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Sample records for arterial transit time

  1. Improved pulse transit time estimation by system identification analysis of proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the system identification approach for potentially improved estimation of pulse transit time (PTT), a popular arterial stiffness marker. In this approach, proximal and distal arterial waveforms are measured and respectively regarded as the input and output of a system. Next, the system impulse response is identified from all samples of the measured input and output. Finally, the time delay of the impulse response is detected as the PTT estimate. Unlike conventional foot-to-foot detection techniques, this approach is designed to provide an artifact robust estimate of the true PTT in the absence of wave reflection. The approach is also applicable to arbitrary types of arterial waveforms. We specifically applied a parametric system identification technique to noninvasive impedance cardiography (ICG) and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from 15 humans subjected to lower-body negative pressure. We assessed the technique through the correlation coefficient (r) between its 1/PTT estimates and measured diastolic pressure (DP) per subject and the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the DP predicted from these estimates and measured DP. The technique achieved average r and RMSE values of 0.81 ± 0.16 and 4.3 ± 1.3 mmHg. For comparison, the corresponding values were 0.59 ± 0.37 (P system identification approach can indeed improve PTT estimation.

  2. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  3. Arterial Transit Time Mapping Obtained by Pulsed Continuous 3D ASL Imaging with Multiple Post-Label Delay Acquisitions: Comparative Study with PET-CBF in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Isozaki, Makoto; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT) is most crucial for measuring absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL), a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion assessment technique, in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We validated ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT maps calculated by pulsed continuous ASL (pCASL) with multiple post-label delay acquisitions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Fifteen patients underwent MR scans, including pCASL, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans with 15O-water to obtain PET-CBF. MR acquisitions with different post-label delays (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 sec) were also obtained for ATT correction. The theoretical framework of 2-compartmental model (2CM) was also used for the delay compensation. ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT were calculated based on the proposed 2CM, and the effect on the CBF values and the ATT correction characteristics were discussed. Linear regression analyses were performed both on pixel-by-pixel and region-of-interest bases in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. There were significant correlations between ASL-CBF and PET-CBF both for voxel values (r = 0.74 ± 0.08, slope: 0.87 ± 0.22, intercept: 6.1 ± 4.9) and for the MCA territorial comparison in both affected (R2 = 0.67, y = 0.83x + 6.3) and contralateral sides (R2 = 0.66, y = 0.74x + 6.3). ASL-ATTs in the affected side were significantly longer than those in the contralateral side (1.51 ± 0.41 sec and 1.12 ± 0.30 sec, respectively, p <0.0005). CBF measurement using pCASL with delay compensation was feasible and fairly accurate even in altered hemodynamic states.

  4. Time constant of the cerebral arterial bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Diedler, Jennifer; Reinhard, Matthias; Carrera, Emmanuel; Smielewski, Peter; Budohoski, Karol P; Sorrentino, Enrico; Haubrich, Christina; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2012-01-01

    We have defined a novel cerebral hemodynamic index, a time constant of the cerebral arterial bed (τ), the product of arterial compliance (C(a)) and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR). C(a) and CVR were calculated based on the relationship between pulsatile arterial blood pressure (ABP) and transcranial Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity. This new parameter theoretically estimates how fast the cerebral arterial bed is filled by blood volume after a sudden change in ABP during one cardiac cycle. We have explored this concept in 11 volunteers and in 25 patients with severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). An additional group of 15 subjects with non-vascular dementia was studied to assess potential age dependency of τ. The τ was shorter (p = 0.011) in ICA stenosis, both unilateral (τ = 0.18 ± 0.04 s) and bilateral (τ = 0.16 ± 0.03 s), than in controls (τ = 0.22 ± 0.0 s). The τ correlated with the degree of stenosis (R = -0.62, p = 0.001). In controls, τ was independent of age. Further study during cerebrovascular reactivity tests is needed to establish the usefulness of τ for quantitative estimation of haemodynamics in cerebrovascular disease.

  5. Searching for transit timing variations in transiting exoplanet systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hrudková, Marie; Benn, Chris; Pollacco, Don; Gibson, Neale; Joshi, Yogesh; Harmanec, Petr; Tulloch, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Searching for transit timing variations in the known transiting exoplanet systems can reveal the presence of other bodies in the system. Here we report such searches for two transiting exoplanet systems, TrES-1 and WASP-2. Their new transits were observed with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope located on La Palma, Spain. In a continuing programme, three consecutive transits were observed for TrES-1, and one for WASP-2 during September 2007. We used the Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to derive transit times and their uncertainties. The resulting transit times are consistent with the most recent ephemerides and no conclusive proof of additional bodies in either system was found.

  6. Antiplatelet therapy at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremke, Michael; Tang, Mariann; Bak, Mikkel;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this multicentre cohort study was to examine the relationship between antiplatelet therapy (APT) at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and postoperative bleeding complications, transfusion requirements and adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: A matched...

  7. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M. [CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Martínez, C. [Observatorio Astronómico de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  8. Effect of transition from sitaxsentan to ambrisentan in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Zeenat SafdarDivision of Pulmonary-Critical Care Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USAIntroduction: Currently available endothelin receptor antagonists for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension block either the endothelin (ET receptor A or both A and B receptors. Transition from one endothelin receptor antagonist to another may theoretically alter side-effects or efficacy. We report our experience of a transition from sitaxsentan to ambrisentan, both predominant ETA receptor antagonists, in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients.Methods: At Baylor Pulmonary Hypertension Center, 18 patients enrolled in the open-label extension phase of the original sitaxsentan studies (Sitaxsentan To Relieve ImpaireD Exercise were transitioned to ambrisentan (from July 2007 to September 2007 at the time of study closure. Pre-transition (PreT, 1 month (1Mth and 1 year (1Yr post-transition assessments of 6-minute walk distance (6MWD, brain naturetic peptide (BNP levels, WHO functional class (WHO FC, Borg dyspnea score (BDS, oxygen saturation, liver function, and peripheral edema were compared.Results: 6MWD was 356 ± 126 m at PreT, 361 ± 125 m at 1Mth, and 394 ± 114 m at 1Yr (mean ± SD. There was no difference in the walk distance at 1Mth and 1Yr post transition compared with PreT (P = 0.92, 0.41 respectively. Oxygen saturation was no different at 1Mth and 1Yr to PreT level (P = 0.49 and P = 0.06 respectively. BNP was 178 ± 244 pg/mL at PreT, 129 ± 144 pg/mL at 1Mth and 157 ± 201 at 1Yr. Peripheral edema was present in 7/18 patients at PreT, in 8/16 patients at 1Mth, and in 6/13 patients at 1Yr post transition. Proportions of patients with edema over these 3 time points did not change significantly (P = 0.803. At 1Yr, 2 patients had died, 1 had undergone lung transplantation, 1 had relocated, and 1 patient was started on intravenous prostacyclin therapy. Over 3 points (baseline, 1 month, and 1 year, there was no significant change in

  9. Duration Properties of Timed Transition Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhiming; Ravn, Anders P.; Li, Xiaoshan

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for formal real-time systems development.The system requirements and high level design decisions are time interval properties, and are therefore specified in the Duration Calculus (DC), while the implementation and refinement are described in termsof timed transition ...

  10. A search for transit timing variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramm U.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photometric follow-ups of transiting exoplanets (TEPs may lead to discoveries of additional, less massive bodies in extrasolar systems. This is possible by detecting and then analysing variations in transit timing of transiting exoplanets. In 2009 we launched an international observing campaign, the aim of which is to detect and characterise signals of transit timing variation (TTV in selected TEPs. The programme is realised by collecting data from 0.6-2.2-m telescopes spread worldwide at different longitudes. We present our observing strategy and summarise first results for WASP-3b with evidence for a 15 Earth-mass perturber in an outer 2:1 orbital resonance.

  11. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Verifying duration properties of timed transition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhiming; Ravn, Anders P.; Li, Xiaoshan

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for formal real-time systems development:Requirements and high level design decisions are time interval properties and are therefore specified in the Duration Calculus (DC), while implementations are described bytimed transition systems (TTS). A link from implementati...

  13. Time constant of the cerebral arterial bed in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Diedler, Jennifer; Reinhard, Matthias; Carrera, Emmanuel; Steiner, Luzius A; Smielewski, Peter; Budohoski, Karol P; Haubrich, Christina; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The time constant of cerebral arterial bed (in brief time constant) is a product of brain arterial compliance (C(a)) and resistance (CVR). We tested the hypothesis that in normal subjects, changes in end-tidal CO(2) (EtCO(2)) affect the value of the time constant. C(a) and CVR were estimated using mathematical transformations of arterial pressure (ABP) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) cerebral blood flow velocity waveforms. Responses of the time constant to controlled changes in EtCO(2) were compared in 34 young volunteers. Hypercapnia shortened the time constant (0.22 s [0.17, 0.26] vs. 0.16 s [0.13, 0.20]; p = 0.000001), while hypocapnia lengthened the time constant (0.22 s [0.17, 0.26] vs. 0.23 s [0.19, 0.32]; p time constant was negatively correlated with changes in EtCO(2) (R(partial) = -0.68, p time constant shortens with increasing EtCO(2). Its potential role in cerebrovascular investigations needs further studies.

  14. Transition Path Time Distribution, Tunneling Times, Friction, and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2017-02-01

    A quantum mechanical transition path time probability distribution is formulated and its properties are studied using a parabolic barrier potential model. The average transit time is well defined and readily calculated. It is smaller than the analogous classical mechanical average transit time, vanishing at the crossover temperature. It provides a direct route for determining tunneling times. The average time may be also used to define a coarse grained momentum of the system for the passage from one side of the barrier to the other. The product of the uncertainty in this coarse grained momentum with the uncertainty in the location of the particle is shown under certain conditions to be smaller than the ℏ/2 formal uncertainty limit. The model is generalized to include friction in the form of a bilinear interaction with a harmonic bath. Using an Ohmic friction model one finds that increasing the friction, increases the transition time. Only moderate values of the reduced friction coefficient are needed for the quantum transition time and coarse grained uncertainty to approach the classical limit which is smaller than ℏ/2 when the friction is not too small. These results show how one obtains classical dynamics from a pure quantum system without invoking any further assumptions, approximations, or postulates.

  15. Transit time for third order resonance extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Pullia, M

    1996-01-01

    An important spin-off from accelerators is the use of synchrotrons for cancer therapy. A precise control of the extraction from the synchrotron is needed to satisfy the medical specifications and this has led to a renewed interest in the basic theory of third-order resonance extraction. In the present paper, a complete description of the transit time in the resonance (the time between a particle becoming unstable and reaching the electrostatic septum) is developed as a basis for future work predicting spill shapes and the influence of power supply ripple. The transit time is evaluated for constant tune and for a slowly varying tune. Both cases are subdivided into particles that start close simulation and are shown to be correct to within a few percent.

  16. Transit timing observations from Kepler. V. Transit timing variation candidates in the first sixteen months from polynomial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, E.B.; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M.J.;

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during...

  17. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  18. Data processing in pulse transit time measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmeng Zhang; Ye Li

    2008-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is used as a noninvasive and cuff-less parameter to estimate blood pressure.In this paper,we develop an algorithm to ohtain PTT rapidly,which is appropriate for micro-processor and could achieve good accuracy in PTT,even in noisy measurements.The algorithm is based on finite impulse response(FIR) filter to reduce the noise and an adaptive threshold to detect the significant points of ECG and PPG.Evaluation of this method is hased on the signals from our PTT-based blood pressure devices It is shown that the method works well for PPT calculation.

  19. Data processing in pulse transit time measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmeng Zhang; Ye Li

    2008-01-01

    Pulse transit time(PTT) is used as a noninvasive and cuff-hss parameter to estimate blood pressure.In this paper,we develop an algorithm to obtain PTT rapidly,which is appropriate for micro-processor and could achieve good accuracy in PTT,even in noisy measurements.,The algorithm is based on finite impulse response(FIR) filter to reduce the noise and an adaptive threshold to detect the significant points of ECG and PPG.Evaluation of this method is based on the signals from our PTT-based blood pressure devices.It is shown that the method works well for PPT calculation.

  20. Automatic segmentation of coronary artery tree based on multiscale Gabor filtering and transition region extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Guozhu; Kang, Lie; Wang, Juan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation method for extracting coronary artery tree from angiogram, which is based on multiscale Gabor filtering and transition region extraction. Firstly the enhanced image is obtained after multiscale Gabor filtering, then the transition region of the enhanced image is extracted using the local complexity algorithm, and the final segmentation threshold is calculated, finally the image segmentation is achieved. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, we carried out experiments on various sets of angiographic images, and compared its effects with those of the improved top-hat segmentation method. The experiments indicate that the proposed method outperforms the latter method about better extraction of small vessels, more background elimination, better visualized coronary artery tree and continuity of the vessels.

  1. Rapid Fatal Outcome from Pulmonary Arteries Compression in Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis A. Voutsadakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a malignancy that metastasizes frequently to lymph nodes including the mediastinal lymph nodes. This occurrence may produce symptoms due to compression of adjacent structures such as the superior vena cava syndrome or dysphagia from esophageal compression. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma for whom mediastinal lymphadenopathy led to pulmonary artery compression and a rapidly fatal outcome. This rare occurrence has to be distinguished from pulmonary embolism, a much more frequent event in cancer patients, in order that proper and prompt treatment be initiated.

  2. Transitional flow analysis in the carotid artery bifurcation by proper orthogonal decomposition and particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Poepping, Tamie L

    2013-07-01

    Blood flow instabilities in the carotid artery bifurcation have been highly correlated to clot formation and mobilization resulting in ischemic stroke. In this work, PIV-measured flow velocities in normal and stenosed carotid artery bifurcation models were analyzed by means of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Through POD analysis, transition to more complex flow was visualized and quantified for increasing stenosis severity. While no evidence of transitional flow was seen in the normal model, the 50%-stenosed model started to show characteristics of transitional flow, which became highly evident in the 70% model, with greatest manifestation during the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle. By means of a model comparison, we demonstrate two quantitative measures of the flow complexity through the power-law decay slope of the energy spectrum and the global entropy. The more complex flow in the 70%-stenosed model showed a flatter slope of energy decay (-0.91 compared to -1.34 for 50% stenosis) and higher entropy values (0.26 compared to 0.17). Finally, the minimum temporal resolution required for POD analysis of carotid artery flow was found to be 100 Hz when determined through a more typical energy-mode convergence test, as compared to 400 Hz based on global entropy values.

  3. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  4. Transition times in the Landau-Zener model

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanov, N V

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents analytic formulas for various transition times in the Landau-Zener model. Considerable differences are found between the transition times in the diabatic and adiabatic bases, and between the jump time (the time for which the transition probability rises to the region of its asymptotic value) and the relaxation time (the characteristic damping time of the oscillations which appear in the transition probability after the crossing). These transition times have been calculated by using the exact values of the transition probabilities and their derivatives at the crossing point and approximations to the time evolutions of the transition probabilities in the diabatic basis, derived earlier \\protect{[}N. V. Vitanov and B. M. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 53}, 4288 (1996)\\protect{]}, and similar results in the adiabatic basis, derived in the present paper.

  5. [Analysis of the timing parameters of blood flow in the carotid basin arteries of hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, E S

    2011-01-01

    Vascular duplex ultrasound study with simultaneous ECG recording was performed to estimate the timing parameters of blood flow in the common carotid, internal carotid, and middle cerebral arteries in patients with grades 1 and 2 arterial hypertension. There was an increase in the blood flow acceleration phase index in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries and a reduction in the systolic phase index in the internal carotid arteries. There were correlations of phasic blood flow parameters in the extra- and intracranial arteries with age and lipidogram readings.

  6. Cerebral Arterial Time Constant Recorded from the MCA and PICA in Normal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Czosnyka, Marek; Poplawska, Karolina; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial time constant (τ) estimates how quickly the cerebral arterial bed distal to the point of insonation is filled with arterial blood following a cardiac contraction. It is not known how τ behaves in different vascular territories in the brain. We therefore investigated the differences in τ of two cerebral arteries: the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the middle cerebral artery (MCA).Transcranial Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the PICA and left MCA along with Finapres arterial blood pressure (ABP) were simultaneously recorded in 35 young healthy volunteers. τ was estimated using mathematical transformations of pulse waveforms of ABP and the CBFV of the MCA and the PICA. Since τ is independent from the vessel radius, its comparison in different cerebral arteries was feasible. Mean ABP was 76.1 ± 9.6 mmHg. The CBFV of the MCA was higher than that of the PICA (59.7 ± 7.7 vs. 41.0 ± 4.5 cm/s; p time is needed to fill it with arterial blood volume. This study thus confirms the physiological validity of the τ concept.

  7. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Ellen M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rogers, Leslie A. [California Institute of Technology, MC249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  8. Transit Light Curves with Finite Integration Time: Fisher Information Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Ellen M

    2014-01-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal-to-noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal-to-noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the tran...

  9. Factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary angiography with DSCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lijun Tang; Xiaomei Zhu; Yi Xu; Tongfu Yu; Hai Xu; Jinhua Tang; Dehang Wang (Dept. of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical Univ., Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), e-mail: wangdehang@hotmail.com; Dogra, Vikram (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    2011-02-15

    Background: CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in diagnosing coronary arterial disease. Delay time and density of the coronary arteries related with patient-specific factors are essential for getting an optimal CTA image. Purpose: To investigate various factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary CTA with dual source CT. Material and Methods: One hundred and sixteen consecutive subjects who underwent cardiac DSCT with retrospective ECG-gating were included. Factors including gender, age, height, weight, transversal cardiac diameter (TCD), transversal thoracic diameter (TTD), heart rate (HR), body surface area (BSA = [weight x height/3600]1/2) and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR = TCD/TTD) were recorded, measured and calculated before administration of contrast media during coronary CT angiography. Delay time was determined as duration from the beginning of the injection to the density in the descending aorta at the level of right main pulmonary artery reaching a threshold of 100 HU. Coronary arterial density was measured at the mid portion of the right coronary artery. Regression analysis and stepwise regression analysis were used to investigate the influence of these factors on delay time and coronary arterial density. Results: Delay time decreased with an increasing HR and it was shorter in women than men. Delay time increased with an increasing TCD. Delay time could be predicted by the formula: DT = 16.651-0.110 x HR + 1.902 x gender + 0.394 x TCD (where DT is abbreviation for delay time, gender is 0 for women and 1 for men). Coronary arterial density decreased with an increasing HR and weight. Coronary arterial density could be predicted by the formula: CAD = 923.42-4.099 x HR-3.293 x weight (CAD = coronary arterial density). There was no relationship between the other factors mentioned above and delay time or coronary arterial density. Conclusion: Delay time is influenced by HR, gender and TCD. Coronary arterial density

  10. The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kennet Bomann West; Hardis, S.; Hinse, T. C.;

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods......: The observations are used to determine the photometric parameters and the physical properties of the GJ1214 system. Our results are in good agreement with published values. Individual times of mid-transit are measured with uncertainties as low as 10s, allowing us to reduce the uncertainty in the orbital period...

  11. Mean transit time image - a new method of analyzing brain perfusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Z.; Ritzl, F.

    1983-05-01

    Point-by-point calculation of the mean transit time based on gamma fit was used to analyze brain perfusion studies in a vertex view. The algorithm and preliminary results in normal brain and in different stages of cerebral perfusion abnormality (ischemia, stroke, migraine, tumor, abscess) are demonstrated. In contrast to the traditional methods using fixed, a priori defined regions of interest this type of mapping of the relative regions cerebral perfusion shows more clearly the irregular outlines of the disturbance. Right to left activity ratios in the arterial part of the time-activity curves showed significant correlation with the mean transit time ratios (Q/sub 1/=1.185-0.192 Qsub(a), n=38, r=0.716, P<0.001).

  12. Transition path time distribution and the transition path free energy barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-10-19

    The recent experimental measurement of the transition path time distributions of proteins presents several challenges to theory. Firstly, why do the fits of the experimental data to a theoretical expression lead to barrier heights which are much lower than the free energies of activation of the observed transitions? Secondly, there is the theoretical question of determining the transition path time distribution, without invoking the Smoluchowski limit. In this paper, we derive an exact expression for a transition path time distribution which is valid for arbitrary memory friction using the normal mode transformation which underlies Kramers' rate theory. We then recall that for low barriers, there is a noticeable difference between the transition path time distribution obtained with absorbing boundary conditions and free boundary conditions. For the former, the transition times are shorter, since recrossings of the boundaries are disallowed. As a result, if one uses the distribution based on absorbing boundary conditions to fit the experimental data, one will find that the transition path barrier will be larger than the values found based on a theory with free boundary conditions. We then introduce the paradigm of a transition path barrier height, and show that one should always expect it to be much smaller than the activation energy.

  13. AMON: Transition to real-time operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, D. F.; Keivani, A.; Tešić, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) will link the world's leading high-energy neutrino, cosmic-ray, gamma-ray and gravitational wave observatories by performing real-time coincidence searches for multimessenger sources from observatories' subthreshold data streams. The resulting coincidences will be distributed to interested parties in the form of electronic alerts for real-time follow-up observation. We will present the science case, design elements, current and projected partner observatories, status of the AMON project, and an initial AMON-enabled analysis. The prototype of the AMON server has been online since August 2014 and processing archival data. Currently, we are deploying new high-uptime servers and will be ready to start issuing alerts as early as winter 2015/16.

  14. Using long-term transit timing to detect terrestrial planets

    CERN Document Server

    Heyl, J S; Heyl, Jeremy S.; Gladman, Brett J.

    2006-01-01

    We propose that the presence of additional planets in extrasolar planetary systems can be detected by long-term transit timing studies. If a transiting planet is on an eccentric orbit then the presence of another planet causes a secular advance of the transiting planet's pericenter over and above the effect of general relativity. Although this secular effect is impractical to detect over a small number of orbits, it causes long-term differences in when future transits occur, much like the long-term decay observed in pulsars. Measuring this transit-timing delay would thus allow the detection of either one or more additional planets in the system or the first measurements of non-zero oblateness ($J_2$) of the central stars.

  15. WASP-14 b: Transit Timing analysis of 19 light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Raetz, St; Seeliger, M; Marka, C; Fernandez, M; Güver, T; Gögüs, E; Nowak, G; Vanko, M; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Mugrauer, M; Trepl, L; Gelszinnis, J

    2015-01-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of "Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative" (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light-curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years ...

  16. Developments in Planet Detection using Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-12-01

    In a transiting planetary system, the presence of a second planet will cause the time interval between transits to vary. These transit timing variations (TTV) are particularly large near mean-motion resonances and can be used to infer the orbital elements of planets with masses that are too small to detect by any other means. The author presents the results of a study of simulated data where they show the potential that this planet detection technique has to detect and characterize secondary planets in transiting systems. These results have important ramifications for planetary transit searches since each transiting system presents an opportunity for additional discoveries through a TTV analysis. They present such an analysis for 13 transits of the HD 209458 system that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis indicates that a putative companion in a low-order, mean-motion resonance can be no larger than the mass of the Earth and constitutes, to date, the most sensitive probe for extrasolar planets that orbit main sequence stars. The presence or absence of small planets in low-order, mean-motion resonances has implications for theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Since TTV is most sensitive in these regimes, it should prove a valuable tool not only for the detection of additional planets in transiting systems, but also as a way to determine the dominant mechanisms of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems.

  17. Gastrointestinal transit times and motility in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Gregersen, Tine; Jønsson, Iben;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction including obstructive symptoms, malabsorption and pain, but the underlying pathophysiology remains obscure. AIM: To compare GI motility and transit times in CF patients and healthy controls. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: Ten CF patients (five women, median age 23) with pancreatic insufficiency were studied. Total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) and segmental colonic transit times (SCTT) were assessed by radiopaque markers. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were evaluated using the magnet......-based motility tracking system (MTS-1). With each method patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. RESULTS: Basic contraction frequencies of the stomach and small intestine were normal, but the pill reached the cecum after 7 h in only 20% of CF patients while in 88% of controls (p = 0.001). Paradoxically...

  18. Simplified scintigraphic methods for measuring gastrointestinal transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether simple transit measurements based on scintigraphy performed only 0, 2, 4 and 24 h after intake of a radiolabelled meal can be used to predict the mean transit time values for the stomach, the small intestine, and the colon, a study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers...... intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated for both markers and compared with fractional gastric emptying at 2 h, fractional colonic filling at 4 h, and geometric centre of colonic content at 24 h, respectively. Highly significant correlations were found between gastric mean transit time...... and fractional gastric emptying at 2 h (111In: r=0.95, Ptime and fractional colonic filling at 4 h (111In: r=-0.97, Ptime and geometric centre of colonic content...

  19. Bisimulation and Open Maps for Timed Transition Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    Formal models for real-time systems have been studied intensively over the past decade. Much of the theory of untimed systems have been lifted to real-time settings. One example is the notion of bisimulation applied to timed transition systems, which is studied here within the general categorical...

  20. Transit timing analysis of CoRoT-1b

    CERN Document Server

    Csizmadia, Sz; Barge, P; Agol, E; Aigrain, S; Alonso, R; Almenara, J M; Bonomo, A S; Borde, P; Bouchy, F; Cabrera, J; Deeg, H J; De la Reza, R; Deleuil, M; Dvorak, R; Erikson, A; Guenther, E W; Fridlund, M; Gondoin, P; Guillot, T; Hatzes, A; Jorda, L; Lammer, H; Lázaro, C; Leger, A; Llebaria, A; Magain, P; Moutou, C; Ollivier, M; Paetzold, M; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Rouan, D; Schneider, J; Wuchterl, G; Gandolfi, D

    2009-01-01

    CoRoT, the pioneer space-based transit search, steadily provides thousands of high-precision light curves with continuous time sampling over periods of up to 5 months. The transits of a planet perturbed by an additional object are not strictly periodic. By studying the transit timing variations (TTVs), additional objects can be detected in the system. A transit timing analysis of CoRoT-1b is carried out to constrain the existence of additional planets in the system. We used data obtained by an improved version of the CoRoT data pipeline (version 2.0). Individual transits were fitted to determine the mid-transit times, and we analyzed the derived $O-C$ diagram. N-body integrations were used to place limits on secondary planets. No periodic timing variations with a period shorter than the observational window (55 days) are found. The presence of an Earth-mass Trojan is not likely. A planet of mass greater than $\\sim 1$ Earth mass can be ruled out by the present data if the object is in a 2:1 (exterior) mean mot...

  1. Daylight Saving Time Transitions and Road Traffic Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuuli Lahti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm disruptions may have harmful impacts on health. Circadian rhythm disruptions caused by jet lag compromise the quality and amount of sleep and may lead to a variety of symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and loss of attention and alertness. Even a minor change in time schedule may cause considerable stress for the body. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time alter the social and environmental timing twice a year. According to earlier studies, this change in time-schedule leads to sleep disruption and fragmentation of the circadian rhythm. Since sleep deprivation decreases motivation, attention, and alertness, transitions into and out of daylight saving time may increase the amount of accidents during the following days after the transition. We studied the amount of road traffic accidents one week before and one week after transitions into and out of daylight saving time during years from 1981 to 2006. Our results demonstrated that transitions into and out of daylight saving time did not increase the number of traffic road accidents.

  2. TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet-star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

  3. High-Cadence Transit Timing Variation Monitoring of Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naef D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We report ground-based high-cadence transit timing observations of the extrasolar planet WASP-2b. We achieve a typical timing error of 15-30 sec. The data show no significant deviations from the predicted ephemeris.

  4. Mean Transit Time and Mean Residence Time for Linear Diffusion–Convection–Reaction Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic times for transport processes in biological systems may be evaluated as mean transit times (MTTs (for transit states or mean residence times (MRT (for steady states. It is shown in a general framework of a (linear reaction–diffusion–convection equation that these two times are related. Analytical formulas are also derived to calculate moments of exit time distribution using solutions for a stationary state of the system.

