorption coat to 8mm waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuanyu

    2016-09-01

    A testing method has been set up to evaluate the attenuation performance of an absorption coat to 8mm waves, which is based on a set of detecting system included by an 8mm wave emitter, a millimeter power meter, a point to point collimator and a reflecting plate. The power meter was aimed at the 8 mm wave emitter along the reflection optical path instead of the direction observation between incident and reflected millimeter wave. Some Al, Fe and aluminum alloy sample plates were made and painted by the dope which was complexed with chopped carbon fibers. A naked metal plate was first used to adjust the transmission path of the millimeter wave. Then the power meter was adjusted to phase locking after preheating, and the millimeter wave power was sampled as the background value. Then the other painted plates were tested under the same conditions. When the concentration of chopped carbon fibers is 0.5mg/ml and the thickness of the absorption coat is 0.5mm, the attenuation percentages of Al, Fe and aluminum alloy painted plates respectively is 54.29%, 58.31% and 41.12%. By the result, the reflection testing method may be widely used to measure the reflection capacity or attenuation performance of various surfaces to millimeter waves.

  4. Suppress the Finger Reflection Error of Littlewood-pelay Wavelet Transformation Device of Surface Acoustic Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Wavelet Transformation (WT device of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW technology is developed on the basis of acoustics, electronics, wavelet theory, applied mathematics and semiconductor planar technology. The Finger Reflection (FR error is the primary reason for this kind of device. To solve the problem, a mathematic model of Littlewood-pelay wavelet was established first, which is matched with the model of SAW. Using the methods of split finger and fake finger to design IDT of Littlewood-pelay WT device of SAW with L-edit software, the FR error can be reduced and the equivalent construction of IDT is simulated.

  5. Surface Reflection Coefficient of Impregnated RAM Honeycomb with Incident Normally Plan Wave to the Side Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhengping; LUO Qing

    2004-01-01

    The impregnated radar absorbing material(RAM) honeycomb is often used to fabricate parts of the warplane for reducing radar cross section.The incidentwave vector may be divided into two components:one perpendicular to its hole and the other to its side wall.Until now,there has not been a program to calculate the input impedance or its equivalent electromagnetic parameters for the later case.In this paper,an approach for analyzing the reflection characteristics of the impregnated honeycomb when its side wall faces the incident plane wave is proposed.Experiments prove it an effective,accurate and fast solution to this subject.

  6. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  7. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients for an Incident Plane Shear Wave at an Interface Separating Two Dissimilar Poroelastic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-09-01

    Using Biot's poroelasticity theory, we derive expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane shear wave incident on an interface separating two different poroelastic solids. The coefficients are formulated as a function of the wave incidence angle, frequency and rock properties. Specific cases calculated include the boundary between water-saturated sand and water-saturated sandstone and the gas-water interface in sand. The results show a very different interface response to that of an incident P wave. Plane SV wave incidence does not significantly excite the Biot slow P wave if the frequency of the wave is below the transition frequency. Above this frequency, an incident plane SV wave can generate a mode-converted slow Biot P wave which is actually a normal propagating wave and not highly attenuating as in the usual (diffusive) case. For an incident SV wave onto a gas-water interface, even at very high frequency, there is no significant Biot second P wave produced. For small incident angles, the gas-water interface is essentially transparent. With increasing angles, there can arise an unusual "definitive angle" in the reflection/transmission coefficient curves which is related to the change of fluid viscosity on both sides of the interface and provides a possible new means for underground fluid assessment.

  8. Nonlinear Acoustics of Bounded Solid-Reflection and Refraction of Second-Order Bulk Waves(Ⅱ)——SV- or SH- Wave Incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱祖文

    1994-01-01

    In the case of SV- or SH-wave oblique incidence,the reflection and refraction of the second-order bulk waves resulting from a plane boundary between two solid media are investigated and the mathematical expressions of them are given.It is shown that an SH-wave incidence is absolutely necessary to an overall knowledge of the relationship between the TOEs for isotropic solid.The importance of both contributions of the nonaccumulation waves and the effects of the boundary surface are indicated by numerical computation.

  9. Reflection and refraction properties of plane waves on the interface of uniaxially anisotropic chiral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the reflection and refraction properties of plane waves incident from free space into a uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium, where the chirality appears only in one direction and the host medium can be either an isotropic dielectric or an anisotropic electric plasma. We show that the reflection and refraction properties are closely related to the dispersion relation of the chiral medium and that negative phase refractions and/or negative group refractions may occur. We further demonstrate that the two eigenwaves within the uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium behave differently with respect to the incident angle, and in some cases only one of them can be supported and transmitted. We have studied the critical angle and Brewster's angle with some special properties. We have also discussed the potential application of the uniaxially anisotropic chiral medium for the polarization beam splitter. Numerical results are given to validate our analysis.

  10. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  11. Shear Wave Reflection Seismics Image Internal Structure of Quick-Clay Landslides in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-12-01

    Covering many different sizes of scale, landslides are widespread and pose a severe hazard in many areas as soon as humans or infrastructure are affected. In order to provide geophysical tools and techniques to better characterize sites prone to sliding, a geophysical assessment working towards a geotechnical understanding of landslides is necessary. As part of a joint project studying clay-related landslides in Nordic countries by a suite of geophysical methods, we therefore tested the use of shear wave reflection seismics to survey shallow structures that are known to be related to quick-clay landslide processes in southern Sweden. On two crossing profiles, a land streamer consisting of 120 SH-geophones with 1 m spacing was deployed, and an ELVIS micro-vibrator was shaking every 4 m to generate the shear wave signal. SH-wave data of high quality were thereby acquired to resolve the gaps between P-wave data and electrical and surface wave based methods of lower resolution. After quality control, correlation, subtractive stack, and geometry setup, single shot gathers already demonstrate the high data quality gained in the region, especially on a gravel road. The migrated depth sections image the structural inventory down to ca. 50 m depth with vertical resolution of less than 1 m. Horizontally layered sediments are visible in the upper 40 m of soft (marine) sediments, followed by top basement with a rough topography varying between ca. 20-40 m depth. The imaged, bowl-shaped basement morphology centres near the profile crossing, and basement is exposed at three sides of the profiles. Three distinct sediment sequences are separated by high-amplitude unconformities. The quick-clay layer may be located above the marked reflection set that lies on top of the more transparent sequence that levels out the basement. Located between 15-20 m depth, this correlates with the height of the last scarp that occurred in the area. In addition, shear wave velocities are determined

  12. Low WSS and High OSI Measured by 3D Cine PC MRI Reflect High Pulmonary Artery Pressures in Suspected Secondary Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Takehara, Yasuo; Isoda, Haruo; Uto, Tomohiro; Matsunaga, Masaki; Alley, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved prospective study was conducted to test whether objective and quantitative hemodynamic markers wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) measured by three-dimensional (3D) cine phase-contrast (PC) can reflect pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Seventeen consecutive patients of suspected secondary PAH were examined for pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs) with right heart catheterization (RHC) and three-dimensional (3D) cine PC MR. Based on the RHC data, patients were subdivided into two groups of 12 non-PAH (median age of 74.5 years) and 5 PAH (median age of 77 years) patients. Based on 3D cine PC magnetic resonance (MR), hemodynamic parameters including spatially averaged systolic WSS (sWSS), diastolic WSS (dWSS), mean WSS (mWSS), OSI and blood vessel section area (BVSA) at the pulmonary arterial trunk were calculated. Streamline images in the pulmonary arteries were also assessed. All the parameters were compared between non-PAH and PAH groups. sWSS (N/m(2)) and mWSS (N/m(2)) of PAH group was lower than that of non-PAH group (0.594 ± 0.067 vs. 0.961 ± 0.590, P = 0.001), (0.365 ± 0.035 vs. 0.489 ± 0.132, P = 0.027). OSI of PAH group was higher than that of non-PAH (0.214 ± 0.026 vs. 0.130 ± 0.046, P = 0.001). sWSS, mWSS, and dWSS were inversely correlated and OSI was positively correlated to mean PAP or systolic PAP with r values of -0.638 (P = 0.005), -0.643 (P = 0.005), -0.485 (P = 0.049), and 0.625 (P = 0.007); or -0.622 (P = 0.008), -0.629 (P = 0.007), -0.484 (P = 0.049), and 0.594 (P = 0.012), respectively. sWSS was also inversely correlated to BVSA with r value of -0.488 (P = 0.049), and OSI was correlated to BVSA with r value of 0.574 (P = 0.016). Vortex or helical flows were observed more frequently in PAH patients. The low sWSS and mWSS as well as high OSI measured with 3D cine PC MR could be potential hemodynamic markers for the increased PAP in suspected secondary PAH patients.

  13. A modified regimen of extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy for treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT improves cardiac function in patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD. We aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a new CSWT treatment regimen. Methods The 55 patients with severe CAD were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups. The control group (n = 14 received only medical therapy. In group A ( n = 20, CSWT was performed 3 times within 3 months. In group B ( n = 21, patients underwent 3 CSWT sessions/week, and 9 treatment sessions were completed within 1 month. Primary outcome measurement was 6-minute walk test (6MWT. Other measurements were also evaluated. Results The 6MWT, CCS grading of angina, dosage of nitroglycerin, NYHA classification, and SAQ scores were improved in group A and B compared to control group. Conclusions A CSWT protocol with 1 month treatment duration showed similar therapeutic efficacy compared to a protocol of 3 months duration. Clinical trial registry We have registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, the protocol ID is CSWT IN CHINA.

  14. S-wave reflection and surface wave surveys in liquefaction affected areas: a case study of the Hinode area, Itako, Ibaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Toshiyuki; Jinguuji, Motoharu; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Murata, Kazunori

    2017-10-01

    Property damage results from liquefaction that occurs easily in soft sandy layers. Moreover, liquefaction damage tends to be more serious at locations where earthquake ground motions are locally amplified. It is commonly understood that ground stiffness is correlated with S-wave velocity (Vs); in addition, the structure of the local subsurface is important for predicting local earthquake ground motion. Surface wave and S-wave reflection surveys are efficient, non-destructive techniques used to obtain two-dimensional S-wave velocity distributions and to map subsurface structures. In this study, we performed surface wave and S-wave reflection surveys to investigate the Hinode area of Itako, Ibaraki, Japan. This area suffered serious liquefaction damage during the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake of 2011. Using subsurface boundaries imaged by the reflection surveys and the Vs structures obtained by surface wave analyses, it is possible to extrapolate geological and hydraulic information obtained by boring and cone penetration tests (CPTs). The combined information was used to delineate the layer in which liquefaction occurred, identified as an artificial layer of sandy dredged material, formed after 1970. The results of this study confirmed the effectiveness and applicability of geophysical surveys to the evaluation of the liquefaction potential. These methods enable us to predict the spatial distribution of liquefiable soils for future large earthquakes.

  15. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  16. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields\\' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  17. The reflection of regular and irregular waves by a partially perforated caisson breakwater on a step bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; LI Yucheng; TENG Bin; XIA Zhisheng

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the reflection of regular and irregular waves from a partially perforated caisson breakwater located on a step bed. The step bed is treated as an idealized rubble mound foundation. Based on the linear potential theory, an analytical solution is developed to calculate the reflection coefficient of the structure subjected to regular waves. The matched eigenfunction expansion method is used for the solution. The regular wave method is also extended to irregular waves using a linear transfer function. The calculated results obtained for limiting cases are exactly the same as corresponding results given by the previous researchers. The present predictions also agree well with experimental data in the published literatures. Numerical experiments are conducted to examine the variations of the reflection coefficient versus its main effect factors, and some interesting results are presented.

  18. Kidney transplantation improves arterial function measured by pulse wave analysis and endothelium-independent dilatation in uraemic patients despite deterioration of glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Clausen, Peter; Idorn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of kidney transplantation on arterial function in relation to changes in glucose metabolism. METHODS: Included were 40 kidney recipients (Tx group, age 38 ± 13 years) and 40 patients without known diabetes remaining on the waiting list...... for kidney transplantation (uraemic control group, age 47 ± 11 years). Arterial function was estimated by the pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the carotid-femoral pulse wave, aortic augmentation index (AIX), flow-mediated (FMD) and nitroglycerin-induced vasodilatation (NID) of the brachial artery performed...... before transplantation and after 12 months. PWV recorded sequentially at the carotid and femoral artery is an estimate of arterial stiffness; AIX is an integrated index of vascular and ventricular function. FMD and NID are the dilatory capacities of the brachial artery after increased flow (endothelium...

  19. Nonlinear reflection process of linearly-polarized, broadband Alfv\\'en waves in the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Shoda, Munehito

    2016-01-01

    Using one-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the elementary process of Alfv\\'{e}n wave reflection in a uniform medium, including nonlinear effects. In the linear regime, Alfv\\'{e}n wave reflection is triggered only by the inhomogeneity of the medium, whereas in the nonlinear regime, it can occur via nonlinear wave-wave interactions. Such nonlinear reflection (backscattering) is typified by decay instability. In most studies of decay instabilities, the initial condition has been a circularly polarized Alfv\\'{e}n wave. In this study we consider a linearly polarized Alfv\\'en wave, which drives density fluctuations by its magnetic pressure force. For generality, we also assume a broadband wave with a red-noise spectrum. In the data analysis, we decompose the fluctuations into characteristic variables using local eigenvectors, thus revealing the behaviors of the individual modes. Different from circular-polarization case, we find that the wave steepening produces a new energy channel from the parent Alfv\\...

  20. Evidence of Boundary Reflection of Kelvin and First-Mode Rossby Waves from Topex/Poseidon Sea Level Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Jean-Philippe; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1996-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level data lead to new opportunities to investigate some theoretical mechanisms suggested to be involved in the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the tropical Pacific ocean. In particular, we are interested in studying the western boundary reflection, a process crucial for the delayed action oscillator theory, by using the TOPEX/POSEIDON data from November 1992 to May 1995. We first projected the sea level data onto Kelvin and first-mode Ross waves. Then we estimated the contribution of wind forcing to these waves by using a single baroclinic mode simple wave model forced by the ERS-1 wind data. Wave propagation was clearly observed with amplitudes well explained by the wind forcing in the ocean interior. Evidence of wave reflection was detected at both the western and eastern boundaries of the tropical Pacific ocean. At the eastern boundary, Kelvin waves were seen to reflect as first-mode Rossby waves during the entire period. The reflection efficiency (in terms of wave amplitude) of the South American coasts was estimated to be 80% of that of an infinite meridional wall. At the western boundary, reflection was observed in April-August 1993, in January-June 1994, and, later, in December 1994 to February 1995. Although the general roles of these reflection events in the variability observed in the equatorial Pacific ocean are not clear, the data suggest that the reflections in January-June 1994 have played a role in the onset of the warm conditions observed in late 1994 to early 1995. Indeed, during the January-June 1994 period, as strong downwelling first-mode Rossby waves reflected into downwelling Kelvin waves, easterly wind and cold sea surface temperature anomalies located near the date line weakened and eventually reversed in June-July 1994. The presence of the warm anomalies near the date line then favored convection and westerly wind anomalies that triggered strong downwelling Kelvin waves propagating throughout the basin

  1. Measurement of transmission and reflection from a thick anisotropic crystal modeled by a sum of incoherent partial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Shane; Arteaga, Oriol; Martin, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Formulas for modeling ellipsometric measurements of bianisotropic crystals assume perfectly coherent plane wave illumination. As such, the finite coherence of typical spectroscopic ellipsometers renders such formulas invalid for crystals thicker than a few micrometers. Reflection measurements of thick crystalline slabs show depolarization. Researchers have proposed strategies for the full accounting for multiply reflected incoherent waves in anisotropic, arbitrarily oriented crystals [Appl. Opt.41, 2521 (2002).APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.41.002521], but to the best of our knowledge these methods have not been tested by explicit measurements. It is shown that by a summation of multiply reflected incoherent waves, transmission and reflection measurements of thick quartz slabs can be interpreted in terms of the constitutive material parameters.

  2. In vitro ultrasound experiments: Standing wave and multiple reflections influence on the outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secomski, Wojciech; Bilmin, Krzysztof; Kujawska, Tamara; Nowicki, Andrzej; Grieb, Paweł; Lewin, Peter A

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the influence of standing waves and possible multiple reflections under the conditions often encountered in examining the effects of ultrasound exposure on the cell cultures in vitro. More specifically, the goal was to quantitatively ascertain the influence of ultrasound exposure under free field (FF) and standing waves (SW) and multiple reflections (MR) conditions (SWMR) on the biological endpoint (50% cell necrosis). Such information would help in designing the experiments, in which the geometry of the container with biological tissue may prevent FF conditions to be established and in which the ultrasound generated temperature elevation is undesirable. This goal was accomplished by performing systematic, side-by-side experiments in vitro with C6 rat glioma cancer cells using 12 well and 96 well plates. It was determined that to obtain 50% of cell viability using the 12 well plates, the spatial average, temporal average (ISATA) intensities of 0.32W/cm(2) and 5.89W/cm(2) were needed under SWMR and FF conditions, respectively. For 96 well plates the results were 0.80W/cm(2) and 2.86W/cm(2) respectively. The corresponding, hydrophone measured pRMS maximum pressure amplitude values, were 0.71MPa, 0.75MPa, 0.75MPa and 0.73MPa, respectively. These results suggest that pRMS pressure amplitude was independent of the measurement set-up geometry and hence could be used to predict the cells' mortality threshold under any in vitro experimental conditions or even as a starting point for (pre-clinical) in vivo tests. The described procedure of the hydrophone measurements of the pRMS maximum pressure amplitude at the λ/2 distance (here 0.75mm) from the cell's level at the bottom of the dish or plate provides the guideline allowing the difference between the FF and SWMR conditions to be determined in any experimental setup. The outcome of the measurements also indicates that SWMR exposure might be useful at any ultrasound assisted

  3. Phase statistics of light wave reflected from one-dimensional optical disordered media and its effects on light transport properties

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Light wave reflection from optical disordered media is always associate with its phase, and the phase statistics influence the reflection statistics. We report a detailed numerical study of the statistics of the reflection coefficient RR* and its associated phase(theta) for plane electromagnetic waves reflected from one dimensional (1D) Gaussian white-noise optical disordered media, ranging from weak to strong disordered regimes. We solve numerically the full Fokker-Planck (FP) equation for the joint probability distribution in the RR* - phase(theta) space for different lengths of the sample with different disorder strengths. The statistical optical transport properties of 1D optical disordered media are calculated using the full FP equation numerically. This constitutes a complete solution for the reflection phase statistics and its effects on light transport properties in a 1D Gaussian white-noise disordered optical potentials. Our results show the regime of the validation of the random phase approximations...

  4. Need for insulin to control gestational diabetes is reflected in the ambulatory arterial stiffness index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärkkäinen Henna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to evaluate the metabolic profile in conjunction with vascular function using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI in women with uncomplicated pregnancies and in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods Plasma glucose, lipids, HOMA –IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and AASI, as obtained from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in third trimester pregnancy and at three months postpartum, were measured in three groups of women: controls (N = 32, women with GDM on diet (N = 42 and women with GDM requiring insulin treatment (N = 10. Results Women with GDM had poorer glycemic control and higher HOMA-IR during and after pregnancy and their total and LDL (low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher after pregnancy than in the controls. After delivery, there was an improvement in AASI from 0.26 ± 0.10 to 0.17 ± 0.09 (P = 0.002 in women with GDM on diet, but not in women with GDM receiving insulin whose AASI tended to worsen after delivery from 0.30 ± 0.23 to 0.33 ± 0.09 (NS, then being significantly higher than in the other groups (P = 0.001-0.047. Conclusions Women with GDM had more unfavorable lipid profile and higher blood glucose values at three months after delivery, the metabolic profile being worst in women requiring insulin. Interestingly, the metabolic disturbances at three months postpartum were accompanied by a tendency towards arterial stiffness to increase in women requiring insulin.

  5. Detection of Reflected Waves from Plate Boundary Using ACROSS Source and Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, T.; Watanabe, T.; Ikuta, R.; Saiga, A.; Miyajima, R.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsuruga, K.; Kunitomo, T.; Hasada, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Satomura, M.; Kumazawa, M.; Fujii, N.

    2005-12-01

    ACROSS (Accurately Controlled and Routinely Operated Signal System) is effective in monitoring temporary changes of Earth's interior. A long-term operation experiment near Nojima fault [Ikuta et al.,2004] detected small temporary changes of travel time of P and S waves at tele-seismic events. Toward Tokai monitoring plan to detect the reflected phases from the top of Philippine Sea Plate and monitor its temporal changes, a mid-term continuous experiment was conducted using ACROSS source and a seismic array. The experiment was operated for the period from Dec. 2004 to Sep.2005 in the Tokai area, Pacific side of the central part of Japan. In this region, the expected Tokai earthquake is a serious concern. In addition, slow slip events and low-frequency tremors are observed in this area. A strong reflected phase from the plate boundary was found by the seismic observation using artificial sources [Iidaka et al.,2003]. The purpose of the experiment is to establish a method to detect and monitor the reflection from the plate boundary using ACROSS. The ACROSS source is located in Toki city and operated by Tono Geoscience Center. The ACROSS source continuously transmits precisely-controlled frequency-modulated signals whose frequency band ranges from 10 to 20 Hz with an interval of 50 seconds. We deployed a short-span seismic array at the distance of 55 km from the ACROSS source. The cross-shaped seismic array spanning 2 km consists of 12 seismometers equipped with an offline data logger, amplifier and solarpanel. We stacked the received signal for a month with an interval of 200 seconds in order to improve signal noise ratio. We extracted a series of line spectrum of ACROSS signal. Transfer function can be obtained by dividing spectrum by the source. Applying inverse Fourier transform, we can obtain the transfer function in time-domain. We identified direct P and S phases by comparing with the standard travel time table by JMA. We also found some coherent later phases

  6. Circularly p olarized wave reflection fo cusing metasurfaces%圆极化波反射聚焦超表面∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇峰; 张介秋; 屈绍波; 王甲富; 吴翔; 徐卓; 张安学

    2015-01-01

    The phase profiles of the reflected circularly polarized waves can be freely manipulated by virtue of a co-polarization reflective metasurface. Based on the co-polarization reflective metasurface, a circularly polarized wave reflection focusing metasurface can be achieved, it can make the reflected waves focus at a focal spot under the normal incidence of circularly polarized plane waves. In this paper, a reflection focusing metasurface is designed. It is found that around the central frequency f =16 GHz, the reflected waves focus on a focal spot above the metasurface with a focal distance L=200 mm under the normal incidence of right-handed circularly polarized waves. However, in the case of normal incidence of left-handed circularly waves, the reflected waves focus on an imaginary focal spot below the metasurface with the focal distance L=−200 mm. The beam-width at the focal spot and focal depth are also calculated by using CST Microwave Studio. The simulation results indicate that the beam-width at the focal spot is approximately equal to the operating wavelength. Therefore, the circularly polarized wave reflection focusing metasurface has a good performance for focusing the reflected waves. In addition, the proposed focusing metasurface displays the advantages of the long focal depth and the broad operating bandwidth.

  7. Proteome Analysis of Human Arterial Tissue Discloses Associations Between the Vascular Content of Small Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteoglycans and Pulse Wave Velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyck Hansen, Maria; Beck, Hans Christian; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that arterial stiffness is associated with changes in the arterial protein profile, particularly of extracellular matrix components. We aimed at determining differentially expressed proteins by quantitative proteome analysis in arterial tissue from patients with differ......OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that arterial stiffness is associated with changes in the arterial protein profile, particularly of extracellular matrix components. We aimed at determining differentially expressed proteins by quantitative proteome analysis in arterial tissue from patients...... with different degrees of arterial stiffness. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Arterial stiffness, assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), central blood pressure and augmentation index by pulse wave analysis were measured the day before surgery in a group of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass...... grafting. Protein extracts of well-defined, homogenous, nonatherosclerotic individual samples of the left mammary artery from 10 of these patients with high PWV and 9 with low PWV were compared by quantitative proteome analysis, using tandem mass tag labeling and nano-liquid chromatography mass...

