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Sample records for arterial transit time

  1. Noninvasive pulse transit time measurement for arterial stiffness monitoring in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Corey; Rostosky, Rea; Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2015-08-01

    The use of a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor to estimate arterial stiffness, by measurement of pulse transit time (PTT), was demonstrated in microgravity. The monitor's utility for space applications was shown by establishing the correlation between ground-based and microgravity-based measurements. The system consists of a scale-based ballistocardiogram (BCG) and a toe-mounted photoplethysmogram (PPG). PTT was measured from the BCG I-wave to the intersecting tangents of the first trough and maximum first derivative of the PPG waveforms of each subject. The system was tested on a recent series of parabolic flights in which the PTT of nine subjects was measured on the ground and in microgravity. An average of 60.2 ms PTT increase from ground to microgravity environments was shown, and was consistent across all test subjects (standard deviation = 32.9 ms). This increase in PTT could be explained by a number of factors associated with microgravity and reported in previous research, including elimination of hydrostatic pressure, reduction of intrathoracic pressure, and reduction of mean arterial pressure induced by vasodilation. PMID:26737764

  2. Continuous blood pressure measurement using the pulse transit time: Comparison to intra-arterial measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzak, Andreas; Mendoza, Yuri; Gesche, Heiko; Konermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Continuous blood pressure (BP) measurement allows the investigation of transient changes in BP and thus may give insights into mechanisms of BP control. We validated a continuous, non-invasive BP measurement based on the pulse transit time (PTT), i.e., BP(PTT), by comparing it with the intra-arterial BP (BP(i.a.)) measurement. Twelve subjects (five females and seven males) were included. BP(i.a.) was obtained from the radial artery using a system from ReCor Medical. Systolic and diastolic BP were calculated using the PTT (BP(PTT), SOMNOscreen). (PTT) was determined from the electrocardiogram and the peripheral pulse wave. The BP was modulated by application of increasing doses of dobutamine (5, 10, 20 μg/kg body mass). Systolic BP(PTT) and systolic BP(i.a.) correlated significantly (R = 0.94). The limits of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot were ± 19 mmHg; the mean values differed by 1 mmHg. The correlation coefficient for the diastolic BP measurements was R = 0.42. The limits of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot were ± 18 mmHg, with a mean difference of 5 mmHg in favour of the BP(PTT). The study demonstrates a significant correlation between the measurement methods for systolic BP. The results encourage the application of PTT-based BP measurement for the evaluation of BP dynamics and pathological BP changes. PMID:25857601

  3. Correlations between aorto-popliteal bolus transit speed and aortic and popliteal bolus transit time during CT angiography of aortoiliac and lower extremity arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate correlations between the aorto-popliteal bolus transit speed and aortic and popliteal bolus transit time in order to evaluate the possibility for prediction of bolus transit speed by single test injection technique. Materials and methods: Approval was obtained from our institutional review board for this study, which included 42 patients, from all of whom written informed consent was obtained. Low-dose serial CT scanning after injection of 12 ml contrast material (300 mg/ml) at a rate of 3 ml/s followed by saline flush was performed twice, first at the level of the upper abdomen and second at the level of the knee joint. The times needed to reach peak enhancement of the upper abdominal aorta (T-aorta) and bilateral popliteal arteries (T-popliteal) were obtained, and aorto-popliteal bolus transit speeds between the abdominal aorta and popliteal arteries were calculated. ABI was recorded for the bilateral feet. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was used to investigate the correlation between the bolus transit speed and T-aorta, T-popliteal, ABI, and patient age. Result: The respective correlation coefficients for bolus transit speed on the one hand and T-aorta, T-popliteal, ABI, patient age on the other were -0.50, -0.84, 0.36, and -0.52. Conclusion: The time to peak enhancement for popliteal arteries showed the strongest correlation with aorto-popliteal bolus transit speeds, and was considered to be the most accurate predictor for aorto-popliteal bolus transit speeds.

  4. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  5. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion

  6. Noninvasive tracking of systolic arterial blood pressure using pulse transit time measured with ECG and carotid doppler signals with intermittent calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a non-invasive blood pressure measurement system using pulse transit time (PTT) from the heart to the common carotid artery, measured by using an electrocardiogram (ECG) R-wave and carotid arterial Doppler signals at the anterior neck. In this study, we examined the validity of our system by comparing PTT derived systolic blood pressure (Dopp_SBP) with invasive radial systolic arterial pressure (Inv_SBP) with calibration every 15 min in the ICU setting.Methods: 17 patients u...

  7. Transition time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 2013 is going to be an interesting year for the High Dilution research field. There is a tendency to revise basic concepts and common beliefs, while refining models and theories. The fundamental research team seems to be open to deeper discussions, aiming to reinforce some hypothesis and discharge others. In somehow, we are stuck in a vicious way of think, trying to manage and describe an informational phenomenon into a molecular framework. The challenge offered to those researchers involved with basic science is to figure out how to deal with such phenomenon, since previous theories and models have not shown to be matched! In the other hand, there is a tendency to explore the HD phenomenon in its technological branch. While basic research is important to describe how things work, the applied research has a more intense social and economic appeal. To develop technology based on HD means to give a different kind of visibility to the field, attracting sponsors, companies, entrepreneurs, always committed to the market regulatory laws. I am expecting for this year some important movements, both in the basic and applied research. Of course, it will be only a new beginning, as these changes require a lot of work, discussions and insights. But this transition time is very welcome!

  8. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  9. Production of brain mean transit time (t-bar) by intra arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) and clinical circulatory values relative to t-bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of this study are to make an excellent image and measure the brain mean circulation time (t-bar) by IADSA in 60 patients of cerebral infarcts. The circulation curves in Intra Carotid Artery and jugular vein are given and t-bar is calculated applying to Hamilton's method. There are several merits in IADSA compared to IVDSA; small amount of contrast media, an excellent image and few side effects. t-bar is measured 4.7 ± 1.5 sec in normal controls, and positively correlated with age (p < 0.01). Measurement must be taken in a certain condition because t-bar is influenced by cerebrovascular parameters. The circulation curves are classified into 4 types influenced by various vascular factors such as cardiac output (CO), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) and other factors. There are negative correlations between t-bar and CO and resional cerebral blood flow but positive one with CVR. The larger low density area is by CT scan and the severer ADL (activity of daily living), the longer t-bar become prolonged. We concluded that IADSA is capable of getting the excellent image and t-bar can be one parameter in cerebrovascular diseases. (author)

  10. Pulse transit times to the capillary bed evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2009-01-01

    The pulse transit time (PTT) of a wave over a specified distance along a blood vessel provides a simple non-invasive index that can be used for the evaluation of arterial distensibility. Current methods of measuring the PTT determine the propagation times of pulses only in the larger arteries. We have evaluated the pulse arrival time (PAT) to the capillary bed, through the microcirculation, and have investigated its relationship to the arterial PAT to a fingertip. To do so, we detected cardia...

  11. Antiplatelet therapy at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremke, Michael; Jensen, Mariann Tang; Bak, Mikkel; Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Hindsholm, Karsten; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this multicentre cohort study was to examine the relationship between antiplatelet therapy (APT) at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and postoperative bleeding complications, transfusion requirements and adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: A matched...

  12. Imaging evaluation of calf arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease by using time-resolved angiography with interleaved stochastic trajectories on MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the value of time-resolved angiography with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) in providing hemodynamic indices and morphological imaging of calf arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) with 3.0 T MR scanner. Methods: Forty patients with confirmed or suspected PAOD underwent TWIST MRA for the calf arteries and conventional contrast- enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) for the whole lower peripheral arteries. TWIST MRA data were used to determine the bolus arriving time of the popliteal artery, the time difference of the bolus arrival in the popliteal artery between the two legs, calf artery transit time, and the mean. peak enhancement time of calf arteries. The mean value of peak enhancement time of calf arteries was correlated with ankle-brachial index(ABI). The calf arteries were divided into 13 segments. The visible score of arterial segment was recorded, and the degree of arterial stenosis was graded too. In 16 patients, DSA was used as the gold standard to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of TWIST MRA and CE-MRA. Results: The bolus arriving time of the popliteal artery was (0.7±7.6) s the time difference of the bolus arrival in the popliteal artery between the two legs was (2.1±2.5) s, the calf artery transit time was (35.6±16.9) s, the mean value of peak enhancement time of calf arteries was (52.6±17.6) s. ABI was acquired from 24 patients and 48 legs, which correlated well with the mean value of peak enhancement time in calf arteries (r=0.627, P0.05). On CE-MRA, there were 38 legs with varying degrees of early venous enhancement; in contrast, there was no venous contamination on TWIST MRA. The sensitivity and specificity of' TWIST MRA were 96.7% (118/122) and 100.0% (72/72) in showing normal artery and mild stenosis, 94.1% (32/34) and 96.2% (154/160) in showing severe stenosis, and 94.7% (36/38) and 98.7% (154/156) in showing occlusion. The sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA were 95.9% (117

  13. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M. [CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Martínez, C. [Observatorio Astronómico de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  14. A search for transit timing variation

    CERN Document Server

    Maciejewski, G; Raetz, St; Errmann, R; Kramm, U; Schmidt, T O B

    2010-01-01

    Photometric follow-ups of transiting exoplanets (TEPs) may lead to discoveries of additional, less massive bodies in extrasolar systems. This is possible by detecting and then analysing variations in transit timing of transiting exoplanets. In 2009 we launched an international observing campaign, the aim of which is to detect and characterise signals of transit timing variation (TTV) in selected TEPs. The programme is realised by collecting data from 0.6--2.2-m telescopes spread worldwide at different longitudes. We present our observing strategy and summarise first results for WASP-3b with evidence for a 15 Earth-mass perturber in an outer 2:1 orbital resonance.

  15. Automatic segmentation method which divides a cerebral artery tree in time-of-flight MR-angiography into artery segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Harauchi, Hajime; Okumura, Yusuke; Umeda, Tokuo

    2006-03-01

    To achieve sufficient accuracy and robustness, 2D/3D registration methods between DSA and MRA of the cerebral artery require an automatic extraction method that can isolate wanted segments from the cerebral artery tree. Here, we described an automatic segmentation method that divides the cerebral artery tree in time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) into each artery. This method requires a 3D dataset of the cerebral artery tree obtained by TOF-MRA. The processes of this method are: 1) every branch in the cerebral artery tree is labeled with a unique index number, 2) the 3D center of the Circle of Willis is determined using 2D and 3D templates, and 3) the labeled branches are classified with reference to the 3D territory map of cerebral arteries centered on the Circle of Willis. This method classifies all branches into internal carotid arteries (ICA), basilar artery (BA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), a1 segment of anterior cerebral artery (ACA(A1)), other segments of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), posterior communication artery (PcomA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA). In the eleven cases examined, the numbers of correctly segmented pixels in each branch were counted and the percentages based on the total number of pixels of the artery were calculated. Manually classified arteries of each case were used as references. Mean percentages were: ACA, 87.6%; R-ACA(A1), 44.9%; L-ACA(A1), 30.4%; R-MC, 82.4%; L-MC, 79.0%; R-PcomA, 0.5%; L-PcomA, 0.0%; R-PCA, 77.2%; L-PCA, 80.0%; R-ICA, 78.6%; L-ICA, 93.05; BA, 77.1%; and total arteries, 78.9%.

  16. Arterial pressure transfer characteristics: effects of travel time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Stok, Wim J; Wesseling, Karel H; Spaan, Jos A E; Westerhof, Nico; Bos, Willem Jan; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the quantitative contribution of all local conduit arterial, blood, and distal load properties to the pressure transfer function from brachial artery to aorta. The model was based on anatomical data, Young's modulus, wall viscosity, blood viscosity, and blood density. A three-element windkessel represented the distal arterial tree. Sensitivity analysis was performed in terms of frequency and magnitude of the peak of the transfer function and in terms of systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure in the aorta. The root mean square error (RMSE) described the accuracy in wave-shape prediction. The percent change of these variables for a 25% alteration of each of the model parameters was calculated. Vessel length and diameter are found to be the most important parameters determining pressure transfer. Systolic and diastolic pressure changed <3% and RMSE <1.8 mmHg for a 25% change in vessel length and diameter. To investigate how arterial tapering influences the pressure transfer, a single uniform lossless tube was modeled. This simplification introduced only small errors in systolic and diastolic pressures (1% and 0%, respectively), and wave shape was less well described (RMSE, approximately 2.1 mmHg). Local (arm) vasodilation affects the transfer function little, because it has limited effect on the reflection coefficient. Since vessel length and diameter translate into travel time, this parameter can describe the transfer accurately. We suggest that with a, preferably, noninvasively measured travel time, an accurate individualized description of pressure transfer can be obtained. PMID:16963619

  17. A search for transit timing variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramm U.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photometric follow-ups of transiting exoplanets (TEPs may lead to discoveries of additional, less massive bodies in extrasolar systems. This is possible by detecting and then analysing variations in transit timing of transiting exoplanets. In 2009 we launched an international observing campaign, the aim of which is to detect and characterise signals of transit timing variation (TTV in selected TEPs. The programme is realised by collecting data from 0.6-2.2-m telescopes spread worldwide at different longitudes. We present our observing strategy and summarise first results for WASP-3b with evidence for a 15 Earth-mass perturber in an outer 2:1 orbital resonance.

  18. Usefulness of Acceleration Time for Internal Carotid Artery Origin Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Hirokazu; Akaiwa, Yasuhisa; Onda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Calcification of the internal carotid artery (ICA) hinders accurate evaluation of the stenosis by conventional ultrasonography due to acoustic shadow. We examined the relationship between acceleration time (AcT) and ICA origin stenosis. One hundred thrity seven samples (266 vessels) that enforced duplex ultrasonography in our hospital were targeted. The results have shown that there is a significant relationship between AcT and stenosis. AcT of more than 110 msec suggests that the stenosis is...

  19. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx-gt 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies (ΔT/T) approx-lt 10-5 can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of ∼100M pc for large-scale structure as well as ∼1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs

  20. Orocaecal transit time in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korman, S H; Bar-Oz, B.; E. Granot; Meyer, S

    1991-01-01

    Smooth muscle degeneration may occur in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We measured fasting orocaecal transit time in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscular dystrophies and in healthy controls. No significant differences were found. In contrast to reports of gastric hypomotility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found no evidence of impaired small intestinal motility.

  1. Time-dependent transition density matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: ► A time-dependent generalization of the transition density matrix (TDM) is proposed. ► The time-dependent TDM is approximately calculated using Kohn–Sham wave functions. ► Numerical examples on one-dimensional lattices illustrate how the TDM works. ► Rapid formation and spreading of electron-hole pairs is observed. ► Here, electron interaction effects are less important than quantum confinement. - Abstract: The transition density matrix (TDM) is a useful tool for analyzing and interpreting electronic excitation processes in molecular systems. For any transition between two eigenstates of a many-body system, the TDM provides a characteristic spatial map which indicates the distribution of the associated electron–hole pairs and allows one to identify their delocalization and coherence lengths. This is particularly useful for characterizing charge-transfer excitations in large molecular chains or light-harvesting molecules. We here extend these concepts into the real-time domain and define the time-dependent TDM and discuss it in the context of TDDFT. An approximation is proposed in terms of the Kohn–Sham Slater determinants. This provides a new tool for the real-time visualization of electronic excitation processes such as exciton formation, diffusion, recombination, or charge separation. We illustrate the time-dependent TDM for simple one-dimensional lattice systems with two spinless electrons which are either noninteracting of fully interacting.

  2. Transit time for third order resonance extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Pullia, M

    1996-01-01

    An important spin-off from accelerators is the use of synchrotrons for cancer therapy. A precise control of the extraction from the synchrotron is needed to satisfy the medical specifications and this has led to a renewed interest in the basic theory of third-order resonance extraction. In the present paper, a complete description of the transit time in the resonance (the time between a particle becoming unstable and reaching the electrostatic septum) is developed as a basis for future work predicting spill shapes and the influence of power supply ripple. The transit time is evaluated for constant tune and for a slowly varying tune. Both cases are subdivided into particles that start close simulation and are shown to be correct to within a few percent.

  3. Transition times in the Landau-Zener model

    OpenAIRE

    Vitanov, N. V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents analytic formulas for various transition times in the Landau-Zener model. Considerable differences are found between the transition times in the diabatic and adiabatic bases, and between the jump time (the time for which the transition probability rises to the region of its asymptotic value) and the relaxation time (the characteristic damping time of the oscillations which appear in the transition probability after the crossing). These transition times have been calculated...

  4. Stiffness Indices and Fractal Dimension relationship in Arterial Pressure and Diameter Time Series in-Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymberknop, L.; Legnani, W.; Pessana, F.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The advent of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, is associated to significant alterations in the physical properties of arterial vessels. Evaluation of arterial biomechanical behaviour is related to the assessment of three representative indices: arterial compliance, arterial distensibility and arterial stiffness index. Elasticity is the most important mechanical property of the arterial wall, whose natures is strictly non-linear. Intervention of elastin and collagen fibres, passive constituent elements of the arterial wall, is related to the applied wall stress level. Concerning this, appropriate tools are required to analyse the temporal dynamics of the signals involved, in order to characterize the whole phenomenon. Fractal geometry can be mentioned as one of those techniques. The aim of this study consisted on arterial pressure and diameter signals processing, by means of nonlinear techniques based on fractal geometry. Time series morphology was related to different arterial stiffness states, generated by means of blood flow variations, during experiences performed in vitro.

  5. Catheterization of cerebral arteries under real-time MR imaging guidance: an experimental study in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of catheterization of cerebral arteries under the real-time MR imaging guidance in experimental pigs. Methods: Ten small-sized female pigs were selected for this study. Via the femoral access, percutaneous catheterization with a 3 F active MR-tracking microcatheter was performed under real-time MRI guidance and the microcatheter was separately placed into bilateral ascending pharyngeal arteries. After the procedure, all the pigs were sacrificed and sent for pathologic examination. Gross pathologic examination of aortic arches, brachio-cephalic arteries, carotid arteries and ascending pharyngeal arteries was performed to search for the perforation and dissection. Results: MR angiography revealed that in pigs the bilateral ascending pharyngeal arteries formed an arteriolar network at the cranial base, supplying blood flow to the brain. Catheterization of ascending pharyngeal arteries from the femoral artery access was successfully performed in all 10 pigs with the help of real-time MR imaging-guidance. A single procedure took about 4-12 minutes. Macroscopically, no evidence of vascular injury of aortic arches, brachio-cephalic arteries, carotid arteries and ascending pharyngeal arteries was found. Conclusion: Under real-time MRI guidance the catheterization of cerebral arteries can be correctly and quickly accomplished in experimental pigs. (authors)

  6. On the estimation of arterial route travel time distribution with Markov chains

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani Ghalenoei, Mohsen; Geroliminis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the probe vehicle deployment offer an innovative prospect for research in arterial travel time estimation. Specifically, we focus on the estimation of probability distribution of arterial route travel time, which contains more information regarding arterial performance measurements and travel time reliability. One of the fundamental contributions of this work is the integration of travel time correlation of route's successive links within the methodology. In the proposed te...

  7. Rapid Fatal Outcome from Pulmonary Arteries Compression in Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis A. Voutsadakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a malignancy that metastasizes frequently to lymph nodes including the mediastinal lymph nodes. This occurrence may produce symptoms due to compression of adjacent structures such as the superior vena cava syndrome or dysphagia from esophageal compression. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma for whom mediastinal lymphadenopathy led to pulmonary artery compression and a rapidly fatal outcome. This rare occurrence has to be distinguished from pulmonary embolism, a much more frequent event in cancer patients, in order that proper and prompt treatment be initiated.

  8. Data processing in pulse transit time measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmeng Zhang; Ye Li

    2008-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is used as a noninvasive and cuff-less parameter to estimate blood pressure.In this paper,we develop an algorithm to ohtain PTT rapidly,which is appropriate for micro-processor and could achieve good accuracy in PTT,even in noisy measurements.The algorithm is based on finite impulse response(FIR) filter to reduce the noise and an adaptive threshold to detect the significant points of ECG and PPG.Evaluation of this method is hased on the signals from our PTT-based blood pressure devices It is shown that the method works well for PPT calculation.

  9. Thrombolytic therapy for cerebral arteries under real-time MR imaging guidance: an experiment in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of thrombolytic therapy for cerebral arteries in experimental pigs under real-time MR imaging guidance. Methods: Ten domestic female pigs (produced in U.S.A.) were enrolled in this study. After puncturing femoral artery with percutaneous technique, the bilateral ascending pharyngeal arteries were catheterized with 3 F active MR-tracking microcatheter under the guidance of real-time MR imaging. Then, aged thrombi were injected via the microcatheter to occlude the pharyngeal arteries. After 30-60 minutes, 500,000-750,000 units of urokinase were infused through the microcatheter into either one of the occluded ascending pharyngeal arteries for thrombolysis. Intraarterial contrast enhanced MRA and T1 fat suppressed coronal MR images were obtained to assess the vessel occlusion and the results of thrombolysis. Results: MR angiography revealed that the major cerebral blood supply in pigs was obtained from the basicranial micro-vascular network which was formed by bilateral ascending pharyngeal arteries. Catheterization of ascending pharyngeal arteries via the femoral artery access was successfully performed in all 10 pigs under the guidance of real-time MR imaging. Both ascending pharyngeal arteries were totally occluded in all pigs after injection of aged thromboli. After urokinase infusion into the ascending pharyngeal arteries, the blood clots were resolved with re-established blood flow. Conclusion: It is feasible to perform thrombolytic therapy for cerebral arteries under real-time MR imaging guidance. (authors)

  10. Theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, J.

    1982-09-01

    A theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters for clean fluids is developed from the equations of fluid mechanics applied simultaneously to the fluid and the sound vibrations. These equations are linearized (weak sound) and use is made of the electroacoustic reciprocity theorem to give a relation between the voltages and currents at the transducer terminals and the fluid velocity. The technique of "reciprocal operation" of a transit time ultrasonic flowmeter is described and the way this technique eliminates zero drift is explained. The theory can be applied to meters with broad sound beams (which provide a better average over velocity profiles) or meters in which the wavelength of sound is not necessarily small compared with the duct diameter. Small modificaition of the sound field (due to flow) is assumed and the resulting phase (or amplitude) shift of the received signal is expressed as an integral throughout the fluid of the dot product of the fluid velocity and a weight vector defined in terms of the sound fields in the stationary fluid. Simple flowmeter designs which approach the ideal of complete immunity to velocity distribution are described.

  11. Hemodynamics of left internal mammary artery bypass graft: Effect of anastomotic geometry, coronary artery stenosis, and postoperative time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Lu, Yuan; Gao, Yan; Meng, Jie; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-03-21

    Although the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) bypass graft is the best choice for surgical revascularization, its hemodynamics are still complex and can result in long-term graft failure. Here, we performed a hemodynamic analysis of the LIMA-coronary artery with end-to-side/side-to-side anastomoses based on 15 patient-specific CTA images at various postoperative periods. We hypothesize that hemodynamic patterns are determined by the interplay of LIMA geometry, anastomotic configuration, and severity of native coronary artery stenosis, which are strongly affected by the postoperative time. A 3D finite volume method with the inlet pressure wave and outlet resistance boundary conditions was used to compute the distribution of pressure and flow, from which the time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillation shear index (OSI), time-averaged WSS gradient (TAWSSG), and transverse WSS (transWSS) were determined. To characterize the hemodynamic environment, we defined surface area ratios of low TAWSS (≤4dynes/cm(2)), high OSI (≥0.15), TAWSSG (≥500dynes/cm(3)), and transWSS (≥6dynes/cm(2)) in the LIMA graft and at the anastomosis between LIMA graft and coronary artery. These ratios were determined by the interplay of multiple morphometric parameters in the LIMA-coronary artery, but increased with postoperative time. These findings have significant implications for understanding LIMA graft patency. PMID:26900034

  12. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-ba...

  13. Measuring bovine mammary gland blood flow using a transit time ultrasonic flow probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorewit, R C; Aromando, M C; Bristol, D G

    1989-07-01

    Lactating cattle were used to validate a transit time ultrasonic blood flow metering system for measuring mammary gland arterial blood flow. Blood flow probes were surgically placed around the right external pudic artery. An electromagnetic flow probe was implanted in tandem with the ultrasonic probe in two cows for comparative measurements. The absolute accuracy of the implanted flow probes was assessed in vivo by mechanical means on anesthetized cows after 2 to 3 wk of implantation. The zero offset of the ultrasonic probes ranged from -12 to 8 ml/min. When the ultrasonic probe was properly implanted, the slopes of the calibration curves were linear and ranged from .92 to .95, tracking absolute flow to within 8%. The transit time instrument's performance was examined under a variety of physiological conditions. These included milking and hormone injections. The transit time ultrasonic flow meter accurately measured physiological changes in mammary arterial blood flow in chronically prepared conscious cattle. Blood flow increased 29% during milking. Epinephrine decreased mammary blood flow by 90 to 95%. Oxytocin doses increased mammary blood flow by 15 to 24%. PMID:2674232

  14. Vascular reactivity in intrapulmonary arteries of chicken embryos during transition to ex ovo life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor, Eduardo; Ruijtenbeek, Karin; Pulgar, Victor; De Mey, Jo G R; Blanco, Carlos E

    2002-03-01

    The present study aimed to characterize pulmonary vascular reactivity in the chicken embryo from the last stage of prenatal development and throughout the perinatal period. Isolated intrapulmonary arteries from non-internally pipped embryos at 19 days of incubation and from internally and externally pipped embryos at 21 days of incubation were studied. Arterial diameter and contractile responses to KCl, endothelin-1, and U-46619 increased with incubation but were unaffected by external pipping. In contrast, the contractions induced by norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and electric field stimulation decreased with development. No developmental changes were observed in endothelium-dependent [acetylcholine (ACh) and cyclopiazonic acid] or endothelium-independent [sodium nitroprusside (SNP)] relaxation. These relaxations were abolished by the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was unaffected by blockade of cyclooxygenase or heme oxygenase but was significantly reduced by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors. Reduction of O2 concentration from 95 to 5% produced a marked reduction in ACh and SNP-induced relaxations. Chicken embryo pulmonary arteries show a marked endothelium-dependent relaxation that is unaffected by transition to ex ovo life. Endothelium-derived NO seems to be the main mediator responsible for this relaxation. PMID:11832415

  15. Timing Detection of Eclipsing Binary Planets and Transiting Extrasolar Moons

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, L. R.; Deeg, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the improved detection of extrasolar planets around eclipsing binaries using eclipse minima timing, and extrasolar moons around transiting planets using transit timing, offered by the upcoming COROT (ESA, 2005), Kepler (NASA, 2007), and Eddington (ESA 2008) spacecraft missions. Hundreds of circum-binary planets should be discovered, and a thorough survey of moons around transiting planets will be accomplished by these missions.

  16. Pulse-wave timing between the cervical carotid and intracranial arteries by means of wavelet transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, HL; de Jonge, AB; Hamoen, DJ; Smit, A; van Bruggen, AC; Mooij, JJA; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet Transform (WT) is applied in a method for timing the blood pulse wave between the internal carotid artery: and one of the intracranial arteries. The required accuracy is a few milliseconds. In contrast to the Fourier Transform (FT), WT is an appropriate technique for the detection of non-sta

  17. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VIII. CATALOG OF TRANSIT TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIRST TWELVE QUARTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Holczer, Tomer; Sokol, Gil [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Zucker, Shay [Department of Geophysical, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Carter, Joshua A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Quintana, Elisa V. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Welsh, William [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV—the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.

  18. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VIII. CATALOG OF TRANSIT TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIRST TWELVE QUARTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV—the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude

  19. Choosing information variables for transition probabilities in a time-varying transition probability Markov switching model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew J. Filardo

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses a practical estimation issue for time-varying transition probability (TVTP) Markov switching models. Time-varying transition probabilities allow researchers to capture important economic behavior that may be missed using constant (or fixed) transition probabilities. Despite its use, Hamilton’s (1989) filtering method for estimating fixed transition probability Markov switching models may not apply to TVTP models. This paper provides a set of sufficient conditions to justi...

  20. Pulse transit times to the capillary bed evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse transit time (PTT) of a wave over a specified distance along a blood vessel provides a simple non-invasive index that can be used for the evaluation of arterial distensibility. Current methods of measuring the PTT determine the propagation times of pulses only in the larger arteries. We have evaluated the pulse arrival time (PAT) to the capillary bed, through the microcirculation, and have investigated its relationship to the arterial PAT to a fingertip. To do so, we detected cardiac-induced pulse waves in skin microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Using the ECG as a reference, PATs to the microcirculation were measured on the four extremities of 108 healthy subjects. Simultaneously, PATs to the radial artery of the left index finger were obtained from blood pressure recordings using a piezoelectric sensor. Both PATs correlate in similar ways with heart rate and age. That to the microcirculation is shown to be sensitive to local changes in skin perfusion induced by cooling. We introduce a measure for the PTT through the microcirculation. We conclude that a combination of LDF and pressure measurements enables simultaneous characterization of the states of the macro and microvasculature. Information about the microcirculation, including an assessment of endothelial function, may be obtained from the responses to perturbations in skin perfusion, such as temperature stress or vasoactive substances

  1. Continuous blood pressure monitoring during exercise using pulse wave transit time measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, J; Meigas, K; Karai, D; Kattai, R; Kaik, J; Rossmann, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research, which is focused on the development of the convenient device for continuous non-invasive monitoring of arterial blood pressure. The blood pressure estimation method is based on a presumption that there is a singular relationship between the pulse wave propagation time in arterial system and blood pressure. The parameter used in this study is pulse wave transit time (PWTT). The measurement of PWTT involves the registration of two time markers, one of which is based on ECG R peak detection and another on the detection of pulse wave in peripheral arteries. The reliability of beat to beat systolic blood pressure calculation during physical exercise was the main focus for the current paper. Sixty-one subjects (healthy and hypertensive) were studied with the bicycle exercise test. As a result of current study it is shown that with the correct personal calibration it is possible to estimate the beat to beat systolic arterial blood pressure during the exercise with comparable accuracy to conventional noninvasive methods. PMID:17272172

  2. Pulse transit times to the capillary bed evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2009-03-01

    The pulse transit time (PTT) of a wave over a specified distance along a blood vessel provides a simple non-invasive index that can be used for the evaluation of arterial distensibility. Current methods of measuring the PTT determine the propagation times of pulses only in the larger arteries. We have evaluated the pulse arrival time (PAT) to the capillary bed, through the microcirculation, and have investigated its relationship to the arterial PAT to a fingertip. To do so, we detected cardiac-induced pulse waves in skin microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Using the ECG as a reference, PATs to the microcirculation were measured on the four extremities of 108 healthy subjects. Simultaneously, PATs to the radial artery of the left index finger were obtained from blood pressure recordings using a piezoelectric sensor. Both PATs correlate in similar ways with heart rate and age. That to the microcirculation is shown to be sensitive to local changes in skin perfusion induced by cooling. We introduce a measure for the PTT through the microcirculation. We conclude that a combination of LDF and pressure measurements enables simultaneous characterization of the states of the macro and microvasculature. Information about the microcirculation, including an assessment of endothelial function, may be obtained from the responses to perturbations in skin perfusion, such as temperature stress or vasoactive substances. PMID:19202235

  3. Non-enhanced artery depiction of the finger using time-slip method. Presidental award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, we have been reported visualization of the artery of the finger using flow-spoiled flesh blood imaging (FBI) technique without using contrast medium in this society. In this study, we use time-spatial labeling inversion tag pulse (Time-SLIP) with peripheral-triggered 3 dimension half-Fourier single shot fast spin echo (FSE) for visualization of the artery of the finger. Time-SLIP is one of the arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques, that allows an alternative acquisition of a spatial-selective inversion recovery (IR) tag-on and tag-off pulse for separation of arteries from veins. The subtraction of the tag-on images from the tag-off images allows only the tagged images at the TI. All signals outside the tag region are subtracted but for the signal of blood that moved from tagged region. Using labeling pulse at the TI on null point of blood, the tagged image shows maximum signal intensity of the artery. The length of the artery from the tagged area depends on the speed of the blood flow of the artery, longer artery of the subtraction image means keeping faster blood flow. Using longer TI than null point of blood, subtraction images visualize longer artery, but the signal of blood become lower because of the T1 relaxation of blood. Inverting by a spatial-selective IR tag-on pulse on just before the excitation time of heart is important to visualize the longer artery of finger, because the TI that means moving period of blood is only 1000 ms. (author)

  4. Factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary angiography with DSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in diagnosing coronary arterial disease. Delay time and density of the coronary arteries related with patient-specific factors are essential for getting an optimal CTA image. Purpose: To investigate various factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary CTA with dual source CT. Material and Methods: One hundred and sixteen consecutive subjects who underwent cardiac DSCT with retrospective ECG-gating were included. Factors including gender, age, height, weight, transversal cardiac diameter (TCD), transversal thoracic diameter (TTD), heart rate (HR), body surface area (BSA = [weight x height/3600]1/2) and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR = TCD/TTD) were recorded, measured and calculated before administration of contrast media during coronary CT angiography. Delay time was determined as duration from the beginning of the injection to the density in the descending aorta at the level of right main pulmonary artery reaching a threshold of 100 HU. Coronary arterial density was measured at the mid portion of the right coronary artery. Regression analysis and stepwise regression analysis were used to investigate the influence of these factors on delay time and coronary arterial density. Results: Delay time decreased with an increasing HR and it was shorter in women than men. Delay time increased with an increasing TCD. Delay time could be predicted by the formula: DT = 16.651-0.110 x HR + 1.902 x gender + 0.394 x TCD (where DT is abbreviation for delay time, gender is 0 for women and 1 for men). Coronary arterial density decreased with an increasing HR and weight. Coronary arterial density could be predicted by the formula: CAD = 923.42-4.099 x HR-3.293 x weight (CAD = coronary arterial density). There was no relationship between the other factors mentioned above and delay time or coronary arterial density. Conclusion: Delay time is influenced by HR, gender and TCD. Coronary arterial density

  5. The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kennet Bomann West; Hardis, S.; Hinse, T. C.;

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods: The...

  6. Accuracy of PET rCBF measurements: Effect of transit time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytic expressions were derived for estimating the error in PET rCBF measurements associated with the time lag between brain and blood radioactivity (1) following 0-15 water injection and (2) during non-steady-state 0-15 CO/sub 2/ inhalation. This lag time reflects the physiological difference in arrival times of 0-15 activity at brain and radial arterial sampling site as well as the experimentally introduced resistance to flow offered by the arterial catheter/stopcock assembly. Multiple measurements of transit time delay were made in 2 patients using Rb-82. The arrival of radioactivity in the brain was detected by a pair of PET detectors operating in coincidence. The arrival of radioactivity at the radial arterial catheter was estimated from consecutive 5-sec blood samples (catheter flow rate 7-10 ml/min). Transit time delays varied between 1 and 8 sec. For non-steady-state 0-15 CO/sub 2//PET measurements, estimated errors in rCBF ranged from 0.02 to 30% for delays of 2-8 sec and scan lengths of 30-180 sec. In the range 20-100 ml/min/100 g, variations in rCBF only marginally affected these errors. Errors increased with scan length and with longer delays but decreased sharply with scan duration > 60 sec. For 30-180 sec scans, even larger errors are associated with the 0-15 water injection technique (peak blood activity at 10 sec): 1-60% for delays of 2-8 sec. A ''slow'' bolus peaking at 20 sec decreased the error by 40%. For the 0-15 water method it is essential to determine the transit time delay to within 2 sec if accurate flow measurements (error < 5%) are to be obtained from 40-60 sec scans

  7. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/~eprice.

  8. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP). PMID:21095971

  9. Mean transit time image - a new method of analyzing brain perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point-by-point calculation of the mean transit time based on gamma fit was used to analyze brain perfusion studies in a vertex view. The algorithm and preliminary results in normal brain and in different stages of cerebral perfusion abnormality (ischemia, stroke, migraine, tumor, abscess) are demonstrated. In contrast to the traditional methods using fixed, a priori defined regions of interest this type of mapping of the relative regions cerebral perfusion shows more clearly the irregular outlines of the disturbance. Right to left activity ratios in the arterial part of the time-activity curves showed significant correlation with the mean transit time ratios (Q1=1.185-0.192 Qsub(a), n=38, r=0.716, P<0.001). (orig.)

  10. Transition: Germany in a race against time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of the situation of Germany with respect to its objectives of energy transition. It outlines that some of these objectives might not be reached, notably as far as the 40 per cent reduction of CO2 emissions by 2020 is concerned. This reduction might reach only 33 to 34 per cent. More precisely and as shown in a table indicating the situation in 2014 and foreseen evolutions by 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050, if the share of renewable energies is remarkably increasing in the electricity sector and is on the right way to compensate the shutdown nuclear reactors, such a trend is still expected in the heat production sector, and transports displays a trend in the wrong direction

  11. Simplified scintigraphic methods for measuring gastrointestinal transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether simple transit measurements based on scintigraphy performed only 0, 2, 4 and 24 h after intake of a radiolabelled meal can be used to predict the mean transit time values for the stomach, the small intestine, and the colon, a study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers...... intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated for both markers and compared with fractional gastric emptying at 2 h, fractional colonic filling at 4 h, and geometric centre of colonic content at 24 h, respectively. Highly significant correlations were found between gastric mean transit time...... and fractional gastric emptying at 2 h (111In: r=0.95, Pintestinal mean transit time and fractional colonic filling at 4 h (111In: r=-0.97, P

  12. Time Varying Transition Probabilities for Markov Regime Switching Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzi, Marco; Blasques, Francisco; Koopman, Siem Jan; Lucas, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new Markov switching model with time varying probabilities for the transitions. The novelty of our model is that the transition probabilities evolve over time by means of an observation driven model. The innovation of the time varying probability is generated by the score of the predictive likelihood function. We show how the model dynamics can be readily interpreted. We investigate the performance of the model in a Monte Carlo study and show that the model is successful in estim...

  13. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, ΔPTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, ΔPTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  14. Validation of a 1-mm transit time flow probe and the potential for use in microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Elberg, Jens J; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2006-01-01

    rates did not previously exist. The experimental design was an in vitro study using the median artery of 15-kg pigs. The vessel was perfused by the pigs' own heparinated blood, at a known flow rate, using a Gemini infusion pump. The infusion rate was increased stepwise, starting at 1 ml/min until 16 ml....../min. Transit time flow was measured continuously. The results showed very accurate flow measurements at all flow rates when compared to the known infusion rate of the Gemini pump. However, at flow rates below 4 ml/min, variation became a problem....

  15. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byeong Cheol [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Min [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Dong Keun; Kim, Gi Ryon [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, He Jeong; Jeon, Gye Rock [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-15

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, {Delta}PTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, {Delta}PTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  16. Parametrized post-Newtonian secular transit timing variations for exoplanets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-based and space-borne observatories used for studying exoplanet transits now and in the future will considerably increase the number of exoplanets known from transit data and the precision of the measured times of transit minima. Variations in the transit times can not only be used to infer the presence of additional planets, but might also provide opportunities to test the general theory of relativity in these systems. To build a framework for these possible tests, we extend previous studies on the observability of the general relativistic precessions of periastron in transiting exoplanets to variations in secular transit timing under parametrized post-Newtonian formalism. We find that if one can measure the difference between observed and predicted variations of general relativistic secular transit timing to 1 s yr−1 in a transiting exoplanet system with a Sun-like mass, a period of ∼ 1 day and a relatively small eccentricity of ∼ 0.1, general relativity will be tested to the level of ∼ 6%

  17. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. V. Transit Timing Variation Candidates in the First Sixteen Months from Polynomial Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; Steffen, Jason H.; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal; Welsh, William

    2012-09-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased (~68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  18. Oral transit time: a critical review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    SOARES, Thais Jacóe; MORAES, Danielle Pedroni; de Medeiros, Gisele Chagas; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; ZILBERSTEIN, Bruno; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral transit time is one of the parameters observed during the clinical assessment of the swallowing function. The importance of this parameter is due to its impact on the total duration of a meal, whose consequence can be an unfavorable nutritional prognostic. Objective To document scientific papers that measure oral transit time in healthy subjects. Method The review followed the steps proposed by the Cochrane Handbook. The search was done via the PubMed database through the us...

  19. Dual-Priced Modal Transition Systems with Time Durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beneš, Nikola; Kretínsky, Jan; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand;

    2012-01-01

    Modal transition systems are a well-established specification formalism for a high-level modelling of component-based software systems. We present a novel extension of the formalism called modal transition systems with durations where time durations are modelled as controllable or uncontrollable...... cheapest long-run average reward. We give an algorithm for computing such optimal implementations via a reduction to a new extension of mean payoff games with time durations and analyse the complexity of the algorithm....

  20. Ultrafast contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid artery: time optimization for discrimination of the arterial from the venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the optimal delay and acquisition time for discrimination of the arterial from the venous phase in ultrafast 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid artery. We reviewed the MR angiographic findings of 233 patients in whom carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular disease were suspected. On the basis of delay and acquistition time they were divided into four groups. In the first three, contrast material was injected manually, and after the optimal time, mechanical injection was used for the last group. On the basis of signal intensity of the carotid artery, image quality was graded in four steps. Discrimination of the arterial from the venous phase was graded in three steps, based on the degree of venous enhancement. The best grade of image quality was 70% in the first group, 85% in the second, and 95% in the third. In discrimination of the arterial-venous phase, the most definite grade was 50% in the first group, 62% in the second, and 75% in the third. Between manual and mechanical injection groups, there was no significant difference in image quality and discrimination of the arterial-venous phase. These results suggest that for ultrafast 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid artery, with manual injection of contrast material, 8-second delay time and 7-second acqusistion time are optimal.=20

  1. WASP-14 b: Transit Timing analysis of 19 light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Raetz, St; Seeliger, M; Marka, C; Fernandez, M; Güver, T; Gögüs, E; Nowak, G; Vanko, M; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Mugrauer, M; Trepl, L; Gelszinnis, J

    2015-01-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of "Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative" (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light-curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years ...

  2. Measurement of mean transit time with radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to validate the use of moment to computer transit time in radioactive tracer studies. In tracer dilution studies, input and output functions usually can be described by means of exponential and gamma-variate functions. The authors demonstrated mathematically that computation of transit time with use of the first moments of these modeling functions is equivalent to the use of impulse response functions. They used a test object that would emulate the transit time of pulmonary blood flow in a medium-size dog to validate the computation of transit time with the first moment. A bolus of 185 MBq (5 mCi) of Tc-99m pertechnetate was injected. The quality of the bolus injection was modified by changing the size of the bolus. The transit time obtained from the first moments of the tracer-dilution curves was in agreement with the first moments of the modeling mathematical functions. Transit time is radionuclide studies can be computed from either the first moment of the tracer-dilution curve or of the modeling mathematical functions. Derivation of the impulse response function is not necessary

  3. Developments in Planet Detection using Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-12-01

    In a transiting planetary system, the presence of a second planet will cause the time interval between transits to vary. These transit timing variations (TTV) are particularly large near mean-motion resonances and can be used to infer the orbital elements of planets with masses that are too small to detect by any other means. The author presents the results of a study of simulated data where they show the potential that this planet detection technique has to detect and characterize secondary planets in transiting systems. These results have important ramifications for planetary transit searches since each transiting system presents an opportunity for additional discoveries through a TTV analysis. They present such an analysis for 13 transits of the HD 209458 system that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis indicates that a putative companion in a low-order, mean-motion resonance can be no larger than the mass of the Earth and constitutes, to date, the most sensitive probe for extrasolar planets that orbit main sequence stars. The presence or absence of small planets in low-order, mean-motion resonances has implications for theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Since TTV is most sensitive in these regimes, it should prove a valuable tool not only for the detection of additional planets in transiting systems, but also as a way to determine the dominant mechanisms of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems.

  4. Bisimulation and Open Maps for Timed Transition Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    Formal models for real-time systems have been studied intensively over the past decade. Much of the theory of untimed systems have been lifted to real-time settings. One example is the notion of bisimulation applied to timed transition systems, which is studied here within the general categorical...

  5. Simplified scintigraphic methods for measuring gastrointestinal transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether simple transit measurements based on scintigraphy performed only 0, 2, 4 and 24 h after intake of a radiolabelled meal can be used to predict the mean transit time values for the stomach, the small intestine, and the colon, a study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers...... intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated for both markers and compared with fractional gastric emptying at 2 h, fractional colonic filling at 4 h, and geometric centre of colonic content at 24 h, respectively. Highly significant correlations were found between gastric mean transit time...... and fractional gastric emptying at 2 h (111In: r=0.95, Ptime and fractional colonic filling at 4 h (111In: r=-0.97, Ptime and geometric centre of colonic content...

  6. Gastrointestinal transit times and motility in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Gregersen, Tine; Jønsson, Iben;

    2012-01-01

    AND METHODS: Ten CF patients (five women, median age 23) with pancreatic insufficiency were studied. Total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) and segmental colonic transit times (SCTT) were assessed by radiopaque markers. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were evaluated using the magnet......OBJECTIVE: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction including obstructive symptoms, malabsorption and pain, but the underlying pathophysiology remains obscure. AIM: To compare GI motility and transit times in CF patients and healthy controls. MATERIAL......-based motility tracking system (MTS-1). With each method patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. RESULTS: Basic contraction frequencies of the stomach and small intestine were normal, but the pill reached the cecum after 7 h in only 20% of CF patients while in 88% of controls (p = 0.001). Paradoxically...