  5. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholm, Jette Rolf; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender Jette Rolf Svanholm 1,2, Mette Spliid Ludvigsen 1,3, Hanne Aagaard 1,4,5 1 Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark 2 Department of Cardiology 3 Department of Renal Medicine 4 Department of Pediatrics 5 Institute of Public Health, Aarhus...... of transition being in a maturing and independence process and what is important to them? • What characterise their interaction with health care staff? • How is the communication between the adolescents and health care staff as perceived by the adolescents when focus is on their illness? Methods: Qualitative...... central characteristics across time, disease and gender. Perspectives It is expected that this study will create knowledge about the existential and interpersonal challenges of adolescents in transition as seen from the • time perspective • diagnose perspective • gender perspective These results will make...

  6. Distribution of capillary transit times in isolated lungs of oxygen-tolerant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Madhavi; Gan, Zhuohui; Clough, Anne V; Molthen, Robert C; Roerig, David L; Audi, Said H

    2010-11-01

    Rats pre-exposed to 85% O₂ for 5-7 days tolerate the otherwise lethal effects of 100% O₂. The objective was to evaluate the effect of rat exposure to 85% O₂ for 7 days on lung capillary mean transit time t(c) and distribution of capillary transit times (h(c)(t)). This information is important for subsequent evaluation of the effect of this hyperoxia model on the redox metabolic functions of the pulmonary capillary endothelium. The venous concentration vs. time outflow curves of fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled dextran (FITC-dex), an intravascular indicator, and coenzyme Q₁ hydroquinone (CoQ₁H₂), a compound which rapidly equilibrates between blood and tissue on passage through the pulmonary circulation, were measured following their bolus injection into the pulmonary artery of isolated perfused lungs from rats exposed to room air (normoxic) or 85% O₂ for 7 days (hyperoxic). The moments (mean transit time and variance) of the measured FITC-dex and CoQ₁H₂ outflow curves were determined for each lung, and were then used in a mathematical model [Audi et al. J. Appl. Physiol. 77: 332-351, 1994] to estimate t(c) and the relative dispersion (RD(c)) of h (c)(t). Data analysis reveals that exposure to hyperoxia decreases lung t(c) by 42% and increases RD(c), a measure h(c)(t) heterogeneity, by 40%.

  7. Transit-time flow measurement as a predictor of coronary bypass graft failure at one year angiographic follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Møller, Christian H; Damgaard, Sune;

    2015-01-01

    on graft vessel type, anastomatic configuration, and coronary artery size. RESULTS: Nine hundred eighty-two coronary anastomoses were performed of which 12% had signs of graft failure at one year angiographic follow-up. In internal mammary arteries (IMAs), analysis showed a 4% decrease in graft failure......BACKGROUND: Transit-time flow measurement (TTFM) is a commonly used intraoperative method for evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) anastomoses. This study was undertaken to determine whether TTFM can also be used to predict graft patency at one year postsurgery. METHODS: Three hundred...... forty-five CABG patients with intraoperative graft flow measurements and one year angiographic follow-up were analyzed. Graft failure was defined as more than 50% stenosis including the "string sign." Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk of graft failure after one year based...

  8. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  9. Postfoundational practical theology for a time of transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C. Müller

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In reflection on the question as to in what sense is our time a time of transition, the article explores the various transitions in epistemology, advocated by the scholars mentioned in brackets:• modern to postmodern • secular dualism to post-secular holism (Cornel du Toit • structural to poststructural • positivistic to relativistic • rational-argumentative to narrative • proposisionalistic to cultural-linguistic (Lindbeck • fundamentalist to postfoundationalist (Schrag and Van Huyssteen • maintenance to missional.

  10. Optimization of automatic bolus tracking for timing of the arterial phase of helical liver CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstede, J.J.W.; Tschammler, A.; Beer, M.; Vogelsang, C.; Wittenberg, G.; Hahn, D. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize bolus tracking for timing of the arterial phase of biphasic helical liver CT and to compare optimized bolus tracking to a standard delay. One hundred fifty patients were examined with six protocols: 5- or 10-s delay after triggering at a threshold of 50 or 75 or 100 HU enhancement in the aorta at the origin of the celiac arteries after injection of 120 ml contrast material at 3 ml/s. Optimal arterial enhancement was defined as 20-30% of hepatic enhancement in portal venous phase. Another 50 patients were examined with the optimized protocol and compared to 50 gender- and age-matched patients who underwent a 25-s standard delay. A 10-s delay after the 75-HU threshold resulted in the most patients with an optimal arterial phase (p<0.01). Thirty-one of 75 patients examined with this protocol showed optimal early liver enhancement. Bolus tracking compared with standard delay revealed only a trend for a difference (p=0.07). The outcome of automatic bolus tracking differs depending on the protocol used; however, optimal arterial phase imaging was seen in only 41% of patients, indicating only a trend for superior timing compared with a standard delay. (orig.)

  11. Transition paths out of part-time unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Månsson, Jonas; Ottoson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Using a rich data set on all registered Swedish part-time unemployed in 2003 we aim at identify individual characteristics that affect the probability of leaving part-time unemployment—from the perspective of whether part-time work serves as a transition mechanism offering access to the core labour market of full-time jobs, a stepping stone to the labour market, or if it is a dead end. The results of the study indicate clearly that there are groups for whom part-time employment cannot be cons...

  12. The liner shipping berth scheduling problem with transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Plum, Christian E.M.; Pisinger, David

    2016-01-01

    In this paper speed optimization of an existing liner shipping network is solved by adjusting the port berth times. The objective is to minimize fuel consumption while retaining the customer transit times including the transhipment times. To avoid too many changes to the time table, changes of port...... berth times are only accepted if they lead to savings above a threshold value. Since the fuel consumption of a vessel is a non-linear convex function of the speed, it is approximated by a piecewise linear function. The developed model is solved using exact methods in less than two minutes for large...

  13. Transit Timing Variations for Eccentric and Inclined Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David

    2009-08-01

    The Transit Timing Variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Nontransiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interactions with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Inferring the orbital elements and mass of the nontransiting planets from TTVs, however, is more challenging than for other planet detection schemes. It is a difficult inverse problem. Here, we extended the new inversion method proposed by Nesvorný & Morbidelli to eccentric transiting planets and inclined orbits. We found that the TTV signal can be significantly amplified for hierarchical planetary systems with substantial orbital inclinations and/or for an eccentric transiting planet with anti-aligned orbit of the planetary companion. Thus, a fortuitous orbital setup of an exoplanetary system may significantly enhance our chances of TTV detection. We also showed that the detailed shape of the TTV signal is sensitive to the orbital inclination of the nontransiting planetary companion. The TTV detection method may thus provide important constraints on the orbital inclination of exoplanets and be used to test theories of planetary formation and evolution.

  14. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  15. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  16. Two analytical solutions for a model of pulsed arterial spin labeling with randomized blood arrival times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabe, J.; Lewis, D. P.

    2004-03-01

    A fairly general theoretical model for pulsed arterial spin labeling perfusion methods has been available for some time but analytical solutions were derived for only a small number of arterial blood input functions. These mostly assumed a sudden and simultaneous arrival of the tagged blood into the imaged region. More general cases had to be handled numerically. We present analytical solutions for two more realistic arterial input functions. They both allow the arrival times of the molecules of tagged arterial blood to be statistically distributed. We consider cases of (1) a uniform distribution on a finite time interval and (2) a normal distribution characterized by its mean and standard deviation. These models are physiologically meaningful because the statistical nature of the arrival times reflects the distribution of velocities and path lengths that the blood water molecules undertake from the tagging region to the imaged region. The model parameters can be estimated from the measured dependency of the perfusion signal on the tag inversion time.

  17. Brief communications: visualization of coronary arteries in rats by 3-dimensional real-time contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Fuminobu; Hirayama, Hideo; Iwata, Akiko; Toshida, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kasumi; Otani, Kentaro; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Beppu, Shintaro

    2008-05-01

    Angiogenesis is under intense investigation to advance the treatment of various ischemic diseases. Small animals, such as mice and rats, are often used for this purpose. However, evaluating the structure of coronary arteries in small animals in situ is not easy. We succeeded in visualizing the coronary artery in rats on 3-dimensional real-time contrast echocardiography using a high-frequency transducer. These methods will be applied for more convenient assessment in a new study, examining issues such as angiogenesis using rats in situ.

  18. Visual Analysis and Comparison of Kepler Transit Timing Variations with Mutli-Transiting System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Mackenzie; Ragozzine, Darin; Flowers, Xzavier

    2016-10-01

    By noticing the dimming and brightening of the star as an exoplanet transit occurs, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope records the times when the exoplanet passes in front of its star. If other planets are gravitationally influencing the transiting planet, the planet might transit late or early; these deviations from a perfectly periodic set of transits are called transit timing variations (TTVs). Therefore, Kepler TTVs have been very useful in determining exoplanet masses which can be hard to measure in other ways.We visually analyzed the TTV data of all ~6000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) to determine whether interesting TTV signals would be missed by purely statistical analyses. Using data from Rowe et al. 2014 and Holczer et al. 2016, we examined TTV plots, periodograms, and folded quadratic+sinusoid fits. To find the most likely KOIs containing visible TTVs and to organize the over 6000 KOIs analyzed, a rating system was developed based on numerous visual factors. By sorting KOIs as such, we were able to compare our findings of the strongest candidates with the same KOIs statistically analyzed by Holczer et al. 2016. It was found that the majority of our findings matched those of Holczer et al. 2016, with only small discrepancies that were understandable based on our different methodologies. Still, our visual inspection of the full list of KOIs contributed multiple planets that were not identified statistically.We combined all of these results with planet properties from the NASA Exoplanet Archive, confirmed and cumulative, to investigate the demographics of planetary systems with and without TTVs. We investigated multi-transiting systems with TTVs not attributable to any of the known planets in the system to better understand exoplanetary system architectures in cases where not all of the planets are transiting.

  19. Capsule endoscopy: Improving transit time and image view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zvi Fireman; D Paz; Y Kopelman

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of various methods of small bowel preparation on the transit time and the quality of visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa.METHODS: Ninety-five patients underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) by easily swallowing the capsule. They were divided into three study groups according to the preparation used: group A (n = 26) by polyethylene glycol (PEG) liter or with sodium phosphate (SP) 12 h prior to the CE study; group B (n = 29) by erythromycin 1 h prior to the CE study; and group C (n = 40) without any preparation. Visualization ranged from good to satisfactory to poor.RESULTS: The gastric emptying time in the group prepared with erythromycin was shorter but without statistical significance and the small bowel transit time was unaffected. In elderly subjects prepared by PEG or SP, the gastric emptying time was significantly longer (163.7 min, P = 0.05). The transit times of the three sub-groups were not affected by gender or pathology.The grade of cleaning of the entire study group was 3.27±1.1. The erythromycin group presented significantly the worst quality of images (P = 0.05) compared to the other sub-groups. Age, gender, and pathology had no effect on the quality of the cleaning of the small bowel in the sub-groups. One (1.05%) case had no natural excretion.CONCLUSION: Erythromycin markedly reduces gastric emptying time, but has a negative effect on the quality of the image in the small bowel. The preparation of elderly subjects with PEG or SP has a negative effect on the small bowel transit time.

  20. Electron transit time measurements of 5-in photomultiplier tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, T.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M.; Rees, L.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the uniformity of electron transit times for two 5-in photomultiplier tubes: the Hamamatsu R1250 and the Adit B133D01S. We focused a highly attenuated short-pulse laser on the tubes while they were mounted on a programmable stage. The stage translated the tubes relative to the incident beam so that measurements could be made with light focused at points along a grid covering the entire photocathodes. A portion of the incident light was split from the incident beam and measured and recorded by a fast photodiode. Electron transit times were measured by computing the time delay between the recorded photodiode signal and photomultiplier signal using software constant-fraction discrimination. The Hamamatsu tube exhibited a uniform timing response that varied by no more than 1.7 ns. The Adit tube was much less uniform, with transit times that varied by as much as 57 ns. The Adit response also exhibited a spatially varying double-peak structure in its response. The technique described in this paper could be usefully employed by photomultiplier tube manufacturers to characterize the performance of their products.

  1. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations; this provides a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively higher response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to prolong transit time.

  2. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations to provide a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively longer response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to contribute to prolong transit time.

  3. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenwald, J.; Fröhlich, M.

    2015-07-01

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices.

  4. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  5. Transit-Time Spin Field-Effect-Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Appelbaum, Ian; Monsma, Douwe

    2007-01-01

    We propose and analyze a four-terminal metal-semiconductor device that uses hot-electron transport through thin ferromagnetic films to inject and detect a charge-coupled spin current transported through the conduction band of an arbitrary semiconductor. This provides the possibility of realizing a spin field-effect-transistor in Si, using electrostatic transit-time control in a perpendicular magnetic field, rather than Rashba effect with spin-orbit interaction.

  6. Duration effect of desflurane anesthesia and its awakening time and arterial concentration in gynecologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Chou Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the awakening arterial blood concentration of desflurane and its relationship with the end-tidal concentration during emergence from various durations of general anesthesia. METHOD: In total, 42 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I-II female patients undergoing elective gynecologic surgery were enrolled. General anesthesia was maintained with fixed 6% inspiratory desflurane in 6 l min-1 oxygen until shutoff of the vaporizer at the end of surgery. One milliliter of arterial blood was obtained for desflurane concentration determination by gas chromatography at 20 and 10 minutes before and 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after the discontinuation of desflurane and at the time of eye opening upon verbal command, defined as awakening. Concentrations of inspiratory and end-tidal desflurane were simultaneously detected by an infrared analyzer. RESULTS: The mean arterial blood concentration of desflurane was 1.20% at awakening, which correlated with the awakening end-tidal concentration of 0.96%. The mean time from the discontinuation of desflurane to eye opening was 5.2 minutes (SD = 1.6, range 3-10, which was not associated with the duration of anesthesia (60-256 minutes, total fentanyl dose, or body mass index (BMI. CONCLUSIONS: The mean awakening arterial blood concentration of desflurane was 1.20%. The time to awakening was independent of anesthetic duration within four hours. Using well-assisted ventilation, the end-tidal concentration of desflurane was proven to represent the arterial blood concentration during elimination and could be a clinically feasible predictor of emergence from general anesthesia.

  7. Estimation of liquid volume fraction using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M.; Langton, Christian M.

    2016-12-01

    It has recently been proposed that the propagation of an ultrasound wave through complex structures, consisting of two-materials of differing ultrasound velocity, may be considered as an array of parallel ‘sonic rays’, the transit time of each determined by their relative proportion; being a minimum (t min) in entire higher velocity material, and a maximum (t max) in entire lower velocity material. An ultrasound transit time spectrum (UTTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays at an individual transit time. It has previously been demonstrated that the solid volume fraction of a solid:liquid composite, specifically acrylic step-wedges immersed in water, may be reliably estimated from the UTTS. The aim of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that the volume fraction of a two-component liquid mixture, of unequal ultrasound velocity, may also be estimated by UTTS. A through-transmission technique incorporating two 1 MHz ultrasound transducers within a horizontally-aligned cylindrical tube-housing was utilised, the proportion of silicone oil to water being varied from 0% to 100%. The liquid volume fraction was estimated from the UTTS at each composition, the coefficient of determination (R 2%) being 98.9  ±  0.7%. The analysis incorporated a novel signal amplitude normalisation technique to compensate for absorption within the silicone oil. It is therefore envisaged that the parallel sonic ray concept and the derived UTTS may be further applied to the quantification of liquid mixture composition assessment.

  8. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VI. Transit Timing Variation Candidates in the First Seventeen Months from Polynomial Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Eric B; Rowe, Jason F; Steffen, Jason H; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Gautier, Thomas N; Holman, Matthew J; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal; Welsh, William

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results an updated TTV analysis for 822 planet candidates (Borucki et al. 2011; Batalha et al. 2012) based on transit times measured during the first seventeen months of Kepler observations (Rowe et al 2012). We present 35 TTV candidates (4.1% of suitable data sets) based on long-term trends and 153 mostly weaker TTV candidates (18% of suitable data sets) based on excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased (~60%-76%) for p...

  9. Leave-one-out prediction error of systolic arterial pressure time series under paced breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Ancona, N; Marinazzo, D; Nitti, L; Pellicoro, M; Pinna, G D; Stramaglia, S

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that different physiological states and pathological conditions may be characterized in terms of predictability of time series signals from the underlying biological system. In particular we consider systolic arterial pressure time series from healthy subjects and Chronic Heart Failure patients, undergoing paced respiration. We model time series by the regularized least squares approach and quantify predictability by the leave-one-out error. We find that the entrainment mechanism connected to paced breath, that renders the arterial blood pressure signal more regular, thus more predictable, is less effective in patients, and this effect correlates with the seriousness of the heart failure. The leave-one-out error separates controls from patients and, when all orders of nonlinearity are taken into account, alive patients from patients for which cardiac death occurred.

  10. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  11. Comparison of noninvasive pulse transit time estimates as markers of blood pressure using invasive pulse transit time measurements as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingwu; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-05-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) measured as the time delay between invasive proximal and distal blood pressure (BP) or flow waveforms (invasive PTT [I-PTT]) tightly correlates with BP PTT estimated as the time delay between noninvasive proximal and distal arterial waveforms could therefore permit cuff-less BP monitoring. A popular noninvasive PTT estimate for this application is the time delay between ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms (pulse arrival time [PAT]). Another estimate is the time delay between proximal and distal PPG waveforms (PPG-PTT). PAT and PPG-PTT were assessed as markers of BP over a wide physiologic range using I-PTT as a reference. Waveforms for determining I-PTT, PAT, and PPG-PTT through central arteries were measured from swine during baseline conditions and infusions of various hemodynamic drugs. Diastolic, mean, and systolic BP varied widely in each subject (group average (mean ± SE) standard deviation between 25 ± 2 and 36 ± 2 mmHg). I-PTT correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.86 ± 0.03 and 0.91 ± 0.03). PPG-PTT also correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.81 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02), and its R(2) values were not significantly different from those of I-PTT PAT correlated best with systolic BP (group average R(2) value of 0.70 ± 0.04), but its R(2) values for all BP levels were significantly lower than those of I-PTT (P < 0.005) and PPG-PTT (P < 0.02). The pre-ejection period component of PAT was responsible for its inferior correlation with BP In sum, PPG-PTT was not different from I-PTT and superior to the popular PAT as a marker of BP.

  12. Detecting and Characterizing Planetary Systems with Transit Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Ford, Eric B; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew J

    2007-01-01

    In the coming decades, research in extrasolar planets aims to advance two goals: 1) detecting and characterizing low-mass planets increasingly similar to the Earth, and 2) improving our understanding of planet formation. We present a new planet detection method that is capable of making large advances towards both of these objectives and describe a modest network of telescopes that is able to make the requisite observations. In a system where a known planet transits its host star, a second planet in that system will cause the time between transits to vary. These transit timing variations can be used to infer the orbital elements and mass of the perturbing planet even if it has a mass that is smaller than the mass of the Earth. This detection technique complements other techniques because it is most sensitive in mean-motion resonances where, due to degeneracies, other techniques have reduced sensitivity. Small ground-based observatories have already exceeded the photometric precision necessary to detect sub-Ea...

  13. Measurements of Transit Timing Variations for WASP-5b

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Akihiko; Tristram, Paul J; Sumi, Takahiro; Abe, Fumio; Itow, Yoshitaka; Sullivan, Denis J; Bond, Ian A; Hirano, Teruyuki; Tamura, Motohide; Bennett, David P; Furusawa, Kei; Hayashi, Fumiya; Hearnshaw, John B; Hosaka, Shun; Kamiya, Koki; Kobara, Shuhei; Korpela, Aarno; Kilmartin, Pam M; Lin, Wei; Ling, Cho Hong; Makita, Shota; Masuda, Kimiaki; Matsubara, Yutaka; Miyake, Noriyuki; Muraki, Yasushi; Nagaya, Maiko; Nishimoto, Kenta; Ohnishi, Kouji; Omori, Kengo; Perrott, Yvette; Rattenbury, Nicholas; Saito, Toshiharu; Skuljan, Ljiljana; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sweatman, Winston L; Wada, Kohei

    2010-01-01

    We have observed 7 new transits of the 'hot Jupiter' WASP-5b using a 61 cm telescope located in New Zealand, in order to search for transit timing variations (TTVs) which can be induced by additional bodies existing in the system. When combined with other available photometric and radial velocity (RV) data, we find that its transit timings do not match a linear ephemeris; the best fit \\chi^2 values of 32.2 with 9 degrees of freedom indicates that a marginal TTV signal has been observed at a confidence level of 99.982 %, or 3.7 \\sigma. The standard deviation of the TTVs is as large as 70 s, and if this is real, it cannot be explained by other effects than that due to an additional body or bodies. We put the upper limit on the RV amplitude due to the possible secondary body as 21 m s^{-1}, which corresponds to its mass of 22-70 M_{Earth} over the period ratio from 0.2 to 5.0. From the TTVs data, using the numerical simulations, we place more stringent limits down to 2 M_{Earth} near 1:2 and 2:1 MMRs at the 3 \\s...

  14. A flexible coefficient smooth transition time series model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Marcelo C; Veiga, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a flexible smooth transition autoregressive (STAR) model with multiple regimes and multiple transition variables. This formulation can be interpreted as a time varying linear model where the coefficients are the outputs of a single hidden layer feedforward neural network. This proposal has the major advantage of nesting several nonlinear models, such as, the self-exciting threshold autoregressive (SETAR), the autoregressive neural network (AR-NN), and the logistic STAR models. Furthermore, if the neural network is interpreted as a nonparametric universal approximation to any Borel measurable function, our formulation is directly comparable to the functional coefficient autoregressive (FAR) and the single-index coefficient regression models. A model building procedure is developed based on statistical inference arguments. A Monte Carlo experiment showed that the procedure works in small samples, and its performance improves, as it should, in medium size samples. Several real examples are also addressed.

  15. Predictable patterns in planetary transit timing variations and transit duration variations due to exomoons

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moons, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures if the drift of the moons' pericenters is sufficiently slow. We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or t...

  16. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be described well by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually. Conclusions: By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the BLS parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available. The MATLAB code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A138

  17. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  18. Embedding and Distributing Constant Time Delay in Circle Time and Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolery, Mark; Anthony, Leslie; Caldwell, Nicola K.; Snyder, Erin D.; Morgante, James D.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated embedding and distributing constant time delay instructional trials into circle time and transitions between activities in a summer camp program. Three boys (ages 5-8) with disabilities or behavior problems participated. Results indicated the children acquired the behaviors they were taught and generalized the learned…

  19. Predictable patterns in planetary transit timing variations and transit duration variations due to exomoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is sufficiently slow. We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio. We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10% moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  20. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    CERN Document Server

    von Essen, C; Mallonn, M; Tingley, B; Marcussen, M

    2016-01-01

    The transit timing variation technique (TTV) has been widely used to detect and characterize multiple planetary systems. Due to the observational biases imposed mainly by the photometric conditions and instrumentation and the high signal-to-noise required to produce primary transit observations, ground-based data acquired using small telescopes limit the technique to the follow-up of hot Jupiters. However, space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have already revealed that hot Jupiters are mainly found in single systems. Thus, it is natural to question ourselves if we are properly using the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional pla...

  1. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    CERN Document Server

    Ofir, Aviv

    2013-01-01

    Context: Transit surveys, both ground- and space- based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be well described by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS one is either rather insensitive to long-period planets, or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3yr long dataset...

  2. Numerical and Analytical Modelling of Transit Time Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We develop and apply methods to extract planet masses and eccentricities from observed transit time variations (TTVs). First, we derive simple analytic expressions for the TTV that include the effects of both first- and second-order resonances. Second, we use N-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, as well as the analytic formulae, to measure the masses and eccentricities of ten planets discovered by Kepler that have not previously been analyzed. Most of the ten planets have low densities. Using the analytic expressions to partially circumvent degeneracies, we measure small eccentricities of a few percent or less.

  3. Numerical and Analytical Modeling of Transit Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    We develop and apply methods to extract planet masses and eccentricities from observed transit timing variations (TTVs). First, we derive simple analytic expressions for the TTV that include the effects of both first- and second-order resonances. Second, we use N-body Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, as well as the analytic formulae, to measure the masses and eccentricities of 10 planets discovered by Kepler that have not previously been analyzed. Most of the 10 planets have low densities. Using the analytic expressions to partially circumvent degeneracies, we measure small eccentricities of a few percent or less.

  4. Real-Time History of the Cosmological Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kurki-Suonio, H

    1996-01-01

    We study numerically the real-time history of the cosmological electrow= eak phase transition, as it may take place in the Standard Model or in MSSM f= or m_H < m_W according to recent lattice results. We follow the nucleated bubble= s from the initial stages of acceleration and rapid growth, through collisions w= ith compression waves resulting in slowing down and reheating to T_c, until t= he final stages of slow growth and evaporation. We find that collisions with compression waves may make the bubble walls oscillate in the radial direc= tion, and that reheating to T_c takes generically place.

  5. Real-Time Elastography Visualization and Histopathological Characterization of Rabbit Atherosclerotic Carotid Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ZhenZhen; Liu, NaNa; Zhang, LiFeng; Li, XiaoYing; Han, XueSong; Peng, YanQing; Dang, MeiZheng; Sun, LiTao; Tian, JiaWei

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive vascular real-time elastography imaging (RTE) in visualizing the composition of rabbit carotid atherosclerotic plaque as determined by histopathology, a rabbit model of accelerated carotid atherosclerosis was used. Thirty rabbits were randomly divided into two groups of 15 rabbits each. The first group was fed a cholesterol-rich diet and received balloon-induced injury the left common carotid artery endothelium, whereas the second group only received a cholesterol-rich diet. The rabbits were all examined in vivo with HITACHI non-invasive vascular real-time elastography (Hi-RTE) at baseline and 12 wk, and results from the elastography were compared with American Heart Association histologic classifications. Hi-RTE and the American Heart Association histologic classifications had good agreement, with weighted Cohen's kappa (95% confidence internal) of 0.785 (0.649-0.920). Strains of segmented plaques that were stained in different colors were statistically different (p visualizing normal and atherosclerotic rabbit carotid arteries non-invasively. This affordable and reliable method can be widely applied in research of both animal and human peripheral artery atherosclerosis.

  6. Measurements Of Coronary Mean Transit Time And Myocardial Tissue Blood Flow By Deconvolution Of Intravasal Tracer Dilution Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, H.; Hoeft, A.; Hellige, G.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that intramyocardial blood volume does not vary to a major extent even during extreme variation of hemodynamics and coronary vascular tone. Based on a constant intramyocardial blood volume it is therefore possible to calculate tissue blood flow from the mean transit time of an intravascular tracer. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically applicable method for measurement of coronary blood flow. The new method was based on indocyanine green, a dye which is bound to albumin and intravasally detectable by means of a fiberoptic catheter device. One fiberoptic catheter was placed in the aortic root and another in the coronary sinus. After central venous dye injection the resulting arterial and coronary venous dye dilution curves were processed on-line by a micro-computer. The mean transit time as well as myocardial blood flow were calculated from the step response function of the deconvoluted arterial and coronary venous signals. Reference flow was determined with an extracorporeal electromagnetic flowprobe within a coronary sinus bypass system. 38 steady states with coronary blood flow ranging from 49 - 333 ml/min*100g were analysed in 5 dogs. Mean transit times varied from 2.9 to 16.6 sec. An average intracoronary blood volume of 13.9 -7 1.8 m1/100g was calculated. The correlation between flow determined by the dye dilution technique and flow measured with the reference method was 0.98. According to these results determination of coronary blood flow with a double fiberoptic system and indocyanine green should be possible even under clinical conditions. Furthermore, the arterial and coronary venous oxygen saturation can be monitored continuously by the fiberoptic catheters. Therefore, additional information about the performance of the heart such as myocardial oxygen consumption and myocardial efficiency is available with the same equipment.