  8. Assessment of pulmonary artery pulse wave velocity in children: an MRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chuen Y; Edwards, Julie M; Evans, C John; Harris, Ashley D; Tsai-Goodman, Beverly; Bolton, Charlotte E; Cockcroft, John R; Wise, Richard G; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of measuring pulmonary artery (PA) pulse wave velocity (PWV) in children breathing ambient air and 12% oxygen. Velocity-encoded phase-contrast MR images of the PA were acquired in 15 children, aged 9-12years, without evidence of cardiac or pulmonary diseases. PWV was derived as the ratio of flow to area changes during early systole. Each child was scanned twice, in air and after at least 20minutes into inspiratory hypoxic challenge. Intra-observer and inter-observer variability and repeatability were also compared. PA PWV, which was successfully measured in all subjects, increased from 1.31±0.32m/s in air to 1.61±0.58m/s under hypoxic challenge (p=0.03). Intra- and inter-observer coefficients of variations were 9.0% and 15.6% respectively. Good correlation within and between observers of r=0.92 and r=0.72 respectively was noted for PA PWV measurements. Mean (95% limit of agreement) intra- and inter-observer agreement on Bland-Altman analysis were -0.02m/s (-0.41-0.38m/s) and -0.28m/s (-1.06-0.49m/s). PA PWV measurement in children using velocity-encoded MRI is feasible, reproducible and sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in PA compliance between normoxia and hypoxia. This technique can be used to detect early changes of PA compliance and monitor PAH in children. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing a laser theodolite for detecting distance using phase difference of incident and reflected waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Keehong; Yoo, Sooyeup

    2013-07-01

    Laser theodolite devices for detecting distance have been used in order to measure the distance of an object target from the location of an observer by transmitting ultra-short pulses toward a target and using a receiver to correlate the pulses returning from the target with corresponding reference pulses derived from the transmitted pulses. In order to replace analog devices, digital versions have been developed recently. In this paper, we propose the development of a digital laser theodolite for detecting distance using the phase difference of incident and reflected waves. Such a device can save expense and manufacturing time. Further, such a device can be realized in SOC (system on chip), an integrated circuit (IC) that integrates all components of a computer or other electronic system into a single chip, in order to utilize the device as a laser distance sensor as part of an overall sensor system.

  10. Kinetic and modeling studies on ETBE pyrolysis behind reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Kenji; Kuraguchi, Yuma; Hidaka, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamada, Hiroshi; Koike, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    The high temperature pyrolysis of ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) was studied behind reflected shock waves coupled with the single-pulse method and UV (195 nm) absorption spectroscopy in the temperature range 1000-1500 K at total pressures ranging between 1.0 and 9.0 atm. The energies of ETBE and transition states for the reactions ETBE = iso-C 4H 8 + C 2H 5OH (1) and ETBE = C 2H 4 + tert-C 4H 9OH (2) were calculated at the MP4/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. A 170-reaction mechanism was constructed to explain the product distribution. From the UV absorption experiment, the rate coefficient k1 = 1.7 × 10 14exp(-254.0 kJ mol -1/RT) s -1 was found to reach its high-pressure limit.

  11. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  12. Reflection imaging in the millimeter-wave range using a video-rate terahertz camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Linda E.; Terroux, Marc; Doucet, Michel; Blanchard, Nathalie; Pancrati, Ovidiu; Dufour, Denis; Bergeron, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The ability of millimeter waves (1-10 mm, or 30-300 GHz) to penetrate through dense materials, such as leather, wool, wood and gyprock, and to also transmit over long distances due to low atmospheric absorption, makes them ideal for numerous applications, such as body scanning, building inspection and seeing in degraded visual environments. Current drawbacks of millimeter wave imaging systems are they use single detector or linear arrays that require scanning or the two dimensional arrays are bulky, often consisting of rather large antenna-couple focal plane arrays (FPAs). Previous work from INO has demonstrated the capability of its compact lightweight camera, based on a 384 x 288 microbolometer pixel FPA with custom optics for active video-rate imaging at wavelengths of 118 μm (2.54 THz), 432 μm (0.69 THz), 663 μm (0.45 THz), and 750 μm (0.4 THz). Most of the work focused on transmission imaging, as a first step, but some preliminary demonstrations of reflection imaging at these were also reported. In addition, previous work also showed that the broadband FPA remains sensitive to wavelengths at least up to 3.2 mm (94 GHz). The work presented here demonstrates the ability of the INO terahertz camera for reflection imaging at millimeter wavelengths. Snapshots taken at video rates of objects show the excellent quality of the images. In addition, a description of the imaging system that includes the terahertz camera and different millimeter sources is provided.

  13. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  14. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yokota, T.; Kiguchi, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Anisotropy has been investigated using S-wave as a technique for detecting fractures. In this study, fundamental experiments were carried out with slightly changing the measuring conditions at a place where anisotropy was expected. This paper describes the fundamental data acquisition of anisotropy analysis using S-wave, and a part of the results. The experiments were conducted on the agricultural road in Yamadera district, Matsuyama-machi, Yamagata Prefecture. Two flat unpaved roads meeting at right angles were used as traverse lines. In this place, several reflection surfaces were certainly detected by P-wave, and anisotropy of S-wave was confirmed from the velocity of refracted wave of S-wave. Data were processed for individual traverse lines meeting at right angles. Firstly, signal sweeping, correlation, and vertical superposition were made. Six kinds of data were prepared, i.e., three-component receiving records of data at 0{degree} of generating direction and three-component receiving records of data at 90{degree} of generating direction. Records of T-component at 0{degree} and R-component at 90{degree} were used for processing of the seismic reflection method. These records would be considered to be data of SH-wave and SV-wave, respectively. 4 figs.

  15. Wave equation-based reflection tomography of the 1992 Landers earthquake area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xueyuan; Yang, Dinghui; Tong, Ping; Badal, José; Liu, Qinya

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of a recent wave equation-based traveltime seismic tomography, we show that incorporating Moho-reflected phases (PmP and SmS) in addition to the direct P and S phases can significantly increase tomography resolution in the lower crust and this may provide additional evidence to resolve important tectonic issues. To highlight the resolving power of the new strategy, we apply it in the region around the 1992 Landers earthquake (Mw = 7.3) in Southern California using seismic arrivals from local earthquakes, obtaining 3-D high-resolution P and S wave crustal velocity models and Poisson's ratio structures. In the upper crust, our method confirmed features that had been previously found. However, in the middle-to-lower crust, we found low-velocity anomalies on the southeastern section of the San Jacinto Fault and high Vp and low Vs structures to the west of the Big Bear earthquake, which may be related to upwelling of partial melt from the mantle.

  16. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Synthetic and field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-05-26

    Full-waveform inversion requires the accurate simulation of the dynamics and kinematics of wave propagation. This is difficult in practice because the amplitudes cannot be precisely reproduced for seismic waves in the earth. Wave-equation reflection traveltime tomography (WT) is proposed to avoid this problem by directly inverting the reflection-traveltime residuals without the use of the high-frequency approximation. We inverted synthetic traces and recorded seismic data for the velocity model by WT. Our results demonstrated that the wave-equation solution overcame the high-frequency approximation of ray-based tomography, was largely insensitive to the accurate modeling of amplitudes, and mitigated problems with ambiguous event identification. The synthetic examples illustrated the effectiveness of the WT method in providing a highly resolved estimate of the velocity model. A real data example from the Gulf of Mexico demonstrated these benefits of WT, but also found the limitations in traveltime residual estimation for complex models.

  17. Prediction of the Fundamental Mode Lamb Wave Reflection from a Crack-Like Discontinuity Using Eigen-Mode Expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Seok [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Po [ANSCO Corp., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Based on the idea of eigen-mode expansion, a method to analyze the reflection of Lamb wave from a finite vertical discontinuity of plate is theoretically derived and verified by experiment. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result, and this strongly suggests that eigen-mode expansion method could be used for solution of inverse scattering problem for ultrasonic testing using Lamb wave

  18. Transmission, reflection and localization of waves in one-dimensional amplifying media with nonlinear gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Phi [Central University of Construction, Tuy Hoa (Viet Nam); Kim, Ki Hong [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We study theoretically the influence of nonlinear gain effects on the transmission and the Anderson localization of waves in both uniform and random one-dimensional amplifying media by using the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation. In uniform amplifying media with nonlinear gain, we find that the strong oscillatory behavior of the transmittance and the reflectance for odd and even values of the sample length disappears for large nonlinearities. The exponential decay rate of the transmittance in the asymptotic limit is found to be independent of nonlinear gain. In random amplifying media, we find that the maximum values of the disorder-averaged logarithmic transmittance and reflectance depend nonmonotonically on the strength of nonlinear gain. We also find that the localization length is independent of nonlinear gain. In other words, the Anderson localization is neither enhanced nor weakened due to nonlinear gain. In both the uniform and the random cases, the crossover length, which is the critical length for the amplification to be efficient, is strongly reduced by the nonlinear nature of the gain.

  19. CONTRIBUTION OF VELOCITY VORTICES AND FAST SHOCK REFLECTION AND REFRACTION TO THE FORMATION OF EUV WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun [Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Ning [School of Tourism and Geography, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650031 (China); Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock at the front of the rope, which then produces a type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast shock touches the bottom boundary, so the Moreton wave lags the type II burst. A secondary echo occurs in the area where reflection of the fast shock encounters the slow-mode shock, and the nearby magnetic field lines are further distorted because of the interaction between the secondary echo and the velocity vortices. Our results indicate that the EUV wave may arise from various processes that are revealed in the new simulations.

  20. The kinetic characteristic features of the low temperature hydrogen oxidation during the induction period behind reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonov, G. L.; Garmash, A. A.; Medvedev, S. P.; Seletkova, A. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Tereza, A. M.; Vlasov, P. A.

    2016-11-01

    The experiments on the ignition of H2-O2 mixtures behind reflected shock waves were carried out. In these experiments the chemiluminescence of electronically excited OH* radicals (λ = 308 nm) at the early stage of the ignition induction period is studied over the temperature range of 800 observed. The experiments showed that the onset of OH* emission is always ahead of the time of pressure rise. Any regular dependence between the onset of OH* emission and the initial temperature behind the reflected shock wave T50 is not observed. This is indicative of a stochastic character of this process or hotspot ignition of the reactive mixture.

  1. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  2. Si-prism-array coupled terahertz-wave parametric oscillator with pump light totally reflected at the terahertz-wave exit surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang; Liu, Chuang; Chen, Zhenlei

    2016-09-01

    A Si-prism-array coupled terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator with the pump totally reflected at the THz-wave exit surface (PR-Si-TPO) is demonstrated by manufacturing an 800 nm air gap between the crystal and the Si-prism array. Influence on the total reflection of the pump from the Si prisms is eliminated and efficient coupling of the THz wave is ensured by using this air gap. When the THz-wave frequency varies from 1.8 to 2.3 THz, compared with a Si-prism-array coupled TPO (Si-TPO) with the pump transmitting through the crystal directly, the THz-wave output energy is enhanced by 20-50 times, and the oscillating threshold is reduced by 10%-35%. Furthermore, the high end of the THz-wave frequency tuning range of the PR-Si-TPO is expanded to 3.66 THz compared with 2.5 THz for the Si-TPO.

  3. Energy distribution among the reflected and refracted plane elastic waves at the boundary between transversely isotropic media - 2nd Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AHMAD

    1967-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy ratios of the reflected and refracted waves
    at the boundary between transversely isotropic media have been investigated.
    The energy equation has been derived on two bases, namely as (a
    double of the kinetic energy, (ft double of the potential energy. The ratios
    of the derived waves to that of the incident quasilongitudinal wave have been
    calculated for the particular case, where the symmetry axes of the media
    coincide with the normal to the boundary surface. The influence of varying
    the different elastic parameters is shown in a few diagrams

  4. Reflection and transmission of plane harmonic waves at an interface between liquid and micropolar viscoelastic solid with stretch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2000-12-01

    A solution of the field equations governing small motions of a micropolar viscoelastic solid half-space with stretch is employed to study the reflection and transmission at the interface between a liquid and a micropolar viscoelastic solid with stretch. The amplitude ratios for various reflected and refracted waves are computed and depicted graphically. Effects of axial stretch and viscosity on the amplitude ratios are discussed.

  5. Experimental study on the determination of the shear-wave reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ediguer E.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Buiochi, Flávio

    2012-05-01

    This work implements the ultrasonic shear-wave reflectance method for viscosity measurements. A modeconversion device was used for the dynamic viscosity measurement of mineral oil, SAE 40 automotive oil and glycerin samples at room temperature and 1 MHz. A novel signals processing technique that calculates the reflection coefficient magnitude in a frequency band, instead of a single frequency, was employed, showing an important improvement on the measurement accuracy.

  6. Dynamics of 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming event and its impact on cold weather over Eurasia: Role of planetary wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Zelin, Cai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander Ivanovich; Wei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of stratospheric planetary wave reflection on tropospheric weather over Central Eurasia during the 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) event. We analyze EP fluxes and Plumb wave activity fluxes to study the two and three dimensional aspects of wave propagation, respectively. The 2013 SSW event is excited by the combined influence of wavenumber 1 (WN1) and wavenumber 2 (WN2) planetary waves, which makes the event an unusual one and seems to have significant impact on tropospheric weather regime. We observe an extraordinary development of a ridge over the Siberian Tundra and the North Pacific during first development stage (last week of December 2012) and later from the North Atlantic in the second development stage (first week of January 2013), and these waves appear to be responsible for the excitation of the WN2 pattern during the SSW. The wave packets propagated upward and were then reflected back down to central Eurasia due to strong negative wind shear in the upper stratospheric polar jet, caused by the SSW event. Waves that propagated downward led to the formation of a deep trough over Eurasia and brought extreme cold weather over Kazakhstan, the Southern part of Russia and the Northwestern part of China during mid-January 2013.

  7. Pulse wave velocity measurement as a marker of arterial stiffness in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurz, Eberhard; Aeschbacher, Eliane; Carman, Nicholas; Schibli, Susanne; Sokollik, Christiane; Simonetti, Giacomo D

    2017-07-01

    In adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased, leading to long-term morbidity. Arterial stiffness (AS) measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a validated early precursor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and measurement of PWV was shown to be a feasible test in children. The aim of this study was to assess AS in children with IBD. In this prospective study, we determined PWV between the carotid and femoral artery (PWVcf) in 25 children and adolescents with IBD (11 females, median age 14.1 years, median disease duration 2.8 years). The majority (68%) of the subjects were in clinical remission, and 48% received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) treatment. AS was not increased in this cohort of children and adolescents with IBD, who did not have signs of cardiovascular disease, such as arterial hypertension. PWV seems to be normal in children with IBD in remission or with mild disease activity. Larger studies should assess its potential role as a valid and non-invasive follow-up marker in children with IBD, to avoid cardiovascular complications. What is Known : • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). • Pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement is the current gold standard to assess arterial stiffness (AS), which is an early predictor of CVD. What is New: • This is the first study using PWV measurements to determine AS in children with IBD. • In children with IBD in remission or only mild disease activity AS is not increased.

  8. Reflection seismic survey across a fault zone in the Leinetal Graben, Germany, using P- and SH-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmann, P.; Polom, U.; Buness, H.; Thomas, R.

    2012-04-01

    Fault systems are considered as a valuable hydro-geothermal reservoir for heat and energy extraction, as permeability may be enhanced compared to the surrounding host rock. Seismic measurements are a well established tool to reveal their structure at depth. Apart from structural parameters like dip, extent and throw, they allow us to derive lithologic parameters, e.g. seismic velocities and impedance. Usually, only compressional waves have been used so far. In the context of the "gebo" Collaborative Research Program, seismic methods are revised to image and characterize geological fault zones in order to minimize the geological and technical risk for geothermal projects. In doing so, we evaluate and develop seismic acquisition, processing and interpretation techniques both for compressional and shear wave surveys to estimate the geothermal potential of fault zones. Here, we present results from high-resolution P- and SH-wave reflection seismic surveys along one and the same profile. They were carried out across the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, Germany. At this survey site, primarily Triassic units crop out that are disrupted by major fault system probably extending down into Permian Zechstein. The seismic P-wave measurements (2.5 m CDP spacing, 20 - 180 Hz sweep sent out by a small vibrator) imaged the structure of the subsurface and its fault inventory with high resolution. Imaging ranges from approximately 50 m (base Keuper) to approximately 1.8 km (within Zechstein) depth. The profiles reveal that the area has undergone multiphase tectonics. This becomes manifest in a complex seismic reflection pattern. In addition the P-wave velocity model shows several features that can be related to folding and faulting. Preliminary results of the SH-wave measurements (0.5 m CDP spacing, 10 - 100 Hz sweep) show that the complex structural geological settings in the subsurface, as imaged by the P-wave survey, can also be imaged by a reflection shear-waves

  9. Reflection and Transmission of Plane Electromagnetic Waves by a Geologic Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Electric field and magnetic field reflection and transmission responses generated by a plane wave normally incident onto a finite - thickness geologic layer are mathematically derived and numerically evaluated. A thin layer with enhanced electric current conductivity and/or magnetic permeability is a reasonable geophysical representation of a hydraulic fracture inject ed with a high - contrast proppant pack. Both theory and numerics indicate that backward - and forward - scattered electromagnetic wavefields are potentially observable in a field experiment, despite the extreme thinness of a fracture compared to a typical low - frequency electromagnetic wavelength. The First Born Approximation (FBA) representation of layer scattering, significant for inversion studies, is shown to be accurate for a thin layer with mild medium parameter (i.e., conductivity, permeability, and per mittivity) contrasts with the surrounding homogeneous wholespace. However, FBA scattering theory breaks down for thick layers and strong parameter contrasts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. This research is conducted under the auspices of CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) SC11/01780.00 between Carbo Ceramics Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories. The author acknowledges former Carbo R&D Vic e - President Mr. Chad Cannan and former SNL Geophysics Department manage r Ms. Amy Halloran for their interest i n and support of this work. Technical discussions with Project Manager and Principal Investigator Dr. Chester J. Weiss of the SNL Geophysics Department greatly benefited this work. Dr. Lewis C. Bartel, formerly with S NL and presently a consultant to Carbo Ceramics, provided many useful and intuitive insights, and

  10. Does mean heart dose sufficiently reflect coronary artery exposure in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Influence of respiratory gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker-Schiebe, Martina [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Braunschweig (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Stockhammer, Maxi; Franz, Heiko [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Braunschweig (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Wetzel, Fabian [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    With extensive use of systemic treatment, the issue of cardiac mortality after breast cancer radiation (RT) is still important. The aim of our analysis was to clarify whether the dose to one surrogate parameter (e. g., mean heart dose, as used in most studies) reflects the dose to the other cardiovascular structures especially the left anterior descending artery depending on breathing-adapted RT. A total of 130 patients who underwent adjuvant RT (50.4 Gy plus boost 9-16 Gy) were evaluated. In all, 71 patients were treated with free-breathing and 59 patients using respiratory monitoring (gated RT). Dosimetric associations were calculated. The mean dose to the heart (Dmean heart) was reduced from 2.7 (0.8-5.2) Gy to 2.4 (1.1-4.6) Gy, the Dmean LAD (left anterior descending artery) decreased from 11.1 (1.3-28.6) Gy to 9.3 (2.2-19.9) Gy with gated RT (p = 0.04). A significant relationship was shown for Dmean{sub heart}-Dmean LAD, V25heart-Dmean LAD and Dmax heart-Dmax LAD for gated patients only (p < 0.01). For every 1 Gy increase in Dmean heart, mean LAD doses rose by 3.6 Gy, without gating V25 ≤5 % did not assure a benefit and resulted in Dmean LAD between 1.3 and 28.6 Gy. A significant reduction and association of heart and coronary artery (LAD) doses using inspiratory gating was shown. However, in free-breathing plans commonly measured dose constraints do not allow precise estimation of the dose to the coronary arteries. (orig.) [German] Das Risiko kardialer Spaetfolgen nach Bestrahlung (RT) eines Mammakarzinoms spielt insbesondere auch aufgrund der zunehmenden systemischen Begleittherapien eine wichtige Rolle. Unklar ist, welche koronaren und/oder myokardialen Mechanismen hier entscheidend sind. Der Einfluss der Atemtriggerung und der daraus resultierenden geometrischen Lagevariabilitaet der Risikoorgane auf die Dosisverteilung am Herzen/Koronarien sollte geprueft werden, um zu klaeren, inwieweit die mittlere Herzdosis ein ausreichender Surrogatparameter fuer

  11. Reflection and refraction of an arbitrary electromagnetic wave at a plane interface separating an isotropic and a biaxial medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnes, J J; Sithambaranathan, G S

    2001-12-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the reflected and transmitted fields resulting when an arbitrary electromagnetic field is incident on a plane interface separating an isotropic medium and a biaxially anisotropic medium in which one of the principal axes is along the interface normal. From our exact solutions for the reflected fields resulting when a plane TE or TM wave is incident on the plane interface, it can be inferred that the reflected field contains both a TE and a TM component. This gives a change in polarization that can be utilized to determine the properties of the biaxial medium. The time-harmonic solution for the reflected field is in the form of two quadruple integrals, one of which is a superposition of plane waves polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence and the other a superposition of plane waves polarized parallel to the plane of incidence. The time-harmonic solution for the transmitted field is also in the form of two quadruple integrals. Each of these is a superposition of extraordinary plane waves with displacement vectors that are perpendicular to the direction of phase propagation.

  12. An assessment of the potential of continuous-wave ranging for measuring the distance to a highly reflective, infinite sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bailey, M. C.; Czerner, M. J.; Dudley, K. L.; Vedeler, E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a continuous-wave, distance-measuring technique for measuring the distance from a spacecraft antenna to a highly ionized plasma surface is examined. The reflection coefficient angle is computed for several aperture models. It is concluded that aperture size and the presence of a nonablating dielectric cover over the antenna are critical factors.

  13. Modeling of the wave transmission properties of large arteries using nonlinear elastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pythoud, F; Stergiopulos, N; Meister, J J

    1994-11-01

    We propose a new, simple way of constructing elastic tubes which can be used to model the nonlinear elastic properties of large arteries. The tube models are constructed from a silicon elastomer (Sylgard 184, Dow Corning), which exhibits a nonlinear behavior with increased stiffness at high strains. Tests conducted on different tube models showed that, with the proper choice of geometric parameters, the elastic properties, in terms of area-pressure relation and compliance, can be similar to that of real arteries.

  14. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optical and structural characterization of reflective quarter wave plates for EUV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballah, A. E. H.; Zuppella, P.; Corso, A. J.; Nicolosi, P.

    2016-07-01

    The high demand to understand the optical, electronic, and structure properties of materials has fostered to extend the investigation down to shorter wavelengths in the far ultraviolet (FUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range. This has pushed scientists to investigate and design new optical tools as wave retarder (QWR) which, coupled with other techniques, can provide valuable information about physical, like magnetic and optical properties of materials. We have designed and studied an EUV polarimetric apparatus based on multilayer structures as QWR with a protective capping layer to avoid oxidation and contamination to improve stability and reflectivity efficiency. This device works within a suitably wide spectral range (88-160 nm) where some important spectral emission lines are as the hydrogen Lyman alpha 121.6 and Oxygen VI (103.2 nm) lines. Such design could be particularly useful as analytical tools in EUV-ellipsometry field. The system can be a relatively simple alternative to Large Scale Facilities and can be applied to test optical components by deriving their efficiency and their phase effect, i.e. determining the Mueller Matrix terms, and even to the analysis of optical surface and interface properties of thin films. In addition, the phase retarder element could be used in other experimental applications for generating EUV radiation beams of suitable polarization or for their characterization.