  7. Daylight Saving Time Transitions and Road Traffic Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuuli Lahti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm disruptions may have harmful impacts on health. Circadian rhythm disruptions caused by jet lag compromise the quality and amount of sleep and may lead to a variety of symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and loss of attention and alertness. Even a minor change in time schedule may cause considerable stress for the body. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time alter the social and environmental timing twice a year. According to earlier studies, this change in time-schedule leads to sleep disruption and fragmentation of the circadian rhythm. Since sleep deprivation decreases motivation, attention, and alertness, transitions into and out of daylight saving time may increase the amount of accidents during the following days after the transition. We studied the amount of road traffic accidents one week before and one week after transitions into and out of daylight saving time during years from 1981 to 2006. Our results demonstrated that transitions into and out of daylight saving time did not increase the number of traffic road accidents.

  8. Planetary transit timing variations induced by stellar binarity. The light travel time effect

    CERN Document Server

    Montalto, M

    2010-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] Since the discovery of the first transiting extrasolar planet, transit timing has been recognized as a powerful method to discover and characterize additional planets in these systems. However, the gravitational influence of additional planets is not the only expected source of transit timing variations. In this work, we derive the expected detection frequency of stellar companions of hot-jupiter transiting planets host-stars, detectable by means of transit timing analysis. Since roughly half of the stars in the solar neighborhood belong to binary or multiple stellar systems, the same fraction of binary systems may be expected to be present among transiting planet-host stars, unless planet formation is significantly influenced by the presence of a stellar companion. Transit searches are less affected by the selection biases against long-period binaries that plague radial velocity surveys. If the frequency of binaries among hot-jupiter planets host stars is the same as determined in the solar neighb...

  9. A late-time transition in the cosmic dark energy?

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, B A; Silk, J; Ungarelli, C; Bassett, Bruce A.; Kunz, Martin; Silk, Joseph; Ungarelli, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    We study constraints from the latest CMB, large scale structure (2dF, Abell/ACO, PSCz) and SN1a data on dark energy models with a sharp transition in their equation of state, w(z). Such a transition is motivated by models like vacuum metamorphosis where non-perturbative quantum effects are important at late times. We allow the transition to occur at a specific redshift, z_t, to a final negative pressure -1 < w_f < -1/3. We find that the CMB and supernovae data, in particular, prefer a late-time transition due to the associated delay in cosmic acceleration. The best fits (with 1 sigma errors) to all the data are z_t = 2.0^{+2.2}_{-0.76}, \\Omega_Q = 0.73^{+0.02}_{-0.04} and w_f = -1^{+0.2}.

  10. Domain-wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate domain-wall formation in late-time phase transitions. We find that, as in the invisible-axion--domain-wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different regions of the Universe to different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low-temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some nonthermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain-wall production is not a robust prediction of late-time transitions may suggest future directions in model building

  11. TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet–star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

  12. Computerprogram for the determination of minimal cardiac transit times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Anger-Type gamma-camera is used to register the first pass of a radioactive tracer of blood flow through the heart. The acquired data are processed by a suitable computer program yielding time-activity curves for sequential heart segments, which are selected by the region of interest technique. The program prints the minimal cardiac transit times, in terms of total transit times, as well as segmental transit times for the right atrium, right ventricle, lung, left atrium and left ventricle. The measured values are normalized to a rate of 80/min and are compared to normal mean values. The deviation from the normal mean values is characterized by a coefficient F. Moreover, these findings are qualitatively rated. (orig./MG)

  13. Sharp asymptotics of metastable transition times for one dimensional SPDEs

    CERN Document Server

    Barret, Florent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of parabolic semi-linear stochastic partial differential equations driven by space-time white noise on a compact space interval. Our aim is to obtain precise asymptotics of the transition times between metastable states. A version of the so-called Eyring-Kramers Formula is proven in an infinite dimensional setting. The proof is based on a spatial finite difference discretization of the stochastic partial differential equation. The expected transition time is computed for the finite dimensional approximation and controlled uniformly in the dimension.

  14. High-Cadence Transit Timing Variation Monitoring of Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naef D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We report ground-based high-cadence transit timing observations of the extrasolar planet WASP-2b. We achieve a typical timing error of 15-30 sec. The data show no significant deviations from the predicted ephemeris.

  15. Mean Transit Time and Mean Residence Time for Linear Diffusion–Convection–Reaction Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic times for transport processes in biological systems may be evaluated as mean transit times (MTTs (for transit states or mean residence times (MRT (for steady states. It is shown in a general framework of a (linear reaction–diffusion–convection equation that these two times are related. Analytical formulas are also derived to calculate moments of exit time distribution using solutions for a stationary state of the system.

  16. Variation of Headways at Signalized Arterials with Respect to Distance and Cycle Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Coşkun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the variation in the proportion of free vehicles at a signalized arterial is tried to be modeled with respect to distance and green/cycle time ratio. In the analysis, it is assumed that headways between vehicles can be defined with Cowan M3 distribution. From the analysis, proportion of free vehicles in the left lane of an arterial is lower than other lanes. This results indicates that, left lanes are occupied by higher vehicle volumes. The analysis also showed that, proportion free vehicles increase with respect to the distance to traffic signals as expected.

  17. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholm, Jette Rolf; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    ’ with congenial heart diseases, chronic kidney diseases and cystic fibrosis perspective. Objective: To study experiences of transition in adolescents with severe chronic diseases in the context of child-centred health care to adult-centred health care Research questions: • What are the adolescents......’ experiences of transition being in a maturing and independence process and what is important to them? • What characterise their interaction with health care staff? • How is the communication between the adolescents and health care staff as perceived by the adolescents when focus is on their illness? Methods...... employed to show central characteristics across time, disease and gender. Perspectives It is expected that this study will create knowledge about the existential and interpersonal challenges of adolescents in transition as seen from the • time perspective • diagnose perspective • gender perspective These...

  18. The liner shipping berth scheduling problem with transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Plum, Christian E.M.; Pisinger, David;

    2016-01-01

    berth times are only accepted if they lead to savings above a threshold value. Since the fuel consumption of a vessel is a non-linear convex function of the speed, it is approximated by a piecewise linear function. The developed model is solved using exact methods in less than two minutes for large......In this paper speed optimization of an existing liner shipping network is solved by adjusting the port berth times. The objective is to minimize fuel consumption while retaining the customer transit times including the transhipment times. To avoid too many changes to the time table, changes of port...

  19. Time course of arterial remodelling in diameter and wall thickness above and below the lesion after a spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dick H J Thijssen; de Groot, Patricia C. E.; van den Bogerd, Arne; Veltmeijer, Matthijs; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.; Hopman, Maria T. E.

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity in response to a spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a potent stimulus for conduit artery remodelling. Changes in conduit artery characteristics may be induced by the local effects of denervation (and consequent extreme inactivity below the level of the lesion), and also by systemic adaptations due to whole body inactivity. Therefore, we assessed the time course of carotid (i.e. above lesion) and common femoral artery (i.e. below lesion) lumen diameter and wall thickness a...

  20. Endovascular treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion: time to treatment is crucial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of multimodal endovascular treatment (EVT) of acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO), including bridging therapy [intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with subsequent EVT], to compare particular EVT techniques and identify predictors of clinical outcome. Materials and methods: This retrospective, multi-centre study comprised 72 acute ischaemic stroke patients (51 males; mean age 59.1 ± 13.3 years) with radiologically confirmed BAO. The following data were collected: baseline characteristics, risk factors, pre-event antithrombotic treatment, neurological deficit at time of treatment, localization of occlusion, time to therapy, recanalization rate, post-treatment imaging findings. Thirty- and 90-day outcomes were evaluated using the modified Rankin scale with a good clinical outcome defined as 0–3 points. Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 94.4% patients. Stepwise binary logistic regression analysis identified the presence of arterial hypertension (OR = 0.073 and OR = 0.067, respectively), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at the time of treatment (OR = 0,829 and OR = 0.864, respectively), and time to treatment (OR = 0.556 and OR = 0.502, respectively) as significant independent predictors of 30- and 90-day clinical outcomes. Conclusion: Data from this multicentre study showed that multimodal EVT was an effective recanalization method in acute BAO. Bridging therapy shortens the time to treatment, which was identified as the only modifiable outcome predictor. - Highlights: • Various treatments are being used in recanalization of basilar artery occlusion. • Multimodal endovascular treatment is an effective recanalization method. • Time-to-treatment is the only modifiable outcome predictor. • Bridging therapy shortens time-to-treatment. • Arterial hypertension, neurologic deficit are associated with poor outcome

  1. Finite-time thermodynamics approach to the superconducting transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo-Brown, F. (Dept. de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematics, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico (Mexico)); Yepez, E. (Dept. de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematics, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico (Mexico)); Zamorano-Ulloa, R. (Dept. de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematics, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico (Mexico))

    1993-12-20

    The superconducting transition is analyzed by means of finite time thermodynamics and the so-called method of Carnot cycles. The results found include a generalized Rutgers' relation and [beta]=[Delta]C/[gamma]T[sub c], expressions that cover a wider range of experimentally reported values than do those of classical thermodynamics. (orig.)

  2. Finite-time thermodynamics approach to the superconducting transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superconducting transition is analyzed by means of finite time thermodynamics and the so-called method of Carnot cycles. The results found include a generalized Rutgers' relation and β=ΔC/γTc, expressions that cover a wider range of experimentally reported values than do those of classical thermodynamics. (orig.)

  3. Caregivers' Playfulness and Infants' Emotional Stress during Transitional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeesun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the playfulness of the teachers of infants and its relations to infants' emotional distress during the transitional time at a child care centre. The study used a qualitative case study. Two infant caregivers in a university-based child care centre participated in this study. For the three-month research…

  4. Leave-one-out prediction error of systolic arterial pressure time series under paced breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Ancona, N; Marinazzo, D; Nitti, L; Pellicoro, M; Pinna, G D; Stramaglia, S

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that different physiological states and pathological conditions may be characterized in terms of predictability of time series signals from the underlying biological system. In particular we consider systolic arterial pressure time series from healthy subjects and Chronic Heart Failure patients, undergoing paced respiration. We model time series by the regularized least squares approach and quantify predictability by the leave-one-out error. We find that the entrainment mechanism connected to paced breath, that renders the arterial blood pressure signal more regular, thus more predictable, is less effective in patients, and this effect correlates with the seriousness of the heart failure. The leave-one-out error separates controls from patients and, when all orders of nonlinearity are taken into account, alive patients from patients for which cardiac death occurred.

  5. Does the transition into daylight saving time affect students' performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Herber, Stefanie P.; Quis, Johanna Sophie; Heineck, Guido

    2015-01-01

    We use international student assessment data on more than 22,000 students from six European countries and a regression discontinuity design to investigate whether the transition into daylight saving time (DST) affects elementary students' test performance in the week after the time change. We do not find reliable statistical effects on students' performance, neither in math, science nor reading. Our results therefore challenge the prevailing public opinion that DST should be abandoned because...

  6. Capsule endoscopy: Improving transit time and image view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zvi Fireman; D Paz; Y Kopelman

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of various methods of small bowel preparation on the transit time and the quality of visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa.METHODS: Ninety-five patients underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) by easily swallowing the capsule. They were divided into three study groups according to the preparation used: group A (n = 26) by polyethylene glycol (PEG) liter or with sodium phosphate (SP) 12 h prior to the CE study; group B (n = 29) by erythromycin 1 h prior to the CE study; and group C (n = 40) without any preparation. Visualization ranged from good to satisfactory to poor.RESULTS: The gastric emptying time in the group prepared with erythromycin was shorter but without statistical significance and the small bowel transit time was unaffected. In elderly subjects prepared by PEG or SP, the gastric emptying time was significantly longer (163.7 min, P = 0.05). The transit times of the three sub-groups were not affected by gender or pathology.The grade of cleaning of the entire study group was 3.27±1.1. The erythromycin group presented significantly the worst quality of images (P = 0.05) compared to the other sub-groups. Age, gender, and pathology had no effect on the quality of the cleaning of the small bowel in the sub-groups. One (1.05%) case had no natural excretion.CONCLUSION: Erythromycin markedly reduces gastric emptying time, but has a negative effect on the quality of the image in the small bowel. The preparation of elderly subjects with PEG or SP has a negative effect on the small bowel transit time.

  7. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations to provide a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively longer response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to contribute to prolong transit time.

  8. Real-Time Automatic Artery Segmentation, Reconstruction and Registration for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anaesthesia of the Femoral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smistad, Erik; Lindseth, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to create an assistant for ultrasound- guided femoral nerve block. By segmenting and visualizing the important structures such as the femoral artery, we hope to improve the success of these procedures. This article is the first step towards this goal and presents novel real-time methods for identifying and reconstructing the femoral artery, and registering a model of the surrounding anatomy to the ultrasound images. The femoral artery is modelled as an ellipse. The artery is first detected by a novel algorithm which initializes the artery tracking. This algorithm is completely automatic and requires no user interaction. Artery tracking is achieved with a Kalman filter. The 3D artery is reconstructed in real-time with a novel algorithm and a tracked ultrasound probe. A mesh model of the surrounding anatomy was created from a CT dataset. Registration of this model is achieved by landmark registration using the centerpoints from the artery tracking and the femoral artery centerline of the model. The artery detection method was able to automatically detect the femoral artery and initialize the tracking in all 48 ultrasound sequences. The tracking algorithm achieved an average dice similarity coefficient of 0.91, absolute distance of 0.33 mm, and Hausdorff distance 1.05 mm. The mean registration error was 2.7 mm, while the average maximum error was 12.4 mm. The average runtime was measured to be 38, 8, 46 and 0.2 milliseconds for the artery detection, tracking, reconstruction and registration methods respectively. PMID:26513782

  9. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  10. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  11. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices

  12. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. I. Basic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new fireball configuration has been developed which produces vircator-like instabilities. Electrons are injected through a transparent anode into a spherical plasma volume. Strong high-frequency oscillations with period corresponding to the electron transit time through the sphere are observed. The frequency is below the electron plasma frequency, hence does not involve plasma eigenmodes. The sphere does not support electromagnetic eigenmodes at the instability frequency. However, the rf oscillations on the gridded anode create electron bunches which reinforce the grid oscillation after one transit time or rf period, which leads to an absolute instability. Various properties of the instability are demonstrated and differences to the sheath-plasma instability are pointed out, one of which is a relatively high conversion efficiency from dc to rf power. Nonlinear effects are described in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012105 (2011)].

  13. Dead time effects of time jitter and metastable gamma-transitions in coincidence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time jitter, or more generally, the time distribution of coincidences in coincidence systems, is investigated for its dead time effect on the coincidence rate. The discussion is extended to metastable γ-transitions and an experimental proof is given for the correction terms developed. (orig.)

  14. Estimation of esophageal transit time by esophageal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors summarize the analytical methods of the esophageal scintigraphy, including the analysis of the time-radioactivity curves, the condensed images and the reproducibility. The esophageal scintigraphy was carried out for 9 cases (including 7 of cirrhosis and 2 of normal healthy individuals) by the posture of decubitus and seat, and analyzed the peak to peak time, the transit time, the mean transit time, the percent clearance at 5 and 10 second after swallowing. Patients were concerned swallow at a gulp 10 ml of milk mixed with Tc-99m Sn-colloid (37-74 Mbq) under fasting for more than 3 hours. The peak to peak time under the posture of seat was shorter than that of decubitus, but the coefficient of variation was large, indicating that the measuring values varied widely. From the analysis of a series of the time-radioactivity curves and the condensed images to the whole esophagus, it is better to use the condensed images for the qualitative analysis than to use the time-radioactivity curves. The esophageal scintigraphy is the excellent method to measure easily and faithfully the real physiological phenomenon to pass the diet through the esophagus, but the problems on the reproducibility of the measuring values remain to be solved. (K.H.)

  15. Computational Discrete Time Markov Chain with Correlated Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Peerayuth Charnsethikul

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a computational procedure for analyzing statistics of steady state probabilities in a discrete time Markov chain with correlations among their transition probabilities. The proposed model simply uses the first order Taylor's series expansion and statistical expected value properties to obtain the resulting linear matrix equations system. Computationally, the bottleneck is O(n4) but can be improved by distributed and parallel processing. A preliminary computational experien...

  16. Preaching as Repetition – in Times of Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard

    2016-01-01

    in light of Søren Kierkegaard’s category of repetition, in the sense of receiving anew, because this phenomenon appears crucial, not only to the genre of preaching but to preachers and listeners alike – especially, in times and situations of transition. I suggest that the Kierkegaardian notion...... of repetition may be useful as a homiletical category with regard of scholars’ method, preachers’ preparation and listeners’ appropriation of preaching....

  17. The Transition to Tertiary Education and Parental Background over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Riphahn, Regina; Schieferdecker, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Using SOEP data (1984-2006) we analyze the role of parental background for transitions to tertiary education in Germany and answer three questions: (a) does the relevance of parental background shift from short-term (contemporary income) to long factors (ability, parental education) at higher levels of education? (b) Did the impact of parental background on participation in tertiary education change over time? (c) Are there different patterns by sex and region? We consider panel estimators wi...

  18. Time Development of Exponentially Small Non-Adiabatic Transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn, George A.; Joye, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Optimal truncations of asymptotic expansions are known to yield approximations to adiabatic quantum evolutions that are accurate up to exponentially small errors. In this paper, we rigorously determine the leading order non--adiabatic corrections to these approximations for a particular family of two--level analytic Hamiltonian functions. Our results capture the time development of the exponentially small transition that takes place between optimal states by means of a particular switching fu...

  19. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system. PMID:27225558

  20. The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation

    CERN Document Server

    Harpsøe, K B W; Hinse, T C; Jørgensen, U G; Mancini, L; Southworth, J; Alsubai, K A; Bozza, V; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dominik, M; Finet, F; Gerner, T; Hundertmark, M; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Mathiasen, M; Nesvorný, D; Nikolov, N; Penny, M T; Proft, S; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Sahu, K C; Scarpetta, G; Schäfer, S; Schönebeck, F; Snodgrass, C; Skottfelt, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wertz, O

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods: The observations were obtained using telescope-defocusing techniques, and achieve a high precision with random errors in the photometry as low as 1mmag per point. To investigate the possibility of TTVs in the light curve, we calculate the overall probability of a TTV signal using Bayesian methods. Results: The observations are used to determine the photometric parameters and the physical properties of the GJ1214 system. Our results are in good agreement with published values. Individual times of mid-transit are measured with uncertainties as low as 10s, allowing us to reduce the uncertainty in the orbital period by a factor of two. Conclusions: A Bayesian analysis reveals that it is highly improbable that the observed tra...

  1. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VI. Transit Timing Variation Candidates in the First Seventeen Months from Polynomial Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Eric B; Rowe, Jason F; Steffen, Jason H; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Gautier, Thomas N; Holman, Matthew J; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal; Welsh, William

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results an updated TTV analysis for 822 planet candidates (Borucki et al. 2011; Batalha et al. 2012) based on transit times measured during the first seventeen months of Kepler observations (Rowe et al 2012). We present 35 TTV candidates (4.1% of suitable data sets) based on long-term trends and 153 mostly weaker TTV candidates (18% of suitable data sets) based on excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased (~60%-76%) for p...

  2. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  3. Implantable reflectance pulse transit time blood pressure sensor with oximetry capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, J.; Gehrke, R.; Theodor, M.; Bingger, P.; Förster, K.; Heilmann, C.; Beyersdorf, F.; Zappe, H.; Seifert, A.

    2010-04-01

    We present a novel implantable multi-wavelength reflectance sensor for the measurement of blood pressure with pulse transit time (PTT). Continuous long-term monitoring of blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation is vital for medical diagnostics and the ensuing therapy of cardiovascular diseases. Conventional cuff-based blood pressure monitors do not provide continuous data and put severe constraints on the patients' daily lives. An implantable sensor would eliminate such problems. The new biocompatible sensor is placed subcutaneously on blood perfused tissue. The PTT is calculated by photoplethysmograms and the ECG-signal, that is recorded with intracorporal electrodes. In addition, the sensor detects the arterial oxygen saturation. An ensuing spectralphotometric analysis of the light intensity changes delivers data on the concentration of dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives. Experimental measurements showed a clear correlation between the estimated PTT and the systolic blood pressure reference. These initial results demonstrate the potential of the sensor as part of an fully implantable sensor system for the longterm-monitoring of cardiovascular parameters.

  4. Time-Dependent Laminar, Transitional and Turbulent Pipe Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ünsal, Bülent

    2008-01-01

    This thesis summarises the author's research work carried out at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics of the Friedrich-Alexander Universiät Erlangen-Nüernberg (LSTM-Erlangen) during his time there as a researcher. The work deals with time dependent laminar, transitional, and turbulent pipe flows. Most investigations of pipe flows, available these days in the literature, are of steady state flow cases. The reason for this was found to lie in the fact that no suitable experimental equipment is avai...

  5. H ∞ synchronization of the coronary artery system with input time-varying delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Meng, Li; Zhan-Shan, Zhao; Jing, Zhang; Lian-Kun, Sun

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the H ∞ synchronization of the coronary artery system with input delay and disturbance. We focus on reducing the conservatism of existing synchronization strategies. Base on the triple integral forms of the Lyapunov–Krasovskii functional (LKF), we utilize single and double integral forms of Wirtinger-based inequality to guarantee that the synchronization feedback controller has good performance against time-varying delay and external disturbance. The effectiveness of our strategy can be exhibited by simulations under the different time-varying delays and different disturbances. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503280, 61403278, and 61272006).

  6. Transit timing variations for planets coorbiting in the horseshoe regime

    CERN Document Server

    Vokrouhlicky, David

    2014-01-01

    While not detected yet, pairs of exoplanets in the 1:1 mean motion resonance probably exist. Low eccentricity, near-planar orbits, which in the comoving frame follow the horseshoe trajectories, are one of the possible stable configurations. Here we study transit timing variations produced by mutual gravitational interaction of planets in this orbital architecture, with the goal to develop methods that can be used to recognize this case in observational data. In particular, we use a semi-analytic model to derive parametric constraints that should facilitate data analysis. We show that characteristic traits of the transit timing variations can directly constrain the (i) ratio of planetary masses, and (ii) their total mass (divided by that of the central star) as a function of the minimum angular separation as seen from the star. In an ideal case, when transits of both planets are observed and well characterized, the minimum angular separation can also be inferred from the data. As a result, parameters derived f...

  7. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the hemodynamics in a stented coronary artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faik, Isam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Mongrain, Rosaire [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Leask, Richard L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Rodes-Cabau, Josep [Laval Hospital, Laval University, 2725 chemin Ste-Foy, Ste-Foy, Quebec, G1V 4G5 (Canada); Larose, Eric [Laval Hospital, Laval University, 2725 chemin Ste-Foy, Ste-Foy, Quebec, G1V 4G5 (Canada); Bertrand, Olivier [Laval Hospital, Laval University, 2725 chemin Ste-Foy, Ste-Foy, Quebec, G1V 4G5 (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    Stenting is becoming the major interventional cardiology procedure worldwide. However restenosis remains a major limitation to the effectiveness of stents. Alterations to the local hemodynamics in the stented segment of the artery could be a potential factor in the development of in-stent restenosis. The characterization of wall shear stress and of blood flow patterns in a stented artery is therefore necessary for a good understanding of the role of hemodynamics in the development of in-stent restenosis. We have used a time-dependent 3D numerical model of a stented coronary artery to study the characteristics of the blood flow and the shear stress distribution. Our results show that the presence of the stent produces significant secondary flow that is limited to an annulus in the near wall region. Low shear stress zones were localized in the vicinity of the struts while the tips of the struts exhibited high values of shear stress. These results support the hypothesis that local hemodynamics may affect the development of in-stent restenosis and could influence the choice of stent geometries for future stent designs.

  8. The effect of time from last food intake on arterial blood gases: Implication on reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedpour Anaraki M

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial blood gas parameters were analyzed in forty-nine healthy persons (31 males, 18 females to detemine reference values fo these parameters and their relation to the time from last food intake to arterial puncture (T. The mean ± standard deviation of arterial oxygen pressure, arterial carbon dioxide pressure and pH at core body temperature were 84.4±7.0 mmHg (Male: 83.0±6.5, Female: 86.7±73, 37.7±2.8 mmHg (Male: 38.5±2.7, Female: 36.2±2.4 respectively 7.41±0.02 (Male: 7.41±0.02 Female: 7.42±0.03. the mean PCO2 was lower in comparison with most of the studies at sea level. The difference between males and females was significant in PCO2 and PH (P=0.004, P=0.02 respectively but in was not significant in PO2 (P=0.07. The PCO2 and pH had no statistically significant relatioship with age (P=0.42, P=0.25 respectively. The relationship between Po2 with age, PCO2 and T was significant (P=0.02, P=0.017, and P=0.019 respectively. The best linear predictive equation was: Po2= 1.28 AO2-29.4 for T10hours Þ AO2 = 0.21(Baro-47 – (1.2PCO2

  9. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be described well by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually. Conclusions: By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the BLS parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available. The MATLAB code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A138

  10. Predictable patterns in planetary transit timing variations and transit duration variations due to exomoons

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moons, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures if the drift of the moons' pericenters is sufficiently slow. We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or t...

  11. [Comparative study of 2 methods of measuring intestinal transit time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Neira, L; León-Barúa, R

    1981-01-01

    In 20 healthy volunteers, intestinal transit times, obtained following a simple method, recently described, in which a small liquid-containing rubber bag is used as a marker, were compared with the times obtained following, simultaneously, another method, already universally accepted, in which small barium-impregnated pellets are used as markers. The intestinal transit determined with the rubber bag (TTI-B) (14.1 - 79.2 hours; mean +/- s.d.: 42.4 +/- 20.7 hours) were significantly shorter than the times determined with the plastic pellets (TTI) (26.4 - 88.1 hours; mean +/- s.d.: 60.2 +/- 25.5 hours (P less than 0.001). But, TTI-B and TTI correlate closely (r: + 0.86), and, furthermore, TTI-B results may be converted to TTI results with the help of a simple regression equation: TTI (in minutes) = 831 + 1.09 TTI-B (in minutes). After analyzing what has been observed in the present work and in previous works, it was concluded that the new method to measure intestinal transient time using the small rubber bag is reliable and simple, and that it may help to better understand what happens in some important gastrointestinal problems. PMID:7342626

  12. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    CERN Document Server

    Ofir, Aviv

    2013-01-01

    Context: Transit surveys, both ground- and space- based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be well described by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS one is either rather insensitive to long-period planets, or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3yr long dataset...

  13. Predictable patterns in planetary transit timing variations and transit duration variations due to exomoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is sufficiently slow. We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio. We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10% moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  14. The meaning of transit times in NDT of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transit times of longitudinal pulses that travel near reinforcing steel bars are usually smaller than in plain concrete. Chung first, and then Bungey, demonstrated the importance of including bar diameters in the correction factors when pulses propagating parallel and near to the bars can not be avoided. Besides the influence of geometric dispersion and mode conversion on pulse propagation, there is an effect due to a specific pattern of radial variation of longitudinal wave velocities from the surface of the embedded steel bar. Wall effects produce a region (a sheath) of concrete surrounding the steel bar, with smaller longitudinal pulse velocities in comparison with the velocity farther away from the bar. Then the acoustics energy travels trapped in a kind of composite leaky waveguide with a velocity less than the compression (P) wave velocity in steel and in concrete but greater than the extensional wave velocity in steel. A mathematical model of the propagation of a longitudinal wave-packet is constructed, taking into account both attenuation and dispersion effects. An asymptotic analysis of pulse propagation and the introduction of a threshold of detection in the receiving transducer, allows the derivation of an approximate analytical formula for transit times. Then the meaning of transit times in NDT of concrete is discussed. The above mentioned formula is used to study the effects of the reinforcing bar radius, the propagation parameters in plain concrete and in the sheath surrounding the steel bar, the path length between the transmitting and the receiving transducers, and the energy and the spectral composition of the pulse injected by the emitter in the tested body. Chung s empirical correlation between the measured pulse velocity and bar radius is reviewed and a new correlation is proposed

  15. Analysis of transit time spread on FBK silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we studied one of the aspects potentially limiting the single-photon time-resolution (SPTR) of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): the transit time spread (TTS). We illuminated the SiPM in different positions with a fast-pulsed laser collimated to a circular spot of 0.2 mm-diameter and acquired bi-dimensional maps of the avalanche-signal arrival time of RGB and RGB-HD SiPMs, produced at FBK. We studied the effect of both the number of bonding wires connecting the device to the package and the layout of the top-metal connection (on the device). We found that the TTS does not simply depend on the trace length between the cell and the bonding pad and it could vary in the range between tens of picoseconds (with 3 bonding connections) to more than one hundred of picoseconds (with one connection)

  16. Analysis of transit time spread on FBK silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, F.; Gola, A.; Ferri, A.; Zorzi, N.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we studied one of the aspects potentially limiting the single-photon time-resolution (SPTR) of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): the transit time spread (TTS). We illuminated the SiPM in different positions with a fast-pulsed laser collimated to a circular spot of 0.2 mm-diameter and acquired bi-dimensional maps of the avalanche-signal arrival time of RGB and RGB-HD SiPMs, produced at FBK. We studied the effect of both the number of bonding wires connecting the device to the package and the layout of the top-metal connection (on the device). We found that the TTS does not simply depend on the trace length between the cell and the bonding pad and it could vary in the range between tens of picoseconds (with 3 bonding connections) to more than one hundred of picoseconds (with one connection).

  17. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    CERN Document Server

    von Essen, C; Mallonn, M; Tingley, B; Marcussen, M

    2016-01-01

    The transit timing variation technique (TTV) has been widely used to detect and characterize multiple planetary systems. Due to the observational biases imposed mainly by the photometric conditions and instrumentation and the high signal-to-noise required to produce primary transit observations, ground-based data acquired using small telescopes limit the technique to the follow-up of hot Jupiters. However, space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have already revealed that hot Jupiters are mainly found in single systems. Thus, it is natural to question ourselves if we are properly using the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional pla...

  18. Preaching as Repetition – in Times of Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I present insights from an empirical study of a congregation which consists of a medley of refugees from the Middle East who have recently converted from Islam and ethnic Danes whose families have belonged to the Lutheran Church for generations. The empirical material is analyzed...... in light of Søren Kierkegaard’s category of repetition, in the sense of receiving anew, because this phenomenon appears crucial, not only to the genre of preaching but to preachers and listeners alike – especially, in times and situations of transition. I suggest that the Kierkegaardian notion of...

  19. Numerical and Analytical Modelling of Transit Time Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We develop and apply methods to extract planet masses and eccentricities from observed transit time variations (TTVs). First, we derive simple analytic expressions for the TTV that include the effects of both first- and second-order resonances. Second, we use N-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, as well as the analytic formulae, to measure the masses and eccentricities of ten planets discovered by Kepler that have not previously been analyzed. Most of the ten planets have low densities. Using the analytic expressions to partially circumvent degeneracies, we measure small eccentricities of a few percent or less.

  20. Arterial spin labeling in patients with chic cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease - Correlation with 15O-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Heterogeneity of arterial transit time due to cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions hampers accurate regional cerebral blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling (ASL). Purpose: To assess the feasibility of regional cerebral blood flow measurement by ASL with multiple-delay time sampling in patients with steno-occlusive diseases by comparing with positron emission tomography (PET), and to determine whether regional arterial transit time measured by this ASL technique is correlated with regional mean transit time, a PET index of perfusion pressure. Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with steno-occlusive diseases received both ASL and 15O-PET. The mean regional cerebral blood flow measured by ASL and PET, regional arterial transit time by ASL, and regional mean transit time by PET were obtained by a region-of-interest analysis. Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET, and correlation between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET were tested using Pearson's correlation coefficient for both absolute and relative values. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to test whether regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling the effect of regional cerebral blood flow by ASL. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET for both absolute (r = 0.520, P < 0.0001) and relative (r = 0.691, P < 0.0001) values. A significant positive correlation was found between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET both for absolute (r = 0.369, P = 0.0002) and relative (r = 0.443, P < 0.0001) values. The regression analysis revealed that regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling regional cerebral blood flow by ASL (P

  1. Excitation signal's influence on ultrasonic transit time flow meter's performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic flow meter performance was analyzed. Ultrasound transit time was used for flow rate estimation. Time of flight was measured using cross correlation processing. Simultaneous channels excitation was used. Ultrasonic signals were excited using low voltage (4V pp) signal generator, received signals were amplified 30 dB and simultaneously acquired by 100 Ms/s 10 bit analog-to-digit converters. Subsample delay estimation was used. Flow rate was varied from 10 l/h to 200 l/h. Measurement channel diameter 8 mm was used. It is complicated to obtain the unbiased reference signal for correlation processing. Various combinations of signals travelling in measurement channel were used for cross-correlation processing. Performance of correlation function and time of flight estimator variance were studied. Variable gain amplifier usually is used for signal dynamic range matching to A/D converter input. Gain influence on time of flight was a subject to study. It has been concluded that gain control introduces systematic errors in time of flight estimator. Influence of the temperature of electronics (pulser, receiver, A/D converter, reference clock etc.) and ultrasonic transducers on the delay estimator was studied. It was concluded that the major temperature-related systematic error comes from the pulser. Performance of the meter was studied when narrowband and spread spectrum signals were used for ultrasound excitation across temperature and flow rate range. It has been concluded that spread spectrum signal allows for better zero flow stability over temperature and lower time of flight variation.

  2. Excitation signal's influence on ultrasonic transit time flow meter's performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilainis, L.; Kabisius, P.; Aleksandrovas, A.; Chaziachmetovas, A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasonic flow meter performance was analyzed. Ultrasound transit time was used for flow rate estimation. Time of flight was measured using cross correlation processing. Simultaneous channels excitation was used. Ultrasonic signals were excited using low voltage (4V pp) signal generator, received signals were amplified 30 dB and simultaneously acquired by 100 Ms/s 10 bit analog-to-digit converters. Subsample delay estimation was used. Flow rate was varied from 10 l/h to 200 l/h. Measurement channel diameter 8 mm was used. It is complicated to obtain the unbiased reference signal for correlation processing. Various combinations of signals travelling in measurement channel were used for cross-correlation processing. Performance of correlation function and time of flight estimator variance were studied. Variable gain amplifier usually is used for signal dynamic range matching to A/D converter input. Gain influence on time of flight was a subject to study. It has been concluded that gain control introduces systematic errors in time of flight estimator. Influence of the temperature of electronics (pulser, receiver, A/D converter, reference clock etc.) and ultrasonic transducers on the delay estimator was studied. It was concluded that the major temperature-related systematic error comes from the pulser. Performance of the meter was studied when narrowband and spread spectrum signals were used for ultrasound excitation across temperature and flow rate range. It has been concluded that spread spectrum signal allows for better zero flow stability over temperature and lower time of flight variation.

  3. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  4. Asymptotic analysis of blood flow in stented arteries: time dependency and direct simulations***

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichon Gostaf Kirill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to extend in two distinct directions results recently obtained in [10]. In a first step we focus on the possible extension of our results to the time dependent case. Whereas in the second part some preliminary numerical simulations aim to give orders of magnitudes in terms of numerical costs of direct 3D simulations. We consider, in the first part, the time dependent rough problem for a simplified heat equation in a straight channel that mimics the axial velocity under an oscillating pressure gradient. We derive first order approximations with respect to ϵ, the size of the roughness. In order to understand the problem and set up correct boundary layer approximations, we perform a time periodic fourier analysis and check that no frequency can interact with the roughness. We show rigorously on this toy problem that the boundary layers remain stationary in time (independent on the frequency number. Finally we perform numerical tests validating our theoretical approach. In the second part, we determine actual limits, when running three-dimensional blood flow simulations of the non-homogenized stented arteries. We solve the stationary Stokes equations for an artery containing a saccular aneurysm. Consecutive levels of uniform mesh refinement, serve to relate spatial resolution, problem scale, and required computation time. Test computations are presented for femoral side aneurysm, where a simplified ten-wire stent model was placed across the aneurysm throat. We advocate the proposed stent homogenization model, by concluding that an actual computation power is not sufficient to run accurate, direct simulations of a pulsatile flow in stented vessels.

  5. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on...

  6. Unbiased computation of transition times by pathway recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many systems, the time scales of the microscopic dynamics and macroscopic dynamics of interest are separated by many orders of magnitude. Examples abound, for instance, nucleation, protein folding, and chemical reactions. For these systems, direct simulation of phase space trajectories does not efficiently determine most physical quantities of interest. The past decade has seen the advent of methods circumventing brute force simulation. For most dynamical quantities, these methods all share the drawback of systematical errors. We present a novel method for generating ensembles of phase space trajectories. By sampling small pieces of these trajectories in different phase space domains and piecing them together in a smart way using equilibrium properties, we obtain physical quantities such as transition times. This method does not have any systematical error and is very efficient; the computational effort to calculate the first passage time across a free energy barrier does not increase with the height of the barrier. The strength of the method is shown in the Ising model. Accurate measurements of nucleation times span almost ten orders of magnitude and reveal corrections to classical nucleation theory

  7. Biosensor cell assay for measuring real-time aldosterone-induced release of histamine from mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Emil G; Andersen, Kenneth; Svenningsen, Per; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The aims were to develop a method for real-time detection of histamine release and to test if incubation with aldosterone induces histamine release from isolated, perfused mice mesenteric arteries. METHODS: Fura-2 loaded HEK-293 cells transfected with the histamine H1 receptor was used as a...... sensitive biosensor assay for histamine release from isolated mouse mesenteric arteries. Activation of the H1 receptor by histamine was measured as an increased number of intracellular Ca(2+) transient peaks using fluorescence imaging RESULTS: The developed biosensor was sensitive to histamine in...... physiological relevant concentrations and responded to substances released by the artery preparation. Aldosterone treatment of mesenteric arteries from wild type mice for 50 minutes resulted in an increased number of intracellular Ca(2+) transient peaks in the biosensor cells, which was significantly inhibited...

  8. Toward a Smartphone Application for Estimation of Pulse Transit Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulse transit time (PTT is an important physiological parameter that directly correlates with the elasticity and compliance of vascular walls and variations in blood pressure. This paper presents a PTT estimation method based on photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi. The method utilizes two opposing cameras for simultaneous acquisition of PPGi waveform signals from the index fingertip and the forehead temple. An algorithm for the detection of maxima and minima in PPGi signals was developed, which includes technology for interpolation of the real positions of these points. We compared our PTT measurements with those obtained from the current methodological standards. Statistical results indicate that the PTT measured by our proposed method exhibits a good correlation with the established method. The proposed method is especially suitable for implementation in dual-camera-smartphones, which could facilitate PTT measurement among populations affected by cardiac complications.

  9. The Timing of School Transitions and Early Adolescent Problem Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Powers, Christopher J.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates whether rural adolescents who transition to a new school in sixth grade have higher levels of risky behavior than adolescents who transition in seventh grade. Our findings indicate that later school transitions had little effect on problem behavior between sixth and ninth grades. Cross-sectional analyses found…

  10. Factors influencing stream baseflow transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, Lyssette E.; Geissert, Daniel R.; Holwerda, Friso; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths, and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs or have related these to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested catchments (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2-year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTTs ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found both within groups of small (0.1-1.5 km2) and large (14-34 km2) catchments. Interestingly, the longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  11. Factors influencing stream water transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, L. E.; Geissert, D. R.; Holwerda, F.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs and related to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested watersheds (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2 year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from GIS analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTT ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form, land cover and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found at the smallest (0.1-1.5 km2) and the largest scales (14-34 km2). Interestingly, longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  12. Optimization of the deflagration to detonation transition: reduction of length and time of transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, R.; Zitoun, R.; Desbordes, D.

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is the study of Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) in tubes in order to (i) reduce both run-up distance and time of transition ( L DDT and t DDT) in connection with Pulsed Detonation Engine applications and to (ii) attempt to scale L DDT with λCJ (the detonation cellular structure width). In DDT, the production of turbulence during the long flame run-up can lead to L DDT values of several meters. To shorten L DDT, an experimental set-up is designed to quickly induce highly turbulent initial flow. It consists of a double chamber terminated with a perforated plate of high Blockage Ratio (BR) positioned at the beginning of a 26 mm inner diameter tube containing a “Shchelkin spiral” of BR ≈ 0.5. The study involves stoichiometric reactive mixtures of H2, CH4, C3H8, and C2H4 with oxygen and diluted with N2 in order to obtain the same cell width λCJ≈10 mm at standard conditions. The results show that a shock-flame system propagating with nearly the isobaric speed of sound of combustion products, called the choking regime, is rapidly obtained. This experimental set-up allows a L DDT below 40 cm for the mixtures used and a ratio L DDT/λCJ ranging from 23 to 37. The transition distance seems to depend on the reduced activation energy ( E a/ RT c) and on the normalized heat of reaction ( Q/ a 0 2). The higher these quantities are, the shorter the ratio L DDT/λCJ is.

  13. Diabetes patients show different time-course of myocardial perfusion improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Seok, J. W.; Eo, J. S. [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes is known to cause microangiopathy. The microangiopathy is hardly detectable on the coronary angiography. Myocardial perfusion imaging shows the resultant perfusion status which reflects the microangiopathy. For patients who underwent revascularization, the microangiopathy could affect the myocardial perfusion improvement. Diabetes patients probably experience the different myocardial perfusion improvement as compared to the non-diabetes patients although they have similar angiographic findings. The aim of this study is to find out whether there is a time-course difference of perfusion improvement between the diabetes and non diabetes patients who showed patent angiographic findings after coronary artery grafting surgery (CABG). A total of 129 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were enrolled in this study. Myocardial SPECTs performed at previous, short-term (3 month), and mid-term (1 year) to CABG. One-year follow up angiography was done 411{+-}121 days after surgery. Graft patency was determined according to the FitzGibbon et al. Segments were assigned to vascular territories using a 20 segment model. The segments of excellent patency were included in this study. Time course differences of concerned segments were analyzed using RMANOVA. The number of segments enrolled was 764 of diabetes and 1083 of non-diabetes. At short-term follow up, reversibility score was 2.8{+-}8.1% in diabetes and 0.3{+-}7.5% in non-diabetes. At long-term follow up, reversibility score was 1.8{+-}8.0% in diabetes and 0.1{+-}7.3% in non-diabetes. The time-course of reversibility score was significantly different between the diabetes and non diabetes (p<0.001) Diabetic segments showed high residual reversibility score than non-diabetic segments after CABG although the angiographic finding was patent in both groups. This result is maybe attributable to microangiopathy induced by

  14. The Anderson transition: time reversal symmetry and universality

    OpenAIRE

    Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    1997-01-01

    We report a finite size scaling study of the Anderson transition. Different scaling functions and different values for the critical exponent have been found, consistent with the existence of the orthogonal and unitary universality classes which occur in the field theory description of the transition. The critical conductance distribution at the Anderson transition has also been investigated and different distributions for the orthogonal and unitary classes obtained.

  15. Radial-femoral concordance in time and frequency domain-based estimates of systemic arterial respiratory variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Robert H; Colquhoun, Douglas A; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Gillies, George T; Durieux, Marcel E

    2012-10-01

    Commonly used arterial respiratory variation metrics are based on mathematical analysis of arterial waveforms in the time domain. Because the shape of the arterial waveform is dependent on the site at which it is measured, we hypothesized that analysis of the arterial waveform in the frequency domain might provide a relatively site-independent means of measuring arterial respiratory variation. Radial and femoral arterial blood pressures were measured in nineteen patients undergoing liver transplantation. Systolic pressure variation (SPV), pulse pressure variation (PPV), area under the curve variation (AUCV), and mean arterial pressure variation (MAPV) at radial and femoral sites were calculated off-line. Two metrics, "Spectral Peak Ratio" (SPeR) and "Spectral Power Ratio" (SPoR) based on ratios of the spectral peak and spectral area (power) at the respiratory and cardiac frequencies, were calculated at both radial and femoral sites. Variance among radial-femoral differences was compared and correlation coefficients describing the relationship between respiratory variation at the radial and femoral sites were developed. The variance in radial-femoral differences were significantly different (p SPV, PPV, AUCV, MAPV, SPeR, and SPoR, respectively. Assuming a PPV treatment threshold of 12 % (or equivalent), differences in treatment decisions based on radial or femoral estimates would arise in 12, 14, 5.4, 5.7, 4.8, and 5.5 % of minutes for SPV, PPV, AUCV, MAPV, spectral peak ratio, and spectral power ratio, respectively. As compared to frequency domain-based estimates of respiratory variation, SPV and PPV are relatively dependent on the anatomic site at which they are measured. Spectral peak and power ratios are relatively site-independent means of measuring respiratory variation, and may offer a useful alternative to time domain-based techniques. PMID:22903732

  16. Feasibility study of MR time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics sequence in evaluation of the dorsalis pedis artery and the first dorsal metatarsal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of MR angiography of the dorsalis pedis artery (DPA), the first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) and the branches at the first toe web by three-dimensional time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) sequence. Methods: Forty three patients with suspected or known soft tissue diseases of the ankle and foot were examined retrospectively by MR TRICKS sequence. Two experienced radiologists independently evaluated the visualization performance of DPA, FDMA and its branches with maximum intensity projection. Kappa analysis was performed for the image evaluation of the two radiologists. Consensus scores were obtained if the two radiologists had different scores. Clinical classification of FDMA was carried out for patients with scores equal to, or more than 2 points after imaging evaluation. FDMA was categorized according to its location (superficial, intramuscular, infra-muscular, absent), diameter (large, medium and small) and branching pattern at the toe web (ramifying type, main trunk type and fine small branch). Results: The scoring results of the two radiologists indicated a high agreement (Kappa value =0.895, P<0.05). TRICKS images can clearly show the arterial filling of DPA, FDMA and its branches. The final consensus scores were as follows: 8 patients had 4 grade and 22 patients 3 grade, 8 patients 2 grade and 5 patients 1 grade. Clinical classification of FDMA for 38 patients (arterial scales ≥2 point): (1) Location: superficial (8 patients), intramuscular (23 patients), intramuscular (7 patients); (2) Diameter at the midpoint of FDMA: large (2 patients), medium (25 patients), and small (11 patients); (3) Branching pattern at the toe web: ramifying type (11 patients), main trunk type (5 patients), fine branch (14 patients). Conclusion: MR TRICKS sequences are valuable in the evaluation of the DPA and FDMA and its branches, which can provide useful anatomical information for classification of FDMA. (authors)

  17. Female Employment and Timing of Births Decisions: A Multiple State Transition Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemen, H.G.; A.S. Kalwij

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we estimate a multiple state transition model, describing transitions into maternity and labor market transitions for women.Each state is characterized by two components: the labor market state and the maternity state. This enables us to investigate to disentangle the effects of socio-economic variables on the timing of births and on labor market transitions.We find that the transition intensities into maternity are significantly higher for non-employed women than for employed w...