  7. Daylight saving time transitions and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čulić, Viktor

    2013-06-01

    Most recently, the possible impact of transitions to and from daylight saving time (DST) on the increased incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been suggested. The goal of this report was to analyze independent influence of DST transitions on the incidence of AMI with simultaneous control for the confounding presence of situational triggers such as physical exertion, emotional stress, heavy meals, and sexual intercourse, as well as for other clinical factors. Detailed information was obtained from 2412 patients and included baseline characteristics, working status, exact time of AMI, possible external triggers, cardiovascular risk factors, and prehospital medication. AMI incidence on days after the DST was compared with incidence during control periods and patient characteristics, cardiovascular medication, and circumstances of AMI were evaluated to identify potential risk modifiers. Relative risks of AMI and differences in patient characteristics were expressed through incidence ratios and odds ratios, respectively, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate analysis was performed by using a stepwise multiple regression to assess the independent predictive significance of the characteristics of patients for the AMI occurring in the posttransitional period. The incidence ratio for AMI for the first four workdays after the spring DST transition was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.09-1.49) and the excess was particularly prominent on Monday. In autumn, the incidence ratio for AMI for this 4-d period was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.19-1.69), with peaks on Tuesday and Thursday. The independent predictors for AMI during this period in spring were male sex (p = 0.03) and nonengagement in physical activity (p = 0.02) and there was a trend for the lower risk of incident among those taking calcium antagonists (p = 0.07). In autumn, the predictors were female sex (p = 0.04), current employment (p = 0.006), not taking β-blocker (p = 0.03), and nonengagement in physical activity (p

  8. The effect of time from last food intake on arterial blood gases: Implication on reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedpour Anaraki M

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial blood gas parameters were analyzed in forty-nine healthy persons (31 males, 18 females to detemine reference values fo these parameters and their relation to the time from last food intake to arterial puncture (T. The mean ± standard deviation of arterial oxygen pressure, arterial carbon dioxide pressure and pH at core body temperature were 84.4±7.0 mmHg (Male: 83.0±6.5, Female: 86.7±73, 37.7±2.8 mmHg (Male: 38.5±2.7, Female: 36.2±2.4 respectively 7.41±0.02 (Male: 7.41±0.02 Female: 7.42±0.03. the mean PCO2 was lower in comparison with most of the studies at sea level. The difference between males and females was significant in PCO2 and PH (P=0.004, P=0.02 respectively but in was not significant in PO2 (P=0.07. The PCO2 and pH had no statistically significant relatioship with age (P=0.42, P=0.25 respectively. The relationship between Po2 with age, PCO2 and T was significant (P=0.02, P=0.017, and P=0.019 respectively. The best linear predictive equation was: Po2= 1.28 AO2-29.4 for T10hours Þ AO2 = 0.21(Baro-47 – (1.2PCO2

  9. Colonic transit time in patient with slow-transit constipation: Comparison of radiopaque markers and barium suspension method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huimin [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Department of General Surgery, Weifang People' s Hospital, ShanDong Province 261041 (China); Han Jiagang [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Na Ying [Department of Medical Imaging, Weifang People' s Hospital, ShanDong Province 261041 (China); Zhao Bo; Ma Huachong [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Wang Zhenjun, E-mail: wang3zj@sohu.com [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Background: Colonic transit study provides valuable information before surgical treatment is considered for patient with constipation. The radiopaque markers method is the most common way for evaluating colon transit time. The aim of this study is to compare the barium suspension with the radiopaque makers to assess the colonic mobility in patient with constipation. Methods: Colonic transit time was measured in 11 female patients with slow-transit constipation using both radiopaque markers and barium suspension method. In radiopaque markers method, the patient ingested 20 markers on the first day, and an abdominal radiograph was performed every 24 h until 80% markers were excreted. In barium suspension method, the patient swallowed up to 50 ml of 200% (w/v) barium meal. The abdominal radiographs were taken at the same time point as the former. Results: The total or segmental colonic transit time were obviously prolonged in all patients. Segmental transits time spent in the right colon, left colon and rectosigmoid for radiopaque markers and barium suspension method was, respectively, 30 {+-} 6 h and 34 {+-} 7 h; 38 {+-} 9 h and 32 {+-} 6 h; 40 {+-} 8 h and 38 {+-} 10 h. In the radiopaque markers method, total colonic transit time was 108 {+-} 14 h and it was 103 {+-} 13 h in the barium suspension method (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The barium suspension and radiopaque markers gave the similar results for colonic transit time. The barium suspension was a simple and cheap method for evaluating the colonic mobility.

  10. Toward a Smartphone Application for Estimation of Pulse Transit Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulse transit time (PTT is an important physiological parameter that directly correlates with the elasticity and compliance of vascular walls and variations in blood pressure. This paper presents a PTT estimation method based on photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi. The method utilizes two opposing cameras for simultaneous acquisition of PPGi waveform signals from the index fingertip and the forehead temple. An algorithm for the detection of maxima and minima in PPGi signals was developed, which includes technology for interpolation of the real positions of these points. We compared our PTT measurements with those obtained from the current methodological standards. Statistical results indicate that the PTT measured by our proposed method exhibits a good correlation with the established method. The proposed method is especially suitable for implementation in dual-camera-smartphones, which could facilitate PTT measurement among populations affected by cardiac complications.

  11. Factors associated with extubation time in coronary artery bypass grafting patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Rezaianzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide, with coronary artery disease being the most common. With increasing numbers of patients, Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG has become the most common operation in the world. Respiratory disorder is one of the most prevalent complications of CABG. Thus, weaning off the mechanical ventilation and extubation are of great clinical importance for these patients. Some post-operative problems also relate to the tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation. Therefore, an increase in this leads to an increase in the number of complications, length of hospital stay, and treatment costs. Since a large number of factors affect the post-operative period, the present study aims to identify the predictors of extubation time in CABG patients using casualty network analysis.Method. This longitudinal study was conducted on 800 over 18 year old patients who had undergone CABG surgery in three treatment centers affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The patients’ information, including pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative variables, was retrospectively extracted from their medical records. Then, the data was comprehensively analyzed through path analysis using MPLUS-7.1 software.Results. The mean of extubation time was 10.27 + 4.39 h. Moreover, extubation time was significantly affected by packed cells during the Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB, packed cells after CPB, inotrope use on arrival at ICU, mean arterial pressure 1st ICU, packed cells 1st ICU, platelets 1st ICU, Blood Urea Nitrogen 1st ICU, and hematocrit 1st ICU.Conclusion. Considering all of the factors under investigation, some peri-operative and post-operative factors had significant effects. Therefore, considering the post-operative factors is important for designing a treatment plan and evaluating patients’ prognosis.

  12. Factors influencing stream baseflow transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, Lyssette E.; Geissert, Daniel R.; Holwerda, Friso; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths, and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs or have related these to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested catchments (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2-year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTTs ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found both within groups of small (0.1-1.5 km2) and large (14-34 km2) catchments. Interestingly, the longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  13. Colon Transit Time in the Iranian Patients with Chronic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "M. Poorafkari

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: There are differences in cultural practices of defecation, diet, and average stool size between countries. On the other hand ROME II criteria tried to allow a unit category for the diagnosis of chronic functional constipation. We de-signed this study to find whether whole gut transit time is in concordance with ROME II criteria. Patients & Methods: From January 2004 to October 2005, we included patients older than 18 years old referred to the radiology ward of Taleghani Hospital for symptom-based definition of constipation pro-posed by an international working team (Rome II definition. None of the patients had responded prop-erly to treatment. Irritable bowel syndrome was ruled out and then conventional colon transit time (CTT test was performed for all of the included patients. Results: A total of 142 patients were enrolled in this study. A hundred and eight patients were women (76 %. Mean age of the patients was 38.9 (SD: 13.8. CTT revealed colonic inertia, and outlet obstruction in 16 (15% and 10 (9.3% patients respectively. Of all patients with abnormal CTT, 21 (80.7% had fewer than three bowel movements per week as their main complaint. Multivariate analysis showed that positive results were more commonly associated with fewer than three bowel movements per week than other symptoms (p value=0.01. Conclusion: Among patients with chronic constipa-tion, objective findings were not in concordance with subjective complaints. Therefore Rome II criteria may overestimate constipation in our population.

  14. Arterial spin labeling in patients with chic cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease - Correlation with {sup 15}O-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamano, Hironori; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Abe, Koichiro; Yamashita, Koji; Honda, Hiroshi [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)], e-mail: tsu@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Togao, Osamu [Dept. of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Background: Heterogeneity of arterial transit time due to cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions hampers accurate regional cerebral blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling (ASL). Purpose: To assess the feasibility of regional cerebral blood flow measurement by ASL with multiple-delay time sampling in patients with steno-occlusive diseases by comparing with positron emission tomography (PET), and to determine whether regional arterial transit time measured by this ASL technique is correlated with regional mean transit time, a PET index of perfusion pressure. Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with steno-occlusive diseases received both ASL and {sup 15}O-PET. The mean regional cerebral blood flow measured by ASL and PET, regional arterial transit time by ASL, and regional mean transit time by PET were obtained by a region-of-interest analysis. Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET, and correlation between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET were tested using Pearson's correlation coefficient for both absolute and relative values. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to test whether regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling the effect of regional cerebral blood flow by ASL. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET for both absolute (r = 0.520, P < 0.0001) and relative (r = 0.691, P < 0.0001) values. A significant positive correlation was found between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET both for absolute (r = 0.369, P = 0.0002) and relative (r = 0.443, P < 0.0001) values. The regression analysis revealed that regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling regional cerebral blood flow by

  15. Time courses of PIVKA-II and AFP levels after hepatic artery embolization and hepatic artery infusion against hepatocellular carcinoma: relation between the time course and tumor necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, K; Sonomura, T; Mitsuzane, K; Nishida, N; Kimura, M; Satoh, M; Yamada, R; Kodama, N; Kinoshita, M; Tanaka, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined 35 untreated patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who exhibited positivity for both plasma PIVKA-II and serum AFP, and studied the weekly course of these markers from the pre-TAE or -HAI period to the third week of treatment. We correlated changes in these markers with the tumor necrosis rate and the time course on X-ray CT images. One week after TAE, the tumor necrosis rate and the time course of PIVKA-II showed a significant correlation (r = 0.7), while the correlation was between the time course of AFP and the tumor necrosis rate was insignificant (r = 0.2). At two and three weeks after TAE, both the time course of AFP and PIVKA-II showed significant correlations with the tumor necrosis rate. In 16 patients with tumor necrosis rates of not less than 90%, the mean of the actual half-life (AHL) of PIVKA-II was 3.2 days, the shortest was 1.83 days, and 75% of all AHLs clustered from two days to four days, while the mean and shortest AHLs of AFP were six days and 2.98 days, respectively, exhibiting a broader distribution. On the other hand, in three out of the nine cases of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated with portal tumor thrombi, PIVKA-II increased after HAI in spite of a reduction in tumor size. It was suggested that the PIVKA-II level requires careful interpretation in cases of portal vein obstruction after intensive hepatic arterial infusion of anticancer agents.

  16. Acute Appendicitis as Complication of Colon Transit Time Study; A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramani, Leila; Roshanravan, Reza; Khodaei, Shahin; Rahimi Kazerooni, Salar; Moslemi, Sam

    2015-07-01

    Colon transit time study with radio opaque markers is a simple method for assessment of colon motility disorder in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation. We report a case of acute appendicitis that was induced by impaction of radio opaque markers after colon transit time study. We think that this case report is first significant complication of colon transit time study until now.

  17. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has...... not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients' regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. METHODS: Fifteen healthy volunteers...... = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency...

  18. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  19. Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Adriaan; Soons, Joris; Heuten, Hilde; Ennekens, Guy; Goovaerts, Inge; Vrints, Christiaan; Lava, Pascal; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19 m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58 m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78 m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

  20. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods.

  1. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  2. Triple Arterial Phase MR Imaging with Gadoxetic Acid Using a Combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, Keyhole, and Viewsharing Techniques and Two-Dimensional Parallel Imaging in Comparison with Conventional Single Arterial Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul 04342 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether triple arterial phase acquisition via a combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, keyhole, temporal viewsharing and parallel imaging can improve arterial phase acquisition with higher spatial resolution than single arterial phase gadoxetic-acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Informed consent was waived for this retrospective study by our Institutional Review Board. In 752 consecutive patients who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI, either single (n = 587) or triple (n = 165) arterial phases was obtained in a single breath-hold under MR fluoroscopy guidance. Arterial phase timing was assessed, and the degree of motion was rated on a four-point scale. The percentage of patients achieving the late arterial phase without significant motion was compared between the two methods using the χ{sup 2} test. The late arterial phase was captured at least once in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 84.2% (494/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Significant motion artifacts (score ≤ 2) were observed in 13.3% (22/165), 1.2% (2/165), 4.8% (8/165) on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scans of triple arterial phase acquisitions and 6.0% (35/587) of single phase acquisitions. Thus, the late arterial phase without significant motion artifacts was captured in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 79.9% (469/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Triple arterial phase imaging may reliably provide adequate arterial phase imaging for gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI.

  3. Triple arterial phase MR imaging with gadoxetic acid using a combination of contrast enhanced time robust angiography, keyhole, and viewsharing techniques and two-dimensional parallel imaging in comparison with conventional single arterial phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To determine whether triple arterial phase acquisition via a combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, keyhole, temporal viewsharing and parallel imaging can improve arterial phase acquisition with higher spatial resolution than single arterial phase gadoxetic-acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Informed consent was waived for this retrospective study by our Institutional Review Board. In 752 consecutive patients who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI, either single (n = 587) or triple (n = 165) arterial phases was obtained in a single breath-hold under MR fluoroscopy guidance. Arterial phase timing was assessed, and the degree of motion was rated on a four-point scale. The percentage of patients achieving the late arterial phase without significant motion was compared between the two methods using the χ2 test. The late arterial phase was captured at least once in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 84.2% (494/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Significant motion artifacts (score ≤ 2) were observed in 13.3% (22/165), 1.2% (2/165), 4.8% (8/165) on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scans of triple arterial phase acquisitions and 6.0% (35/587) of single phase acquisitions. Thus, the late arterial phase without significant motion artifacts was captured in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 79.9% (469/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Triple arterial phase imaging may reliably provide adequate arterial phase imaging for gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI.

  4. Asymptotic analysis of blood flow in stented arteries: time dependency and direct simulations***

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichon Gostaf Kirill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to extend in two distinct directions results recently obtained in [10]. In a first step we focus on the possible extension of our results to the time dependent case. Whereas in the second part some preliminary numerical simulations aim to give orders of magnitudes in terms of numerical costs of direct 3D simulations. We consider, in the first part, the time dependent rough problem for a simplified heat equation in a straight channel that mimics the axial velocity under an oscillating pressure gradient. We derive first order approximations with respect to ϵ, the size of the roughness. In order to understand the problem and set up correct boundary layer approximations, we perform a time periodic fourier analysis and check that no frequency can interact with the roughness. We show rigorously on this toy problem that the boundary layers remain stationary in time (independent on the frequency number. Finally we perform numerical tests validating our theoretical approach. In the second part, we determine actual limits, when running three-dimensional blood flow simulations of the non-homogenized stented arteries. We solve the stationary Stokes equations for an artery containing a saccular aneurysm. Consecutive levels of uniform mesh refinement, serve to relate spatial resolution, problem scale, and required computation time. Test computations are presented for femoral side aneurysm, where a simplified ten-wire stent model was placed across the aneurysm throat. We advocate the proposed stent homogenization model, by concluding that an actual computation power is not sufficient to run accurate, direct simulations of a pulsatile flow in stented vessels.

  5. Deconfinement Phase Transition in an Expanding Quark system in Relaxation Time Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Z; Yang, Zhenwei; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of nonequilibrium and collision terms on the deconfinement phase transition of an expanding quark system in Friedberg-Lee model in relaxation time approximation. By calculating the effective quark potential, the critical temperature of the phase transition is dominated by the mean field, while the collisions among quarks and mesons change the time structure of the phase transition significantly.

  6. Conductivity and transit time estimates of a soil liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.H.; Herzog, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    A field-scale soil linear was built to assess the feasibilty of constructing a liner to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of the U.S. EPA (i.e., less than 1 ?? 10-7 cm/s), and to determine the breakthrough and transit times of water and tracers through the liner. The liner, 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m, was constructed in 15-cm compacted lifts using a 20,037-kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.4 ?? 10-9 cm/s, based on data from large-ring infiltrometers; 4.0 ?? 10-8 cm/s from small-ring infiltrometers; and 5.0 ?? 10-8 cm/s from a water-balance analysis. These estimates were derived from 1 year of monitoring water infiltration into the linear. Breakthrough of tracers at the base of the liner was estimated to be between 2 and 13 years, depending on the method of calculation and the assumptions used in the calculation.

  7. Modeling hyporheic exchange and in-stream transport with time-varying transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A.; Harman, C. J.; Ward, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTD) are used to understand in-stream transport and exchange with the hyporheic zone by quantifying the probability of water (and of dissolved material) taking time T to traverse the stream reach control volume. However, many studies using this method assume a TTD that is time-invariant, despite the time-variability of the streamflow. Others assume that storage is 'randomly sampled' or 'well-mixed' with a fixed volume or fixed exchange rate. Here we present a formulation for a time-variable TTD that relaxes both the time-invariant and 'randomly sampled' assumptions and only requires a few parameters. The framework is applied to transient storage, representing some combination of in-stream and hyporheic storage, along a stream reach. This approach does not assume that hyporheic and dead-zone storage is fixed or temporally-invariant, and allows for these stores to be sampled in more physically representative ways determined by the system itself. Instead of using probability distributions of age, probability distributions of storage (ranked by age) called Ω functions are used to describe how the off-stream storage is sampled in the outflow. Here the Ω function approach is used to describe hyporheic exchange during diurnal fluctuations in streamflow in a gaining reach of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. The breakthrough curves of salt slugs injected four hours apart over a 28-hour period show a systematic variation in transit time distribution. This new approach allows us to relate these salt slug TTDs to a corresponding time-variation in the Ω function, which can then be related to changes in in-stream storage and hyporheic zone mobilization under varying flow conditions. Thus, we can gain insights into how channel storage and hyporheic exchange are changing through time without having to specify difficult to measure or unmeasurable quantities of our system, such as total storage.

  8. Diabetes patients show different time-course of myocardial perfusion improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Seok, J. W.; Eo, J. S. [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes is known to cause microangiopathy. The microangiopathy is hardly detectable on the coronary angiography. Myocardial perfusion imaging shows the resultant perfusion status which reflects the microangiopathy. For patients who underwent revascularization, the microangiopathy could affect the myocardial perfusion improvement. Diabetes patients probably experience the different myocardial perfusion improvement as compared to the non-diabetes patients although they have similar angiographic findings. The aim of this study is to find out whether there is a time-course difference of perfusion improvement between the diabetes and non diabetes patients who showed patent angiographic findings after coronary artery grafting surgery (CABG). A total of 129 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were enrolled in this study. Myocardial SPECTs performed at previous, short-term (3 month), and mid-term (1 year) to CABG. One-year follow up angiography was done 411{+-}121 days after surgery. Graft patency was determined according to the FitzGibbon et al. Segments were assigned to vascular territories using a 20 segment model. The segments of excellent patency were included in this study. Time course differences of concerned segments were analyzed using RMANOVA. The number of segments enrolled was 764 of diabetes and 1083 of non-diabetes. At short-term follow up, reversibility score was 2.8{+-}8.1% in diabetes and 0.3{+-}7.5% in non-diabetes. At long-term follow up, reversibility score was 1.8{+-}8.0% in diabetes and 0.1{+-}7.3% in non-diabetes. The time-course of reversibility score was significantly different between the diabetes and non diabetes (p<0.001) Diabetic segments showed high residual reversibility score than non-diabetic segments after CABG although the angiographic finding was patent in both groups. This result is maybe attributable to microangiopathy induced by

  9. TTVFast: An efficient and accurate code for transit timing inversion problems

    CERN Document Server

    Deck, Katherine M; Holman, Matthew J; Nesvorny, David

    2014-01-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times (Nesvorny et al. 2013). The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any p...

  10. Gastrointestinal mean transit times in young and middle-aged healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of age and gender on gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times, a study was conducted in 32 healthy volunteers: eight young women (22-30 years), eight young men (20-28 years), eight middle-aged women (43-51 years) and eight middle-aged men (38-53 years......, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated. The gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were significantly longer in women. Ageing was shown to accelerate the gastric and small intestinal transit significantly. In the group of men the colonic mean transit time...... was unaffected by age, but middle-aged women had a significantly slower colonic transit than young women. We therefore conclude that both age and gender have to be considered when reference values for gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times have to be established....

  11. Transitional flow in intracranial aneurysms - a space and time refinement study below the Kolmogorov scales using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Kartik; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2015-01-01

    Most Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies of hemodynamics in intracranial aneurysms are based on the assumption of laminar flow due to a relatively low (below 500) parent artery Reynolds number. A few studies have recently demonstrated the occurrence of transitional flow in aneurysms, but these studies employed special finite element schemes tailored to capture transitional nature of flow. In this study we investigate the occurrence of transition using a standard Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The LBM is used because of its computational efficiency, which in the present study allowed us to perform simulations at a higher resolution than has been done in the context of aneurysms before. The high space-time resolutions of 8{\\mu}m and 0.11 {\\mu}s resulted in nearly one billion cells and 9 million time steps per second and allowed us to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy at resolutions below the Kolmogorov scales. We perform an in-depth space and time refinement study on 2 aneurysms; one was previously ...

  12. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokesch, R.W. E-mail: rupert.prokesch@univie.ac.at; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P

    1999-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG.

  13. Cisapride decreasing orocecal transit time in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Sheng Fu; Feng Jiang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Altered small-intestine motility, lengthening of orocecal transit time (OCTT), and small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) have been detected in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). These changes might be related to the progressive course and poor prognosis of the disease. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of 4-week treatment with cisapride on OCTT. METHODS: Ten NASH patients without diabetes were included. Ten healthy individuals served as controls. OCTT was measured by lactulose breath test (LBT). Anti-endotoxin core antibodies (EndoCAb) IgG were also examined. The effect of cisapride (10 mg TID during 4 weeks) on LBT and serum EndoCAb IgG levels in NASH patients was investigated. RESULTS: The NASH patients had more signiifcantly prolonged OCTT (95±17 min) than the controls (59±18 min, P=0.00032). Cisapride administration decreased OCTT (from 95±17 min to 83±19 min, P=0.037), basal breathed H2 (from 9.87±1.60 ppm to 8.61±1.63 ppm, P=0.046) and EndoCAb IgG titers (from 5.24±0.68 GMU/ml to 4.20±0.72 GMU/ml, P=0.013) in NASH patients. CONCLUSIONS:The present data suggest the existence of deranged intestinal motility and endotoxemia in NASH patients. Cisapride administration during 4 weeks possibly restore intestinal motility and ameliorate endotoxemia in NASH patients.

  14. TEE, a simple estimator for the precision of eclipse and transit minimum times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deeg, Hans J.; Tingley, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Context: Transit or eclipse timing variations have proven to be a valuable tool in exoplanet research. However, no simple way to estimate the potential precision of such timing measures has been presented yet, nor are guidelines available regarding the relation between timing errors and sampling......: The simulations show that the TEE gives timing errors very close to the correct value, as long as the temporal sampling is faster than transit ingress/egress durations and transits with very low S/N are avoided. Conclusions: The TEE is a useful tool to estimate eclipse or transit timing errors in actual...

  15. Discovering the space-time dimensions of schedule padding and delay from GTFS and real-time transit data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Nate; Widener, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Schedule padding is the extra time added to transit schedules to reduce the risk of delay. Where there is more random delay, there should be more schedule padding. While schedule padding is a product of transit planners, a method for detecting when and where it exists could provide valuable feedback as transit agencies continually develop their networks. By analyzing transit schedules and real-time vehicle location data at the level of stop-to-stop segments, we can locate padding in space and time and identify the places that may be most effected by stochastic delay. Such information could be used to target delay-reduction interventions such as fare prepayment or transit-only rights of way. The Toronto Transit Commission is used as a case study, and initial results suggest that highly delayed segments appear mostly in the expected, but some surprising, places.

  16. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  17. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  18. Jump time and passage time the duration of a quantum transition

    CERN Document Server

    Schulman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Under unitary evolution, systems move gradually from state to state. An unstable atom has amplitude in its original state after many lifetimes ($\\tau_L$). But in the laboratory, transitions seem to go instantaneously, as suggested by the term "quantum jump." The problem studied here is whether the "jump" can be assigned a duration, in theory and in experiment. Two characteristic times are defined, jump time ($\\tau_J$) and passage time ($\\tau_P$). Both use Zeno time, $\\tau_Z$, defined in terms of $H$ and its initial state as $\\tau_Z \\equiv \\hbar/\\sqrt{}$, with $E_\\psi \\equiv $. $\\tau_J$ is defined in terms of the time needed to slow (\\`a la the quantum Zeno effect) the decay: $\\tau_J \\equiv \\tau_Z^2/\\tau_L$. It appears in several contexts. It is related to tunneling time in barrier penetration. Its inverse is the bandwidth of the Hamiltonian, in a time-energy uncertainty principle. $\\tau_J$ is also an indicator of the duration of the quadratic decay regime in both experiment and in numerical calculations (cf. ...

  19. Transitive Lie groups on S^1\\times S^{2m}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatsevich, Vladimir V.

    2007-10-01

    The structure of Lie groups acting transitively on the direct product of a circle and an even-dimensional sphere is described. For products of two spheres of dimension >1 a similar problem has already been solved by other authors. The minimal transitive Lie groups on S^1 and S^{2m} are also indicated. As an application of these results, the structure of the automorphism group of one class of geometric structures, generalized quadrangles (a special case of Tits buildings) is considered. A conjecture put forward by Kramer is proved: the automorphism group of a connected generalized quadrangle of type (1,2m) always contains a transitive subgroup that is the direct product of a compact simple Lie group and a one-dimensional Lie group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  20. Semileptonic transition of B in noncommutative space- time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gholami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we study the noncommutative effect on the semileptonic transition of B Ò Dlv . We replace the weak interaction vertex in the ordinary space with its counterpart in the noncommutative space. It is shown that, more new form factors are needded to describe the hadronic part of the transition amplitude. All the form factors are obtained at the lowest order of three point QCD sum rule. Consequently, the decay rate of B Ò Dlv is calculated and a bound of the order of 4 GeV on is given for B Ò Dlv=(5.5 ± 0.5 × 10-2.

  1. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Ford, Eric B; Carter, Joshua A; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J; Lissauer, Jack J; Moorhead, Althea V; Rowe, Jason F; Ragozzine, Darin; Welsh, William F; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Buchhave, Lars A; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ron L; Girouard, Forrest R; Jenkins, Jon M; Horch, Elliott; Howell, Steve B; Isaacson, Howard; Klaus, Todd C; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Lucas, Philip; MacQueen, Phillip J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; McCauliff, Sean; Middour, Christopher K; Morris, Robert L; Mullally, Fergal R; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa V; Shporer, Avi; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Twicken, Joseph D; Van Cleve, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-Domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anti-correlations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27, and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  3. Improving perfusion quantification in arterial spin labeling for delayed arrival times by using optimized acquisition schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramme, Johanna [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; Gregori, Johannes [mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Diehl, Volker [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Samson-Himmelstjerna, Frederico C. von [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Lentschig, Markus [ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Guenther, Matthias [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The improvement in Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion quantification, especially for delayed bolus arrival times (BAT), with an acquisition redistribution scheme mitigating the T1 decay of the label in multi-TI ASL measurements is investigated. A multi inflow time (TI) 3D-GRASE sequence is presented which adapts the distribution of acquisitions accordingly, by keeping the scan time constant. The MR sequence increases the number of averages at long TIs and decreases their number at short TIs and thus compensating the T1 decay of the label. The improvement of perfusion quantification is evaluated in simulations as well as in-vivo in healthy volunteers and patients with prolonged BATs due to age or steno-occlusive disease. The improvement in perfusion quantification depends on BAT. At healthy BATs the differences are small, but become larger for longer BATs typically found in certain diseases. The relative error of perfusion is improved up to 30% at BATs > 1500 ms in comparison to the standard acquisition scheme. This adapted acquisition scheme improves the perfusion measurement in comparison to standard multi-TI ASL implementations. It provides relevant benefit in clinical conditions that cause prolonged BATs and is therefore of high clinical relevance for neuroimaging of steno-occlusive diseases.