  16. Displacement noise from back scattering and specular reflection of input optics in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, B; Genin, E; Vajente, G; Marque, J

    2013-05-06

    The second generation of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors are currently being built and installed. They are designed to be better in strain sensitivity by about a factor 10 with respect to the first generation. Light originating from the laser and following unintended paths, called stray light, has been a major problem during the commissioning of all of the first generation detectors. Indeed, stray light carries information about the phase of the emitting object. Therefore, in the next generation all the optics will be suspended in the vacuum in order to mitigate their associated stray light displacement noise. Despite this additional precaution, the challenging target sensitivity at low frequency which is partially limited by quantum radiation pressure combined with up-conversion effects, requires more detailed investigation. In this paper, we turn our attention to stray light originating from auxiliary optical benches. We use a dedicated formalism to compute the re-coupling of back-reflected and back-scattered light. We show, in particular, how much care should be taken in designing and setting requirements for the input bench optics.

  17. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subrosion is a term for underground leaching of soluble rocks and is a global phenomenon. It involves dissolution of evaporites due to the presence of unsaturated water, fractures and faults. Fractures and faults are pathways for water to circulate and to generate subsurface cavities. Depending on the leached material and the parameters of the generation process, especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. Subrosion is a natural process, but it can be enhanced by anthropogenic factors like manipulation of the aquifer system and groundwater flow and by e.g. extraction of saline water. The formation of sinkholes and depressions are a dangerous geohazard, especially if they occur in urban areas, which often leads to building and infrastructural damage and life-threatening situations. For this reason investigations of the processes that induce subrosion and a detailed analysis of the resulting structures are of importance. To develop a comprehensive model of near-subsurface subrosion structures, reflection seismics is one of the methods used by the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics. The study area is located in the city of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by Permian deposits. Bad Frankenhausen is situated directly south of the Kyffhäuser mountain range at the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault. This major fault is one of the main pathways for the circulating ground- and meteoric waters that leach the Permian deposits, especially the Leine-, Staßfurt- and Werra Formations. 2014 and 2015 eight shear wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out in the urban area of Bad Frankenhausen and three profiles in the countrified surroundings. Altogether ca. 3.6 km were surveyed using a landstreamer as receiver and an electro-dynamic vibrator as source. The surveys were

  18. Evaluation of arterial stiffness with plasma GGT levels and pulse wave velocity measurement in patients with FMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Filiz; Ulu, Sena; Akcı, Önder; Ahsen, Ahmet; Demir, Kasım; Yüksel, Şeref

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive technique used to evaluate the arterial elasticity, which is an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Lately, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is considered a determiner of arterial stiffness (AS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between GGT levels and AS with PWV in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The study was conducted with 60 patients with FMF and 40 controls. Genetic analysis of the patients were performed. AS was assessed by PWV and, after the measurement of PWV, the presence of AS was determined. Mean PWV values and AS frequency were significantly higher in patients with FMF compared with the control group (pFMF patients were higher than in the control group but the difference was not statistically different. In the correlation analysis, PWV and AS were positively correlated with FMF (r=0349, pFMF duration and FMF were associated with GGT (r=0.300, p=0.02; r=0199, p=0.047, respectively). Increased PWV values in FMF patients may indicate arterial stiffness. These patients may be followed closely with PWV as an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the cardiovascular risk can be determined in the early stages of disease and it may be possible to take necessary precautions.

  19. Investigation on empowering one direction emission of guided waves to avoid undesired reflections from other pipe attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Peter W.; Zhou, Fang

    2016-02-01

    An in-service pipe always contains elbows and joints at the ends of the pipe. Since the emitted guided waves from a transducer array is bi-directional, any attachments located at both ends of the pipe will cause reflections. For building pipes that are partially covered by wall, the transducer array must be installed near one end of the pipe. If there is elbow or joint connected to that end of the pipe, high reflections generated from the elbow or joint are inevitable. Such reflections may interfere the detection of reflections caused by true defect exists along the pipe body. Hence, to minimize such undesired interference, one must employs some smart devices or algorithms so that it can reduce the emission of guided wave from one direction but enhance the emission from the other direction. To achieve such purpose, two identical transducer arrays must be installed on the same pipe but with a smartly and specially calculated distance apart from the mounting locations of these two arrays. The distance is to ensure there is a proper time delay for emitting the second array after the emission of the first array. The designed processes are listed as follow. Firstly, two identical transducer arrays that could emit L(0,1) guided waves were mounted on a pipe with a specific distance apart from their mounting locations. The distance was determined after calculating the necessary time delay. Secondly, the guided waves generated from the two arrays are combined together to create the desired superimposing effect. With the help of simulation and finite element analysis, such single direction guided wave was successfully generated and tested. By accurately adjusted the time delay, results showed that it is possible to minimize the emitted guided waves in one direction and then empower the guided waves in another direction. Hence, the reflections generated from elbows and joints at one end of the pipe has been minimized, whilst, the emission of guided wave in the other direction

  20. Experimental measurement of variations in the optical reflection coefficient of water-magnetic liquid interface in an electric field, wave motion, and surface instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekanov, V. V.; Kandaurova, N. V.; Chekanov, V. S.

    2014-09-01

    A variation in the reflection coefficient of an interface of two liquids (water and magnetic liquid) in the presence of an electric field is experimentally studied. An increase in the reflection coefficient of the interface is demonstrated. A surface instability of the water-magnetic liquid interface, the wave motion at the interface, and wave interference are observed.

  1. Reflection Of Propagating Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves In Hot Coronal Loops : Multi-instrument Observations and Numerical Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Sudip; Fang, Xia; Banerjee, Dipankar; Pant, Vaibhav; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Slow MHD waves are important tools for understanding the coronal structures and dynamics. In this paper, we report a number of observations, from X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board HINODE and SDO/AIA of reflecting longitudinal waves in hot coronal loops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind as seen from the XRT and simultaneously with the AIA. The wave appears after a micro-flare occurs at one of the footpoints. We estimate the density and the temperature of the loop plasma by performing DEM analysis on the AIA image sequence. The estimated speed of propagation is comparable or lower than the local sound speed suggesting it to be a propagating slow wave. The intensity perturbation amplitudes, in every case, falls very rapidly as the perturbation moves along the loop and eventually vanishes after one or more reflections. To check the consistency of such reflection signatures with the obtained loop parameters, we perform a 2.5D MHD simulation, which uses the parameters obtained from our observati...

  2. Pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness among people with spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatani, Masae; Masani, Kei; Oh, Paul I; Miyachi, Motohiko; Popovic, Milos R; Craven, B Cathy

    2009-01-01

    The most significant complication and leading cause of death for people with spinal cord injury (SCI) is coronary artery disease (CAD). It has been confirmed that aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an emerging CAD predictor among able-bodied individuals. No prior study has described PWV values among people with SCI. The objective of this study was to compare aortic (the common carotid to femoral artery) PWV, arm (the brachial to radial artery) PWV, and leg (the femoral to posterior tibial artery) PWV in people with SCI (SCI group) to able-bodied controls (non-SCI group). Participants included 12 men with SCI and 9 non-SCI controls matched for age, sex, height, and weight. Participants with a history of CAD or current metabolic syndrome were excluded. Aortic, arm, and leg PWV was measured using the echo Doppler method. Aortic PWV (mean +/- SD) in the SCI group (1,274 +/- 369 cm/s) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in the non-SCI group (948 +/- 110 cm/s). There were no significant between-group differences in mean arm PWV (SCI: 1,152 +/- 193 cm/s, non-SCI: 1,237 +/- 193 cm/s) or mean leg PWV (SCI: 1,096 +/- 173 cm/s, non-SCI: 994 +/- 178 cm/s) values. Aortic PWV was higher among the SCI group compared with the non-SCI group. The higher mean aortic PWV values among the SCI group compared with the non-SCI group indicated a higher risk of CAD among people with SCI in the absence of metabolic syndrome.

  3. Comparison between holographic interferometry and high-speed videography techniques in the study of the reflection of plane shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Filipe J.; Skews, Beric W.

    1997-05-01

    Double exposure holographic interferometry and high speed laser shadowgraph photography and videography are used to investigate the mutual reflection of two plane shock waves. Normally research on the transition from regular to Mach reflection is undertaken by allowing a plane shock wave to impinge on a wedge. However due to the boundary layer growth on the wedge, regular reflection persists at wedge angles higher than that allowed for by inviscid shock wave theory. Several bifurcated shock tubes have been constructed, wherein an initially planar shock wave is split symmetrically into two and then recombined at the trailing edge of a wedge. The plane of symmetry acts as an ideal rigid wall eliminating thermal and viscous boundary layer effects. The flow visualization system used needs to provide high resolution information on the shockwave, slipstream, triple point and vortex positions and angles. Initially shadowgraph and schlieren methods, with a Xenon light source, were used. These results, while proving useful, are not of a sufficient resolution to measure the Mach stem and slipstream lengths accurately enough in order to determine the transition point between regular and Mach reflection. To obtain the required image resolution a 2 joule double pulse ruby laser, with a 30 ns pulse duration, was used to make holographic interferograms. The combined advantages of holographic interferometry and the 30 ns pulse laser allows one to obtain much sharper definition, and more qualitative as well as quantitative information on the flow field. The disadvantages of this system are: the long time taken to develop holograms, the difficulty of aligning the pulse laser and the fact that only one image per test is obtained. Direct contact shadowgraphs were also obtained using the pulse ruby laser to help determine triple point trajectory angles. In order to provide further information a one million frames per second CCD camera, which can take up to 10 superimposed images, was

  4. Effect of Pressure Gradients on the Initiation of PBX-9502 via Irregular (Mach) Reflection of Low Pressure Curved Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Phillip Isaac [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    In the instance of multiple fragment impact on cased explosive, isolated curved shocks are generated in the explosive. These curved shocks propagate and may interact and form irregular or Mach reflections along the interaction loci, thereby producing a single shock that may be sufficient to initiate PBX-9501. However, the incident shocks are divergent and their intensity generally decreases as they expand, and the regions behind the Mach stem interaction loci are generally unsupported and allow release waves to rapidly affect the flow. The effects of release waves and divergent shocks may be considered theoretically through a “Shock Change Equation”.

  5. Associations between plasma fibulin-1, pulse wave velocity and diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and arterial stiffness and its consequences may be the factor connecting the two. Arterial stiffness is often measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), but no plasma biomarker reflecting arterial stiffnes...

  6. 转换波AVO反演速度比各横波反射系数%Converted wave AVO inversion for average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏修成; 陈天胜; 季玉新

    2008-01-01

    Based on the empirical Gardner equation describing the relationship between density and compressional wave velocity, the converted wave reflection coefficient extrema attributes for AVO analysis are proposed and the relations between the extrema position and amplitude, average velocity ratio across the interface, and shear wave reflection coefficient are derived. The extrema position is a monotonically decreasing function of average velocity ratio, and the extrema amplitude is a function of average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient. For theoretical models, the average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient are inverted from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function to converted wave AVO curves. Shear wave reflection coefficient sections have clearer physical meaning than conventional converted wave stacked sections and establish the theoretical foundation for geological structural interpretation and event correlation. 'The method of inverting average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function is applied to real CCP gathers. The inverted average velocity ratios are consistent with those computed from compressional and shear wave well logs.

  7. 振荡管复合阻尼陷波%ELIMINATION OF REFLECT SHOCK WAVE IN OSCILLATORY TUBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学来; 朱彻

    2001-01-01

    A new concept,compound damp drip for absorbing shock wave in oscillatory tube,is developed in the present paper.The main idea of the concept is that the shock wave absorber must has the two functions,that is,it can not only exhaust the energy of the incident shock wave fully but also transfer the energy out promptly.In the experiment,the compound damp drip is structured with a multi-orifice for intensifying the energy dissipation of the shock wave and an internal cooling system for strengthening the heat transfer.The experimental results show that a strong reflect shock wave,whose strength is 66%of the incident shock wave ,is measured at the position of the relative tube length x/L=0.3 when the oscillatory tube without the compound damp drip.But,after the compound damp drip is amounted at the closed end of the tube,the reflect shock wave is eliminated effectively and the refrigerating efficiency η is increased by 4?%~10?% in case of the L/d ratio is 140 and the expansion ratio ε is changed from 2.0 to 6.0.What is more ,the refrigerating efficiency in case of L/d=140 and the tube is mounted with the compound damp drip is still higher by 2?%~6?% than that the tube without damp drip but L/d=300.The above result means that while the damp drip is used,the refrigerating efficiency can be increased and the size of the refrigerator can be decreased significantly.

  8. New and Improved T-wave Morphology Parameters to Differentiate Healthy Individuals from those with Cardiomyopathy and Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, E. C.; Schlegel, T. T.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Starc, V.; Rahman, M. A.; Delgado, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the ability of several known as well as new ECG repolarization parameters to differentiate healthy individuals from patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiomyopathy (CM). Advanced high-fidelity 12-lead ECG tests (approx. 5-min supine) were first performed on a "training set" of 99 individuals: 33 with ischemic or dilated CM and low ejection fraction (EF less than 40%); 33 with catheterization-proven obstructive CAD but normal EF; and 33 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. The following multiple parameters of T-wave morphology (TWM) were derived via signal averaging and singular value decomposition (SVD, which yields 8 eigenvalues, rho(sub 1) greater than rho(sub 2)...greater than rho(sub 8) and studied for their retrospective accuracy in detecting underlying disease: 1) Principal component analysis ratio of the T wave (T-PCA) = 100*rho(sub 2)/rho(sub 1); 2) Relative T-wave residuum (rTWR) = 100* SIGMA (rho(sub 4)(sup 2) +...+ rho(sub 8)(sup 2)); 3) Modified complexity ratio of the T wave (T-mCR) = 100*SIGMA(rho(sub 3)(sup 2) +...+rho(sb 8) (sup 2)); and 4) Normalized 3-dimensional volume of the T wave (nTV) = 100*(rho(sub 2)*rho(sub 3)/rho(sub 1)(sup 2). All TWM parameters significantly differentiated CAD from controls (p less than 0.0001), and also CM from controls (p less than 0.0001). Retrospective areas under the ROC curve were 0.77, 0.81, 0.82, and 0.83 (CAD vs. controls) and 0.93, 0.89, 0.95 and 0.96 (CM vs. controls) for T-PCA, rTWR, T-mCR and nTV respectively. The newer TWM parameters (T-mCR and nTV) thus outperformed the more established parameters (T-PCA and rTWR), presumably by putting a greater emphasis on the third T-wave eigenvalue, which in most healthy subjects has little energy compared to the first two eigenvalues. Subsequent prospective analyses have also yielded similar results, such that we conclude that diagnostic differentiation of pathology from non-pathology may be especially aided by detecting

  9. Pulse Wave Velocity as Marker of Preclinical Arterial Disease: Reference Levels in a Uruguayan Population Considering Wave Detection Algorithms, Path Lengths, Aging, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV has emerged as the gold standard for non-invasive evaluation of aortic stiffness; absence of standardized methodologies of study and lack of normal and reference values have limited a wider clinical implementation. This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American population in order to characterize normal, reference, and threshold levels of PWV considering normal age-related changes in PWV and the prevailing blood pressure level during the study. A conservative approach was used, and we excluded symptomatic subjects; subjects with history of cardiovascular (CV disease, diabetes mellitus or renal failure; subjects with traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender; asymptomatic subjects with atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries; patients taking anti-hypertensives or lipid-lowering medications. The included subjects (n=429 were categorized according to the age decade and the blood pressure levels (at study time. All subjects represented the “reference population”; the group of subjects with optimal/normal blood pressures levels at study time represented the “normal population.” Results. Normal and reference PWV levels were obtained. Differences in PWV levels and aging-associated changes were obtained. The obtained data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related arterial changes.

  10. Asymptotic Formulas for the Reflection/Transmission of Long Water Waves Propagating in a Tapered and Slender Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric-Gustavo Bautista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain asymptotic formulas for the reflection/transmission coefficients of linear long water waves, propagating in a harbor composed of a tapered and slender region connected to uniform inlet and outlet regions. The region with variable character obeys a power-law. The governing equations are presented in dimensionless form. The reflection/transmission coefficients are obtained for the limit of the parameter κ2≪1, which corresponds to a wavelength shorter than the characteristic horizontal length of the harbor. The asymptotic formulas consider those cases when the geometry of the harbor can be variable in width and depth: linear or parabolic among other transitions or a combination of these geometries. For harbors with nonlinear transitions, the parabolic geometry is less reflective than the other cases. The reflection coefficient for linear transitions just presents an oscillatory behavior. We can infer that the deducted formulas provide as first approximation a practical reference to the analysis of wave reflection/transmission in harbors.

  11. Indexes of aortic pressure augmentation markedly underestimate the contribution of reflected waves toward variations in aortic pressure and left ventricular mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booysen, Hendrik L; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Sibiya, Moekanyi J; Hodson, Bryan; Raymond, Andrew; Libhaber, Elena; Sareli, Pinhas; Norton, Gavin R

    2015-03-01

    Although indexes of wave reflection enhance risk prediction, the extent to which measures of aortic systolic pressure augmentation (augmented pressures [Pa] or augmentation index) underestimate the effects of reflected waves on cardiovascular risk is uncertain. In participants from a community sample (age >16), we compared the relative contribution of reflected (backward wave pressures and the reflected wave index [RI]) versus augmented (Pa and augmentation index) pressure wave indexes to variations in central aortic pulse pressure (PPc; n=1185), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI; n=793). Aortic hemodynamics and LVMI were determined using radial applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor) and echocardiography. Independent of confounders, RI and backward wave pressures contributed more than forward wave pressures, whereas Pa and augmentation index contributed less than incident wave pressure to variations in PPc (Ppressures (partial r=0.28, Ppressures (partial r=0.15, Ppressure (partial r=0.22, Ppressures (partial r=0.21, Ppressures (P=0.98), while incident wave pressure (partial r=0.23, Prelations between indexes of aortic pressure augmentation and PPc or LVMI, strikingly better relations are noted between aortic wave reflection and PPc or LVMI. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. [Alterations in arterial compliance of dyslipidemic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Fernando Mario; Corral, Pablo; Blanco, Gustavo Hector; Scandurra, Adriana Graciela; Meschino, Gustavo Javier

    2015-01-01

    We studied the alteration on the distensibility of the arterial walls caused by dyslipidemia LDLc dependent, along the decades of life, by means of a study of the radial artery pulse wave. We made an analysis of the radial artery pulse wave records acquired by means a movement displacement sensor, placed on radial palpation area. We recruited 100 dyslipidemic men without other cardiovascular risk factors, between the 3rd and the 6th decade. We identified the reflected wave in the records and we computed the augmentation index in order to quantify its amplitude and position. This index is useful to assess the endothelial dysfunction. Besides, we defined a velocity coefficient as the ratio between the size of the individuals and the delay time between the peak of the systolic wave and the arrival of the reflected wave. Results were compared against those obtained in a group of 161 healthy volunteers. We found that dyslipidemic patients presented augmentation index values similar to controls until the fourth decade, increasing thereafter with significant differences only in the 6th decade. No significant differences were found in the velocity index in any of the ages studied. We conclude that alterations produced by dyslipidemia take decades to manifest, and they begin affecting the mechanism of vasodilation of distal arteries with highest proportion of smooth muscle, without altering the proximal conduit arteries with more elastin content. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. SH-wave reflection seismic and VSP as tools for the investigation of sinkhole areas in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Tschache, Saskia; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes can lead to damage of buildings and infrastructure and they can cause life-threatening situations, if they occur in urban areas. The process behind this phenomenon is called subrosion. Subrosion is the underground leaching of soluble rocks, e.g. anhydrite and gypsum, due to the contact with ground- and meteoric water. Depending on the leached material, and especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. For a better understanding of the subrosion processes a detailed characterization of the resulting structures is necessary. In Germany sinkholes are a problem in many areas. In northern Germany salt and in central and southern Germany sulfate and carbonate deposits are affected by subrosion. The study areas described here are located in Thuringia in central Germany and the underground is characterized by soluble Permian deposits. The occurrence of 20 to 50 sinkholes is reported per year. Two regions, Bad Frankenhausen and Schmalkalden, are investigated, showing a leaning church tower and a sinkhole of 30 m diameter and 20 m depth, respectively. In Bad Frankenhausen four P-wave and 16 SH-wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out, supplemented by three zero-offset VSPs. In Schmalkalden five SH-wave reflection seismic profiles and one zero-offset VSP were acquired. The 2-D seismic sections, in particular the SH-wave profiles, showed known and unknown near-surface faults in the vicinity of sinkholes and depressions. For imaging the near-surface ( 2,5, probably indicating unstable areas due to subrosion. We conclude, that SH-wave reflection seismic offer an important tool for the imaging and characterization of near-surface subrosion structures and the identification of unstable zones, especially in combination with P-wave reflection seismic and zero-offset VSP with P- and S-waves. Presumably there is a connection between the presence of large

  14. High-resolution SH-wave seismic reflection investigations near a coal mine-related roadway collapse feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Erich D.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Richard C.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Lefchik, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    We acquired crossline-crossline (SH-SH) shear-wave reflection data along a heavily trafficked section of Interstate highway 70 in eastern Ohio where the roadway had collapsed into underground coal-mine workings. We acquired these data to determine whether subsurface subsidence processes had continued at the collapse location after remediation, and to identify additional areas of potential collapse along this section of the roadway. A reflection correlating to the overburden and bedrock interface (above the mine workings) was consistently identified in raw field records, and our data processing and imaging targeted this high impedance contrast. Data quality was high enough to permit resolution of vertical offsets of 3-4 ft (0.91-1.2 m) and horizontal disruptions of about 20 ft (6.1 m) in the otherwise continuous bedrock horizon at two locations close to the previous collapse, suggesting a relatively high risk for future roadway failure in these areas. SH-wave data interpretations were supported by exploratory drilling results which confirmed that bedrock had subsided into underlying coal-mine workings at these two locations. Our results show that high-resolution SH-wave seismic reflection surveys can be effective for diagnosing mine-induced subsidence potential beneath heavily traveled roadways.

  15. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karzova, M., E-mail: masha@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France)

    2015-10-28

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime.

  16. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  17. Riding the Wave: Student Researcher Reflection on the Action Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrea; Thomas, Jonathan; Woods, Angie; Suess, Robert; Dole, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is the exploration of and an explanation of student researchers' affect and activity in an action research project. Using a hermeneutical theoretical framework we argue that the researcher group as a whole constructs a wave process and at the same time each individual researcher in the group creates a wave process that…

  18. Identifying Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Middle-Aged Sportsmen: The Additional Value of Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs L Braber

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular screening may benefit middle-aged sportsmen, as coronary artery disease (CAD is the main cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death. Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, may help identify sportsmen with subclinical CAD. We examined the additional value of PWV measurements to traditional CAD risk factors for identifying CAD.From the Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC cohort of asymptomatic, middle-aged sportsmen who underwent low-dose Cardiac CT (CCT after routine sports medical examination (SME, 193 consecutive sportsmen (aged 55 ± 6.6 years were included with additional PWV measurements before CCT. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of PWV values (>8.3 and >7.5 m/s assessed by Arteriograph were used to identify CAD (coronary artery calcium scoring ≥ 100 Agatston Units or coronary CT angiography luminal stenosis ≥ 50% and to assess the additional diagnostic value of PWV to established cardiovascular risk factors.Forty-seven sportsmen (24% had CAD on CCT. They were older (58.9 vs. 53.8 years, p8.3m/s respectively >7.5 m/s sensitivity to detect CAD on CT was 43% and 74%, specificity 69% and 45%, positive predictive value 31% and 30%, and negative predictive value 79% and 84%. Adding PWV to traditional risk factor models did not change the area under the curve (from 0.78 (95% CI = 0.709-0.848 to AUC 0.78 (95% CI 0.710-0.848, p = 0.99 for prediction of CAD on CCT.Limited additional value was found for PWV on top of established risk factors to identify CAD. PWV might still have a role to identify CAD in middle-aged sportsmen if risk factors such as cholesterol are unknown.