  18. A Gaussian Model-Based Probabilistic Approach for Pulse Transit Time Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probabilistic approach to pulse transit time (PTT) estimation using a Gaussian distribution model. It is motivated basically by the hypothesis that PTTs normalized by RR intervals follow the Gaussian distribution. To verify the hypothesis, we demonstrate the effects of arterial compliance on the normalized PTTs using the Moens-Korteweg equation. Furthermore, we observe a Gaussian distribution of the normalized PTTs on real data. In order to estimate the PTT using the hypothesis, we first assumed that R-waves in the electrocardiogram (ECG) can be correctly identified. The R-waves limit searching ranges to detect pulse peaks in the photoplethysmogram (PPG) and to synchronize the results with cardiac beats--i.e., the peaks of the PPG are extracted within the corresponding RR interval of the ECG as pulse peak candidates. Their probabilities of being the actual pulse peak are then calculated using a Gaussian probability function. The parameters of the Gaussian function are automatically updated when a new pulse peak is identified. This update makes the probability function adaptive to variations of cardiac cycles. Finally, the pulse peak is identified as the candidate with the highest probability. The proposed approach is tested on a database where ECG and PPG waveforms are collected simultaneously during the submaximal bicycle ergometer exercise test. The results are promising, suggesting that the method provides a simple but more accurate PTT estimation in real applications. PMID:25420274

  19. Improving perfusion quantification in arterial spin labeling for delayed arrival times by using optimized acquisition schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramme, Johanna [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; Gregori, Johannes [mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Diehl, Volker [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Samson-Himmelstjerna, Frederico C. von [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Lentschig, Markus [ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Guenther, Matthias [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The improvement in Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion quantification, especially for delayed bolus arrival times (BAT), with an acquisition redistribution scheme mitigating the T1 decay of the label in multi-TI ASL measurements is investigated. A multi inflow time (TI) 3D-GRASE sequence is presented which adapts the distribution of acquisitions accordingly, by keeping the scan time constant. The MR sequence increases the number of averages at long TIs and decreases their number at short TIs and thus compensating the T1 decay of the label. The improvement of perfusion quantification is evaluated in simulations as well as in-vivo in healthy volunteers and patients with prolonged BATs due to age or steno-occlusive disease. The improvement in perfusion quantification depends on BAT. At healthy BATs the differences are small, but become larger for longer BATs typically found in certain diseases. The relative error of perfusion is improved up to 30% at BATs > 1500 ms in comparison to the standard acquisition scheme. This adapted acquisition scheme improves the perfusion measurement in comparison to standard multi-TI ASL implementations. It provides relevant benefit in clinical conditions that cause prolonged BATs and is therefore of high clinical relevance for neuroimaging of steno-occlusive diseases.

  20. Transitional flow in intracranial aneurysms - a space and time refinement study below the Kolmogorov scales using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Kartik; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2015-01-01

    Most Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies of hemodynamics in intracranial aneurysms are based on the assumption of laminar flow due to a relatively low (below 500) parent artery Reynolds number. A few studies have recently demonstrated the occurrence of transitional flow in aneurysms, but these studies employed special finite element schemes tailored to capture transitional nature of flow. In this study we investigate the occurrence of transition using a standard Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The LBM is used because of its computational efficiency, which in the present study allowed us to perform simulations at a higher resolution than has been done in the context of aneurysms before. The high space-time resolutions of 8{\\mu}m and 0.11 {\\mu}s resulted in nearly one billion cells and 9 million time steps per second and allowed us to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy at resolutions below the Kolmogorov scales. We perform an in-depth space and time refinement study on 2 aneurysms; one was previously ...

  1. Effects of cuff inflation and deflation on pulse transit time measured from ECG and multi-wavelength PPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Dai, Wen-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-08-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT), which refers to the time it takes a pulse wave to travel between two arterial sites is a promising index for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) estimation, as well as non-invasive assessment of arterial functions. However, it has not been investigated whether PTTs measured from ECG and different wavelength PPG are equally affected by the arterial status. Furthermore, comparison between the changes of different PTTs can provide enlightenment on the hardware implementation of the PTT-based BP estimation method. This work mainly studied the changes of PTTs calculated from electrocardiogram (ECG) and multi-wavelength photoplethysmogram (PPG) after exerting cuff pressure on the upper arm. A four-channel PPG acquisition system was developed to collect the multi-wavelength PPG signals of red, yellow, green and blue light at the fingertip simultaneously. Ten subjects participated in the experiment and their PTTs measured from different PPG and ECG signals before and after exerting cuff pressure were compared. This study found that within one minute after the four-minute cuff inflation and deflation process, the PTT measured from ECG and yellow PPG experienced a significant increase (p0.9) compared with that before exerting cuff pressure. This indicates that PTTs calculated from different wavelength PPG have different recoverability from smooth muscle relaxation. Another interesting finding is that the PTT calculated from ECG and yellow PPG had a strong correlation (|r|>0.7) with the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPG signals, which implies the potential of the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPGs as a complementary to PTT-based model for blood pressure estimation. PMID:26737652

  2. The mass of the Mars-sized exoplanet Kepler-138 b from transit timing

    OpenAIRE

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Extrasolar planets that pass in front of their host star (transit) cause a temporary decrease in the apparent brightness of the star once per orbit, providing a direct measure of the planet's size and orbital period. In some systems with multiple transiting planets, the times of the transits are measurably affected by the gravitational interactions between neighbouring planets. In favorable cases, the departures from Keplerian orbits implied by the observed transit times permit planetary mass...

  3. TTVFast: An efficient and accurate code for transit timing inversion problems

    CERN Document Server

    Deck, Katherine M; Holman, Matthew J; Nesvorny, David

    2014-01-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times (Nesvorny et al. 2013). The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any p...

  4. Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2013-10-01

    People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver

  5. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow. PMID:26147641

  6. Gastrointestinal mean transit times in young and middle-aged healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of age and gender on gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times, a study was conducted in 32 healthy volunteers: eight young women (22-30 years), eight young men (20-28 years), eight middle-aged women (43-51 years) and eight middle-aged men (38-53 years...... unaffected by age, but middle-aged women had a significantly slower colonic transit than young women. We therefore conclude that both age and gender have to be considered when reference values for gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times have to be established......., small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated. The gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were significantly longer in women. Ageing was shown to accelerate the gastric and small intestinal transit significantly. In the group of men the colonic mean transit time was...

  7. Photobleaching of arterial fluorescent compounds: characterization of elastin, collagen and cholesterol time-resolved spectra during prolonged ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, L; Grundfest, W S; Maarek, J M

    1999-06-01

    To study the photobleaching of the main fluorescent compounds of the arterial wall, we repeatedly measured the time-resolved fluorescence of elastin, collagen and cholesterol during 560 s of excitation with nitrogen laser pulses. Three fluence rate levels were used: 0.72, 7.25 and 21.75 microW/mm2. The irradiation-related changes of the fluorescence intensity and of the time-resolved fluorescence decay constants were characterized for the emission at 390, 430 and 470 nm. The fluorescence intensity at 390 nm decreased by 25-35% when the fluence delivered was 4 mJ/mm2, a common value in fluorescence studies of the arterial wall. Cholesterol fluorescence photobleached the most, and elastin fluorescence photobleached the least. Photobleaching was most intense at 390 nm and least intense at 470 nm such that the emission spectra of the three compounds were markedly distorted by photobleaching. The time-resolved decay constants and the fluorescence lifetime were not altered by irradiation when the fluence was below 4 mJ/mm2. The spectral distortions associated with photobleaching complicate the interpretation of arterial wall fluorescence in terms of tissue content in elastin, collagen and cholesterol. Use of the time-dependent features of the emission that are not altered by photobleaching should increase the accuracy of arterial wall analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:10378012

  8. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokesch, R.W. E-mail: rupert.prokesch@univie.ac.at; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P

    1999-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG.

  9. Telemedicine-supported transition of stable coronary artery disease patients from tertiary to primary health care facilities: protocol for a randomized non-inferiority trial

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Joanna d’Arc Lyra; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Katz, Natan; Agostinho, Milena Rodrigues; Neto, Brasil Silva; Harzheim, Erno; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Many Brazilian patients with complex diseases who are treated in tertiary referral clinics have been stable for long periods. The main needs of these patients involve monitoring of risk factors and review of drug prescriptions, which could be satisfactorily done in primary care facilities. The goal of this protocol is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of telemedicine services to support the transition of patients with stable chronic coronary artery disease from the tertiary ...

  10. TRANSIT MONITORING IN THE SOUTH (TraMoS) PROJECT: DISCARDING TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-5b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M⊕, 1 M⊕, and 2 M⊕ around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by ∼5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  11. Transitive Lie groups on S^1\\times S^{2m}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatsevich, Vladimir V.

    2007-10-01

    The structure of Lie groups acting transitively on the direct product of a circle and an even-dimensional sphere is described. For products of two spheres of dimension >1 a similar problem has already been solved by other authors. The minimal transitive Lie groups on S^1 and S^{2m} are also indicated. As an application of these results, the structure of the automorphism group of one class of geometric structures, generalized quadrangles (a special case of Tits buildings) is considered. A conjecture put forward by Kramer is proved: the automorphism group of a connected generalized quadrangle of type (1,2m) always contains a transitive subgroup that is the direct product of a compact simple Lie group and a one-dimensional Lie group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  12. Time course and recovery of arterial blood gases during exacerbations in adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, D F

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia and hypercapnia are closely linked to morbidity and mortality in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The aims of this study were to describe the changes in blood gases during and following an acute pulmonary exacerbation in adults with CF. METHODS: We performed a prospective observational study of patients with CF admitted for management of an acute exacerbation. Blood gas and spirometric analysis was performed on admission, throughout the treatment period, and 31 days after discharge (day 45). RESULTS: At presentation, eight of nineteen patients had evidence of either hypoxia (PaO(2)<8 kPa) and\\/or hypercapnia (PaCO(2)>6.6 kPa). Blood gas parameters stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with little difference evident in between treatment completion and subsequent review following discharge. Hypercapnia reversed in three patients, with persistent hypercapnia evident in two patients. CONCLUSION: In our study group, hypoxemia and hypercapnia were frequently observed at presentation of the acute exacerbation. Blood gases stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with arterial PCO(2) one month following hospital discharge generally similar to that at time of discharge.

  13. On a Possibility of Phase Transitions in the Geometric Structure of Space-Time

    OpenAIRE

    Bogoslovsky, G. Yu.; Goenner, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that space-time may be not only in a state which is described by Riemann geometry but also in states which are described by Finsler geometry. Transitions between various metric states of space-time have the meaning of phase transitions in its geometric structure. These transitions together with the evolution of each of the possible metric states make up the general picture of space-time manifold dynamics.

  14. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent;

    2015-01-01

    not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients' regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. METHODS: Fifteen healthy volunteers......BACKGROUND/AIMS: The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has.......5 (range: 8.5-47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1-142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4-5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8-7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0...

  15. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  16. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Ford, Eric B; Carter, Joshua A; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J; Lissauer, Jack J; Moorhead, Althea V; Rowe, Jason F; Ragozzine, Darin; Welsh, William F; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Buchhave, Lars A; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ron L; Girouard, Forrest R; Jenkins, Jon M; Horch, Elliott; Howell, Steve B; Isaacson, Howard; Klaus, Todd C; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Lucas, Philip; MacQueen, Phillip J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; McCauliff, Sean; Middour, Christopher K; Morris, Robert L; Mullally, Fergal R; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa V; Shporer, Avi; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Twicken, Joseph D; Van Cleve, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-Domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anti-correlations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27, and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  17. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  18. Impact of Timing of Eptifibatide Administration on Preprocedural Infarct-Related Artery Patency in Acute STEMI Patients Undergoing Primary PCI

    OpenAIRE

    Dharma, Surya; Firdaus, Isman; Danny, Siska Suridanda; Juzar, Dafsah A.; Wardeh, Alexander J.; Jukema, J Wouter; van der Laarse, Arnoud

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate timing of eptifibatide initiation for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains unclear. This study aimed to analyze the impact of timing of eptifibatide administration on infarct-related artery (IRA) patency in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. Acute STEMI patients who underwent primary PCI (n = 324) were enrolled in this retrospective study; 164 patients received eptifibatide bol...

  19. Interpretation of cross-correlation transit time from LPRM signals in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a commercial BWR, the cross correlation between two noise signals from Local Power Range Monitors is performed. As a consequence, a transit time is determined. There is not yet a wide acceptation of what exactly this transit time means. Four different techniques for the noise analysis are used; the results were alike, but the Rehocence method stood out as the most robust. Noise measurements were performed in a commercial BWR. Understanding what the transit time means, an attempt is made. Comparison with the output of a detailed thermohydraulic code shows agreement with the transit time measurements. (authors)

  20. Pharyngeal transit time measured by scintigraphic and biomagnetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative evaluation between scintigraphic and biomagnetic method to measure the pharyngeal transit is presented. Three volunteers have been studied. The aliment (yogurt) was labeled with 99m Technetium for the scintigraphic test and with ferrite for the biomagnetic one. The preliminary results indicate a difference between the values obtained, probably due to the biomagnetic detector resolution

  1. Submillimeter 3D coronary MR angiography with real-time navigator correction in 107 patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of high-resolution coronary MR angiography (coronary MRA) in a large group of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Methods and Material: 107 patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent free-breathing coronary MRA (Intera, 1.5 T, Philips Medical Systems). To compensate for artefacts due to respiratory motion, a right hemidiaphragmatic navigator with real time-time slice correction was used. An ECG-gated, fat-suppressed, 3D segmented-k-space gradient echo sequence (in plane resolution 0.70 x 0.79 mm2) was used. Cardiac catheterization with selective coronary angiography was performed in all patients. Visualization of the coronary arteries (CA) was qualitatively assessed using a four-point grading scale. Results: Image quality of grade 1 was achieved in 24%, grade 2 in 48%, grade 3 in 24% and grade in in 4% of patients. Based on an evaluation of the coronary MRAs of all patients (n = 107) sensitivity and specificity for the detection of stenoses > 60% in the proximal and middle main coronary arteries were 74% and 63%, respectively. In coronary MRAs with good quality [grade 1 and 2, n = 77/107 (72%)] sensitivity and specificity for the detection of coronary stenoses were 88% and 91%, respectively. Conclusion: Submillimeter 3D coronary MRA with real-time navigator correction allows high quality imaging of the proximal and middle main coronary arteries with good sensitivity and specificity for detection of stenoses > 50% in selected patients. However, in about 28% of patients image quality is severely impaired. (orig.)

  2. Time-Series Interactions of Gene Expression, Vascular Growth and Hemodynamics during Early Embryonic Arterial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Selda; Uslu, Fazil E; Kowalski, William J; Ermek, Erhan; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    The role of hemodynamic forces within the embryo as biomechanical regulators for cardiovascular morphogenesis, growth, and remodeling is well supported through the experimental studies. Furthermore, clinical experience suggests that perturbed flow disrupts the normal vascular growth process as one etiology for congenital heart diseases (CHD) and for fetal adaptation to CHD. However, the relationships between hemodynamics, gene expression and embryonic vascular growth are poorly defined due to the lack of concurrent, sequential in vivo data. In this study, a long-term, time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging campaign was conducted to acquire simultaneous blood velocity, pulsatile micro-pressure and morphometric data for 3 consecutive early embryonic stages in the chick embryo. In conjunction with the in vivo growth and hemodynamics data, in vitro reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to track changes in transcript expression relevant to histogenesis and remodeling of the embryonic arterial wall. Our non-invasive extended OCT imaging technique for the microstructural data showed continuous vessel growth. OCT data coupled with the PIV technique revealed significant but intermitted increases in wall shear stress (WSS) between first and second assigned stages and a noticeable decrease afterwards. Growth rate, however, did not vary significantly throughout the embryonic period. Among all the genes studied, only the MMP-2 and CASP-3 expression levels remained unchanged during the time course. Concurrent relationships were obtained among the transcriptional modulation of the genes, vascular growth and hemodynamics-related changes. Further studies are indicated to determine cause and effect relationships and reversibility between mechanical and molecular regulation of vasculogenesis. PMID:27552150

  3. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time compromise sleep and the rest-activity cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lönnqvist Jouko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of transition out of and into daylight saving time on the rest-activity cycles and sleep. Rest-activity cycles of nine healthy participants aged 20 to 40 years were measured around transitions out of and into daylight saving time on fall 2005 and spring 2006 respectively. Rest-activity cycles were measured using wrist-worn accelerometers. The participants filled in the Morningness-Eveningness and Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaires before starting the study and kept a sleep diary during the study. Results Fall transition was more disturbing for the more morning type and spring transition for the more evening type of persons. Individuals having a higher global seasonality score suffered more from the transitions. Conclusion Transitions out of and into daylight saving time enhanced night-time restlessness and thereby compromised the quality of sleep.

  4. Statistical theory for transition and long-time sustainment of improved confinement state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of stochastic transition is investigated in the presence of triggers by turbulence noise and external events. The probability of observing the transition is calculated under the circumstance that the global controlling parameters change in time. This is another important prediction of statistical theory in addition to the long time average. This clarifies the feature of transient response of the system with stochastic transitions. The interpretation of the experimental threshold database is discussed. (author)

  5. Community walking speed, sedentary or lying down time, and mortality in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina R; Greenland, Philip; Green, David; Liu, Kiang; Zhao, Lihui; Wilkins, John T; Huffman, Mark D; Shah, Sanjiv J; Liao, Yihua; Gao, Ying; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Criqui, Michael H

    2016-04-01

    We studied whether slower community walking speed and whether greater time spent lying down or sleeping were associated with higher mortality in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants with an ankle-brachial index (ABI) walking speed outside their home and the number of hours they spent lying down or sleeping per day. Cause of death was adjudicated using death certificates and medical record review. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, comorbidities, ABI, and other confounders. Of 1314 PAD participants, 189 (14.4%) died, including 63 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. Mean follow-up was 34.9 months ± 18.1. Relative to average or normal pace (2-3 miles/hour), slower walking speed was associated with greater CVD mortality: no walking at all: hazard ratio (HR) = 4.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.46-11.89; casual strolling (0-2 miles/hour): HR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.16-4.32; brisk or striding (>3 miles/hour): HR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.07-4.30. These associations were not significant after additional adjustment for the six-minute walk. Relative to sleeping or lying down for 8-9 hours, fewer or greater hours sleeping or lying down were associated with higher CVD mortality: 4-7 hours: HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.06-4.05; 10-11 hours: HR = 4.07, 95% CI = 1.86-8.89; ⩾ 12 hours: HR = 3.75, 95% CI = 1.47-9.62. These associations were maintained after adjustment for the six-minute walk. In conclusion, slower walking speed outside the home and less than 8 hours or more than 9 hours lying down per day are potentially modifiable behaviors associated with increased CVD mortality in patients with PAD. PMID:26873873

  6. Diameter measurements of cerebral arteries on three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To measure and establish the normal values of diameters of Chinese cerebral arteries on MRA. Methods: The diameters of the cerebral arteries in 100 persons with normal findings on 3D TOF MRA were measured with projector. There were 53 males and 47 females with the mean age of 45.8 years. 12 subjects were younger than 14 years and 88 were older than 14 years. The diameter differences between the left and the right, in gender and in ages were analyzed statistically. Results: The measurements of each arterial diameter were as follows: Ophthalmic artery: (0.8 ±0.2) mm in male, (0.9±0.2) mm in female. C2 segment of internal carotid artery (ICA-C2): (3.0±0.3) mm (≤14 years) and (3.5±0.6) mm (>14 years) in male, (2.8±0.6) mm (≤14 years) and (3.1±0.5) mm (>14 years) in female. ICA-C4: (4.3±0.6) mm in male, (3.9±0.6) mm in female. A1 segment of anterior cerebral artery (ACA-A1): (2.1±0.4) mm in male, (2.1±0.4) mm in female. Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) : (1.4±0.4) mm in male, (1.3±0.4) mm in female. M1 segment of middle cerebral artery (MCA-M1) : (2.7±0.4) mm in male, (2.6±0.4) mm in female. Basilar artery (BA) : (2.9±0.5) mm in male, (2.8±0.4) mm in female. P1 segment of posterior cerebral artery (PCA-P1) : (2.1±0.5) mm on the left and (2.0±0.5) mm on the right in male, (2.0±0.3) mm on the left and (1.9±0.3) mm on the right in female. PCA-P2: (1.8±0.4) mm in male, (1.7±0.3) mm in female. Posterior communicating artery (PCoA): (1.1±0.3) mm in male, (1.2±0.4) mm in female. Among various diameters, only PCA-P1 had significant difference between the left and the right ( P=0.003); only MCA-M1 (P =0.048), PCA-P1 (P=0.012), ICA-C2 (P=0.000) and C4 segments (P=0.000) had significant differences in gender, respectively; and only ICA-C2 had significant difference in age (P=0.001). Of these significantly different diameters, the diameters in male were larger than those in female. There were significant correlation between PCA-P1 and PCA

  7. The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Bruce, Samuel L; Gopinath, Ajay B; Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G; Kim, Jin Woong; Choi, Hong Sung; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-08-16

    The mechanical phenotype or 'mechanotype' of cells is emerging as a potential biomarker for cell types ranging from pluripotent stem cells to cancer cells. Using a microfluidic device, cell mechanotype can be rapidly analyzed by measuring the time required for cells to deform as they flow through constricted channels. While cells typically exhibit deformation timescales, or transit times, on the order of milliseconds to tens of seconds, transit times can span several orders of magnitude and vary from day to day within a population of single cells; this makes it challenging to characterize different cell samples based on transit time data. Here we investigate how variability in transit time measurements depends on both experimental factors and heterogeneity in physical properties across a population of single cells. We find that simultaneous transit events that occur across neighboring constrictions can alter transit time, but only significantly when more than 65% of channels in the parallel array are occluded. Variability in transit time measurements is also affected by the age of the device following plasma treatment, which could be attributed to changes in channel surface properties. We additionally investigate the role of variability in cell physical properties. Transit time depends on cell size; by binning transit time data for cells of similar diameters, we reduce measurement variability by 20%. To gain further insight into the effects of cell-to-cell differences in physical properties, we fabricate a panel of gel particles and oil droplets with tunable mechanical properties. We demonstrate that particles with homogeneous composition exhibit a marked reduction in transit time variability, suggesting that the width of transit time distributions reflects the degree of heterogeneity in subcellular structure and mechanical properties within a cell population. Our results also provide fundamental insight into the physical underpinnings of transit measurements

  8. Effect of electrical forepaw stimulation on capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Cai, Changsi; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke;

    2016-01-01

    Functional hyperemia reduces oxygen extraction efficacy unless counteracted by a reduction of capillary transit-time heterogeneity of blood. We adapted a bolus tracking approach to capillary transit-time heterogeneity estimation for two-photon microscopy and then quantified changes in plasma mean...

  9. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transi...

  10. A Matheuristic for the Liner Shipping Network Design Problem with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Desaulniers, Guy; Karsten, Christian Vad;

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for the liner shipping network design problem with transit time restrictions on the cargo flow. We extend an existing matheuristic for the liner shipping network design problem to consider transit time restrictions. The matheuristic is an improvement heuristic, where...

  11. [Synchonization of the blood flow rate in arterial with the changing rate of space of blood pressure with time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenghua; Qin, Renjia

    2012-10-01

    In physiology-related books, there are many relationship curves about blood flow rate in arteries and blood pressure changes with time, but there are not much explanation about such relationship. This is the very the question that the present article tries to answer. We clarified the relations between blood flow rate and blood pressure gradient using the experimental curves as the basis, using Poiseuille Law and relative knowledge of phisics and mathematics, and using analysis and reasoning. Based on the study, it can be concluded that in every course of cardiac cycle, the blood flow rate of any section in artery blood vessel is roughly synchronized with changing rate of space and time of the blood pressure, but blood flow rate is not synchronized with blood pressure. PMID:23198422

  12. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times - Conference Proceedings

    OpenAIRE

    Käpplinger, Bernd; Lichte, Nina; Haberzeth, Erik; Kulmus, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles almost 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was “Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times”. Many authors within this volume refer to this title and the thematic outline within the call for papers. Furthermore, conferences are also a g...

  13. Model of transit time for SiGe HBT Collector junction depletion-layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Hui-Yong; Zhang He-Ming; Dai Xian-Ying; Jia Xin-Zhang; Cui Xiao-Ying; Wang Wei; Ou Jian-Feng; Wang Xi-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The transit time through collector junction depletion-layer is an important parameter that influences AC gain and frequency performance. In SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) collector junction, the depletion-layer width is given in three cases. The models of collector depletion-layer transit time, considering the collector current densities and base extension effect, are established and simulated using MATLAB. The influence of the different collector j unction bias voltage, collector concentration of As or P dopant and collector width on collector junction transit time is quantitatively studied. When the collector junction bias voltage, collector doping concentration and collector width are large, the transit time is quite long. And, from the results of simulations, the influence of the collector depletion-layer transit time on frequency performance is considerable in SiGe HBT with a thin base, so it could not be ignored.

  14. A model for temporal resolution of multidetector computed tomography of coronary arteries in relation to rotation time, heart rate and reconstruction algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuter, M. J. W.; Flohr, T.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.

    2007-01-01

    A model is presented that describes the image quality of coronary arteries with multidetector computer tomography. The results are discussed in the context of rotation time of the scanner, heart rate, and number of sectors used in the acquisition process. The blurring of the coronary arteries was ca

  15. Circulation time determined by carotid angiography in patients with chronic internal Carotid artery occlusion. Comparison with cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism measured by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Inugami, Atsushi (Research Inst. for Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan)); Shishido, Fumio (and others)

    1994-10-01

    The degree of collateral circulation in patients with unilaterally chronic internal carotid artery occlusion was estimated by mean transit time of contrast material in rapid sequence carotid angiography (Angiographic MTT), and compared with cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism measured by PET. In normal density region on X-ray CT, a significant negative correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and cerebral blood flow (CBF). This indicates that cerebral blood flow can be estimated by Angiographic MTT. It has been reported that the ratio of cerebral blood volume (CBV) to CBF (CBV/CBF), i.e., mean transit time determined by PET well agreed with OEF, and is good indicator for brain circulation reserve. In this study, no significant correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and CBV/CBF. However, a significant positive correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and no significant correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and oxygen consumption rate (CMRO[sub 2]). These indicates that Angiographic MTT may be indicator for brain circulation reserve. (author).

  16. Least Expected Time Paths in Stochastic Schedule-Based Transit Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dang Khoa Vo; Tran Vu Pham; Nguyen Huynh Tuong; Van Hoai Tran

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of determining a least expected time (LET) path that minimizes the number of transfers and the expected total travel time in a stochastic schedule-based transit network. A time-dependent model is proposed to represent the stochastic transit network where vehicle arrival times are fully stochastically correlated. An exact label-correcting algorithm is developed, based on a proposed dominance condition by which Bellman’s principle of optimality is valid. Experimental res...

  17. Numerical assessment of time-domain methods for the estimation of local arterial pulse wave speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey, Jordi

    2011-03-15

    A local estimation of pulse wave speed c, an important predictor of cardiovascular events, can be obtained at arterial locations where simultaneous measurements of blood pressure (P) and velocity (U), arterial diameter (D) and U, flow rate (Q) and cross-sectional area (A), or P and D are available, using the PU-loop, sum-of-squares (∑(2)), lnDU-loop, QA-loop or new D(2)P-loop methods. Here, these methods were applied to estimate c from numerically generated P, U, D, Q and A waveforms using a visco-elastic one-dimensional model of the 55 larger human systemic arteries in normal conditions. Theoretical c were calculated from the parameters of the model. Estimates of c given by the loop methods were closer to theoretical values and more uniform within each arterial segment than those obtained using the ∑(2). The smaller differences between estimates and theoretical values were obtained using the D(2)P-loop method, with root-mean-square errors (RMSE) smaller than 0.18 ms(-1), followed by averaging the two c given by the PU- and lnDU-loops (RMSE elastic effects were small and nearby junctions were well-matched for forward-travelling waves. The ∑(2) performed better at proximal locations. PMID:21211799

  18. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. X. KOI-142 c: first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting exoplanet discovered by transit timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, S. C. C.; Díaz, R. F.; Santerne, A.; Bruno, G.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Damiani, C.; Hébrard, G.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.

    2014-01-01

    The exoplanet KOI-142b (Kepler-88b) shows transit timing variations (TTVs) with a semi-amplitude of ~12 h, which earned it the nickname "king of transit variations". Only the transit of planet b was detected in the Kepler data with an orbital period of ~10.92 days and a radius of ~0.36 RJup. The TTVs together with the transit duration variations of KOI-142b were analysed recently, finding a unique solution for a companion-perturbing planet. An outer non-transiting companion was predicted, KOI-142c, with a mass of 0.626 ± 0.03 MJup and a period of 22.3397-0.0018+0.0021 days, which is close to the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with the inner transiting planet. We report an independent confirmation of KOI-142c using radial velocity observations with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. We derive an orbital period of 22.10 ± 0.25 days and a minimum planetary mass of 0.760.16+0.32 MJup, both in good agreement with the predictions by previous transit timing analysis. Therefore, this is the first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting planet discovered with TTVs, providing an independent validation of the TTVs technique. Based on observations collected with the NASA Kepler satellite and with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Alterations of calf venous and arterial compliance following acclimation to heat administered at a fixed daily time in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Megumi; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Koga, Miki; Shido, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of heat acclimation on venous and arterial compliance in humans. Four male and four female volunteers were exposed to an ambient temperature of 40°C and relative humidity of 40% for 4 h (1330 1730 hours) per day for 9 10 consecutive days. The calf venous compliance (CV) was estimated using venous occlusion plethysmography with a mercury-in-silastic strain gauge placed around the right calf at its maximum girth. The compliance of the small (CSA) and large (CLA) arteries were assessed by reflective and capacitance compliance by analyzing the radial artery blood pressure waveforms, basing on the use of a modified Windkessel model. The calf CV, CSA, CLA, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate and core temperature were determined twice a day, 0930 1100 hours (AM test) and 1500 1630 hours (PM test), in both heat-acclimated and non-heat-acclimated (control) conditions. Heat acclimation appeared to decrease blood pressures, heart rate and significantly lowered core temperature only in the PM test. In the control condition, the calf CV was not affected by the time of day and the CSA was significantly depressed in the PM test. After acclimation to heat, the calf CV significantly increased and the CSA did not decrease in the PM test. The results presented suggest that repeated heat exposure in humans, for 4 h at a fixed time daily, increases the calf CV and the CSA particularly during the period when the subjects were previously exposed to heat.

  20. Validation of transit-time flowmetry for chronic measurements of regional blood flow in resting and exercising rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Amaral

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to validate the transit-time technique for long-term measurements of iliac and renal blood flow in rats. Flow measured with ultrasonic probes was confirmed ex vivo using excised arteries perfused at varying flow rates. An implanted 1-mm probe reproduced with accuracy different patterns of flow relative to pressure in freely moving rats and accurately quantitated the resting iliac flow value (on average 10.43 ± 0.99 ml/min or 2.78 ± 0.3 ml min-1 100 g body weight-1. The measurements were stable over an experimental period of one week but were affected by probe size (resting flows were underestimated by 57% with a 2-mm probe when compared with a 1-mm probe and by anesthesia (in the same rats, iliac flow was reduced by 50-60% when compared to the conscious state. Instantaneous changes of iliac and renal flow during exercise and recovery were accurately measured by the transit-time technique. Iliac flow increased instantaneously at the beginning of mild exercise (from 12.03 ± 1.06 to 25.55 ± 3.89 ml/min at 15 s and showed a smaller increase when exercise intensity increased further, reaching a plateau of 38.43 ± 1.92 ml/min at the 4th min of moderate exercise intensity. In contrast, exercise-induced reduction of renal flow was smaller and slower, with 18% and 25% decreases at mild and moderate exercise intensities. Our data indicate that transit-time flowmetry is a reliable method for long-term and continuous measurements of regional blood flow at rest and can be used to quantitate the dynamic flow changes that characterize exercise and recovery

  1. Clinical application of magnetic resonance angiography for coronary arteries. Correlation with conventional angiography and evaluation of imaging time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitatori, Toshiaki; Hanaoka, Hideto; Yoshino, Ayako [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the coronary arteries is a particularly difficult task because of the small size of the vessels and cardio-respiratory motion. The authors describe a method of performing of ultrafast MRA of the coronary arteries with a standard MR system and body coil. Each image was obtained within a single breath hold by `segmented Turbo FLASH` sequences using an electro-cardiography gate. Clinical application was performed in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease, and a comparison was made with conventional coronary angiography. The imaging time was shortened significantly by our methods. The diagnosis was made by at least two different images to avoid false positives. The results indicated a good correlation between MRA and conventional angiography. (author).

  2. Effects of unsteadiness and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow through a tapered time-variant stenotic artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional model is used to analyze the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood through a tapered artery with stenosis. The rheology of the flowing blood is captured by the constitutive equation of Carreau model. The geometry of the time-variant stenosis has been used to carry out the present analysis. The flow equations are set up under the assumption that the lumen radius is sufficiently smaller than the wavelength of the pulsatile pressure wave. A radial coordinate transformation is employed to immobilize the effect of the vessel wall. The resulting partial differential equations along with the boundary and initial conditions are solved using finite difference method. The dimensionless radial and axial velocity, volumetric flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress are analyzed for normal and diseased artery with particular focus on variation of these quantities with non-Newtonian parameters.

  3. The Use of Transit Timing to Detect Extrasolar Planets with Masses as Small as Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Holman, Matthew J.; Murray, Norman W.

    2004-01-01

    Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets, including the space-based mission Kepler (Borucki et al 2003), are expected to detect hundreds of Jovian mass planets and tens of terrestrial mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1--100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting), via their gravit...

  4. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  5. No Timing Variations Observed in Third Transit of Snow-Line Exoplanet Kepler-421b

    CERN Document Server

    Dalba, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of the snow-line exoplanet Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Previously, the Kepler Spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b leaving the planet's transit ephemeris unconstrained. Our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b barring significant TTVs. We use the light curves to assess the probabilities of various transit models using both the posterior odds ratio and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and find that a transit model with no TTVs is favored to 3.6-sigma confidence. These observations suggest that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the Kepler-421b ephemeris constrained, we calculate future transit times and discuss the opportunity to characteriz...

  6. Calculation of 99m Tc-DTPA transit times in normal kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: renal dynamic study is a well-established and popular test in routine practice of nuclear medicine. The test is noninvasive, rapid and unique in evaluation of the kidney function.In despite of its clinical values, the parameters derived from renogram are physiologically meaningless. That is due to the fact that renogram is not the true kidney function. From mathematical points of view, renogram is the convolution of kidney function and kidney input function. The real kidney function, which is usually called Impulse retention function, could be derived using convolution technique. The main parameters that can be derived from IRF are transit times. Methods and materials: the data collected from 30 normal healthy individual volunteers were used for calculation of transit times. Due to the sensitivity of deconvolution technique to the error and to minimize the error in the raw data, an investigation was launched to determine the most suitable method of noise reduction, background subtraction and numerical method of deconvolution. Based on our finding a software package was developed on the system and evaluated using system phantom. Results: our results showed that among different transit time parameters for different parts of the kidney mean transit time of the parenchymal is statistically the most valuable parameter. Assuming a Gaussian distribution for the parameter and accepting a 95 % confidence interval, the normal rage of mean parenchymal transit time was calculated to be 205 ±70 sec. Using the same logic the abnormal rage of mean parenchymal transit time was calculated to be more than 300 sec. Discussion: during the last decade skeptical questions have raised about the suitability of renogram for deconvolution and validity of transit time parameter. Our experiences have proved that kidney is approximately a linear ad stationary system, therefore, suitable for deconvolution.The validity of transit time parameter, is extremely depended on the

  7. The consequences of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel Teilfeldt; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Hageman, Ida; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Daylight savings time (DST) transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between DST transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate of depressive...... episodes. This seems likely because DST transitions affect the circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the consequences of DST transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. METHODS Using time series intervention...... analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012 we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted trend in the incidence rate. RESULTS...

  8. First-time viewers' comprehension of films: bridging shot transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildirar, Sermin; Schwan, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Which perceptual and cognitive prerequisites must be met in order to be able to comprehend a film is still unresolved and a controversial issue. In order to gain some insights into this issue, our field experiment investigates how first-time adult viewers extract and integrate meaningful information across film cuts. Three major types of commonalities between adjacent shots were differentiated, which may help first-time viewers with bridging the shots: pictorial, causal, and conceptual. Twenty first-time, 20 low-experienced and 20 high-experienced viewers from Turkey were shown a set of short film clips containing these three kinds of commonalities. Film clips conformed also to the principles of continuity editing. Analyses of viewers' spontaneous interpretations show that first-time viewers indeed are able to notice basic pictorial (object identity), causal (chains of activity), as well as conceptual (links between gaze direction and object attention) commonalities between shots due to their close relationship with everyday perception and cognition. However, first-time viewers' comprehension of the commonalities is to a large degree fragile, indicating the lack of a basic notion of what constitutes a film. PMID:24654735

  9. Pointwise upper estimates for transition probability of continuous time random walks on graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinxing

    2013-01-01

    Let $X$ be a continuous time random walk on a weighted graph. Given the on-diagonal upper bounds of transition probabilities at two vertices $x_1$ and $x_2$, we use an adapted metric initiated by Davies, and obtain Gaussian upper estimates for the off-diagonal transition probability $P_{x_1}(X_t=x_2)$.

  10. Transit timing observations from Kepler. VI. Potentially interesting candidate systems from fourier-based statistical tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffen, J.H.; Ford, E.B.; Rowe, J.F.;

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify...

  11. Markov Model of Wind Power Time Series UsingBayesian Inference of Transition Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Berthelsen, Kasper Klitgaard; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte;

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes to use Bayesian inference of transition matrix when developing a discrete Markov model of a wind speed/power time series and 95% credible interval for the model verification. The Dirichlet distribution is used as a conjugate prior for the transition matrix. Three discrete Markov...

  12. Analysis of the Transition Time From Air to Oxy-Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasek Janusz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some issues of the transition process from air- to oxy-combustion were investigated. Advantages of flexible combustion were described. Flexible combustion tests carried out at four European plants and five plants outside Europe of different scales of process and test parameters were presented. An analysis of the transition time from air to oxy-combustion of different laboratory and pilot scale processes was carried out. The “first-order + dead time” approach was used as a model to describe transition process. Transitional periods between combustion modes and characteristic parameters of the process were determined. The transition time depends not only on the facility’s capacity but also it is impacted by specific operational parameters.

  13. Nonparametric estimation in an "illness-death" model when all transition times are interval censored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Halina; Gerds, Thomas; Grøn, Randi;

    2013-01-01

    We develop nonparametric maximum likelihood estimation for the parameters of an irreversible Markov chain on states {0,1,2} from the observations with interval censored times of 0 → 1, 0 → 2 and 1 → 2 transitions. The distinguishing aspect of the data is that, in addition to all transition times...... being interval censored, the times of two events (0 → 1 and 1 → 2 transitions) can be censored into the same interval. This development was motivated by a common data structure in oral health research, here specifically illustrated by the data from a prospective cohort study on the longevity of dental...... veneers. Using the self-consistency algorithm we obtain the maximum likelihood estimators of the cumulative incidences of the times to events 1 and 2 and of the intensity of the 1 → 2 transition. This work generalizes previous results on the estimation in an "illness-death" model from interval censored...

  14. Determination of transit time in the hydraulic system of the San Gaban II hydroelectric plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work determines the hydraulic behavior of waters from different lakes (Pauchinta, Parinajota and Suytococha) which feed the San Gaban II Hydroelectric Plant across the Corani and Macusani rivers through the transit time to the headwater dam

  15. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Svanholm, Jette Rolf

    diseases and chronic kidney diseases. We specifically focus on the adolescents’ experiences, 'what is important to them', 'what characterises their interaction with health care staff' and 'the communication between the adolescents and health care staff as perceived by the adolescents'. Methods: This is a...... interview with the adolescent at outpatient clinics at Aarhus University Hospital. Follow-up is planned at 15 and 18 years of age. A comparative approach is employed to show central characteristics across time, disease and gender. Results: Results from analysis inspired by Ricoeur's phenomenological...

  16. The Cover Time of Deterministic Random Walks for General Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraga, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    The deterministic random walk is a deterministic process analogous to a random walk. While there are some results on the cover time of the rotor-router model, which is a deterministic random walk corresponding to a simple random walk, nothing is known about the cover time of deterministic random walks emulating general transition probabilities. This paper is concerned with the SRT-router model with multiple tokens, which is a deterministic process coping with general transition probabilities ...

  17. Automatic location of L/H transition times for physical studies with a large statistical basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Pereira, A.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Ramírez, J. M.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-06-01

    Completely automatic techniques to estimate and validate L/H transition times can be essential in L/H transition analyses. The generation of databases with hundreds of transition times and without human intervention is an important step to accomplish (a) L/H transition physics analysis, (b) validation of L/H theoretical models and (c) creation of L/H scaling laws. An entirely unattended methodology is presented in this paper to build large databases of transition times in JET using time series. The proposed technique has been applied to a dataset of 551 JET discharges between campaigns C21 and C26. A prediction with discharges that show a clear signature in time series is made through the locating properties of the wavelet transform. It is an accurate prediction and the uncertainty interval is ±3.2 ms. The discharges with a non-clear pattern in the time series use an L/H mode classifier based on discharges with a clear signature. In this case, the estimation error shows a distribution with mean and standard deviation of 27.9 ms and 37.62 ms, respectively. Two different regression methods have been applied to the measurements acquired at the transition times identified by the automatic system. The obtained scaling laws for the threshold power are not significantly different from those obtained using the data at the transition times determined manually by the experts. The automatic methods allow performing physical studies with a large number of discharges, showing, for example, that there are statistically different types of transitions characterized by different scaling laws.

  18. Automatic location of L/H transition times for physical studies with a large statistical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completely automatic techniques to estimate and validate L/H transition times can be essential in L/H transition analyses. The generation of databases with hundreds of transition times and without human intervention is an important step to accomplish (a) L/H transition physics analysis, (b) validation of L/H theoretical models and (c) creation of L/H scaling laws. An entirely unattended methodology is presented in this paper to build large databases of transition times in JET using time series. The proposed technique has been applied to a dataset of 551 JET discharges between campaigns C21 and C26. A prediction with discharges that show a clear signature in time series is made through the locating properties of the wavelet transform. It is an accurate prediction and the uncertainty interval is ±3.2 ms. The discharges with a non-clear pattern in the time series use an L/H mode classifier based on discharges with a clear signature. In this case, the estimation error shows a distribution with mean and standard deviation of 27.9 ms and 37.62 ms, respectively. Two different regression methods have been applied to the measurements acquired at the transition times identified by the automatic system. The obtained scaling laws for the threshold power are not significantly different from those obtained using the data at the transition times determined manually by the experts. The automatic methods allow performing physical studies with a large number of discharges, showing, for example, that there are statistically different types of transitions characterized by different scaling laws. (paper)

  19. Controls on snowmelt water mean transit times in northern boreal catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, S. W.; H. Laudon; Seibert, Jan; Morth, M.; D. Tetzlaff; K. H. Bishop

    2010-01-01

    Catchment-scale transit times for water are increasingly being recognized as an important control on geochemical processes. In this study, snowmelt water mean transit times (MTTs) were estimated for the 15 Krycklan research catchments in northern boreal Sweden. The snowmelt water MTTs were assumed to be representative of the catchment-scale hydrologic response during the spring thaw period and, as such, may be considered to be a component of the catchment's overall MTT. These snowmelt water M...

  20. Gastrointestinal mean transit times in young and middle-aged healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of age and gender on gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times, a study was conducted in 32 healthy volunteers: eight young women (22-30 years), eight young men (20-28 years), eight middle-aged women (43-51 years) and eight middle-aged men (38-53 years...... unaffected by age, but middle-aged women had a significantly slower colonic transit than young women. We therefore conclude that both age and gender have to be considered when reference values for gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times have to be established....

  1. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Dilling Kjaer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL. This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365. Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF was 49% (3–77 and 62% (17–98 after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360. A median daily stool frequency of nine (4–25 was reported and three (14% patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90% patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful.