  4. Functional real-time optoacoustic imaging of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kneipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Longitudinal functional imaging studies of stroke are key in identifying the disease progression and possible therapeutic interventions. Here we investigate the applicability of real-time functional optoacoustic imaging for monitoring of stroke progression in the whole brain of living animals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was used to model stroke in mice, which were imaged preoperatively and the occlusion was kept in place for 60 minutes, after which optoacoustic scans were taken at several time points. RESULTS: Post ischemia an asymmetry of deoxygenated hemoglobin in the brain was observed as a region of hypoxia in the hemisphere affected by the ischemic event. Furthermore, we were able to visualize the penumbra in-vivo as a localized hemodynamically-compromised area adjacent to the region of stroke-induced perfusion deficit. CONCLUSION: The intrinsic sensitivity of the new imaging approach to functional blood parameters, in combination with real time operation and high spatial resolution in deep living tissues, may see it become a valuable and unique tool in the development and monitoring of treatments aimed at suspending the spread of an infarct area.

  5. Assessment of Carotid Arterial Wall Elasticity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Microalbuminuria by Real-Time Ultrasound Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate carotid arterial wall elasticity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with microalbuminuria by real-time ultrasound elastography. Two hundred and ten T2DM patients were divided into two groups according to levels of urinary albumin excretion (UAE: T2DM without microalbuminuria (T2DM1 group, 120 and T2DM with microalbuminuria (T2DM2 group, 90. The right common carotid arteries were examined by real-time ultrasound elastography. The strain ratio (SR, blood to arterial wall strain ratio was calculated by dividing the strain value of the blood by that of the carotid arterial wall. The correlation between SR and general data was analyzed. The mean SR value ± SD of T2DM2 group was significantly higher than that of T2DM1 group (P<0.05. SR was positively and significantly correlated with UAE, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure (r=0.456,0.435,0.235, P<0.05 for all. The mean value ± SD of UAE, HbA1c, 2hPG, BMI, and TC of T2DM2 group was significantly higher than that of T2DM1 group (P<0.05 for all. In conclusion, there is an association between microalbuminuria and carotid arterial wall elasticity in T2DM patients.

  6. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  7. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea restricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients’ regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were investigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Results Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5–47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1–142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4–5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8–7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9–40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0–134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental colonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03–1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0–0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Conclusions Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements. PMID:26130638

  8. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. VI. Potentially Interesting Candidate Systems from Fourier-based Statistical Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G.; Prsa, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the sy...

  9. Daylight savings time transitions and the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel T; Sønderskov, Kim M; Hageman, Ida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate...... of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. METHODS......: Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012 we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted...

  10. Regularity and stability of transition fronts in nonlocal equations with time heterogeneous ignition nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenxian; Shen, Zhongwei

    2017-03-01

    The present paper is devoted to the investigation of various properties of transition fronts in one-dimensional nonlocal equations in heterogeneous media of ignition type, whose existence has been established by the authors of the present paper in a previous work. It is first shown that transition fronts are continuously differentiable in space with uniformly bounded and uniformly Lipschitz continuous space partial derivative. This is the first time that space regularity of transition fronts in nonlocal equations is ever studied. It is then shown that transition fronts are uniformly steep. Finally, asymptotic stability, in the sense of exponentially attracting front-like initial data, of transition fronts is studied.

  11. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit...... time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation...... to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness...

  12. Off-pump and on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery:time to move on

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahzad G Raja

    2004-01-01

    @@ To the editor: Chen and colleagues,1 and the editorial staff of the Chinese Medical Journal, deserve much credit for carrying out and publishing a prospective comparative study of on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery in 300 patients with triple-vessel coronary artery disease. Although this study is limited by non-randomization and selection bias yet contrary to the previously published prospective, randomized studies by Van Dijk et al,2 and Ascione et al,3 the patient population of this study is more representative of current coronary artery surgery practices. Even more important is the conclusion that OPCAB can be applied to patients with triple-vessel coronary artery disease and "in experienced hands" can achieve similar completeness of revascularization and similar early surgical results.

  13. Time course and recovery of arterial blood gases during exacerbations in adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, D F

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia and hypercapnia are closely linked to morbidity and mortality in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The aims of this study were to describe the changes in blood gases during and following an acute pulmonary exacerbation in adults with CF. METHODS: We performed a prospective observational study of patients with CF admitted for management of an acute exacerbation. Blood gas and spirometric analysis was performed on admission, throughout the treatment period, and 31 days after discharge (day 45). RESULTS: At presentation, eight of nineteen patients had evidence of either hypoxia (PaO(2)<8 kPa) and\\/or hypercapnia (PaCO(2)>6.6 kPa). Blood gas parameters stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with little difference evident in between treatment completion and subsequent review following discharge. Hypercapnia reversed in three patients, with persistent hypercapnia evident in two patients. CONCLUSION: In our study group, hypoxemia and hypercapnia were frequently observed at presentation of the acute exacerbation. Blood gases stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with arterial PCO(2) one month following hospital discharge generally similar to that at time of discharge.

  14. Generalizing memories over time: sleep and reinforcement facilitate transitive inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werchan, Denise M; Gómez, Rebecca L

    2013-02-01

    The use of reinforcement and rewards is known to enhance memory retention. However, the impact of reinforcement on higher-order forms of memory processing, such as integration and generalization, has not been directly manipulated in previous studies. Furthermore, there is evidence that sleep enhances the integration and generalization of memory, but these studies have only used reinforcement learning paradigms and have not examined whether reinforcement impacts or is critical for memory integration and generalization during sleep. Thus, the aims of the current study were to examine: (1) whether reinforcement during learning impacts the integration and generalization of memory; and (2) whether sleep and reinforcement interact to enhance memory integration and generalization. We investigated these questions using a transitive inference (TI) task, which is thought to require the integration and generalization of disparate relational memories in order to make novel inferences. To examine whether reinforcement influences or is required for the formation of inferences, we compared performance using a reinforcement or an observation based TI task. We examined the impact of sleep by comparing performance after a 12-h delay containing either wake or sleep. Our results showed that: (1) explicit reinforcement during learning is required to make transitive inferences and that sleep further enhances this effect; (2) sleep does not make up for the inability to make inferences when reinforcement does not occur during learning. These data expand upon previous findings and suggest intriguing possibilities for the mechanisms involved in sleep-dependent memory transformation.

  15. The Barrier Method: A Technique for Calculating Very Long Transition Times

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, David A; Sander, Leonard M.; Ziff, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    In many dynamical systems there is a large separation of time scales between typical events and "rare" events which can be the cases of interest. Rare-event rates are quite difficult to compute numerically, but they are of considerable practical importance in many fields: for example transition times in chemical physics and extinction times in epidemiology can be very long, but are quite important. We present a very fast numerical technique that can be used to find long transition times (very...

  16. Investigation of Timing to Switch Control Mode in Powered Knee Prostheses during Task Transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Current powered prosthetic legs require switching control modes according to the task the user is performing (e.g. level-ground walking, stair climbing, walking on slopes, etc.. To allow prosthesis users safely and seamlessly transition between tasks, it is critical to determine when to switch the prosthesis control mode during task transitions. Our previous study defined critical timings for different types of task transitions in ambulation; however, it is unknown whether it is the unique timing that allows safe and seamless transitions. The goals of this study were to (1 systematically investigate the effects of mode switch timing on the prosthesis user's performance in task transitions, and (2 identify appropriate timing to switch the prosthesis control mode so that the users can seamlessly transition between different locomotion tasks. Five able-bodied (AB and two transfemoral (TF amputee subjects were tested as they wore a powered knee prosthesis. The prosthesis control mode was switched manually at various times while the subjects performed different types of task transitions. The subjects' task transition performances were evaluated by their walking balance and success in performing seamless task transitions. The results demonstrated that there existed a time window within which switching the prosthesis control mode neither interrupted the subjects' task transitions nor disturbed their walking balance. Therefore, the results suggested the control mode switching of a lower limb prosthesis can be triggered within an appropriate time window instead of a specific timing or an individual phase. In addition, a generalized criterion to determine the appropriate mode switch timing was proposed. The outcomes of this study could provide important guidance for future designs of neurally controlled powered knee prostheses that are safe and reliable to use.

  17. The use of transit timing to detect terrestrial-mass extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J; Murray, Norman W

    2005-02-25

    Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets are expected to detect hundreds of jovian-mass planets and tens of terrestrial-mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1 to 100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting) by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The transit-time variations depend on the mass of the additional planet, and in some cases terrestrial-mass planets will produce a measurable effect. In systems where two planets are seen to transit, the density of both planets can be determined without radial-velocity observations.

  18. TEE, an estimator for the precision of eclipse and transit minimum times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, H. J.; Tingley, B.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Transit or eclipse timing variations have proven to be a valuable tool in exoplanet research. However, no simple way to estimate the potential precision of such timing measures has been presented yet, nor are guidelines available regarding the relation between timing errors and sampling rate. Aims: A timing error estimator (TEE) equation is presented that requires only basic transit parameters as input. With the TEE, estimating timing precision for actual data and for future instruments, such as the TESS and PLATO space missions, is straightforward. Methods: A derivation of the timing error based on a trapezoidal transit shape is given. We also verify the TEE on realistically modelled transits using Monte Carlo simulations and determine its validity range, exploring in particular the interplay between ingress/egress times and sampling rates. Results: The simulations show that the TEE gives timing errors very close to the correct value, as long as the temporal sampling is faster than transit ingress/egress durations and transits with very low S/N are avoided. Conclusions: The TEE is a useful tool for estimating eclipse or transit timing errors in actual and future data sets. In combination with a previously published equation to estimate period-errors, predictions for the ephemeris precision of long-coverage observations are possible as well. The tests for the TEE's validity range also led to implications for instrumental design. Temporal sampling has to be faster than transit ingress or egress durations, or a loss in timing precision will occur. An application to the TESS mission shows that transits close to its detection limit will have timing uncertainties that exceed 1 h within a few months of their acquisition. Prompt follow-up observations will be needed to avoid "losing" their ephemerides.

  19. Not ready for prime time: transitional events in the extremely preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Successful transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life involves significant physiologic changes. The majority of these changes occur relatively quickly during those first moments following delivery; however, transition for the extremely preterm infant occurs over a longer period of time. Careful assessment and perceptive interventions on the part of neonatal care providers is essential as the extremely preterm infant adjusts to life outside the womb. This article will focus on respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic transitional events experienced by the extremely premature infant.

  20. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  1. No Timing Variations Observed in Third Transit of Snow-Line Exoplanet Kepler-421b

    CERN Document Server

    Dalba, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of the snow-line exoplanet Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Previously, the Kepler Spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b leaving the planet's transit ephemeris unconstrained. Our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b barring significant TTVs. We use the light curves to assess the probabilities of various transit models using both the posterior odds ratio and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and find that a transit model with no TTVs is favored to 3.6-sigma confidence. These observations suggest that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the Kepler-421b ephemeris constrained, we calculate future transit times and discuss the opportunity to characteriz...

  2. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment.

  3. The role of hillslopes in stream flow response: connectivity, flow path, and transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to stream flow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. Much of the difficulty in deciphering hillslope response in the stream is due to riparian zone modulation of these inputs. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics in a 10 ha catchment in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows, providing an unambiguous hillslope hydrologic signal to the stream channel. Water transit time was used as a framework to develop a conceptual stream flow generation model for the small basin. We based our conceptualization on observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components using a simple linear systems model. Event water mean transit times (8 to 34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions, demonstrated that contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, vadose zone water and runoff mean transit times during non-storm conditions were greater than the timescale of storm events. Vadose zone water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment baseflow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  4. Time-Varying Transition Probability Matrix Estimation and Its Application to Brand Share Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tomoaki; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    In a product market or stock market, different products or stocks compete for the same consumers or purchasers. We propose a method to estimate the time-varying transition matrix of the product share using a multivariate time series of the product share. The method is based on the assumption that each of the observed time series of shares is a stationary distribution of the underlying Markov processes characterized by transition probability matrices. We estimate transition probability matrices for every observation under natural assumptions. We demonstrate, on a real-world dataset of the share of automobiles, that the proposed method can find intrinsic transition of shares. The resulting transition matrices reveal interesting phenomena, for example, the change in flows between TOYOTA group and GM group for the fiscal year where TOYOTA group’s sales beat GM’s sales, which is a reasonable scenario. PMID:28076383

  5. The mass of the Mars-sized exoplanet Kepler-138 b from transit timing

    CERN Document Server

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Extrasolar planets that pass in front of their host star (transit) cause a temporary decrease in the apparent brightness of the star once per orbit, providing a direct measure of the planet's size and orbital period. In some systems with multiple transiting planets, the times of the transits are measurably affected by the gravitational interactions between neighbouring planets. In favorable cases, the departures from Keplerian orbits implied by the observed transit times permit planetary masses to be measured, which is key to determining bulk densities. Characterizing rocky planets is particularly difficult, since they are generally smaller and less massive than gaseous planets. Thus, few exoplanets near Earth's size have had their masses measured. Here we report the sizes and masses of three planets orbiting Kepler-138, a star much fainter and cooler than the Sun. We measure the mass of the Mars-sized inner planet based on on the transit times of its neighbour and thereby provide the first density measuremen...

  6. Validation of transit-time flowmetry for chronic measurements of regional blood flow in resting and exercising rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Amaral

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to validate the transit-time technique for long-term measurements of iliac and renal blood flow in rats. Flow measured with ultrasonic probes was confirmed ex vivo using excised arteries perfused at varying flow rates. An implanted 1-mm probe reproduced with accuracy different patterns of flow relative to pressure in freely moving rats and accurately quantitated the resting iliac flow value (on average 10.43 ± 0.99 ml/min or 2.78 ± 0.3 ml min-1 100 g body weight-1. The measurements were stable over an experimental period of one week but were affected by probe size (resting flows were underestimated by 57% with a 2-mm probe when compared with a 1-mm probe and by anesthesia (in the same rats, iliac flow was reduced by 50-60% when compared to the conscious state. Instantaneous changes of iliac and renal flow during exercise and recovery were accurately measured by the transit-time technique. Iliac flow increased instantaneously at the beginning of mild exercise (from 12.03 ± 1.06 to 25.55 ± 3.89 ml/min at 15 s and showed a smaller increase when exercise intensity increased further, reaching a plateau of 38.43 ± 1.92 ml/min at the 4th min of moderate exercise intensity. In contrast, exercise-induced reduction of renal flow was smaller and slower, with 18% and 25% decreases at mild and moderate exercise intensities. Our data indicate that transit-time flowmetry is a reliable method for long-term and continuous measurements of regional blood flow at rest and can be used to quantitate the dynamic flow changes that characterize exercise and recovery

  7. Wave dissipation in flexible tubes in the time domain: in vitro model of arterial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Long, Q; Khir, A W

    2007-01-01

    Earlier work of wave dissipation in flexible tubes and arteries has been carried out predominantly in the frequency domain and most of the studies used the measured pressure waveform for presenting the results. In this work we investigate the pattern of wave dissipation in the time domain using the separated forward and backward travelling waves in flexible tubes. We tested four sizes of latex tubes of 2m in length each, where a single semi-sinusoidal in shape, pressure wave, was produced at the inlet of each tube. Simultaneous measurements of pressure and flow waveforms were recorded every 5cm along the tubes and wave speed was determined using the pressure-velocity loop method (PU-loop). The measured data and wave speed were used to separate the pressure waveform and wave intensity, into their forward and backward directions, using wave intensity analysis (WIA). Also, the energy carried by the wave was calculated by integrating the relevant area under the wave intensity curve. The peak of the measured pressure waveform increased downstream, however, the peak of the separated forward pressure waveform decreased exponentially along the tube. Wave intensity and energy also dissipated exponentially along the travelling distance. The peaks of the separated pressure and wave intensity decreased in the forward in a similar exponential way to that in the backward direction in all four tube sizes. Also, the smaller the size of the tube the greater wave dissipation it caused. We conclude that wave separation is useful in studying wave dissipation in elastic tubes, and WIA provides a convenient method for determining the dissipation of the energy carried by the wave along the travelled distance. The separated pressure waveform, wave intensity and wave energy dissipate exponentially with the travelling distance, and wave dissipation varies conversely with the diameter of elastic tubes.

  8. Critical capacity, travel time delays and travel time distribution of rapid mass transit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Lee, Kee Khoon; Hung, Gih Guang

    2014-07-01

    We set up a mechanistic agent-based model of a rapid mass transit system. Using empirical data from Singapore's unidentifiable smart fare card, we validate our model by reconstructing actual travel demand and duration of travel statistics. We subsequently use this model to investigate two phenomena that are known to significantly affect the dynamics within the RTS: (1) overloading in trains and (2) overcrowding in the RTS platform. We demonstrate that by varying the loading capacity of trains, a tipping point emerges at which an exponential increase in the duration of travel time delays is observed. We also probe the impact on the rail system dynamics of three types of passenger growth distribution across stations: (i) Dirac delta, (ii) uniform and (iii) geometric, which is reminiscent of the effect of land use on transport. Under the assumption of a fixed loading capacity, we demonstrate the dependence of a given origin-destination (OD) pair on the flow volume of commuters in station platforms.

  9. Dual-Priced Modal Transition Systems with Time Durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beneš, Nikola; Kretínsky, Jan; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand;

    2012-01-01

    intervals. We further equip the model with two kinds of quantitative aspects: each action has its own running cost per time unit, and actions may require several hardware components of different costs. We ask the question, given a fixed budget for the hardware components, what is the implementation...... with the cheapest long-run average reward. We give an algorithm for computing such optimal implementations via a reduction to a new extension of mean payoff games with time durations and analyse the complexity of the algorithm....

  10. What do we know about the timing of fertility transitions in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinnane, T W; Okun, B S; Trussell, J

    1994-02-01

    The Princeton project on the decline of fertility in Europe (the European Fertility Project) suggested that this historical fertility transition occurred virtually simultaneously in a wide variety of economic and social environments. This finding has been cited widely as evidence for an innovation/diffusion view of fertility transitions. We demonstrate that the demographic methods used to date the fertility transition in Europe--primarily Ig, and (to a lesser extent) the Coale-Trussell M&m indices--may fail to detect the initial stages of a fertility transition and therefore cannot be used as the basis for strong statements about the timing of transitions. We review these measurement problems and their implications for the current understanding of the European fertility transition.

  11. Using a physically-based transit time distribution function to estimate the hydraulic parameters and hydraulic transit times of an unconfined aquifer from tritium measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Maloszewski, Piotr; Schneider, Wilfried; Gallé, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater transit time is of interest in environmental studies pertaining to the transport of pollutants from its source to the aquifer outlet (spring or pumping well) or to an observation well. Different models have been proposed to describe the distribution of transit times within groundwatersheds, the most common being the dispersion model, the exponential-piston-flow model (EPM) both proposed by Maloszewski and Zuber (Maloszewski and Zuber, 1982) and the (two or three parameter) gamma model (Amin and Campana, 1996; Kirchner et al., 1999). Choosing which function applies best is a recurrent and controversial problem in hydrogeology. The object of this study is to revisit the applicability of the EPM for unconfined aquifers, and to introduce an alternative model based explicitly on groundwater hydraulics. The alternative model is based on the transit time of water from any point at the groundwater table to the aquifer outlet, and is used to calculate inversely the hydraulic parameters of a fractured unconfined sandstone aquifer from tritium measurements made in a series of contact springs. This model is compared to the EPM, which is usually adopted to describe the transit time distribution of confined and unconfined aquifers alike. Both models are tested against observations, and it is shown that the EPM fails the test for some of the springs, and generally seems to overestimate the older water component. Amin, I. E., and M. E. Campana (1996), A general lumped parameter model for the interpretation of tracer data and transit time calculation in hydrologic systems, Journal of Hydrology, 179, 1-21, doi: 10.1016/0022-1694(95)02880-3. Kirchner, J. W., X. H. Feng, and C. Neal (1999), Fractal stream chemistry and its implications for contaminant transport in catchments, Nature physics, 403, 524-527, doi: 10.1038/35000537. Maloszewski, P., and A. Zuber (1982), Determining the turnover time of groundwater systems with the aid of environmental tracers, Journal of

  12. TTVFast: An efficient and accurate code for transit timing inversion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deck, Katherine M. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Washington at Seattle, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Nesvorný, David [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Studies, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 400, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times. The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any particular system. We find a speed-up of at least an order of magnitude relative to dynamical integrations with high precision using a Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.

  13. On time-resolved approach for phonon assisted interband transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotins, E.

    2015-03-01

    Photoexcited dynamics of electrons and holes in two-band dielectric, with special emphasis on back reaction of phonons are developed by combining the quantum electrodynamics and Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) canonical transformation. These methods create an explicit time-domain representation of photoinduced processes and contribute in unifying phonon-assisted description of distribution functions of electron and hole quasiparticles for the description of observable effects of photoinduced processes in dielectrics.

  14. Analysis of the Transition Time From Air to Oxy-Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasek Janusz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some issues of the transition process from air- to oxy-combustion were investigated. Advantages of flexible combustion were described. Flexible combustion tests carried out at four European plants and five plants outside Europe of different scales of process and test parameters were presented. An analysis of the transition time from air to oxy-combustion of different laboratory and pilot scale processes was carried out. The “first-order + dead time” approach was used as a model to describe transition process. Transitional periods between combustion modes and characteristic parameters of the process were determined. The transition time depends not only on the facility’s capacity but also it is impacted by specific operational parameters.

  15. Time-course of ventilation, arterial and pulmonary CO(2) tension during CO (2) increase in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Toru; Okada, Yasumasa; Hara, Yasushi; Sakamaki, Fumio; Kyotani, Shingo; Tomita, Takeshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi; Nakanishi, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    A change of ventilation (VE), PaCO( 2 ) (arterial CO( 2 ) tension) and PvCO( 2 ) (pulmonary arterial CO( 2 ) tension) with time was not evaluated precisely during exercise or CO( 2 ) rebreathing in humans. In this study, changes of these variables with time were fitted to exponential curves {y = Exp ( x/ T + A ) + k} and compared. When exercise pulmonary hemodynamics was examined in 15 cardiac patients to decide therapies, we asked the patients to undergo CO( 2 ) rebreathing using air with supplementation of consumed O( 2 ). Arterial and pulmonary blood was drawn every minute. During exercise, T was 28.2 ± 8.4 and 26.8 ± 12.4, and A was 0.80 ± 0.50 and 0.50 ± 0.90 in VE and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with no statistical differences. During CO( 2 ) rebreathing, T was 18.6 ± 5.8, 41.8 ± 38.0 and 21.6 ± 9.7 and A was 0.39 ± 0.67, 1.64 ± 1.35 and 0.17 ± 0.83 in VE, PaCO( 2 ) and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with statistical difference of PaCO( 2 ) from other variables, suggesting that VE and PvCO( 2 ) showed same mode of change according to time but PaCO( 2 ) did not.

  16. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Svanholm, Jette Rolf

    diseases and chronic kidney diseases. We specifically focus on the adolescents’ experiences, 'what is important to them', 'what characterises their interaction with health care staff' and 'the communication between the adolescents and health care staff as perceived by the adolescents'. Methods...... interview with the adolescent at outpatient clinics at Aarhus University Hospital. Follow-up is planned at 15 and 18 years of age. A comparative approach is employed to show central characteristics across time, disease and gender. Results: Results from analysis inspired by Ricoeur's phenomenological...

  17. The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition Out of Full-Time Paid Work

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective framework this study examines how engagement in unpaid work prior to and at the transition from full-time work influences whether individuals partial...

  18. An Analisys Of Transitivity Time Megazine A Case Study Of Arts Rubrics

    OpenAIRE

    Winda, Yusta Utami

    2010-01-01

    Skripsi yang berjudul An Analysis of Transitivity Process in Time Magazine: A Case Study of Arts Rubrics. Merupakan suatu kajian Linguistik Fungsional Sistemik pada majalah mingguan Time khususnya pada bidang seni. Untuk mendapatkan proses yang palind dominan digunakan formula yang dikembangkan oleh Bungin (2005,171-172). Analisis proses transitivity didalam skripsi ini menerapkan teori Linguistik Fungsional Sistemik (Systemic Functional Linguistics) yag dipelopori oleh Halliday. Proses ini d...

  19. Effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on mouth to caecum transit time in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladas, S D; Frydas, A; Papadopoulos, A.; S. A. Raptis

    1992-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors acarbose and miglitol have been successfully used to control postprandial hyperglycaemia in diabetics. They probably work by slowing carbohydrate digestion and absorption, but their effect on mouth to caecum transit time has not been studied. The effect acarbose (100 mg), miglitol (100 mg), and placebo on mouth to caecum transit time (380 kcal breakfast with 20 g of lactulose) was investigated in 18 normal volunteers using breath hydrogen analysis. Both miglit...

  20. A Matheuristic for the Liner Shipping Network Design Problem with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Desaulniers, Guy; Karsten, Christian Vad;

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for the liner shipping network design problem with transit time restrictions on the cargo flow. We extend an existing matheuristic for the liner shipping network design problem to consider transit time restrictions. The matheuristic is an improvement heuristic, where...... on the benchmark suite LINER-LIB are reported, showing profitable networks for most instances. We provide insights on causes for rejecting demand and the average speed per vessel class in the solutions obtained....

  1. Transit timing, depth, and duration variation in exoplanet TrES-2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaňko M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on our ongoing search for timing, duration, and depth variations in the exoplanet TrES-2. In Raetz et al. (2009 we already presented ten different transits obtained at the University Observatory Jena. Between November 2008 and August 2010 twelve additional transits could be observed. The timing, depth and duration of each individual event was analyzed and is presented here.

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Rowe, Jason F; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Holman, Matthew J; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Batalha, Natalie M; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A; Ciardi, David R; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G; Prsa, Andrej; Sanderfer, Dwight T; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  4. Effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on mouth to caecum transit time in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, S D; Frydas, A; Papadopoulos, A; Raptis, S A

    1992-09-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors acarbose and miglitol have been successfully used to control postprandial hyperglycaemia in diabetics. They probably work by slowing carbohydrate digestion and absorption, but their effect on mouth to caecum transit time has not been studied. The effect acarbose (100 mg), miglitol (100 mg), and placebo on mouth to caecum transit time (380 kcal breakfast with 20 g of lactulose) was investigated in 18 normal volunteers using breath hydrogen analysis. Both miglitol and acarbose significantly increased breath hydrogen excretion (F2,34 = 6.31, p = 0.005) and shortened the mouth to caecum transit time (F2,34 = 3.49, p = 0.04) after breakfast compared with placebo. There was a significant negative correlation between breath hydrogen excretion and mouth to caecum transit time suggesting that with shorter transit times significantly more carbohydrates were spilled into the colon. These results indicate that alpha-glucosidase inhibitors accelerate mouth to caecum transit time by inducing carbohydrate malabsorption.

  5. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Dilling Kjaer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL. This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365. Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF was 49% (3–77 and 62% (17–98 after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360. A median daily stool frequency of nine (4–25 was reported and three (14% patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90% patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful.