  19. Quantum wave packet dynamics with trajectories: reflections on a downhill ramp potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopreore, Courtney L.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2000-07-01

    The quantum trajectory method (QTM) for wave packet dynamics involves solving discretized hydrodynamic equations-of-motion in the Lagrangian picture (C. Lopreore, R.E. Wyatt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 5190). In this Letter, results are presented which illustrate the dynamics of an initial Gaussian wave packet on a downhill ramp potential. Plots are shown for the time evolving probability density, as well as phase space plots and force diagrams. The mechanism, deduced from these plots, surprisingly shows some of the transmitted fluid elements of the wave packet making a U-turn before they head downhill on the ramp potential.

  20. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhard Michael Reindl; Bernd Henning; Jens Rautenberg; Gerhard Lindner; Sergei Olfert; Martin Schmitt

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide ...

  1. Deconvolution imaging of weak reflective pipe defects using guided-wave signals captured by a scanning receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zeqing; Sun, Anyu; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Guided-wave echoes from weak reflective pipe defects are usually interfered by coherent noise and difficult to interpret. In this paper, a deconvolution imaging method is proposed to reconstruct defect images from synthetically focused guided-wave signals, with enhanced axial resolution. A compact transducer, circumferentially scanning around the pipe, is used to receive guided-wave echoes from discontinuities at a distance. This method achieves a higher circumferential sampling density than arrayed transducers-up to 72 sampling spots per lap for a pipe with a diameter of 180 mm. A noise suppression technique is used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The enhancement in both signal-to-noise ratio and axial resolution of the method is experimentally validated by the detection of two kinds of artificial defects: a pitting defect of 5 mm in diameter and 0.9 mm in maximum depth, and iron pieces attached to the pipe surface. A reconstructed image of the pitting defect is obtained with a 5.87 dB signal-to-noise ratio. It is revealed that a high circumferential sampling density is important for the enhancement of the inspection sensitivity, by comparing the images reconstructed with different down-sampling ratios. A modified full width at half maximum is used as the criterion to evaluate the circumferential extent of the region where iron pieces are attached, which is applicable for defects with inhomogeneous reflection intensity.

  2. Reflection of a plane wave from a two-layered seafloor with non-parallel interface between the layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Panagiotis I; Piperakis, George S; Kalogerakis, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    This work studies the reflection coefficient of a plane wave incident on a seafloor consisting of two layers (sediment and substrate), whose interface is linear but not parallel to the water-sediment interface. This is an extension of the well-established and studied reflection coefficient concept for seafloors with parallel layers. Moreover this study introduces the concept of the Coherent Reflection Coefficient (CRC) that extends the usual Rayleigh reflection coefficient definition not only at the water-sediment interface but inside the water column as well. The mathematical formulation of the CRC is derived and its numerical implementation is explained. Based on this implementation a numerical code is developed and incorporated-among other codes-in a user-friendly graphics toolbox that was built to facilitate CRC calculations. Numerical examples for realistic seafloors are presented and the derived results are compared to similar ones for parallel layers, indicating that even for small inclination angles the reflection coefficient difference between parallel and slanted interface layers is substantial, hence cannot be ignored. An imminent application of the extended seafloor model and the CRC introduced in this work is the enhancement of geophysics inversion schemes for the estimation of the seafloor parameters.

  3. S-waves velocity model for the SW-Iberia derived from the IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.; Ayarza, P.; Simancas, F.; Martinez-Poyatos, D.; Azor, A.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2009-04-01

    The IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects acquired in 2003 in SW-Iberia Peninsula provided constraints on the P-wave seismic velocity structure across the three tectonic provinces in the area: the South Portuguesse Zone (SPZ), the Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ) and the Central Iberia Zone (CIZ). These data were acquired by 650 vertical component seismographs (TEXAN seismic recorders) from the IRIS-PASSCAL Instrument center, using explosive sources with charge sizes ranging from 500 to 1000 kg. Both transects A and B are, approximately, 300 km long with a station spacing of 400 m and of 150 m respectively. The relatively small station spacing favored the lateral correlation of the seismic events and provided enough resolution for the identification of shear-wave arrivals. The most prominent S-wave phase recorded by the vertical component sensors corresponds to the SmS which is nearly horizontal for a velocity reduction of 4600 m/s. This phase can even be followed up to near vertical incidence at 18 s(twtt). A few S-wave crustal arrivals can be also identified, although at small offsets they interfere with the previous P-wave arrivals. The Sn phase can be observed at very far offsets providing additional constraints on the nature of the shallow subcrustal mantle. Furthermore, slant stacks of the shot gathers (tau-p sections) reveal the existing of PS energy. PS phases are more difficult to identify in the shot gathers. Finally, a preliminary S-wave velocity model has been derived by iterative forward modeling to provide additional constraints on the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle beneath the Variscan of SW-Iberia.

  4. Two-dimensional standing wave total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy: superresolution imaging of single molecular and biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Daekeun; Cui, Yan; Kim, Yang-Hyo; So, Peter T C

    2007-09-01

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Lateral resolution improvement of up to a factor of 2 has been achieved using structured illumination. In a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope, an evanescence excitation field is formed as light is total internally reflected at an interface between a high and a low index medium. The excitation region resulting in low background fluorescence. We present even higher resolution wide-field biological imaging by use of standing wave total internal reflection fluorescence (SW-TIRF). Evanescent standing wave (SW) illumination is used to generate a sinusoidal high spatial frequency fringe pattern on specimen for lateral resolution enhancement. To prevent thermal drift of the SW, novel detection and estimation of the SW phase with real-time feedback control is devised for the stabilization and control of the fringe phase. SW-TIRF is a wide-field superresolution technique with resolution better than a fifth of emission wavelength or approximately 100 nm lateral resolution. We demonstrate the performance of the SW-TIRF microscopy using one- and two-directional SW illumination with a biological sample of cellular actin cytoskeleton of mouse fibroblast cells as well as single semiconductor nanocrystal molecules. The results confirm the superior resolution of SW-TIRF in addition to the merit of a high signal/background ratio from TIRF microscopy.

  5. Evaluation stationariness of triaxial seismic while drilling and detection of reflected wave; Kosei kussaku ni tomonau danseiha no sanjiku kaiseki ni yoru hiteijo hyoka to hanshaha no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Asanuma, H.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports a method to detect reflected wave components contained in an elastic wave caused in association with well drilling. Measurement was made on an elastic wave caused in association with well drilling in an experimental field by using a triaxial elastic wave detector disposed in a measurement well. Analyzing the particle motion tracks in the derived elastic wave signals (to derive the main axial direction of a three-dimensional hologram) revealed that oscillation direction of the signals changes non-steadily by time centering around the S-wave oscillation direction. In addition, a sound source position was estimated during the drilling. Existence probability of the S-wave signal in the non-steady continuous signals was estimated by handling the particle motion tracks stochastically. In addition, this existence probability was used as a weighting function for a correlative analysis to detect a reflected wave from directly reaching wave components in the non-steady continuous signals. Thus, improvement in reliability of reflected wave detection was attempted. Effectiveness of this method was endorsed by the field data. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Red wine, arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzi, Kalliopi; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Papamichael, Christos; Lekakis, John; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Zampelas, Antonis

    2009-01-01

    Red wine is considered to reduce cardiovascular risk and decrease peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Central aortic pressures are often more sensitive clinical and prognostic factors than peripheral pressures, while arterial stiffness is an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular events. Great efforts are being made to find natural sources of improving health. In order to clarify the mechanisms under which a widely used drink, like red wine, is affecting heart and vessels, we aimed to review the available data regarding the effects of red wine on arterial stiffness, wave reflections and central blood pressures. The effect of red wine on central hemodynamics has been poorly explored with divergent results. Possible consequences of acute and long-term intake on arterial stiffness, wave reflections and central pressures are not clear. This might make someone skeptical when suggesting the consumption of a glass of red wine, although its cardioprotective actions (when moderately consumed) are already shown from epidemiological studies.

  7. Supersonic Shear Wave Imaging to Assess Arterial Nonlinear Behavior and Anisotropy: Proof of Principle via Ex Vivo Testing of the Horse Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Shcherbakova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI is a noninvasive, ultrasound-based technique to quantify the mechanical properties of bulk tissues by measuring the propagation speed of shear waves (SW induced in the tissue with an ultrasound transducer. The technique has been successfully validated in liver and breast (tumor diagnostics and is potentially useful for the assessment of the stiffness of arteries. However, SW propagation in arteries is subjected to different wave phenomena potentially affecting the measurement accuracy. Therefore, we assessed SSI in a less complex ex vivo setup, that is, a thick-walled and rectangular slab of an excised equine aorta. Dynamic uniaxial mechanical testing was performed during the SSI measurements, to dispose of a reference material assessment. An ultrasound probe was fixed in an angle position controller with respect to the tissue to investigate the effect of arterial anisotropy on SSI results. Results indicated that SSI was able to pick up stretch-induced stiffening of the aorta. SW velocities were significantly higher along the specimen's circumferential direction than in the axial direction, consistent with the circumferential orientation of collagen fibers. Hence, we established a first step in studying SW propagation in anisotropic tissues to gain more insight into the feasibility of SSI-based measurements in arteries.

  8. Feasibility of two-dimensional speckle tracking in evaluation of arterial stiffness: Comparison with pulse wave velocity and conventional sonographic markers of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Michał; Grzelak, Piotr; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Polguj, Michał; Łukaszewski, Maciej; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2017-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffening is an early marker of atherosclerosis that has a prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although many markers of arterial hardening have been proposed, the search is on for newer, more user-friendly and reliable surrogates. One such potential candidate has emerged from cardiology, the speckle-tracking technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the two-dimensional speckle tracking for the evaluation of arterial wall stiffness in comparison with standard stiffness parameters. Methods Carotid ultrasound and applanation tonometry were performed in 188 patients with no cardiovascular risk factors. The following parameters were then evaluated: the intima-media complex thickness, distensibility coefficient, β-stiffness index, circumferential strain/strain rate, and pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. These variables were compared with each other and with patient age, and their reliability was assessed with Bland-Altman plots. Results Strain parameters derived from two-dimensional speckle tracking and intima-media complex thickness correlated better with age and pulse wave velocity than standard makers of arterial stiffness. Moreover, the reliability of these measurements was significantly higher than conventional surrogates. Conclusions Two-dimensional speckle tracing is a reliable method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. Therefore, together with intima-media complex thickness measurement, it offers great potential in clinical practice as an early marker of atherosclerosis.

  9. Analysis of X-band radar images for the detection of the reflected and diffracted waves in coastal zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Vicinanza, Diego; Serafino, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The observation of nearshore waves and the knowledge of the sea state parameters can play a crucial role for the safety of harbors and ocean engineering. In the last two decades, different algorithms for the estimation of sea state parameters, surface currents and bathymetry from X-band radar data have been developed and validated [1, 2]. The retrieval of ocean wave parameters such as significant height, period, direction and wavelength of the dominant wave is based on the spectral analysis of data sequences collected by nautical X-band radars [3]. In particular, the reconstruction of the wave motion is carried out through the inversion procedure explained in [1-3], which exploits the dispersion relationship to define a band pass filter used to separate the energy associated with the ocean waves from the background noise. It is worth to note that the shape of such a band pass filter depends upon the value of both the surface currents and bathymetry; in our reconstruction algorithm these parameters are estimated through the (Normalized Scalar Product) procedure [1], which outperforms other existing methods (e.g., the Least Squares) [4]. From the reconstructed wave elevation sequences we can get the directional spectrum that provides useful information (i.e., wavelength, period, direction and amplitude) relevant to the main waves contributing to the wave motion. Of course, in coastal zones a number of diffraction and reflection phenomena can be observed, due to sea-waves impinging obstacles as jetties, breakwaters and boats. In the present paper we want to show the capability to detect reflected and diffracted sea-waves offered by the processing of X-band radar data. Further details relevant to the obtained results will be provided in the full paper and at the conference time. References [1] F. Serafino, C. Lugni, F. Soldovieri, "A novel strategy for the surface current determination from marine X-Band radar data", IEEE Geosci. and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 7, no

  10. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiographic T Wave Inversion in Lead aVL in Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Chronic Stable Angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem L. Farhan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The clinical value of T wave inversion in lead aVL in diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the correlation between aVL T wave inversion and CAD in patients with chronic stable angina.Methods: Electrocardiograms (ECGs of 257 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography were analyzed. All patients had chronic stable angina. All patients with secondary T wave inversion had been excluded (66 patients. The remaining 191 patients constituted the study population. Detailed ECG interpretation and coronary angiographic findings were conducted by experienced cardiologists.Results: T wave inversion in aVL was identified in 89 ECGs (46.8% with definite ischemic Q-ST-T changes in different leads in 97 ECGs (50.8%. Stand alone aVL T wave inversion was found in 27 ECGs (14.1% while ischemic changes in other leads with normal aVL were identified in 36 ECGs (18.8%. The incidence of CAD was 86.3%. Single, two- and multi-vessel CAD were found in 38.8%, 28.5% and 32.7% of cases respectively. The prevalence of left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries were 4.7%, 61.2%, 29.3% and 44.5%, respectively. T wave inversion in aVL was found to be the only ECG variable significantly predicting mid segment left anterior descending artery (LAD lesions (Odds Ratio 2.93, 95% Confidence Interval 1.59-5.37, p=0.001.Conclusion: This study provides new information relating to T wave inversion in lead aVL to mid segment LAD lesions. Implication of this simple finding may help in bedside diagnosis of CAD typically mid LAD lesions. However, further studies are needed to corroborate this finding.

  11. A method to overcome the diffraction limit in infrared microscopy using standing waves in an attenuated total reflection configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendaoui, Nordine; Mani, Aladin; Liu, Ning; Tofail, Syed M.; Silien, Christophe; Peremans, André

    2017-01-01

    A method is proposed to overcome the diffraction limit of spatial resolution in infrared microscopy. To achieve this, standing waves in an attenuated total reflection configuration were generated to spatially modulate the absorbance of adsorbate vibrational transitions. A numerical simulation was undertaken. It showed that chemical imaging with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 nm is achievable in the case of self-assembled patterns (ofoctdecyltrichlorosilane [CH3-(CH2)17-SiCl3]), when probing the methyl modes located near 3.5 micrometres.

  12. Sleep spindle and slow wave frequency reflect motor skill performance in primary school-age children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astill, Rebecca G; Piantoni, Giovanni; Raymann, Roy J E M; Vis, Jose C; Coppens, Joris E; Walker, Matthew P; Stickgold, Robert; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The role of sleep in the enhancement of motor skills has been studied extensively in adults. We aimed to determine involvement of sleep and characteristics of spindles and slow waves in a motor skill in children. Hypothesis: We hypothesized sleep-dependence of skill enhancement a

  13. How Reflected Wave Fronts Dynamically Establish Hooke's Law in a Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Stephen; O'Riordan, John; O'Sullivan, Colm; Twomey, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A simple benchtop experiment in which a moving cart collides with a fixed spring is described. Force-time and force-distance data recorded during the collision display the transit of compression wave fronts through the spring following impact. These data can be used by students to develop a computational model of the dynamics of this simple…

  14. Conservation of angular momentum, transverse shift, and spin Hall effect in reflection and refraction of an electromagnetic wave packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu; Bliokh, Yury P

    2006-02-24

    We present a solution to the problem of reflection and refraction of a polarized Gaussian beam on the interface between two transparent media. The transverse shifts of the beams' centers of gravity are calculated. They always satisfy the total angular momentum conservation law for beams, but, in general, do not satisfy the conservation laws for individual photons as a consequence of the lack of the "which path" information in a two-channel wave scattering. The field structure for the reflected and refracted beams is analyzed. In the scattering of a linearly polarized beam, photons of opposite helicities are accumulated at the opposite edges of the beam: this is the spin Hall effect for photons, which can be registered in the cross-polarized component of the scattered beam.

  15. Goos-Haenchen shifts of the reflected waves from the inhomogeneous slab with a positive and negative index transition layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Hongmin; Zang, Taocheng; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao; Xu, Guoding [Department of Physics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts of the reflected waves through a transition layer where both the dielectric permittivity {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu} change linearly from positive to negative values are investigated. Based on invariant imbedding approach and the stationary-phase method, the differential equations for the reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained. We demonstrate numerically the dependence of the shifts on the angle of incidence and the inhomogeneous slab's thickness. The results show that the GH shifts are sensitive to the angle of incidence in a specific thickness. Different thickness of media can result in the different dependences of the shifts on the angle of incidence. At the positions where {epsilon} or {mu} is zero, due to the resonant effect, the GH shifts can be greatly enhanced. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Hereditary and environmental influences on arterial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C S; Benetos, A

    2007-07-01

    1. With the ageing population and increasing heart failure, arterial function has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular risk because of its adverse effects on ventriculovascular coupling. Population studies have confirmed independent prognostic information of arterial stiffening on cardiovascular survival. 2. The term 'arterial function' encompasses a range of phenotypes, including measures of arterial structure/remodelling, measures of arterial wall mechanics, surrogate measures of stiffness and of wave reflection. There exists significant interaction between these measures and none is truly independent of the others. Added to this complexity is the recognition that, although arterial function has a strong genetic component, quantification requires a range of techniques from twin to family and population studies. 3. The contribution of heritability is often derived from statistical models with input from genomic scanning and candidate gene studies. Studies to date confirm a significant heritable component for the majority of phenotypes examined. However, it has also been recognized that the factors involved in blood pressure maintenance are likely to be separate to those in arterial structural degeneration with ageing. Candidate genes for arterial function go beyond those of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems and include genes involved in signalling pathways and extracellular matrix modulation. 4. The present review examines the evidence for heritability of the major arterial function phenotypes with environmental and ageing modulation. A brief overview of the impact of atherosclerotic risk factors on arterial function is included.

  17. Relative contributions from the ventricle and arterial tree to arterial pressure and its amplification: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddum, Nicholas; Alastruey, Jordi; Chowienczyk, Phil; Rutten, Marcel C M; Segers, Patrick; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Arterial pressure is an important diagnostic parameter for cardiovascular disease. However, relative contributions of individual ventricular and arterial parameters in generating and augmenting pressure are not understood. Using a novel experimental arterial model, our aim was to characterize individual parameter contributions to arterial pressure and its amplification. A piston-driven ventricle provided programmable stroke profiles into various silicone arterial trees and a bovine aorta. Inotropy was varied in the ventricle, and arterial parameters modulated included wall thickness, taper and diameter, the presence of bifurcation, and a native aorta (bovine) versus silicone. Wave reflection at bifurcations was measured and compared with theory, varying parent-to-child tube diameter ratios, and branch angles. Intravascular pressure-tip wires and ultrasonic flow probes measured pressure and flow. Increasing ventricular inotropy independently augmented pressure amplification from 17% to 61% between the lower and higher systolic gradient stroke profiles in the silicone arterial network and from 10% to 32% in the bovine aorta. Amplification increased with presence of a bifurcation, decreasing wall thickness and vessel taper. Pulse pressure increased with increasing wall thickness (stiffness) and taper angle and decreasing diameter. Theoretical predictions of wave transmission through bifurcations werre similar to measurements (correlation: 0.91, R(2) = 0.94) but underestimated wave reflection (correlation: 0.75, R(2) = 0.94), indicating energy losses during mechanical wave reflection. This study offers the first comprehensive investigation of contributors to hypertensive pressure and its propagation throughout the arterial tree. Importantly, ventricular inotropy plays a crucial role in the amplification of peripheral pressure wave, which offers opportunity for noninvasive assessment of ventricular health.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study distinguishes contributions

  18. Cardiac output in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: association with arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure wave amplitudes and outcome of shunt surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Per K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH responding to shunt surgery, we have consistently found elevated intracranial pressure (ICP wave amplitudes during diagnostic ICP monitoring prior to surgery. It remains unknown why ICP wave amplitudes are increased in these patients. Since iNPH is accompanied by a high incidence of vascular co-morbidity, a possible explanation is that there is reduced vascular compliance accompanied by elevated arterial blood pressure (ABP wave amplitudes and even altered cardiac output (CO. To investigate this possibility, the present study was undertaken to continuously monitor CO to determine if it is correlated to ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and the outcome of shunting in iNPH patients. It was specifically addressed whether the increased ICP wave amplitudes seen in iNPH shunt responders were accompanied by elevated CO and/or ABP wave amplitude levels. Methods Prospective iNPH patients (29 were clinically graded using an NPH grading scale. Continuous overnight minimally-invasive monitoring of CO and ABP was done simultaneously with ICP monitoring; the CO, ABP, and ICP parameters were parsed into 6-second time windows. Patients were assessed for shunt surgery on clinical grade, Evan's index, and ICP wave amplitude. Follow-up clinical grading was performed 12 months after surgery. Results ICP wave amplitudes but not CO or ABP wave amplitude, showed good correlation with the response to shunt treatment. The patients with high ICP wave amplitude did not have accompanying high levels of CO or ABP wave amplitude. Correlation analysis between CO and ICP wave amplitudes in individual patients showed different profiles [significantly positive in 10 (35% and significantly negative in 16 (55% of 29 recordings]. This depended on whether there was also a correlation between ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and on the average level of ICP wave amplitude. Conclusions These results gave no

  19. Intensity fluctuations of reflected wave from a diffuse target with a hard edge in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Gao, Ming; Li, Yaqing; Gong, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The intensity fluctuation of the reflected field from a diffuse circular plate with a hard edge in turbulence is investigated by combining the Rytov theory and the Extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The normalized covariance and variance of the reflected intensity are formulated and calculated. The enhancement effect on the normalized variance is discussed around the backscattering direction, which disappears rapidly as the receiving point moves away from the transmitting center. The ;averaging effect; of the target aperture is also discussed, and the results show that the normalized variance and the backscattering enhancement effect decreases with increasing target size.

  20. Attenuation and reflection of radio waves by a melting layer of precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    1990-01-01

    Attenuation and reflection of a melting layer are calculated using a meteorological model. The model employs a new scheme for the calculation of the dielectric properties of melting ice particles with densities ranging from those of loose snow to hail, and a new scheme for calculating the melting

  1. Attenuation and reflection of radio waves by a melting layer of precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    1990-01-01

    Attenuation and reflection of a melting layer are calculated using a meteorological model. The model employs a new scheme for the calculation of the dielectric properties of melting ice particles with densities ranging from those of loose snow to hail, and a new scheme for calculating the melting ra

  2. Attenuation and reflection of radio waves by a melting layer of precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    1990-01-01

    Attenuation and reflection of a melting layer are calculated using a meteorological model. The model employs a new scheme for the calculation of the dielectric properties of melting ice particles with densities ranging from those of loose snow to hail, and a new scheme for calculating the melting ra

  3. Pulse Waves in the Lower Extremities as a Diagnostic Tool of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Predictor of Mortality in Elderly Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Qi-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Fei-Ka; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease may have elongated upstroke time in pulse waves in the lower extremities. We investigated upstroke time as a diagnostic tool of peripheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in an elderly (≥60 years) Chinese population. We recorded pulse waves at the left and right ankles by pneumoplethysmography and calculated the percentage of upstroke time per cardiac cycle. Diagnostic accuracy was compared with the conventional ankle-brachial index method (n=4055) and computed tomographic angiography (34 lower extremities in 17 subjects). Upstroke time per cardiac cycle at baseline (mean±SD, 16.4%±3.1%) was significantly (Pperipheral arterial disease (upstroke time per cardiac cycle, ≥21.7%) in comparison with computed tomographic angiography. During 5.9 years (median) of follow-up, all-cause and cardiovascular deaths occurred in 366 and 183 subjects, respectively. In adjusted Cox regression analyses, an upstroke time per cardiac cycle ≥21.7% (n=219; 5.4%) significantly (Pperipheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in the elderly.