  2. The effect of conjunctions on the transit timing variations of exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, David, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytic model for transit timing variations produced by orbital conjunctions between gravitationally interacting planets. If the planetary orbits have tight orbital spacing, which is a common case among the Kepler planets, the effect of a single conjunction can be best described as: (1) a step-like change of the transit timing ephemeris with subsequent transits of the inner planet being delayed and those of the outer planet being sped up, and (2) a discrete change in sampling of the underlying oscillations from eccentricity-related interaction terms. In the limit of small orbital eccentricities, our analytic model gives explicit equations for these effects as a function of the mass and orbital separation of planets. We point out that a detection of the conjunction effect in real data is of crucial importance for the physical characterization of planetary systems from transit timing variations.

  3. Transiting planets as a precision clock to constrain the time variation of the gravitational constant

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Kento

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of transit times in exoplanetary systems accurately provides an instantaneous orbital period, $P(t)$, of their member planets. A long-term monitoring of those transiting planetary systems puts limits on the variability of $P(t)$, which are translated into the constraints on the time variation of the gravitational constant $G$. We apply this analysis to $10$ transiting systems observed by the Kepler spacecraft, and find that $\\Delta G/G\\lesssim 5\\times10^{-6}$ for 2009-2013, or $\\dot{G}/G \\lesssim 10^{-6}\\,\\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$ if $\\dot{G}$ is constant. While the derived limit is weaker than those from other analyses, it is complementary to them and can be improved by analyzing numerous transiting systems that are continuously monitored.

  4. Landau level transitions in doped graphene in a time dependent magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardenghi, J.S., E-mail: jsardenghi@gmail.com; Bechthold, P.; Jasen, P.; Gonzalez, E.; Nagel, O.

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this work is to describe the Landau level transitions of Bloch electrons in doped graphene with an arbitrary time dependent magnetic field in the long wavelength approximation. In particular, transitions from the m Landau level to the m±1 and m±2 Landau levels are studied using the time dependent perturbation theory. Time intervals are computed in which transition probabilities tend to zero at a low order in the coupling constant. In particular, Landau level transitions are studied in the case of Bloch electrons traveling in the direction of the applied magnetic force and the results are compared with classical and revival periods of electrical current in graphene. Finally, current probabilities are computed for the n=0 and n=1 Landau levels showing expected oscillating behavior with modified cyclotron frequency.

  5. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  6. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  7. In silico labeling reveals the time-dependent label half-life and transit-time in dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiwald Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical models of dynamical systems facilitate the computation of characteristic properties that are not accessible experimentally. In cell biology, two main properties of interest are (1 the time-period a protein is accessible to other molecules in a certain state - its half-life - and (2 the time it spends when passing through a subsystem - its transit-time. We discuss two approaches to quantify the half-life, present the novel method of in silico labeling, and introduce the label half-life and label transit-time. The developed method has been motivated by laboratory tracer experiments. To investigate the kinetic properties and behavior of a substance of interest, we computationally label this species in order to track it throughout its life cycle. The corresponding mathematical model is extended by an additional set of reactions for the labeled species, avoiding any double-counting within closed circuits, correcting for the influences of upstream fluxes, and taking into account combinatorial multiplicity for complexes or reactions with several reactants or products. A profile likelihood approach is used to estimate confidence intervals on the label half-life and transit-time. Results Application to the JAK-STAT signaling pathway in Epo-stimulated BaF3-EpoR cells enabled the calculation of the time-dependent label half-life and transit-time of STAT species. The results were robust against parameter uncertainties. Conclusions Our approach renders possible the estimation of species and label half-lives and transit-times. It is applicable to large non-linear systems and an implementation is provided within the PottersWheel modeling framework (http://www.potterswheel.de.

  8. Daylight saving time transitions and hospital treatments due to accidents or manic episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lönnqvist Jouko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daylight saving time affects millions of people annually but its impacts are still widely unknown. Sleep deprivation and the change of circadian rhythm can trigger mental illness and cause higher accident rates. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time changes the circadian rhythm and may cause sleep deprivation. Thus it seems plausible that the prevalence of accidents and/or manic episodes may be higher after transition into and out of daylight saving time. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of transitions into and out of daylight saving time on the incidence of accidents and manic episodes in the Finnish population during the years of 1987 to 2003. Methods The nationwide data were derived from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. From the register we obtained the information about the hospital-treated accidents and manic episodes during two weeks before and two weeks after the transitions in 1987–2003. Results The results were negative, as the transitions into or out of daylight saving time had no significant effect on the incidence of accidents or manic episodes. Conclusion One-hour transitions do not increase the incidence of manic episodes or accidents which require hospital treatment.

  9. Intermittency transition to generalized synchronization in coupled time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M

    2007-12-01

    We report the nature of the transition to generalized synchronization (GS) in a system of two coupled scalar piecewise linear time-delay systems using the auxiliary system approach. We demonstrate that the transition to GS occurs via an on-off intermittency route and that it also exhibits characteristically distinct behaviors for different coupling configurations. In particular, the intermittency transition occurs in a rather broad range of coupling strength for the error feedback coupling configuration and in a narrow range of coupling strength for the direct feedback coupling configuration. It is also shown that the intermittent dynamics displays periodic bursts of periods equal to the delay time of the response system in the former case, while they occur in random time intervals of finite duration in the latter case. The robustness of these transitions with system parameters and delay times has also been studied for both linear and nonlinear coupling configurations. The results are corroborated analytically by suitable stability conditions for asymptotically stable synchronized states and numerically by the probability of synchronization and by the transition of sub-Lyapunov exponents of the coupled time-delay systems. We have also indicated the reason behind these distinct transitions by referring to the unstable periodic orbit theory of intermittency synchronization in low-dimensional systems. PMID:18233907

  10. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  11. Attenuation of systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time hysteresis during exercise and recovery in cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yan, Bryan P; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2014-02-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a cardiovascular parameter of emerging interest due to its potential to estimate blood pressure (BP) continuously and without a cuff. Both linear and nonlinear equations have been used in the estimation of BP based on PTT. This study, however, demonstrates that there is a hysteresis phenomenon between BP and PTT during and after dynamic exercise. A total of 46 subjects including 16 healthy subjects, 13 subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and 17 patients with cardiovascular disease underwent graded exercise stress test. PTT was measured from electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram of the left index finger of the subject, i.e., a pathway that includes predominately aorta, brachial, and radial arteries. The results of this study showed that, for the same systolic BP (SBP), PTT measured during exercise was significantly larger than PTT measured during recovery for all subject groups. This hysteresis was further quantified as both normalized area bounded by the SBP-PTT relationship (AreaN) and SBP difference at PTT during peak exercise plus 20 ms (ΔSBP20). Significant attenuation of both AreaN (p <; 0.05) and ΔSBP20 (p <; 0.01) is observed in cardiovascular patients compared with healthy subjects, independent of resting BP. Since the SBP-PTT relationship are determined by the mechanical properties of arterial wall, which is predominately mediated by the sympathetic nervous system through altered vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone during exercise, results of this study are consistent with the previous findings of autonomic nervous dysfunction in cardiovascular patients. We further conclude that VSM tone has a nonnegligible influence on the BP-PTT relationship and thus should be considered in the PTT-based BP estimation. PMID:24158470

  12. Salt-tracer experiments to measure hyporheic transit time distributions in gravel-bed sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Perk, M.; Petticrew, E. L.; Owens, P. N.; Hulsman, R.; Wubben, L.

    2009-04-01

    We performed a series of tracer experiments in large outdoor flumes at the Quesnel River Research Centre, Likely, BC, Canada to quantify the hyporheic transit time distribution in gravel bed sediments. For this purpose, an 18.9 m x 2 m flume was filled with a 30 cm thick layer of well-sorted gravel with a d50 of 39.1 mm. The average longitudinal gradient of the gravel bed was 0.05% The flumes were filled with aerated local groundwater, so that a standing water layer of 20 cm depth over the gravel bed was established. Subsequently, dissolved common salt was added until the water reached an electrical conductivity (EC) between 450 and 550 µS/cm. The flumes were equilibrated overnight to ensure a uniform distribution of the salt concentration across the flume. At the start of each experiment local groundwater (EC = 150 µS/cm) was discharged at a rate of approximately 16 l/s at the upper end of the flume. At 10 m downstream from the inlet the EC was monitored in the water layer until the EC remained constant at a value close to the background value of about 150 µS/cm. The experiment was replicated three times. The measured breakthrough curves were used to calculate the overall transit time distributions of water in the 10 m stretch of the flume. The transit time distribution in the water layer was calculated using the longitudinal dispersion coefficient estimated using the empirical equation of Fischer et al. (1979). For the transit time distributions within the gravel layer we assumed a probability density function as proposed by Marion and Zaramella (2005). These hyporheic transit time distributions were estimated using least-squares deconvolution of the overall transit time distributions. The fitted overall transit time distributions corresponded fairly well to the ‘observed' distributions. The 10th percentile of the hyporheic transit time distributions in the 10 m stretch of the flume varied between 45 s and 65 s. The median transit time ranged between 200 s

  13. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography and its applications in evaluation for coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉

    2004-01-01

    It is important to assess myocardial perfusion in the diagnosis, treatment and risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease. At present, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is used to evaluate myocardial perfusion, but it is limited by relatively low spatial resolution, the need to inject radioisotopes, and not being able to be performed at the patient ' s bedside. Using intracoronary injection of ultrasound contrast agent, the potential of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) instead of perfusion assessment has been proved in numerous animal and human studies. Recent improvements in contrast agents have resulted in stable microbubbles that, following intravenous administration, traverse the pulmonary circulation and reach the left heart. Combined with the emergence of contrast-specific imaging modalities along with quantitative analytical method, intravenous MCE is now a feasible and promising noninvasive technique for perfusion assessment.

  14. Transiting planets as a precision clock to constrain the time variation of the gravitational constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kento; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of transit times in exoplanetary systems accurately provides an instantaneous orbital period, P(t), of their member planets. A long-term monitoring of those transiting planetary systems puts limits on the variability of P(t), which are translated into the constraints on the time variation of the gravitational constant G. We apply this analysis to 10 transiting systems observed by the Kepler spacecraft, and find that ΔG/G ≲ 5 × 10- 6 for 2009-2013, or dot{G}/G ≲ 10^{-6}yr-1 if dot{G} is constant. While the derived limit is weaker than those from other analyses, it is complementary to them and can be improved by analyzing numerous transiting systems that are continuously monitored.

  15. Scintigraphic determination of gastrointestinal transit times. A comparison with breath hydrogen and radiologic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Larsen, N E; Hilsted, J;

    1991-01-01

    A scintigraphic method for determination of gastrointestinal transit times was compared with the breath hydrogen test and a multiple-bolus, single-radiograph technique. A close temporal association was found between the caecal appearance of radioactivity and the onset of breath hydrogen excretion....... In conclusion, inadequate delineation of the caecal region seems to be an unimportant drawback of the scintigraphic measurements, whereas day-to-day variation in gastrointestinal transit rates may influence the reliability of the assessments. Probably, quantitative transit data cannot be obtained from...... the breath hydrogen concentration profiles....

  16. Transition time

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2013-01-01

    2013 is going to be an interesting year for the High Dilution research field. There is a tendency to revise basic concepts and common beliefs, while refining models and theories. The fundamental research team seems to be open to deeper discussions, aiming to reinforce some hypothesis and discharge others. In somehow, we are stuck in a vicious way of think, trying to manage and describe an informational phenomenon into a molecular framework. The challenge offered to those researchers involved ...

  17. Calibration of pulse transit time through a cable for EAS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang-Li, Qian; Cun-Feng, Feng; Zhao-Yang, Feng; Quan-Bu, Gou; Yi-Qing, Guo; Hong-Bo, Hu; Cheng, Liu; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Xue; Xue-Yao, Zhang; Yi, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    In ground-based extensive air shower experiments, the direction and energy are reconstructed by measuring the relative arrival time of secondary particles, and the energy they deposit. The measurement precision of the arrival time is crucial for determination of the angular resolution. For this purpose, we need to obtain a precise relative time offset for each detector, and to apply the calibration process. The time offset is associated with the photomultiplier tube, cable, relevant electronic circuits, etc. In view of the transit time through long cables being heavily dependent on the ambient temperature, a real-time calibration method for the cable transit time is investigated in this paper. Even with a poor-resolution time-to-digital converter, this method can achieve high precision. This has been successfully demonstrated with the Front-End-Electronic board used in the Daya Bay neutrino experiment.

  18. Arterial Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY Patient Information Series Arterial Catheterization An arterial catheter is a thin, hollow tube ... PHYSICIANS: AND COPY Why Do I Need Arterial Catheterization? Common reasons an arterial catheterization is done include: ■ ...

  19. State Estimation for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems with Markov Jumps and Nonhomogeneous Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Shunyi Zhao; Zhiguo Wang; Fei Liu

    2013-01-01

    State estimation problem is addressed for a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems with Markov parameters and nonhomogeneous transition probabilities (TPs). In this paper, the optimal estimation mechanism of transition probability matrix is proposed in the minimum mean square error sense to show some critical points. Based on this mechanism, the extended Kalman filters are employed as the subfilters to obtain the subestimates with corresponding models. A novel operator which fuses the prior...

  20. Can The Markov Switching Model with Time Varying Transition Probabilities Forecast Exchange Rates?

    OpenAIRE

    Bong-Han Kim; Joong-Haeng Lee

    2001-01-01

    We use Lee's (1991) Markov switching model with time varying transition probabilities (the TVTP Markov model) to analyze the behavior of the U.S. dollar/ British Pound exchange rate. We employ the magnitude of the deviation of the exchange rate from a monetary equilibrium value as the economic fundamental with which the transition probabilities vary. The empirical results we obtained from this paper are the following: first, the deviation of the exchange rate from a monetary equilibrium value...

  1. Transition to parenthood and mental health in first-time parents

    OpenAIRE

    Parfitt, Y.; Ayers, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the transition to parenthood and mental health in first-time parents in detail and explore any differences in this transition in the context of parental gender and postpartum mental health. Semistructured clinical interviews (Birmingham Interview for Maternal Mental Health) were carried out with 46 women and 40 men, 5 months after birth. Parents were assessed on pre- and postpartum anxiety, depression, and postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and a rang...

  2. Markov Model of Wind Power Time Series UsingBayesian Inference of Transition Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peiyuan; Berthelsen, Kasper Klitgaard; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes to use Bayesian inference of transition matrix when developing a discrete Markov model of a wind speed/power time series and 95% credible interval for the model verification. The Dirichlet distribution is used as a conjugate prior for the transition matrix. Three discrete Markov models are compared, i.e. the basic Markov model, the Bayesian Markov model and the birth-and-death Markov model. The proposed Bayesian Markov model shows the best accuracy in modeling the autocorr...

  3. Functional imaging of the brain using digital subtraction angiography: Cerebral mean transit time distribution pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-density curves (TDCs) describe the perfusion of tissue by contrast media. From those TDCs the authors calculate mean transit time (MTT) values using a modified transit time theory. This theory is applied to TDCs of the brain ascertained using digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The theory excludes the problems of densitometry. MTT values help to decide whether a stenosis is relevant to the brain tissue or nor. Functional images of the regional distribution of transit times can be generated with excellent spatial resolution (512 x 512 pixel matrix). They are of high diagnostic quality and correlate strongly with blood flow distribution patterns. Function and morphology can be assessed with only one examination, and ischemic foci are demonstrated. The results in 50 patients are reported

  4. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. IX. Catalog of the Full Long-Cadence Data Set

    OpenAIRE

    Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Ragozzine, Darin; Kane, Mackenzie; Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new transit timing catalog of 2599 Kepler Objects of Interest (=KOIs), using the PDC-MAP long-cadence light curves that include the full seventeen quarters of the mission (ftp://wise- ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV/ver_112). The goal is to produce an easy-to-use catalog that can stimulate further analyses of interesting systems. For 779 KOIs with high enough SNRs, we derived the timing, duration and depth of 69,914 transits. For 1820 KOIs with lower SNR, we derived only the timing ...

  5. New geometric transition as origin of particle production in time-dependent backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By extending the quantum evolution of a scalar field in time-dependent backgrounds to the complex-time plane and transporting the in-vacuum along a closed path, we argue that the geometric transition from the simple pole at infinity determines the multi-pair production depending on the winding number. We apply the geometric transition to Schwinger mechanism in the time-dependent vector potential for a constant electric field and to Gibbons–Hawking particle production in the planar coordinates of a de Sitter space

  6. Timing preferences for women's family life transitions: intergenerational transmission among migrants and Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, H.A.G.; Liefbroer, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the transmission of preferences regarding the timing of family-life transitions of women among migrant and native Dutch families. We study how and to what extent parental preferences, migrant origin, and family characteristics affect the child’s timing preferences. We use parent

  7. A new correlation method to the transit time determination in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluctuation of the neutron flux caused by steam bubbles air was analyzed in this paper in order to determine transit time in the four fuel bundles surrounding the in-core detector string in a boiling water reactor. A new correlation method is applied and compared with the ordinary cross-correlation technique in the time and frequency domain. (author)

  8. The determination of allowed outage time using the evaluation of transition risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    he objectives of this study are to propose a new evaluation method for transition risk and to determine the AOT using the new method. We review and compare the evaluation methods of transition risk which was previously studied. We also identify important assumptions used in previous studies for the evaluation of transition risk. We select general items required for the development of evaluation method for the transition risk. Based on the items selected, we propose a new evaluation method for transition risk. The new evaluation method for the transition risk is based on following assumptions; 1)For the same time span, the risk occurred from the failure to the completion of component repair during power operation is the same as the total risk including the risk occurred from power operation to specific shutdown/low power operation and the risk from specific shutdown/low power operation to power operation. 2)Shutdown operation and the repair of components are initiated just after the identification of the failure of components. The evaluation of the transition risk is performed to incorporate the characteristics of shutdown operation into Ulchin Units 3 and 4 Level 1 internal PSA for power operation. The application results of the new method to the HPSIS and the LPSIS for Ulchin Units 3 and 4 show that the AOT of HPSIS is properly determined and the AOT of LPSIS can be greatly increased. In this study, the main factors affecting the determination of AOT using the evaluation for transition risk are identified as the time of shutdown operation, the consideration of the change on common cause failure probability, and the risk of shutdown operation. It is expected that the evaluation method for the transition risk proposed in this study will be used for the determination of AOT and for the decision, in the case of the components unavailable, whether power operation is continuously performed or shutdown operation is initiated

  9. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  10. Non-invasive monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure from timing information by EIT: experimental evaluation during induced hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Rimoldi, Stefano F

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in pulmonary hypertensive patients is currently limited to invasive solutions. We investigate a novel non-invasive approach for continuous monitoring of PAP, based on electrical impedance tomography (EIT), a safe, low-cost and non-invasive imaging technology. EIT recordings were performed in three healthy subjects undergoing hypoxia-induced PAP variations. The pulmonary pulse arrival time (PAT), a timing parameter physiologically linked to the PAP, was automatically calculated from the EIT signals. Values were compared to systolic PAP values from Doppler echocardiography, and yielded strong correlation scores ([Formula: see text]) for all three subjects. Results suggest the feasibility of non-invasive, unsupervised monitoring of PAP. PMID:27212013

  11. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts. PMID:26586528

  12. Characterization of post mortem arterial tissue using time-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy at 436, 461 and 532 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to characterize post mortem arterial tissue for the purpose of discriminating between normal and atheromatous areas of tissue. Ultrasonic thermoelastic waves were generated in post mortem human aorta by the absorption of nanosecond laser pulses at 436, 461 and 532 nm produced by a frequency doubled Q-switched d:YAG laser in conjunction with a gas filled Raman cell. A PVDF membrane zydrophone was used to detect the thermoelastic waves. At 436 nm, differences in the photoacoustic signatures of normal tissue and atherorma were found to be highly variable. At 461 nm, there was a clear and reproducible difference between the photoacoustic response of atheroma and normal tissue as a result of increased optical attenuation in atheroma. At 532 nm, the generation of subsurface thermoelastic waves provided a means of determining the structure and thickness of the tissue sample. It is suggested that pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy at 461 and 532 nm may find application in characterizing arterial tissue in situ by providing information about both the composition and thickness of the vessel wall. (author)

  13. A model for temporal resolution of multidetector computed tomography of coronary arteries in relation to rotation time, heart rate and reconstruction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuter, M.J.W.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Oudkerk, M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Flohr, T. [Siemens Medical Solutions, CT Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    A model is presented that describes the image quality of coronary arteries with multidetector computer tomography. The results are discussed in the context of rotation time of the scanner, heart rate, and number of sectors used in the acquisition process. The blurring of the coronary arteries was calculated for heart rates between 50 and 100 bpm for rotation times of 420, 370, and 330 ms, and one-, two-, three-, and four-sector acquisition modes and irregular coronary artery movement is included. The model predicts optimal timing within the RR cycle of 45{+-}3% (RCA), 44{+-}4% and 74{+-}6% (LCX), and 35{+-}4% and 76{+-}5% (LAD). The optimal timing shows a negative linear dependency on heart rate and increases with the number of sectors used. The RCA blurring decreases from 0.98 cm for 420 ms, one-sector mode to 0.27 cm for 330 ms, four-sector mode. The corresponding values are 0.81 cm and 0.29 cm for LCX and 0.42 cm and 0.17 cm for LAD. The number of sectors used in a multisector reconstruction and the timing within the cardiac cycle should be adjusted to the specific coronary artery that has to be imaged. Irregular coronary artery movement of 1.5 mm justifies the statement that no more than two sectors should be used in multisector acquisition processes in order to improve temporal resolution in cardiac MDCT. (orig.)

  14. Transit time of a freely-falling quantum particle in a background gravitational field

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Paul Charles William

    2004-01-01

    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a non-relativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case that the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical transit times coincide, in conformity with the principle of equivalence. I also calculate the quantum corrections to the transit time when the de Broglie wavelengths are long enough to probe the spacetime curvature. The results are compared with the calculation of Chaio and Speliotopoulos (2003), who propose an experiment to measure the foregoing effects.

  15. Transit time of a freely falling quantum particle in a background gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a non-relativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case in which the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical transit times coincide, in conformity with the principle of equivalence. I also calculate the quantum corrections to the transit time when the de Broglie wavelengths are long enough to probe the spacetime curvature. The results are compared with the calculation of Chiao and Speliotopoulos (2003), who propose an experiment to measure the foregoing effects

  16. Dynamic detection of wake-sleep transition with reaction time-magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Bin Chen; Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to observable behaviors, sleep and wakefulness are two fundamentally different behavioral states. Although electroencephalogram (EEG) is traditionally used to define sleep stage, it is difficult to detect or to quantify microarousals or disruptions during sleep. In addition,initial sleep cannot be defined. It is thought that the wake-sleep transition cannot be defined by EEG patterns.OBJECTIVE: To observe the behavioral response magnitude during wake-sleep transition by EEG monitoring and to define the wake-sleep transition.DESIGN, TIME AND SE'n'ING: A behavioral and neural network study was performed at the Key Lab of Human Being Development and Mental Health of Central China Normal University, and Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science of South Central University for Nationalities, China in July 2007.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 30 healthy volunteers, of equal gender and aged (19.7+1.1) years, were recruited from the Central China Normal University, China for this study. None of the subjects had undergone EEG recording prior to this study or received any medication for sleep disturbances.METHODS: A novel adaptive approach was applied to detect wake-sleep transition, which avoided stimulus-induced waking. To test the difference between wake state and wake-sleep transition, the amount of self-information and mutual-information were effective parameters to analyze wake-sleep transition.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following parameters were measured: morphological changes in reaction time-magnitude, as well as correlation between phase changes and sleep, and wake and wake-sleep transition.RESULTS: There were three typical phases in morphological changes of reaction time-magnitude.With regard to the behavioral definition and criterion for sleep, the phase morphological characteristics displayed good correlation with behavioral states, such as sleep, wakefulness, and sleep onset. Entropy as an indicator of brain cognitive processes was introduced to test

  17. Nonlinear light behaviors near phase transition in non-parity-time-symmetric complex waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Many classes of non-parity-time (PT) symmetric waveguides with arbitrary gain and loss distributions still possess all-real linear spectrum or exhibit phase transition. In this article, nonlinear light behaviors in these complex waveguides are probed analytically near a phase transition. Using multi-scale perturbation methods, a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived for the light's amplitude evolution. This ODE predicts that the first class of these non-PT-symmetric waveguides support continuous families of solitons and robust amplitude-oscillating solutions both above and below phase transition, in close analogy with PT-symmetric systems. For the other classes of waveguides, the light's intensity always amplifies under the effect of nonlinearity even if the waveguide is below phase transition. These analytical predictions are confirmed by direct computations of the full system.

  18. Nonlinear light behaviors near phase transition in non-parity-time-symmetric complex waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2016-06-15

    Many classes of non-parity-time (PT)-symmetric waveguides with arbitrary gain and loss distributions still possess all-real linear spectrum or exhibit phase transition. In this Letter, nonlinear light behaviors in these complex waveguides are probed analytically near a phase transition. Using multi-scale perturbation methods, a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived for the light's amplitude evolution. This ODE predicts that a single class of these non-PT-symmetric waveguides supports soliton families and amplitude-oscillating solutions both above and below linear phase transition, in close analogy with PT-symmetric systems. For the other classes of waveguides, the light's intensity always amplifies under the effect of nonlinearity, even if the waveguide is below the linear phase transition. These analytical predictions are confirmed by direct computations of the full system. PMID:27304279

  19. Research on Association with Freight Transit Period and Forwarding Time base on Logistics conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHANGFENG. ZHU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The whole process of freight forwarding includes multiple links. The consumption time of every link and its operational efficiency may affect the entire freight forwarding time, which can influence the transit period of freight, as well as the formulation and achievement of the transportation organizations scheme and the transportation contract. In order to analyze the existed problems in present calculation method of railway transit period, and the effects of logistics on forwarding time, on the basis of investigating and literature, Railway freight forwarding process and factor of logistics on railway freight forwarding time were analyzed, and average speed of through train, ordinary through train and high-speed train, and daily average running tariff kilometer and time were analyzed, and statistical results were exained by adopting 2χtesting method, finally, daily average running tariff kilometer and time of logistics developed and under-developed area were comparative analyzed, from which daily average running tariff kilometer and time were obtained. The analytical results show that the average speed, daily average running tariff kilometer and time respectively obeys normal distribution, the maximum difference value between the transit period calculated by present method and the practical forwarding time of freight is four 4.5 days, which show that the method can not objectively responds the freight forwarding time of each kind of freight transport product under logistics condition.

  20. Least Expected Time Paths in Stochastic Schedule-Based Transit Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Khoa Vo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of determining a least expected time (LET path that minimizes the number of transfers and the expected total travel time in a stochastic schedule-based transit network. A time-dependent model is proposed to represent the stochastic transit network where vehicle arrival times are fully stochastically correlated. An exact label-correcting algorithm is developed, based on a proposed dominance condition by which Bellman’s principle of optimality is valid. Experimental results, which are conducted on the Ho Chi Minh City bus network, show that the running time of the proposed algorithm is suitable for real-time operation, and the resulting LET paths are robust against uncertainty, such as unknown traffic scenarios.

  1. Mean transit times in contrasting headwater catchments from southeast Australia determined using Tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Irvine, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    Headwater streams contribute a significant proportion of the total discharge of many river systems. However, despite their importance, the time taken for rainfall to pass through the catchment into the streams (the transit time) in headwater catchments is largely unknown as are the catchment characteristics (such as drainage density, topography, landuse, or geology) that determine variations in transit times. Because the peak in Tritium activities in rainfall produced by atmospheric nuclear tests in the1950's and 1960's (the "bomb-pulse") was several orders of magnitude lower in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere, Tritium activities of remnant bomb pulse water in the southern hemisphere have decayed below those of modern rainfall. This allows mean transit times to be estimated from single Tritium measurements. Here we use Tritium to estimate transit times of water contributing to perennial streams in the adjacent upper catchments of the Yarra and Latrobe Rivers (southeast Australia). Samples were collected at varying flow from six headwater tributary sites in the Latrobe catchment, which is largely forested and four tributaries in the Yarra catchment which has been extensively cleared for dryland agriculture. The lowest Tritium activities were recorded during summer baseflow conditions and are between 1.25 and 1.75 TU, these are significantly below the Tritium activity of local rainfall (~2.8 TU). Mean transit times calculated using an exponential-piston flow lumped parameter model are 21 to 47 years. Tritium activities during the recession periods following winter high flows are higher (1.54 to 2.1 TU), which may reflect either the dilution of a baseflow component with recent surface runoff or mobilisation of different stores of water with different residence times (e.g., from the soils or the regolith) from within the catchment. The variation of major ion concentrations with discharge suggests it is more likely that that different stores of

  2. Thresholds for the slope ratio in determining transition time and quantifying diffuser performance in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    This study is concerned with an objective measure called the slope ratio that can detect acoustic defects due to unexpected pressure increases such as strong reflections and coincidental constructive interference. The slope ratio is the ratio of the instantaneous slope to the mean slope in a decay...... curve. The slope ratio was suggested for determining the room acoustic transition time experimentally, but its threshold criteria have not been thoroughly investigated. The thresholds for the slope ratio, particularly for applications such as determining the room acoustic transition time and quantifying...

  3. Gender Transitions in Later Life: The Significance of Time in Queer Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbre, Vanessa D.

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of time are ubiquitous in studies of aging. This article integrates an existential perspective on time with a notion of queer time based on the experiences of older transgender persons who contemplate or pursue a gender transition in later life. Interviews were conducted with male-to-female identified persons aged 50 years or older (N=22), along with participant observation at three national transgender conferences (N=170 hours). Interpretive analyses suggest that an awareness of “ti...

  4. Transition from winnerless competition to synchronization in time-delayed neuronal motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Li, P. J.; Wu, F. P.; Wu, W. J.; Jiang, M.; Chen, L.; Qi, G. X.; Huang, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of brain functional motifs are studied. It is shown that different rhythms can occur in the motifs when time delay is taken into account. These rhythms include synchronization, winnerless competition (WLC) and "two plus one" (TPO). The main discovery is that the transition from WLC to synchronization can be induced simply by time delay. It is also concluded that some medium time delay is needed to achieve WLC in the realistic case. The motifs composed of heterogeneous neurons are also considered.

  5. QUANTIFYING THE CHALLENGES OF DETECTING UNSEEN PLANETARY COMPANIONS WITH TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both ground- and space-based transit observatories are poised to significantly increase the number of known transiting planets and the number of precisely measured transit times. The variation in a planet's transit times may be used to infer the presence of additional planets. Deducing the masses and orbital parameters of such planets from transit time variations (TTVs) alone is a rich and increasingly relevant dynamical problem. In this work, we evaluate the extent of the degeneracies in this process, systematically explore the dependence of TTV signals on several parameters, and provide phase space plots that could aid observers in planning future observations. Our explorations are focused on a likely-to-be prevalent situation: a known transiting short-period Neptune- or Jupiter-sized planet and a suspected external low-mass perturber on a nearly coplanar orbit. Through ∼107 N-body simulations, we demonstrate how TTV signal amplitudes may vary by orders of magnitude due to slight variations in any one orbital parameter (10-3 AU in a semimajor axis, 0.005 in eccentricity, or a few degrees in orbital angles), and quantify the number of consecutive transit observations necessary in order to obtain a reasonable opportunity of characterizing the unseen planet (∼>50 observations). Planets in or near period commensurabilities of the form p:q, where p ≤ 20 and q ≤ 3, produce distinct TTV signatures, regardless of whether the planets are actually locked in a mean motion resonance. We distinguish these systems from the secular systems in our explorations. Additionally, we find that computing the autocorrelation function of a TTV signal can provide a useful diagnostic for identifying possible orbits for additional planets and suggest that this method could aid integration of TTV signals in future studies of particular exosystems.

  6. Reliability of perfusion MR imaging in symptomatic carotid occlusive disease. Cerebral blood volume, mean transit time and time-to-peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Perfusion MR imaging offers an easy quantitative evaluation of relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT) and time-to-peak (TTP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of these parameters in assessing the hemodynamic disturbance of carotid occlusive disease in comparison with normative data. Material and Methods: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T2*-weighted perfusion MR imaging was performed in 19 patients with symptomatic unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion and 20 control subjects. The three parameters were calculated from the concentration-time curve fitted by gamma-variate function. Lesion-to-contralateral ratios of each parameter were compared between patients and control subjects. Results: Mean±SD of rrCBV, rMTT and TTP ratios of patients were 1.089±0.118, 1.054±0.031 and 1.062±0.039, respectively, and those of control subjects were 1.002±0.045, 1.000±0.006, 1.001±0.006, respectively. The rMTT and TTP ratios of all patients were greater than 2SDs of control data, whereas in only 6 patients (32%), rrCBV ratios were greater than 2SDs of control data. The three parameter ratios of the patients were significantly high compared with those of control subjects, respectively (p<0.01 for rrCBV ratios, p<0.0001 for rMTT ratios, and p<0.0001 for TTP ratios). Conclusion: Our results indicate that rMTT and TTP of patients, in contrast to rrCBV, are distributed in narrow ranges minimally overlapped with control data. The rMTT and TTP could be more reliable parameters than rrCBV in assessing the hemodynamic disturbance in carotid occlusive disease

  7. Time-dependent Mott transition in the periodic Anderson model with nonlocal hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Felix; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Mott transition in a periodic Anderson model with off-site, nearest-neighbor hybridization is studied within the framework of nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Using the two-site dynamical-impurity approximation, we compute the real-time dynamics of the optimal variational parameter and of different observables initiated by sudden quenches of the Hubbard-U and identify the critical interaction. The time-dependent transition is orbital selective, i.e., in the final state, reached in the long-time limit after the quench to the critical interaction, the Mott gap opens in the spectral function of the localized orbitals only. We discuss the dependence of the critical interaction and of the final-state effective temperature on the hybridization strength and point out the various similarities between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium Mott transition. It is shown that these can also be smoothly connected to each other by increasing the duration of a U-ramp from a sudden quench to a quasi-static process. The physics found for the model with off-site hybridization is compared with the dynamical Mott transition in the single-orbital Hubbard model and with the dynamical crossover found for the real-time dynamics of the conventional Anderson lattice with on-site hybridization.

  8. Measurement of planet masses with transit timing variations due to synodic "chopping" effects

    CERN Document Server

    Deck, Katherine M

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic "chopping" contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally <10% error) for modest eccentricities e <~ 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy which can appear for systems near first order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems which had been previously analyzed with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the ma...

  9. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  10. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  11. A Framework for Relating Timed Transition Systems and Preserving TCTL Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lasse; Jacobsen, Morten; Møller, Mikael Harkjær; Srba, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Many formal translations between time dependent models have been proposed over the years. While some of them produce timed bisimilar models, others preserve only reachability or (weak) trace equivalence. We suggest a general framework for arguing when a translation preserves Timed Computation Tree...... Logic (TCTL) or its safety fragment.The framework works at the level of timed transition systems, making it independent of the modeling formalisms and applicable to many of the translations published in the literature. Finally, we present a novel translation from extended Timed-Arc Petri Nets to...

  12. Image Fusion of Preprocedural CTA with Real-time Fluoroscopy to Guide Proper Hepatic Artery Catheterization During Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargellini, Irene, E-mail: irenebargellini@hotmail.com; Turini, Francesca; Bozzi, Elena; Lauretti, Dario; Cicorelli, Antonio; Lunardi, Alessandro; Cioni, Roberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    To assess feasibility of proper hepatic artery catheterization using a 3D model obtained from preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA), fused with real-time fluoroscopy, during transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. Twenty consecutive cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization were prospectively enrolled onto the study. The early arterial phase axial images of the preprocedural CTA were postprocessed on an independent workstation connected to the angiographic system (Innova 4100; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI), obtaining a 3D volume rendering image (VR) that included abdominal aorta, splanchnic arteries, and first and second lumbar vertebrae. The VR image was manually registered to the real-time X-ray fluoroscopy, with the lumbar spine used as the reference. The VR image was then used as guidance to selectively catheterize the proper hepatic artery. The procedure was considered successful when performed with no need for intraarterial contrast injections or angiographic acquisitions. The procedure was successful in 19 (95 %) of 20 patients. In one patient, celiac trunk angiography was required for the presence of a significant ostial stenosis that was underestimated at computed tomography. Time for image reconstruction and registration was <10 min in all cases. The use of preprocedural CTA model with fluoroscopy enables confident and direct catheterization of the proper hepatic artery with no need for preliminary celiac trunk angiography, thus reducing radiation exposure and contrast media administration.

  13. Image Fusion of Preprocedural CTA with Real-time Fluoroscopy to Guide Proper Hepatic Artery Catheterization During Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess feasibility of proper hepatic artery catheterization using a 3D model obtained from preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA), fused with real-time fluoroscopy, during transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. Twenty consecutive cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization were prospectively enrolled onto the study. The early arterial phase axial images of the preprocedural CTA were postprocessed on an independent workstation connected to the angiographic system (Innova 4100; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI), obtaining a 3D volume rendering image (VR) that included abdominal aorta, splanchnic arteries, and first and second lumbar vertebrae. The VR image was manually registered to the real-time X-ray fluoroscopy, with the lumbar spine used as the reference. The VR image was then used as guidance to selectively catheterize the proper hepatic artery. The procedure was considered successful when performed with no need for intraarterial contrast injections or angiographic acquisitions. The procedure was successful in 19 (95 %) of 20 patients. In one patient, celiac trunk angiography was required for the presence of a significant ostial stenosis that was underestimated at computed tomography. Time for image reconstruction and registration was <10 min in all cases. The use of preprocedural CTA model with fluoroscopy enables confident and direct catheterization of the proper hepatic artery with no need for preliminary celiac trunk angiography, thus reducing radiation exposure and contrast media administration.

  14. Aggregation in environmental systems: catchment mean transit times and young water fractions under hydrologic nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Methods for estimating mean transit times from chemical or isotopic tracers (such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ2H) commonly assume that catchments are stationary (i.e. time-invariant) and homogeneous. Real catchments are neither. In a companion paper, I showed that catchment mean transit times estimated from seasonal tracer cycles are highly vulnerable to aggregation error, exhibiting strong bias and large scatter in spatially heterogeneous catchments. I proposed a different measure of transit times, the young water fraction, and showed that it is virtually immune to aggregation error under spatial heterogeneity. Here I extend this analysis by exploring how nonstationarity affects mean transit times and young water fractions estimated from seasonal tracer cycles, using benchmark tests based on a simple two-box model. The model exhibits complex nonstationary behavior, with striking volatility in tracer concentrations, young water fractions, and mean transit times, driven by rapid shifts in the mixing ratios of fluxes from the upper and lower boxes. The transit-time distribution in streamflow becomes increasingly skewed at higher discharges, with marked increases in the young water fraction and decreases in the mean water age, reflecting the increased dominance of the upper box at higher flows. Even this simple two-box model exhibits strong equifinality; hydrograph calibration cannot constrain four of its five parameters. This equifinality problem can be partly resolved by simple parameter transformations. However, transit times are primarily determined by residual storage, which cannot be constrained through hydrograph calibration and must instead be estimated by tracer behavior. Seasonal tracer cycles in the two-box model are very poor predictors of mean transit times, with typical errors of several hundred percent. However, the same tracer cycles predict young water fractions within a few percent, even in model catchments that are both nonstationary and spatially

  15. Long-term transit timing monitoring and homogenous study of WASP-32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report new photometric observations of the transiting exoplanetary system WASP-32 made by using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatories and Ho Koon Nature Education cum Astronomical Centre, China from 2010 to 2012. Following our usual procedure, the observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to the coarse decorrelation and SYSREM algorithms so as to enhance the signal of the transit events. Combined with radial velocity data presented in the literature, our newly observed data and earlier photometric data in the literature are simultaneously analyzed to derive the physical parameters describing the system by employing the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. The derived parameters are consistent with the result published in the original paper about WASP-32b, but the uncertainties of the new parameters are smaller than those in the original paper. Moreover, our modeling result supports a circular orbit for WASP-32b. Through the analysis of all available mid-transit times, we have refined the orbital period of WASP-32b; no evident transit timing variation is found in these transit events. (research papers)

  16. A late-time transition in the equation of state versus Lambda-CDM

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, B A; Silk, J; Ungarelli, C

    2002-01-01

    We study a model of the dark energy which exhibits a rapid change in its equation of state w(z), such as occurs in vacuum metamorphosis. We compare the model predictions with CMB, large scale structure and supernova data and show that a late-time transition is marginally preferred over standard Lambda-CDM.

  17. Quantum processes: probability fluxes, transition probabilities in unit time and vacuum vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition probabilities in unit time and probability fluxes are compared in studying the elementary quantum processes -the decay of a bound state under the action of time-varying and constant electric fields. It is shown that the difference between these quantities may be considerable, and so the use of transition probabilities W instead of probability fluxes Π, in calculating the particle fluxes, may lead to serious errors. The quantity W represents the rate of change with time of the population of the energy levels relating partly to the real states and partly to the virtual ones, and it cannot be directly measured in experiment. The vacuum background is shown to be continuously distorted when a perturbation acts on a system. Because of this the viewpoint of an observer on the physical properties of real particles continuously varies with time. This fact is not taken into consideration in the conventional theory of quantum transitions based on using the notion of probability amplitude. As a result, the probability amplitudes lose their physical meaning. All the physical information on quantum dynamics of a system is contained in the mean values of physical quantities. The existence of considerable differences between the quantities W and Π permits one in principle to make a choice of the correct theory of quantum transitions on the basis of experimental data. (author)

  18. Predicting Coronal Mass Ejections transit times to Earth with neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, D; Dumbović, M

    2015-01-01

    Predicting transit times of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) from their initial parameters is a very important subject, not only from the scientific perspective, but also because CMEs represent a hazard for human technology. We used a neural network to analyse transit times for 153 events with only two input parameters: initial velocity of the CME, $v$, and Central Meridian Distance, CMD, of its associated flare. We found that transit time dependence on $v$ is showing a typical drag-like pattern in the solar wind. The results show that the speed at which acceleration by drag changes to deceleration is $v\\approx$500 km s$^{-1}$. Transit times are also found to be shorter for CMEs associated with flares on the western hemisphere than those originating on the eastern side of the Sun. We attribute this difference to the eastward deflection of CMEs on their path to 1 AU. The average error of the NN prediction in comparison to observations is $\\approx$12 hours which is comparable to other studies on the same subject.

  19. Emotional instability as an indicator of strictly timed infantile developmental transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerth, C.; Van Geert, P. L. C.

    1998-01-01

    There are indications that periods of disorganization/instability/regression accompany developmental transitions in early infancy. The goal of the present study was to validate a pattern of 10 strictly timed periods of emotional instability found through maternal reports by van de Rijt-Plooij & Ploo

  20. The Measurement of Time: Children's Construction of Transitivity, Unit Iteration, and Conservation of Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kathy; Kamii, Constance

    2001-01-01

    Interviews 120 children in kindergarten and grades 2, 4, and 6 with five Piagetian tasks to determine the grade level at which most have constructed transitive reasoning, unit iteration, and conservation of speed. Indicates that construction of the logic necessary to make sense of the measurement of time is generally not complete before sixth…

  1. Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment: Longitudinal Profiles and Transitions over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shari; Williams, Jason; Cutbush, Stacey; Gibbs, Deborah; Clinton-Sherrod, Monique; Jones, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Although there is growing recognition of the problem of dating violence, little is known about how it unfolds among young adolescents who are just beginning to date. This study examined classes (subgroups) and transitions between classes over three time points based on dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment perpetration and victimization…

  2. The distinction between obstructive uropathy and nephropathy by radioisotope transit times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconvolution analysis of different regions of interest on gamma camera renography enables obstructive lesions causing impairment of nephron function to be distinguished from obstructive lesions in which parenchymal function is unimpaired. Quantitation of isotope transit time through the parenchyma is a reliable method of diagnosing upper urinary tract obstruction. (author)

  3. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. IX. Catalog of the Full Long-Cadence Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Holczer, Tomer; Nachmani, Gil; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B; Fabrycky, Daniel; Ragozzine, Darin; Kane, Mackenzie; Steffen, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    We present a new transit timing catalog of 2599 Kepler Objects of Interest (=KOIs), using the PDC-MAP long-cadence light curves that include the full seventeen quarters of the mission (ftp://wise- ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV/ver_112). The goal is to produce an easy-to-use catalog that can stimulate further analyses of interesting systems. For 779 KOIs with high enough SNRs, we derived the timing, duration and depth of 69,914 transits. For 1820 KOIs with lower SNR, we derived only the timing of 225,273 transits. After removal of outlier timings, we derived various statistics for each KOI that were used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have detected 260 KOIs which showed significant TTVs with long-term variations (>100 day), and another fourteen KOIs with periodic modulations shorter than 100 day and small amplitudes. For five of those, the periodicity is probably due to the crossing of rotating stellar spots by the transiting planets.

  4. Estimating and Testing Continuous-Time Models in Finance: The Role of Transition Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Yacine Aït-Sahalia

    2009-01-01

    This article surveys recent developments to estimate and test continuous-time models in finance using discrete observations on the underlying asset price or derivative securities' prices. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are described. All these methods share a common focus on the transition density as the central object for inference and testing of the model.

  5. The nature of the long time decay at a second order transition point

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Moshe; Edwards, S.F.

    2000-01-01

    We show that at a second order phase transition, of \\phi^4 like system, a necessary condition for streched exponential decay of the time structure factor is obeyed. Using the ideas presented in this proof a crude estimate of the decay of the structure factor is obtained and shown to yield stretched exponential decay under very reasonable conditions.