  6. Effects of unsteadiness and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow through a tapered time-variant stenotic artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional model is used to analyze the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood through a tapered artery with stenosis. The rheology of the flowing blood is captured by the constitutive equation of Carreau model. The geometry of the time-variant stenosis has been used to carry out the present analysis. The flow equations are set up under the assumption that the lumen radius is sufficiently smaller than the wavelength of the pulsatile pressure wave. A radial coordinate transformation is employed to immobilize the effect of the vessel wall. The resulting partial differential equations along with the boundary and initial conditions are solved using finite difference method. The dimensionless radial and axial velocity, volumetric flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress are analyzed for normal and diseased artery with particular focus on variation of these quantities with non-Newtonian parameters.

  7. Timing of the maturation transition in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, D; Wright, P J; O'Sullivan, M

    2010-10-01

    The timing of maturation in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus was examined using changes in gonad development, follicle stimulating hormone β (FSH-β) transcript expression profile, growth and condition of 1 year old females held under a common environment between the summer and winter solstices. The circumnuclear ring, cortical alveolus and vitellogenic oocyte stages were first observed in August, October and November, respectively. FSH-β transcript levels did not change significantly until September but increased markedly thereafter in maturing fish. A combined analysis of the mean oocyte diameter of the leading cohort, histological staging and FSH-β transcript profile provided evidence of a commitment to maturation by October or November. Contrary to that previously proposed for gadoid species, histological analysis of field-caught immature M. aeglefinus during the spawning season indicated that cortical alveolar, rather than circumnuclear ring, stage oocytes provided definitive evidence of maturation. A decrease in relative liver size following the summer solstice suggested a possible link between energy status and maturation.

  8. Generation of chaotic oscillations in auto-oscillator based on avalanche transit-time diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasin, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Time series of chaotic oscillations have been observed for the first time in an auto-oscillator for the 8-mm wavelength range based on an avalanche transit-time diode. The noise generator based on this diode has been used as a signal source for a noise radar prototype.

  9. Intermittency transition to generalized synchronization in coupled time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M

    2007-12-01

    We report the nature of the transition to generalized synchronization (GS) in a system of two coupled scalar piecewise linear time-delay systems using the auxiliary system approach. We demonstrate that the transition to GS occurs via an on-off intermittency route and that it also exhibits characteristically distinct behaviors for different coupling configurations. In particular, the intermittency transition occurs in a rather broad range of coupling strength for the error feedback coupling configuration and in a narrow range of coupling strength for the direct feedback coupling configuration. It is also shown that the intermittent dynamics displays periodic bursts of periods equal to the delay time of the response system in the former case, while they occur in random time intervals of finite duration in the latter case. The robustness of these transitions with system parameters and delay times has also been studied for both linear and nonlinear coupling configurations. The results are corroborated analytically by suitable stability conditions for asymptotically stable synchronized states and numerically by the probability of synchronization and by the transition of sub-Lyapunov exponents of the coupled time-delay systems. We have also indicated the reason behind these distinct transitions by referring to the unstable periodic orbit theory of intermittency synchronization in low-dimensional systems.

  10. Exploring business process modelling paradigms and design-time to run-time transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Filip; Vanthienen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The business process management literature describes a multitude of approaches (e.g. imperative, declarative or event-driven) that each result in a different mix of process flexibility, compliance, effectiveness and efficiency. Although the use of a single approach over the process lifecycle is often assumed, transitions between approaches at different phases in the process lifecycle may also be considered. This article explores several business process strategies by analysing the approaches at different phases in the process lifecycle as well as the various transitions.

  11. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  12. Scintigraphic determination of gastrointestinal transit times. A comparison with breath hydrogen and radiologic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Larsen, N E; Hilsted, J;

    1991-01-01

    A scintigraphic method for determination of gastrointestinal transit times was compared with the breath hydrogen test and a multiple-bolus, single-radiograph technique. A close temporal association was found between the caecal appearance of radioactivity and the onset of breath hydrogen excretion....... In conclusion, inadequate delineation of the caecal region seems to be an unimportant drawback of the scintigraphic measurements, whereas day-to-day variation in gastrointestinal transit rates may influence the reliability of the assessments. Probably, quantitative transit data cannot be obtained from...

  13. Non-invasive quantification of peripheral arterial volume distensibility and its non-linear relationship with arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2009-05-29

    Arterial wall function is associated with different physiological and clinical factors. Changes in arterial pressure cause major changes in the arterial wall. This study presents a simple non-invasive method to quantify arterial volume distensibility changes with different arterial pressures. The electrocardiogram, finger and ear photoplethysmogram were recorded from 15 subjects with the right arm at five different positions (90 degrees , 45 degrees , 0 degrees , -45 degrees and -90 degrees referred to the horizontal level). Arm pulse propagation time was determined by subtracting ear pulse transit time from finger pulse transit time, and was used to obtain arterial volume distensibility. The mean arterial blood pressure with the arm at the horizontal level was acquired, and changes with position were calculated using the hydrostatic principle that blood pressure in the arm is linearly related to its vertical distance from the horizontal level. The mean arm pulse propagation times for the five different positions were 88, 72, 57, 54 and 52ms, with the corresponding mean arterial volume distensibility of 0.234%, 0.158%, 0.099%, 0.088% and 0.083% per mmHg. For all consecutive changes in arm position, arm pulse propagation time and arterial volume distensibility, were significantly different (all probability Ppressure decreased significantly between each consecutive arm position from 90 degrees to -45 degrees (all Ppressure changes from 101 to 58mmHg. In conclusion, the inverse and non-linear relationship between arterial volume distensibility and arterial pressure has been quantified using a simple arm positioning procedure, with the greatest effect at low pressures. This work is an important step in developing a simple non-invasive technique for assessing peripheral arterial volume distensibility.

  14. Total and segmental colonic transit time in constipated patients with Chagas? disease without megaesophagus or megacolon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Manometric and pharmacological tests have shown that motor abnormalities may occur in the non-dilated colons of chagasic patients. In order to investigate the presence of abnormalities of colonic function in constipated patients with Chagas? disease (ChC without megaesophagus or megacolon, studies of total and segmental colonic transit time with radiopaque markers were performed on 15 ChC patients, 27 healthy volunteers and 17 patients with idiopathic constipation (IC. The values obtained for the control group were similar to those reported in the literature (total colonic time: 34.1 ± 15.6 h; right colon: 9.9 ± 7.3 h; left colon: 10.8 ± 10 h, and rectosigmoid: 12.6 ± 9.9 h. Colonic transit time data permitted us to divide both IC and ChC patients into groups with normal transit and those with slow colonic transit. Colonic inertia was detected in 41% of IC patients and in 13% of ChC patients; left colon isolated stasis (hindgut dysfunction was detected in 12% of IC patients and 7% of ChC patients, and outlet obstruction was detected in 6% of IC patients and 7% of ChC patients. There were no significant differences in total or segmental colonic transit times between slow transit IC and slow transit ChC patients. In conclusion, an impairment of colonic motility was detected in about 30% of constipated patients with Chagas? disease without megaesophagus or megacolon. This subgroup of patients presented no distinctive clinical feature or pattern of colonic dysmotility when compared to patients with slow transit idiopathic constipation.

  15. A theory of lead-time in probabilistic excitation of L/H transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Shinichiro; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A quantity of a lead-time, t{sub lead}, is newly introduced to examine the probabilistic occurrence of the L/H transition. The lead-time is a time period during which a transition is likely to occur. We show that the lead-time has the statistical distribution as a function of the distance from critical parameter, e.g.|n{sub c} - n{sub c0}|when the density is a key parameter for transition. It has the dependence like t{sub lead} {proportional_to}|n{sub c} - n{sub c0}|{sup 2} if the background noise distribution is given as P (n{sub c}) {proportional_to}|n{sub c} - n{sub c0}|{sup -2}. (author)

  16. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrycky, Daniel C; Steffen, Jason H; Rowe, Jason F; Carter, Joshua A; Moorhead, Althea V; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Steve; Buchhave, Lars A; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fanelli, Michael N; Fischer, Debra; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Lissauer, Jack J; Lucas, Philip; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Mazeh, Tsevi; McCauliff, Sean; Quinn, Samuel; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Shporer, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets' masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems' architectures, even in cases for which high-precis...

  17. Transition to complete synchronization and global intermittent synchronization in an array of time-delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R.; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Lakshmanan, M.; Kurths, J.

    2012-07-01

    We report the nature of transitions from the nonsynchronous to a complete synchronization (CS) state in arrays of time-delay systems, where the systems are coupled with instantaneous diffusive coupling. We demonstrate that the transition to CS occurs distinctly for different coupling configurations. In particular, for unidirectional coupling, locally (microscopically) synchronization transition occurs in a very narrow range of coupling strength but for a global one (macroscopically) it occurs sequentially in a broad range of coupling strength preceded by an intermittent synchronization. On the other hand, in the case of mutual coupling, a very large value of coupling strength is required for local synchronization and, consequently, all the local subsystems synchronize immediately for the same value of the coupling strength and, hence, globally, synchronization also occurs in a narrow range of the coupling strength. In the transition regime, we observe a type of synchronization transition where long intervals of high-quality synchronization which are interrupted at irregular times by intermittent chaotic bursts simultaneously in all the systems and which we designate as global intermittent synchronization. We also relate our synchronization transition results to the above specific types using unstable periodic orbit theory. The above studies are carried out in a well-known piecewise linear time-delay system.

  18. Long-Term Transit Timing Monitoring and Refined Light Curve Parameters of HAT-P-13b

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, Benjamin J; Winn, Joshua N; Holman, Matthew J; Pál, András; Gazak, J Zachary

    2011-01-01

    We present 10 new transit light curves of the transiting hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b, obtained during two observational seasons by three different telescopes. When combined with 12 previously published light curves, we have a sample consisting of 22 transit light curves, spanning 1,041 days across 4 observational seasons. We use this sample to examine the recently observed large-amplitude transit timing variations (P\\'al et al. 2011), and give refined system parameters. We find that the transit times are consistent with a linear ephemeris, with the exception of a single transit time, from UT 2009 Nov 5, for which the measured mid transit time significantly deviates from our linear ephemeris. The nature of this deviation is not clear, and the rest of the data does not show any significant transit timing variation.

  19. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  20. Early complement activation follows eversion carotid endarterectomy and correlates with the time of clamping of the carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Széplaki, Gábor; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Gombos, Tímea

    2008-01-01

    -inhibitor, C4d, C3a and SC5b-9 and concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in samples serially taken from 16 patients with eversion CEA and 10 with carotid artery stenting (CAS) in the first 24h post-surgery/intervention. MBL2 genotypes were also determined. RESULTS: In patients with CEA...... an intense increase in C3a levels were observed immediately after surgery (psurgery, compared with the baseline values and with CAS patients. Peak C3a levels correlated with the time of carotid...

  1. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  2. Theoretical and experimental researches on C-band three-cavity transit-time effect oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Zhikai; LIU Qingxiang; CHEN Daibing; TAN Jie; ZHOU Haijing

    2004-01-01

    The C-band three-cavity transit-time effect oscillator (3C TTTO) is a novel high power microwave device based on the transit-time effect of the three-cavity (3C) resonator. The operational principle of this device is briefly expounded in this paper, and the theoretical and experimental researches on the radial insulation diode, the 3C resonator, the double-gap output cavity and the circular waveguide bevel cut radiation antenna are presented in detail. By using the analytic method, the eigen modes and their field distributions of the 3C resonator are developed, and some basic laws of the transit-time effect are obtained in non-( mode field of the 3C resonator. At last, the experimental results are given. This device generated RF peak power in excess of 400MW with 15ns FWHM, and its beam-wave power conversion efficiency is about 17%.

  3. Transit time of a freely falling quantum particle in a background gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a non-relativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case in which the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical transit times coincide, in conformity with the principle of equivalence. I also calculate the quantum corrections to the transit time when the de Broglie wavelengths are long enough to probe the spacetime curvature. The results are compared with the calculation of Chiao and Speliotopoulos (2003), who propose an experiment to measure the foregoing effects.

  4. Transit time of a freely falling quantum particle in a background gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P C W [Australian Centre for Astrobiology, Macquarie University, New South Wales 2109 (Australia)

    2004-12-21

    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a non-relativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case in which the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical transit times coincide, in conformity with the principle of equivalence. I also calculate the quantum corrections to the transit time when the de Broglie wavelengths are long enough to probe the spacetime curvature. The results are compared with the calculation of Chiao and Speliotopoulos (2003), who propose an experiment to measure the foregoing effects.

  5. Effect of Equal and Mismatched Signal Transition Time on Power Dissipation in Global VLSI Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Kumar Sharma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High density chips have introduced problems like crosstalk noise and power dissipation. The mismatching in transition time of the inputs occurs because different lengths of interconnects lead to different parasitic values. This paper presents the analysis of the effect of equal and unequal (mismatched transition time of inputs on power dissipation in coupled interconnects. Further, the effect of signal skew on transition time is analysed. To demonstrate the effects, a model of two distributed RLC lines coupled capacitively and inductively is taken into consideration. Each interconnect line is 4mm long and terminated by capacitive load of 30fF. The analysis is carried out for simultaneously switching lines. The results are obtained through SPICE simulations and waveforms are generated.

  6. Scintigraphic small intestinal transit time and defaecography in patients with J-pouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mie Dilling; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Hvidsten, Svend;

    2015-01-01

    Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch...... mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365). Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF) was 49% (3–77) and 62% (17–98) after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360). A median daily stool frequency of nine (4......–25) was reported and three (14%) patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90%) patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF) and pouch function in univariate...

  7. Dynamic detection of wake-sleep transition with reaction time-magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Bin Chen; Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to observable behaviors, sleep and wakefulness are two fundamentally different behavioral states. Although electroencephalogram (EEG) is traditionally used to define sleep stage, it is difficult to detect or to quantify microarousals or disruptions during sleep. In addition,initial sleep cannot be defined. It is thought that the wake-sleep transition cannot be defined by EEG patterns.OBJECTIVE: To observe the behavioral response magnitude during wake-sleep transition by EEG monitoring and to define the wake-sleep transition.DESIGN, TIME AND SE'n'ING: A behavioral and neural network study was performed at the Key Lab of Human Being Development and Mental Health of Central China Normal University, and Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science of South Central University for Nationalities, China in July 2007.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 30 healthy volunteers, of equal gender and aged (19.7+1.1) years, were recruited from the Central China Normal University, China for this study. None of the subjects had undergone EEG recording prior to this study or received any medication for sleep disturbances.METHODS: A novel adaptive approach was applied to detect wake-sleep transition, which avoided stimulus-induced waking. To test the difference between wake state and wake-sleep transition, the amount of self-information and mutual-information were effective parameters to analyze wake-sleep transition.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following parameters were measured: morphological changes in reaction time-magnitude, as well as correlation between phase changes and sleep, and wake and wake-sleep transition.RESULTS: There were three typical phases in morphological changes of reaction time-magnitude.With regard to the behavioral definition and criterion for sleep, the phase morphological characteristics displayed good correlation with behavioral states, such as sleep, wakefulness, and sleep onset. Entropy as an indicator of brain cognitive processes was introduced to test

  8. Reconciling transition path time and rate measurements in reactions with large entropic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments and simulation studies showed that protein/DNA folding barriers inferred from folding rates or from potentials of mean force are often much higher than the barriers estimated from the distributions of transition path times. Here a toy model is used to explain a possible origin of this effect: It is shown that when the transition in question involves an entropic barrier, the one-dimensional Langevin model commonly used to interpret experimental data, while adequately predicting the transition rate, fails to describe the properties of the subset of the trajectories that form the transition path ensemble; the latter may still be describable in terms of a one-dimensional model, but with a different potential, just as observed experimentally.

  9. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  10. Mean transit times in contrasting headwater catchments from southeast Australia determined using Tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Irvine, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    Headwater streams contribute a significant proportion of the total discharge of many river systems. However, despite their importance, the time taken for rainfall to pass through the catchment into the streams (the transit time) in headwater catchments is largely unknown as are the catchment characteristics (such as drainage density, topography, landuse, or geology) that determine variations in transit times. Because the peak in Tritium activities in rainfall produced by atmospheric nuclear tests in the1950's and 1960's (the "bomb-pulse") was several orders of magnitude lower in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere, Tritium activities of remnant bomb pulse water in the southern hemisphere have decayed below those of modern rainfall. This allows mean transit times to be estimated from single Tritium measurements. Here we use Tritium to estimate transit times of water contributing to perennial streams in the adjacent upper catchments of the Yarra and Latrobe Rivers (southeast Australia). Samples were collected at varying flow from six headwater tributary sites in the Latrobe catchment, which is largely forested and four tributaries in the Yarra catchment which has been extensively cleared for dryland agriculture. The lowest Tritium activities were recorded during summer baseflow conditions and are between 1.25 and 1.75 TU, these are significantly below the Tritium activity of local rainfall (~2.8 TU). Mean transit times calculated using an exponential-piston flow lumped parameter model are 21 to 47 years. Tritium activities during the recession periods following winter high flows are higher (1.54 to 2.1 TU), which may reflect either the dilution of a baseflow component with recent surface runoff or mobilisation of different stores of water with different residence times (e.g., from the soils or the regolith) from within the catchment. The variation of major ion concentrations with discharge suggests it is more likely that that different stores of

  11. Effect of electrical forepaw stimulation on capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Cai, Changsi; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke;

    2016-01-01

    microvascular networks. Electrical forepaw stimulation reduced, both mean transit time (11.3% ± 1.3%) and capillary transit-time heterogeneity (24.1% ± 3.3%), consistent with earlier literature and model predictions. We observed a coefficient of variance reduction (14.3% ± 3.5%) during functional activation......, especially for the arteriolar-to-venular passage. Such coefficient of variance reduction during functional activation suggests homogenization of capillary flows beyond that expected as a passive response to increased blood flow by other stimuli. This finding is consistent with an active neurocapillary...

  12. Nonlinear ion dynamics in Hall thruster plasma source by ion transit-time instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Park, Jae Sun; Kim, Holak; Seon, Jongho; Garrigues, L.

    2017-03-01

    High-energy tail formation in an ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is explained in a Hall thruster plasma with the stationary crossed electric and magnetic fields whose discharge current is oscillated at the ion transit-time scale with a frequency of 360 kHz. Among ions in different charge states, singly charged Xe ions (Xe+) have an IEDF that is significantly broadened and shifted toward the high-energy side, which contributes to tail formation in the entire IEDF. Analytical and numerical investigations confirm that the IEDF tail is due to nonlinear ion dynamics in the ion transit-time oscillation.

  13. Optical and x-ray time resolved study of the structural transition in mixed valence manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Q. X.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved optical reflectivity and x-ray diffraction techniques are employed to study the laser-induced structural response in two charge and orbitally ordered manganites. Optical data indicate a non-thermal nature of the laser-triggered phase transition via the disappearance of an optical phonon related to the charge and orbitally ordered phase. The x-ray diffraction measurements on superlattice reflections confirm the non-thermal time scale of the initial step of this phase transition but also show that the complete change of structural symmetry is not instantaneous.

  14. Hydroclimatic influences on non-stationary transit time distributions in a boreal headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Tapia, A.; Soulsby, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Sponseller, R.; Bishop, K.; Laudon, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how water moves through catchments - from the time it enters as precipitation to when it exits via streamflow - is of fundamental importance to understanding hydrological and biogeochemical processes. A basic descriptor of this routing is the Transit Time Distribution (TTD) which is derived from the input-output behavior of conservative tracers, the mean of which represents the average time elapsed between water molecules entering and exiting a flow system. In recent decades, many transit time studies have been conducted, but few of these have focused on snow-dominated catchments. We assembled a 10-year time series of isotopic data (δ18O and δ2H) for precipitation and stream water to estimate the characteristics of the transit time distribution in a boreal catchment in northern Sweden. We applied lumped parameter models using a gamma distribution to calculate the Mean Transit Time (MTT) of water over the entire period of record and to evaluate how inter-annual differences in transit times relate to hydroclimatic variability. The best fit MTT for the complete 10-year period was 650 days (Nash-Sutcliff Efficiency = 0.65), while the best fit inter-annual MTT ranged from 300 days up to 1200 days. Whilst there was a weak negative correlation between mean annual total precipitation and the annual MTT, this relationship was stronger (r2 = 0.53, p = 0.02) for the annual rain water input. This strong connection between the MTT and annual rainfall, rather than snowmelt, has strong implications for understanding future hydrological and biogeochemical processes in boreal regions, given that predicted warmer winters would translate into a greater proportion of precipitation falling as rain and thus shorter MTT in catchments. Such a change could have direct implications for the export of solutes and pollutants.

  15. Detection of Earth-mass and Super-Earth Trojan Planets Using Transit Timing Variation Method

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader; Hinse, Tobias C

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive study of the possibility of the detection of Earth-mass and super-Earth Trojan planets using transit timing variation method with the Kepler space telescope. We have considered a system consisting of a transiting Jovian-type planet in a short period orbit, and determined the induced variations in its transit timing due to an Earth-mass/super-Earth Trojan planet. We mapped a large section of the phase space around the 1:1 mean-motion resonance and identified regions corresponding to several other mean-motion resonances where the orbit of the planet would be stable. We calculated TTVs for different values of the mass and orbital elements of the transiting and perturbing bodies as well as the mass of central star, and identified orbital configurations of these objects (ranges of their orbital elements and masses) for which the resulted TTVs would be within the range of the variations of the transit timing of Kepler's planetary candidates. Results of our study indicate that in gen...

  16. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography and its applications in evaluation for coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉

    2004-01-01

    It is important to assess myocardial perfusion in the diagnosis, treatment and risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease. At present, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is used to evaluate myocardial perfusion, but it is limited by relatively low spatial resolution, the need to inject radioisotopes, and not being able to be performed at the patient ' s bedside. Using intracoronary injection of ultrasound contrast agent, the potential of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) instead of perfusion assessment has been proved in numerous animal and human studies. Recent improvements in contrast agents have resulted in stable microbubbles that, following intravenous administration, traverse the pulmonary circulation and reach the left heart. Combined with the emergence of contrast-specific imaging modalities along with quantitative analytical method, intravenous MCE is now a feasible and promising noninvasive technique for perfusion assessment.

  17. Can we measure the spiral and uterine artery blood flow by real-time sonography and Doppler indices to predict spontaneous miscarriage in a normal-risk population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Mehmet Burak; Ozyazici, Elif; Emiroglu, Baris; Özkara, Enis

    2015-05-01

    Introduction: The predictive value of spiral artery flow Doppler measurements of a subsequent early miscarriage in first trimester pregnancy is explored here. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine uterine and spiral artery blood flow changes in first trimester subsequent miscarriages and correlate within the mechanisms of the Doppler indicies. Study design: The uterine artery and spiral artery pulsatility and resistance indexes, systolic and diastolic ratios, acceleration times, and blood flow of both the right and left uterine arteries were obtained by trans vaginal color Doppler ultrasonography in consecutive viable pregnancies between 5 and 12 gestational week. Women were subsequently classified as having continuing pregnancies or pregnancy loss before 20 weeks gestation. To predict subsequent pregnancy loss, Doppler findings were adjusted for maternal age, history of previous abortion, presence of subchorionic hematoma, embryonic bradycardia, and gestational age by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis. The cut-off values are used for the ROC curve. Results: Twenty-five pregnancies (11.7%) were spontaneously aborted before 20 weeks of gestational age. In 29 (13.6%) cases there were previously abortion history, 30 (14%) had bradycardia, and 37 (17.3%) had subchoronic hematoma. Regarding the parameters of uterine and spiral artery pulsatility and resistive index, acceleration time, systolic/diastolic ratios and blood flows, only uterine artery S/D low values were significantly associated with pregnancy loss in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (P = 0.0001,95% CI: 4.968-55.675). Conclusion: The uterine artery systolic/diastolic ratios have a predictive value for early pregnancy loss and seem to be useful as a marker. On the other hand, spiral artery changes could be so local that they cannot be determined by the parameters of spectral Doppler techniques. This suggests that uterine vascular bed alterations should be measured to

  18. Time-dependent Mott transition in the periodic Anderson model with nonlocal hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Felix; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Mott transition in a periodic Anderson model with off-site, nearest-neighbor hybridization is studied within the framework of nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Using the two-site dynamical-impurity approximation, we compute the real-time dynamics of the optimal variational parameter and of different observables initiated by sudden quenches of the Hubbard-U and identify the critical interaction. The time-dependent transition is orbital selective, i.e., in the final state, reached in the long-time limit after the quench to the critical interaction, the Mott gap opens in the spectral function of the localized orbitals only. We discuss the dependence of the critical interaction and of the final-state effective temperature on the hybridization strength and point out the various similarities between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium Mott transition. It is shown that these can also be smoothly connected to each other by increasing the duration of a U-ramp from a sudden quench to a quasi-static process. The physics found for the model with off-site hybridization is compared with the dynamical Mott transition in the single-orbital Hubbard model and with the dynamical crossover found for the real-time dynamics of the conventional Anderson lattice with on-site hybridization.

  19. Proximal pulmonary arterial obstruction decreases the time constant of the pulmonary circulation and increases right ventricular afterload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnamenta, Alberto; Vanderpool, Rebecca; Brimioulle, Serge; Naeije, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The time constant of the pulmonary circulation, or product of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and compliance (Ca), called the RC-time, has been reported to remain constant over a wide range of pressures, etiologies of pulmonary hypertension, and treatments. We wondered if increased wave reflection on proximal pulmonary vascular obstruction, like in operable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, might also decrease the RC-time and thereby increase pulse pressure and right ventricular afterload. Pulmonary hypertension of variable severity was induced either by proximal obstruction (pulmonary arterial ensnarement) or distal obstruction (microembolism) eight anesthetized dogs. Pulmonary arterial pressures (Ppa) were measured with high-fidelity micromanometer-tipped catheters, and pulmonary flow with transonic technology. Pulmonary ensnarement increased mean Ppa, PVR, and characteristic impedance, decreased Ca and the RC-time (from 0.46 ± 0.07 to 0.30 ± 0.03 s), and increased the oscillatory component of hydraulic load (Wosc/Wtot) from 25 ± 2 to 29 ± 2%. Pulmonary microembolism increased mean Ppa and PVR, with no significant change in Ca and characteristic impedance, increased RC-time from 0.53 ± 0.09 to 0.74 ± 0.05 s, and decreased Wosc/Wtot from 26 ± 2 to 13 ± 2%. Pulse pressure increased more after pulmonary ensnarement than after microembolism. Concomitant measurements with fluid-filled catheters showed the same functional differences between the two types of pulmonary hypertension, with, however, an underestimation of Wosc. We conclude that pulmonary hypertension caused by proximal vs. distal obstruction is associated with a decreased RC-time and increased pulsatile component of right ventricular hydraulic load.

  20. Time-dependency of improvements in arterial oxygenation during partial liquid ventilation in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Martin; Kuhlen, Ralf; Dembinski, Rolf; Rossaint, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms by which partial liquid ventilation (PLV) can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury are still unclear. Therefore, we examined the time- and dose-dependency of the improvements in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) due to PLV in eight pigs with experimental lung injury, in order to discriminate increases due to oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon before its intrapulmonary instillation from a persistent diffusion of the respiratory gas through the liquid column. Results: Application of four sequential doses of perfluorocarbon resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PaO2. Comparison of measurements 5 and 30 min after instillation of each dose revealed a time-dependent decrease in PaO2 for doses that approximated the functional residual capacity of the animals. Conclusion: Although oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon at the onset of PLV can cause a short-term improvement in arterial oxygenation, diffusion of oxygen through the liquid may not be sufficient to maintain the initially observed increase in PaO2. PMID:11056747

  1. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  2. Measurement of planet masses with transit timing variations due to synodic "chopping" effects

    CERN Document Server

    Deck, Katherine M

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic "chopping" contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally <10% error) for modest eccentricities e <~ 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy which can appear for systems near first order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems which had been previously analyzed with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the ma...