  4. Visualization study of ignition modes behind bifurcated-reflected shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Hiroki; Kasahara, Jiro; Sugiyama, Yuta; Matsuo, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    This study was a numerical and experimental investigation of low-temperature auto-ignitions behindreflected shock waves in which a shock tube was employed as the experimental system. We used ahigh-speed video camera and the Schlieren method to visualize the ignition phenomena. Experimentswere performed over a temperature range from 549 ± 10 to 1349 ± 11 K and a pressure range from56 ± 2 to 203 ± 13 kPa, and a non-diluted stoichiometric acetylene–oxygen mixture was chosen as thecombustible gas...

  5. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Esirkepov, T; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-20

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (approximately 10/30 fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses.

  6. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhidkov, A.; Esirkepov, T.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Koga, J; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    An optically-dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other is shown to be an efficient coherent x-ray converter. The resulting velocity of a quasi-plane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection increases with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing an easy tuning the wavelength of x-rays. The x-ray spectra of a converted, lower frequency coherent light change from the monoc...

  7. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, A; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-01-01

    An optically-dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other is shown to be an efficient coherent x-ray converter. The resulting velocity of a quasi-plane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection increases with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing an easy tuning the wavelength of x-rays. The x-ray spectra of a converted, lower frequency coherent light change from the monochromatic to a high order harmonic-like with the duration of ionizing pulses and the intensity of scattered pulses; the spectrum are not symmetrical at Vc.

  8. Characteristics of Light Reflected from a Dense Ionization Wave with a Tunable Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A.; Esirkepov, T.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-11-01

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (˜10/30fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses.

  9. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  10. Impedance matching at arterial bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N

    1993-01-01

    Reflections of pulse waves will occur in arterial bifurcations unless the impedance is matched continuously through changing geometric and elastic properties. A theoretical model is presented which minimizes pulse wave reflection through bifurcations. The model accounts for the observed linear changes in area within the bifurcation, generalizes the theory to asymmetrical bifurcations, characterizes changes in elastic properties from parent to daughter arteries, and assesses the effect of branch angle on the mechanical properties of daughter vessels. In contradistinction to previous models, reflections cannot be minimized without changes in elastic properties through bifurcations. The theoretical model predicts that in bifurcations with area ratios (beta) less than 1.0 Young's moduli of daughter vessels may be less than that in the parent vessel if the Womersley parameter alpha in the parent vessel is less than 5. Larger area ratios in bifurcations are accompanied by greater increases in Young's moduli of branches. For an idealized symmetric aortic bifurcation (alpha = 10) with branching angles theta = 30 degrees (opening angle 60 degrees) Young's modulus of common iliac arteries relative to that of the distal abdominal aorta has an increase of 1.05, 1.68 and 2.25 for area ratio of 0.8, 1.0 and 1.15, respectively. These predictions are consistent with the observed increases in Young's moduli of peripheral vessels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Arterial pulse wave dynamics after percutaneous aortic valve replacement: fall in coronary diastolic suction with increasing heart rate as a basis for angina symptoms in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Sen, Sayan; Broyd, Chris; Hadjiloizou, Nearchos; Baksi, John; Francis, Darrel P; Foale, Rodney A; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Casula, Roberto; Malik, Iqbal S; Mikhail, Ghada W; Mayet, Jamil

    2011-10-04

    Aortic stenosis causes angina despite unobstructed arteries. Measurement of conventional coronary hemodynamic parameters in patients undergoing valvular surgery has failed to explain these symptoms. With the advent of percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) and developments in coronary pulse wave analysis, it is now possible to instantaneously abolish the valvular stenosis and to measure the resulting changes in waves that direct coronary flow. Intracoronary pressure and flow velocity were measured immediately before and after PAVR in 11 patients with unobstructed coronary arteries. Using coronary pulse wave analysis, we calculated the intracoronary diastolic suction wave (the principal accelerator of coronary blood flow). To test physiological reserve to increased myocardial demand, we measured at resting heart rate and during pacing at 90 and 120 bpm. Before PAVR, the basal myocardial suction wave intensity was 1.9±0.3×10(-5) W · m(-2) · s(-2), and this increased in magnitude with increasing severity of aortic stenosis (r=0.59, P=0.05). This wave decreased markedly with increasing heart rate (β coefficient=-0.16×10(-4) W · m(-2) · s(-2); Pcoronary physiological reserve with increasing heart rate (β coefficient=0.9×10(-3) W · m(-2) · s(-2); P=0.014). In aortic stenosis, the coronary physiological reserve is impaired. Instead of increasing when heart rate rises, the coronary diastolic suction wave decreases. Immediately after PAVR, physiological reserve returns to a normal positive pattern. This may explain how aortic stenosis can induce anginal symptoms and their prompt relief after PAVR. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01118442.

  12. Millimeter-Wave Broadband Anti-Reflection Coatings Using Laser Ablation of Sub-Wavelength Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Tomotake; Wen, Qi; Hanany, Shaul; Koch, Jürgen; Suttman, Oliver; Schütz, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first use of laser ablation to make sub-millimeter, broad-band, anti-reflection coatings (ARC) based on sub-wavelength structures (SWS) on alumina and sapphire. We used a 515 nm laser to produce pyramid-shaped structures with pitch of about 320 \\mu m and total height of near 800 \\mu m. Transmission measurements between 70 and 140 GHz are in agreement with simulations using electromagnetic propagation software. The simulations indicate that SWS ARC with the fabricated shape should have a fractional bandwidth response of $\\Delta \

  13. Two-Dimensional Tests of Wave Transmission and Reflection Characteristics of Laboratory Breakwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    should be adjusted to KFC = - - 2C)- 0 and 1 on 15 fronting slope (16)R R Figures 17 and 18 illustrate the observed and predicted wave transmission...65. 1.69 1.0 .337 .337 .016 .0006 700301124. as. 1.69 0.3 .215 .sibs016 .0015 78103011131. 65. 1.41 9.6 .100 .100 .016 t00l0 76430211400 45. logo 13.6... logo 1. .391 .397 .016 .0020 78002631ft3. 35. 1.30 11.5 0862 .3A2 .001 .0069 7830eh610?. 35. 1.301 18.8 also o3’0 .021 .0069 780261236. 30. 2.17 7.7

  14. A REFLECTION ON THE WAVE OF AMALGAMATIONS IN THE ROMANIAN HEALTH SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina MITU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of New Public Management (NPM and good governance, in the last decade the Romanian public health system has undergone a reform process. One of its consequences is the wave of public hospitals amalgamations that have occurred especially since the adoption of the new health law. Thus, in 2011 the Ministry of Health has made public a list of proposed amalgamations of hospitals (around 25% from total hospitals with beds that existed in that period. The aim of this research is to examine the wave of hospital mergers that occurred in Romania between 2011 and 2012. In particular, the study focuses on the drivers, social impact, typology and purpose of the analysed amalgamations. The study uses primary resources documents and it is based on a content analysis of 25 Government Decisions and Substantiation Notes from 2011 to 2012. An important generalization of the paper is that all the amalgamations from the analysed period are involuntary and are selected on territorial criteria and depending on the distance, the specific health services for the purpose of efficient use of human and material resources in order to enhance public health services. Additionally, the expected social impact of these events is materialized mainly in improving the quality of medical services provided to the population and providing unconditional access to medical services for policyholders. The expected changes include: reduction of staff costs; efficient use of public services; classifying the amalgamated hospitals in a higher category; reduction of management positions; optimizing medical activity in terms of economic efficiency; and achieving a management capable of the best use of existing financial resources.

  15. Relation of Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Creatine Kinase-MB Elevations and New Q Waves With Long-Term Cardiovascular Death in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Michael; Farkouh, Michael E; Zak, Victor; French, John; Alexander, John H; Bochenek, Andrzej; Hamon, Martial; Mahaffey, Kenneth; Puskas, John; Smith, Peter; Shrader, Peter; Fuster, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Associations of early creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) elevation and new Q waves and their association with cardiovascular death (CVD) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have been reported, but this association has not been studied in a large population of patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we examine the association of periprocedural CK-MB elevations and new Q waves with CVD in the Future Revascularization Evaluation in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: Optimal Management of Multivessel Disease trial. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the relation of CK-MB elevations and new Q waves in the first 24 hours after procedure and their relation to CVD; logistic regression was used to assess odds ratios of these variables. Hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and p values associated with Wald chi-square test are reported. CK-MB elevation in first 24 hours after procedure was independently associated with CVD. CVD hazard increased by 6% (p URL); odds of new post-CABG Q waves increased by a factor of 1.08 (p URL, HR was >2. CK-MB URL multiples of 7, 12, and 15 were associated with new Q-wave odds ratios of 9, 16, and 27 times, respectively (p ≤0.001, C-statistic >0.70). New Q waves were independently associated with survival in the multivariate model only when CK-MB was excluded (p = 0.01). In conclusion, independent associations included (1) CVD and early post-CABG CK-MB elevation; (2) new Q waves with early post-CABG CK-MB elevation; (3) CVD with new Q waves only when CK-MB elevation is excluded from analysis.

  16. Goos-Hänchen shifts of the reflected waves from a cold, inhomogeneous, and magnetized plasma slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoding; Zang, Taocheng; Pan, Tao

    2010-01-01

    We discuss theoretically the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of the reflected waves from a cold, inhomogeneous, and magnetized plasma slab by using the invariant imbedding approach. Aiming at the linear and parabolic electron-density profiles, we demonstrate numerically the dependences of the co- and cross-polarized GH shifts on the angle of incidence, external static magnetic field, and the thickness of the plasma slab. The results show that the different electron-density profiles of plasma can result in the very different dependences of the GH shifts on the angle of incidence, external magnetic field, and the slab's thickness; the GH shifts can be switched between the considerably large positive and negative values under certain conditions. Particularly, without altering the structure of the plasma slab, the GH shifts can be manipulated by modifying the angle of incident or the external static magnetic field.

  17. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  18. Wave reflection in dielectric media obeying spatial Kramers-Kronig relations

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In a recent work, S.A.R. Horsley and coworkers [Nature Photon 9, 436-439 (2015)] showed rather interestingly that planar dielectric media, for which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related by spatial Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations, are one-way reflectionless, whatever the angle of incidence. Such a fascinating property, besides of extending our comprehension of the fundamental phenomenon of reflection, may offer new ways for the design of antireflection surfaces and thin materials with efficient light absorption. However, KK dielectric media are generally described by slowly-decaying complex permittivity profiles which may introduce some subtle issues in the study of the scattering problem. Here we provide a condition on the imaginary part of the dielectric profile that ensures the existence of proper scattering states and present a proof of the one-way reflectionless property in KK dielectric media which is free from loophole. Finally, we show that instabilities might arise at ...

  19. Identifying coronary artery disease in men with type 2 diabetes: osteoprotegerin, pulse wave velocity, and other biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with type 2 diabetes, high serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear how well OPG performs when compared with traditional biomarkers of cardiovascular risk such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Furthermore, OPG levels are also high in the presence of diabetes-related microvascular disease, and it is unclear whether OPG can distinguish microvascular disease from large-vessel atherosclerosis. The first aim of this study was to compare OPG levels against other biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in the identification of patients with documented multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). The second aim was to compare OPG levels in patients with microvascular complications (microalbuminuria) against those with established CAD. METHODS: Three groups of male patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited: patients without microvascular complications or large-vessel atherosclerosis (n = 24), patients with microalbuminuria only (n = 23), and patients with microalbuminuria and documented multivessel CAD (n = 25). OPG, hsCRP, interleukin 6, urate, and pulse wave velocity were measured. RESULTS: Serum OPG levels were significantly higher in patients with a combination of microalbuminuria and CAD than in those with microalbuminuria alone. There were no significant differences in any of the other biomarkers between the groups. CONCLUSION: OPG was found to be superior to the other biomarkers studied in identifying patients with documented CAD. The presence of CAD was a greater determinant of serum OPG levels than microalbuminuria in our population. These findings support the use of OPG as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk.

  20. On the propagation and multiple reflections of a blast wave travelling through a dusty gas in a closed box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello; Drikakis, Dimitris; Kokkinakis, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    This paper concerns the propagation of shock waves in an enclosure filled with dusty gas. The main motivation for this problem is to probe the effect on such dynamics of solid particles dispersed in the fluid medium. This subject, which has attracted so much attention over recent years given its important implications in the study of the structural stability of systems exposed to high-energy internal detonations, is approached here in the framework of a hybrid numerical two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian methodology. In particular, insights are sought by considering a relatively simple archetypal setting corresponding to a shock wave originating from a small spherical region initialized on the basis of available analytic solutions. The response of the system is explored numerically with respect to several parameters, including the blast intensity (via the related value of the initial shock Mach number), the solid mass fraction (mass load), and the particle size (Stokes number). Results are presented in terms of pressure-load diagrams. Beyond practical applications, it is shown that a kaleidoscope of fascinating patterns is produced by the "triadic" relationships among multiple shock reflection events and particle-fluid and particle-wall interaction dynamics. These would be of great interest to researchers and scientists interested in fundamental problems relating to the general theory of pattern formation in complex nonlinear multiphase systems.

  1. Hammer-Impact SH-Wave Seismic Reflection Methods in Neotectonic Investigations: General Observations and Case Histories from the Mississippi Embayment, U.S.A.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James B Harris

    2009-01-01

    Shallow shear-wave seismic reflection imaging, using a sledgehammer and mass energy source and standard processing, has become increasingly common in mapping near-surface geologic features, especially in water-saturated, unconsolidated sediments. Tests of the method in the Mississippi Embayment region of the central United States show Interpretable reflection arrivals in the depth range of 100 m with the potential for increased resolution when compared with compresslonal-wave data. Shear-wave reflection profiles were used to help interpret the significance of neotectonic surface deformation at five sites in the Mississippi Embayment. The interpreted profiles show a range of shallow structural styles that include reverse faulting, fault propagation folding, and reactivated normal faulting, and provide crucial subsurface evidence in support of paleuseismologic trenching and shallow drilling.

  2. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound: comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts cause difficulties in the interpretation of images and reduce contrast and imaging depth. We recently developed a method called PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to circumvent the problem of reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. We already demonstrated that the photoacoustic signals can be backpropagated using synthetic aperture pulse-echo data for identifying and reducing reflection artifacts in vivo. In this work, we propose an alternative variant of PAFUSion in which synthetic backpropagation of photoacoustic signals is based on multi-angled plane-wave ultrasound measurements. We implemented plane-wave and synthetic aperture PAFUSion in a handheld ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system and demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on a human finger using both approaches. Our results suggest that, while both approaches are equivalent in terms of artifact reduction efficiency, plane-wave PAFUSion requires less pulse echo acquisitions when the skin absorption is the main cause of reflection artifacts. PMID:28736669

  3. In-line broadband 270 degrees (3lambda/4) chevron four-reflection wave retarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A; Khanfar, H K

    2008-09-20

    The net differential phase shift Delta(t) introduced between the orthogonal p and s linear polarizations after four successive total internal reflections inside an in-line chevron dual-Fresnel-rhomb retarder is a function of the first internal angle of incidence phi and prism refractive index n. Retardance of 3lambda/4 (i.e., Delta(t)=270 degrees) is achieved with minimum angular sensitivity when phi=45 degrees and n=1.900822. Several optical glasses with this refractive index are identified. For Schott glass SF66 the deviation of Delta(t) from 270 degrees is three octaves (0.5 to 4.5 microm) in the visible, near-, and mid-IR spectral range. Another mid-IR 3lambda/4 retarder uses a Si prism, which is coated by an optically thick silicon oxynitride film of the proper composition, to achieve retardance that differs from 270 degrees by < 0.5 degrees over the 3-5 microm spectral range.

  4. Wave reflection in dielectric media obeying spatial Kramers-Kronig relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent work, Horsley and coworkers (Nat. Photon., 9 (2015) 436) showed rather interestingly that planar dielectric media, for which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related by spatial Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations, are one-way reflectionless, whatever the angle of incidence. Such a fascinating property, besides extending our comprehension of the fundamental phenomenon of reflection, may offer new ways for the design of antireflection surfaces and thin materials with efficient light absorption. However, KK dielectric media are generally described by slowly decaying complex permittivity profiles which may introduce some subtle issues in the study of the scattering problem. Here we provide a condition on the imaginary part of the dielectric profile that ensures the existence of proper scattering states and present a proof of the one-way reflectionless property in KK dielectric media which is free from loopholes. Finally, we show that instabilities might arise at the interface of KK dielectric media when the medium is not purely dissipative.

  5. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl;

    2013-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix protein, fibulin-1, was recently found in higher concentrations in the arterial wall and in plasma in patients with long duration type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, plasma fibulin-1 independently predicted total mortality and was associated with pulse pressure, an indirect measure of arterial...

  6. On revealing the vertical structure of nanoparticle films with elemental resolution: A total external reflection X-ray standing waves study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zargham, Ardalan, E-mail: zargham@ifp.uni-bremen.d [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schmidt, Thomas; Flege, Jan Ingo; Sauerbrey, Marc; Hildebrand, Radowan [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Roehe, Sarah; Baeumer, Marcus [Applied and Physical Chemistry, University of Bremen, Leobener Str. 2, 28359, Bremen (Germany); Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We present a promising combination of methods to precisely determine the morphology of nanostructures, drawing on the example of monodisperse CoPt{sub 3} nanoparticle films deposited by spin coating and dip coating techniques on functionalized Au substrates. Ex-situ X-ray standing waves in total external reflection combined with X-ray reflectivity measurements were employed to determine element-specific atomic-density distributions in vertical direction.

  7. Extracorporeal Cardiac Shock Wave Therapy Ameliorates Clinical Symptoms and Improves Regional Myocardial Blood Flow in a Patient with Severe Coronary Artery Disease and Refractory Angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Prinz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Different therapeutic options are being used for chronic coronary artery disease (CAD. We report about a 51-year-old female with CAD and refractory angina pectoris despite maximally tolerated medical therapy and after both percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. The patient received cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT over a period of 6 month. There was no arrhythmia during or after treatment; enzyme levels were normal at all times. PET imaging showed a substantial improvement of myocardial stress perfusion. Since the patient reported that she now was fully capable to deal with her everyday life, further treatment options were postponed. Our case report suggests that ultrasound-guided CSWT is able to improve symptoms and perfusion in ischemic myocardium.

  8. Experimental exposure to diesel exhaust increases arterial stiffness in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newby David E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Vascular dysfunction reduces arterial compliance and increases central arterial pressure and left ventricular after-load. We determined the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on arterial compliance using a validated non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Methods In a double-blind randomized fashion, 12 healthy volunteers were exposed to diesel exhaust (approximately 350 μg/m3 or filtered air for one hour during moderate exercise. Arterial stiffness was measured using applanation tonometry at the radial artery for pulse wave analysis (PWA, as well as at the femoral and carotid arteries for pulse wave velocity (PWV. PWA was performed 10, 20 and 30 min, and carotid-femoral PWV 40 min, post-exposure. Augmentation pressure (AP, augmentation index (AIx and time to wave reflection (Tr were calculated. Results Blood pressure, AP and AIx were generally low reflecting compliant arteries. In comparison to filtered air, diesel exhaust exposure induced an increase in AP of 2.5 mmHg (p = 0.02 and in AIx of 7.8% (p = 0.01, along with a 16 ms reduction in Tr (p = 0.03, 10 minutes post-exposure. Conclusion Acute exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with an immediate and transient increase in arterial stiffness. This may, in part, explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure. If our findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of susceptible populations, this simple non-invasive method of assessing arterial stiffness may become a useful technique in measuring the impact of real world exposures to combustion derived-air pollution.

  9. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-01-01

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined. PMID:28241503

  10. Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

  11. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-02-23

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined.

  12. Modeling and Design of AlN Based SAW Device and Effect of Reflected Bulk Acoustic Wave Generated in the Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Khan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the effect of generation and reflection of bulk acoustic waves (BAWs on the performance surface acoustic wave (SAW device using finite element method (FEM simulation is carried out. A SAW delay line structure using Aluminum Nitride (AlN substrate is simulated. The dimension of the device is kept in the range of the 42  22.5 m in order to analyze the effect in MEMS devices. The propagation of the bulk wave in all the direction of the substrate is studied and analyzed. Since BAW reflect from the bottom of the SAW device and interfere with the receiving IDTs. The output of the SAW device is greatly affected by the interference of the BAW with SAWs in the device. Thus in SAW devices, BAW needed to be considered before designing the device.

  13. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  14. Temporal reflection as a spectral-broadening mechanism in dual-pumped dispersion-decreasing fibers and its connection to dispersive waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antikainen, Aku; Arteaga-Sierra, Francisco R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2017-03-01

    We show that temporal reflections off a moving refractive index barrier play a major role in the spectral broadening of a dual-wavelength input inside a highly nonlinear, dispersion-decreasing fiber. We also find that a recently developed linear theory of temporal reflections works well in predicting the reflected frequencies. Successive temporal reflections from multiple closely spaced solitons create a blueshifted spectral band, while continuous narrowing of solitons inside the dispersion-decreasing fiber enhances Raman-induced redshifts, leading to supercontinuum generation at relatively low pump powers. We also show how dispersive wave emission can be considered a special case of the more general process of temporal reflections. Hence our findings have implications on all systems able to support solitons.