  6. FDTD based transition time dependent crosstalk analysis for coupled RLC interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of high density chips operating in the GHz range is mostly affected by on-chip interconnects. The interconnect delay depends on many factors, a few of them are inputs toggling patterns, line and coupling parasitics, input rise/fall time and source/load characteristics. The transition time of the input is of prime importance in high speed circuits. This paper addresses the FDTD based analysis of transition time effects on functional and dynamic crosstalk. The analysis is carried out for equal and unequal transition times of coupled inputs. The analysis of the effects of unequal rise time is equally important because practically, it is quite common to have mismatching in the rise time of the signals transmitting through different length wires. To demonstrate the effects, two distributed RLC lines coupled inductively and capacitively are taken into consideration. The FDTD technique is used because it gives accurate results and carries time domain analysis of coupled lines. The number of lumps in SPICE simulations is considered the same as those of spatial segments. To validate the FDTD computed results, SPICE simulations are run and results are compared. A good agreement of the computed results has been observed with respect to SPICE simulated results. An average error of less than 3.2% is observed in the computation of the performance parameters using the proposed method. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  7. Synchronization transitions in coupled time-delay electronic circuits with a threshold nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K.; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Murali, K.; Lakshmanan, M.; Kurths, J.

    2011-06-01

    Experimental observations of typical kinds of synchronization transitions are reported in unidirectionally coupled time-delay electronic circuits with a threshold nonlinearity and two time delays, namely feedback delay τ1 and coupling delay τ2. We have observed transitions from anticipatory to lag via complete synchronization and their inverse counterparts with excitatory and inhibitory couplings, respectively, as a function of the coupling delay τ2. The anticipating and lag times depend on the difference between the feedback and the coupling delays. A single stability condition for all the different types of synchronization is found to be valid as the stability condition is independent of both the delays. Further, the existence of different kinds of synchronizations observed experimentally is corroborated by numerical simulations and from the changes in the Lyapunov exponents of the coupled time-delay systems.

  8. Controlling the transition between Turing and antispiral patterns by using time-delayed-feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ya-Feng; Liu Fu-Cheng; Fan Wei-Li; Dong Li-Fang

    2012-01-01

    The controllable transition between Turing and antispiral patterns is studied by using a time-delayed-feedback strategy in a FitzHugh-Nagumo model.We treat the time delay as a perturbation and analyse the effect of the time delay on the Turing and Hopf instabilities near the Turing-Hopf codimension-two phase space.Numerical simulations show that the transition between the Turing patterns (hexagon,stripe,and honeycomb),the dual-mode antispiral,and the antispiral by applying appropriate feedback parameters.The dual-mode antispiral pattern originates from the competition between the Turing and Hopf instabilities.Our results have shown the flexibility of the time delay on controlling the pattern formations near the Turing-Hopf codimension-two phase space.

  9. Establishment of a protocol for determining gastrointestinal transit time in mice using barium and radiopaque markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myagmarjaibuu, Bilomaa; Moon, Myeong Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Seo In; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Seong [Dept. of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Dept. of Physiology, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish a minimally invasive and reproducible protocol for estimating the gastrointestinal (GI) transit time in mice using barium and radiopaque markers. Twenty 5- to 6-week-old Balb/C female mice weighing 19-21 g were used. The animals were divided into three groups: two groups that received loperamide and a control group. The control group (n = 10) animals were administered physiological saline (1.5 mL/kg) orally. The loperamide group I (n = 10) and group II (n = 10) animals were administered 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg loperamide orally, respectively. Thirty minutes after receiving the saline or loperamide, the mice was administered 80 μL of barium solution and six iron balls (0.5 mm) via the mouth and the upper esophagus by gavage, respectively. Afterwards, the mice were continuously monitored with fluoroscopic imaging in order to evaluate the swallowing of the barium solution and markers. Serial fluoroscopic images were obtained at 5- or 10-min intervals until all markers had been excreted from the anal canal. For analysis, the GI transit times were subdivided into intestinal transit times (ITTs) and colon transit times (CTTs). The mean ITT was significantly longer in the loperamide groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean ITT in loperamide group II (174.5 ± 32.3) was significantly longer than in loperamide group I (133.2 ± 24.2 minute) (p < 0.05). The mean CTT was significantly longer in loperamide group II than in the control group (p < 0.05). Also, no animal succumbed to death after the experimental procedure. The protocol for our study using radiopaque markers and barium is reproducible and minimally invasive in determining the GI transit time of the mouse model.

  10. Flow-rate measurement using radioactive tracers and transit time method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transit time method is a flow measurement method based on tracer techniques. Measurement is done by injecting to the flow a pulse of tracer and measuring its transit time between two detection positions. From the transit time the mean flow velosity and - using the pipe cross section area - the volume flow rate can be calculated. When a radioisotope tracer is used the measurement can be done from outside the pipe and without disturbing the process (excluding the tracer injection). The use of the transit time method has been limited because of difficulties associated with handling and availability of radioactive tracers and lack of equipment suitable for routine use in industrial environments. The purpose of this study was to find out if these difficulties may be overcome by using a portable isotope generator as a tracer source and automating the measurement. In the study a test rig and measuring equipment based on the use of a ''1''3''7Cs/''1''3''7''''mBa isotope generator were constructed. They were used to study the accuracy and error sources of the method and to compare different algorithms to calculate the transit time. The usability of the method and the equipment in industrial environments were studied by carrying out over 20 flow measurements in paper and pulp mills. On the basis of the results of the study, a project for constructing a compact radiatracer flowmeter for industrial use has been started. The application range of this kind of meter is very large. The most obvious applications are in situ calibration of flowmeters, material and energy balance studies, process equipment analyses (e.g. pump efficiency analyses). At the moment tracer techniques are the only methods applicable to these measurements on-line and with sufficient accuracy

  11. Amplification of Quantum Meson Modes in the Late Time of the Chiral Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, K

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the quantum meson modes in the late time of chiral phase transition. In particular, it is shown that there exists a possible solution to the equation of motion for the quantum meson modes, which reveals a parametric resonance and/or resonance through forced oscillation induced by the small oscillation of the chiral condensate. After that, we demonstrate the unstable regions for the quantum meson modes in both the cases of a uniform and spatially expanding system.

  12. Transit Time and Charge Correlations of Single Photoelectron Events in R7081 PMTs

    OpenAIRE

    Kaether, F.; Langbrandtner, C.

    2012-01-01

    During the calibration phase of the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for the Double Chooz experiment the PMT response to light with single photoelectron (SPE) intensity was analysed. With our setup we were able to measure the combined transit time and charge response of the PMT and therefore we could deconstruct and analyse all physical effects having an influence on the PMT signal. Based on this analysis charge and time correlated probability density functions were developed to include the PMT re...

  13. Robust Blind Frequency and Transition Time Estimation for Frequency Hopping Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo-Ching Fu; Yung-Fang Chen

    2010-01-01

    In frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) systems, two major problems are timing synchronization and frequency estimation. A blind estimation scheme is presented for estimating frequency and transition time without using reference signals. The scheme is robust in the sense that it can avoid the unbalanced sampling block problem that occurs in existing maximum likelihood-based schemes, which causes large errors in one of the estimates of frequency. The proposed scheme has a lower computatio...

  14. A data mining approach for trip time prediction in mass transit companies

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, João M., 1964-; Alípio Jorge; Jorge Freire Sousa; Carlos Soares

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how trip time prediction can beuseful for operational optimization in mass transit companies and howdata mining techniques can be used to improve results. Firstly, we an-alyze which departments need trip time prediction and when. Secondly,we review related work and thirdly we present the analysis of trip timeover a particular path. We proceed by presenting experimental resultsconducted on real data with the forecasting techniques we found mostadequate, and conclude by...

  15. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  16. Renogram evaluation using an equation of balance for clearance and transit time determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of [123I]hippuran (OIH) renogram evaluation is proposed, which delivers transition rates for total and split renal clearance. It is based on the reconstruction of the true kidney input, using an equation of balance and a two-compartment model assumption of OIH kinetics. Results are compared with clearance determinations using whole body principles and transit time determination by deconvolution. It is shown that the reconstructed true input corresponds to the plasma activity while the vascular volume of distribution corresponds to the blood

  17. Graft patency in off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass grafting for treatment of triple vessel coronary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡盛寿; 王小启; 宋云虎; 吕锋

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare graft patency in off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass grafting by using the transit time flow meter in the treatment of triple vessel coronary artery disease. Methods Between June 2000 and April 2001, 60 patients with triple vessel coronary artery disease underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. They were divided into two groups: off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass. All completed grafts were tested intraoperatively using Transit Time Flow Measurement (TTFM). Preoperative and postoperative variables of the two groups were also compared. Results There were no significant differences in sex, age, weight, acute or remote myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes and type of bypass grafts between the two groups. The number of bypass grafts and the assisted respiratory time of the off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) group were significantly less than those of the conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCABG) group. The flow and pulsatile index (PI) of the left anterior descending artery bypass grafts and the right coronary artery bypass grafts were not significantly different between the OPCAB and CCABG groups. The flow of OM in the CCABG group with the multiple anastomosis site of sequential grafts was higher than that in the OPCAB group. Diffused narrow coronary artery bypass grafts in both groups had less flow.Conclusion No signficant differences in graft patency were observed in patients with triple vessel coronary artery disease who had undergone OPCAB or CCABG.

  18. Measurement of renal parenchymal transit time of 99mTc-MAG3 using factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal parenchymal transit time of the recently introduced radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MAG3 (mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycinel) was measured in 37 kidneys, using factor analysis to separate parenchymal activity from that in the collecting system. A new factor algorithm was employed, based on prior interpolative background subtraction and use of the fact that the initial slope of the collecting system factor time-activity curve must be zero. The only operator intervention required was selection of a rectangular region enclosing the kidney (by identifying two points at opposite corners). Transit time was calculated from the factor time-activity curves both by deconvolution of the parenchymal factor curve and also by measuring the appearance time for collecting system activity from the collecting system factor curve. There was substantial agreement between the two methods. Factor analysis led to a narrower range of normal values than a conventional cortical region-of-interest method, presumably by decreasing crosstalk from the collecting system. In preliminary trials, the parenchymal transit time did not well separate four obstructed from seventeen unobstructed kidneys, but it successfully (p < 0.05) separated six transplanted kidneys with acute rejection or acute tubular necrosis from 10 normal transplants. (orig.)

  19. Nanosecond-scale timing jitter in transition edge sensors at telecom and visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Lamas-Linares, Antia; Tomlin, Nathan A; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E; Beyer, Joern; Mirin, Richard P; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-01-01

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have the highest reported efficiencies (>98%) for detection of single photons in the visible and near infrared. Experiments in quantum information and foundations of physics that rely critically on this efficiency have started incorporating these detectors into con- ventional quantum optics setups. However, their range of applicability has been hindered by slow operation both in recovery time and timing jitter. We show here how a conventional tungsten-TES can be operated with jitter times of < 4 ns, well within the timing resolution necessary for MHz clocking of experiments, and providing an important practical simplification for experiments that rely on the simultaneous closing of both efficiency and locality loopholes.

  20. Radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fibers on rat colonic transit time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of different fiber sources on colonic transit time was charted using serial radiographs. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 10 rats per group, were provided with either a fiber-free control diet or the control diet uniformly diluted to provide 8% dietary fiber from guar, pectin, cellulose, wheat bran, or oat bran. At surgery, radiopaque markers were inserted at defined distances in the mesentary closest to the large bowel. Three weeks postsurgery, the animals were intubated with 0.5 ml of a radiopaque marker, and radiographs were taken at 15-min intervals. Of the two poorly fermented fibers, cellulose was as slow as and wheat bran was faster than the fiber-free controls at five out of the six bowel segments measured. The fermentable fibers (pectin, guar, and oat bran) were fast through some bowel segments and slow through others. This study provides in vivo data on colonic transit time and shows that neither 24-h fecal weight nor total transit time is a good predictor of the rate of transit through particular gut segments

  1. Measurement of Planet Masses with Transit Timing Variations Due to Synodic “Chopping” Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic “chopping” contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally \\lt 10% error) for modest eccentricities e≲ 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy, which can appear for systems near first-order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems, which had been previously modeled with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the masses of both planets can be determined uniquely, in agreement with previous results, but without the need for numerical orbit integrations. This demonstrates how mass measurements from TTVs may primarily arise from an observable chopping signal. The formula for chopping can also be used to predict the number of transits and timing precision required for future observations, such as those made by TESS or PLATO, in order to infer planetary masses through analysis of TTVs.

  2. Simulation of Electron Cloud Density Distributions in RHIC Dipoles at Injection and Transition and Estimates for Scrubbing Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He,P.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2009-01-02

    In this report we summarize electron-cloud simulations for the RHIC dipole regions at injection and transition to estimate if scrubbing over practical time scales at injection would reduce the electron cloud density at transition to significantly lower values. The lower electron cloud density at transition will allow for an increase in the ion intensity.

  3. Universal space-time scaling symmetry in the dynamics of bosons across a quantum phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Logan W; Chin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of many-body systems spanning condensed matter, cosmology, and beyond is hypothesized to be universal when the systems cross continuous phase transitions. The universal dynamics is expected to satisfy a scaling symmetry of space and time with the crossing rate, inspired by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. We test this symmetry based on Bose condensates in a shaken optical lattice. Shaking the lattice drives condensates across an effectively ferromagnetic quantum phase transition. After crossing the critical point, the condensates manifest delayed growth of spin fluctuations and develop anti-ferromagnetic spatial correlations resulting from sub-Poisson generation of topological defects. The characteristic times and lengths scale as power-laws of the crossing rate, yielding the temporal exponent 0.50(2) and the spatial exponent 0.26(2), consistent with theory. Furthermore, the fluctuations and correlations are invariant in scaled space-time coordinates, in support of the scaling symmetry of quantum crit...

  4. Transition times and stochastic resonance for multidimensional diffusions with time periodic drift: A large deviations approach

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Samuel; Imkeller, Peter; Peithmann, Dierk

    2006-01-01

    We consider potential type dynamical systems in finite dimensions with two meta-stable states. They are subject to two sources of perturbation: a slow external periodic perturbation of period $T$ and a small Gaussian random perturbation of intensity $\\epsilon$, and, therefore, are mathematically described as weakly time inhomogeneous diffusion processes. A system is in stochastic resonance, provided the small noisy perturbation is tuned in such a way that its random trajectories follow the ex...

  5. Arterial stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the main arteries in the forearm (radial and ulnar arteries). The procedure is done as follows: The ... Arteries also have thicker walls and have more nerves. When the needle is inserted, there may be ...

  6. Accelerating the transit time of barium sulphate suspensions in small bowel examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether hyperosmolar and effervescent agents proven individually to accelerate transit time in the barium small bowel examination have an additive effect when combined, surpassing that of either agent alone. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-nine patients were randomised to four groups. Three hundred milliliters of barium sulphate alone was given to the first group. Fifteen milliliters of iodinated hyperosmolar contrast agent (Gastrografin, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, Schering) was given in addition to barium sulphate to the second group while six packets of effervescent granules (Carbex, Ferring) were added for the third group. The final group was given a combination of both additives and barium sulphate. The time taken following ingestion for the contrast column to reach the caecum, as assessed by frequent interval fluoroscopy, was recorded. A subgroup of 32 patients were selected randomly from the four groups, 8 from each and assessed for quality of examination. Statistical assessments were made using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: One hundred and nineteen patients were analysed after exclusions. The addition of accelerant to barium sulphate, both individually and in combination significantly reduced the small bowel transit time (p < 0.001). No significant difference existed between the additives when used with barium alone. The combined group had significantly faster transit times compared to the hyperosmolar group (p = 0.02). Differences between combined and effervescent groups tended towards significance (p = 0.09). No significant difference existed between groups when examination quality was assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the addition of combined effervescent and hyperosmolar agents to the barium suspension may significantly shorten the small bowel transit time without adversely affecting examination quality. This has implications for patient acceptability of the examination as well as

  7. Quantifying [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Bashyam, Arjun; Ramachandran, Abhinay; Gholami, Saeid; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Werner, Tom; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV{sub MAX}) and cSUV{sub MEAN}. The PVE-corrected SUV{sub MEAN} (pvcSUV{sub MEAN}) was also calculated using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  8. Quantifying [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after 18F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of 18F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUVMAX) and cSUVMEAN. The PVE-corrected SUVMEAN (pvcSUVMEAN) was also calculated using 18F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUVMEAN was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUVMAX (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUVMEAN (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUVMEAN was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUVMAX (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUVMEAN (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  9. Transition from lognormal to χ2-superstatistics for financial time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Beck, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Share price returns on different time scales can be well modelled by a superstatistical dynamics. Here we provide an investigation which type of superstatistics is most suitable to properly describe share price dynamics on various time scales. It is shown that while χ2-superstatistics works well on a time scale of days, on a much smaller time scale of minutes the price changes are better described by lognormal superstatistics. The system dynamics thus exhibits a transition from lognormal to χ2 superstatistics as a function of time scale. We discuss a more general model interpolating between both statistics which fits the observed data very well. We also present results on correlation functions of the extracted superstatistical volatility parameter, which exhibits exponential decay for returns on large time scales, whereas for returns on small time scales there are long-range correlations and power-law decay.

  10. The mass of the Mars-sized exoplanet Kepler-138 b from transit timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F; Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B

    2015-06-18

    Extrasolar planets that pass in front of their host star (transit) cause a temporary decrease in the apparent brightness of the star, providing a direct measure of the planet's size and orbital period. In some systems with multiple transiting planets, the times of the transits are measurably affected by the gravitational interactions between neighbouring planets. In favourable cases, the departures from Keplerian orbits (that is, unaffected by gravitational effects) implied by the observed transit times permit the planetary masses to be measured, which is key to determining their bulk densities. Characterizing rocky planets is particularly difficult, because they are generally smaller and less massive than gaseous planets. Therefore, few exoplanets near the size of Earth have had their masses measured. Here we report the sizes and masses of three planets orbiting Kepler-138, a star much fainter and cooler than the Sun. We determine that the mass of the Mars-sized inner planet, Kepler-138 b, is 0.066(+0.059)(-0.037) Earth masses. Its density is 2.6(+2.4)(-1.5) grams per cubic centimetre. The middle and outer planets are both slightly larger than Earth. The middle planet's density (6.2(+5.8)(-3.4) grams per cubic centimetre) is similar to that of Earth, and the outer planet is less than half as dense at 2.1(+2.2)(-1.2) grams per cubic centimetre, implying that it contains a greater portion of low-density components such as water and hydrogen. PMID:26085271

  11. Observation of parity-time symmetry breaking transitions in a dissipative Floquet system of ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiaming; Liu, Ji; de Melo, Leonardo; Joglekar, Yogesh N; Luo, Le

    2016-01-01

    Open physical systems with balanced loss and gain exhibit a transition, absent in their solitary counterparts, which engenders modes that exponentially decay or grow with time and thus spontaneously breaks the parity-time PT symmetry. This PT-symmetry breaking is induced by modulating the strength or the temporal profile of the loss and gain, but also occurs in a pure dissipative system without gain. It has been observed that, in classical systems with mechanical, electrical, and electromagnetic setups with static loss and gain, the PT-symmetry breaking transition leads to extraordinary behavior and functionalities. However, its observation in a quantum system is yet to be realized. Here we report on the first quantum simulation of PT-symmetry breaking transitions using ultracold Li-6 atoms. We simulate static and Floquet dissipative Hamiltonians by generating state-dependent atom loss in a noninteracting Fermi gas, and observe the PT-symmetry breaking transitions by tracking the atom number for each state. W...

  12. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation

  13. The 9 May 2016 Mercury transit – a timely opportunity for outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothery, David; Benkhoff, Johannes; Zender, Joe; Gill, Ranpal

    2015-04-01

    People across most of the globe will have a chance to witness Mercury's next solar transit, 11:12-18:42 UT, Monday 9 May 2016. Occurring a year after the end of the MESSENGER mission and a few months before the launch of BepiColombo, this transit (the first since 2006) will be an ideal occasion to draw the public's attention to the science goals of those missions, to showcase what we have recently learned about Mercury, and to draw attention to the conundrums that make Mercury such a fascinating object to study. The 2004 and 2012 transits of Venus were accompanied by major outreach events, and stimulated day-long media interest. The 2016 Mercury transit offers a similar opportunity, which the Mercury science community should seize upon. It is especially timely as an occasion to showcase the science achieved by MESSENGER and planned for BepiColombo. As a bonus, outreach infrastructure and momentum should still be fresh enough to re-use for the next transit, on 11 Nov 2019 (after that there will be a 13-year gap until 2032). Inexpensive solar projectors adequate to show the transit are readily available, and a recent upsurge of amateurs posting H-alpha and Ca-K solar images via social media shows that the amateur astronomy community is well-equipped to observe the Sun. Provisional plans for Mercury transit day 2016 are to webstream images for the benefit of those in darkness or afflicted by cloud, taking images from satellites such as PROBA-2 and SOHO as well as ground-based observatories. We will also webstream interviews and features about Mercury itself, to show what a fascinating world BepiColombo will be visiting. We would like to encourage observatories and astronomical societies to invite the public to view the transit using their facilities, and hope to be able to provide an on-line searchable list of transit events so members of the public can find one nearby.

  14. Incremental value of live/real time three-dimensional over two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the evaluation of right coronary artery fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jaymala; Puri, Hari Prakash; Hsiung, Ming C; Misra, Stuti; Khairnar, Prakash; Laxmi Gollamudi, Bhargavi; Patel, Adilahmed; Nanda, Navin C; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wei, Jeng; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Sudhakar, Selvin

    2011-08-01

    We report an adult with a right coronary artery to right atrial fistula in whom live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography with its ability to trace the entire course and obtain en face views of the fistula connections, was able to provide significant incremental information over two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:21752093

  15. Robust Blind Frequency and Transition Time Estimation for Frequency Hopping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Kuo-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS systems, two major problems are timing synchronization and frequency estimation. A blind estimation scheme is presented for estimating frequency and transition time without using reference signals. The scheme is robust in the sense that it can avoid the unbalanced sampling block problem that occurs in existing maximum likelihood-based schemes, which causes large errors in one of the estimates of frequency. The proposed scheme has a lower computational cost than the maximum likelihood-based greedy search method. The estimated parameters are also used for the subsequent time and frequency tracking. The simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  16. Robust Blind Frequency and Transition Time Estimation for Frequency Hopping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Yung-Fang

    2010-12-01

    In frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) systems, two major problems are timing synchronization and frequency estimation. A blind estimation scheme is presented for estimating frequency and transition time without using reference signals. The scheme is robust in the sense that it can avoid the unbalanced sampling block problem that occurs in existing maximum likelihood-based schemes, which causes large errors in one of the estimates of frequency. The proposed scheme has a lower computational cost than the maximum likelihood-based greedy search method. The estimated parameters are also used for the subsequent time and frequency tracking. The simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  17. Markov transition probability-based network from time series for characterizing experimental two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhong-Ke; Hu Li-Dan; Jin Ning-De

    2013-01-01

    We generate a directed weighted complex network by a method based on Markov transition probability to represent an experimental two-phase flow.We first systematically carry out gas-liquid two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals.Then we construct directed weighted complex networks from various time series in terms of a network generation method based on Markov transition probability.We find that the generated network inherits the main features of the time series in the network structure.In particular,the networks from time series with different dynamics exhibit distinct topological properties.Finally,we construct two-phase flow directed weighted networks from experimental signals and associate the dynamic behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flow with the topological statistics of the generated networks.The results suggest that the topological statistics of two-phase flow networks allow quantitative characterization of the dynamic flow behavior in the transitions among different gas-liquid flow patterns.

  18. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Bryson, Steve; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Bohr Inst. /Copenhagen U.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  19. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/97/40009], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates.

  20. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  1. Markov transition probability-based network from time series for characterizing experimental two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We generate a directed weighted complex network by a method based on Markov transition probability to represent an experimental two-phase flow. We first systematically carry out gas—liquid two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals. Then we construct directed weighted complex networks from various time series in terms of a network generation method based on Markov transition probability. We find that the generated network inherits the main features of the time series in the network structure. In particular, the networks from time series with different dynamics exhibit distinct topological properties. Finally, we construct two-phase flow directed weighted networks from experimental signals and associate the dynamic behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flow with the topological statistics of the generated networks. The results suggest that the topological statistics of two-phase flow networks allow quantitative characterization of the dynamic flow behavior in the transitions among different gas—liquid flow patterns. (general)

  2. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  3. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor

  4. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttafava, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.buttafava@polimi.it; Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dalla Mora, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor.

  5. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and...... cirrhosis. The relation between PBV and PTT and the low diffusing capacity suggests the pulmonary vascular compartment as an important element in the pathophysiology of the lung dysfunction in cirrhosis....

  6. Lagrangian Descriptors of Thermalized Transition States on Time-Varying Energy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-10-01

    Thermalized chemical reactions driven under dynamical load are characteristic of activated dynamics for arbitrary nonautonomous systems. Recent generalizations of transition state theory to obtain formally exact rates have required the construction of a time-dependent transition state trajectory. Here, we show that Lagrangian descriptors can be used to obtain this structure directly. By developing a phase space separatrix that is void of recrossings, these constructs allow for the principal criterion in the implementation of modern rate theories to be satisfied. Thus, the reactive flux over a time-varying barrier can be determined without ambiguity in chemical reactions. The generality of the formalism suggests that this approach is applicable to any activated system subjected to arbitrary driving and thermal fluctuations.

  7. The Possible Orbital Decay and Transit Timing Variations of the Planet WASP-43b

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Ing-Guey; Savushkin, Alexander; Mkrtichian, David; Antonyuk, Kirill; Griv, Evgeny; Hsieh, He-Feng; Yeh, Li-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the previously reported high orbital decay rate of the planet WASP-43b, eight newly transit light curves are obtained and presented. Together with other data in literature, we perform a self-consistent timing analysis with data covering a timescale of 1849 epochs. The results give an orbital decay rate dP/dt = -0.02890795\\pm 0.00772547 sec/year, which is one order smaller than previous values. This slow decay rate corresponds to a normally assumed theoretical value of stellar tidal dissipation factor. In addition, through the frequency analysis, the transit timing variations presented here are unlikely to be periodic, but could be signals of a slow orbital decay.

  8. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... cirrhosis. The relation between PBV and PTT and the low diffusing capacity suggests the pulmonary vascular compartment as an important element in the pathophysiology of the lung dysfunction in cirrhosis....... not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and...

  9. Lagrangian Descriptors of Thermalized Transition States on Time-Varying Energy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-10-01

    Thermalized chemical reactions driven under dynamical load are characteristic of activated dynamics for arbitrary nonautonomous systems. Recent generalizations of transition state theory to obtain formally exact rates have required the construction of a time-dependent transition state trajectory. Here, we show that Lagrangian descriptors can be used to obtain this structure directly. By developing a phase space separatrix that is void of recrossings, these constructs allow for the principal criterion in the implementation of modern rate theories to be satisfied. Thus, the reactive flux over a time-varying barrier can be determined without ambiguity in chemical reactions. The generality of the formalism suggests that this approach is applicable to any activated system subjected to arbitrary driving and thermal fluctuations. PMID:26551825

  10. Realization of a multipath ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on transit-time technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Weihua; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    A microcomputer-based ultrasonic gas flowmeter with transit-time method is presented. Modules of the flowmeter are designed systematically, including the acoustic path arrangement, ultrasound emission and reception module, transit-time measurement module, the software and so on. Four 200 kHz transducers forming two acoustic paths are used to send and receive ultrasound simultaneously. The synchronization of the transducers can eliminate the influence caused by the inherent switch time in simple chord flowmeter. The distribution of the acoustic paths on the mechanical apparatus follows the Tailored integration, which could reduce the inherent error by 2-3% compared with the Gaussian integration commonly used in the ultrasonic flowmeter now. This work also develops timing modules to determine the flight time of the acoustic signal. The timing mechanism is different from the traditional method. The timing circuit here adopts high capability chip TDC-GP2, with the typical resolution of 50 ps. The software of Labview is used to receive data from the circuit and calculate the gas flow value. Finally, the two paths flowmeter has been calibrated and validated on the test facilities for air flow in Shaanxi Institute of Measurement & Testing. PMID:23809902

  11. Does the Timing of Transition Matter? Comparison of German Students' Self-Perceptions before and after Transition to Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Craven, Rhonda G.; Watermann, Rainer; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    The often observed decline in students' self-perceptions across transition to secondary school after grade 6 is often attributed to students' entry to puberty. This study aims to examine whether lowered self-perceptions can be observed after transition in Germany which occurs after grade 4 and thus takes place before puberty. Fifth graders (N =…

  12. Measuring space-time variation of the fundamental constants with redshifted submillimetre transitions of neutral carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, S. J.; Tanna, A.; Koch, F. E.; Berengut, J. C.; Webb, J K; Stark, A. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    We compare the redshifts of neutral carbon and carbon monoxide in the redshifted sources in which the fine structure transition of neutral carbon, [CI], has been detected, in order to measure space-time variation of the fundamental constants. Comparison with the CO rotational lines measures gives the same combination of constants obtained from the comparison fine structure line of singly ionised carbon, [CII]. However, neutral carbon has the distinct advantage that it may be spatially coincid...

  13. Efficient Transition Probability Computation for Continuous-Time Branching Processes via Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jason; Minin, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    Branching processes are a class of continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) with ubiquitous applications. A general difficulty in statistical inference under partially observed CTMC models arises in computing transition probabilities when the discrete state space is large or uncountable. Classical methods such as matrix exponentiation are infeasible for large or countably infinite state spaces, and sampling-based alternatives are computationally intensive, requiring integration over all possible...

  14. Stability and Stabilization of Continuous-Time Markovian Jump Singular Systems with Partly Known Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of the stability and stabilization of continuous-time Markovian jump singular systems with partial information on transition probabilities. A new stability criterion which is necessary and sufficient is obtained for these systems. Furthermore, sufficient conditions for the state feedback controller design are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  15. Stability and Stabilization of Continuous-Time Markovian Jump Singular Systems with Partly Known Transition Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumei Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of the stability and stabilization of continuous-time Markovian jump singular systems with partial information on transition probabilities. A new stability criterion which is necessary and sufficient is obtained for these systems. Furthermore, sufficient conditions for the state feedback controller design are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. Transit time of a freely-falling quantum particle in a background gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, P.C.W.

    2004-01-01

    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a non-relativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case that the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical...

  17. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  18. Time-Averaged Behaviour at the Critical Parameter Point of Transition to Spatiotemporal Chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺凯芬

    2001-01-01

    A time-averaged behaviour is found to be important for investigating the critical behaviour in parameter space for the transition from temporal chaos to spatiotemporal chaos by using an energy representation. Considering any wave solution as a superposition of the steady wave with its perturbation wave, we find that when approaching the critical parameter point the averaged positive interaction energy for the k = 1 mode becomes competitive with the negative one, with the summation displaying a scaling behaviour of power law.

  19. Numerical study of long-time dynamics and ergodic-nonergodic transitions in dense simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, David D.

    2015-08-01

    Since the mid-1980s, mode-coupling theory (MCT) has been the de facto theoretic description of dense fluids and the transition from the fluid state to the glassy state. MCT, however, is limited by the approximations used in its construction and lacks an unambiguous mechanism to institute corrections. We use recent results from a new theoretical framework—developed from first principles via a self-consistent perturbation expansion in terms of an effective two-body potential—to numerically explore the kinetics of systems of classical particles, specifically hard spheres governed by Smoluchowski dynamics. We present here a full solution for such a system to the kinetic equation governing the density-density time correlation function and show that the function exhibits the characteristic two-step decay of supercooled fluids and an ergodic-nonergodic transition to a dynamically arrested state. Unlike many previous numerical studies—and in stark contrast to experiment—we have access to the full time and wave-number range of the correlation function with great precision and are able to track the solution unprecedentedly close to the transition, covering nearly 15 decades in scaled time. Using asymptotic approximation techniques analogous to those developed for MCT, we fit the solution to predicted forms and extract critical parameters. We find complete qualitative agreement with known glassy behavior (e.g. power-law divergence of the α -relaxation time scale in the ergodic phase and square-root growth of the glass form factors in the nonergodic phase), as well as some limited quantitative agreement [e.g. the transition at packing fraction η*=0.60149761 (10 ) ] , consistent with previous static solutions under this theory and with comparable colloidal suspension experiments. However, most importantly, we establish that this new theory is able to reproduce the salient features seen in other theories, experiments, and simulations but has the advantages of being

  20. Deterministic models of groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective-dispersive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cornaton, Fabien; Perrochet, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation consisted in the elaboration of a methodology to determine reservoir groundwater age, life expectancy, and transit time probability distributions in a deterministic manner, considering advective-dispersive transport in steady velocity fields. In the first section, it is shown that by modelling the statistical distribution of groundwater age at aquifer scale by means of the classical advection-dispersion equation (ADE) for a conservative and non-reactive...

  1. Drainage structures and transit-time distributions in conduit-dominated and fissured karst aquifer systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lauber, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Karst aquifers are important groundwater resources. Solutionally-enlarged conduits embedded in a fissured rock matrix result in a highly heterogeneous underground drainage pattern that makes karst aquifers difficult to characterize. This thesis emphasizes the identification of drainage structures and the quantification of related transit-time distributions of diverse karst aquifer systems. Applied methods include artificial tracer tests, natural tracer analysis, and discharge analysis.

  2. Pulse transit time as a measure of respiratory effort under noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Contal, Olivier; Carnevale, Claudio; Borel, Jean-Christian; Sabil, AbdelKébir; Tamisier, Renaud; Lévy, Patrick; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Among the respiratory events that may occur during nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV), differentiating between central and obstructive events requires appropriate indicators of respiratory effort. The aim of the present study was to assess pulse transit time (PTT) as an indicator of respiratory effort under NIV in comparison with oesophageal pressure (P(oes)). During wakefulness, PTT was compared to P(oes) during spontaneous breathing and under NIV with or without induced leaks in 11 hea...

  3. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs (Manga, 1999) has shown groundwater responds on shorter time scales than the MTT, but of interest the results presented here indicate that relatively stable and old springs with long MTTs (> 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While not fully representative of the UCRB, results from the 19 springs indicate that groundwater discharge responds to climate variation and water-demand imbalances over a relatively short time period of years.

  4. Influence of temperature on transit times and microwave noise performances of SiGe HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Albarran, L. M.; Ramirez-Garcia, E.; Zerounian, N.; Aniel, F.; Rodriguez-Mendez, L. M.; Valdez-Perez, D.; Galaz-Larios, M. C.; Enciso-Aguilar, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of temperature (300 K and 40 K) on intrinsic transit times and microwave noise performances of silicon germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) is investigated. At 300 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters and four noise parameters, and we found a good agreement. At 40 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters, and we deduced noise performances from the S-parameter measurements. The electric model includes correlated junction noise sources and a proper extraction of the transit times involved in these sources. Moreover, the microwave noise model considers all the physical phenomena that impact noise performances in SiGe HBTs. We analysed three devices having different Ge content (10%-20%, 10%-25% and 10%-30%). At 40 K, the device with 10%-25% reaches one of the lowest base transit times (τ B), the lowest minimum noise figure (NFmin), and the lowest equivalent noise resistance (R n), for operation frequencies up to the maximum device dynamic performances (f ≈ f T) These results demonstrate the excellent potential to develop cryogenic applications of SiGe HBTs.

  5. A New Method for Increasing Output Power of a Three-Cavity Transit-Time Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jun-Tao; ZHONG Hui-Huang; QIAN Bao-Liang; LIU Yong-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new method to increase the output power of a three-cavity transit-time oscillator (TC-TTO).Conventional transit-time effect oscillators, such as the split-cavity oscillator (SCO), super-Reltron, and TC-TTO (or double-foil SCO), etc., have a common feature that the span of any modulating cavity is uniform. The new method is to vary the three-cavity spans from uniform to nonuniform. Its configuration is called the nonuniform three-cavity transit-time oscillator (NTC-TTO). Numerical simulations show that the electron-beam is modulated more deeply in certain NTC-TTOs than that in the TC-TTO with the same whole modulating length, and the output microwave power in certain NTC-TTOs is higher than that in the TC-TTO. The experimental results are in agreement with those of the numerical simulations. The results show that the new method can increase the output power of a microwave tube based on the TC-TTO.

  6. Influence of temperature on transit times and microwave noise performances of SiGe HBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of temperature (300 K and 40 K) on intrinsic transit times and microwave noise performances of silicon germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) is investigated. At 300 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters and four noise parameters, and we found a good agreement. At 40 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters, and we deduced noise performances from the S-parameter measurements. The electric model includes correlated junction noise sources and a proper extraction of the transit times involved in these sources. Moreover, the microwave noise model considers all the physical phenomena that impact noise performances in SiGe HBTs. We analysed three devices having different Ge content (10%–20%, 10%–25% and 10%–30%). At 40 K, the device with 10%–25% reaches one of the lowest base transit times (τ B), the lowest minimum noise figure (NFmin), and the lowest equivalent noise resistance (R n), for operation frequencies up to the maximum device dynamic performances (f ≈ f T) These results demonstrate the excellent potential to develop cryogenic applications of SiGe HBTs. (paper)

  7. Time of Occurrence and Duration of Atrial Fibrillation Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdic, Sevleta; Osmanovic, Enes; Kadric, Nedzad; Mujanovic, Emir; Ibisevic, Merima; Avdic, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dilatation of the left atrium and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DDLV) according to recent studies has significance in the occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke and death. Authors of some studies found no relationship between these parameters and atrial fibrillation. Objective: this study is to determine the time of occurrence and duration of atrial fibrillation in patients after surgical revascularization (CABG) due to the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and left atrium dilatation and identify the most significant predictors of incident AF. Methods: Prospective study included 116 patients undergoing surgical myocardial revascularization followed from admission to discharge. The study was conducted at the Special Hospital “Heart Center BH” Tuzla for a period of one year (March 2011/2012 g.). For all patients was performed preoperative ultrasound examination, especially parameters of diastolic function of the left ventricle and left atrium volume index (LAVi), as the best parameter sized left atrium, and the postoperative occurrence of certain AF and day occurrence, duration in hours, the number of attacks. To assess whether an event occurred or not was used logistic regression, and the effect of time on the event of interest is analyzed by Cox ‘s regression hazard parallel. Results: 75.9 % of patients had DDLV, and 91.4 % were hypertensives, 12.9 % from the previous stroke (ICV) and 42.2 % diabetics (DM), 14 % with COPD. The average age of patients was 61.41 ± 4.69 years. In both groups was 32.8 % women and 67.2 % men. LAVi preoperative values were significantly higher as DDLV greater degree. In patients with DDLV and higher values LAVi risk of AF is higher, the greater the length of AF and significantly higher number of attacks FA. Early occurrence of atrial fibrillation and its longer duration in function with increasing LAVi a marked increase in the value LAVi have the greatest hazard for

  8. [Echocardiographic parameters and systolic times in arterial hypertension in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Santoro, G; Giusti, C; Di Bello, V; Cini, G; Del Corso, L

    1989-09-01

    In 40 subjects, 15 mean age 70.7 +/- 5.6 with systolic-diastolic hypertension, 15 mean age 75.5 +/- 6.8 years with systolic hypertension and 10 mean age 73.6 +/- 5.1 normotensive control group we have analyzed with M-mode 2D echocardiography and echophonocardiography the following parameters: diastolic--EDD--and systolic diameter--SD--of left ventricle, diastolic thickness of septum--SSD--and posterior wall--SPPD--of left ventricle, left ventricular ejection fraction--EF--(Theicholtr. formula), radius posterior wall thickness--R/SPPD--, left ventricular mass--LVM--(Devereux' formula), and systolic time intervals (Q-A2, LVET, PEP and PEP/LVET). The differences between groups are: systolic-diastolic hypertensive patients have increased EDD, SPPD and LVM, reduction of EF and increased PEP/LVET ratio in comparison with B and C groups; systolic hypertension doesn't increase EDD; SSD and PEP/LVET increase, while the EF remains within normal limits. In the healthy aged subjects SSD, SPPD and LVM are normal. PMID:2608185

  9. Near-infrared laparoscopy for real-time intra-operative arterial and lymphatic perfusion imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-01

    Multimodal laparoscopic imaging systems possessing the capability for extended spectrum irradiation and visualization within a unified camera system are now available to provide enhanced intracorporeal operative anatomic and dynamic perfusion assessment and potentially augmented patient outcome. While ultraviolet-range energies have limited penetration and hence are probably more useful for endoscopic mucosal interrogation, the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum is of greater potential utility for the purposes of examining inducible fluorescence in abdominopelvic tissue that can be achieved by administration of specific tracer agents, either directly into the circulation (e.g. for anastomotic perfusion assessment at the time of stapling) or into the lymphatic system (e.g. for lymph basin road-mapping and\\/or focussed target nodal assessment). This technology is also capable of supplementing anatomic recognition of the biliary system while implantable fibres can also be inserted intraoperatively for the purpose of safeguarding vital structures such as the oesphagus and ureters especially in difficult reoperations. It is likely that this technological capability will find a clear and common indication in colorectal specialist and general surgical departments worldwide in the near future.

  10. Identifying transit corridors for elephant using a long time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittiglio, Claudia; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van Gils, Hein A. M. J.; Prins, Herbert H. T.

    2012-02-01

    The role of corridors in mitigating the effects of landscape fragmentation on biodiversity is controversial. Recent studies have highlighted the need for new approaches in corridor design using long-term datasets. We present a method to identify transit corridors for elephant at a population scale over a large area and an extended period of time using long-term aerial surveys. We investigated environmental and anthropogenic factors directly and indirectly related to the wet versus dry season distribution of elephant and its transit corridors. Four environmental variables predicted the presence of elephant at the landscape scale in both seasons: distance from permanent water, protected areas and settlements and vegetation structure. Path analysis revealed that altitude and monthly average NDVI, and distance from temporary water had a significant indirect effect on elephant distribution at local scale in dry and wet seasons respectively. Five transit corridors connecting Tarangire National Park and the northern as well as south-eastern wet season dispersal areas were identified and matched the wildlife migration routes described in the 1960s. The corridors are stable over the decades, providing landscape connectivity for elephant. Our approach yielded insights how advanced spatial analysis can be integrated with biological data available from long-term datasets to identify actual transit corridors and predictors of species distribution.

  11. H/L transition time estimation in JET using conformal predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► H/L transitions have been predicted using H/L and L/H models. ► Models have been built using conformal predictors to hedge the prediction with confidence and credibility measures. ► Models have been trained using linear and radial basis function kernels. ► Conformal measures have proven their usefulness to validate data-driven models. - Abstract: Recent advances in data mining allow the automatic recognition of physical phenomena in the databases of fusion devices without human intervention. This is important to create large databases of physical events (thereby increasing the statistical relevance) in an unattended manner. Important examples are the L/H and H/L transitions. In this contribution, a novel technique is introduced to automatically locate H/L transitions in JET by using conformal predictors. The focus is on H/L transitions because typically there is not a clear signature in the time series of the most widely available signals to recognize the change of confinement. Conformal predictors hedge their prediction by means of two parameters: confidence and credibility. The technique has been based on binary supervised classifiers to separate the samples of the respective confinement modes. Results with several underlying classifiers are presented.

  12. H/L transition time estimation in JET using conformal predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S., E-mail: sergio.gonzalez@ciemat.es [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM/ENEA per la Fusione, Padova 4-25127 (Italy); Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Ramirez, J.M. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H/L transitions have been predicted using H/L and L/H models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been built using conformal predictors to hedge the prediction with confidence and credibility measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been trained using linear and radial basis function kernels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformal measures have proven their usefulness to validate data-driven models. - Abstract: Recent advances in data mining allow the automatic recognition of physical phenomena in the databases of fusion devices without human intervention. This is important to create large databases of physical events (thereby increasing the statistical relevance) in an unattended manner. Important examples are the L/H and H/L transitions. In this contribution, a novel technique is introduced to automatically locate H/L transitions in JET by using conformal predictors. The focus is on H/L transitions because typically there is not a clear signature in the time series of the most widely available signals to recognize the change of confinement. Conformal predictors hedge their prediction by means of two parameters: confidence and credibility. The technique has been based on binary supervised classifiers to separate the samples of the respective confinement modes. Results with several underlying classifiers are presented.

  13. Comparison between continuous non-invasive estimated cardiac output by pulse wave transit time and thermodilution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish C Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Cardiac output (CO measurement is essential for many therapeutic decisions in anesthesia and critical care. Most available non-invasive CO measuring methods have an invasive component. We investigate "pulse wave transit time" (estimated continuous cardiac output [esCCO] a method of CO measurement that has no invasive component to its use. Materials and Methods: After institutional ethical committee approval, 14 adult (21-85 years patients undergoing surgery and requiring pulmonary artery catheter (PAC for measuring CO, were included. Postoperatively CO readings were taken simultaneously with thermodilution (TD via PAC and esCCO, whenever a change in CO was expected due to therapeutic interventions. Both monitoring methods were continued until patients′ discharge from the Intensive Care Unit and observer recording values using TD method was blinded to values measured by esCCO system. Results: Three hundred and one readings were obtained simultaneously from both methods. Correlation and concordance between the two methods was derived using Bland-Altman analysis. Measured values showed significant correlation between esCCO and TD ( r = 0.6, P < 0.001, 95% confidence limits of 0.51-0.68. Mean and (standard deviation for bias and precision were 0.13 (2.27 L/min and 6.56 (2.19 L/min, respectively. The 95% confidence interval for bias was - 4.32 to 4.58 L/min and for precision 2.27 to10.85 L/min. Conclusions: Although, esCCO is the only true non-invasive continuous CO monitor available and even though its values change proportionately to TD method (gold standard with the present degree of error its utility for clinical/therapeutic decision-making is questionable.