  3. Direct measurement of sequence-dependent transition path times and conformational diffusion in DNA duplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Krishna; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T

    2017-02-07

    The conformational diffusion coefficient, D, sets the timescale for microscopic structural changes during folding transitions in biomolecules like nucleic acids and proteins. D encodes significant information about the folding dynamics such as the roughness of the energy landscape governing the folding and the level of internal friction in the molecule, but it is challenging to measure. The most sensitive measure of D is the time required to cross the energy barrier that dominates folding kinetics, known as the transition path time. To investigate the sequence dependence of D in DNA duplex formation, we measured individual transition paths from equilibrium folding trajectories of single DNA hairpins held under tension in high-resolution optical tweezers. Studying hairpins with the same helix length but with G:C base-pair content varying from 0 to 100%, we determined both the average time to cross the transition paths, τtp, and the distribution of individual transit times, PTP(t). We then estimated D from both τtp and PTP(t) from theories assuming one-dimensional diffusive motion over a harmonic barrier. τtp decreased roughly linearly with the G:C content of the hairpin helix, being 50% longer for hairpins with only A:T base pairs than for those with only G:C base pairs. Conversely, D increased linearly with helix G:C content, roughly doubling as the G:C content increased from 0 to 100%. These results reveal that G:C base pairs form faster than A:T base pairs because of faster conformational diffusion, possibly reflecting lower torsional barriers, and demonstrate the power of transition path measurements for elucidating the microscopic determinants of folding.

  4. The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

  5. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  6. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. IX. Catalog of the Full Long-Cadence Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Holczer, Tomer; Nachmani, Gil; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B; Fabrycky, Daniel; Ragozzine, Darin; Kane, Mackenzie; Steffen, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    We present a new transit timing catalog of 2599 Kepler Objects of Interest (=KOIs), using the PDC-MAP long-cadence light curves that include the full seventeen quarters of the mission (ftp://wise- ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV/ver_112). The goal is to produce an easy-to-use catalog that can stimulate further analyses of interesting systems. For 779 KOIs with high enough SNRs, we derived the timing, duration and depth of 69,914 transits. For 1820 KOIs with lower SNR, we derived only the timing of 225,273 transits. After removal of outlier timings, we derived various statistics for each KOI that were used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have detected 260 KOIs which showed significant TTVs with long-term variations (>100 day), and another fourteen KOIs with periodic modulations shorter than 100 day and small amplitudes. For five of those, the periodicity is probably due to the crossing of rotating stellar spots by the transiting planets.

  7. Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment: Longitudinal Profiles and Transitions over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shari; Williams, Jason; Cutbush, Stacey; Gibbs, Deborah; Clinton-Sherrod, Monique; Jones, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Although there is growing recognition of the problem of dating violence, little is known about how it unfolds among young adolescents who are just beginning to date. This study examined classes (subgroups) and transitions between classes over three time points based on dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment perpetration and victimization…

  8. Time and Space Issues in the Generation of Graph Transition Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend

    2005-01-01

    GROOVE is a tool for the automatic generation of graph transition systems from graph grammars. In this type of tool, both memory and time performance are of prime importance. In this paper we discuss the implementation techniques used for optimising the tool in this regard, and we list possible futu

  9. Effects of dietary fiber on gastrointestinal transit time, fecal properties and fat absorption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, A; Iwane, S; Todate, M; Nakaji, S; Sugawara, K

    1995-08-01

    The gastrointestinal transit time of food was determined by x-ray fluoroscopy using barium sulfate in rats fed with diets of various dietary fiber contents, and the effects of dietary fiber on the transit time, properties of feces, and fat absorption were examined. In 4- and 16-month-old rats fed with the diet for 3 and 15 month, respectively, the transit time of the cecum and colon in those receiving 20 and 40% wheat bran diets was shortened compared with that in the 0% group. The fecal pellet number and volume increased as the wheat bran content of the diet increased. In another experiments, the daily total fat excretion was found to be the greatest in rats receiving 15% pectin diet, followed by rats receiving 15% cellulose and non-fiber diets, respectively. These results suggest that shortening of the transit time through the cecum and colon with increase of fecal volume and suppression of fat absorption all participate in the mechanism of the inhibitory action of wheat bran on carcinogenesis and on the development of diverticulum of the large intestine.

  10. Validation of a 1-mm transit time flow probe and the potential for use in microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Elberg, Jens J; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a prototype transit time ultrasound flow probe (Medi-Stim Butterfly Flowmeter BF 2004) of only 1 mm and to evaluate its potential for use in microsurgery. Knowledge of the ability of this kind of system to measure flow in small vessels and at small flow...

  11. Predicting Coronal Mass Ejections transit times to Earth with neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, D; Dumbović, M

    2015-01-01

    Predicting transit times of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) from their initial parameters is a very important subject, not only from the scientific perspective, but also because CMEs represent a hazard for human technology. We used a neural network to analyse transit times for 153 events with only two input parameters: initial velocity of the CME, $v$, and Central Meridian Distance, CMD, of its associated flare. We found that transit time dependence on $v$ is showing a typical drag-like pattern in the solar wind. The results show that the speed at which acceleration by drag changes to deceleration is $v\\approx$500 km s$^{-1}$. Transit times are also found to be shorter for CMEs associated with flares on the western hemisphere than those originating on the eastern side of the Sun. We attribute this difference to the eastward deflection of CMEs on their path to 1 AU. The average error of the NN prediction in comparison to observations is $\\approx$12 hours which is comparable to other studies on the same subject.

  12. Simultaneous Optimization of Container Ship Sailing Speed and Container Routing with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsten, Christian Vad; Røpke, Stefan; Pisinger, David

    We introduce a decision support tool for liner shipping companies to optimally determine the sailing speed and needed fleet for a global network. As a novelty we incorporate cargo routing decisions with tight transit time restrictions on each container such that we get a realistic picture...

  13. Influence of orocaecal transit time on hydrogen excretion after carbohydrate malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Hamberg, O; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether changes in orocaecal transit time (OCTT) affect the magnitude of the breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after ingestion of unabsorbable carbohydrate. We studied eight healthy subjects by interval sampling of end expiratory H2 concentration for 12...

  14. Virtual single-photon transition interrupted: time-gated optical gain and loss

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Jens; Locher, Reto; Sabbar, Mazyar; Rivière, Paula; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael; Gallmann, Lukas; Keller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The optical response of a virtual dipole transition triggered by an ultra-short light pulse intrinsically consists of both absorption and emission in time and frequency. So far, this fundamental feature has been hidden by the time-integrated detection. However, as we will demonstrate, the time-dependence during a virtual single-photon transition can be mapped out and controlled by a second electromagnetic field. The resulting time-gated optical signal shows previously unexpected radiation gain and loss at different delays of the control pulse. The model presented here can be applied to any system that assumes a two-level character through near-resonant optical dipole excitation, whether they are of atomic, molecular or even solid-state nature. We validate the theoretical model by an attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiment in helium. Our model and the experimental data display excellent qualitative agreement.

  15. The barrier method: a technique for calculating very long transition times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D A; Sander, L M; Ziff, R M

    2010-09-28

    In many dynamical systems, there is a large separation of time scales between typical events and "rare" events which can be the cases of interest. Rare-event rates are quite difficult to compute numerically, but they are of considerable practical importance in many fields, for example, transition times in chemical physics and extinction times in epidemiology can be very long, but are quite important. We present a very fast numerical technique that can be used to find long transition times (very small rates) in low-dimensional systems, even if they lack detailed balance. We illustrate the method for a bistable nonequilibrium system introduced by Maier and Stein and a two-dimensional (in parameter space) epidemiology model.

  16. Synchronization transitions in coupled time-delay electronic circuits with a threshold nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K; Senthilkumar, D V; Murali, K; Lakshmanan, M; Kurths, J

    2011-06-01

    Experimental observations of typical kinds of synchronization transitions are reported in unidirectionally coupled time-delay electronic circuits with a threshold nonlinearity and two time delays, namely feedback delay τ(1) and coupling delay τ(2). We have observed transitions from anticipatory to lag via complete synchronization and their inverse counterparts with excitatory and inhibitory couplings, respectively, as a function of the coupling delay τ(2). The anticipating and lag times depend on the difference between the feedback and the coupling delays. A single stability condition for all the different types of synchronization is found to be valid as the stability condition is independent of both the delays. Further, the existence of different kinds of synchronizations observed experimentally is corroborated by numerical simulations and from the changes in the Lyapunov exponents of the coupled time-delay systems.

  17. Total and Segmental Colon Transit Time Study in Functional Constipation: Comparison With Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Prasad A.; Patel, Jatin A.; Parikh, Pathik; Ingle, Meghraj A.; Phadke, Anniruddha; Sawant, Prabha D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation is a common problem worldwide. Constipation can be primary or secondary. Primary constipation is subdivided in slow transit constipation, normal transit constipation, and dyssynergic defecation. Colon transit time (CTT) is the most basic and primary tool in evaluating disorders of colonic motility. CTT helps to differentiate between types of constipation and plan the treatment. Methods Fifty functional constipation patients and 25 healthy controls were asked to ingest four gelatin capsules (each containing five radio-opaque markers) at 0, 12 and 24 hours. An abdominal X-ray was taken at 36 hours. Total or segmental CTT was measured after calculating the number of markers remaining in each segment at 36 hours on abdominal X-ray. Results Mean CTT in healthy controls in our study was 15.4 hours which is shorter than western population. Total CTT is significantly higher in constipation group (23 hours) compared to healthy subjects (15.4 hours). Transit time in right segment was significantly high in constipation group than healthy population (14.2 vs. 8.3 hours). Total as well as segmental transit times are slightly higher in females as compared to males in both the groups, however not statistically significant. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies from India that compared the CTTs in functional constipation and healthy controls. Conclusion Radio-opaque marker study for CTT is a simple and reliable technique for evaluation of constipation. Patients with functional constipation have significantly longer CTT than healthy population. Total CTT is much less in this study population compared to west. There is need to establish standards for slow colon transit. PMID:27785288

  18. Establishment of a protocol for determining gastrointestinal transit time in mice using barium and radiopaque markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myagmarjaibuu, Bilomaa; Moon, Myeong Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Seo In; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Seong [Dept. of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Dept. of Physiology, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish a minimally invasive and reproducible protocol for estimating the gastrointestinal (GI) transit time in mice using barium and radiopaque markers. Twenty 5- to 6-week-old Balb/C female mice weighing 19-21 g were used. The animals were divided into three groups: two groups that received loperamide and a control group. The control group (n = 10) animals were administered physiological saline (1.5 mL/kg) orally. The loperamide group I (n = 10) and group II (n = 10) animals were administered 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg loperamide orally, respectively. Thirty minutes after receiving the saline or loperamide, the mice was administered 80 μL of barium solution and six iron balls (0.5 mm) via the mouth and the upper esophagus by gavage, respectively. Afterwards, the mice were continuously monitored with fluoroscopic imaging in order to evaluate the swallowing of the barium solution and markers. Serial fluoroscopic images were obtained at 5- or 10-min intervals until all markers had been excreted from the anal canal. For analysis, the GI transit times were subdivided into intestinal transit times (ITTs) and colon transit times (CTTs). The mean ITT was significantly longer in the loperamide groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean ITT in loperamide group II (174.5 ± 32.3) was significantly longer than in loperamide group I (133.2 ± 24.2 minute) (p < 0.05). The mean CTT was significantly longer in loperamide group II than in the control group (p < 0.05). Also, no animal succumbed to death after the experimental procedure. The protocol for our study using radiopaque markers and barium is reproducible and minimally invasive in determining the GI transit time of the mouse model.

  19. Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging in acute stroke: assessment of cerebral perfusion deficits related to arterial recanalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognese, Manuel; Artemis, Dimitrios; Alonso, Angelika; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephan; Kern, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    We investigated whether real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) is able to detect perfusion changes related to arterial recanalization in the acute phase of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Twenty-four patients with acute territorial MCA stroke were examined with rt-UPI and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound (TCCD). Ultrasound studies were consecutively performed within 24 h and 72-96 h after stroke onset. Real-time UPI parameters of bolus kinetics (time to peak, rt-TTP) and of refill kinetics (plateau A and slope β of the exponential replenishment curve) were calculated from regions of interest of ischemic versus normal brain tissue; these parameters were compared between early and follow-up examinations in patients who recanalized. At the early examination, there was a delay of rt-TTP in patients with MCA occlusion (rt-TTP [s]: 13.09 ± 3.21 vs. 10.16 ± 2.6; p = 0.01) and a lower value of the refill parameter β (β [1/s]: 0.62 ± 0.34 vs. 1.09 ± 0.58; p = 0.01) in ischemic compared with normal brain tissue, whereas there were no differences of the parameters A and Axβ. At follow-up, the delay of rt-TTP was reversible once recanalization of an underlying MCA obstruction was demonstrated: rt-TTP [s], 13.09 ± 3.21 at 24 h versus 10.95 ± 1.5 at 72-96 h (p = 0.03). Correspondingly, β showed a higher slope than at the first examination: β [1/s]: 0.55 ± 0.29 at 24 h versus 0.71 ± 0.27 at 72-96 h (p = 0.04). We conclude that real-time UPI can detect hemodynamic impairment in acute MCA occlusion and subsequent improvement following arterial recanalization. This offers the chance for bedside monitoring of the hemodynamic compromise (e.g. during therapeutic interventions such as systemic thrombolysis).

  20. Amplification of Quantum Meson Modes in the Late Time of the Chiral Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, K

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the quantum meson modes in the late time of chiral phase transition. In particular, it is shown that there exists a possible solution to the equation of motion for the quantum meson modes, which reveals a parametric resonance and/or resonance through forced oscillation induced by the small oscillation of the chiral condensate. After that, we demonstrate the unstable regions for the quantum meson modes in both the cases of a uniform and spatially expanding system.

  1. Time-dependent renormalized Redfield theory II for off-diagonal transition in reduced density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihiro

    2016-09-01

    In our previous letter (Kimura, 2016), we constructed time-dependent renormalized Redfield theory (TRRT) only for diagonal transition in a reduced density matrix. In this letter, we formulate the general expression for off-diagonal transition in the reduced density matrix. We discuss the applicability of TRRT by numerically comparing the dependencies on the energy gap of the exciton relaxation rate by using the TRRT and the modified Redfield theory (MRT). In particular, we roughly show that TRRT improves MRT for the detailed balance about the excitation energy transfer reaction.

  2. Real-time study of graphene's phase transition in polymer matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, Moran; Fang, Ying

    2009-05-01

    We present real-time study of pristine graphene sandwiched in a homogeneous polymer matrix and its phase transition where the graphene membrane irreversibly scrolls and folds above the polymer's glass temperature. Tubular structures tend to form by curling up from edge defects of graphene and roll along its surface. A single-layer can also fold into two- or three-layer stacks and the overlapping between layers extends along the membrane surface to enlarge up to micrometer sizes. Further, oxidized graphene does not show such reactivity at even higher temperatures, indicating that the intrinsic thermal instability of pristine graphene in the polymer matrix is the origin of the transition.

  3. The Diversity of Low-mass Exoplanets Characterized via Transit Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack. J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2016-10-01

    Transit timing variations (TTV) in multi-transiting systems enables precise characterizations of low-mass planets and their orbits. The range of orbital periods and incident fluxes with detailed TTV constraints complements the radial velocity sample for low-mass planets, pushing exoplanet characterization to the regime sub-Earth size planets and out to Mercury-like distances. This has revealed an astonishing diversity in the density of super-Earth mass planets. We summarize these and other contributions to exoplanet science from TTVs.

  4. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  5. Linear and nonlinear theory of the proton beam transit-time oscillator (TTO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John E.; Mostrom, Michael A.; Clark, Randy M.; Arman, M. Joseph; Campbell, Mark M.

    1989-07-01

    A theoretical characterization is presented for both the small- and large-amplitude behaviors of the intense beam-driven transit-time oscillator device which encompasses the effects of the beam self-fields and space-charge effects. The theory has been employed in the development of expressions for comparison with particle simulation results. Attention is given to the effect of beam-plasma frequency on gain, saturation growth in the monotron, the effects of space-charge depression on the transit angle, and the dependence of monotron performance on beam energy.

  6. Effects of aspirin dosage and time of administration on arterial prostacyclin production and platelet aggregation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, R B; Paul, M L

    1984-07-01

    Previously we reported that electrically-induced carotid artery thrombosis in anesthetized rats was prevented by 3.3 or 10 mg/kg aspirin (ASA) given i.v. 10 min before injury but not by 1.7, 20 or 100 mg/kg and protection was lost by delaying injury to 20 min (Haemostasis 13:42, 1983). Here, collagen-induced platelet aggregation and arterial prostacyclin-generating activity, measured by RIA for 6 keto-PGF1 alpha and by human platelet aggregation bioassay, were studied ex vivo after i.v. ASA to anesthetized rats. In all cases where platelet aggregation was inhibited less than 50%, no protection had been observed (1.7 mg/kg at 10 min, 3.3 at 20 min, 20 at 10 min). In the two cases where protection had been observed, platelet aggregation was inhibited by about 75% or more and in one, prostacyclin activity was about 50% of normal (3.3 mg/kg at 10 min). Thus in five of six dose-time combinations tested, antithrombotic protection could be explained by a requirement for about 50% of normal prostacyclin activity and about 75% of inhibition of collagen aggregation. Aberrant findings are discussed in the light of knowledge of salicylate/aspirin competition for cyclooxygenase.

  7. Radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fibers on rat colonic transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupton, J.R.; Meacher, M.M. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The effect of different fiber sources on colonic transit time was charted using serial radiographs. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 10 rats per group, were provided with either a fiber-free control diet or the control diet uniformly diluted to provide 8% dietary fiber from guar, pectin, cellulose, wheat bran, or oat bran. At surgery, radiopaque markers were inserted at defined distances in the mesentary closest to the large bowel. Three weeks postsurgery, the animals were intubated with 0.5 ml of a radiopaque marker, and radiographs were taken at 15-min intervals. Of the two poorly fermented fibers, cellulose was as slow as and wheat bran was faster than the fiber-free controls at five out of the six bowel segments measured. The fermentable fibers (pectin, guar, and oat bran) were fast through some bowel segments and slow through others. This study provides in vivo data on colonic transit time and shows that neither 24-h fecal weight nor total transit time is a good predictor of the rate of transit through particular gut segments.

  8. Nanosecond-scale timing jitter in transition edge sensors at telecom and visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Lamas-Linares, Antia; Tomlin, Nathan A; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E; Beyer, Joern; Mirin, Richard P; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-01-01

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have the highest reported efficiencies (>98%) for detection of single photons in the visible and near infrared. Experiments in quantum information and foundations of physics that rely critically on this efficiency have started incorporating these detectors into con- ventional quantum optics setups. However, their range of applicability has been hindered by slow operation both in recovery time and timing jitter. We show here how a conventional tungsten-TES can be operated with jitter times of < 4 ns, well within the timing resolution necessary for MHz clocking of experiments, and providing an important practical simplification for experiments that rely on the simultaneous closing of both efficiency and locality loopholes.

  9. Transit Timing Variation analysis with Kepler light curves of KOI 227 and Kepler 93b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulz, Shannon; Reed, Mike

    2017-01-01

    By searching for transit signals in approximately 150,000 stars, NASA’s Kepler Space telescope found thousands of exoplanets over its primary mission from 2009 to 2013 (Tenenbaum et al. 2014, ApJS, 211, 6). Yet, a detailed follow-up examination of Kepler light curves may contribute more evidence on system dynamics and planetary atmospheres of these objects. Kepler’s continuous observing of these systems over the mission duration produced light curves of sufficient duration to allow for the search for transit timing variations. Transit timing variations over the course of many orbits may indicate a precessing orbit or the existence of a non-transiting third body such as another exoplanet. Flux contributions of the planet just prior to secondary eclipse may provide a measurement of bond albedo from the day-side of the transiting planet. Any asymmetries of the transit shape may indicate thermal asymmetries which can measure upper atmosphere motion of the planet. These two factors can constrain atmospheric models of close orbiting exoplanets. We first establish our procedure with the well-documented TTV system, KOI 227 (Nesvorny et al. 2014, ApJ, 790, 31). Using the test case of KOI 227, we analyze Kepler-93b for TTVs and day-side flux contributions. Kepler-93b is likely a rocky planet with R = 1.50 ± 0.03 Earth Radii and M = 2.59 ± 2.0 Earth Masses (Marcy et al. 2014, ApJS, 210, 20). This research is funded by a NASA EPSCoR grant.

  10. The Weibull - log Weibull transition of interoccurrence times for synthetic and natural earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasumi, Tomohiro; Akimoto, Takuma; Aizawa, Yoji

    2008-01-01

    We have studied interoccurrence time distributions by analyzing the synthetic and three natural catalogs of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC), and Taiwan Central Weather Bureau (TCWB) and revealed the universal feature of the interoccurrence time statistics, Weibull - log Weibull transition. This transition reinforces the view that the interoccurrence time statistics possess Weibull statistics and log-Weibull statistics. Here in this paper, the crossover magnitude from the superposition regime to the Weibull regime $m_c^2$ is proportional to the plate velocity. In addition, we have found the region-independent relation, $m_c^2/m_{max} = 0.54 \\pm 0.004$.

  11. Autaptic self-feedback-induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts neuronal network with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-04-01

    Autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this work, we numerically study the effect of chemical autapse on the synchronization of Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron network with time delays. It is found that the neurons exhibit synchronization transitions as autaptic self-feedback delay is varied, and the phenomenon enhances when autaptic self-feedback strength increases. Moreover, this phenomenon becomes strongest when network time delay or coupling strength is optimal. It is also found that the synchronization transitions by network time delay can be enhanced by autaptic activity and become strongest when autaptic delay is optimal. These results show that autaptic delayed self-feedback activity can intermittently enhance and reduce the synchronization of the neuronal network and hence plays an important role in regulating the synchronization of the neurons. These findings could find potential implications for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  12. Universal space-time scaling symmetry in the dynamics of bosons across a quantum phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Logan W; Chin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of many-body systems spanning condensed matter, cosmology, and beyond is hypothesized to be universal when the systems cross continuous phase transitions. The universal dynamics is expected to satisfy a scaling symmetry of space and time with the crossing rate, inspired by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. We test this symmetry based on Bose condensates in a shaken optical lattice. Shaking the lattice drives condensates across an effectively ferromagnetic quantum phase transition. After crossing the critical point, the condensates manifest delayed growth of spin fluctuations and develop anti-ferromagnetic spatial correlations resulting from sub-Poisson generation of topological defects. The characteristic times and lengths scale as power-laws of the crossing rate, yielding the temporal exponent 0.50(2) and the spatial exponent 0.26(2), consistent with theory. Furthermore, the fluctuations and correlations are invariant in scaled space-time coordinates, in support of the scaling symmetry of quantum crit...

  13. Observer-based robust finite time H∞ sliding mode control for Markovian switching systems with mode-dependent time-varying delay and incomplete transition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lijun; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Dandan

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the problem of robust finite time H∞ sliding mode control for a class of Markovian switching systems. The system is subjected to the mode-dependent time-varying delay, partly unknown transition rate and unmeasurable state. The main difficulty is that, a sliding mode surface cannot be designed based on the unknown transition rate and unmeasurable state directly. To overcome this obstacle, the set of modes is firstly divided into two subsets standing for known transition rate subset and unknown one, based on which a state observer is established. A component robust finite-time sliding mode controller is also designed to cope with the effect of partially unknown transition rate. It is illustrated that the reachability, finite-time stability, finite-time boundedness, finite-time H∞ state feedback stabilization of sliding mode dynamics can be ensured despite the unknown transition rate. Finally, the simulation results verify the effectiveness of robust finite time control problem.

  14. New Parameters and Transit Timing Studies for OGLE2-TR-L9 b

    CERN Document Server

    Lendl, M; Koppenhoefer, J; Nikolov, N; Henning, Th; Swain, M; Greiner, J

    2010-01-01

    Context: Repeated observations of exoplanet transits allow us to refine the planetary parameters and probe them for any time dependent variations. In particular deviations of the period from a strictly linear ephemeris, transit timing variations (TTVs), can indicate the presence of additional bodies in the planetary system. Aims: Our goal was to reexamine the largely unstudied OGLE2-TR-L9 system with high cadence, multi-color photometry in order to refine the planetary parameters and probe the system for TTVs. Methods: We observed five full transits of OGLE2-TR-L9 with the GROND instrument at the ESO/MPG 2.2 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. GROND is a multichannel imager that allowed us to gather simultaneous light curves in the g', r', i', and z' filters. Results: From our analysis we find that the semi-major axis and the inclination differ from the previously published values. With the newly observed transits, we were able to refine the ephemeris to 2454492.80008(+/- 0.00014) + 2.48553417(+/- 6.4) x 10^...

  15. Observation of parity-time symmetry breaking transitions in a dissipative Floquet system of ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiaming; Liu, Ji; de Melo, Leonardo; Joglekar, Yogesh N; Luo, Le

    2016-01-01

    Open physical systems with balanced loss and gain exhibit a transition, absent in their solitary counterparts, which engenders modes that exponentially decay or grow with time and thus spontaneously breaks the parity-time PT symmetry. This PT-symmetry breaking is induced by modulating the strength or the temporal profile of the loss and gain, but also occurs in a pure dissipative system without gain. It has been observed that, in classical systems with mechanical, electrical, and electromagnetic setups with static loss and gain, the PT-symmetry breaking transition leads to extraordinary behavior and functionalities. However, its observation in a quantum system is yet to be realized. Here we report on the first quantum simulation of PT-symmetry breaking transitions using ultracold Li-6 atoms. We simulate static and Floquet dissipative Hamiltonians by generating state-dependent atom loss in a noninteracting Fermi gas, and observe the PT-symmetry breaking transitions by tracking the atom number for each state. W...

  16. The mass of the Mars-sized exoplanet Kepler-138 b from transit timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F; Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B

    2015-06-18

    Extrasolar planets that pass in front of their host star (transit) cause a temporary decrease in the apparent brightness of the star, providing a direct measure of the planet's size and orbital period. In some systems with multiple transiting planets, the times of the transits are measurably affected by the gravitational interactions between neighbouring planets. In favourable cases, the departures from Keplerian orbits (that is, unaffected by gravitational effects) implied by the observed transit times permit the planetary masses to be measured, which is key to determining their bulk densities. Characterizing rocky planets is particularly difficult, because they are generally smaller and less massive than gaseous planets. Therefore, few exoplanets near the size of Earth have had their masses measured. Here we report the sizes and masses of three planets orbiting Kepler-138, a star much fainter and cooler than the Sun. We determine that the mass of the Mars-sized inner planet, Kepler-138 b, is 0.066(+0.059)(-0.037) Earth masses. Its density is 2.6(+2.4)(-1.5) grams per cubic centimetre. The middle and outer planets are both slightly larger than Earth. The middle planet's density (6.2(+5.8)(-3.4) grams per cubic centimetre) is similar to that of Earth, and the outer planet is less than half as dense at 2.1(+2.2)(-1.2) grams per cubic centimetre, implying that it contains a greater portion of low-density components such as water and hydrogen.

  17. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2014-08-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on esCCO measurement, we retrospectively identified two cases in which apparent changes in SVR developed in a short period during data collection. In each case, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output and time component of PWTT were analyzed. Recorded data suggest that the time component of PWTT may have a significant impact on the accuracy of estimating stroke volume during changes in SVR. However, further prospective clinical studies are required to test this hypothesis.

  18. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Weitang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Zhen; Song, Junmin; Wu, Changcai [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China); Wang, Guixian, E-mail: guixianwang@hotmail.com [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation.