  15. Vascular Aging and Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikael, Luana de Rezende; Paiva, Anelise Machado Gomes de; Gomes, Marco Mota; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Vitorino, Priscila Valverde de Oliveira; Euzébio, Maicon Borges; Sousa, Wátila de Moura; Barroso, Weimar Kunz Sebba

    2017-06-29

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) account annually for almost one third of all deaths worldwide. Among the CVD, systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is related to more than half of those outcomes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for SAH because it causes functional and structural damage to the arterial wall, leading to stiffness. Several studies have related oxidative stress, production of free radicals, and neuroendocrine and genetic changes to the physiopathogenesis of vascular aging. Indirect ways to analyze that aging process have been widely studied, pulse wave velocity (PWV) being considered gold standard to assess arterial stiffness, because there is large epidemiological evidence of its predictive value for cardiovascular events, and it requires little technical knowledge to be performed. A pulse wave is generated during each cardiac contraction and travels along the arterial bed until finding peripheral resistance or any bifurcation point, determining the appearance of a reflected wave. In young individuals, arteries tend to be more elastic, therefore, the reflected wave occurs later in the cardiac cycle, reaching the heart during diastole. In older individuals, however, the reflected wave occurs earlier, reaching the heart during systole. Because PWV is an important biomarker of vascular damage, highly valuable in determining the patient's global cardiovascular risk, we chose to review the articles on vascular aging in the context of cardiovascular risk factors and the tools available to the early identification of that damage. Resumo As doenças cardiovasculares são anualmente responsáveis por quase um terço do total de mortes no mundo. Dentre elas, a hipertensão arterial sistêmica (HAS) está relacionada com mais da metade desses desfechos. O diabetes mellitus tipo 2 é visto com um fator de risco independente para HAS por causar lesões funcionais e estruturais na parede arterial, ocasionando-lhe enrijecimento. Diversos estudos

  16. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  17. Kinetics of the thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane behind the reflected shock waves between 1058 and 1194 K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Parandaman; B Rajakumar

    2016-04-01

    Thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon was studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single pulse shock tube (SPST) in the temperature range of 1058–1194 K. The major products formed in the decomposition are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4); whereas ethane and propylene were detected in lower concentrations. The decomposition of TMS seems to be initiated via Si-C bond cission by forming methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The total rate coefficients obtained for the decomposition of TMS were fit to Arrhenius equation in two different temperature regions 1058–1130K and 1130–1194 K. The temperature dependent rate coefficients obtained are ktotal (1058–1130 K) = (4.61 ± 0.70) × 1018 exp (−(79.9 kcal mol−1 ± 3.5)/RT) −1, ktotal (1130-1194 K) = (1.33 ± 0.19) × 106 exp (−(15.3 kcal mol−1 ± 3.5)/RT) −1. The rate coefficient for the formation of CH4 is obtained to be methane (1058–1194 K) = (4.36 ± 1.23) × 1014 exp (−(61.9 kcal mol−1±4.9)/RT) s−1. A kinetic scheme containing 21 species and 38 elementary reactions was proposed and simulations were carried out to explain the formation of all the products in the decomposition of tetramethylsilane.

  18. Andreev reflection through a junction of a 3D topological insulator and an s-wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Son-Hsien; Sun, Shih-Jye

    2016-12-01

    We examine the retro and specular Andreev reflections (ARs) through a junction consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) Bi2Se3 topological insulator (TI) and an s-wave superconductor (SC) using spatially-resolved nonequilibrium Green function formalism in Nambu space. A 3DTI Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian is constructed. The retro (specular) AR is identified by the spatial distribution of charge (spin-y) current. When approaching the interface, unlike the specular AR, the retro AR exhibits a large amount of net charge flow near the top surface of the 3DTI. In the specular AR, a large parallel component of the spin-y flow is developed in the interface, which is not found in the retro AR. Diminished charge currents are found near the onset of the specular AR. The AR mechanism enhances the current-induced spin-y polarization flowing through the junction interface. In the TI phase, larger normal-transmission conductance {{G}\\text{NT}} in the normal-metal junction yields larger AR conductance {{G}\\text{AR}} in the corresponding SC junction. The Zeeman splitting perpendicular to the quintuple layers partially (completely) suppresses the {{G}\\text{AR}} in the finite (infinite thick) TI.

  19. Goos-Hänchen shift of the reflected wave through an anisotropic metamaterial containing metal/dielectric nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyan; Zhao, Bin; Gao, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift of a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave reflected from a semi-infinite anisotropic metamaterial consisting of aligned metallic nanowires in a dielectric matrix is investigated. Based on Bruggeman effective medium theory, we obtain the conditions for realizing the negative refraction, which are dependent on both the incident wavelength and the volume fraction of metallic inclusions. Then, we investigate the GH shifts from the composite metamaterial with positive and negative refractions with the stationary-phase method. Numerical results show that the enhancement of GH shift can be achieved near the pseudo-Brewster angle for small volume fractions and at the close-to-grazing incidence for large volume fractions. We further find that for positively refractive metamaterials with weak absorption, one can realize the transition from negative GH shift to the positive one by adjusting the incident wavelength. However, for negatively refractive composite metamaterials, the reversal of the GH shifts may take place by the adjustment of the volume fraction instead of the incident wavelength. In order to demonstrate the validity of the stationary-phase approach, numerical simulations are performed for a Gaussian-shaped beam. In the end, by using COMSOL simulation, a comprehensive understanding is given and the above analysis is confirmed.

  20. A Method to Retrieve the Multi-Receiver Moho Reflection Response from SH-Wave Scattering Coda in the Radiative Transfer Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartstra, I.; Wapenaar, C. P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss a method to retrieve the multi-receiver Moho reflection response by interferometry from SH-wave coda in the 0.5-3 Hz frequency range. An image derived from a reflection response with a well defined virtual source would provide deterministic impedance contrasts, which can complement transmission tomography. For an accurate retrieval, cross-correlation interferometry requires the coda wave field to sample the imaging target and isotropically illuminate the receiver array. When these illumination requirements are not or only partially met, the stationary phase cannot be fully captured and artifacts will contaminate the retrieved reflection response. Here we conduct numerical scalar 2D finite difference simulations to investigate the challenging situation in which only shallow crustal earthquake sources illuminate the Moho and the response is recorded by a 2D linear array. We quantify to what extent the prevalence of scatterers in the crust can improve the illumination conditions and thus the retrieval of the Moho reflection. The accuracy of the retrieved reflection is evaluated for two physically different scattering regimes: the Rayleigh and Mie regime. We only use the earlier part of the scattering coda, because we have found that the later diffusive part does not significantly improve the retrieval. The density of the spherical scatterers is varied in order to change the scattering mean free path. This characteristic length scale is calculated for each model with the 2D radiative transfer equation, which is the governing equation in the earlier part of the scattering coda. The experiment is repeated for models of different geological settings derived from existing S-wave tomographies, which vary in Moho depth and reflectivity. The scattering mean free path can be approximated for real data if intrinsic attenuation is known, because the wavenumber-dependent scattering attenuation of the coherent wave amplitude is dependent on the scattering mean free path

  1. Arterial stiffness: pathophysiology and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guerin, Alain P; Pannier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The ill effects of hypertension are usually attributed to a reduction in the caliber or the number of arterioles, resulting in an increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR). This definition does not take into account the fact that BP is a cyclic phenomenon with systolic and diastolic BP being the limits of these oscillations. The appropriate term to define the arterial factor(s) opposing LV ejection is aortic input impedance which depends on TPR, arterial distensibility (D), and wave reflections (WR). D defines the capacitive properties of arterial stiffness, whose role is to dampen pressure and flow oscillations and to transform pulsatile flow and pressure in arteries into a steady flow and pressure in peripheral tissues. Stiffness is the reciprocal value of D. These parameters are BP dependent, and arteries become stiffer at high pressure. In to D which provides information about the elasticity> of artery as a hollow structure, the elastic incremental modulus (Einc) characterizes the properties of the arterial wall biomaterials, independently of vessel geometry. As an alternative, arterial D can be evaluated by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) which increases with the stiffening of arteries. Arterial stiffening increases left ventricular (LV) afterload and alters the coronary perfusion. With increased PWV, the WR impacts on the aorta during systole, increasing systolic pressures and myocardial oxygen consumption, and decreasing diastolic BP and coronary flow. The arterial stiffness is altered primarily in association with increased collagen content and alterations of extracellular matrix (arteriosclerosis) as classically observed during aging or in arterial hypertension. The arterial stiffening estimated by changes in aortic PWV and intensity of WR are independent predictors of survival in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and general population. Improvement of arterial stiffening could be obtained by antihypertensive treatmen as observed with the calcium

  2. Gravity wave reflection and its influence on the consistency of temperature- and wind-based momentum fluxes simulated above Typhoon Ewiniar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For a case study of Typhoon Ewiniar performed with a mesoscale model, we compare stratospheric gravity wave (GW momentum flux determined from temperature variances by applying GW polarization relations and by assuming upward propagating waves, with GW momentum flux calculated from model winds which is considered as a reference. The temperature-based momentum-flux profile exhibits positive biases relative to the reference, which fluctuate significantly with altitude. The vertically-averaged magnitude of the positive biases is about 14% of the reference momentum flux. We found that this deviation from the reference stems from the interference between upward and downward propagating waves. The downward propagating GWs are due mainly to partial reflections of upward propagating waves at altitudes where the background wind and stability change with height. When the upward and downward propagating waves are decomposed and their momentum fluxes are calculated separately from temperature perturbations, the fraction of the momentum flux arising from the downward propagating waves is about 4.5–8.2% of that from the upward propagating waves. The net momentum flux of upward and downward propagating GWs agrees well with the reference from the model wind perturbations. The implications of this study for the GW momentum-flux observations from satellites are discussed.

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Dialysis Calcium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Mac-Way

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is the major determinant of isolated systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure. Aortic stiffness is also associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and general population. Hemodynamically, arterial stiffness results in earlier aortic pulse wave reflection leading to increased cardiac workload and decreased myocardial perfusion. Although the clinical consequence of aortic stiffness has been clearly established, its pathophysiology in various clinical conditions still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present paper is to review the studies that have looked at the impact of dialysis calcium concentration on arterial stiffness. Overall, the results of small short-term studies suggest that higher dialysis calcium is associated with a transient but significant increase in arterial stiffness. This calcium dependant increase in arterial stiffness is potentially explained by increased vascular smooth muscle tone of the conduit arteries and is not solely explained by changes in mean blood pressure. However, the optimal DCa remains to be determined, and long term studies are required to evaluate its impact on the progression of arterial stiffness.

  4. Observation and modeling of gravity wave propagation through reflection and critical layers above Andes Lidar Observatory at Cerro Pachón, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bing; Heale, Christopher J.; Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.; Snively, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    A complex gravity wave event was observed from 04:30 to 08:10 UTC on 16 January 2015 by a narrow-band sodium lidar and an all-sky airglow imager located at Andes Lidar Observatory (ALO) in Cerro Pachón (30.25°S, 70.73°W), Chile. The gravity wave packet had a period of 18-35 min and a horizontal wavelength of about 40-50 km. Strong enhancements of the vertical wind perturbation, exceeding 10 m s-1, were found at ˜90 km and ˜103 km, consistent with nearly evanescent wave behavior near a reflection layer. A reduction in vertical wavelength was found as the phase speed approached the background wind speed near ˜93 km. A distinct three-layered structure was observed in the lidar data due to refraction of the wave packet. A fully nonlinear model was used to simulate this event, which successfully reproduced the amplitudes and layered structure seen in observations. The model results provide dynamical insight, suggesting that a double reflection occurring at two separate heights caused the large vertical wind amplitudes, while the three-layered structure in the temperature perturbation was a result of relatively stable regions at those altitudes. The event provides a clear perspective on the filtering processes to which short-period, small-scale gravity waves are subject in mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  5. Eplerenone attenuates pulse wave reflection in chronic kidney disease stage 3-4--a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesby, Lene; Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Strandgaard, Svend

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity associated with increased arterial stiffness. Plasma aldosterone levels are increased in CKD, and aldosterone has been found to increase vascular inflammation and fibrosis. It was hypothesized...

  6. A wave based method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficient of two-dimensional rigid frame porous structures with periodic inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckers, Elke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Claeys, Claus; Atak, Onur [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier [Laboratiore d' Acoustique de l' Universiteé du Maine, L' Université Nantes Angers Le Mans, Université du Maine, CNRS, UMR-6613 CNRS, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Desmet, Wim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an extension to the Wave Based Method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficients of a porous material with an embedded periodic set of inclusions. The porous unit cell is described using the Multi-Level methodology and by embedding Bloch–Floquet periodicity conditions in the weighted residual scheme. The dynamic pressure field in the semi-infinite acoustic domains is approximated using a novel wave function set that fulfils the Helmholtz equation, the Bloch–Floquet periodicity conditions and the Sommerfeld radiation condition. The method is meshless and computationally efficient, which makes it well suited for optimisation studies.

  7. Computed tomography of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A for biological tissues via difference frequency wave from a parametric array in reflection mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huanlei; ZHU Xiaofeng; GONG Xiufen; ZHANG Dong

    2003-01-01

    Based on the finite amplitude insert-substitu- tion method, a novel technique to reconstruct the acoustic nonlinear parameter B/A tomography for biological tissues in reflection mode via the difference frequency wave generated by a parametric array is developed in this paper. An experimental system is established, and the beam pattern of the difference frequency wave is measured and compared with that excited directly from a transmitter at the same frequency. B/A tomography for several biological tissues including normal and pathological tissues, is experimentally obtained with satisfying quality. Results indicate that B/A imaging using this mode may become a novel modality in ultrasonic diagnosis.

  8. Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves microcirculation blood flow of ischemic limbs in patients with peripheral arterial disease: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara, Shuhei; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Takagi, Gen; Kirinoki-Ichikawa, Sonoko; Tezuka, Akito; Hada, Tomohito; Takagi, Ikuyo

    2014-01-01

    Because direct application of low-energy shock waves induces angiogenesis, we investigated the safety and efficacy of this new therapy to develop a noninvasive method of repeatable therapeutic angiogenesis for treating peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The subjects were 10 patients who had symptomatic PAD and limited ischemia in a below-the-knee artery. Low-energy shock waves were directly applied to the calf muscles 6 times every other day. Intracorporeal changes were evaluated with ultrasonography to determine adverse effects of therapy. To assess blood flow of the microcirculation, transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), and (99m)technetium-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) scintigraphy were performed before and after therapy. The TcPO2 was measured while subjects inhaled pure oxygen (maximum TcPO2). The (99m)Tc-TF perfusion index was determined as a ratio of uptake in muscle to that in the brain (control) for quantitative analysis. No adverse effects were noted in any patient. Maximum TcPO2 values increased significantly on the calf (57.3±28.4 to 71.0±14.5 mm Hg, p=0.044) and the dorsum of the foot (52.2±21.8 to 76.1±17.9 mm Hg, p=0.012). The SPP tended to increase after therapy on the dorsum and plantar surfaces of the foot, but the differences were not significant. The (99m)Tc-TF perfusion index in the foot significantly increased (0.48±0.09 to 0.61±0.12, p=0.0013), but that in the leg did not change. We have demonstrated that low-energy shock wave therapy is safe and can restore blood flow in the microcirculation in patients with symptomatic PAD.

  9. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance imaging of infarct core and peri-infarct depolarization in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2014-03-01

    To understand the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke, in vivo imaging of the brain tissue viability and related spreading depolarization is crucial. In the infarct core, impairment of energy metabolism causes anoxic depolarization (AD), which considerably increases energy consumption, accelerating irreversible neuronal damage. In the peri-infarct penumbra region, where tissue is still reversible despite limited blood flow, peri-infarct depolarization (PID) occurs, exacerbating energy deficit and hence expanding the infarct area. We previously showed that light-scattering signal, which is sensitive to cellular/subcellular structural integrity, was correlated with AD and brain tissue viability in a rat hypoxia-reoxygenation model. In the present study, we performed transcranial NIR diffuse reflectance imaging of the rat brain during middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion and examined whether the infarct core and PIDs can be detected. Immediately after occluding the left MCA, light scattering started to increase focally in the occlusion site and a bright region was generated near the occlusion site and spread over the left entire cortex, which was followed by a dark region, showing the occurrence of PID. The PID was generated repetitively and the number of times of occurrence in a rat ranged from four to ten within 1 hour after occlusion (n=4). The scattering increase in the occlusion site was irreversible and the area with increased scattering expanded with increasing the number of PIDs, indicating an expansion of the infarct core. These results suggest the usefulness of NIR diffuse reflectance signal to visualize spatiotemporal changes in the infarct area and PIDs.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids do not alter P-wave parameters in electrocardiogram or expression of atrial connexins in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Palaniappan; West, Annette L; Bridgewater, Ben; Davidson, Neil C; Calder, Philip C; Dobrzynsky, Halina; Trafford, Andrew; O'Neill, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    We previously reported omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFAs) supplementation does not reduce atrial fibrillation (AF) following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of n-3 PUFAs on electrocardiogram (ECG) atrial arrhythmic markers and compare with expression of gap-junction proteins, Connexins. Subset of clinical trial subjects with right atrial sampling during CABG surgery included. Twelve-lead ECG performed at recruitment and at surgery [after supplementation with n-3 PUFA (∼1.8 g/day) or matched placebo] for ∼14 days. Electrocardiograms analysed for maximum P-wave duration (P-max) and difference between P-max and minimum P-wave duration, P-wave dispersion (PWD). Right atrial specimens analysed for expression of Connexins 40 and 43 using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot. Serum levels of n-3 PUFA at baseline, at surgery, and atrial tissue levels at surgery collated from file. Postoperative AF was quantified by analysing data from stored continuous electrograms. A total of 61 patients (n-3 PUFA 34, Placebo 27) had ECG analysis and AF burden, of which 52 patients (26 in each group) had qPCR and 16 (8 in each group) had western blot analyses for Connexins 40 and 43. No difference between the two groups in ECG parameters or expression of Connexin 40 or 43. P-wave dispersion in the preoperative ECG independently predicted occurrence of AF following CABG surgery. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation does not alter pro-arrhythmic P-wave parameters in ECG or connexin expression in human atrium with no effect on the incidence of AF following CABG surgery. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Gravity wave reflection and its influence on the consistency of temperature- and wind-based momentum fluxes simulated above Typhoon Ewiniar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available For a case study of Typhoon Ewiniar performed with a mesoscale model, we compare stratospheric gravity wave (GW momentum flux determined from temperature variances by applying GW polarization relations and by assuming upward propagating waves with GW momentum flux calculated from model winds, which is considered as a reference. The temperature-based momentum-flux profile exhibits positive biases which fluctuate with altitude and have peak values of 17–39% at 20–40 km. We found that this deviation stems from the interference between upward and downward propagating waves. The downward propagating GWs are due mainly to partial reflections of upward propagating waves at altitudes where the background wind and stability change with height. When the upward and downward propagating waves are decomposed and their momentum fluxes are calculated separately from temperature perturbations, the fraction of the momentum flux arising from the downward propagating waves is about 4.5–8.2%. The net momentum flux of upward and downward propagating GWs agrees well with the reference from the model wind perturbations. Global distributions of GW momentum flux can be deduced from satellite measurements of temperatures also employing GW polarization relations but using different analysis methods. The implications of this study for the GW momentum-flux observations from satellites are discussed.

  12. A supercell, Bloch wave method for calculating low-energy electron reflectivity with applications to free-standing graphene and molybdenum disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, John

    This dissertation reports on a novel theoretical and computational framework for calculating low-energy electron reflectivities from crystalline surfaces and its application to two layered systems of two-dimensional materials, graphene and molybdenum disulfide. The framework provides a simple and efficient approach through the matching of a small set of Fourier components of Bloch wave solutions to the Schrodinger Equation in a slab-in-supercell geometry to incoming and outgoing plane waves on both sides of the supercell. The implementation of this method is described in detail for the calculation of reflectivities in the lowest energy range, for which only specular reflection is allowed. This implementation includes the calculation of reflectivities from beams with normal or off-normal incidence. Two different algorithms are described in the case of off-normal incidence which differ in their dependence on the existence of a symmetry with a mirror plane parallel to the crystal surface. Applications to model potentials in one, two, and three dimensions display consistent results when using different supercell sizes and convergent results with the density of Fourier grids. The design of the Bloch wave matching also allows for the accurate modeling of crystalline slabs through the use of realistic potentials determined via density functional theory. The application of the method to low-energy electron scattering from free-standing systems of a few layers of graphene, including the use of these realistic potentials, demonstrates this ability of the method to accurately model real systems. It reproduces the layer-dependent oscillations found in experimental, normal incidence reflectivity curves for a few layers of graphene grown on silicon carbide. The normal incidence reflectivity curves calculated for slabs consisting of few-layer graphene on 10 layers of nickel show some qualitative agreement with experiment. General incidence reflectivity spectra for free

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  14. Relationship between resistant hypertension and arterial stiffness assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung CM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Min Chung,1,2 Hui-Wen Cheng,2 Jung-Jung Chang,2 Yu-Sheng Lin,2 Ju-Feng Hsiao,2 Shih-Tai Chang,1 Jen-Te Hsu2,31School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 2Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan County, TaiwanBackground: Resistant hypertension (RH is a common clinical condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in older patients. Several factors and conditions interfering with blood pressure (BP control, such as excess sodium intake, obesity, diabetes, older age, kidney disease, and certain identifiable causes of hypertension are common in patients resistant to antihypertensive treatment. Arterial stiffness, measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, is increasingly recognized as an important prognostic index and potential therapeutic target in hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between RH and arterial stiffness. Methods: This study included 1,620 patients aged ≥65 years who were referred or self-referred to the outpatient hypertension unit located at a single cardiovascular center. They were separated into normotensive, controlled BP, and resistant hypertension groups. Home BP, blood laboratory parameters, echocardiographic studies and baPWV all were measured. Results: The likelihood of diabetes mellitus was significantly greater in the RH group than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 2.114, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.194–3.744, P=0.010. Systolic BP was correlated in the RH group significantly more than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 1.032, 95% CI 1.012–1.053, P=0.001. baPWV (odds ratio 1.084, 95% CI 1.016–1.156, P=0.015 was significantly correlated with the presence of RH. The other factors were negatively correlated with the existence of RH.Conclusion: In

  15. Superluminal advanced transmission of X waves undergoing frustrated total internal reflection: the evanescent fields and the Goos-Hänchen effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawi, Amr M; Tawfik, Bassem H; Besieris, Ioannis M

    2002-10-01

    A study of X waves undergoing frustrated total internal reflection at a planar slab is provided. This is achieved by choosing the spectral plane wave components of the incident X wave to fall on the upper interface at angles greater than the critical angle. Thus, evanescent fields are generated in the slab and the peak of the field tunneling through the slab appears to be transmitted at a superluminal speed. Furthermore, it is shown that for deep barrier penetration, the peak of the transmitted field emerges from the rear interface of the slab before the incident peak reaches the front interface. To understand this advanced transmission of the peak of the pulse, a detailed study of the behavior of the evanescent fields in the barrier region is undertaken. The difference in tunneling behavior between deep and shallow barrier penetrations is shown to be influenced by the sense of the Goos-Hänchen shift.

  16. Measuring and Modeling of P- and S-Wave Velocities on Crustal Rocks: A Key for the Interpretation of Seismic Reflection and Refraction Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Kern

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithologic interpretations of the earth crust from seismic wave velocities are non-unique so that inferences about composition can not be drawn. In order to evaluate how elastic properties of rock materials are controlled by lithology at in situ pressures and temperatures, compressional (Vp, shear wave velocities (Vs and velocity anisotropy of crustal rocks were measured at conditions of greater depth. The first part deals with the interdependence of elastic wave propagation and the physical and lithological parameters. In the second part data from laboratory seismic measurements and theoretical calculations are used to interpret (1 a shallow seismic reflection line (SE Finland and (2 a refraction profile of a deep crust (Central China. The comparison of the calculated velocities with the experimentally-derived in situ velocities of the Finnish crustal rocks give hints that microcracks have an important bearing on the in situ seismic velocities, velocity anisotropy and the reflectivity observed at relative shallow depth. The coupling of the experimentally-derived in situ velocities of P- and S-wave and corresponding Poisson's ratios of relevant exhumed high-grade metamorphic crustal rocks from Central China with respective data from seismic refraction profiling provided a key for the lithologic interpretation of a deep seismic crustal structure.

  17. Flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave is a sign of proarrhythmic risk and a reflection of action potential triangulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Kanters, J.K.;

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced triangulation of the cardiac action potential is associated with increased risk of arrhythmic events. It has been suggested that triangulation causes a flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave but the relationship between triangulation, T-wave flattening and onset of arrhythmia...