  14. Measurement of small bowel transit time by 99Tcm-SC imaging: preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop a method of measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT) by 99Tcm-sulfur collide (SC) imaging and to compare with the method of added lactose in the test meal. Methods: 20 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with gastrointestinal disorders were studied. In fasting state, the subjects were asked to ingest the 99Tcm-SC labelled solid meal within 5 minutes, then the image acquisition was immediately started with SPECT. The images were acquired every 15 min during the first hour, at 30 min intervals during 2∼4 hours and hourly thereafter until 80% radioactivity had entered the colon. One week later, the same procedure of imaging with 15 g lactulose added in the test meal was performed. The regions of interest (ROIs) were taken at stomach and colon, and the SBTT was calculated by deconvolution or by subtraction of the 50% time of gastric emptying from the 50% time of colon filling. Results: 1) The mean SBTT of 20 healthy volunteers was (4.2 +- 0.5) h, oral-caecum transit time (OCTT) was (4.3 +- 0.6) h; lactulose shortened the SBTT by (1.8 +- 0.6) h; 2) 26 patients showed different results of SBTT due to their different gastrointestinal disorders bases. Conclusions: 99Tcm-SC imaging was a noninvasive and useful method to measure SBTT. The added lactulose can shorten the examination time and help to identify the time of food to the ileocecal region

  15. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands); Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France); Sérusclat, André [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France); Moulin, Philippe [Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  16. Validation of a method to differentiate arterial and venous vessels in CT perfusion data using linear combinations of quantitative time-density curve characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to develop and evaluate a new method that reliably differentiates between cerebral arteries and veins using voxel-wise CT-perfusion-derived parameters. Fourteen consecutive patients with suspected stroke but without pathological findings were examined on a multi-detector CT system: 32 dynamic phases (∇t = 1.5 s) during application of 35 mL iomeprol-350 were acquired at 80 kV/200mAs. Three hemodynamic parameters were calculated for 18 arterial and venous vessel segments: A (maximum of the time-density-curve), T (time-to-peak), and W (full-width-at-half-maximum). Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), the performance of every classifier (A, T, W) and of all linear combinations for the differentiation of arterial and venous vessels was determined. A maximum area under the ROC-curve (AUC) of 0.945 (accuracy = 86.8 %) was obtained using the FLDA combination of A and T or the triplet FLDA of A and T and W for the classification of venous and arterial vessels. The best single parameter was T with an AUC of 0.871 (accuracy = 79.0 %), which performed significantly worse than the combination A and T (p < 0.001). Arteries and veins can be accurately differentiated based on dynamic CT perfusion data using the maximum of the time-density curve, its time-to-peak, its width, and FLDA combinations of these parameters, which yield accuracies up to 87 %. (orig.)

  17. Validation of a method to differentiate arterial and venous vessels in CT perfusion data using linear combinations of quantitative time-density curve characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havla, Lukas; Schneider, Moritz; Dietrich, Olaf [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Beyer, Sebastian E.; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We aimed to develop and evaluate a new method that reliably differentiates between cerebral arteries and veins using voxel-wise CT-perfusion-derived parameters. Fourteen consecutive patients with suspected stroke but without pathological findings were examined on a multi-detector CT system: 32 dynamic phases (∇t = 1.5 s) during application of 35 mL iomeprol-350 were acquired at 80 kV/200mAs. Three hemodynamic parameters were calculated for 18 arterial and venous vessel segments: A (maximum of the time-density-curve), T (time-to-peak), and W (full-width-at-half-maximum). Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), the performance of every classifier (A, T, W) and of all linear combinations for the differentiation of arterial and venous vessels was determined. A maximum area under the ROC-curve (AUC) of 0.945 (accuracy = 86.8 %) was obtained using the FLDA combination of A and T or the triplet FLDA of A and T and W for the classification of venous and arterial vessels. The best single parameter was T with an AUC of 0.871 (accuracy = 79.0 %), which performed significantly worse than the combination A and T (p < 0.001). Arteries and veins can be accurately differentiated based on dynamic CT perfusion data using the maximum of the time-density curve, its time-to-peak, its width, and FLDA combinations of these parameters, which yield accuracies up to 87 %. (orig.)

  18. Effects of skin pressure by clothing on digestion and orocecal transit time of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Y; Kato, N; Kojima, Y; Takasu, N; Tokura, H

    2000-05-01

    In order to reveal the influence of clothing skin pressure on digestion of food through the gastrointestinal tract, we examined the absorption of dietary carbohydrate and orocecal transit time of a test meal by means of a breath hydrogen test on 7 healthy young women. In this experiment, we collected breath samples from the participants wearing loose-fitting experimental garment on the second day of the experiment and from the same participants but wearing an additional tight-fitting girdle on the following day for 16 hours and 9 hours, respectively. Skin pressure applied by a girdle on participant's waist, abdomen and hip region was 15.5 +/- 0.4 mmHg (mean +/- SE), 11.0 +/- 0.2 mmHg, and 13.6 +/- 0.6 mmHg, respectively, and the values were 2-3 times larger than those of the experimental garment. The hydrogen concentration vs. time curve showed that breath hydrogen levels at its peaks (15:00, 15:30, 16:00, 16:30, and 17:00 hr) on the third day of the experiment were significantly higher than those of the corresponding time on the second day (p clothing condition (p hand, the transit time of the test meal for the subjects wearing a girdle did not differ significantly from that for the subjects wearing the garment of less pressure (270 +/- 18 minutes and 263 +/- 21 minutes, respectively). These results indicate that the clothing skin pressure has an inhibitory effect on the absorption of dietary carbohydrate in the small intestine, but no effect on the orocecal transit time of a meal. PMID:10924040

  19. The volume and time comparison principle and transition probability estimates for random walks

    OpenAIRE

    Telcs, András

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for on- and off-diagonal transition probability estimates for random walks on weighted graphs. On the integer lattice and on may fractal type graphs both the volume of a ball and the mean exit time from a ball are independent of the center, uniform in space. Here the upper estimate is given without such restriction and two-sided estimate is given if the mean exit time is independent of the center but the volume is not.

  20. Transit Time and Charge Correlations of Single Photoelectron Events in R7081 PMTs

    CERN Document Server

    Kaether, Florian

    2012-01-01

    During the calibration phase of the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for the Double Chooz experiment the PMT response to light with single photoelectron (SPE) intensity was analysed. With our setup we were able to measure the combined transit time and charge response of the PMT and therefore we could deconstruct and analyse all physical effects having an influence on the PMT signal. Based on this analysis charge and time correlated probability density functions were developed to include the PMT response in a Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. Transit time and charge correlations of single photoelectron events in R7081 photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the calibration phase of the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for the Double Chooz experiment the PMT response to light with single photoelectron (SPE) intensity was analysed. With our setup we were able to measure the combined transit time and charge response of the PMT and therefore we could deconstruct and analyse all physical effects having an influence on the PMT signal. Based on this analysis charge and time correlated probability density functions were developed to include the PMT response in a Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Identifying timescales and possible precursors of the awake to asleep transition in EOG time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we study the awake to asleep state transition in eye blinking activity. In this perspective the human electroculographic activity (EOG) was first experimentally investigated by means of a spectral analyses of the time series resulting for processes underlying both the brain activity and the eye dynamics. We studied the evolution of the spectral content both via the classical spectrogram and with the computation of summarizing scalar parameters: mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral variance. With these tools we highlighted a significative dynamical change appearing before the transition from the awake to the asleep state, characterized by a general widening of the spectrum, that translates into a decrease of the maximum frequency, an increase of the average frequency and an increase of the spectral variance. Due to inherently high non-linearities involved, chaotic patterns were likely to occur in the experimental time series. These were analyzed therefore with the chaos theory. In particular we studied the time evolution of dynamical parameters as computed on different windows of the time series, i.e. optimal delay time as suggested by autocorrelation and mutual information on one side, embedding quality evaluation as suggested by the False Nearest Neighbours percentage on the other

  3. Time-dependent mean-field theory of the superfluid-insulator phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a time-dependent mean-field approach, within the time-dependent variational principle, to describe the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition. We construct the zero-temperature phase diagram both of the Bose-Hubbard model (BHM), and of a spin-S Heisenberg model (SHM) with the XXZ anisotropy. The phase diagram of the BHM indicates a phase transition from a Mott insulator to a compressibile superfluid phase, and shows the expected lobelike structure. The SHM phase diagram displays a quantum phase transition between a paramagnetic and a canted phases showing as well a lobelike structure. We show how the BHM and the quantum phase model (QPM) can be rigorously derived from the SHM. Based on such results, the phase boundaries of the SHM are mapped to the BHM ones, while the phase diagram of the QPM is related to that of the SHM. The QPM's phase diagram obtained through the application of our approach to the SHM, describes the known onset of the macroscopic phase coherence from the Coulomb blockade regime for increasing Josephson coupling constant. The BHM and the QPM phase diagrams are in good agreement with quantum Monte Carlo results, and with the third-order strong-coupling perturbative expansion

  4. Transit timing variations for planets co-orbiting in the horseshoe regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Although not yet detected, pairs of exoplanets in 1:1 mean motion resonance probably exist. Low eccentricity, near-planar orbits, which in the comoving frame follow horseshoe trajectories, are one of the possible stable configurations. Here we study transit timing variations (TTVs) produced by mutual gravitational interaction of planets in this orbital architecture, with the goal to develop methods that can be used to recognize this case in observational data. In particular, we use a semi-analytic model to derive parametric constraints that should facilitate data analysis. We show that characteristic traits of the TTVs can directly constrain the (1) ratio of planetary masses and (2) their total mass (divided by that of the central star) as a function of the minimum angular separation as seen from the star. In an ideal case, when transits of both planets are observed and well characterized, the minimum angular separation can also be inferred from the data. As a result, parameters derived from the observed transit timing series alone can directly provide both planetary masses scaled to the central star mass.

  5. Comprehensive time series analysis of the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-33b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, G.; Kovács, T.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D.; Noyes, R. W.; Regály, Zs.; Esquerdo, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    Context. HD 15082 (WASP-33) is the hottest and fastest rotating star known to harbor a transiting extrasolar planet (WASP-33b). The lack of high precision radial velocity (RV) data stresses the need for precise light curve analysis and gathering further RV data. Aims: By using available photometric and RV data, we perform a blend analysis, compute more accurate system parameters, confine the planetary mass, and, attempt to cast light on the observed transit anomalies. Methods: We combined the original HATNet observations and various followup data to jointly analyze the signal content and extract the transit component and used our RV data to aid the global parameter determination. Results: The blend analysis of the combination of multicolor light curves yields the first independent confirmation of the planetary nature of WASP-33b. We clearly identify three frequency components in the 15-21 d-1 regime with amplitudes 7-5 mmag. These frequencies correspond to the δ Scuti-type pulsation of the host star. None of these pulsation frequencies or their low-order linear combinations are in close resonance with the orbital frequency. We show that these pulsation components explain some but not all of the observed transit anomalies. The grand-averaged transit light curve shows that there is a ~1.5 mmag brightening shortly after the planet passes the mid-transit phase. Although the duration and amplitude of this brightening varies, it is visible even through the direct inspections of the individual transit events (some 40-60% of the followup light curves show this phenomenon). We suggest that the most likely explanation of this feature is the presence of a well-populated spot belt which is highly inclined to the orbital plane. This geometry is consistent with the inference from the spectroscopic anomalies. Finally, we constrain the planetary mass to Mp = 3.27 ± 0.73 MJ by using our RV data collected by the TRES spectrograph. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http

  6. Interpretation of the radiocardiograms by determining the mean-transit time of the indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the interpretation of the radiocardiographic (RCG) data is proposed. As distinct from the widely used method developed by Donato et al. based on the exponential extrapolation of the terminal zones of the RCG peaks and the calculation of the mean time of the indication general circulation in the body, this one is based on the approximation of both RCG peaks by γ-image function, measurement of the indicator maximUm level in the field of interest of the vena cava superior and calculation of the time indices that characterize the mean-transit time of radioactivity through the right cardiac regions and through the heart and lupgs in general. On eXamination of practically healthy persons and 62 patients with ischemic heart disease 10 different RCG time indices were identified. The correlation matrix of the interrelationships of these indices and the matrix of the coefficients of respective regression equations were calculated

  7. Value of beat-to-beat blood pressure changes, detected by pulse transit time, in the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitson, D J; Stradling, J R

    1998-09-01

    Two important aspects of a respiratory sleep study are a measure of inspiratory effort and an estimate of the number of arousals. These can be derived from an indirect estimate of beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP), pulse transit time (PTT). This study investigated the reproducibility of inspiratory BP falls (reflecting inspiratory effort), and BP arousals derived from PTT, and the contribution they could make to the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Overnight PTT was recorded at home in 40 patients being investigated for OSAHS, and a second PTT recording was made in the sleep laboratory with full polysomnography. Patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of their sleep disorder, and a third PTT recording was made at home in 13 patients subsequently established on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The reproducibility between the home and laboratory studies was reasonable (r=0.87 for inspiratory BP falls, r=0.81 for BP arousals). Both derivatives showed a clear progression through the three patient groups, which returned to normal on treatment. The differences between the groups were significant (p4% arterial oxygen saturation dip rate and electroencephalography micro-arousals at dividing patients into two groups, either requiring nasal CPAP or not requiring CPAP. Pulse transit time can provide a noninvasive estimate of inspiratory effort and a measure of arousals that together document disease severity and response to treatment and may be useful in managing obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. PMID:9762800

  8. The importance of water transit time and mineral dissolution kinetics for the flux of weathering products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Martin; Bishop, Kevin; Köhler, Stephan; Amvrosiadi, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Soil mineral weathering is one of the major sources of base cations (BC), which play a dual role for a forest ecosystem; they function both as plant nutrients, and for buffering against acidification of catchment runoff. On a long-term basis, the soil weathering rates will determine the highest sustainable forest productivity without causing acidification. It is believed that the hydrologic residence time play a key role in determining weathering rates on a landscape scale. In this study, we investigate the significance of the water transit residence time (WTT) distribution for the transport of base cations to catchment runoff. By modelling hillslope flowpaths with different transit times, using the geochemical computing code PHREEQC, we demonstrate how in-stream dynamics as exemplified by elemental ratios can be explained by mineral dissolution kinetics and equilibria. Specifically, we hypothesize that equilibrium of plagioclase regulates the delivery of base cations and silica to catchment runoff. These patters can be seen in field data from 10 years of sampling from a nested-catchment, where the Na+/BC and the Si/BC-ratios vary systematically with WTT on both a temporal and a spatial scale. This behavior has implications for the total transport of products from mineral dissolution to catchment runoff. As the water entering the stream is a mixture of water with different transit times, the composition of stream water will not only be dependent on the average WTT, but also on the shape of the WTT distribution. For the base cations associated with minerals that becomes supersaturated or with precipitating secondary phases within the range of WTT, i.e. Na+ and K+, the tails of "old water" of the WRT-distribution will not contribute to any extra transport of these elements. Finally, we use the derived relationships to estimate the transport of weathering products from a forested hillslope, given the modelled WRT distribution.

  9. Tracer-derived transit time of the waters in the eastern Nordic Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial-temporal distribution of the anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs originating from nuclear bomb testing and the Sellafield reprocessing plant in the Irish Sea is simulated using a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM). The physical model has a horizontal resolution of about 40 km, and it is forced with daily atmospheric reanalysed fields for the period 1948 to 2002. A comparison of the temporal evolution of observed and simulated concentrations of 137Cs has been conducted for the regions east of Scotland, west of central Norway and at the entrance of the Barents Sea. It follows that the annual mean 137Cs concentration signal from the Sellafield discharge reaches the southwestern Barents Sea region in 5 yr, in accordance with available observations. To more accurately assess the age of the caesium-tagged water masses, three additional experiments were performed with an Eulerian age coupled to the evolution of the tracer concentration. It is demonstrated that the transit time depends on the duration of the tracer release history, on the dynamical ocean state and on whether the transit time is derived from the time difference between the release history and the concentration evolution downstream of the release, or as an explicit Eulerian age tracer. The Eulerian age tracer gives a transit time for a Sellafield-like discharge to reach the Barents Sea of 56 months in the 1970s, 52 months in the 1960s and 51 months in the 1980s, and that this difference is strongly governed by the ocean dynamics in the Faeroe-Scotland region

  10. Effect of fasting on the transit time of 144Ce in the mouse gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work with G.I. absorption of actinide elements indicates greater absorption by fasted animals than by animals on regular diets (Weiss and Walburg, undated). Residence time of a metallic compound in the gut may be an important factor influencing G.I. absorption. Cerium-144 (III) chloride was administered by gavage to fasted mice and to mice on regular feed. The G.I. tract was excised, cut into sections, and the activity of each section determined as a function of time after dosing. Our results indicate rapid transit of 144CeCl3 along the empty mouse gut. One hour after dosing, about half the Ce is in the cecal contents; about 40% remains in stomach contents. Twelve hours after dosing, only about 2% remains in the cecum; by 16 hours, almost the entire dose has been cleared from the intestine. Transit times in mice with stomach and intestines containing food were 12 hours longer than in fasted mice. These results lead to the conclusion that factors other than G.I. residence time determine G.I. absorption of actinides in mice

  11. Further Results on Stability Analysis of Discrete-Time Markov Jump Linear Systems with Time-Varying Delay and Partly Known Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Xingang Zhao; Jianda Han; Yiwen Zhao

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability analysis of discrete-time Markov jump linear systems (MJLSs) with time-varying delay and partly known transition probabilities. The time delay is varying between lower and upper bounds, and the partly known transition probabilities cover the cases of known, uncertain with known lower and upper bounds, and completely unknown, which is more general than the existing result. Via constructing an appropriate Lyapunov function and employing a new technique...

  12. Transit-Based Emergency Evacuation with Transit Signal Priority in Sudden-Onset Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciyun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents methods of transit signal priority without transit-only lanes for a transit-based emergency evacuation in a sudden-onset disaster. Arterial priority signal coordination is optimized when a traffic signal control system provides priority signals for transit vehicles along an evacuation route. Transit signal priority is determined by “transit vehicle arrival time estimation,” “queuing vehicle dissipation time estimation,” “traffic signal status estimation,” “transit signal optimization,” and “arterial traffic signal coordination for transit vehicle in evacuation route.” It takes advantage of the large capacities of transit vehicles, reduces the evacuation time, and evacuates as many evacuees as possible. The proposed methods were tested on a simulation platform with Paramics V6.0. To evaluate and compare the performance of transit signal priority, three scenarios were simulated in the simulator. The results indicate that the methods of this study can reduce the travel times of transit vehicles along an evacuation route by 13% and 10%, improve the standard deviation of travel time by 16% and 46%, and decrease the average person delay at a signalized intersection by 22% and 17% when the traffic flow saturation along an evacuation route is 0.81.0, respectively.

  13. Association of rumination time with subclinical ketosis in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, E I; LeBlanc, S J; McBride, B W; Duffield, T F; DeVries, T J

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between rumination and subclinical ketosis (SCK) in transition dairy cows. A study was conducted on 4 commercial dairy farms in eastern Ontario, Canada. A total of 339 Holstein dairy cows (107 primiparous and 232 multiparous) were monitored for rumination activity and SCK from 14 d before calving until 28 d after calving. Rumination was recorded daily using an automated monitoring system. A blood sample was taken from the coccygeal vein of each cow for measurement of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) once weekly throughout the 6-wk observation period. Cows with BHB ≥1.2mmol/L in any of the 4 postpartum samples were considered to have SCK. Cases of retained placenta, metritis, milk fever, or mastitis during the study period were also recorded. Cows were categorized into 1 of 4 groups: healthy cows (HLT) that had no SCK or any other recorded health problem (n=139); cows treated for at least one health issue other than SCK (HLT+; n=50); cows with SCK (hyperketonemia; HYK) with no other health problems during transition (n=97); or cows (HYK+) that had SCK and one or more other health problems (n=53). Daily rumination time was summarized by week and comparisons were made between HLT and HYK and HYK+. From 2 wk before calving (wk -2) to 4 wk after calving (wk +4), there was no difference in rumination time (409±9.8min/d) among HLT, HYK, and HYK+ cows in their first lactation. Multiparous cows in HLT spent an average of 459±11.3min/d ruminating from wk -2 to wk +4. Multiparous HYK cows ruminated 25±12.8min/d less than HLT cows, whereas HYK+ cows ruminated 44±15.6min/d less than HLT cows. The largest differences in rumination time between HLT and HYK+ cows were seen during wk -1, +1, and +2, when HYK+ cows ruminated 48±17.2, 73±16.0, and 65±19.4min/d less than HLT cows, respectively. In multiparous cows, increased odds of HYK were associated with greater milk yield in the previous lactation, greater loss of

  14. Analytical determination of transition time between transient and steady state water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassabatere, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The hydraulic characterization of soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to the modelling of flow in the vadose zone. Since many years, numerous methods were developed to determine soil hydraulic properties. Many of these methods rely on water infiltration experiments and their analysis using analytical or numerical models. At the beginning, most models were developed for water infiltration at steady state. These models had the advantage to be easy to develop from a theoretical point of view. Yet, many drawbacks remain including the need to wait for a long time, leading to time-consuming experiments, the risk to infiltrate water in large volumes of soil, leading to a response affected by soil variability, and the uncertainty regarding the attainment of steady state (i.e. constant infiltration rate). More recently, infiltration models and mathematical developments addressed the case of consecutive transient and steady states. Yet, one main problem remain. In the field, the operator is never sure about the state of water infiltration data. This paper present analytical formulations for the estimation of a transition time. We consider the model developed by Haverkamp et al. (1994) linking 1D infiltration flux to cumulative infiltration and related approximated expansions. An analytical method based on scaling is proposed to define transition time values in terms of both scaled cumulative infiltration and times. Dimensional times are then calculated for a large variety of soils and initial conditions. These time database can be considered as a relevant tool for the guidance for operators who conduct water infiltration experiments and wants to know when to stop and also for modelers who want to know how to select the data to fit transient or steady state models. Haverkamp, R., Ross, P. J., Smetten, K. R. J., Parlange, J. Y. (1994), Three-dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc infiltrometer: 2 Physically based infiltration equation. Water Resour. Res

  15. Evaluation of time of flight MR angiography for stenotic arterial lesions. Including comparison of maximum intensity projection and volume rendering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagami, Akihiko (Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of time of flight MR angiography (MRA) for stenotic arterial lesions, 25 patients were examined in the neck and 28 patients in the pelvis and lower extremities with a GE SIGNA system. MR angiograms were reconstructed with maximum intensity projection (MIP) and/or volume rendering (VR) technique using a CEMAX-VIP station, and compared with contrast angiograms. Stenotic grade according to MRA correlated well with that of contrast angiography, and MRA had an accuracy of 91.9% in the neck and 94.2% in the pelvis and lower extremities, for detecting stenosis of 50% or greater. MRA reconstructed from sagittal sections was efficacious in the diagnosis of subclavian artery lesions. In demonstrating distal recanalization of occlusive arteries, MRA was superior to contrast angiography. MIP images demonstrated peripheral vessels more clearly than volume rendering images, but VR images were able to display the anterio-posterior location of vessels correctly, something that was not feasible with MIP. Furthermore, 3-dimensional images were able to be observed in any direction usign the CEMAX-VIP station. In conclusion, MRA was useful for stenotic arterial lesions, and volume rendering display was considered to be useful for evaluation of vessel overlap. (author).

  16. Stochastic Stability for Time-Delay Markovian Jump Systems with Sector-Bounded Nonlinearities and More General Transition Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Ye; Quan-Yong Fan; Xin-Gang Zhao; Guang-Hong Yang

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with delay-dependent stochastic stability for time-delay Markovian jump systems (MJSs) with sector-bounded nonlinearities and more general transition probabilities. Different from the previous results where the transition probability matrix is completely known, a more general transition probability matrix is considered which includes completely known elements, boundary known elements, and completely unknown ones. In order to get less conservative criterion, the state a...

  17. Critical space-time networks and geometric phase transitions from frustrated edge antiferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time that self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension dH=4 . The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (dH-ds) , where ds is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean-field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  18. Critical Space-Time Networks and Geometric Phase Transitions from Frustrated Edge Antiferromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2015-01-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time which self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension d_H=4. The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (d_H-d_s) where d_s is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  19. Photo-Dynamical Analysis of Three Kepler Objects of Interest with Significant Transit Timing Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Terrell, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    KOI-227, KOI-319 and KOI-884 are identified here as (at least) two planet systems. For KOI-319 and KOI-884, the observed Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) of the inner transiting planet are used to detect an outer non-transiting planet. The outer planet in KOI-884 is 2.6 Jupiter masses and has the orbital period just narrow of the 3:1 resonance with the inner planet (orbital period ratio 2.93). The distribution of parameters inferred from KOI-319.01's TTVs is bimodal with either a 1.6 Neptune-mass (M_N) planet wide of the 5:3 resonance (period 80.1 d) or a 1 Saturn-mass planet wide of the 7:3 resonance (period 109.2 d). The radial velocity measurements can be used in this case to determine which of these parameter modes is correct. KOI-227.01's TTVs with large 10 hour amplitude can be obtained for planetary-mass companions in various major resonances. Based on the Bayesian evidence, the current TTV data favor the outer 2:1 resonance with a companion mass 1.5 M_N, but this solution implies a very large density ...

  20. Search for Time-Independent Lorentz Violation using Muon Neutrino to Muon Antineutrino Transitions in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2016-05-10

    Data from the MINOS experiment has been used to search for mixing between muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos using a time-independent Lorentz-violating formalism derived from the Standard-Model Extension (SME). MINOS is uniquely capable of searching for muon neutrino-antineutrino mixing given its long baseline and ability to distinguish between neutrinos and antineutrinos on an event-by-event basis. Neutrino and antineutrino interactions were observed in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors from an exposure of 10.56$\\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target from the NuMI neutrino-optimized beam. No evidence was found for such transitions and new, highly stringent limits were placed on the SME coefficients governing them. We place the first limits on the SME parameters $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} $ and $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau}$ at $-8.4\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} < 8.0\\times10^{-23}$ and $-8.0\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau} < 8.4\\times10^{-23}$, and the world's best limits on the $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}$ and $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}$ parameters at $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$ and $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$, all limits quoted at $3\\sigma$.

  1. Springtime trans-pacific atmospheric transport from east Asia: a transit-time-pdf approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M.; McKendry, I.; Jaffe, D.

    2003-04-01

    The atmosphere is known to episodically transport aerosols, dust, and gaseous pollutants from industrialized south-east Asia, the Gobi desert, and Siberian wild fires to western North America. We give a novel characterization of the ever-present background transport from these regions and of the probability of transport ``events", that is, long-range transport of high concentrations with minimal dispersion. Our primary transport diagnostic is the transit-time probability density function (pdf), {\\cal G}, which is a tracer-independent measure of the flow that allows us to isolate the role of transport from other factors such as source variability and chemistry. The pdf approach, unlike typical back-trajectory analyses, captures transport due to all possible paths and accounts for both resolved advection and subgrid processes. We use a numerical model of the global atmosphere (MATCH), driven by NCEP reananlysis data, to establish the springtime statistics of daily averages of {\\cal G}. A suitably defined average of {\\cal G} quantifies the mass fraction of background air of a given transit time, or age, from the source regions. An analysis of the variability of {\\cal G} at fixed transit time allows us to identify transport events and to estimate their probability of occurrence. This is illustrated for transport events to the ``Pacific-North-West" (PNW) region of North America, defined as (43.8o-53.3o{N}) × (115.3o-124.7o{W}). Correlations between {\\cal G} averaged over the PNW and the winds at any point in the atmosphere identify large-scale anomaly structures of the flow that correspond to favorable transport to the PNW.

  2. Video capsule endoscopy completion and total transit times are similar with oral or endoscopic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanich, Peter P.; Guido, John; Kleinman, Bryan; Betkerur, Kavita; Porter, Kyle M.; Meyer, Marty M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is limited by incomplete procedures. There are also contraindications to the standard ingestion of the capsule that require endoscopic placement. Our aim was to compare the study completion rate of VCE after oral ingestion and endoscopic deployment. Patients and methods: We performed a review of all VCE from April 2010 through March 2013. Inpatient and outpatient cohorts grouped by the method of capsule delivery were formed and compared. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was utilized adjusting for variables with a P value ≤ 0.1 in group comparisons. Log-rank analysis was used to compare transit times. Results: A total of 687 VCE were performed, including 316 inpatient (36 endoscopic deployment, 280 oral ingestion) and 371 outpatient (20 endoscopic deployment, 351 oral ingestion). For VCE on hospitalized patients, the completion rates were similar after endoscopic deployment and oral ingestion (72 % vs 73 %, P = 0.94). The completion rates were also similar for ambulatory patients (90 % vs 87 %, P = 0.69). There remained no difference after multivariable modeling for inpatients (P = 0.71) and outpatients (P = 0.46). Total transit times were not significantly different. Conclusions: VCE completion rates and total transit times are similar after oral or endoscopic deployment for both hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Endoscopic placement is effective in patients with contraindications to standard oral ingestion, but should otherwise be avoided to limit unnecessary procedural risks and costs. PMID:26878055

  3. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  4. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  5. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  6. Historical Memory and Transitional Justice in Spain: the Time as Actor of Criminal Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Tamarit Sumalla

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the political, criminal and legal challenges posed by accountability demands for past crimes by studying the singularities that the Spanish transition from Franco’s dictatorship to democracy has raised. Especially, it is analysed the Historical Memory Law of 2007 and the most problematic points of the criminal justice actions that have emerged due to offenses committed during the dictatorship. Despite the existence of international crimes, the elapsed time has brought difficult to overcome, factual and legal difficulties for effective prosecution. This problem, focusing on the prohibition of retroactivity, prescription and effects of the Amnesty Act of 1977 is examined here.

  7. Gas bubble detection in liquid metals by means of the ultrasound transit-time-technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid metals are used in nuclear energy technology and a precise knowledge of the distribution of the gas bubbles and their behaviour inside liquid metals is very useful. In this work the ultrasound-transit time technique is introduced as a versatile method to analyze the bubble dynamics in liquid-metal-gas flows. After discussing the principle of operation and the implementation of the technique, the methods used to extract the positions of the bubbles, their velocities, or their diameters are explained. Finally, the performance of the method is demonstrated for a liquid-metal-gas flow with and without a magnetic field. (authors)

  8. Simultaneous Optimization of Container Ship Sailing Speed and Container Routing with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsten, Christian Vad; Røpke, Stefan; Pisinger, David

    We introduce a decision support tool for liner shipping companies to optimally determine the sailing speed and needed fleet for a global network. As a novelty we incorporate cargo routing decisions with tight transit time restrictions on each container such that we get a realistic picture of the...... decomposition and column generation that exploits the separability of the problem. Computational results show that the method is applicable to liner shipping networks of realistic size and that it is important to incorporate cargo routing decisions when optimizing speed....

  9. Money, Trust and Happiness in Transition Countries: Evidence from Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefano; Mikucka, Malgorzata; Sarracino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The evolution over time of subjective well-being (SWB) in transition countries exhibit some peculiarities: greater variations which are more strongly correlated with the trends of GDP relative to other countries. What is the possible role of social trust in predicting such variations? We compare the capacity of the trends of GDP and of social trust to predict the trends of SWB. We find that the strength of the relationship between social trust and SWB over the medium-term is comparable to tha...

  10. Dynamical basis for the GOE-GUE transition upon the breaking of time-reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible to explain why the long range two-point energy level statistics of chaotic systems coincide with those of Gaussian ensembles, on the basis of semiclassical periodic orbit theory. The statistics of general systems follow the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE), whereas systems with time reversal invariance are governed by the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE). The effect of a symmetry breaking perturbation on the GOE statistics was derived within random matrix theory by Pandey and Mehta (1983). The breaking of phase coherence for the contribution of symmetric pairs of periodic orbits to the periodic orbit sum is here shown to produce the same transition. (author). 15 refs

  11. GARUSO - Version 1.0. Uncertainty model for multipath ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunde, Per; Froeysa, Kjell-Eivind; Vestrheim, Magne

    1997-09-01

    This report describes an uncertainty model for ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters configured with parallel chords, and a PC program, GARUSO Version 1.0, implemented for calculation of the meter`s relative expanded uncertainty. The program, which is based on the theoretical uncertainty model, is used to carry out a simplified and limited uncertainty analysis for a 12`` 4-path meter, where examples of input and output uncertainties are given. The model predicts a relative expanded uncertainty for the meter at a level which further justifies today`s increasing tendency to use this type of instruments for fiscal metering of natural gas. 52 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Transit times of water particles in the vadose zone across catchment states and catchments functional units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the water movement in the vadose zone and its associated transport of solutes are of major interest to reduce nutrient leaching, pollution transport or other risks to water quality. Soil physical models are widely used to asses such transport processes, while the site specific parameterization of these models remains challenging. Inverse modeling is a common method to adjust the soil physical parameters in a way that the observed water movement or soil water dynamics are reproduced by the simulation. We have shown that the pore water stable isotope concentration can serve as an additional fitting target to simulate the solute transport and water balance in the unsaturated zone. In the presented study, the Mualem- van Genuchten parameters for the Richards equation and diffusivity parameter for the convection-dispersion equation have been parameterized using the inverse model approach with Hydrus-1D for 46 experimental sites of different land use, topography, pedology and geology in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. With the best parameter set we simulated the transport of a conservative solute that was introduced via a pulse input at different points in time. Thus, the transit times in the upper 2 m of the soil for different catchment states could be inferred for each location. It has been shown that the time a particle needs to pass the -2 m depth plane highly varies from the systems state and the systems forcing during and after infiltration of that particle. Differences in transit times among the study sites within the Attert basin were investigated with regards to its governing factors to test the concept of functional units. The study shows the potential of pore water stable isotope concentration for residence times and transport analyses in the unsaturated zone leading to a better understanding of the time variable subsurface processes across the catchment.

  13. Residual circulation trajectories and transit times into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Birner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere (LMS can be divided into a slow part (time-scale of several months to years associated with the global-scale stratospheric residual circulation and a fast part (time-scale of days to a few months associated with (mostly quasi-horizontal mixing (i.e. two-way irreversible transport, including stratosphere-troposphere exchange. The stratospheric residual circulation can be considered to consist of two branches: a deep branch more strongly associated with planetary waves breaking in the middle to upper stratosphere, and a shallow branch more strongly associated with synoptic-scale waves breaking in the subtropical lower stratosphere. In this study the contribution due to the stratospheric residual circulation alone to transport into the LMS is quantified using residual circulation trajectories, i.e. trajectories driven by the (time-dependent residual mean meridional and vertical velocities. This contribution represents the advective part of the overall transport into the LMS and can be viewed as providing a background onto which the effect of mixing has to be added. Residual mean velocities are obtained from a comprehensive chemistry-climate model as well as from reanalysis data. Transit times of air traveling from the tropical tropopause to the LMS along the residual circulation streamfunction are evaluated and compared to recent mean age of air estimates. A clear time-scale separation with much smaller transit times into the mid-latitudinal LMS than into polar LMS is found that is indicative of a clear separation of the shallow from the deep branch of the residual circulation. This separation between the shallow and the deep circulation branch is further manifested in a clear distinction in the aspect ratio of the vertical to meridional extent of the trajectories as well as the integrated mass flux along the residual circulation trajectories. The residual transit time distribution reproduces

  14. Residual circulation trajectories and transit times into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Birner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere (LMS can be divided into a slow part (time-scale of several months to years associated with the global-scale stratospheric residual circulation and a fast part (time-scale of days to a few months associated with (mostly quasi-horizontal mixing (i.e. two-way irreversible transport, including extratropical stratosphere-troposphere exchange. The stratospheric residual circulation may be considered to consist of two branches: a deep branch more strongly associated with planetary waves breaking in the middle to upper stratosphere, and a shallow branch associated with synoptic and planetary scale waves breaking in the subtropical lower stratosphere. In this study the contribution due to the stratospheric residual circulation alone to transport into the LMS is quantified using residual circulation trajectories, i.e. trajectories driven by the (time-dependent residual mean meridional and vertical velocities. This contribution represents the advective part of the overall transport into the LMS and can be viewed as providing a background onto which the effect of mixing has to be added. Residual mean velocities are obtained from a comprehensive chemistry-climate model as well as from reanalysis data. Transit times of air traveling from the tropical tropopause to the LMS along the residual circulation streamfunction are evaluated and compared to recent mean age of air estimates. A time-scale separation with much smaller transit times into the mid-latitudinal LMS than into polar LMS is found that is indicative of a separation of the shallow from the deep branch of the residual circulation. This separation between the shallow and the deep circulation branch is further manifested in a distinction in the aspect ratio of the vertical to meridional extent of the trajectories, the integrated mass flux along the residual circulation trajectories, as well as the stratospheric entry latitude of the trajectories

  15. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) in the pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis-associated pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Sergio A; Piera-Velazquez, Sonsoles

    2016-04-01

    Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by progressive fibrosis of skin and multiple internal organs and severe functional and structural microvascular alterations. SSc is considered to be the prototypic systemic fibrotic disorder. Despite currently available therapeutic approaches SSc has a high mortality rate owing to the development of SSc-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), complications that have emerged as the most frequent causes of disability and mortality in SSc. The pathogenesis of the fibrotic process in SSc is complex and despite extensive investigation the exact mechanisms have remained elusive. Myofibroblasts are the cells ultimately responsible for tissue fibrosis and fibroproliferative vasculopathy in SSc. Tissue myofibroblasts in SSc originate from several sources including expansion of quiescent tissue fibroblasts and tissue accumulation of CD34+ fibrocytes. Besides these sources, myofibroblasts in SSc may result from the phenotypic conversion of endothelial cells into activated myofibroblasts, a process known as endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndoMT). Recently, it has been postulated that EndoMT may play a role in the development of SSc-associated ILD and PAH. However, although several studies have described the occurrence of EndoMT in experimentally induced cardiac, renal, and pulmonary fibrosis and in several human disorders, the contribution of EndoMT to SSc-associated ILD and PAH has not been generally accepted. Here, the experimental evidence supporting the concept that EndoMT plays a role in the pathogenesis of SSc-associated ILD and PAH will be reviewed. PMID:26807760

  16. Direct simulation of groundwater transit-time distributions using the reservoir theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, David; Perrochet, Pierre

    Groundwater transit times are of interest for the management of water resources, assessment of pollution from non-point sources, and quantitative dating of groundwaters by the use of environmental isotopes. The age of water is the time water has spent in an aquifer since it has entered the system, whereas the transit time is the age of water as it exits the system. Water at the outlet of an aquifer is a mixture of water elements with different transit times, as a consequence of the different flow-line lengths. In this paper, transit-time distributions are calculated by coupling two existing methods, the reservoir theory and a recent age-simulation method. Based on the derivation of the cumulative age distribution over the whole domain, the approach accounts for the whole hydrogeological framework. The method is tested using an analytical example and its applicability illustrated for a regional layered aquifer. Results show the asymmetry and multimodality of the transit-time distribution even in advection-only conditions, due to the aquifer geometry and to the velocity-field heterogeneity. Résumé Les temps de transit des eaux souterraines sont intéressants à connaître pour gérer l'évaluation des ressources en eau dans le cas de pollution à partir de sources non ponctuelles, et aussi pour dater quantitativement les eaux souterraines au moyen des isotopes du milieu. L'âge de l'eau est le temps qu'elle a passé dans un aquifère depuis qu'elle est entrée dans le système, alors que le temps de transit est l'âge de l'eau au moment où elle quitte le système. L'eau à la sortie d'un aquifère est un mélange d'eaux possédant différents temps de transit, du fait des longueurs différentes des lignes de courant suivies. Dans ce papier, les distributions des temps de transit sont calculées en couplant deux méthodes, la théorie du réservoir et une méthode récente de simulation des âges. Basée sur la dérivation de la distribution cumulées des âges sur

  17. The Effects of Positive Discipline Techniques as They Relate to Transition Times in the Middle School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Patrick; Davis, Ruth

    This study examined the relationship between positive discipline techniques and classroom transition times in middle-school classrooms. The study sample consisted of four language arts classes with a total of 113 predominantly white eighth-grade students from a northeast Tennessee school system. Data were collected by establishing transition times…

  18. Going through the Rites of Passage: Timing and Transition of Menarche, Childhood Sexual Abuse, and Anxiety Symptoms in Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Mendle, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Menarche is a discrete, transitional event that holds considerable personal, social, biological, and developmental significance. The present longitudinal study examined both the transition and timing of menarche on the trajectory of anxiety in girls with histories of childhood maltreatment (N = 93; 63% European American, 14% multiracial, 10%…

  19. Spin time-relaxation within strongly coupled paramagnetic systems exhibiting paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present work is a quantitative study of the spin time relaxation within superweak ferrimagnetic materials exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, when the temperature is changed from an initial value Ti to a final one Tf very close to the critical temperature Tc. From a magnetic point of view, the material under investigation is considered to be made of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices of respective moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and ψ. Calculations are made within a Landau mean-field theory, whose free energy involves, in addition to quadratic and quartic terms in both moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and ψ, a lowest-order coupling - Cphi (cursive,open) Greekψ, where C1 and τ2. The former is a long time and the second a short one, and they are associated, respectively, with long and local wavelength fluctuations. We find that, only the first relaxation time is relevant for physics, since it drives the system to undergo a phase transition. Spatial fluctuations are also taken into account. In this case, we find an explicit expression of the relaxation times, which are functions of temperature T, coupling constant C and wave vector q. We find that the critical mode is that given by the zero scattering-angle limit, i.e. q=0. Finally, we emphasize that the appearance of these two relaxation times is in good agreement with results reported in recent experimental work dealt with the Curie-Weiss paramagnet compound LixNi2-xO2, where the composition x is very close to 1

  20. [Time-delay to avoid: delayed recovery of a percutaneous central venous catheter fractured and embolized in the pulmonary artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Luigi; Sauro, Rosario; Manganelli, Fiore; Rotondi, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man with a fracture of the catheter of a port-a-cath, dislodged into the right atrium. Two days after the diagnosis, the fragment embolized into the lobar artery of the left lower lung lobe. The catheter was removed using a gooseneck snare. PMID:22120781

  1. Detection of Laplace-resonant three-planet systems from transit timing variations

    CERN Document Server

    Libert, A -S

    2013-01-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are useful to constrain the existence of perturbing planets, especially in resonant systems where the variations are strongly enhanced. Here we focus on Laplace-resonant three-planet systems, and assume the inner planet transits the star. A dynamical study is performed for different masses of the three bodies, with a special attention to terrestrial planets. We consider a maximal time-span of ~ 100 years and discuss the shape of the inner planet TTVs curve. Using frequency analysis, we highlight the three periods related to the evolution of the system: two periods associated with the Laplace-resonant angle and the third one with the precession of the pericenters. These three periods are clearly detected in the TTVs of an inner giant planet perturbed by two terrestrial companions. Only two periods are detected for a Jupiter-Jupiter-Earth configuration (the ones associated with the giant interactions) or for three terrestrial planets (the Laplace periods). However, the latter sy...

  2. Diagnostic yield of small bowel capsule endoscopy depends on the small bowel transit time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessie Westerhof; Jan J Koornstra; Reinier A Hoedemaker; Wim J Sluiter; Jan H Kleibeuker; Rinse K Weersma

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate whether the small bowel transit time (SBTT) influences the diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy (CE).METHODS:Six hundred and ninety-one consecutive CE procedures collected in a database were analyzed.SBTT and CE findings were recorded.A running mean for the SBTT was calculated and correlated to the diagnostic yield with a Spearman's correlation test.Subgroup analyses were performed for the various indications for the procedure.RESULTS:There was a positive correlation between the diagnostic yield and SBTT (Spearman's rho 0.58,P < 0.01).Positive correlations between diagnostic yield and SBlT were found for the indication obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (r =0.54,P < 0.01),for polyposis and carcinoid combined (r =0.56,P < 0.01) and for the other indications (r =0.90,P <0.01),but not for suspected Crohn's disease (r =-0.40).CONCLUSION:The diagnostic yield in small bowel capsule endoscopy is positively correlated with the small bowel transit time.This is true for all indications except for suspected Crohn's disease.

  3. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodoro Cordova-Fraga; Modesto Sosa; Cados Wiechers; Jose Maria De la Roca-Chiapas; Alejandro Maldonado Moreles; Jesus BernaI-Alvarado; Raquel Huerta-Franco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT)and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI).METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright,fowler,and supine positions; 90°,45° and 0°,respectively).RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions.The ETT means were 5.2 ±1.1 s,6.1±1.5 s,and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90°,45° and 0°,respectively.Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects' anatomical position,and r =-0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject's BHI.CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique,it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT.

  4. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenwald, J., E-mail: jgruenwald@gmx.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-08-15

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  5. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  6. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. II. Mode jumping and nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A fireball is formed inside a highly transparent spherical grid immersed in a dc discharge plasma. The ambient plasma acts as a cathode and the positively biased grid as an anode. A strong nearly current-free double layer separates the two plasmas. Electrons are accelerated into the fireball, ionize, and establish a discharge plasma with plasma potential near the grid potential. Ions are ejected from the fireball. Since electrons are lost at the same rate as ions, most electrons accelerated into the fireball just pass through it. Thus, the electron distribution contains radially counterstreaming electrons. High-frequency oscillations are excited with rf period given by the electron transit time through the fireball. Since the frequency is well below the electron plasma frequency, no eigenmodes other than a beam space-charge wave exists. The instability is an inertial transit-time instability similar to the sheath-plasma instability or the reflex vircator instability. In contrast to vircators, there is no electron reflection from a space-charge layer but counterstreaming arises from spherical convergence and divergence of electrons. While the basic instability properties have been presented in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012104 (2011)], the present paper focuses on observed mode jumping and nonlinear effects. The former produce frequency jumps and different potential profiles, the latter produce harmonics associated with electron bunching at large amplitudes. In situ probe measurements are presented and interpreted.