  19. Time Course of Isoflurane-Induced Vasodilation: A Doppler Ultrasound Study of the Left Coronary Artery in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzarini, Francesca; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Isoflurane is widely used as vasodilator in studies of coronary flow reserve (CFR) in small animals, but the protocols have not been standardized. This study assessed the time course of the increase in isoflurane-induced flow in the mouse coronary artery by pulsed-wave Doppler measurements at 1% isoflurane concentration maintained for 6 min and then increased to 2.5% for 30 min. Velocity-time integral and velocity peak values were best fitted by the sigmoid model, which allowed derivation of the mean time (Tt90 = 14 min) of high-isoflurane needed to reach 90% of the hyperemic plateau value. In subsequent experiments, CFR was measured at 4 min (mean time of literature data) and 14 min of hyperemic response. The 4-min CFR was significantly lower than the 14 -min CFR, and the Bland-Altman plot revealed significant bias of the 4-min CFR against the 14-min CFR. This result suggests that measurements of flow velocity at times shorter than 14 min may be inappropriate for expressing the effective value of CFR.

  20. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Bryson, Steve; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Bohr Inst. /Copenhagen U.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  1. Wavelength dependent measurements of optical fiber transit time, material dispersion, and attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COCHRANE,KYLE ROBERT; BAILEY,JAMES E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; CARLSON,ALAN L.

    2000-04-18

    A new method for measuring the wavelength dependence of the transit time, material dispersion, and attenuation of an optical fiber is described. The authors inject light from a 4-ns risetime pulsed broad-band flashlamp into various length fibers and record the transmitted signals with a time-resolved spectrograph. Segments of data spanning an approximately 3,000 {angstrom} range are recorded from a single flashlamp pulse. Comparison of data acquired with short and long fibers enables the determination of the transit time and the material dispersion as functions of wavelength dependence for the entire recorded spectrum simultaneously. The wavelength dependent attenuation is also determined from the signal intensities. The method is demonstrated with experiments using a step index 200-{micro}m-diameter SiO{sub 2} fiber. The results agree with the transit time determined from the bulk glass refractive index to within {+-} 0.035% for the visible (4,000--7,200 {angstrom}) spectrum and 0.12% for the ultraviolet (2,650--4,000 {angstrom}) spectrum, and with the attenuation specified by the fiber manufacturer to within {+-} 10%.

  2. Transition from phase to generalized synchronization in time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M; Kurths, J

    2008-06-01

    The notion of phase synchronization in time-delay systems, exhibiting highly non-phase-coherent attractors, has not been realized yet even though it has been well studied in chaotic dynamical systems without delay. We report the identification of phase synchronization in coupled nonidentical piecewise linear and in coupled Mackey-Glass time-delay systems with highly non-phase-coherent regimes. We show that there is a transition from nonsynchronized behavior to phase and then to generalized synchronization as a function of coupling strength. We have introduced a transformation to capture the phase of the non-phase-coherent attractors, which works equally well for both the time-delay systems. The instantaneous phases of the above coupled systems calculated from the transformed attractors satisfy both the phase and mean frequency locking conditions. These transitions are also characterized in terms of recurrence-based indices, namely generalized autocorrelation function P(t), correlation of probability of recurrence, joint probability of recurrence, and similarity of probability of recurrence. We have quantified the different synchronization regimes in terms of these indices. The existence of phase synchronization is also characterized by typical transitions in the Lyapunov exponents of the coupled time-delay systems.

  3. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  4. Analysis of Time of Day Fare Discounts on Urban Mass Transit Travel Behavior, Crowding, and Waiting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Every morning, commuters select the regularly dispatched urban mass transit for traveling from a residential area to a workplace. This paper aims to find an optimal discount fare and time intervals on morning peak hour. As a direct and flexible traffic economic instrument, fares can influence commuters’ behavior. Therefore, fare discount has been proposed to regulate traffic flow in different time. Two models have been analyzed to describe it with schedule delay because of the travel demand size. The first objective function is constructed on pressure equalization when the travel demand is small. The other objective function is to minimize total waiting time when the travel demand is large. In the end, numerical examples based on an artificial network are performed to characterize fare discount models.

  5. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttafava, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.buttafava@polimi.it; Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dalla Mora, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor.

  6. An Approach to Optimize the Departure Times of Transit Vehicles with Strict Capacity Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an urban transit line which connects several residential areas and a workplace during the morning rush hours. The congestion is represented by some passengers who must wait for an extended duration and board the next or the third departure vehicles. This paper divides the time horizon equally into several small periods to measure the dynamic passenger demands. Under period-dependent demand conditions, a biobjective optimization model is developed to determine the departure times of transit vehicles at the start station with strict capacity constraints, in which a heuristic algorithm based on intelligent search and local improvement is designed to solve the model. The developed model can address the case in which more than two passengers arrive at a station simultaneously during one same period and calculate the number of boarded passengers. Finally, the model and algorithm have been successfully verified by a numerical example.

  7. A Matheuristic for the Liner Shipping Network Design Problem with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Desaulniers, Guy; Karsten, Christian Vad

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for the liner shipping network design problem with transit time restrictions on the cargo flow. We extend an existing matheuristic for the liner shipping network design problem to consider transit time restrictions. The matheuristic is an improvement heuristic, where...... an integer program is solved iteratively as a move operator in a large-scale neighborhood search. To assess the effects of insertions/removals of port calls, flow and revenue changes are estimated for relevant commodities along with an estimation of the change in the vessel cost. Computational results...... on the benchmark suite LINER-LIB are reported, showing profitable networks for most instances. We provide insights on causes for rejecting demand and the average speed per vessel class in the solutions obtained....

  8. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis...... and in 12 controls. The lung function including diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL, CO) was determined by conventional single breath technique. RESULTS: In the patients, PTT was shorter, 3.9+/-1.2 vs 5.7+/-1.0 s in the controls, P

  9. Transition from anticipatory to lag synchronization via complete synchronization in time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M

    2005-01-01

    The existence of anticipatory, complete, and lag synchronization in a single system having two different time delays, that is, feedback delay tau1 and coupling delay tau2, is identified. The transition from anticipatory to complete synchronization and from complete to lag synchronization as a function of coupling delay tau2 with a suitable stability condition is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the stability condition is independent of the delay times tau1 and tau2. Consequently, for a fixed set of parameters, all the three types of synchronizations can be realized. Further, the emergence of exact anticipatory, complete, or lag synchronization from the desynchronized state via approximate synchronization, when one of the system parameters (b2) is varied, is characterized by a minimum of the similarity function and the transition from on-off intermittency via periodic structure in the laminar phase distribution.

  10. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG;

    2006-01-01

    not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis......BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... and in 12 controls. The lung function including diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL, CO) was determined by conventional single breath technique. RESULTS: In the patients, PTT was shorter, 3.9+/-1.2 vs 5.7+/-1.0 s in the controls, P

  11. Design of cavity-enhanced absorption cell for reducing transit-time broadening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masashi; Iwakuni, Kana; Okubo, Sho; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-15

    To reduce the linewidth of Lamb dips, we introduce a cavity-enhanced absorption cell (CEAC) coupled with a Gaussian beam with a 1.9-mm 1/e(2) radius at the beam waist for the reduction of transit-time broadening. We state that transit-time broadening depends only on the beam radius at the beam waist. This fact is useful for the design of the CEAC, and a pair of concave and convex mirrors is thereby employed. We have carried out sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy of the ν(3) band of CH(4) and the ν(1) band of CH(3)D using a difference-frequency-generation source and the CEAC, and the recorded Lamb dips narrow to 80 kHz (HWHM).

  12. Thresholds for the slope ratio in determining transition time and quantifying diffuser performance in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    This study is concerned with an objective measure called the slope ratio that can detect acoustic defects due to unexpected pressure increases such as strong reflections and coincidental constructive interference. The slope ratio is the ratio of the instantaneous slope to the mean slope in a decay...... curve. The slope ratio was suggested for determining the room acoustic transition time experimentally, but its threshold criteria have not been thoroughly investigated. The thresholds for the slope ratio, particularly for applications such as determining the room acoustic transition time and quantifying...... in situ diffuseness, are examined for various room impulse responses. For the tested rooms, a slope ratio threshold of 11 gives the most consistent and systematic results....

  13. Image Fusion of Preprocedural CTA with Real-time Fluoroscopy to Guide Proper Hepatic Artery Catheterization During Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargellini, Irene, E-mail: irenebargellini@hotmail.com; Turini, Francesca; Bozzi, Elena; Lauretti, Dario; Cicorelli, Antonio; Lunardi, Alessandro; Cioni, Roberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    To assess feasibility of proper hepatic artery catheterization using a 3D model obtained from preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA), fused with real-time fluoroscopy, during transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. Twenty consecutive cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization were prospectively enrolled onto the study. The early arterial phase axial images of the preprocedural CTA were postprocessed on an independent workstation connected to the angiographic system (Innova 4100; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI), obtaining a 3D volume rendering image (VR) that included abdominal aorta, splanchnic arteries, and first and second lumbar vertebrae. The VR image was manually registered to the real-time X-ray fluoroscopy, with the lumbar spine used as the reference. The VR image was then used as guidance to selectively catheterize the proper hepatic artery. The procedure was considered successful when performed with no need for intraarterial contrast injections or angiographic acquisitions. The procedure was successful in 19 (95 %) of 20 patients. In one patient, celiac trunk angiography was required for the presence of a significant ostial stenosis that was underestimated at computed tomography. Time for image reconstruction and registration was <10 min in all cases. The use of preprocedural CTA model with fluoroscopy enables confident and direct catheterization of the proper hepatic artery with no need for preliminary celiac trunk angiography, thus reducing radiation exposure and contrast media administration.

  14. Real-Time 12-Lead High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiography for Enhanced Detection of Myocardial Ischemia and Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Kulecz, Walter B.; DePalma, Jude L.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Wilson, John S.; Rahman, M. Atiar; Bungo, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown that diminution of the high-frequency (HF; 150-250 Hz) components present within the central portion of the QRS complex of an electrocardiogram (ECG) is a more sensitive indicator for the presence of myocardial ischemia than are changes in the ST segments of the conventional low-frequency ECG. However, until now, no device has been capable of displaying, in real time on a beat-to-beat basis, changes in these HF QRS ECG components in a continuously monitored patient. Although several software programs have been designed to acquire the HF components over the entire QRS interval, such programs have involved laborious off-line calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. We describe a personal computer-based ECG software program developed recently at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that acquires, analyzes, and displays HF QRS components in each of the 12 conventional ECG leads in real time. The system also updates these signals and their related derived parameters in real time on a beat-to-beat basis for any chosen monitoring period and simultaneously displays the diagnostic information from the conventional (low-frequency) 12-lead ECG. The real-time NASA HF QRS ECG software is being evaluated currently in multiple clinical settings in North America. We describe its potential usefulness in the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia and coronary artery disease.

  15. A transit-time flow meter for measuring milliliter per minute liquid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Canqian; Kymmel, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik

    1988-01-01

    A transit-time flow meter, using periodic temperature fluctuations as tracers, has been developed for measuring liquid flow as small as 0.1 ml/min in microchannels. By injecting square waves of heat into the liquid flow upstream with a tiny resistance wire heater, periodic temperature fluctuations....... This flow meter will be used to measure and control the small liquid flow in microchannels in flow injection analysis. Review of Scientific Instruments is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Time-Averaged Behaviour at the Critical Parameter Point of Transition to Spatiotemporal Chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺凯芬

    2001-01-01

    A time-averaged behaviour is found to be important for investigating the critical behaviour in parameter space for the transition from temporal chaos to spatiotemporal chaos by using an energy representation. Considering any wave solution as a superposition of the steady wave with its perturbation wave, we find that when approaching the critical parameter point the averaged positive interaction energy for the k = 1 mode becomes competitive with the negative one, with the summation displaying a scaling behaviour of power law.

  17. Some properties of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks with finite time of transition between states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimenov, Ibragim; Mun, Grigoriy; Panchenko, Sergey; Pak, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    There were implemented samples of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks which have finite time of transition from one state to another. It was shown that in such systems, various oscillation modes could occur. It was revealed that the oscillation of the output signal of certain neuron could be treated as extra logical variable, which describes the state of the neuron. Asymmetric Hopfield neural networks are described in terms of ternary logic. Such logic may be employed in image recognition procedure.

  18. Estimation of coronary artery stenosis by low-dose adenosine stress real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography: a quantitative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao; ZHI Guang; XU Yong; WANG Jing; YAN Guo-hui

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary microcirculation reserve is an important field in the research of coronary artery disease,but it is difficult to identify clinically.Currently it is widely accepted that myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is a safe,inexpensive method and has comparatively high image resolution.The present study used quantitative low-dose adenosine stress real-time (RT)-MCE to estimate myocardial perfusion and the coronary stenosis.Methods Forty-nine left ventricular (LV) segments from 14 unselected patients were divided into three groups according to the coronary angiography or CT angiography results:group 1 (n=20,41%) without significant stenosis (<70%),group 2 (n=12,24%)with successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI),and group 3 (n=17,35%)with significant stenosis (>70%).RT-MCE was performed in these patients with low-dose adenosine stress and continuous infusion of Sonovue.The replenishing curves were drawn according to the contrast density measured at the end-diastolic frame of every cardiac circle by ACQ software.Results Forty-nine LV segments with satisfactory image quality were picked for quantitative contrast echo analysis.The replenishing curves were analyzed at baseline and after stress.Perfusion of group 3 did not decrease significantly at baseline,and showed no improvement during adenosine stress and was significantly different from groups 1 and 2 (P <0.05).The A·β and β increased more significantly in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (P <0.05).In a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis,A·β under adenosine stress <1.74 dB/s had a sensitivity and specificity of 71% for diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis,reduced adenosine-induced rise (percentage of A·β <81%) had a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 79% for the diagnosis of low-reserve,and β <54% had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 79%.Conclusions Rest perfusion of severely stenosed arteries may be normal

  19. HST Time-Series Photometry of the Transiting Planet of HD 209458

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, T M; Gilliland, R L; Noyes, R W; Burrows, A; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Noyes, Robert W.; Burrows, Adam

    2001-01-01

    We have observed 4 transits of the planet of HD 209458 using the STIS spectrograph on HST. Summing the recorded counts over wavelength between 582 nm and 638 nm yields a photometric time series with 80 s time sampling and relative precision of about 1.1E-4 per sample. The folded light curve can be fit within observational errors using a model consisting of an opaque circular planet transiting a limb-darkened stellar disk. In this way we estimate the planetary radius R_p = 1.347 +/- 0.060 R_Jup, the orbital inclination i = 86.68 +/- 0.14 degrees, the stellar radius R_* = 1.146 +/- 0.050 R_solar, and one parameter describing the stellar limb darkening. Our estimated radius is smaller than those from earlier studies, but is consistent within measurement errors, and is also consistent with theoretical estimates of the radii of irradiated Jupiter-like planets. Satellites or rings orbiting the planet would, if large enough, be apparent from distortions of the light curve or from irregularities in the transit timing...

  20. A New Method for Increasing Output Power of a Three-Cavity Transit-Time Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jun-Tao; ZHONG Hui-Huang; QIAN Bao-Liang; LIU Yong-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new method to increase the output power of a three-cavity transit-time oscillator (TC-TTO).Conventional transit-time effect oscillators, such as the split-cavity oscillator (SCO), super-Reltron, and TC-TTO (or double-foil SCO), etc., have a common feature that the span of any modulating cavity is uniform. The new method is to vary the three-cavity spans from uniform to nonuniform. Its configuration is called the nonuniform three-cavity transit-time oscillator (NTC-TTO). Numerical simulations show that the electron-beam is modulated more deeply in certain NTC-TTOs than that in the TC-TTO with the same whole modulating length, and the output microwave power in certain NTC-TTOs is higher than that in the TC-TTO. The experimental results are in agreement with those of the numerical simulations. The results show that the new method can increase the output power of a microwave tube based on the TC-TTO.

  1. Probing the NO2 --> NO+O transition state via time resolved unimolecular decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, S. I.; Brucker, G. A.; Jaques, C.; Chen, Y.; Wittig, C.

    1993-09-01

    Time resolved, subpicosecond resolution measurements of photoinitiated NO2 unimolecular decomposition rates are reported for expansion cooled and room temperature samples. The molecules are excited by 375-402 nm tunable subpicosecond pulses having bandwidths ≥20 cm-1 to levels which are known to be thorough admixtures of the 2B2 electronically excited state and the 2A1 ground electronic state. Subsequent decomposition is probed by a 226 nm subpicosecond pulse that excites laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the NO product. When increasing the amount of excitation over the dissociation threshold, an uneven, ``step-like'' increase of the decomposition rate vs energy is observed for expansion cooled samples. The steps are spaced by ˜100 cm-1 and can be assigned ad hoc to bending at the transition state. Relying on experimental estimates for the near threshold density of states, we point out that simple transition state theory predictions give rates that are consistent with these measured values. The rates are sufficiently rapid to question the assumption of rapid intramolecular vibrational redistribution, which is implicit in transition state theories. In contrast to expansion cooled samples, room temperature samples exhibit a smooth variation of the reaction rate vs photon energy. By comparing rates for rotationally cold and room temperature NO2, the ON-O bond is estimated to be ˜40% longer in the transition state than in the parent molecule.

  2. H/L transition time estimation in JET using conformal predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S., E-mail: sergio.gonzalez@ciemat.es [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM/ENEA per la Fusione, Padova 4-25127 (Italy); Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Ramirez, J.M. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H/L transitions have been predicted using H/L and L/H models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been built using conformal predictors to hedge the prediction with confidence and credibility measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been trained using linear and radial basis function kernels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformal measures have proven their usefulness to validate data-driven models. - Abstract: Recent advances in data mining allow the automatic recognition of physical phenomena in the databases of fusion devices without human intervention. This is important to create large databases of physical events (thereby increasing the statistical relevance) in an unattended manner. Important examples are the L/H and H/L transitions. In this contribution, a novel technique is introduced to automatically locate H/L transitions in JET by using conformal predictors. The focus is on H/L transitions because typically there is not a clear signature in the time series of the most widely available signals to recognize the change of confinement. Conformal predictors hedge their prediction by means of two parameters: confidence and credibility. The technique has been based on binary supervised classifiers to separate the samples of the respective confinement modes. Results with several underlying classifiers are presented.

  3. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  4. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs ( 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While not fully representative of the UCRB, results from the 19 springs indicate that groundwater discharge responds to climate variation and water-demand imbalances over a relatively short time period of years.

  5. Effect of sodium acid pyrophosphate on ranitidine bioavailability and gastrointestinal transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K M; Parr, A F; Tomlinson, J J; Sandefer, E P; Digenis, G A; Donn, K H; Powell, J R

    1993-07-01

    During development of a ranitidine effervescent oral solution dosage form, a marked decrease was observed in the extent of ranitidine absorption relative to the conventional oral tablet. Two studies were conducted in healthy volunteers to confirm the involvement of an excipient, SAPP (sodium acid pyrophosphate), and the mechanism of interaction, altered gastrointestinal transit. The first study (n = 12) involved single-dose crossover comparisons of (A) 150 mg ranitidine with 1132 mg SAPP versus (B) 150 mg ranitidine and (C) 150 mg ranitidine with all the effervescent tablet excipients except SAPP versus (D) a 150-mg ranitidine effervescent tablet, all administered as oral solutions. Serum ranitidine AUC, Cmax, and tmax were compared using two one-sided t test 90% confidence intervals (CI). Comparing treatments A to B and D to C, all 90% CI were below the 80-120% range, indicating significantly less extensive ranitidine absorption (54% based on AUC) from the oral solutions containing SAPP. The second study (n = 12) was a single-dose crossover comparing 50 microCi 111 InCl solutions with and without 1132 mg SAPP. Gastrointestinal transit times, determined by scintigraphic imaging, were compared between treatments. Gastric emptying time was unchanged, but small intestinal transit time was decreased to 56% in the presence of SAPP. More rapid small intestinal transit associated with an excipient of a solution dosage form apparently resulted in a decreased extent of ranitidine absorption. This observation contradicts the conventional wisdom that oral solutions are unlikely to fall short of bioequivalence relative to solid oral formulations.

  6. Transition in the mechanism of flow-mediated dilation with aging and development of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas M; Zinkevich, Natalya; Miller, Bradley; Liu, Yanping; Wittenburg, April L; Mitchell, Michael; Galdieri, Ralph; Sorokin, Andrey; Gutterman, David D

    2017-01-01

    In microvessels of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is largely dependent upon the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor H2O2. The goal of this study is to examine the influence of age and presence or absence of disease on the mechanism of FMD. Human coronary or adipose arterioles (~150 µm diameter) were prepared for videomicroscopy. The effect of inhibiting COX [indomethacin (Indo) or NOS (L-NAME), eliminating H2O2 (polyethylene glycol-catalase (PEG-CAT)] or targeting a reduction in mitochondrial ROS with scavengers/inhibitors [Vitamin E (mtVitamin E); phenylboronic acid (mtPBA)] was determined in children aged 0-18 years; young adults 19-55 years; older adults >55 years without CAD, and similarly aged adults with CAD. Indo eliminated FMD in children and reduced FMD in younger adults. This response was mediated mainly by PGI2, as the prostacyclin-synthase-inhibitor trans-2-phenyl cyclopropylamine reduced FMD in children and young adults. L-NAME attenuated dilation in children and younger adults and eliminated FMD in older adults without CAD, but had no effect on vessels from those with CAD, where mitochondria-derived H2O2 was the primary mediator. The magnitude of dilation was reduced in older compared to younger adults independent of CAD. Exogenous treatment with a sub-dilator dose of NO blocked FMD in vessels from subjects with CAD, while prolonged inhibition of NOS in young adults resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed in disease. The mediator of coronary arteriolar FMD evolves throughout life from prostacyclin in youth, to NO in adulthood. With the onset of CAD, NO-inhibitable release of H2O2 emerges as the exclusive mediator of FMD. These findings have implications for use of pharmacological agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents in children and the role of microvascular endothelium in cardiovascular health.

  7. Glass transition temperature of PIB, PDMS and PMMA from small-time simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duki, Solomon; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    2009-03-01

    We have applied some new techniques to obtain predictions of the glass transition temperatures Tg of poly(isobutylene), poly(dimethyl-siloxane), and poly(methyl methacrylate) from small-time atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The different fragilities of these materials are reflected in the results of the simulations. One approach involved measurement of the apparent softening of the ``cage'' in which a monomer is bound, while another involved studying autocorrelation of a convolution of the velocity with a smoothing function in order to detect the frequency of escapes from the ``cage.'' To check the accuracy of the short-time methods, the Tg of the polymers was also found using conventional diffusion simulations in which the rate of increase of the root mean squared displacement of an atom, monomer, or molecule is measured at very long times. The economical short-time simulations yielded results for Tg that were identical to those of the computer-intensive long-time simulations.

  8. Graft patency in off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass grafting for treatment of triple vessel coronary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡盛寿; 王小启; 宋云虎; 吕锋

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare graft patency in off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass grafting by using the transit time flow meter in the treatment of triple vessel coronary artery disease. Methods Between June 2000 and April 2001, 60 patients with triple vessel coronary artery disease underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. They were divided into two groups: off-pump and conventional coronary artery bypass. All completed grafts were tested intraoperatively using Transit Time Flow Measurement (TTFM). Preoperative and postoperative variables of the two groups were also compared. Results There were no significant differences in sex, age, weight, acute or remote myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes and type of bypass grafts between the two groups. The number of bypass grafts and the assisted respiratory time of the off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) group were significantly less than those of the conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCABG) group. The flow and pulsatile index (PI) of the left anterior descending artery bypass grafts and the right coronary artery bypass grafts were not significantly different between the OPCAB and CCABG groups. The flow of OM in the CCABG group with the multiple anastomosis site of sequential grafts was higher than that in the OPCAB group. Diffused narrow coronary artery bypass grafts in both groups had less flow.Conclusion No signficant differences in graft patency were observed in patients with triple vessel coronary artery disease who had undergone OPCAB or CCABG.

  9. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Confirmation of 27 planets in 13 multiplanet systems via Transit Timing Variations and orbital stability

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Agol, Eric; Ford, Eric B; Morehead, Robert C; Cochran, William D; Lissauer, Jack J; Adams, Elisabeth R; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A; Dupree, Andrea; Jenkins, Jon M; Robertson, Paul; Rowe, Jason F; Seader, Shawn; Thompson, Susan; Twicken, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    We confirm 27 planets in 13 planetary systems by showing the existence of statistically significant anti-correlated transit timing variations (TTVs), which demonstrates that the planet candidates are in the same system, and long-term dynamical stability, which places limits on the masses of the candidates---showing that they are planetary. %This overall method of planet confirmation was first applied to \\kepler systems 23 through 32. All of these newly confirmed planetary systems have orbital periods that place them near first-order mean motion resonances (MMRs), including 6 systems near the 2:1 MMR, 5 near 3:2, and one each near 4:3, 5:4, and 6:5. In addition, several unconfirmed planet candidates exist in some systems (that cannot be confirmed with this method at this time). A few of these candidates would also be near first order MMRs with either the confirmed planets or with other candidates. One system of particular interest, Kepler-56 (KOI-1241), is a pair of planets orbiting a 12th magnitude, giant sta...

  10. Biosensor cell assay for measuring real-time aldosterone-induced release of histamine from mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Emil G; Andersen, Kenneth; Svenningsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    as a sensitive biosensor assay for histamine release from isolated mouse mesenteric arteries. Activation of the H1 receptor by histamine was measured as an increased number of intracellular Ca(2+) transient peaks using fluorescence imaging RESULTS: The developed biosensor was sensitive to histamine...... in physiological relevant concentrations and responded to substances released by the artery preparation. Aldosterone treatment of mesenteric arteries from wild type mice for 50 minutes resulted in an increased number of intracellular Ca(2+) transient peaks in the biosensor cells, which was significantly inhibited...... by the histamine H1 blocker pyrilamine. Mesenteric arteries from mast cell deficient SASH mice induced similar pyrilamine-sensitive Ca(2+) transient response in the biosensor cells. Mesenteric arteries from wild type and SASH mice expressed histamine decarboxylase mRNA, indicating that mast cells are not the only...

  11. Distributional behavior of diffusion coefficients obtained by single trajectories in annealed transit time model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Yamamoto, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Local diffusion coefficients in disordered systems such as spin glass systems and living cells are highly heterogeneous and may change over time. Such a time-dependent and spatially heterogeneous environment results in irreproducibility of single-particle-tracking measurements. Irreproducibility of time-averaged observables has been theoretically studied in the context of weak ergodicity breaking in stochastic processes. Here, we provide rigorous descriptions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium diffusion processes for the annealed transit time model, which is a heterogeneous diffusion model in living cells. We give analytical solutions for the mean square displacement (MSD) and the relative standard deviation of the time-averaged MSD for equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations. We find that the time-averaged MSD grows linearly with time and that the time-averaged diffusion coefficients are intrinsically random (irreproducible) even in the long-time measurements in non-equilibrium situations. Furthermore, the distribution of the time-averaged diffusion coefficients converges to a universal distribution in the sense that it does not depend on initial conditions. Our findings pave the way for a theoretical understanding of distributional behavior of the time-averaged diffusion coefficients in disordered systems.