  18. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  19. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar Measurements of Surface Reflectance and Implications for CO2 Column Measurements: Results from 2013 ASCENDS Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.; Dobler, J. T.; Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Obland, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Improved knowledge of the Earth's surface reflectance in the 1.57-micron spectral band is of particular importance for accurate Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) measurements and modeling of IPDA CO2 column measurements as required by the Active Sensing of CO2 Emission of Nights Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) Decadal Survey space mission. The Earth's surface albedo in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum is extremely low for snow and ice and for water under high wind conditions, and this can lead to degraded signal to noise ratios of surface reflectances and of IPDA CO2 column retrievals, requiring increased integration periods. This paper discusses the magnitude and variability of the surface reflectance and corresponding column CO2 measurements over snow measured using an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), namely the Exelis Multi-function Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), during the winter 2013 ASCENDS airborne campaign. This LAS system is currently being evaluated by NASA Langley as the ASCENDS space mission prototype system. The surface reflectance measurements over snow and ice as well as over water collected during the 2013 winter DC-8 flight campaign were calibrated using surface reflectance data obtained over well-established satellite radiometric calibration sites such as Railroad Valley, Nevada and over other homogeneous desert sites in California and Arizona that have been used for similar calibrations on past ASCENDS airborne campaigns. Two separate flights targeting differences in surface reflectances between fresh and aged snow were conducted over the U.S. Central Plains and Colorado Rockies, respectively. From these measurements, the nominal surface reflectance of fresh snow (less than 1-2 days old; ~ 0.01/sr at 1.57 microns) was found to be approximately half that of aged snow (3-4 days old; ~ 0.02/sr) which is believed to be a result of increased absorption due to the snow water content. The

  1. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  2. Two-Dimensional Standing Wave Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy: Superresolution Imaging of Single Molecular and Biological Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Lateral resolution improvement of up to a factor of 2 has been achieved using structured illumination. In a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope, an evanescence excitation field is formed as light is total internally reflected at an interface between a high and a low index medium. The

  3. High-resolution shear-wave seismic reflection as a tool to image near-surface subrosion structures - a case study in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2016-10-01

    Subrosion is the subsurface leaching of soluble rocks that results in the formation of depression and collapse structures. This global phenomenon is a geohazard in urban areas. To study near-surface subrosion structures, four shear-wave seismic reflection profiles, with a total length of ca. 332 m, were carried out around the famous leaning church tower of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany, which shows an inclination of 4.93° from the vertical. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by soluble Permian deposits, and the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault is assumed to be a main pathway for water to leach the evaporite. The seismic profiles were acquired with the horizontal micro-vibrator ELVIS, developed at Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), and a 72 m long landstreamer equipped with 72 horizontal geophones. The high-resolution seismic sections show subrosion-induced structures to a depth of ca. 100 m and reveal five features associated with the leaching of Permian deposits: (1) lateral and vertical varying reflection patterns caused by strongly heterogeneous strata, (2) discontinuous reflectors, small offsets, and faults, which show the underground is heavily fractured, (3) formation of depression structures in the near-surface, (4) diffractions in the unmigrated seismic sections that indicate increased scattering of the seismic waves, and (5) varying seismic velocities and low-velocity zones that are presumably caused by fractures and upward-migrating cavities. A previously undiscovered southward-dipping listric normal fault was also found, to the north of the church. It probably serves as a pathway for water to leach the Permian formations below the church and causes the tilting of the church tower. This case study shows the potential of horizontal shear-wave seismic reflection to image near-surface subrosion structures in an urban environment with a horizontal resolution of less than 1 m in the uppermost 10

  4. Modeling the relative roles of the foehn wind and urban expansion in the 2002 Beijing heat wave and possible mitigation by high reflective roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyun; Shao, Haiyan; Song, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Rapid urbanization has intensified summer heat waves in recent decades in Beijing, China. In this study, effectiveness of applying high-reflectance roofs on mitigating the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind was simulated for a record-breaking heat wave occurred in Beijing during July 13-15, 2002. Simulation experiments were performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF version 3.0) model coupled with an urban canopy model. The modeled diurnal air temperatures were compared well with station observations in the city and the wind convergence caused by urban heat island (UHI) effect could be simulated clearly. By increasing urban roof albedo, the simulated UHI effect was reduced due to decreased net radiation, and the simulated wind convergence in the urban area was weakened. Using WRF3.0 model, the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind were quantified separately, and were compared with the cooling effect due to the increased roof albedo. Results illustrated that the foehn warming effect under the northwesterly wind contributed greatly to this heat wave event in Beijing, while contribution from urban expansion accompanied by anthropogenic heating was secondary, and was mostly evident at night. Increasing roof albedo could reduce air temperature both in the day and at night, and could more than offset the urban expansion effect. The combined warming caused by the urban expansion and the foehn wind could be potentially offset with high-reflectance roofs by 58.8 % or cooled by 1.4 °C in the early afternoon on July 14, 2002, the hottest day during the heat wave.

  5. Relation between central artery pressure and pulse wave conduction in aged patients with masked hypertension%老年隐性高血压患者中心动脉压与脉搏波传导速度的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇学俊; 邢艳秋; 路方红; 刘振东; 胡小亮

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the relation of central artery pressure and its augmentation index with pulse wave velocity(PWV) in aged patients with masked hypertension. Methods Two hundred and fifty individuals were divided into normal blood pressure group(? = 169) ,masked hypertension group(n = 81) ,and hypertension group(w=150) according to their blood pressure. Their 24 h dynamic blood pressure was monitored. Central artery pressure and its reflected wave were measured with a conductive artery device and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) was measured with a PWV device. Results The central artery systolic and diastolic pressure, central, pulse pressure(CPP) ,mean central systolic and diastolic pressure,end systolic pressure,augmented pressure and crPWV were significantly higher in masked hypertension group than in normal blood pressure group and significantly lower in masked hypertension group than in hypertension group(P<0. 05, P<0. 01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the central artery pressure,CPP,and LDL-C were the major risk factors for crPWV((3 = 0. 268,0. 313, 0. 311, P< 0. 01). Conclusion The central artery pressure and its augmentation index are significantly higher in aged patients with masked hypertension, indicating that decreased artery elasticity, central artery systolic pressure,CPP,and LDL-C are the major risk factors for arterial stiffness.%目的 探讨老年隐性高血压患者中心动脉压及增强指数与脉搏波传导速度(PWV)的相关性.方法 选择临床诊断血压正常者250例,根据血压诊断标准分为血压正常(正常组)169例和隐性高血压(隐性组)81例,及高血压患者(高血压组)150例.监测24 h动态血压.并采用大动脉测量仪测量中心动脉压及其反射波;采用PWV测定仪测量颈-桡动脉PWV(crPWV).结果 隐性组中心动脉收缩压、中心动脉舒张压、中心脉压、平均收缩压、平均舒张压、收缩末压、增强压、crPWV明显高于正常

  6. Large Artery Stiffness Assessment Using SphygmoCor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Large artery stiffness assessment has been an integral part of the SphygmoCor technology since 1998. Aortic stiffness is approximated with non-invasive measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, with improvements made with time to make the assessment procedure quicker and more user independent. Also standard in the devices is the ability to reliably calculate the central aortic waveform shape from a peripheral pressure waveform from either the brachial or radial artery. This waveform contains much information beyond peak and trough (systolic and diastolic pressure). Relative waveform features such as the augmentation index, wave reflection magnitude, reflection time index, and subendocardial viability ratio are parameters that are influenced by the stiffness of systemic arteries. This article briefly describes these parameters related to large artery stiffness and provides reference to validation and repeatability studies relative to the clinical use of the SphygmoCor devices. It is beyond the scope to review here the 424 original research articles that have employed SphygmoCor devices in measuring arterial stiffness. Instead, the method of measurement across the devices is described, including tonometry, volumetric displacement through cuff placement around limbs, and ambulatory monitoring. Key population and subpopulation studies are cited where the average stiffness parameter progression with age and gender, as measured by SphygmoCor devices, is quantified in the healthy and general population. Finally, with reference to guidelines from working groups on arterial stiffness and hypertension, the clinical utility of large artery stiffness measurement is discussed in the context of the arterial stiffness parameters provided by the SphygmoCor systems. PMID:28229053

  7. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (Ppressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (Ppressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively.

  8. Assessment of left anterior descending artery stenosis of intermediate severity by fractional flow reserve, instantaneous wave-free ratio, and non-invasive coronary flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, P; Clerc, J; Ardourel, D; Djou, U; Martis, S; Botoro, T; Elmkies, F; Zemir, H; Luycx-Bore, A; Boulanger, J

    2016-10-17

    To test the usefulness of non-invasive coronary flow reserve (CFR) by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography by comparison to invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) and instantaneous wave-free ratio (IFR), a new vasodilator-free index of coronary stenosis severity, in patients with left anterior descending artery (LAD) stenosis of intermediate severity (IS) and stable coronary artery disease. 94 consecutive patients (mean age 68 ± 10 years) with angiographic LAD stenosis of IS (50-70 % diameter stenosis), were prospectively studied. IFR was calculated as a trans-lesion pressure ratio during the wave-free period in diastole; FFR as distal pressure divided by mean aortic pressure during maximal hyperemia (using 180 μg intracoronary adenosine); and CFR as hyperemic peak LAD flow velocity divided by baseline flow velocity using intravenous adenosine (140 μg/kg/min over 2 min). The mean values of IFR, FFR, and CFR were 0.88 ± 0.07, 0.81 ± 0.09, and 2.4 ± 0.6 respectively. A significant correlation was found between CFR and FFR (r = 0. 68), FFR and IFR (r = 0.6), and between CFR and IFR (r = 0.5) (all, p < 0.01). Using a ROC curve analysis, the best cut-off to detect a significant lesion based on FFR assessment (FFR ≤ 0.8, n = 31) was IFR ≤ 0.88 with a sensitivity (Se) of 74 %, specificity (Sp) of 73 %, AUC 0.81 ± 0.04, accuracy 72 %; and CFR ≤ 2 with a Se = 77 %, Sp = 89 %, AUC 0.88 ± 0.04, accuracy 85 % (all, p < 0.001). In stable patients with LAD stenosis of IS, non-invasive CFR is a useful tool to detect a significant lesion based on FFR. Furthermore, there was a better correlation between CFR and FFR than between CFR and IFR, and a trend to a better diagnostic performance for CFR versus IFR.

  9. Polarization, transverse shifts, and angular momentum conservation laws in partial reflection and refraction of an electromagnetic wave packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, K Yu; Bliokh, Yu P

    2007-06-01

    We present a solution to the problem of partial reflection and refraction of a polarized paraxial Gaussian beam at the interface between two transparent media. The Fedorov-Imbert transverse shifts of the centers of gravity of the reflected and refracted beams are calculated. Our results differ in the general case from those derived previously by other authors. In particular, they obey general conservation law for the beams' total angular momentum but do not obey one-particle conservation laws for individual photons, which have been proposed by [Onoda Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083901 (2004)]. We ascertain that these circumstances relate to the artificial model accepted in the literature for the polarized beam; this model does not fit to real beams. The present paper resolves the recent controversy and confirms the results of our previous paper [Bliokh Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 073903 (2006)]. In addition, a diffraction effect of angular transverse shifts of the reflected and refracted beams is described.

  10. Sources of and Remedies for Removing Unwanted Reflections in Millimeter Wave Images of Complex SOFI-Covered Space Shuttle Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Hepburn, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    In the recent years, continuous-wave near-field and lens-focused millimeter wave imaging systems have been effectively used to demonstrate their utility for producing high-resolution images of metallic structures covered with spay on foam insulation (SOFI) such as the Space Shuttle external fuel tank. However, for some specific structures a certain interference -pattern may be superimposed on the produced images. There are methods by which the influence of this unwanted interference can be reduced, such as the incorporation of an incidence .angle and the proper use of signal polarization. This paper presents the basics of this problem and describes the use of the methods for reducing this unwanted influence through specific examples.

  11. Cuspidal caustic and focusing of acoustical waves generated by a parametric array onto a concave reflecting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnède, Bernard; Sahraoui, Sohbi; Tournat, Vincent; Tahani, Najat

    2009-09-01

    The present Note is devoted to the study of the so-called cuspidal caustic at the surface of a hemi-cylindrical reflector illuminated with plane waves. In order to generate low frequency (e.g. in the range of 4 kHz) acoustical plane waves, a commercially available parametric array has been used. It produces powerful ultrasonic carrier waves at 40 kHz which can be electronically modulated between 200 Hz and 10 kHz. Further self-demodulation process during propagation in air generates an ultra-directive acoustical field (i.e. quasi-planar wavefronts) enabling to accurately study the focusing process occurring along the cuspidal caustic. The focusing coefficient can be computed locally by using two numerical tools, on one hand by computing the density of tangent rays to the caustic, and on the other hand by using some numerical results provided by a ray tracing algorithm. Some preliminary experimental data are then provided in order to validate the numerical predictions (spatial position of the caustic and focusing coefficient). To cite this article: B. Castagnède et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  12. Accuracy of the staggered-grid finite-difference method of the acoustic wave equation for marine seismic reflection modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Jin; WU Shiguo; CUI Ruofei

    2013-01-01

    Seismic wave modeling is a cornerstone of geophysical data acquisition,processing,and interpretation,for which finite-difference methods are often applied.In this paper,we extend the velocitypressure formulation of the acoustic wave equation to marine seismic modeling using the staggered-grid finite-difference method.The scheme is developed using a fourth-order spatial and a second-order temporal operator.Then,we define a stability coefficient (SC) and calculate its maximum value under the stability condition.Based on the dispersion relationship,we conduct a detailed dispersion analysis for submarine sediments in terms of the phase and group velocity over a range of angles,stability coefficients,and orders.We also compare the numerical solution with the exact solution for a P-wave line source in a homogeneous submarine model.Additionally,the numerical results determined by a Marmousi2 model with a rugged seafloor indicate that this method is sufficient for modeling complex submarine structures.

  13. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index in chronic kidney disease stage 2-5. Reproducibility and relationship with pulse wave parameters and kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesby, Lene; Thijs, Lutgarde; Elung-Jensen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Arterial stiffness contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Reproducible and easily obtainable indices of arterial stiffness are needed in order to monitor therapeutic strategies. The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) has been proposed...... as such a marker. The present study investigated the day-to-day reproducibility of AASI in CKD stage 2-5 and its relationship with other markers of arterial stiffness as well as with kidney function....

  14. Reflection and transmission of elastic waves in non-local band-gap metamaterials: A comprehensive study via the relaxed micromorphic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Angela; Neff, Patrizio; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Rosi, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we derive, by means of a suitable least action principle, the duality jump conditions to be imposed at surfaces of discontinuity of the material properties in non-dissipative, linear-elastic, isotropic, Mindlin's and relaxed micromorphic media, respectively. The introduced theoretical framework allows the transparent set-up of different types of micro-macro connections which are intrinsically compatible with the governing bulk equations. To illustrate the interest of the many introduced jump conditions, we focus on the case of an interface between a classical Cauchy continuum on one side and a relaxed micromorphic one on the other side. As expected, we find a complete reflection in the frequency intervals for which band-gaps are known to occur in the relaxed micromorphic continuum and precise microstructure-related reflective patterns are identified. We repeat a similar study for analogous connections between a classical Cauchy continuum and a Mindlin's micromorphic one and we show that the reflective properties of the considered interfaces are drastically modified due to the fact that band-gaps are not allowed in standard Mindlin's micromorphic media. The present work opens the way towards the possibility of conceiving complex metastructures in which band-gap metamaterials and classical materials are coupled together to produce structures with completely new and unorthodox properties with respect to wave propagation, transmission and reflection. Last, but not least, indirect measurements of the material coefficients of the relaxed micromorphic model based upon real experiments of reflection and transmission in band-gap metamaterials are uncovered by the present work which makes them finally realizable in the short term.

  15. Reflection of hierarchical medium structures of different scales in the space time data of wave fields distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The last decades are characterized by active development of Earth's sciences. The modern research methods and technologies give the opportunity to obtain new data about the Earth's structure and processes, which occur in its interior. The conception development about the nonlinear geodynamics practically coincides with research of nonlinear processes in different parts of physics. In geology soliton and auto wave conceptions are developed, principles of synergetic and self organization become be used, in geodynamics the macro quantum behavior of large mass matter, which are in critical state, in geophysics the auto wave nature of geophysical fields is researched in a frame of a new structural model with hierarchical inclusions. It is very significant to define the time of reaction lagging, in spite of the influence on the massif can be assumed as elastic. The unique model which can explain that effect is a model of the massif with a hierarchic structure. We developed a mathematical algorithm using integral and integral-differential equations for 2-D model for two problems in a frequency domain: diffraction a sound wave and linear polarized transverse wave through a arbitrary hierarchy rank inclusion plunged in an N-layered medium. That algorithm differs from the fractal model approach by a freer selecting of heterogeneities position of each rank. And the second, the problem is solved in the dynamical approach. The higher the amount of the hierarchic ranks the more is the degree of nonlinearity of the massive response and the longer can be the time of massive reaction lag of the influence. For research of hierarchic medium we had developed an iterative algorithm for electromagnetic and seismic fields in the problem setting similar to analyze higher for layered-block models with homogeneous inclusions. We had developed an iterative algorithm of inverse problem solution for the same models, using the approach of three stage interpretation. For that we had developed a

  16. Shear wave reflectivity imaging of the Nazca-South America subduction zone: Stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contenti, Sean; Gu, Yu Jeffrey; Ökeler, Ahmet; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we utilize over 5000 SS waveforms to investigate the high-resolution mantle reflectivity structure down to 1200 km beneath the South American convergent margin. Our results indicate that the dynamics of the Nazca subduction are more complex than previously suggested. The 410- and 660-km seismic discontinuities beneath the Pacific Ocean and Amazonian Shield exhibit limited lateral depth variations, but their depths vary substantially in the vicinity of the subducting Nazca plate. The reflection amplitude of the 410-km discontinuity is greatly diminished in a ˜1300-km wide region in the back-arc of the subducting plate, which is likely associated with a compositional heterogeneity on top of the upper mantle transition zone. The underlying 660-km discontinuity is strongly depressed, showing localized depth and amplitude variations both within and to the east of the Wadati-Benioff zone. The width of this anomalous zone (˜1000 km) far exceeds that of the high-velocity slab structure and suggesting significant slab deformation within the transition zone. The shape of the 660-km discontinuity and the presence of lower mantle reflectivity imply both stagnation and penetration are possible as the descending Nazca slab impinges upon the base of the upper mantle.

  17. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Donghui [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Huang, Mei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Wang, Zhijiang, E-mail: wangzj@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Feng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  18. An Approach to Biochemical Imaging of Heterogeneity in the Bio-tissue Simultaneously Using the Data of Reflectance and Transmittance of Diffuse-Photon Density Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Guang-Jiong; HAN Ru-Shan; HUANG Yun; Kaoru Sakatani; HUANG Feng-Yuan

    2001-01-01

    An algorithm for the biochemical imaging of heterogeneity in the bio-tissue with finite parallel-plane geometry simultaneously using the data of reflectance and transmittance of diffuse-photon density waves is presented.In this algorithm, the priori knowledge of heterogeneity is not needed. This algorithm is suitable for the imaging of heterogeneity in the large volume tissue and in small organs. To reduce the errors produced by the algorithm, it is suggested that the experiment should be performed in two steps, at first step the light source should be placed at one boundary to measure the data of reflectance and transmittance, and these data are used to construct the heterogeneous function in the haff space close to the light source; at the second step the light source should be placed at another boundary to measure the data of reflectance and transmittance, these data are used to construct the heterogeneous function in another half space closed to the light source; after taking above two steps the heterogeneous function in the whole space is constructed.

  19. Dependence of P-wave dispersion on mean arterial pressure as an independent hemodynamic variable in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The relationship between diastolic dysfunction and P-wave dispersion (PWD in the electrocardiogram has been studied for some time. In this regard, echocardiography is emerging as a diagnostic tool to improve risk stratification for mild hypertension.Objective:To determine the dependence of PWD on the electrocardiogram and on echocardiographic variables in a pediatric population.Methods: Five hundred and fifteen children from three elementary schools were studiedfrom a total of 565 children. Those whose parents did not want them to take part in the study, as well as those with known congenital diseases, were excluded. Tests including 12-lead surface ECGs and 4 blood pressure (BP measurements were performed. Maximum and minimum P-values were measured, and the PWD on the electrocardiogram was calculated. Echocardiography for structural measurements and the pulsed Doppler of mitral flow were also performed.Results: A significant correlation in statistical variables was found between PWD and mean BP for pre-hypertensive and hypertensive children, i.e., r= 0.32, p <0.01 and r= 0.33, p <0.01, respectively. There was a significant correlation found between PWD and the left atrial area (r= 0.45 and p <0.01.Conclusions: We highlight the dependency between PWD, the electrocardiogram and  mean  blood pressure. We also draw attention to the dependence of PWD on the left atrial area.  This result provides an explanation for earlier changes in atrial electrophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients.

  20. Estimation of Q and inverse Q filtering for prestack reflected PP-and converted PS-waves%叠前纵波和转换波地震资料Q值提取及反Q滤波

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严红勇; 刘洋

    2009-01-01

    Multi-component seismic exploration technology, combining reflected PP- and converted PS-waves, is an effective tool for solving complicated oil and gas' exploration problems. The improvement of converted wave resolution is one of the key problems.The main factor affecting converted wave resolution is the absorption of seismic waves in overlying strata. In order to remove the effect of absorption on converted waves, inverse Q filtering is used to improve the resolution. In this paper, we present a method to estimate the S-wave Q values from prestack converted wave gathers. Furthermore, we extend a stable and effective poststack inverse Q filtering method to prestack data which uses wave field continuation along the ray path to compensate for attenuation in prestack common shot PP-and PS-waves. The results of theoretical modeling prove that the method of estimating the S-wave Q values has high precision. The results from synthetic and real data prove that the stable inverse Q filtering method can effectively improve the resolution of prestack PP- and PS-waves.

  1. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  2. Tube-Load Model Parameter Estimation for Monitoring Arterial Hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanqun eZhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A useful model of the arterial system is the uniform, lossless tube with parametric load. This tube-load model is able to account for wave propagation and reflection (unlike lumped-parameter models such as the Windkessel while being defined by only a few parameters (unlike comprehensive distributed-parameter models. As a result, the parameters may be readily estimated by accurate fitting of the model to available arterial pressure and flow waveforms so as to permit improved monitoring of arterial hemodynamics. In this paper, we review tube-load model parameter estimation techniques that have appeared in the literature for monitoring wave reflection, large artery compliance, pulse transit time, and central aortic pressure. We begin by motivating the use of the tube-load model for parameter estimation. We then describe the tube-load model, its assumptions and validity, and approaches for estimating its parameters. We next summarize the various techniques and their experimental results while highlighting their advantages over conventional techniques. We conclude the review by suggesting future research directions and describing potential applications.