  7. Search for time-independent Lorentz violation using muon neutrino to muon antineutrino transitions in MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Chen, R; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; de Rijck, S; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Pfützner, M M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2016-01-01

    Data from the MINOS experiment has been used to search for mixing between muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos using a time-independent Lorentz-violating formalism derived from the Standard-Model Extension (SME). MINOS is uniquely capable of searching for muon neutrino-antineutrino mixing given its long baseline and ability to distinguish between neutrinos and antineutrinos on an event-by-event basis. Neutrino and antineutrino interactions were observed in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors from an exposure of 10.56$\\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target from the NuMI neutrino-optimized beam. No evidence was found for such transitions and new, highly stringent limits were placed on the SME coefficients governing them. We place the first limits on the SME parameters $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} $ and $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau}$ at $-8.4\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} < 8.0\\times10^{-23}$ and $-8.0\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau} < 8.4\\times10^{-23}$, and the world's best limits on the $\\tilde{g}^{Z...

  8. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Carter, Joshua A; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J; Lissauer, Jack J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Allen, Christopher; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Christopher J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Cochran, William D; Désert, Jean-Michel; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra A; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ron L; Jenkins, Jon M; Haas, Michael R; Horch, Elliott; Howell, Steve B; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A; Isaacson, Howard; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Lucas, Philip; MacQueen, Phillip J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; McCauliff, Sean; Mullally, Fergal R; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa; Shporer, Avi; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Wohler, Bill

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timingn variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:...

  9. Sport Transition of JPSS VIIRS Imagery for Night-time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuell, Kevin; LeRoy, Anita; Smith, Matt; Miller, Steve; Kann, Diedre; Bernhardt, David; Reydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program and NOAA/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) work within the NOAA/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Ground to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the VIIRS instrument. Very similar to MODIS, the VIIRS instrument provides many high-resolution visible and infrared channels in a broad spectrum. In addition, VIIRS is equipped with a low-light sensor that is able to detect light emissions from the land and atmosphere as well as reflected sunlight by the lunar surface. This band is referred to as the Day-Night Band due to the sunlight being used at night to see cloud and topographic features just as one would typically see in day-time visible imagery. NWS forecast offices that collaborate with SPoRT and CIRA have utilized MODIS imagery in operations, but have longed for more frequent passes of polar-orbiting data. The VIIRS instrument enhances SPoRT collaborations with WFOs by providing another day and night-time pass, and at times two additional passes due to its large swath width. This means that multi-spectral, RGB imagery composites are more readily available to prepare users for their use in GOES-R era and high-resolution imagery for use in high-latitudes is more frequently able to supplement standard GOES imagery within the SPoRT Hybrid GEO-LEO product. The transition of VIIRS also introduces the new Day-Night Band capability to forecast operations. An Intensive Evaluation Period (IEP) was conducted in Summer 2013 with a group of "Front Range" NWS offices related to VIIRS night-time imagery. VIIRS single-channel imagery is able to better analyze the specific location of fire hotspots and other land features, as well as provide a more true measurement of various cloud and aerosol properties than geostationary measurements, especially at night. Viewed within the SPoRT Hybrid imagery, the VIIRS data allows forecasters to better interpret the more frequent, but

  10. Thermoluminescence and nuclear particle tracks in ALHA-81005 Evidence for a brief transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Crozaz, G.

    1983-09-01

    Thermoluminescence and nuclear particle track measurements were made on the Antarctic meteorite ALHA-81005. No nuclear particle tracks were found in lithic fragments indicating that the clast material never resided at the very surface of the parent body. The unusually low natural thermoluminescence of this material is interpreted as being due to a combination of anomalous fading and thermal decay. The thermal decay could be due to very long terrestrial age or heating either during atmospheric entry, in a near sun orbit or during a parent body impact event. Impact heating is considered the more likely of these possibilities for this meteorite. If the impact heating interpretation is correct the thermoluminescence data constrains the space exposure time of the object to be less than 2,500 years. Such a brief earth transit time is consistent with a lunar origin for this meteorite.

  11. The η transition form factor from space- and time-like experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, R. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica, Grup de Fisica Teorica, and Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Masjuan, P.; Sanchez-Puertas, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The η transition form factor is analyzed for the first time in both space- and time-like regions at low and intermediate energies in a model-independent approach through the use of rational approximants. The η @→ e{sup +}e{sup -}γ experimental data provided by the A2 Collaboration in the very low energy region of the dielectron invariant mass distribution allows for the extraction of the most precise up-to-date slope and curvature parameters of the form factors as well as their values at zero and infinity. The impact of these new results on the mixing parameters of the η-η' system, together with the role played by renormalization dependent effects, and on the determination of the V Pγ couplings from V @→ Pγ and P → Vγ radiative decays is also discussed. (orig.)

  12. Forced bursting and transition mechanism in CO oxidation with three time scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiang-Hong; Bi Qin-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical model of CO oxidation with three time scales on platinum group metals is investigated,in which order gaps between the time scales related to external perturbation and the rates associated with different chemical reaction steps exist.Forced bursters,such as point-point type forced bursting and point-cycle type forced bursting,are presented.The bifurcation mechanism of forced bursting is novel,and the phenomenon where two different kinds of spiking states coexist in point-cycle type forced bursting has not been reported in previous work.A double-parameter bifurcation set of the fast subsystem is explored to reveal the transition mechanisms of different forced bursters with parameter variation.

  13. Forced bursting and transition mechanism in CO oxidation with three time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical model of CO oxidation with three time scales on platinum group metals is investigated, in which order gaps between the time scales related to external perturbation and the rates associated with different chemical reaction steps exist. Forced bursters, such as point—point type forced bursting and point—cycle type forced bursting, are presented. The bifurcation mechanism of forced bursting is novel, and the phenomenon where two different kinds of spiking states coexist in point—cycle type forced bursting has not been reported in previous work. A double-parameter bifurcation set of the fast subsystem is explored to reveal the transition mechanisms of different forced bursters with parameter variation. (general)

  14. Exploring sensitive dependence and transitivity to optimize travel time in chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transitivity and sensitive dependence on initial conditions are the main characteristics of chaotic behavior. The latter one can be exploited so that small controlled perturbations in system parameters may imply a faster transfer in time from a desired start point to a neighborhood of a desired final state. In this study three targeting approaches are evaluated: The first one uses a geometric approach to find the proper perturbation which allows a faster transfer between two desired points; The second, an evolutionary algorithm called GEO (Generalized External Optimization), is adapted to search for optimized orbits; The third one, uses successive perturbations along the path in order to direct the orbits to the final desired point in a short time interval. These three methods are evaluated regarding performance and implementation complexity

  15. Losartan renography for the detection of renal artery stenosis: comparison with captopril renography and evaluation of dose and timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenay, Emel Ceylan; Erguen, Eser Lay; Salanci, Bilge Volkan; Ugur, Oemer; Caner, Biray [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Oeztuerk, M. Halil; Hekimoglu, Baki [Social Security Hospital Clinic of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Altun, Buelent [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nephrology, Ankara (Turkey); Cil, Barbaros [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01

    Radionuclide renography with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition plays an important role in the diagnosis of haemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis. Angiotensin receptor antagonists inhibit the renin angiotensin system at different levels from ACE inhibitors by selectively blocking the binding of angiotensin II to AT1 receptors. The AT1 angiotensin receptor antagonist losartan has recently been used clinically in the treatment of hypertension. However, the available data on the use of losartan with renography for the detection of renovascular hypertension are limited and contradictory. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare the effectiveness of losartan renography and captopril scintigraphy in revealing renal artery stenosis. A total of 61 renal units in 32 patients with hypertension were studied in two groups based on the losartan dosage (50 mg in group A and 100 mg in group B). Group A consisted of 17 patients, in whom 19 renal units had angiographically proven renal artery stenosis ({>=}50%). In group B, there were 15 patients, in whom 20 renal arteries were stenotic. All of the patients underwent three renographies (baseline, captopril renography and early losartan renography). Early losartan renography was performed at 1 h after oral losartan administration in both groups. In group B, seven patients underwent additional losartan renography (late losartan) performed 3 h after oral losartan administration; these patients composed group B1. The sensitivities of captopril and losartan studies were 63.2% and 42% in group A, 65% and 65% in group B and 55.6% and 66.6% in group B1, respectively. From our preliminary results, we conclude that losartan is not superior to captopril renography for the detection of haemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis. However, a high dose (100 mg) of losartan provided higher sensitivity than the lower dose (50 mg). Late losartan scintigraphy provided similar diagnostic efficacy to early

  16. Arterial Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Park, Sung-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Arterial ageing is characterized by age associated degeneration and sclerosis of the media layer of the large arteries. However, besides ageing, clinical conditions, which enhance oxidative stress and inflammation act to accelerate the degree of arterial ageing. In this review, we summarized the pathophysiology and contributing factors that accelerate arterial ageing. Among them, we focused on hypertension, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and vascular inflammation which are modifiabl...

  17. Factors controlling inter-catchment variation of mean transit time with consideration of temporal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Yamanaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    The catchment transit time, a lumped descriptor reflecting both time scale and spatial structure of catchment hydrology can provide useful insights into chemical/nuclear pollution risks within a catchment. Despite its importance, factors controlling spatial variation of mean transit time (MTT) are not yet well understood. In this study, we estimated time-variant MTTs for about ten years (2003-2012) in five mesoscale sub-catchments of the Fuji River catchment, central Japan, to establish the factors controlling their inter-catchment variation with consideration of temporal variability. For this purpose, we employed a lumped hydrological model that was calibrated and validated by hydrometric and isotopic tracer observations. Temporal variation patterns of estimated MTT were similar in all sub-catchments, but with differing amplitudes. Inter-catchment variation of MTT was greater in dry periods than wet periods, suggesting spatial variation of MTT is controlled by water 'stock' rather than by 'flow'. Although the long-term average MTT (LAMTT) in each catchment was correlated with mean slope, coverage of forest (or conversely, other land use types), coverage of sand-shale conglomerate, and groundwater storage, the multiple linear regression revealed that inter-catchment variation of LAMTT is principally controlled by the amount of groundwater storage. This is smaller in mountainous areas covered mostly by forests and greater in plain areas with less forest coverage and smaller slope. This study highlights the topographic control of MTT via groundwater storage, which might be a more important factor in mesoscale catchments, including both mountains and plains, rather than in smaller catchments dominated by mountainous topography.

  18. THE NEW COMPUTERIZED TRANSIT SYSTEM AND E-CUSTOMS INFLUENCE ON SAVINGS IN TRANSIT TIME AND COSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandar Erceg

    2013-01-01

    E-customs is dramatically changing the role of customs offices and international forwarders. E-customs comprises from different activit ies which are used for a safe exchange of goods, services and information using computers and modern information and communicat ion technologies. New e-Customs system is based on new customs procedures and tax system as well as new commerce and statistics regulation in Croatia. The New Computerized Transit System (NCTS) is one of the first e-Customs tools whi...

  19. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  20. STUDY OF THE BEHAVIOR MODELS BASED ON PROBABILITY AND TIME BY USING MARKOV PROCESS AND TRANSITION MATRIX.

    OpenAIRE

    Sumangala Patil; P.Nagaraju; Somashekar Deasi

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to software system architecture specification based on behavior models. The behavior of the system is defined as an event occurring probability and time. The behavior ofthe system over a time of stationary Markov process is completely characterized by the one step transition matrix, the matrix of instantaneous transition rates. Given the element of the appropriative matrix, it is possible to calculate probability of event of the process.

  1. Lactose malabsorption in Greek adults: correlation of small bowel transit time with the severity of lactose intolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladas, S.; Papanikos, J; Arapakis, G

    1982-01-01

    Using breath hydrogen analysis after 139 mmol (50 g) oral lactose load, we investigated the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in 200 Greek adults and examined the relationship between symptoms and small bowel transit time. One hundred and fifty subjects had increased breath hydrogen concentrations (greater than 20 ppm) after the lactose load. In these individuals peak breath hydrogen concentration was inversely related to small bowel transit time (r = 0.63, 6 = 6.854, p less than 0.001) and...

  2. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  3. Life time of the HFS transition in Li-like {sup 209}Bi{sup 80+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geppert, C.; Noertershaeuser, W. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Uni Mainz (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Hannen, V.; Joehren, R.; Ortjohann, H.W.; Vollbrecht, J.; Weinheimer, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Uni Muenster (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Uni Mainz (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena (Germany); S' anchez, R.; Winters, D. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, T. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Uni Mainz (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena (Germany); Uni Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Measuring the hyperfine splitting of heavy, highly charged ions enables tests of QED in strong fields. HFS calculations have a relative uncertainty of more than 10{sup -3} due to the distribution of the magnetic moment (Bohr-Weisskopf-Effekt). With an appropriate comparison of H- and Li-like ions this nuclear structure contribution can be suppressed. Bismuth is a suitable element for these studies, as the HFS splitting for both configurations are in a wavelength range suitable for laser spectroscopy. For this purpose the two ion species were stored in the Experimental Storage Ring at GSI at a velocity of β = 0.71. To efficiently collect the forward emitted photons a specially developed movable detector system was used. Thereby the HFS of Li-like {sup 209}Bi{sup 80+} was successfully measured for the first time. Besides the determination of the transition energy it was possible to extract the lifetime of the transition out of the collected data. The corresponding analysis and the results are presented on this poster.

  4. Life time of the HFS transition in Li-like 209Bi80+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring the hyperfine splitting of heavy, highly charged ions enables tests of QED in strong fields. HFS calculations have a relative uncertainty of more than 10-3 due to the distribution of the magnetic moment (Bohr-Weisskopf-Effekt). With an appropriate comparison of H- and Li-like ions this nuclear structure contribution can be suppressed. Bismuth is a suitable element for these studies, as the HFS splitting for both configurations are in a wavelength range suitable for laser spectroscopy. For this purpose the two ion species were stored in the Experimental Storage Ring at GSI at a velocity of β = 0.71. To efficiently collect the forward emitted photons a specially developed movable detector system was used. Thereby the HFS of Li-like 209Bi80+ was successfully measured for the first time. Besides the determination of the transition energy it was possible to extract the lifetime of the transition out of the collected data. The corresponding analysis and the results are presented on this poster.

  5. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION OF NEAR-RESONANCE PLANETARY PAIRS: CONFIRMATION OF 12 MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ji-Wei, E-mail: xiejiwei@gmail.com, E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-10-01

    We extract transit timing variation (TTV) signals for 12 pairs of transiting planet candidates that are near first-order mean motion resonances (MMR), using publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q14). These pairs show significant sinusoidal TTVs with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate these planet candidates are orbiting and interacting in the same system. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs because of the well-known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity, TTV phases and amplitudes can still place upper limits on the masses of the candidates, confirming their planetary nature. Furthermore, the mass ratios of these planet pairs can be relatively tightly constrained using these TTVs. The planetary pair in KOI 880 seems to have particularly high mass and density ratios, which might indicate very different internal compositions of these two planets. Some of these newly confirmed planets are also near MMR with other candidates in the system, forming unique resonance chains (e.g., KOI 500)

  6. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  7. Optimal Blood Suppression inversion time based on breathing rates and heart rates to improve renal artery visibility in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yi Gang; Li, Fang; Long, Xue Ying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Jin Kang; Li, Wen Zheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shen, Hao [GE Healthcare, Waukesha (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency.

  8. Incidence and Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing First-Time Coronary Angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Kralev, Stefan; Schneider, Kathrin; Lang, Siegfried; Süselbeck, Tim; Borggrefe, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background In standard reference sources, the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) ranged between 24 and 46.5%. Since then, the incidence of cardiovascular risk factors (CRF) has increased and modern treatment strategies (“pill in the pocket”) are only applicable to patients without structural heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of CAD in patients with AF. Methods From January 2005 until December 20...

  9. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-01-01

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the b...

  10. The experimental investigation of the X-band transit-time tube oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    MaQiaoSheng; Fan Zhi Kai; Hu Hai Ying; LiuQingXiang; Su Chang

    2002-01-01

    The experimental investigation of X-band transit-time tube oscillator on the accelerator Sinus-700 is described. The accelerator is adjusted so that it can work stably; some parameters which influence the operation of the microwave device are adjusted so that the appropriate values of the parameters are obtained. The appropriate values of the parameters are described as follow: the length of the 1/4 wavelength stand equals 8 mm, the strength of the magnetic field 1.75 T, the voltage of the diode 700 kV and the shape of the cathode is annular. As a result, the microwave frequency is 9.18 GHz, the microwave power 1.5 GW, the pulse width 26 ns and the power conversion efficiency 31%

  11. The City: Spaces, Times and Subjects in the Global Transition (edited by Niccolò Cuppini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Cuppini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the entering in the global era, the city is come back again as a strategic architrave of the world's infrastructure – while the State, the historical figure through which Modernity was organized, has been declared in crisis long time ago. Despite the broad spectrum of urban reflections, there still is a deep lack of political theory of the city. The globalization of the city – within the pathway of the planetary urbanization – is the object of the article, that elaborates on a twofold level: on one hand, a genealogical trace of that process is proposed – articulating it by distilling urban political thought from different authors and historical episodes; on the other hand, the article suggests a theoretical and methodological horizon through which to grasp the contemporary global transitions, labelled as “seeing like a city”.

  12. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described

  13. Education and fertility decline in China during transitional times: A cohort approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Martin; Tong, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effect of education on birth outcomes in China during the period of economic transition and large-scale changes in mass education and population control measures. Retrospective micro data from the 2008 Chinese General Social Survey and discrete time event history analysis are used to examine the fertility history of several cohorts of women born between 1945 and 1968. We observed births at different parities, distinguishing the education effect across cohorts and rural/urban sectors. We found differences across cohorts consistent with unique features of the Chinese context, such as the radical egalitarian era of educational expansion, and the Reform Era. We also found that despite the increase in some education levels across cohorts (e.g., junior high school in rural areas), birth chances were more likely to be concentrated among less educated women, suggesting the impact of factors related to returns to education and hence the desire for children. PMID:26680291

  14. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  15. Anomalous Parity-Time Symmetry Transition away from an Exceptional Point

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems have two distinguished phases, e.g., one with real energy eigenvalues and the other with complex conjugate eigenvalues. To enter one phase from the other, it is believed that the system must pass through an exceptional point, which is a non-Hermitian degenerate point with coalesced eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In this letter we reveal an anomalous PT transition that takes place away from an exceptional point in a nonlinear system: as the nonlinearity increases, the original linear system evolves along two distinct PT-symmetric trajectories, each of which can have an exceptional point. However, the two trajectories collide and vanish away from these exceptional points, after which the system is left with a PT-broken phase. We first illustrate this phenomenon using a coupled mode theory and then exemplify it using paraxial wave propagation in a transverse periodic potential.

  16. Flow acoustics modelling and implications for ultrasonic flow measurement based on the transit-time method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willatzen, M

    2004-05-01

    A comparison between three mathematical models frequently used in flow acoustics is presented and discussed with respect to ultrasonic flow-meter performance based on the transit-time method. The flow-meter spoolpiece geometry is assumed to be a cylindrical pipe. Semi-analytical calculations employing the Frobenius power series expansion method are shown for the cases of a constant-, linear-, parabolic-, and cubic-flow profiles although the Frobenius method presented can be applied to any smooth flow profile. It is shown that the so-called deviation of measurement, often used as a measure of the flow-meter accuracy, is strongly dependent on the acoustic mode excited and the flow profile. Furthermore, differences with respect to deviation of measurement results exist among the three mathematical models analyzed. PMID:15110538

  17. A transit timing analysis of nine RISE light curves of the exoplanet system TrES-3

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, N P; Skillen, I; Simpson, E K; Barros, S; Joshi, Y C; Todd, I; Benn, C; Christian, D; Hrudková, M; Keenan, F P; Steele, I A

    2009-01-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be Rp/Rstar=0.1664^{+0.0011}_{-0.0018} and i = 81.73^{+0.13}_{-0.04} respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving chi^2 = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a con...

  18. Empirical Assessment on Factors Affecting Travel Time of Bus Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergyanto E Gunawan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the century, many cities around the world adopt the bus rapid transit (BRT system to fulfill their need of mass transportation system. The system features with platform-level boarding, bus lanes in the central verge of the road, off-vehicle fare collection, and physically protected busway. So far, these criteria are considered to be the most important aspects with respect to the BRT performance. In this research, we intend to study to what extent the BRT performance may be affected by the interference of the mixed traffic during the BRT operation. We adopt an empirical approach by observing the phenomenon unfolding in the eleven TransJakarta BRT corridors. The TransJakarta BRT operates in the city of Jakarta, the capital of the Republic of Indonesia. We record the travel time data from station to station for the case where the TransJakarta bus can travel smoothly and the case where the traveling bus is interfered with the mixed traffic. For the cases, we evaluate the travel time variation. As the results, we found that the Corridor 1 of TransJakarta BRT has the best performance in term of the travel time variation. For the two directions, the corridor has the mean travel time of 34 min, the standard deviation of 3 min, and the travel time variation of 8%. On this corridor, the mixed-traffic interference is relatively negligible. On the Corridor 7, the two-direction travel times have the mean of 45 min, the standard deviation of 8 min, and the travel time variation of 16%. On the Corridor 9, the twodirection travel times have the mean of 1 hr and 25 min, the standard deviation of 11 min, and the travel time variation of 14%. On the last two corridors, the busways are heavily interfered by the mixed traffic; thus, the end-to-end travel times are significantly uncertain although only very few road segments are interfered. The research leads us to a conclusion that the interference, although only occurs on a road segment, may

  19. Life Course Transitions and Housework: Marriage, Parenthood, and Time on Housework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Janeen; Hewitt, Belinda; Haynes, Michele

    2008-01-01

    We examine the effects of transitions in marital and parenthood status on 1,091 men's and women's housework hours using two waves of data from an Australian panel survey titled Negotiating the Life Course. We examine transitions between cohabitation and marriage, and from cohabitation or marriage to separation, as well as transitions to first and…

  20. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  1. Effect of erythromycin on image quality and transit time of capsule endoscopy: A two-center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Niv; Ido Bogner; Olga Barkay; Zamir Halpern; Elisabeth Mahajna; Roman Depsames; Yael Kopelman; Zvi Fireman

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effect of oral erythromycin vs no preparation with prokinetics on the transit time and the image quality of capsule endoscopy (CE) in evaluating small bowel (SB) pathology.METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, blinded (to the type of preparation) review of 100 CE studies,50 with no preparation with prokinetics from one medical center (Group A) and 50 from another center with administration of a single dose of 200 mg oral erythromycin 1 h prior to CE (Group B).Gastric, SB and total transit times were calculated, the presence of bile in the duodenum was scored, as was cleanliness within the proximal, middle and distal intestine.RESULTS: The erythromycin group had a slightly shorter gastric transit time (21 rain vs 28 min, with no statistical significance).SB transit time was similar for both groups (all P > 0.05).Total transit time was almost identical in both groups.The rate of incomplete examination was 16% for Group A and 10% for Group B (P = 0.37).Bile and cleanliness scores in different parts of the intestine were similar for the two groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: Preparation for capsule endoscopy with erythromycin does not affect SB or total transit time.It tends to reduce gastric transit time, but it does not increase the cecum-reaching rate.Erythromycin does not adversely affect image quality.We consider the routine use of oral erythromycin preparation as being unjustified,although it might be considered in patients with known prolonged gastric emptying time.

  2. Phase transitions between lower and higher level management learning in times of crisis: an experimental study based on synergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liening, Andreas; Strunk, Guido; Mittelstadt, Ewald

    2013-10-01

    Much has been written about the differences between single- and double-loop learning, or more general between lower level and higher level learning. Especially in times of a fundamental crisis, a transition between lower and higher level learning would be an appropriate reaction to a challenge coming entirely out of the dark. However, so far there is no quantitative method to monitor such a transition. Therefore we introduce theory and methods of synergetics and present results from an experimental study based on the simulation of a crisis within a business simulation game. Hypothesized critical fluctuations - as a marker for so-called phase transitions - have been assessed with permutation entropy. Results show evidence for a phase transition during the crisis, which can be interpreted as a transition between lower and higher level learning. PMID:24011119

  3. First Order Transition for the Optimal Search Time of Lévy Flights with Resetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierz, Lukasz; Majumdar, Satya N; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2014-11-28

    We study analytically an intermittent search process in one dimension. There is an immobile target at the origin and a searcher undergoes a discrete time jump process starting at x_{0}≥0, where successive jumps are drawn independently from an arbitrary jump distribution f(η). In addition, with a probability 0≤rreset to its initial position x_{0}. The efficiency of the search strategy is characterized by the mean time to find the target, i.e., the mean first passage time (MFPT) to the origin. For arbitrary jump distribution f(η), initial position x_{0} and resetting probability r, we compute analytically the MFPT. For the heavy-tailed Lévy stable jump distribution characterized by the Lévy index 0global minimum in the (μ,r) plane at (μ^{*}(x_{0}),r^{*}(x_{0})). We find a remarkable first-order phase transition as x_{0} crosses a critical value x_{0}^{*} at which the optimal parameters change discontinuously. Our analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:25494063

  4. Spin time-relaxation within strongly coupled paramagnetic systems exhibiting paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Chahid, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is a quantitative study of the spin time relaxation within superweak ferrimagnetic materials exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, when the temperature is changed from an initial value T sub i to a final one T sub f very close to the critical temperature T sub c. From a magnetic point of view, the material under investigation is considered to be made of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices of respective moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi. Calculations are made within a Landau mean-field theory, whose free energy involves, in addition to quadratic and quartic terms in both moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi, a lowest-order coupling - Cphi (cursive,open) Greek psi, where C<0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first determine the time dependence of the shifts of the order parameters delta phi (cursive,open) Greek and delta psi from the equilibrium state. We find that this time dependence ...

  5. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-10-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique `two-step' dynamics, with a robust `plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  6. Radionuclide esophageal transit time for the assessment of pneumatic dilation in patients with achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Desouki Mahmoud

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the value of radionuclide esophageal transit time (RET in prediction of the results of pneumatic dilation in patients with achalasia. Patients and methods: Thirty patients (13 males with a mean age of 37 ± 15.6 years (range 17-73 years were included in the study. All patients were diagnosed to have idiopathic achalasia of the cardia and selected for pneumatic dilation. Each patient had three RET, two the same day of dilation (pre-and postdilation and a third follow up one within three months of dilation (4 patients failed to come for follow up and were excluded. Results: Several parameters were derived from RET studies, T/50: time required for 50% of activity in the esophagus to be cleared, T/10 : time required for 90% of activity in the esophagus to be cleared and percentage clearance at 10 min. These parameters were compared to response of dysphagia to dilation. It was evident that the higher the esophageal clearance postdilation, the better the outcome. When immediate post dilation clearance was 85% or more the success rate was 83.3% whereas when it was 20-50% the success rate was only 21.4%. No relation was found between T/50, T/10 and dysphagia response. Conclusion: RET appears to be a useful quantitative procedure in the assessment of pneumatic dilation outcome in achalasia patients.

  7. Inflationary spectra from near $\\Omega$-deformed space-time transition point in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Anomaly-free perturbations of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections reveal a $\\Omega$ -deformed space-time structure, $\\Omega:=1-2\\rho/\\rho_c$, where $\\Omega0$ means a Lorentz-like space. It would be reasonable to give the initial value at the space-time transition point, $\\rho=\\rho_c/2$, but we find it is impossible to define a Minkowski-like vacuum even for large $k$-modes at that time. However if we loose the condition and give the initial value near after $\\Omega=0$, e.g. $\\Omega\\simeq 0.2$, the vacuum state can be well defined and furthermore the slow roll approximation also works well in that region. Both scalar and tensor spectra are considered in the framework of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections. We find that if the energy density is not too small compared with $\\rho_c/2$ when the considered $k$-mode crossing the horizon, effective theory can give a much smaller scalar power spectrum than classical theory and the spectrum of tensor perturbations could blue shift. But when co...

  8. Two Eyes on the Prize: Revealing the Complete Architectures of Planetary Systems through Transit Timing with Kepler and Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrycky, Daniel; Stevenson, Kevin; Ballard, Sarah; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew; Bean, Jacob; Ragozzine, Darin

    2013-11-01

    The transit timing variation (TTV) technique has recently become a crucial method for determining the complete architectures (i.e., planet masses, orbital eccentricities, inclinations, and resonant properties) of extrasolar planetary systems. This technique has blossomed because of the Kepler mission's discovery of systems with multiple transiting planets and individual planets exhibiting very large TTVs. All of Kepler's results in this area so far have been for relatively short-period planets, but Kepler has also discovered dynamically-interacting systems with planets that have longer periods, similar to those of the Solar System. However, the ill-timed failure of the Kepler telescope has left us with an incomplete picture of these systems due to a lack of the required time baseline. Fortunately, Spitzer is positioned to leverage the unique potential that these planets offer, by extending the time baseline of transit observations. We propose to observe transits of seven Kepler-discovered planets in four particularly compelling systems to precisely determine their transit times. Combining the legacy Kepler transit times with the new times from Spitzer will give us the baseline that is needed to confirm and characterize these dynamically interacting systems of planets. This information will allow us to assess the complete architectures of these systems -- we will discover planets that do not transit and determine the masses and orbital properties of all the planets. For 6 planets in these systems, the TTVs will allow us to measure the planetary masses to better than 20%, which will approximately double the number of cool giant planets with known masses and radii. Several of the systems have mean-motion resonances between the planets, and characterizing these interactions yields information on the formation and migration of giant planets. The required precision and duration of these observations render Spitzer the only remaining instrument capable of such study.

  9. Estimation of Catchment Transit Time in Fuji River Basin by using an improved Tank model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenchao, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Wakiyama, Y.; Wang, P.

    2013-12-01

    As an important parameter that reflects the characteristics of catchments, the catchment transit time (CTT) has been given much more widely attentions especially in recent years. The CTT is defined as the time water spends travelling through a catchment to the stream network [1], and it describes how catchments retain and release water and solutes and thus control geochemical and biogeochemical cycling and contamination persistence [2]. The objectives of the present study are to develop a new approach for estimating CTT without prior information on such TTD functions and to apply it to the Fuji River basin in the Central Japan Alps Region. In this study, an improved Tank model was used to compute mean CTT and TTD functions simultaneously. It involved water fluxes and isotope mass balance. Water storage capacity in the catchment, which strongly affects CTT, is reflected in isotope mass balance more sensitively than in water fluxes. A model calibrated with observed discharge and isotope data is used for virtual age tracer computation to estimate CTT. This model does not only consider the hydrological data and physical process of the research area but also reflects the actual TTD with considering the geological condition, land use and the other catchment-hydrological conditions. For the calibration of the model, we used river discharge record obtained by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation, and are collecting isotope data of precipitation and river waters monthly or semi-weekly. Three sub-catchments (SC1~SC3) in the Fuji River basin was selected to test the model with five layers: the surface layer, upper-soil layer, lower-soil layer, groundwater aquifer layer and bedrock layer (Layer 1- Layer 5). The evaluation of the model output was assessed using Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean square error-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR), and percent bias (PBIAS). Using long time-series of discharge records for calibration, the simulated

  10. Transit time of mixed high pressure injection water and primary loop water in pressurized water reactor cold legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During an overcooling transient in a pressurized water reactor, cold water from the high pressure injection (HPI) mixes with the hot primary coolant in the cold leg. The transit time is a gauge for the assessment of the time and the velocity of the mixed flow that passes through the cold leg to the downcomer. Existing data from mixing tests at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/CREARE and EPRI/SAI facilities are analyzed. By means of models for HPI jet entrainment as well as the propagation of a gravity current, dimensionless correlations have been developed for the transit time and cold water front velocity at stagnant loop flow conditions. Based on this transit time correlation for stagnant loop flow and the limiting condition for large loop flow, a general correlation has been developed to account for the loop flow effect on transit time. These correlations unify a wide range of data obtained from five geometrically different test sections with two fluids (pure water and saline solution). In addition to the geometric factors, the governing dimensionless parameters for the transit time are the HPI jet Froude number, the Froude number for the cold-leg channel, and the ratio of loop flow to HPI flow

  11. Comparison of active-set method deconvolution and matched-filtering for derivation of an ultrasound transit time spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of ultrasound computed tomography imaging is primarily determined by the accuracy of ultrasound transit time measurement. A major problem in analysis is the overlap of signals making it difficult to detect the correct transit time. The current standard is to apply a matched-filtering approach to the input and output signals. This study compares the matched-filtering technique with active set deconvolution to derive a transit time spectrum from a coded excitation chirp signal and the measured output signal. The ultrasound wave travels in a direct and a reflected path to the receiver, resulting in an overlap in the recorded output signal. The matched-filtering and deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the transit times associated with the two signal paths. Both techniques were able to detect the two different transit times; while matched-filtering has a better accuracy (0.13 μs versus 0.18 μs standard deviations), deconvolution has a 3.5 times improved side-lobe to main-lobe ratio. A higher side-lobe suppression is important to further improve image fidelity. These results suggest that a future combination of both techniques would provide improved signal detection and hence improved image fidelity. (note)

  12. A novel platelet-rich arterial thrombosis model in rabbits. Simple, reproducible, and dynamic real-time measurement by using double-opposing inverted-sutures model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, S J; Chiu, H Y; Shi, G Y; Wu, C M; Wang, J C; Chen, C H; Wu, H L

    2001-09-01

    Though numerous animal thrombosis models have been introduced, an easy, reliable, and reproducible arterial thrombosis model remains a continuing challenge prior to a thrombolytic study. In an effort to evaluate the efficiency of various recombinant thrombolytic agents with specific affinity to activated platelets in vivo, we developed a novel double-opposing inverted-sutures model to create a platelet-rich thrombus in the femoral artery of rabbits. The arteriotomy was done semicircumferentially, and variously sized microsurgical sutures were introduced intraluminally in a double-opposing inverted manner. The animals were divided into three groups according to the double-opposing inverted-sutures used: Group 1 with 10-0 nylon (n=6), Group 2 with 9-0 nylon (n=6), and Group 3 with 8-0 nylon (n=22). The superficial epigastric branch was cannulated with a thin polyethylene (PE) tube for intraarterial administration of the studied thrombolytic agent. The blood flow was continuously measured with a real-time ultrasonic flow meter. Within 2 h of installation of the sutures, there was no thrombus formation in either Group 1 or 2. In Group 3, the thrombosis rate was 91% (20 of 22) under a steady baseline flow (with an average of 12.23+/-2.40 ml/min). It was highly statistically significant with a P-value of .0000743 using Fisher's Exact Test. The averaged time to thrombosis was 21.8+/-9.8 min. The ultrasonic flow meter to record the dynamic real-time measurement of blood flow was a guideline for thrombus formation or dissolution, which was correlated with the morphological findings of stenotic status of the vessel detected by the Doppler sonography. The components of the thrombus were proven to be platelet-rich predominant by histological examination via hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To confirm that the double-opposing inverted-sutures model would be useful for a study of thrombolytic agents, we evaluated the effects of

  13. Arterial pH and Blood Lactate Levels of Anesthetized Mongolian Khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus) in the Mongolian Gobi Correlate with Induction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsmann, Hanno; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Kaczensky, Petra; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Payne, John; Boldbaatar, Sukhbaatar; Walzer, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Research and conservation of wide-ranging wild equids in most cases necessitate capture and handling of individuals. For free-roaming Mongolian khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus), also known as the khulan, capture involves a strenuous, high-speed chase, and physiologic responses have yet to be elucidated. We analyzed sequential arterial blood gas (ABG) samples as a proxy for respiratory and metabolic status of khulan during capture-related anesthesia. We recorded precise chase and induction times and monitored vital parameters and ABG from free-ranging khulan during anesthesia performed for GPS collaring. At the initiation of anesthesia, animals had ABG values similar to those recorded for thoroughbred horses ( Equus caballus ) after maximal exercise. Longer induction times resulted in higher arterial pH (P<0.001) and lower blood lactate (P<0.002). This trend of improvement continued over the course of anesthesia. The most important factor explaining pH and lactate was the time that elapsed between cessation of the chase and obtaining the first ABG sample, which, under field conditions, is tightly linked to induction time. All animals recovered uneventfully. Our data show that khulan recover and shift their metabolic status back toward expected normal values during opioid-based field anesthesia. PMID:27243152

  14. Robust Guaranteed Cost Observer Design for Singular Markovian Jump Time-Delay Systems with Generally Incomplete Transition Probability

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of the design of robust guaranteed cost observer for a class of linear singular Markovian jump time-delay systems with generally incomplete transition probability. In this singular model, each transition rate can be completely unknown or only its estimate value is known. Based on stability theory of stochastic differential equations and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, we design an observer to ensure that, for all uncertainties, the resultin...

  15. Estimation of Time-Varying Channel State Transition Probabilities for Cognitive Radio Systems by means of Particle Swarm Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    A. Akbulut; T. Adiguzel; YILMAZ, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, Particle Swarm Optimization is applied for the estimation of the channel state transition probabilities. Unlike most other studies, where the channel state transition probabilities are assumed to be known and/or constant, in this study, these values are realistically considered to be time-varying parameters, which are unknown to the secondary users of the cognitive radio systems. The results of this study demonstrate the following: without any a priori information about the cha...

  16. Going Through the Rites of Passage: Timing and Transition of Menarche, Childhood Sexual Abuse, and Anxiety Symptoms in Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Mendle, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Menarche is a discrete, transitional event that holds considerable personal, social, biological, and developmental significance. The present longitudinal study examined both the transition and timing of menarche on the trajectory of anxiety in girls with histories of childhood maltreatment (N = 93; 63% European American, 14% multiracial, 10% Latino, 9% African American, and 4% Native American). We hypothesized that because menarche is a novel, unfamiliar experience, girls would show greater a...

  17. Test MaxEnt in Social Strategy Transitions with Experimental Two-Person Constant Sum 2$\\times$2 Games

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    By using laboratory experimental data, we test the uncertainty of social strategy transitions in various competing environments of fixed paired two-person constant sum $2 \\times 2$ games. It firstly shows that, the distributions of social strategy transitions are not erratic but obey the principle of the maximum entropy (MaxEnt). This finding indicates that human subject social systems and natural systems could have wider common backgrounds.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Liver Cancer: Is It Time to Distinguish Conventional from Drug-Eluting Chemoembolization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads are increasingly being performed interchangeably in many institutions throughout the world. As both therapies continue to being tested in many phase II and III studies and in combination with other therapies, especially targeted agents, for treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer, it is imperative to review their current status and evaluate their impact on patient survival. This review critically assesses patient selection, indications, contraindications, techniques, materials, safety, and clinical outcomes of patients treated with conventional chemoembolization and chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads.

  19. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-03-01

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993. PMID:26950143

  20. Eight planets in four multi-planet systems via transit timing variations in 1350 days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of candidate pairs near mean-motion resonances (MMRs) is an effective method to confirm planets. Hitherto, 68 planets in 34 multi-planet systems have been confirmed via TTVs. We analyze the TTVs of all candidates from the most recent Kepler data with a time span of upto about 1350 days (Q0-Q15). The anti-correlations of TTV signals and the mass upper limits of candidate pairs in the same system are calculated using an improved method suitable for long-period TTVs. If the false alarm probability of a candidate pair is less than 10–3 and the mass upper limit for each candidate is less than 13 M J, we confirm them as planets in the same system. Finally, eight planets in four multi-planet systems are confirmed via analysis of their TTVs. All of the four planet pairs are near first-order MMRs, including KOI-2672 near 2:1 MMR and KOI-1236, KOI-1563, and KOI-2038 near 3:2 MMR. Four planets have relatively long orbital periods (>35 days). KOI-2672.01 has an orbital period of 88.51658 days and a fit mass of 17 M ⊕. To date, it is the longest-period planet confirmed near a first-order MMR via TTVs.

  1. Measuring space-time variation of the fundamental constants with redshifted submillimetre transitions of neutral carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J; Koch, F E; Berengut, J C; Webb, J K; Stark, A A; Flambaum, V V

    2011-01-01

    We compare the redshifts of neutral carbon and carbon monoxide in the redshifted sources in which the fine structure transition of neutral carbon, [CI], has been detected, in order to measure space-time variation of the fundamental constants. Comparison with the CO rotational lines measures gives the same combination of constants obtained from the comparison fine structure line of singly ionised carbon, [CII]. However, neutral carbon has the distinct advantage that it may be spatially coincident with the carbon monoxide, whereas [CII] could be located in the diffuse medium between molecular clouds, and so any comparison with CO could be dominated by intrinsic velocity differences. Using [CI], we obtain a mean variation of dF/F = (-3.6 +/- 8.5) x 10^-5, over z = 2.3 - 4.1, for the eight [CI] systems, which degrades to (-1.5+/- 11) x 10^-5, over z = 2.3 - 6.4 when the two [CII] systems are included. That is, zero variation over look-back times of 10.8-12.8 Gyr. However, the latest optical results indicate a spa...

  2. Eight planets in four multi-planet systems via transit timing variations in 1350 days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jia-Yi; Zhou, Ji-Lin, E-mail: zhoujl@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: huigen@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of candidate pairs near mean-motion resonances (MMRs) is an effective method to confirm planets. Hitherto, 68 planets in 34 multi-planet systems have been confirmed via TTVs. We analyze the TTVs of all candidates from the most recent Kepler data with a time span of upto about 1350 days (Q0-Q15). The anti-correlations of TTV signals and the mass upper limits of candidate pairs in the same system are calculated using an improved method suitable for long-period TTVs. If the false alarm probability of a candidate pair is less than 10{sup –3} and the mass upper limit for each candidate is less than 13 M {sub J}, we confirm them as planets in the same system. Finally, eight planets in four multi-planet systems are confirmed via analysis of their TTVs. All of the four planet pairs are near first-order MMRs, including KOI-2672 near 2:1 MMR and KOI-1236, KOI-1563, and KOI-2038 near 3:2 MMR. Four planets have relatively long orbital periods (>35 days). KOI-2672.01 has an orbital period of 88.51658 days and a fit mass of 17 M {sub ⊕}. To date, it is the longest-period planet confirmed near a first-order MMR via TTVs.

  3. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-21

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments. PMID:27389209

  4. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  5. A study on the pulmonary mean transit time and the pulmonary blood volume by RI-cardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulmonary mean transit time and the pulmonary blood volume in cases of cardio-pulmonary disease were measured using Giuntini's method which is considered the most appropriate among radiocardiographic methods. The errors in this method were confirmed to be almost negligible. The results obtained were as follows: 1) The pulmonary mean transit time was related to the systemic mean transit time and markedly prolonged in left heart failure. On the other hand, it was markedly shortened in some cases of chronic pulmonary disease, particularly pulmonary emphysema. 2) The pulmonary blood volume tended to increase in left heart disorders and mitral valve disease and tended to decrease in the chronic pulmonary disease. The decrease was conspicuous particularly in some cases of pulmonary emphysema. 3) A structural change of the pulmonary vascular system in the chronic pulmonary disease appeared to bring about shortening of the pulmonary mean transit time and a decrease in the pulmonary blood volume. The pathophysiology of cardio-pulmonary disease can be more clarified by the RI-cardiogram used in this study, in which the pulmonary mean transit time and the pulmonary blood volume are used as the indicator. (author)

  6. Three-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography of Intracranial Vessels in a Canine Model of Ischemic Stroke with Permanent Occlusion of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    OpenAIRE

    KANG, Byeong-Teck; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Gu, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young-Bo; Lim, Chae-Young; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) to validate a canine ischemic stroke model. Ischemic stroke was induced through permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in 5 healthy Beagle dogs. T2-turbo spin echo images and TOF-MRA were obtained with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance system before and 3 and 10 d after MCAO. In 3 dogs, angiograms of the brain obtained at 3 d after MCAO showed complete ...

  7. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Morehead, Robert C.; /Florida U.; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  8. Imaging of the coronary arteries by means of multislice helical CT: optimization of image quality with multisegmental reconstruction and variable gantry rotation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of multisegmental reconstruction and variable gantry rotation time for reducing motion-induced artifacts in coronary artery imaging by multislice helical CT. Materials and Methods: The data sets of 20 patients (8 with HR60 bpm) were analyzed. The patients underwent multislice helical CT (Aquilion 8, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan) using the following parameters: 0.5 mm slice thickness, 250 mA, 120 kV, pitch of 0.25 and variable gantry rotation times of 400, 500, or 600 msec. Images were generated by halfscan and multisegmental reconstruction. In 9 coronary segments of each patient, the presence and severity of motion artifacts were assessed and graded on a scale between 5 (no artifacts) and 1 (heaviest artifacts). Results: Diagnostically relevant motion artifacts were rare at low heart rates (60 bpm) were associated with an increase in motion artifacts of halfscan reconstructions (33% of all segments, p0.05), whereas at higher heart rates image quality was better for multisegmental reconstruction than for halfscan reconstruction (4.23±0.47 vs. 3.11±0.63; p<0.05). Conclusion: Multisegmental reconstruction with variable gantry rotation times suppresses motion artifacts and thus improves assessment of the coronary arteries in patients with higher heart rates. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of the K2-19 Multiple-Transiting Planetary System via High-Dispersion Spectroscopy, AO Imaging, and Transit Timing Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Fukui, Akihiko; Hori, Yasunori; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Delrez, Laetitia; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; McCormac, James; Holman, Matthew; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Takeda, Yoichi; Tamura, Motohide; Yanagisawa, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is a unique planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ~ 7 $R_{Earth}$ (inner planet b) and ~ 4 $R_{Earth}$ (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2m telescope. We find that the host star is relatively old (>8 Gyr) late G-type star ($T_{eff}$ ~ 5350 K, $M_s$ ~ 0.9 $M_{Sun}$, and $R_{s}$ ~ 0.9 $R_{Sun}$). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star which could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit-timing variations, as previously re...

  10. Dynamic CT brain scanning in the haemodynamic evaluation of cerebral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic cerebral CT scanning (DCT) was used to quantitatively analyse the haemodynamic effects of extracranial and intracranial arterial occlusive lesions in 17 patients with TIA's or minor cerebral infarcts. Using DCT and gamma variate curve fitting, mean transit times were determined for the terminal internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries and middle cerebral-supplied Sylvian cortex at the level of the Circle of Willis. Six patients were studied sequentially, four before and after transcranial bypass surgery. No arterial or tissue delays were found in patients without haemodynamic arterial lesions or cortical infarcts. Seven of nine patients with haemodynamic, extracranial carotid lesions showed ipsilateral delays in arterial or tissue transit times. Tissue delays usually correlated with CT or clinical evidence of infarction. Improved haemodynamics in patients re-studied correlated with the effects of surgery or clinical recovery. DCT has several important limitations but has the potential to provide additional haemodynamic information about the cerebral circulation in selected patients with cerebral arterial occlusive disease. (orig.)

  11. Take Time to Listen: A First Step toward Collaborative Transition Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is mounting about the importance of the transition to adulthood for youth with disabilities, and occupational therapists have a role to play in this area. The article in this issue by Tina Mankey offers evidence about the barriers and strategies for involvement in transition planning. Using a person-centered approach with each client in…

  12. 77 FR 77180 - Notice of Transportation Services' OMB Designation, timely return of excess transit benefits to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Transportation Facilitation, 65 FR 19482 (April 11, 2000). III. Minimum Internal Controls To ensure that funds... return of excess transit benefits to the Treasury, and stakeholder notification of the minimum internal... of the Federal internal controls that now govern the Transit Benefit Program to prevent...

  13. Making a Drama out of Transition: Challenges and Opportunities at Times of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Nick

    2016-01-01

    This case study explored how teachers and children perceive challenges and opportunities at transition. Using Forum Theatre (FT), an interactive drama approach, children were able to show aspects of transitions they perceived as challenging and how these barriers may be overcome. FT offered a tangible reference point for children to discuss their…

  14. Characters available in photoplethysmogram for blood pressure estimation: beyond the pulse transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjun; Wang, Zengli; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Xianglin; Song, Jinzhong

    2014-06-01

    The continuous and noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement based on pulse transit time (PTT) doesn't need cuff and could monitor BP in real time for a long period. However, PTT is just a time index derived from electrocardiogram (ECG) and photoplethysmogram (PPG), while BP-related information within the PPG waveform has seldom been taken into consideration. We hypothesized that PPG waveform feature might be useful for BP estimation. Nine healthy subjects took part in an exercise stress test, including baseline resting, exercise on bicycle ergometry and recovering resting. ECG of lead V5 and PPG from left finger were collected simultaneously, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were recorded from a cuff sphygmometer on the right wrist. The correlation coefficients were obtained between BP (SBP, DBP and pulse pressure (PP)) and PPG morphological indices (total 15 indices in terms of waveform amplitude, time span and area ratio). Five PPG indices were correlated with both SBP and PP (absolute value of correlation coefficient |r| > 0.6) and were further tested for the capability to BP estimation, which were: (1) PTTA, time delay between the R peak of ECG and the foot point of PPG; (2) RSD, time ratio of systole to diastole; (3) RtArea, area ratio of systole to diastole; (4) TmBB, time span of PPG cycle; (5) TmCA, diastolic duration. Comparisons were made between the measured BP and the estimated BP by regression lines and quadratic curve fitting, respectively. As a result, the mean errors of SBP liner fitting with RSD, RtArea, TmBB and TmCA respectively were 5.5, 5.4, 5.2, 5.1 mmHg, which were smaller than that with PTTA of 5.8 mmHg. And the mean errors of SBP quadratic curve fitting with RSD, RtArea, TmBB and TmCA were all 5.1 mmHg, which were smaller than that with PTTA of 5.7 mmHg. The mean errors of multiple regression for SBP, PP and DBP was 4.7, 4.7, 3.5 mmHg respectively, which were more accurate than the regression with

  15. Stochastic Stability for Time-Delay Markovian Jump Systems with Sector-Bounded Nonlinearities and More General Transition Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with delay-dependent stochastic stability for time-delay Markovian jump systems (MJSs with sector-bounded nonlinearities and more general transition probabilities. Different from the previous results where the transition probability matrix is completely known, a more general transition probability matrix is considered which includes completely known elements, boundary known elements, and completely unknown ones. In order to get less conservative criterion, the state and transition probability information is used as much as possible to construct the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and deal with stability analysis. The delay-dependent sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee the stability of systems. Finally, numerical examples are exploited to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018−0.004+0.005, and planets smaller than 2.5 R ⊕ are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R ⊕. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm–3 × (R/3 R ⊕)–2.3 for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R ⊕ are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  17. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groiss, H., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Daruka, I., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Springholz, G.; Schäffler, F. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Koike, K.; Yano, M. [Nanomaterials Microdevices Research Center, Osaka Institute of Technology, Asahi-ku Ohmiya, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Hesser, G. [Center for Surface- and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Zakharov, N.; Werner, P. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle 06120 (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  18. Comparison of colonic transit time findings between spastic pelvic floor syndrome and normal on defecogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Choi, Sang Hee; Chung, Il Gyu; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choo, Sung Wook; Rhee, Poong Lyul [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate colonic transit time (CTT) in patients with spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS) diagnosed by defecography and compare findings with those of patients with normal defecography. Over a recent 15-month period, 140 patients underwent both defecography and CTT test because of chronic idiopathic constipation. Of these, 54 with SPFS diagnosed by defecography and 49 controls with normal defecography were included in our study. CTT test involved the radiopaque marker method. Subjects ingested 24 markers at 9:00 Am on three consecutive days and a plain film of the abdomen was obtained on day 4. We calculated total and segmental CTT test findings in the two groups. Delayed total CTT was found in 35% of patients (19/54) with SPFS. Segmental CTT in the right, left and rectosigmoid colon was delayed in 31 % of patients (15/49) with SPFS. Segmental CTT in the right, left and rectosigmoid colon was delayed in 19 % (10/54), 44 % (24/54), and 31 % of cases (17/54), respectively. Total CTT was delayed in 31 % of patients (15/49) with normal defecography. In this group, segmental CTT in the left colon was delayed in 39 % of cases. There was no significant difference in CTT findings between the SPFS and normal groups on defecogram. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. Climatic and landscape controls on water transit times and silicate mineral weathering in the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rademacher, Laura; Troch, Peter A.; Brooks, Paul D.; Rasmussen, Craig; Chorover, Jon

    2015-08-01

    The critical zone (CZ) can be conceptualized as an open system reactor that is continually transforming energy and water fluxes into an internal structural organization and dissipative products. In this study, we test a controlling factor on water transit times (WTT) and mineral weathering called Effective Energy and Mass Transfer (EEMT). We hypothesize that EEMT, quantified based on local climatic variables, can effectively predict WTT within—and mineral weathering products from—the CZ. This study tests whether EEMT or static landscape characteristics are good predictors of WTT, aqueous phase solutes, and silicate weathering products. Our study site is located around Redondo Peak, a rhyolitic volcanic resurgent dome, in northern New Mexico. At Redondo Peak, springs drain slopes along an energy gradient created by differences in terrain aspect. This investigation uses major solute concentrations, the calculated mineral mass undergoing dissolution, and the age tracer tritium and relates them quantitatively to EEMT and landscape characteristics. We found significant correlations between EEMT, WTT, and mineral weathering products. Significant correlations were observed between dissolved weathering products (Na+ and DIC), 3H concentrations, and maximum EEMT. In contrast, landscape characteristics such as contributing area of spring, slope gradient, elevation, and flow path length were not as effective predictive variables of WTT, solute concentrations, and mineral weathering products. These results highlight the interrelationship between landscape, hydrological, and biogeochemical processes and suggest that basic climatic data embodied in EEMT can be used to scale hydrological and hydrochemical responses in other sites.

  20. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; Winchenbach, K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination.

  1. Quantum percolation and transition point of a directed discrete-time quantum walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, C M; Busch, Th

    2014-01-01

    Quantum percolation describes the problem of a quantum particle moving through a disordered system. While certain similarities to classical percolation exist, the quantum case has additional complexity due to the possibility of Anderson localisation. Here, we consider a directed discrete-time quantum walk as a model to study quantum percolation of a two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice. Using numerical analysis we determine the fraction of connected edges required (transition point) in the lattice for the two-state particle to percolate with finite (non-zero) probability for three fundamental lattice geometries, finite square lattice, honeycomb lattice, and nanotube structure and show that it tends towards unity for increasing lattice sizes. To support the numerical results we also use a continuum approximation to analytically derive the expression for the percolation probability for the case of the square lattice and show that it agrees with the numerically obtained results for the discrete case. Beyond the fundamental interest to understand the dynamics of a two-state particle on a lattice (network) with disconnected vertices, our study has the potential to shed light on the transport dynamics in various quantum condensed matter systems and the construction of quantum information processing and communication protocols. PMID:25301394

  2. Developments in Time-Division Multiplexing of X-ray Transition-Edge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W. B.; Morgan, K. M.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Joe, Y. I.; Mates, J. A. B.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Robbins, N. O.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-07-01

    Time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a mature scheme for the readout of arrays of transition-edge sensors (TESs). TDM is based on superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID) current amplifiers. Multiple spectrometers based on gamma-ray and X-ray microcalorimeters have been operated with TDM readout, each at the scale of 200 sensors per spectrometer, as have several astronomical cameras with thousands of sub-mm or microwave bolometers. Here we present the details of two different versions of our TDM system designed to read out X-ray TESs. The first has been field-deployed in two 160-sensor (8 columns × 20 rows) spectrometers and four 240-sensor (8 columns × 30 rows) spectrometers. It has a three-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 320 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.41 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. The second, which is presently under development, has a two-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 160 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.19 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. Both quoted noise values are non-multiplexed and referred to the first-stage SQUID. In a demonstration of this new architecture, a multiplexed 1-column × 32-row array of NIST TESs achieved average energy resolution of 2.55± 0.01 eV at 6 keV.

  3. Securing the Extremely Low-Densities of Low-Mass Planets Characterized by Transit Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) provide an excellent tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many at orbital periods beyond the reach of both Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified low-mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities (e.g., Kepler-79d, Jontof-Hutter et al. 2014; Kepler-51, Masuda 2014; Kepler-87c, Ofir et al. 2014). Additional low-density, low-mass planets will likely become public before ESS III (Jontof-Hutter et al. in prep). Collectively, these results suggest that very low density planets with masses of 2-6 MEarth are not uncommon in compact multiple planet systems. Some astronomers have questioned whether there could be an alternative interpretation of the TTV observations. Indeed, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. While the physics of TTVs is rock solid, the statistical analysis of Kepler observations can be challenging, due to the complex interactions between model parameters and high-dimensional parameter spaces that must be explored. We summarize recent advances in computational statistics that enable robust characterization of planetary systems using TTVs. We present updated analyses of a few particularly interesting systems and discuss the implications for the robustness of extremely low densities for low-mass planets. Such planets pose an interesting challenge for planet formation theory and are motivating detailed theoretical studies (e.g., Lee & Chiang 2015 and associated ESS III abstracts).

  4. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination

  5. Transit timing variations for planets near eccentricity-type mean motion resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Deck, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    We present a derivation of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of a pair of planets near the j:j-2 second order resonance on nearly circular and nearly coplanar orbits. We show that the TTVs of each planet are given by sinusoids with a frequency of j n_2-(j-2)n_1, where n_2 and n_1 are the mean motions of the outer and inner planets, respectively. The amplitude of the TTV depends on the mass of the perturbing planet, relative to the mass of the star, and on a function of the eccentricities and longitudes of pericenter of each planet. The phase of each sinusoid is approximately phi and phi+pi, where the phase phi also depends on the eccentricities and longitudes of pericenter. Therefore, the situation for second order resonances is analogous to the case of TTVs induced by two planets near a first order mean motion resonance. Degeneracies between planet masses and eccentricities/longitudes of pericenter occur when the small phase offset from pi cannot be resolved, and even when it can be, degeneracies persist ...

  6. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018{sub −0.004}{sup +0.005}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕}. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm{sup –3} × (R/3 R {sub ⊕}){sup –2.3} for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  7. Transit timing variation and transmission spectroscopy analyses of the hot Neptune GJ3470b

    CERN Document Server

    Awiphan, S; Pichadee, S; Komonjinda, S; Dhillon, V S; Rujopakarn, W; Poshyachinda, S; Marsh, T R; Reichart, D E; Ivarsen, K M; Haislip, J B

    2016-01-01

    GJ3470b is a hot Neptune exoplanet orbiting an M dwarf and the first sub-Jovian planet to exhibit Rayleigh scattering. We present transit timing variation (TTV) and transmission spectroscopy analyses of multi-wavelength optical photometry from 2.4-m and 0.5-m telescopes at the Thai National Observatory, and the 0.6-m PROMPT-8 telescope in Chile. Our TTV analysis allows us to place an upper mass limit for a second planet in the system. The presence of a hot Jupiter with a period of less than 10 days or a planet with an orbital period between 2.5 and 4.0 days are excluded. Combined optical and near-infrared transmission spectroscopy favour a H/He dominated haze (mean molecular weight 1.18$\\pm$0.22) with high particle abundance at high altitude. We also argue that previous near-infrared data favour the presence of methane in the atmosphere of GJ3470b.

  8. Transit timing variation and transmission spectroscopy analyses of the hot Neptune GJ3470b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awiphan, S.; Kerins, E.; Pichadee, S.; Komonjinda, S.; Dhillon, V. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Poshyachinda, S.; Marsh, T. R.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.

    2016-08-01

    GJ3470b is a hot Neptune exoplanet orbiting an M dwarf and the first sub-Jovian planet to exhibit Rayleigh scattering. We present transit timing variation (TTV) and transmission spectroscopy analyses of multi-wavelength optical photometry from 2.4-m and 0.5-m telescopes at the Thai National Observatory, and the 0.6-m PROMPT-8 telescope in Chile. Our TTV analysis allows us to place an upper mass limit for a second planet in the system. The presence of a hot Jupiter with a period of less than 10 days or a planet with an orbital period between 2.5 and 4.0 days are excluded. Combined optical and near-infrared transmission spectroscopy favour a H/He dominated haze (mean molecular weight 1.08 ± 0.20) with high particle abundance at high altitude. We also argue that previous near-infrared data favour the presence of methane in the atmosphere of GJ3470b.

  9. Mean transit time as an index of cerebral perfusion pressure in experimental systemic hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease requires the accurate identification of brain regions with compromised cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Current clinical measures of CPP are invasive and lack regional information. Dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging provides a means of looking at regional cerebral hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to determine if any of the parameters associated with dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging could be used as an index for CPP under graded systemic hypotension in a rabbit model. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, mean transit time (MTT), and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) were measured using Computed Tomography Perfusion in three groups: normotensive (n = 14), mild hypotensive (n = 9), and moderate hypotensive (n = 6). MTT demonstrated the strongest correlation with CPP (ρ = −0.642, P < 0.05). CBF was the only other parameter to demonstrate a statistically significant correlation (ρ = 0.575, P < 0.05). CVR is gaining momentum for diagnosing cerebrovascular disease; however, the technique requires patients to be given a hemodynamic challenge, which could aggravate symptoms and even trigger stroke. The results of this study suggest that the use of MTT, not requiring hemodynamic manipulation, is more sensitive to subtle changes in CPP, as would occur in the early stages of cerebrovascular disease

  10. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  11. Excitonic transitions in silicon nanostructures probed by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrat, M.; Shalibo, Y.; Arad, N.; Popov, I. [Racah Institute of Physics, Harvey M. Krueger Family Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Lee, S.T. [Center for Super-Diamond and Advanced Films, Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sa' ar, A.

    2009-07-15

    Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been utilized to reveal excitonic transitions in silicon nanowires and silicon nanocrystals. While previous works on porous silicon and silicon nanocrystals have shown a two-level splitting, e.g., singlet-triplet states, our measurements reveal the fine structure of the excitons including three semi-bright states and a ground dark excitonic state. Surprisingly, for silicon nanowires we have found the slowest semi-dark exciton to fall above the faster semi-bright excitonic state as opposed to silicon nanocrystals. The results are analyzed in terms of spin and orbital selection rules showing that the interchange in the level's hierarchy corresponds to a swap between spin-forbidden and orbitally-allowed states. We assign this surprising phenomenon to the relationship between the exchange interaction and the direct Coulomb interaction, which is affected by the dimensionality of the exciton. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  13. Minimal cardiac transit-times in the diagnosis of heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Indium-113m and the Gamma Retina V (Fucks-Knipping Camera), the minimal cardiac transit times (MTTs) were measured radiocardiographically from the right auricle to the aortic root. This analysis served to determine the relation between stroke volume and the segment volume of the part of circulation between the right auricle and the aortic root. In 39 patients with myocardial insufficiency of different clinical degree the effectiveness of digitalization was, up to a period of 5 years, measured by means of the volume relation mentioned above. The following conclusions can be drawn from the results: digitalization of patients with myocardial insufficiency leads to an improvement of the impaired relation of central volumes. In patients with diminished cardiac reserve the improvement is drastic and often results in a nearly complete normalization. The data remain constant during therapy even for an observation period of 5 years. Digitalization of patients with congestive heart failure only leads to a partial improvement. In contrast to patients with diminished cardiac reserve this effect is temporary. The different behaviour of the relation between stroke volume and segment volume in patients with diminished cardiac reserve and congestive heart failure under prolonged administration of digitalis points to the necessity of treatment with digitalis in the early stage of myocardial disease. (orig.)

  14. Time-resolved x-ray studies of pressure-jump-induced topological transitions in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Osterberg, Frederik; Gruner, Sol M.; Tate, Mark W.; Kriechbaum, Manfred

    1995-09-01

    Topological transitions in membrane liquid crystals formed by biological lipid-water systems have been the subject of much recent interest. We have developed an x-ray diffraction system capable of initiating pressure jumps of up to 3 kbar in about 5 ms. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction patterns were obtained (approximately 9 ms each) at the National Synchrotron Light Source using two state-of-the-art CCD based detectors developed at Princeton. Numerous Bragg diffraction patterns were obtained in studying the effect of pressure on the simplest topological transitions in membranes, the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. The patterns from one of the detectors were recorded with a signal-to-noise sufficient to measure peak positions, peak widths, and integrated areas to an accuracy adequate to test models and mechanisms of phase transition kinetics. Additional longer time-scale studies were performed using optical turbidity measurements and were found to be consistent with x-ray studies. Transition rates were found to vary by nearly 5 orders of magnitude as the difference between the final pressure and the equilibrium transition pressure was varied. As the magnitude of the pressure jump in these lyotropic systems is increased, the transition mechanism is determined not only by the rate at which water and lipid molecules transform from one phase to the new emerging phase, but also by the need for water transport. Finally, it was found that the lamellar phase acts as an intermediate phase in transitions between the gel phase and the hexagonal phase, induced by very large pressure jumps (> 2 kbar).

  15. Effect of loperamide and naloxone on mouth-to-caecum transit time evaluated by lactulose hydrogen breath test.

    OpenAIRE

    Basilisco, G; Bozzani, A; Camboni, G; M. Recchia; Quatrini, M; Conte, D.; Penagini, R; PA Bianchi

    1985-01-01

    The effect of loperamide and naloxone on mouth-to-caecum transit time was evaluated by the lactulose hydrogen breath test in four men and four women. Each subject underwent tests during the administration of placebo, loperamide (12-16 mg po), naloxone (40 micrograms/kg/h by a three-hour intravenous infusion), and loperamide plus naloxone, carried out at intervals of one or two weeks. The transit time was significantly longer after loperamide, and this effect was antagonised by the concomitant...

  16. Regional in vivo transit time measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity in mice with high-field CMR at 17.6 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Eberhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mouse models are increasingly used to study the pathophysiology of human cardiovascular diseases. The aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV is an indirect measure for vascular stiffness and a marker for cardiovascular risk. Results This study presents a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR transit time (TT method that allows the determination of the PWV in the descending murine aorta by analyzing blood flow waveforms. Systolic flow pulses were recorded with a temporal resolution of 1 ms applying phase velocity encoding. In a first step, the CMR method was validated by pressure waveform measurements on a pulsatile elastic vessel phantom. In a second step, the CMR method was applied to measure PWVs in a group of five eight-month-old apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/- mice and an age matched group of four C57Bl/6J mice. The ApoE(-/- group had a higher mean PWV (PWV = 3.0 ± 0.6 m/s than the C57Bl/6J group (PWV = 2.4 ± 0.4 m/s. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.014. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that high field CMR is applicable to non-invasively determine and distinguish PWVs in the arterial system of healthy and diseased groups of mice.

  17. In vivo evaluation of a novel ‘diastole-patching’ algorithm for the estimation of pulse transit time: advancing the precision in pulse wave velocity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the gold standard for the assessment of aortic stiffness. It is calculated by the ratio of pulse transit time (PTT) between two arterial sites and the distance between them. The precision of PTT estimation depends upon the algorithm that determines characteristic points at the foot of the pulse waveforms. Different algorithms yield variable PTT values thus affecting the precision of PWV and subsequently its diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Our aim was to apply in vivo a new ‘diastole-patching’ algorithm and investigate whether it improves the precision of PWV measurement. Two repeated PWV measurements were performed in a general population (340 subjects) by a reference apparatus (SphygmoCor) which uses the tangential method for PTT estimation. PTT was re-estimated by the ‘diastole-patching’ algorithm. We computed statistical parameters of agreement, consistency, precision and variability between the two PWV measurements. The ‘diastole-patching’ method yielded more precise and reproducible measurements of PWV compared to the tangential method at the total population. In those cases where the reference method provided PWV measurements with difference >1 m s−1, the ‘diastole-patching’ algorithm further improved the precision of PWV. These findings may have direct implications concerning the enhancement of the diagnostic and prognostic value of PWV. (paper)

  18. Incidence and severity of coronary artery disease in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing first-time coronary angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kralev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In standard reference sources, the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF ranged between 24 and 46.5%. Since then, the incidence of cardiovascular risk factors (CRF has increased and modern treatment strategies ("pill in the pocket" are only applicable to patients without structural heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of CAD in patients with AF. METHODS: From January 2005 until December 2009, we included 261 consecutive patients admitted to hospital with paroxysmal, persistent or permanent AF in this prospective study. All patients underwent coronary angiography and the Framingham risk score (FRS was calculated. Patients with previously diagnosed or previously excluded CAD were excluded. RESULTS: The overall incidence of CAD in patients presenting with AF was 34%; in patients >70 years, the incidence of CAD was 41%. The incidence of patients undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG was 21%. Patients with CAD were older (73±8 years vs 68±10 years, p = 0.001, had significantly more frequent hypercholesterolemia (60% vs 30%, p<0.001, were more frequent smokers (26% vs 13%, p = 0.017 and suffered from angina more often (37% vs 2%, p<0.001. There was a significant linear trend among the FRS categories in percentage and the prevalence of CAD and PCI/CABG (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The overall incidence of CAD in patients presenting with AF was relatively high at 34%; the incidence of PCI/CABG was 21%. Based upon increasing CRF in the western world, we recommend a careful investigation respecting the FRS to either definitely exclude or establish an early diagnosis of CAD--which could contribute to an early and safe therapeutic strategy considering type Ic antiarrhythmics and oral anticoagulation.

  19. Fine tuning the color-transition temperature of thermoreversible polydiacetylene/zinc oxide nanocomposites: The effect of photopolymerization time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiphol, Nisanart; Faisadcha, Kunruethai; Potai, Ruttayapon; Traiphol, Rakchart

    2015-02-01

    An ability to control the thermochromic behaviors of polydiacetylene (PDA)-based materials is very important for their utilization. Recently, our group has developed the PDA/zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocomposites, which exhibit reversible thermochromism (Traiphol et al., 2011). In this study, we present our continuation work demonstrating a rather simple method for fine tuning their color-transition temperature. The PDA/ZnO nanocomposites are prepared by varying photopolymerization time, which in turn affects the length of PDA conjugated backbone. We have found that the increase of photopolymerization time from 1 to 120min results in systematically decrease of the color-transition temperature from about 85 to 40°C. These PDA/ZnO nanocomposites still exhibit reversible thermochromism. The PDA/ZnO nanocomposites embedded in polyvinyl alcohol films show two-step color-transition processes, the reversible blue to purple and then irreversible purple to orange. Interestingly, the increase of photopolymerization time causes an increase of the irreversible color-transition temperature. Our method is quite simple and cheap, which can provide a library of PDA-based materials with controllable color-transition temperature. PMID:25463181

  20. A transit timing analysis with combined ground- and space-based photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raetz St.

    2015-01-01

    The CoRoT satellite looks back on six years of high precision photometry of a very high number of stars. Thousands of transiting events are detected from which 27 were confirmed to be transiting planets so far. In my research I search and analyze TTVs in the CoRoT sample and combine the unprecedented precision of the light curves with ground-based follow-up photometry. Because CoRoT can observe transiting planets only for a maximum duration of 150 days the ground-based follow-up can help to refine the ephemeris. Here we present first examples.

  1. Venous flow velocity, venous volume and arterial blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship of arterial blood flow and venous volume to venous flow velocity was studied in normal subjects. The effects of current modes of treatment in venous thrombosis and of a vasodilator drug on venous flow velocity were also investigated. Total calf flow and venous volume were measured by venous occlusion plethysmography while venous flow axial velocity was determined by the transit time of 131I albumin from calf to inguinal region. Local intravenous epinephrine administration induced venoconstriction and increased venous flow velocity. Intra-arterial isoproterenol and angiotensin increased and decreased arterial flow, respectively, with no change in venous flow velocity or volume, but local heat increased arterial flow and venous flow velocity with no change in venous volume. Local cold, despite venoconstriction, decreased venous flow velocity accompanied by decreased arterial flow. Intravenous heparin did not affect venous flow velocity. Intravenous but not oral nylidrin increased venous flow velocity. Therefore venous flow velocity can be significantly increased by venoconstriction, by large increases in arterial flow (local heat), and by a parenteral vasodilator drug. These experiments indicate that there is a basis for applying heat but not cold in the prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis

  2. Simultaneous noninvasive evaluation of gastric emptying and orocaecal transit times. Use in studying the actions of cisapride in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O; Guillausseau, P J; Bayle, M; Chagnon, S; Caulin, C; Sallenave, J R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the study was to use a novel combination of two methods for the simultaneous evaluation of two effects of oral cisapride in 10 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy; gastric empyting time was measured by following radio-opaque markers and orocaecal transit time by the sulphasalazine-sulphapridine method. The study was of double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. It was possible to evaluate the effect of a prokinetic drug on gastric emptying and orocaecal transit times using these two noninvasive techniques at the same time. Cisapride significantly reduced both the gastric empyting (1.2 h versus 2.1 h) and orocaecal tansit (5.9 h versus 7.7 h) times. PMID:1425866

  3. Radiofrequency ablation in a porcine liver model: Effects of transcatheter arterial embolization with iodized oil on ablation time, maximum output, and coagulation diameter as well as angiographic characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Motoki Nakai; Morio Sato; Shinya Sahara; Nobuyuki Kawai; Hirohiko Tanihata; Masashi Kimura; Masaki Terada

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effects of combined radiofrequency ablation and transcatheter arterial embolization with iodized oil on ablation time, maximum output, coagulation diameter, and portal angiography in a porcine liver model.METHODS: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was applied to in vivo livers of 10 normal pigs using a 17-gauge 3.0cm expandable LeVeen RF needle electrode with or without transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with iodized oil (n = 5). In each animal, 2 areas in the liver were ablated. Direct portography was performed before and after RFA. Ablation was initiated at an output of 30 W, and continued with an increase of 10 W per minute until rolloff occurred. Ablation time and maximum output until roll-off, and coagulated tissue diameter were compared between the 2 groups. Angiographic changes on portography before and after ablation were also reviewed.RESULTS: For groups with and without TAE with iodized oil, the ablation times until roll-off were 320.6 ± 30.9seconds and 445.1 ± 35.9 seconds, respectively, maximum outputs were 69.0 ± 7.38 W and 87.0 ± 4.83 Wand maximal diameters of coagulation were 41.7 ± 3.85mm and 33.2 ± 2.28 mm. Significant reductions of ablation time and maximum output, and significantly largercoagulation diameter were obtained with RFA following TAE with iodized oil compared to RFA alone. Portography after RFA following TAE with iodized oil revealed more occlusion of the larger portal branches than with RFA alone.CONCLUSION: RFA following TAE with iodized oil can increase the volume of coagulation necrosis with lower output and shorter ablation time than RFA alone in normal pig liver tissue.

  4. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  5. Time-of-flight measurements in atomic beam devices using adiabatic high frequency transitions and sextupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic beam devices are frequently equipped with sextupole magnets to focus the beam or to act as spin filters in combination with RF-transitions for manipulating the hyperfine population within the atomic beam. A useful tool for the analysis of sextupole systems, the application of time-of-flight (TOF) measurements is presented. TOF measurements are enabled without mechanical beam chopper by utilizing adiabatic radio frequency transitions to select atoms within a certain time interval. This method is especially interesting for the use in atomic beam devices that are already equipped with RF-transitions and sextupole magnets and where space limitations or the required quality of the vacuum do not allow the installation of a mechanical chopper. The measurements presented here were performed with the atomic beam polarimeter of the HERMES polarized deuterium target and the results have been used to optimize the sextupole system of the polarimeter

  6. Robust Guaranteed Cost Observer Design for Singular Markovian Jump Time-Delay Systems with Generally Incomplete Transition Probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the investigation of the design of robust guaranteed cost observer for a class of linear singular Markovian jump time-delay systems with generally incomplete transition probability. In this singular model, each transition rate can be completely unknown or only its estimate value is known. Based on stability theory of stochastic differential equations and linear matrix inequality (LMI technique, we design an observer to ensure that, for all uncertainties, the resulting augmented system is regular, impulse free, and robust stochastically stable with the proposed guaranteed cost performance. Finally, a convex optimization problem with LMI constraints is formulated to design the suboptimal guaranteed cost filters for linear singular Markovian jump time-delay systems with generally incomplete transition probability.

  7. Aggregation in environmental systems - Part 2: Catchment mean transit times and young water fractions under hydrologic nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Methods for estimating mean transit times from chemical or isotopic tracers (such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ2H) commonly assume that catchments are stationary (i.e., time-invariant) and homogeneous. Real catchments are neither. In a companion paper, I showed that catchment mean transit times estimated from seasonal tracer cycles are highly vulnerable to aggregation error, exhibiting strong bias and large scatter in spatially heterogeneous catchments. I proposed the young water fraction, which is virtually immune to aggregation error under spatial heterogeneity, as a better measure of transit times. Here I extend this analysis by exploring how nonstationarity affects mean transit times and young water fractions estimated from seasonal tracer cycles, using benchmark tests based on a simple two-box model. The model exhibits complex nonstationary behavior, with striking volatility in tracer concentrations, young water fractions, and mean transit times, driven by rapid shifts in the mixing ratios of fluxes from the upper and lower boxes. The transit-time distribution in streamflow becomes increasingly skewed at higher discharges, with marked increases in the young water fraction and decreases in the mean water age, reflecting the increased dominance of the upper box at higher flows. This simple two-box model exhibits strong equifinality, which can be partly resolved by simple parameter transformations. However, transit times are primarily determined by residual storage, which cannot be constrained through hydrograph calibration and must instead be estimated by tracer behavior. Seasonal tracer cycles in the two-box model are very poor predictors of mean transit times, with typical errors of several hundred percent. However, the same tracer cycles predict time-averaged young water fractions (Fyw) within a few percent, even in model catchments that are both nonstationary and spatially heterogeneous (although they may be biased by roughly 0.1-0.2 at sites where strong

  8. Prolonged transition time between colostrum and mature milk in a bear, the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Katharine; Rong, Hou; Wang, Hairui; Zhang, Zhihe; ZHANG, Tong; Watson, David G.; BURCHMORE, RICHARD; Loeffler, I. Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Bears produce the most altricial neonates of any placental mammal. We hypothesized that the transition from colostrum to mature milk in bears reflects a temporal and biochemical adaptation for altricial development and immune protection. Comparison of bear milks with milks of other eutherians yielded distinctive protein profiles. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis of serial milk samples collected from six giant pandas showed a prolonged transition from colostrum to main-phase lactation over a...

  9. Feasibility of MR-guided angioplasty of femoral artery stenoses using real-time imaging and intraarterial contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetzel, C.; Zorger, N.; Bachthaler, M.; Voelk, M.; Seitz, J.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Lenhart, M.; Nitz, W.R. [University Hospital of Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) for guided interventional therapy of femoral and popliteal artery stenoses with commercially available materials supported by MR real-time imaging and intraarterial MR angiography. Materials and Methods: Three patients (1 female, 2 male), suffering from symptomatic arterial occlusive disease with stenoses of the femoral (n=2) or popliteal (n=1) arteries were included. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography was performed in each patient pre- and post-interventionally as standard of reference to quantify stenoses. The degree of the stenoses reached from 71-88%. The MR images were acquired on a 1.5 T MR scanner (Magnetom Sonata; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For MR-angiography, a Flash 3D sequence was utilized following injection of 5 mL diluted gadodiamide (Omniscan; Amersham Buchler, Braunschweig, Germany) via the arterial access. Two maximum intensity projections (MIP) were used as road maps and localizer for the interactive positioning of a continuously running 2D-FLASH sequence with a temporal solution of 2 images per second. During the intervention, an MR compatible monitor provided the image display inside the scanner room. Safety guidelines were followed during imaging in the presence of a conductive guidewire. The lesion was crossed by a commercially available balloon catheter (Wanda, Boston Scientific; Ratingen, Germany), which was mounted on a 0.035'' guidewire (Terumo; Leuven, Belgium). The visibility was provided by radiopaque markers embedded in the balloon and was improved by injection of 1 mL gadodiamide into the balloon. After dilation, the result was checked by intraarterial MR angiography and catheter angiography. Results: The stenoses could be correctly localized by intraarterial MR angiography. There was complete correlation between intraarterial MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography. The combination of guidewire and balloon was visible and the balloon was

  10. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  11. Usefulness of colon transit time and defecography in patients with chronic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Seuk; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myung Hyun; Park, Su Mi; Yang, Hee Chul [NHIC Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to evaluate whether both the colonic transit time (CTT) and defecography are necessary for diagnosing constipated patients, and we also wanted to assess the defecographic findings of patients with outlet obstruction on CTT. Over the recent 3 years, 26 patients (21 women and 5 men, mean age: 59 years) underwent both CTT and defecography because of their chronic constipations or defecation difficulty. The mean interval between the 2 studies was 48 days. Colonoscopy, barium enema and manometry were performed in 22, 8 and all the patients, respectively. On CTT, 13 patients (50.0%) were normal and 13 patients (50.0%) were abnormal; the abnormal results were composed of outlet obstruction (n = 8, 30.8%), outlet obstruction and colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), and outlet obstruction and hindgut dysfunction (n = 1, 3.8%). On defecography, 6 patients (23.1%) were normal and 20 patients (76.9%) were abnormal; the results were composed of rectocele (n = 8, 30.7%), rectocele and perineal descent syndrome (PDS; n = 4, 15.4%), PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 3, 11.5%), spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS; n = 3, 11.5%), rectocele and SPFS (n = 1, 3.8%), and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 3.8%). Of the 11 patients with outlet obstruction on CTT, rectocele (n = 4, 36.4%), SPFS (n = 1, 9.1%), rectocele and PDS (n = 1, 9.1%), and PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 9.1%) were demonstrated on defecography, except for the 4 normal cases. Both CTT and defecography were necessary for diagnosing the patients with chronic constipation in compensation, and 63.6% of the patients with pelvic outlet obstruction showed an abnormal pelvic defecation function.

  12. Runoff Generation Mechanisms and Mean Transit Time in a High-Elevation Tropical Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, G.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding runoff generation processes in tropical mountainous regions remains poorly understood, particularly in ecosystems above the tree line. Here, we provide insights on the process dominating the ecohydrology of the tropical alpine biome (i.e., páramo) of the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory. The study site is located in south Ecuador between 3400-3900 m in elevation. We used a nested monitoring system with eight catchments (20-753 ha) to measure hydrometric data since December 2010. Biweekly samples of rainfall, streamflow, and soil water at low tension were collected for three years (May 2011-May2014) and analyzed for water stable isotopes. We conducted an isotopic characterization of rainfall, streamflow, and soil waters to investigate runoff generation. These data were also integrated into a lumped model to estimate the mean transit time (MTT) and to investigate landscape features that control its variability. The isotopic characterization evidenced that the water stored in the shallow organic horizon of the Histosol soils (Andean wetlands) located near the streams is the major contributor of water to the streams year-round, whereas the water draining through the hillslope soils, the Andosols, regulates discharge by recharging the wetlands at the valley bottoms. The MTT evaluation indicated relatively short MTTs (0.15-0.73 yr) linked to short subsurface flow paths of water. We also found evidence for topographic controls on the MTT variability. These results reveal that: 1) the ecohydrology of this ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow in the organic horizon of the soils and 2) the combination of the high storage capacity of the Andean wetlands and the slope of the catchments controls runoff generation and the high water regulation capacity of the ecosystem.

  13. Measurement of oro-caecal transit time by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savarino, Edoardo; De Cassan, Chiara [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, Padua (Italy); Savarino, Vincenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; Moscatelli, Alessandro [University of Genoa, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Fox, Mark [Queen' s Medical Center, NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    To assess prospectively the agreement of orocaecal transit time (OCTT) measurements by lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects. Volunteers underwent abdominal 1.5-T MRI using axial and coronal single-shot fast-spin-echo T2-weighted sequences, having fasted and after lactulose ingestion (10 g/125 mL). Imaging and H{sub 2} excretion gas-chromatography were performed concurrently every 15 min up to 180 min. MR images were analyzed using semiautomatic segmentation to calculate small bowel gas volume (SBGV) and visually to detect bolus arrival in the caecum. Agreement between MRI- and LHBT-OCTT was assessed. Twenty-eight subjects (17 men/11 women; mean age ± standard deviation 30 ± 8 years) were evaluated. Two H{sub 2} non-producers on LHBT were excluded. OCTT measured by MRI and LHBT was concordant in 18/26 (69 %) subjects (excellent agreement, k = 0.924). Median SBGV was 49.0 mL (interquartile interval 44.1 - 51.6 mL). In 8/26 (31 %) subjects, MRI showed that the lactulose bolus was in the terminal ileum and not the caecum when H{sub 2}E increased on LHBT. Median OCTT measured by MRI was significantly longer than OCTT measured by LHBT [135 min (120 - 150 min) vs. 127.5 min (105 - 150 min); p = 0.008]. Above baseline levels, correlation between [H{sub 2}] and SBGV was significant (r = 0.964; p < 0.001). MRI provides valid measurements of OCTT and gas production in the small bowel. (orig.)

  14. Dating of streamwater using tritium in a post nuclear bomb pulse world: continuous variation of mean transit time with streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Morgenstern

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tritium measurements of streamwater draining the Toenepi catchment, a small dairy farming area in Waikato, New Zealand, have shown that the mean transit time of the water varies with the flow rate of the stream. Mean transit times through the catchment are 2–5 years during high baseflow conditions in winter, increasing to 30–40 years as baseflow decreases in summer, and then dramatically older water during drought conditions with mean transit time of more than 100 years. Older water is gained in the lower reaches of the stream, compared to younger water in the headwater catchment. The groundwater store supplying baseflow was estimated from the mean transit time and average baseflow to be 15.4 × 106 m3 of water, about 1 m water equivalent over the catchment and 2.3 times total annual streamflow. Nitrate is relatively high at higher flow rates in winter, but is low at times of low flow with old water. This reflects both lower nitrate loading in the catchment several decades ago as compared to current intensive dairy farming, and denitrification processes occurring in the older groundwater. Silica, leached from the aquifer material and accumulating in the water in proportion to contact time, is high at times of low streamflow with old water. There was a good correlation between silica concentration and streamwater age, which potentially allows silica concentrations to be used as a proxy for age when calibrated by tritium measurements. This study shows that tritium dating of stream water is possible with single tritium measurements now that bomb-test tritium has effectively disappeared from hydrological systems in New Zealand, without the need for time-series data.

  15. Estimating subsurface water volumes and transit times in Hokkaido river catchments, Japan, using high-accuracy tritium analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, Maksym; Yamazaki, Yusuke; Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Kashiwaya, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Daisuke; Sawano, Hisaya

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate subsurface water transit times and volumes in headwater catchments of Hokkaido, Japan, using the New Zealand high-accuracy tritium analysis technique. Transit time provides insights into the subsurface water storage and therefore provides a robust and quick approach to quantifying the subsurface groundwater volume. Our method is based on tritium measurements in river water. Tritium is a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years, and is inert in the subsurface after the water enters the groundwater system. Therefore, tritium is ideally suited for characterization of the catchment's responses and can provide information on mean water transit times up to 200 years. Only in recent years has it become possible to use tritium for dating of stream and river water, due to the fading impact of the bomb-tritium from thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and due to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments and estimating subsurface water volume. While many tritium transit time studies have been conducted in New Zealand, only a limited number of tritium studies have been conducted in Japan. In addition, the meteorological, orographic and geological conditions of Hokkaido Island are similar to those in parts of New Zealand, allowing for comparison between these regions. In 2014, three field trips were conducted in Hokkaido in June, July and October to sample river water at river gauging stations operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). These stations have altitudes between 36 m and 860 m MSL and drainage areas between 45 and 377 km2. Each sampled point is located upstream of MLIT dams, with hourly measurements of precipitation and river water levels enabling us to distinguish between the snow melt and baseflow contributions

  16. Groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective-dispersive systems: 1. Generalized reservoir theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornaton, F; 10.1016/j.advwatres.2005.10.009

    2011-01-01

    We present a methodology for determining reservoir groundwater age and transit time probability distributions in a deterministic manner, considering advective-dispersive transport in steady velocity fields. In a first step, we propose to model the statistical distribution of groundwater age at aquifer scale by means of the classical advection-dispersion equation for a conservative and nonreactive tracer, associated to proper boundary conditions. The evaluated function corresponds to the density of probability of the random variable age, age being defined as the time elapsed since the water particles entered the aquifer. An adjoint backward model is introduced to characterize the life expectancy distribution, life expectancy being the time remaining before leaving the aquifer. By convolution of these two distributions, groundwater transit time distributions, from inlet to outlet, are fully defined for the entire aquifer domain. In a second step, an accurate and efficient method is introduced to simulate the tr...

  17. Comparison of the Number of Image Acquisitions and Procedural Time Required for Trans arterial Chemo embolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with and without Tumor-Feeder Detection Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the number of image acquisitions and procedural time required for trans arterial chemo embolization (TACE) with and without tumor-feeder detection software in cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 50 cases involving software-assisted TACE (September 2011-February 2013) and 84 cases involving TACE without software assistance (January 2010-August 2011). We compared the number of image acquisitions, the overall procedural time, and the therapeutic efficacy in both groups. Results. Angiography acquisition per session reduced from 6.6 times to 4.6 times with software assistance ( Ρ < 0.001 ). Total image acquisition significantly decreased from 10.4 times to 8.7 times with software usage ( Ρ = 0.004 ). The mean procedural time required for a single session with software-assisted TACE (103 min) was significantly lower than that for a session without software (116 min, Ρ = 0.021 ). For TACE with and without software usage, the complete (68% versus 63%, resp.) and objective (78% versus 80%, resp.) response rates did not differ significantly. Conclusion. In comparison with software-unassisted TACE, automated feeder-vessel detection software-assisted TACE for HCC involved fewer image acquisitions and could be completed faster while maintaining a comparable treatment response

  18. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [∼mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [∼mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [∼mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [∼mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 ± 257.5 compared to 482.2 ± 187.5 [∼mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method (±2.1 s vs. ±9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  19. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krix, Martin, E-mail: martin.krix@kabelbw.de [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, D-78467 Konstanz (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Translational Oncology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Armarteifio, Erick [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fuerstenberger, Susanne [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [{approx}mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [{approx}mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [{approx}mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [{approx}mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 {+-} 257.5 compared to 482.2 {+-} 187.5 [{approx}mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method ({+-}2.1 s vs. {+-}9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  20. Unifying phantom inflation with late-time acceleration: scalar phantom-non-phantom transition model and generalized holographic dark energy

    OpenAIRE

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.(Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan)

    2005-01-01

    The unifying approach to early-time and late-time universe based on phantom cosmology is proposed. We consider gravity-scalar system which contains usual potential and scalar coupling function in front of kinetic term. As a result, the possibility of phantom-non-phantom transition appears in such a way that universe could have effectively phantom equation of state at early time as well as at late time. In fact, the oscillating universe may have several phantom and non-phantom phases. As a sec...