  3. Tube-Load Model Parameter Estimation for Monitoring Arterial Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanqun; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-01-01

    A useful model of the arterial system is the uniform, lossless tube with parametric load. This tube-load model is able to account for wave propagation and reflection (unlike lumped-parameter models such as the Windkessel) while being defined by only a few parameters (unlike comprehensive distributed-parameter models). As a result, the parameters may be readily estimated by accurate fitting of the model to available arterial pressure and flow waveforms so as to permit improved monitoring of arterial hemodynamics. In this paper, we review tube-load model parameter estimation techniques that have appeared in the literature for monitoring wave reflection, large artery compliance, pulse transit time, and central aortic pressure. We begin by motivating the use of the tube-load model for parameter estimation. We then describe the tube-load model, its assumptions and validity, and approaches for estimating its parameters. We next summarize the various techniques and their experimental results while highlighting their advantages over conventional techniques. We conclude the review by suggesting future research directions and describing potential applications. PMID:22053157

  4. The reservoir-wave approach to characterize pulmonary vascular-right ventricular interactions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Anukul; Andersen, Mads J; Burrowes, Lindsay M; Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Grant, Andrew D; Belenkie, Israel; Fine, Nowell M; Borlaug, Barry A; Tyberg, John V

    2016-12-01

    Using the reservoir-wave approach (RWA) we previously characterized pulmonary vasculature mechanics in a normal canine model. We found reflected backward-traveling waves that decrease pressure and increase flow in the proximal pulmonary artery (PA). These waves decrease right ventricular (RV) afterload and facilitate RV ejection. With pathological alterations to the pulmonary vasculature, these waves may change and impact RV performance. Our objective in this study was to characterize PA wave reflection and the alterations in RV performance in cardiac patients, using the RWA. PA pressure, Doppler-flow velocity, and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure were measured in 11 patients with exertional dyspnea. The RWA was employed to analyze PA pressure and flow; wave intensity analysis characterized PA waves. Wave-related pressure was partitioned into two components: pressures due to forward-traveling and to backward-traveling waves. RV performance was assessed by examining the work done in raising reservoir pressure and that associated with the wave components of systolic PA pressure. Wave-related work, the mostly nonrecoverable energy expended by the RV to eject blood, tended to vary directly with mean PA pressure. Where PA pressures were lower, there were pressure-decreasing/flow-increasing backward waves that aided RV ejection. Where PA pressures were higher, there were pressure-increasing/flow-decreasing backward waves that impeded RV ejection. Pressure-increasing/flow-decreasing backward waves were responsible for systolic notches in the Doppler flow velocity profiles in patients with the highest PA pressure. Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by reflected waves that impede RV ejection and an increase in wave-related work. The RWA may facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies.

  5. Thermal decomposition of 1-chloropropane behind the reflected shock waves in the temperature range of 1015-1220 K: Single pulse shock tube and computational studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sudhakar; B Rajakumar

    2014-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of 1-chloropropane in argon was studied behind reflected shock waves in a single pulse shock tube over the temperature range of 1015-1220 K. The reaction mainly goes through unimolecular elimination of HCl. The major products observed in the decomposition are propylene and ethylene, while the minor products identified are methane and propane. The rate constant for HCl elimination in the studied temperature range is estimated to be k(1015-1220 K) = 1.63 × 1013exp(-(60.1 ± 1.0) kcal mol-1/RT) s-1. The DFT calculations were carried out to identify the transition state(s) for the major reaction channel; and rate coefficient for this reaction is obtained to be k(800-1500 K) = 5.01 × 1014exp(-(58.8) kcal mol-1/RT) s-1. The results are compared with the experimental findings.

  6. Comment on "Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(5), 2597-2611 (2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Youngmin; Song, H C

    2016-05-01

    A computationally efficient, time-domain Helmholtz-Kirchhoff (H-K) integral was derived and applied to reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses [Walstead and Deane, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2597-2611 (2013)]. However, the final form of the integral equation incorporating a stationary phase approximation contained a complex phase term exp(iπ/4), which cannot be treated as a simple time delay. In this work, a real time-domain H-K integral is presented that includes an additional Hilbert transform of the time-derivative of the transmitted pulse. Numerical simulation with a sinusoidal surface shows good agreement between the real time-domain formulation and exact H-K integral, while achieving a significant improvement in computational speed (e.g., 2 orders of magnitude).

  7. Reduced blood flow response to acetazolamide reflects pre-existing vasodilation and decreased oxygen metabolism in major cerebral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Kishibe, Yoshihiko; Sugimoto, Kanji; Takahashi, Masaaki [Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, 5-4-30 Moriyama, Moriyama-city, Shiga 524-8524 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    A decrease in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to acetazolamide may indicate an increase in cerebral blood volume (CBV) caused by reduced perfusion pressure in patients with major cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions. However, a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) caused by ischemic changes may also decrease the CBF response to acetazolamide by decreasing the production of carbon dioxide. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the values of CBV and CMRO{sub 2} are independent predictors of the CBF response to acetazolamide in major cerebral arterial occlusive disease. We used positron emission tomography to study 30 patients with major cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions. The CBF response to acetazolamide was assessed by measuring baseline CBF and CBF 10 min after an intravenous injection of 1 g of acetazolamide. Multivariate analysis was used to test the independent predictive value of the CBV and CMRO{sub 2} at baseline with respect to the percent change in CBF during acetazolamide administration. Both increased CBV and decreased CMRO{sub 2} were significant and independent predictors of the reduced CBF response to acetazolamide. CBV accounted for 25% of the variance in the absolute change in CBF during acetazolamide administration and 42% of the variance in the percent change in CBF, whereas CMRO{sub 2} accounted for 19% and 4% of the variance, respectively. In patients with major cerebral arterial occlusive disease, a decrease in CMRO{sub 2} may contribute to the reduced CBF response to acetazolamide, although an increase in CBV appears to be the major contributing factor. (orig.)

  8. Arterial Stiffening With Exercise in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Andersen, Mads J; Obokata, Masaru; Koepp, Katlyn E; Kane, Garvan C; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Olson, Thomas P; Borlaug, Barry A

    2017-07-11

    Aortic stiffening and reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability may contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). This study compared indices of arterial stiffness at rest and during exercise in subjects with HFpEF and hypertensive control subjects to examine their relationships to cardiac hemodynamics and determine whether exertional arterial stiffening can be mitigated by inorganic nitrite. A total of 22 hypertensive control subjects and 98 HFpEF subjects underwent hemodynamic exercise testing with simultaneous expired gas analysis to measure oxygen consumption. Invasively measured radial artery pressure waveforms were converted to central aortic waveforms by transfer function to assess integrated measures of pulsatile aortic load, including arterial compliance, resistance, elastance, and wave reflection. Arterial load and wave reflections in HFpEF were similar to those in control subjects at rest. During submaximal exercise, HFpEF subjects displayed reduced total arterial compliance and higher effective arterial elastance despite similar mean arterial pressures in control subjects. This was directly correlated with higher ventricular filling pressures and depressed cardiac output reserve (both p exercise, increased wave reflections, impaired compliance, and increased resistance and elastance were observed in subjects with HFpEF. A subset of HFpEF subjects (n = 52) received sodium nitrite or placebo therapy in a 1:1 double-blind, randomized fashion. Compared to placebo, nitrite decreased aortic wave reflections at rest and improved arterial compliance and elastance and central hemodynamics during exercise. Abnormal pulsatile aortic loading during exercise occurs in HFpEF independent of hypertension and is correlated with classical hemodynamic derangements that develop with stress. Inorganic nitrite mitigates arterial stiffening with exercise and improves hemodynamics, indicating that arterial stiffening with

  9. In-situ analysis of fruit anthocyanins by means of total internal reflectance, continuous wave and time-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zude, Manuela; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Dosche, Carsten; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2009-08-01

    In sweet cherry (Prunus avium), the red pigmentation is correlated with the fruit maturity stage and can be measured by non-invasive spectroscopy. In the present study, the influence of varying fruit scattering coefficients on the fruit remittance spectrum (cw) were corrected with the effective pathlength and refractive index in the fruit tissue obtained with distribution of time-of-flight (DTOF) readings and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) analysis, respectively. The approach was validated on fruits providing variation in the scattering coefficient outside the calibration sample set. In the validation, the measuring uncertainty when non-invasively analyzing fruits with cw method in comparison with combined application of cw, DTOF, and TIRF measurements showed an increase in r2 up to 22.7 % with, however, high errors in all approaches.

  10. Excitation of the soliton-type wave of change of reflection and conduction in the rubber: new experimental data important for its mechanism development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudriavtsev, Eugene M.; Zodov, S. D.

    2002-05-01

    It was shown experimentally, that in elastic soft polymer samples such as rubber the IR-laser pulse excites components of the soliton-like Wave of change of reflection and conduction (WCRC). It is most probable, that the arrival of a wave results in local decreasing of the temperature of different rubber samples. At room temperature the WCRC velocity measurement for two vacuum rubber samples with different thickness given agreeable data correspond to the nineteenth WCRC component. In crude, not polymerized rubber and at cooling of vacuum rubber up to approximately 230 K the WCRC also was excited. As well as in researches with plexiglas, in the present work of the effect of saturation of a new sample by components of soliton-like WCRC was observed. The obtained data confirm availability of soliton properties for studied WCRC and in applicability of the dislocations recombination mechanism as the causes resulting in formation WCRC. These results are important for the WCRC mechanism development. It presents a phenomenon, which in process of its research appears to be more and more universal. The work was made at financial support by RFBR, project 00-02-17249-(a), and by KIE.

  11. The Seismic Reflection Wave of Liaolan Breaks at Puyang Seismostation%濮阳台聊兰断裂带地震反射波分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭杰; 郭德科; 李桂清; 郑培玲; 吴山峰

    2015-01-01

    There are many small earthquakes in the Liaolan Fault Zone,and the seismic stations around the area record a special seismic phase. Puyang seismic station record some earthquakes in this area which have the character. With the help of comparative method,graphic method and time distance equation method,we analyzed the seismic phase characteristics in this area according to the characteristics of geological structure and seismic wave kinematics , proposed that the special seismic phase is underground interface reflection wave.%聊兰断裂带小震较多,周围台站记录该地区地震震相特殊。濮阳市地震台搜集了该区域有这一特征的地震,依据本区地质构造特征和地震波运动学特征,运用对比法、作图法和时距方程法,分析了该区域特殊震相特征,认为两个不明震相为地下界面反射波。

  12. Reference values for local arterial stiffness. Part B : femoral artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossuyt, Jelle; Engelen, Lian; Ferreira, Isabel; Stehouwer, Coen D; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stéphane; Segers, Patrick; Reesink, Koen; Van Bortel, Luc M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered the gold standard measure of arterial stiffness, representing mainly aortic stiffness. As compared with the elastic carotid and aorta, the more muscular femoral artery may be differently associated with cardiovascular risk factors (C

  13. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.-H. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Gray, A. X. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kaiser, A. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Peter Grunberg Institute, PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mun, B. S. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Gyeonggi 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sell, B. C. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio 43081 (United States); Kortright, J. B. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Fadley, C. S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2013-02-21

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  14. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  15. Imaging seismic reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Root, Timotheus Johannes Petrus Maria

    2011-01-01

    The goal of reflection seismic imaging is making images of the Earth subsurface using surface measurements of reflected seismic waves. Besides the position and orientation of subsurface reflecting interfaces it is a challenge to recover the size or amplitude of the discontinuities. We investigate tw

  16. Research Progress of Extracorporeal Cardiac Shock Wave Therapy in Treating Coronary Artery Disease%体外心脏震波治疗冠心病的疗效研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭云珠; 杨萍

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT) is an effective and noninvasive therapeutic strategy for coronary artery disease. Additionally, it can enhance ischemic myocardium angiogenesis, improve ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction, and it has been shown to relieve patient symptoms without side-effects. This article presents the history of CSWT in coronary artery disease, and reviews the development of the therapy and the assessment of the curative effects of CSWT.%体外心脏震波治疗是近年来治疗冠心病的一个安全无创的新方法.研究表明它能促进血管再生,改善心肌梗死后心室重构以及慢性心肌缺血患者症状,现对心脏震波治疗冠心病的疗效研究进展做一综述.

  17. Hemodynamic Correlates of Late Systolic Flow Velocity Augmentation in the Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Heffernan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx. We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years. Forward waves ( and backward waves (negative area, NA were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/ = RIx. Additional parameters included which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx. Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included , logRIx , and AIx . FAIx was not associated with CCA stiffness . Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  18. Hemodynamic correlates of late systolic flow velocity augmentation in the carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years). Forward waves (W 1) and backward waves (negative area, NA) were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/W 1 = RIx). Additional parameters included W 2 which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx). Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included W 2 (r = - 0.52, P 0.05). Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle) and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  19. Noninvasive Measurement of Central Vascular Pressures With Arterial Tonometry: Clinical Revival of the Pulse Pressure Waveform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Stepanek, Jan; Cevette, Michael; Covalciuc, Michael; Hurst, R. Todd; Tajik, A. Jamil

    2010-01-01

    The arterial pulse has historically been an essential source of information in the clinical assessment of health. With current sphygmomanometric and oscillometric devices, only the peak and trough of the peripheral arterial pulse waveform are clinically used. Several limitations exist with peripheral blood pressure. First, central aortic pressure is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than peripheral pressure. Second, peripherally obtained blood pressure does not accurately reflect central pressure because of pressure amplification. Lastly, antihypertensive medications have differing effects on central pressures despite similar reductions in brachial blood pressure. Applanation tonometry can overcome the limitations of peripheral pressure by determining the shape of the aortic waveform from the radial artery. Waveform analysis not only indicates central systolic and diastolic pressure but also determines the influence of pulse wave reflection on the central pressure waveform. It can serve as a useful adjunct to brachial blood pressure measurements in initiating and monitoring hypertensive treatment, in observing the hemodynamic effects of atherosclerotic risk factors, and in predicting cardiovascular outcomes and events. Radial artery applanation tonometry is a noninvasive, reproducible, and affordable technology that can be used in conjunction with peripherally obtained blood pressure to guide patient management. Keywords for the PubMed search were applanation tonometry, radial artery, central pressure, cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, and arterial pulse. Articles published from January 1, 1995, to July 1, 2009, were included in the review if they measured central pressure using radial artery applanation tonometry. PMID:20435839

  20. CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  1. Effect of short-term exercise on brachial ankle artery pulse wave velocity in patients with coronary artery disease after PCI%短时运动对冠状动脉介入治疗术后冠心病患者肱动脉踝动脉脉搏波速度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩; 张丽; 张亚晶; 王海军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of short-term exercise on brachial ankle artery pulse wave velocity(baPWV) in patients with coronary artery disease after PCI. Methods Sixty-nine male patients with cornary artery disease after PCI were enrolled in this study. Their baPWV was measured 10 minutes after they underwent treadmill test with modified Bruce program. Results The mean arterial pressure and baPWV were significantly lower after exercise than before exer-cise(97. 26±11.51 mm Hg vs 91. 33 + 9. 64 mm Hg, 1421. 84 + 224.14 cm/s vs 1340.25 + 218. 16 cm/s,P0. 05). Conclusion Short-term exercise can effectively improve the arterial stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease.%目的 探讨短时运动对PCI术后冠心病患者肱动脉-踝动脉脉搏波速度(brachial-ankle artery pulse wave velocity,baPWV)的影响.方法 选择PCI术后常规复查的男性冠心病患者69例,平板运动试验采用改良Bruce方案,试验前及试验结束后10 min测量患者baPWV值.结果 患者短时运动后平均动脉压和baPWV值较运动前明显下降[(97.26±11.51)mm Hg vs(91.33±9.64)mm Hg(1 mm Hg=0.133 kPa),(1421.84±224.14) cm/svs (1340.25±218.16) cm/s],差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);收缩压和舒张压较运动前有所下降,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 短时运动可以有效改善冠心病患者的动脉僵硬度.

  2. Association of arterial stiffness with coronary flow reserve in revascularized coronary artery disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vlassis Tritakis; Stavros Tzortzis; Ignatios Ikonomidis; Kleanthi Dima; Georgios Pavlidis; Paraskevi Trivilou; Ioannis Paraskevaidis; Giorgos Katsimaglis; John Parissis; John Lekakis

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of arterial wave reflection with coronary flow reserve(CFR) in coronary artery disease(CAD) patients after successful revascularization.METHODS: We assessed 70 patients with angiographically documented CAD who had undergone recent successful revascularization. We measured(1) reactive hyperemia index(RHI) using fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry(RH-PAT Endo-PAT);(2) carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity(PWVc-Complior);(3) augmentation index(AIx), the diastolic area(DAI%) and diastolic reflection area(DRA) of the central aortic pulse wave(Arteriograph);(4) CFR using Doppler echocardiography; and(5) blood levels of lipoprotein-phospholipase A2(LpPLA2).RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, blood pressure parameter, lipidemic, diabetic and smoking status, we found that coronary flow reserve was independently related to AIx(b =-0.38, r = 0.009), DAI(b = 0.36, P = 0.014), DRA(b = 0.39, P = 0.005) and RT(b =-0.29,P = 0.026). Additionally, patients with CFR < 2.5 had higher PWVc(11.6 ± 2.3 vs 10.2 ± 1.4 m/s, P = 0.019), SBPc(139.1 ± 17.8 vs 125.2 ± 19.1 mm Hg, P = 0.026), AIx(38.2% ± 14.8% vs 29.4% ± 15.1%, P = 0.011) and lower RHI(1.26 ± 0.28 vs 1.50 ± 0.46, P = 0.012), DAI(44.3% ± 7.9% vs 53.9% ± 6.7%, P = 0.008), DRA(42.2 ± 9.6 vs 51.6 ± 11.4, P = 0.012) and Lp PLA2(268.1 ± 91.9 vs 199.5 ± 78.4 ng/m L, P = 0.002) compared with those with CFR ≥ 2.5. Elevated Lp PLA2 was related with reduced CFR(r =-0.33, P = 0.001), RHI(r =-0.37, P < 0.001) and DRA(r =-0.35, P = 0.001) as well as increased PWVc(r = 0.34, P = 0.012) and AIx(r = 0.34, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Abnormal arterial wave reflections are related with impaired coronary flow reserve despite successful revascularization in CAD patients. There is a common inflammatory link between impaired aortic wall properties, endothelial dysfunction and coronary flow impairment in CAD.

  3. Long-wave infrared radiation reflected by compression stockings in the treatment of cellulite: a clinical double-blind, randomized and controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, E; Miot, H A; Soares, J L M; Sanudo, A; Afonso, J P J M; de Barros Junior, N; Talarico, S

    2013-10-01

    Cellulite refers to changes in skin relief on the thighs and buttocks of women, with a prevalence of 80-90%, causing dissatisfaction and search for treatment. Etiopathogenesis is multifactorial, as follows: herniation of the hypodermis towards the dermis, facilitated by perpendicular fibrous septa, changes in the dermal extracellular matrix, decreased adiponectin, genetic polymorphism, microcirculation alterations and inflammatory process. There are numerous therapeutic approaches, with little evidence of effectiveness. The long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation interacts with water, improves microcirculation and stimulates metabolic processes. To date, the use of tissues with potential reflection of LWIR radiation has not been systematically investigated as adjuvant treatment for cellulite. To investigate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of cellulite through the use of compression stockings made with thread reflecting LWIR radiation. Clinical study of therapeutic intervention, controlled and double-blind, including 30 women, aging from 25 to 40 years, with cellulite of grades II and III on the thighs and buttocks who used compression stockings, "pantyhose" model, made with reflector thread of LWIR radiation, on only one randomized side. Women under other treatments for cellulite and with venous and/or blood insufficiencies were excluded. Evaluation of efficacy by clinical parameters, photographs, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), cutometry and high frequency ultrasonography and security by observation of adverse events and venous EcoDoppler recordings. DLQI scores showed significant reduction; the two-dimensional high-frequency ultrasonography showed an insignificant increase in dermal echogenicity as well as other efficacy parameters demonstrated no or slight improvement, with no differences between the sides exposed or not to LWIR; and there were no severe adverse events. Compression stockings, with or without thread reflector of LWIR, showed slight

  4. Arterial stiffness response to exercise in persons with and without Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Fahs, Christopher A; Atiq, Muhammed; Atique, Nazia; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-10-01

    This study compared arterial stiffness and wave reflection at rest and following maximal exercise between individuals with and without Down syndrome (DS), and the influence of body mass index (BMI), peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) on changes in arterial stiffness. Twelve people with DS (26.6 ± 2.6 yr) and 15 healthy controls (26.2 ± 0.6 yr) completed this study. Intima-media thickness (IMT) and stiffness of common carotid artery was examined. Hemodynamic and arterial variables were measured before and 3-min after exercise. Persons with DS had higher BMI and lower VO 2 peak than controls. IMT did not differ between groups. At rest, carotid β stiffness was significantly higher in persons with DS (PObesity and particularly VO 2 peak influenced these findings. These results suggest impaired vascular function in people with DS.

  5. 导波在端锚锚杆锚固段上界面的反射研究%Research on the guided wave reflecting from the upper interface of partially grouted rock bolt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何文; 王成; 宁建国; 唐永刚

    2009-01-01

    Finite element method was used to simulate longitudinal guided wave reflecting from the upper interface of partially grouted bolt, with the excitation wave frequencies 5 ~ 60 kHz. Reflection coefficient was used to evaluate the upper interface reflection wave which can be seen clearly while reflection coefficient was large. The effect of thickness of the grout layer, wedge angle between the upper interface and the bolt axial direction and grout materials on the upper interface reflection wave was studied. The results show that the factors above have little effect on reflection coefficient with the same excitation wave frequency, and reflection coefficient is larger when the excitation wave frequency is lower than 20 kHz, and reflection coefficient reaches its minimun when the frequency is 40 kHz. The results of numerical simulation agree well with the experimental results.%利用有限元数值模拟研究了5~60 kHz纵向导波在端锚锚杆锚固段上界面的反射情况.使用反射系数衡量导波在锚固段上界面反射能量的大小,反射系数越大,即导波在锚固段上界面的反射越明显.通过改变锚固层厚度、锚固段上界面与锚杆轴向间的楔角和锚固层的材料,研究了反射系数的变化.結果表明,以上因素对同频率导波的反射系数影响不大;当激发波频率低于20 kHz,反射系数较大;而频率为40 kHz时,反射系数最小.数值模拟导波在锚固段上界面反射系数与现场测试所得结果吻合较好.

  6. Beneficial effects on arterial stiffness and pulse-wave reflection of combined enalapril and candesartan in chronic kidney disease--a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Marie; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Strandgaard, Svend

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Inhibition of the renin-angiotensinsystem (RAS) in hypertension causes differential effects on central and brachial blood pressure (BP), which has been translated into improved outcome. The objective...

  7. Serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentration reflects severity of coronary artery disease in patients without heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Mikako; Takahashi, Masao; Doi, Kent; Myojo, Masahiro; Kiyosue, Arihiro; Ando, Jiro; Hirata, Yasunobu; Komuro, Issei

    2016-10-01

    Serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is recognized as a useful biomarker for acute kidney injury. Recently, elevated NGAL levels were reported in patients with heart failure and cardiac events, but the association between serum NGAL and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been investigated adequately. This study aimed to evaluate the association between serum NGAL concentration and CAD severity in patients without heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Two-hundred thirteen patients [mean age: 66.2 ± 9.2 (SD)] without heart failure and chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) who underwent coronary angiography were retrospectively analyzed using the SYNTAX score. The mean concentration of serum NGAL was 134.3 ± 111.3 ng/mL. A statistically significant correlation was observed between serum NGAL levels and the SYNTAX score (R = 0.18, P = 0.0091). Multivariable analysis also showed elevated serum NGAL as an independent risk factor for a high SYNTAX score (P 100 ng/mL) and high levels of BNP (>25 pg/mL) had a higher SYNTAX score (low-low vs. high-high: 13.8 ± 13.4 vs. 20.8 ± 18.9, P heart failure. Serum NGAL might be a biomarker for CAD severity.

  8. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  9. Three infinite sequences for evolution of partially reflected short-crested waves by a vertical wall breakwater%直立堤前部分反射短峰波演变的三个无穷序列

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄虎

    2011-01-01

    在直立墙防波堤前部分反射的n色n向短峰波高阶系统中,发现了其解析解数目演变的三个无穷序列,具有基本的水波理论和工程应用价值.%Three infinite sequences of analytical solution numbers for partially reflected n -chromatic n -directional short-crested waves by a vertical wall breakwater are found, which are significant for water wave theory and engineering application.

  10. Active Absorption Wave Maker System for Irregular Waves