  12. Phase transitions in the common brainstem and related systems investigated by nonstationary time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, M; Vandenhouten, R; Grebe, R; Langhorst, P

    2000-01-14

    Neuronal activities of the reticular formation (RF) of the lower brainstem and the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS, first relay station of baroreceptor afferents) were recorded together in the anesthized dog with related parameters of EEG, respiration and cardiovascular system. The RF neurons are part of the common brainstem system (CBS) which participates in regulation and coordination of cardiovascular, respiratory, somatomotor systems, and vigilance. Multiple time series of these physiological subsystems yield useful information about internal dynamic coordination of the organism. Essential problems are nonlinearity and instationarity of the signals, due to the dynamic complexity of the systems. Several time-resolving methods are presented to describe nonlinear dynamic couplings in the time course, particularly during phase transitions. The methods are applied to the recorded signals representing the complex couplings of the physiological subsystems. Phase transitions in these systems are detected by recurrence plots of the instationary signals. The pointwise transinformation and the pointwise conditional coupling divergence are measures of the mutual interaction of the subsystems in the state space. If the signals show marked rhythms, instantaneous frequencies and their shiftings are demonstrated by time frequency distributions, and instantaneous phase differences show couplings of oscillating subsystems. Transient signal components are reconstructed by wavelet packet time selective transient reconstruction. These methods are useful means for analyzing coupling characteristics of the complex physiological system, and detailed analyses of internal dynamic coordination of subsystems become possible. During phase transitions of the functional organization (a) the rhythms of the central neuronal activities and the peripheral systems are altered, (b) changes in the coupling between CBS neurons and cardiovascular signals, respiration and the EEG, and (c) between NTS

  13. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  14. Improving method of real-time offset tuning for arterial signal coordination using probe trajectory data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the environment of intelligent transportation systems, traffic condition data would have higher resolution in time and space, which is especially valuable for managing the interrupted traffic at signalized intersections. There exist a lot of algorithms for offset tuning, but few of them take the advantage of modern traffic detection methods such as probe vehicle data. This study proposes a method using probe trajectory data to optimize and adjust offsets in real time. The critical point, representing the changing vehicle dynamics, is first defined as the basis of this approach. Using the critical points related to different states of traffic conditions, such as free flow, queue formation, and dissipation, various traffic status parameters can be estimated, including actual travel speed, queue dissipation rate, and standing queue length. The offset can then be adjusted on a cycle-by-cycle basis. The performance of this approach is evaluated using a simulation network. The results show that the trajectory-based approach can reduce travel time of the coordinated traffic flow when compared with using well-defined offline offset.

  15. Improvements in Low-cost Ultrasonic Measurements of Blood Flow in "by-passes" Using Narrow & Broad Band Transit-time Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Calas, H.; Diez, L.; Moreno, E.; Prohías, J.; Villar, A.; Carrillo, E.; Jiménez, A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Von Krüger, M. A.

    The cardio-pathology by ischemia is an important cause of death, but the re-vascularization of coronary arteries (by-pass operation) is an useful solution to reduce associated morbidity improving quality of life in patients. During these surgeries, the flow in coronary vessels must be measured, using non-invasive ultrasonic methods, known as transit time flow measurements (TTFM), which are the most accurate option nowadays. TTFM is a common intra-operative tool, in conjunction with classic Doppler velocimetry, to check the quality of these surgery processes for implanting grafts in parallel with the coronary arteries. This work shows important improvements achieved in flow-metering, obtained in our research laboratories (CSIC, ICIMAF, COPPE) and tested under real surgical conditions in Cardiocentro-HHA, for both narrowband NB and broadband BB regimes, by applying results of a CYTED multinational project (Ultrasonic & computational systems for cardiovascular diagnostics). mathematical models and phantoms were created to evaluate accurately flow measurements, in laboratory conditions, before our new electronic designs and low-cost implementations, improving previous ttfm systems, which include analogic detection, acquisition & post-processing, and a portable PC. Both regimes (NB and BB), with complementary performances for different conditions, were considered. Finally, specific software was developed to offer facilities to surgeons in their interventions.

  16. Quantifying [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Bashyam, Arjun; Ramachandran, Abhinay; Gholami, Saeid; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Werner, Tom; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV{sub MAX}) and cSUV{sub MEAN}. The PVE-corrected SUV{sub MEAN} (pvcSUV{sub MEAN}) was also calculated using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  17. Time-varying coupling functions: Dynamical inference and cause of synchronization transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav

    2017-02-01

    Interactions in nature can be described by their coupling strength, direction of coupling, and coupling function. The coupling strength and directionality are relatively well understood and studied, at least for two interacting systems; however, there can be a complexity in the interactions uniquely dependent on the coupling functions. Such a special case is studied here: synchronization transition occurs only due to the time variability of the coupling functions, while the net coupling strength is constant throughout the observation time. To motivate the investigation, an example is used to present an analysis of cross-frequency coupling functions between delta and alpha brain waves extracted from the electroencephalography recording of a healthy human subject in a free-running resting state. The results indicate that time-varying coupling functions are a reality for biological interactions. A model of phase oscillators is used to demonstrate and detect the synchronization transition caused by the varying coupling functions during an invariant coupling strength. The ability to detect this phenomenon is discussed with the method of dynamical Bayesian inference, which was able to infer the time-varying coupling functions. The form of the coupling function acts as an additional dimension for the interactions, and it should be taken into account when detecting biological or other interactions from data.

  18. Critical Space-Time Networks and Geometric Phase Transitions from Frustrated Edge Antiferromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2015-01-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time which self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension d_H=4. The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (d_H-d_s) where d_s is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  19. Study of phase transitions from short-time non-equilibrium behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, E V; Bab, M A; Baglietto, G; Borzi, R A; Grigera, T S; Loscar, E S; Rodriguez, D E; Rubio Puzzo, M L; Saracco, G P [Instituto de Investigaciones FisicoquImicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, c.c. 16, suc. 4, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-02-15

    We review recent progress in the understanding of phase transitions and critical phenomena, obtained by means of numerical simulations of the early dynamic evolution of systems prepared at well-specified initial conditions. This field has seen exhaustive scientific research during the last decade, when the renormalization-group (RG) theoretical results obtained at the end of the 1980s were applied to the interpretation of dynamic Monte Carlo simulation results. While the original RG theory is restricted to critical phenomena under equilibrium conditions, numerical simulations have been applied to the study of far-from-equilibrium systems and irreversible phase transitions, the investigation of the behaviour of spinodal points close to first-order phase transitions and the understanding of the early-time evolution of self-organized criticality (SOC) systems when released far form the SOC regime. The present review intends to provide a comprehensive overview of recent applications in those fields, which can give the flavour of the main ideas, methods and results, and to discuss the directions for further studies. All of these numerical results pose new and interesting theoretical challenges that remain as open questions to be addressed by new research in the coming years.

  20. A mechanism-based approach for absorption modeling: the Gastro-Intestinal Transit Time (GITT) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Bergstrand, Martin; Standing, Joseph F; Karlsson, Mats O

    2012-06-01

    Absorption models used in the estimation of pharmacokinetic drug characteristics from plasma concentration data are generally empirical and simple, utilizing no prior information on gastro-intestinal (GI) transit patterns. Our aim was to develop and evaluate an estimation strategy based on a mechanism-based model for drug absorption, which takes into account the tablet movement through the GI transit. This work is an extension of a previous model utilizing tablet movement characteristics derived from magnetic marker monitoring (MMM) and pharmacokinetic data. The new approach, which replaces MMM data with a GI transit model, was evaluated in data sets where MMM data were available (felodipine) or not available (diclofenac). Pharmacokinetic profiles in both datasets were well described by the model according to goodness-of-fit plots. Visual predictive checks showed the model to give superior simulation properties compared with a standard empirical approach (first-order absorption rate + lag-time). This model represents a step towards an integrated mechanism-based NLME model, where the use of physiological knowledge and in vitro–in vivo correlation helps fully characterize PK and generate hypotheses for new formulations or specific populations.

  1. Transit-Based Emergency Evacuation with Transit Signal Priority in Sudden-Onset Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciyun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents methods of transit signal priority without transit-only lanes for a transit-based emergency evacuation in a sudden-onset disaster. Arterial priority signal coordination is optimized when a traffic signal control system provides priority signals for transit vehicles along an evacuation route. Transit signal priority is determined by “transit vehicle arrival time estimation,” “queuing vehicle dissipation time estimation,” “traffic signal status estimation,” “transit signal optimization,” and “arterial traffic signal coordination for transit vehicle in evacuation route.” It takes advantage of the large capacities of transit vehicles, reduces the evacuation time, and evacuates as many evacuees as possible. The proposed methods were tested on a simulation platform with Paramics V6.0. To evaluate and compare the performance of transit signal priority, three scenarios were simulated in the simulator. The results indicate that the methods of this study can reduce the travel times of transit vehicles along an evacuation route by 13% and 10%, improve the standard deviation of travel time by 16% and 46%, and decrease the average person delay at a signalized intersection by 22% and 17% when the traffic flow saturation along an evacuation route is 0.81.0, respectively.

  2. Near-infrared laparoscopy for real-time intra-operative arterial and lymphatic perfusion imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-01

    Multimodal laparoscopic imaging systems possessing the capability for extended spectrum irradiation and visualization within a unified camera system are now available to provide enhanced intracorporeal operative anatomic and dynamic perfusion assessment and potentially augmented patient outcome. While ultraviolet-range energies have limited penetration and hence are probably more useful for endoscopic mucosal interrogation, the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum is of greater potential utility for the purposes of examining inducible fluorescence in abdominopelvic tissue that can be achieved by administration of specific tracer agents, either directly into the circulation (e.g. for anastomotic perfusion assessment at the time of stapling) or into the lymphatic system (e.g. for lymph basin road-mapping and\\/or focussed target nodal assessment). This technology is also capable of supplementing anatomic recognition of the biliary system while implantable fibres can also be inserted intraoperatively for the purpose of safeguarding vital structures such as the oesphagus and ureters especially in difficult reoperations. It is likely that this technological capability will find a clear and common indication in colorectal specialist and general surgical departments worldwide in the near future.

  3. [Abdominal artery aneurysm and associated surgical abdominal diseases: towards optimal timing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilo, Francesco; Mirenda, Francesco; Mandolfino, Tommaso; La Spada, Michele; D'Alfonso, Mario; Carmignani, Amedeo; De Caridi, Giovanni; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess which modalities offered the best timing in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms associated with other abdominal surgical diseases. From January 1984 to December 2002, 372 patients underwent surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms, 350 men (94%) and 22 women (6%), mean age 72 years. Of these 10% were operated on urgently. The traditional open technique was used in 307 patients, and the endovascular method in the remaining 65 cases. In 40 patients (11%) we observed other associated abdominal diseases which were treated during the same operation in 34 cases (85%). We had three deaths in the 34 cases treated in the same operation (9%). In the remaining cases no perioperative mortality was registered. There were no cases of prosthesis infection. The mean hospital stay was 9 days. Simultaneous treatment appears, on the one hand, to carry an increased operative risk and increased mortality and, on the other, to present the advantage of having to perform only one surgical procedure. The advent of the endovascular method allows us to postpone the treatment of the associated disease without increasing the technical difficulty of the second operation.

  4. How does landscape structure influence catchment transit time across different geomorphic provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; McGuire, K.J.; Laudon, H.; Burns, Douglas A.; Dunn, S.M.; Soulsby, C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of empirical investigations of catchment transit times (TTs), virtually all are based on individual catchments and there are few attempts to synthesize understanding across different geographical regions. Uniquely, this paper examines data from 55 catchments in five geomorphic provinces in northern temperate regions (Scotland, United States of America and Sweden). The objective is to understand how the role of catchment topography as a control on the TTs differs in contrasting geographical settings. Catchment inverse transit time proxies (ITTPs) were inferred by a simple metric of isotopic tracer damping, using the ratio of standard deviation of ??18O in streamwater to the standard deviation of ??18O in precipitation. Quantitative landscape analysis was undertaken to characterize the catchments according to hydrologically relevant topographic indices that could be readily determined from a digital terrain model (DTM). The nature of topographic controls on transit times varied markedly in different geomorphic regions. In steeper montane regions, there are stronger gravitational influences on hydraulic gradients and TTs tend to be lower in the steepest catchments. In provinces where terrain is more subdued, direct topographic control weakened; in particular, where flatter areas with less permeable soils give rise to overland flow and lower TTs. The steeper slopes within this flatter terrain appear to have a greater coverage of freely draining soils, which increase sub-surface flow, therefore increasing TTs. Quantitative landscape analysis proved a useful tool for intercatchment comparison. However, the critical influence of sub-surface permeability and connectivity may limit the transferability of predictive tools of hydrological function based on topographic parameters alone. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Time delay induced transition of gene switch and stochastic resonance in a genetic transcriptional regulatory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Noise, nonlinear interactions, positive and negative feedbacks within signaling pathways, time delays, protein oligomerization, and crosstalk between different pathways are main characters in the regulatory of gene expression. However, only a single noise source or only delay time in the deterministic model is considered in the gene transcriptional regulatory system in previous researches. The combined effects of correlated noise and time delays on the gene regulatory model still remain not to be fully understood. Results The roles of time delay on gene switch and stochastic resonance are systematically explored based on a famous gene transcriptional regulatory model subject to correlated noise. Two cases, including linear time delay appearing in the degradation process (case I) and nonlinear time delay appearing in the synthesis process (case II) are considered, respectively. For case I: Our theoretical results show that time delay can induce gene switch, i.e., the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the high concentration state to the low concentration state ("on"→"off"). With increasing the time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further accelerated. Moreover, it is found that the stochastic resonance can be enhanced by both the time delay and correlated noise intensity. However, the additive noise original from the synthesis rate restrains the stochastic resonance. It is also very interesting that a resonance bi-peaks structure appears under large additive noise intensity. The theoretical results by using small-delay time-approximation approach are consistent well with our numerical simulation. For case II: Our numerical simulation results show that time delay can also induce the gene switch, however different with case I, the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the low concentration state to the high concentration state ("off"→"on"). With increasing time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further

  6. Search for Time-Independent Lorentz Violation using Muon Neutrino to Muon Antineutrino Transitions in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2016-05-10

    Data from the MINOS experiment has been used to search for mixing between muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos using a time-independent Lorentz-violating formalism derived from the Standard-Model Extension (SME). MINOS is uniquely capable of searching for muon neutrino-antineutrino mixing given its long baseline and ability to distinguish between neutrinos and antineutrinos on an event-by-event basis. Neutrino and antineutrino interactions were observed in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors from an exposure of 10.56$\\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target from the NuMI neutrino-optimized beam. No evidence was found for such transitions and new, highly stringent limits were placed on the SME coefficients governing them. We place the first limits on the SME parameters $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} $ and $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau}$ at $-8.4\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} < 8.0\\times10^{-23}$ and $-8.0\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau} < 8.4\\times10^{-23}$, and the world's best limits on the $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}$ and $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}$ parameters at $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$ and $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$, all limits quoted at $3\\sigma$.

  7. Changes in sleep duration, timing, and quality as children transition to kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Alyssa; Harsh, John

    2014-01-01

    Sleep can be seen as a biologically driven behavior shaped by cultural context. A "poor fit" occurs when contextual demands for the timing and duration sleep periods are incompatible with the underlying biology. Such contextual factors are well-known for adults, yet little is known of the contextual factors that shape young children's sleep health and to what degree such factors impact sleep duration, timing, and quality. This study attempted to identify how the transition to kindergarten was associated with changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality for children enrolled in preschool prior to attending kindergarten vs. those who were not. Wrist actigraphy in 38 5-year-old children was collected at three longitudinal points before and after the start of kindergarten. Our data suggested that the transition to kindergarten was associated with a reduction in weekday sleep (mostly due to lost napping) and an advance in the weekday nocturnal sleep period that was most pronounced for children not enrolled in preschool prior to kindergarten. These sleep changes paralleled objective and caregiver-reported data of increased sleep pressure that lasted well into the first month of kindergarten.

  8. A general stochastic model for studying time evolution of transition networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Choujun; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We consider a class of complex networks whose nodes assume one of several possible states at any time and may change their states from time to time. Such networks represent practical networks of rumor spreading, disease spreading, language evolution, and so on. Here, we derive a model describing the dynamics of this kind of network and a simulation algorithm for studying the network evolutionary behavior. This model, derived at a microscopic level, can reveal the transition dynamics of every node. A numerical simulation is taken as an "experiment" or "realization" of the model. We use this model to study the disease propagation dynamics in four different prototypical networks, namely, the regular nearest-neighbor (RN) network, the classical Erdös-Renyí (ER) random graph, the Watts-Strogátz small-world (SW) network, and the Barabási-Albert (BA) scalefree network. We find that the disease propagation dynamics in these four networks generally have different properties but they do share some common features. Furthermore, we utilize the transition network model to predict user growth in the Facebook network. Simulation shows that our model agrees with the historical data. The study can provide a useful tool for a more thorough understanding of the dynamics networks.

  9. Prospects of long-time-series observations from Dome C for transit search

    CERN Document Server

    Rauer, Heike; Erikson, Anders

    2008-01-01

    The detection of transiting extrasolar planets requires high-photometric quality and long-duration photometric stellar time-series. In this paper, we investigate the advantages provided by the Antarctic observing platform Dome C for planet transit detections during its long winter period, which allows for relatively long, uninterrupted time-series. Our calculations include limiting effects due to the Sun and Moon, cloud coverage and the effect of reduced photometric quality for high extinction of target fields. We compare the potential for long time-series from Dome C with a single site in Chile, a three-site low-latitude network as well as combinations of Dome C with Chile and the network, respectively. Dome C is one of the prime astronomical sites on Earth for obtaining uninterrupted long-duration observations in terms of prospects for a high observational duty cycle. The duty cycle of a project can, however, be significantly improved by integrating Dome C into a network of sites.

  10. GaN based transfer electron and avalanche transit time devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.Parida; A.K.Panda

    2012-01-01

    A new model is developed to study the microwave/mm wave characteristics of two-terminal GaN- based transfer electron devices (TEDs),namely a Gunn diode and an impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) device.Microwave characteristics such as device efficiency and the microwave power generated are computed and compared at D-band (140 GHz center frequency) to see the potentiality of each device under the same operating conditions.It is seen that GaN-based IMPATT devices surpass the Gunn diode in the said frequency region.

  11. GaN based transfer electron and avalanche transit time devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, R. K.; Panda, A. K.

    2012-05-01

    A new model is developed to study the microwave/mm wave characteristics of two-terminal GaN-based transfer electron devices (TEDs), namely a Gunn diode and an impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) device. Microwave characteristics such as device efficiency and the microwave power generated are computed and compared at D-band (140 GHz center frequency) to see the potentiality of each device under the same operating conditions. It is seen that GaN-based IMPATT devices surpass the Gunn diode in the said frequency region.

  12. Comparison of axial and radial electron beam-breakup transit-time oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mostrom, M.A. [Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Comparison of two configurations of a novel high-power microwave generator is presented in this article. Coupling the beam-breakup instability with the transit-time effect of the electron beam in the cavity, rapid energy exchange between the electrons and cavity modes can occur. The dominant cavity modes in the axial and radial configurations are different but their growth rates are comparable. We found that the radial configuration can have a beam impedance less than 10 {Omega} and therefore more suitable for low-voltage and high power operation. Good agreements have been obtained between linear theory and simulation for both configurations.

  13. Transit times of water particles in the vadose zone across catchment states and catchments functional units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the water movement in the vadose zone and its associated transport of solutes are of major interest to reduce nutrient leaching, pollution transport or other risks to water quality. Soil physical models are widely used to asses such transport processes, while the site specific parameterization of these models remains challenging. Inverse modeling is a common method to adjust the soil physical parameters in a way that the observed water movement or soil water dynamics are reproduced by the simulation. We have shown that the pore water stable isotope concentration can serve as an additional fitting target to simulate the solute transport and water balance in the unsaturated zone. In the presented study, the Mualem- van Genuchten parameters for the Richards equation and diffusivity parameter for the convection-dispersion equation have been parameterized using the inverse model approach with Hydrus-1D for 46 experimental sites of different land use, topography, pedology and geology in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. With the best parameter set we simulated the transport of a conservative solute that was introduced via a pulse input at different points in time. Thus, the transit times in the upper 2 m of the soil for different catchment states could be inferred for each location. It has been shown that the time a particle needs to pass the -2 m depth plane highly varies from the systems state and the systems forcing during and after infiltration of that particle. Differences in transit times among the study sites within the Attert basin were investigated with regards to its governing factors to test the concept of functional units. The study shows the potential of pore water stable isotope concentration for residence times and transport analyses in the unsaturated zone leading to a better understanding of the time variable subsurface processes across the catchment.

  14. Direct simulation of groundwater transit-time distributions using the reservoir theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, David; Perrochet, Pierre

    Groundwater transit times are of interest for the management of water resources, assessment of pollution from non-point sources, and quantitative dating of groundwaters by the use of environmental isotopes. The age of water is the time water has spent in an aquifer since it has entered the system, whereas the transit time is the age of water as it exits the system. Water at the outlet of an aquifer is a mixture of water elements with different transit times, as a consequence of the different flow-line lengths. In this paper, transit-time distributions are calculated by coupling two existing methods, the reservoir theory and a recent age-simulation method. Based on the derivation of the cumulative age distribution over the whole domain, the approach accounts for the whole hydrogeological framework. The method is tested using an analytical example and its applicability illustrated for a regional layered aquifer. Results show the asymmetry and multimodality of the transit-time distribution even in advection-only conditions, due to the aquifer geometry and to the velocity-field heterogeneity. Résumé Les temps de transit des eaux souterraines sont intéressants à connaître pour gérer l'évaluation des ressources en eau dans le cas de pollution à partir de sources non ponctuelles, et aussi pour dater quantitativement les eaux souterraines au moyen des isotopes du milieu. L'âge de l'eau est le temps qu'elle a passé dans un aquifère depuis qu'elle est entrée dans le système, alors que le temps de transit est l'âge de l'eau au moment où elle quitte le système. L'eau à la sortie d'un aquifère est un mélange d'eaux possédant différents temps de transit, du fait des longueurs différentes des lignes de courant suivies. Dans ce papier, les distributions des temps de transit sont calculées en couplant deux méthodes, la théorie du réservoir et une méthode récente de simulation des âges. Basée sur la dérivation de la distribution cumulées des âges sur

  15. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands); Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France); Sérusclat, André [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France); Moulin, Philippe [Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  16. A comparison of two methods for calculating CR (time constant) during studies of arterial blood flow in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaoka, K; Ogawa, K

    1990-11-01

    Some of our earlier reports have dealt with experiments on the central caudal arteries of a series of anesthetized rats. The results of these experiments were expressed by a relationship derived from the Windkessel theory where f(t) = alpha dz(t)/dt + beta z(t). When this theory is used, the measured blood flow forms f(t) and calculated wave forms alpha dz(t)/dt + beta z(t) agree closely. In these studies, we discovered that, when blood flow adz(t)/dt + beta z(t) agree closely. In these studies, we discovered that, when blood flow decreases, CR (time constant tau, the product of the blood vessel compliance C and the peripheral resistance R) values increase and vary widely. In the present study, 1) we investigated changes in CR when blood flow increases, and, 2) the method of least squares was used in calculating the formula given above. We achieved a better conformity between measured blood flow and calculated blood flow and perceived a clearer relationship between mean blood flow and CR than when they were calculated by the old method.

  17. Validation of a method to differentiate arterial and venous vessels in CT perfusion data using linear combinations of quantitative time-density curve characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havla, Lukas; Schneider, Moritz; Dietrich, Olaf [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Beyer, Sebastian E.; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We aimed to develop and evaluate a new method that reliably differentiates between cerebral arteries and veins using voxel-wise CT-perfusion-derived parameters. Fourteen consecutive patients with suspected stroke but without pathological findings were examined on a multi-detector CT system: 32 dynamic phases (∇t = 1.5 s) during application of 35 mL iomeprol-350 were acquired at 80 kV/200mAs. Three hemodynamic parameters were calculated for 18 arterial and venous vessel segments: A (maximum of the time-density-curve), T (time-to-peak), and W (full-width-at-half-maximum). Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), the performance of every classifier (A, T, W) and of all linear combinations for the differentiation of arterial and venous vessels was determined. A maximum area under the ROC-curve (AUC) of 0.945 (accuracy = 86.8 %) was obtained using the FLDA combination of A and T or the triplet FLDA of A and T and W for the classification of venous and arterial vessels. The best single parameter was T with an AUC of 0.871 (accuracy = 79.0 %), which performed significantly worse than the combination A and T (p < 0.001). Arteries and veins can be accurately differentiated based on dynamic CT perfusion data using the maximum of the time-density curve, its time-to-peak, its width, and FLDA combinations of these parameters, which yield accuracies up to 87 %. (orig.)

  18. Insights into the water mean transit time in a high-elevation tropical ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Giovanny M.; Segura, Catalina; Vaché, Kellie B.; Windhorst, David; Breuer, Lutz; Crespo, Patricio

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the mean transit time (MTT) of water and its spatial variability in a tropical high-elevation ecosystem (wet Andean páramo). The study site is the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory (7.53 km2) located in southern Ecuador. A lumped parameter model considering five transit time distribution (TTD) functions was used to estimate MTTs under steady-state conditions (i.e., baseflow MTT). We used a unique data set of the δ18O isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow water samples collected for 3 years (May 2011 to May 2014) in a nested monitoring system of streams. Linear regression between MTT and landscape (soil and vegetation cover, geology, and topography) and hydrometric (runoff coefficient and specific discharge rates) variables was used to explore controls on MTT variability, as well as mean electrical conductivity (MEC) as a possible proxy for MTT. Results revealed that the exponential TTD function best describes the hydrology of the site, indicating a relatively simple transition from rainfall water to the streams through the organic horizon of the wet páramo soils. MTT of the streams is relatively short (0.15-0.73 years, 53-264 days). Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between the catchment's average slope and MTT (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.05). MTT showed no significant correlation with hydrometric variables, whereas MEC increases with MTT (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001). Overall, we conclude that (1) baseflow MTT confirms that the hydrology of the ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow; (2) the interplay between the high storage capacity of the wet páramo soils and the slope of the catchments provides the ecosystem with high regulation capacity; and (3) MEC is an efficient predictor of MTT variability in this system of catchments with relatively homogeneous geology.

  19. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Carter, Joshua A; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J; Lissauer, Jack J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Allen, Christopher; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Christopher J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Cochran, William D; Désert, Jean-Michel; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra A; Gautier, Thomas N; Gilliland, Ron L; Jenkins, Jon M; Haas, Michael R; Horch, Elliott; Howell, Steve B; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A; Isaacson, Howard; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Li, Jie; Lucas, Philip; MacQueen, Phillip J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; McCauliff, Sean; Mullally, Fergal R; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa; Shporer, Avi; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Wohler, Bill

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timingn variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:...

  20. TASTE. III. A homogeneous study of transit time variations in WASP-3b

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimbeni, V; Murabito, S; Sada, P V; Aparicio, A; Piotto, G; Bedin, L R; Milone, A P; Rosenberg, A; Borsato, L; Damasso, M; Granata, V; Malavolta, L

    2012-01-01

    The TASTE project is searching for low-mass planets with the Transit Timing Variation (TTV) technique, by gathering high-precision, short-cadence light curves for a selected sample of transiting exoplanets. It has been claimed that the "hot Jupiter" WASP-3b could be perturbed by a second planet. Presenting eleven new light curves (secured at the IAC80 and UDEM telescopes) and re-analyzing thirty-eight archival light curves in a homogeneous way, we show that new data do not confirm the previously claimed TTV signal. However, we bring evidence that measurements are not consistent with a constant orbital period, though no significant periodicity can be detected. Additional dynamical modeling and follow-up observations are planned to constrain the properties of the perturber or to put upper limits to it. We provide a refined ephemeris for WASP-3b and improved orbital/physical parameters. A contact eclipsing binary, serendipitously discovered among field stars, is reported here for the first time.

  1. Pulse transit time variability analysis in an animal model of endotoxic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Collin H H; Chan, Gregory S H; Middleton, Paul M; Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Javed, Faizan; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-invasively measured pulse transit time (PTT) to monitor the cardiovascular systems in critically ill patients, like sepsis, can be of significant clinical value. In this study, the potential of PTT and its variability in cardiovascular system monitoring in a mechanically ventilated and anesthetized rabbit model of endotoxic shock was assessed. Eight adult New Zealand white rabbits, which were treated with endotoxin bolus infusion, were studied. Measurements of PTT, pre-ejection period (PEP), and vascular transit time (VTT) were obtained in pre- and post-intervention stages (before and 90 minutes after the administration of endotoxin). The decrease in mean PTT (p VTT (p VTT (R(2) ≥ 0.84 with positive slope). Computation of coherence and phase shift in the ventilating frequency band (HF: 0.50 - 0.75 Hz) showed that the respiratory variation in PTT was synchronized with both PEP and VTT (coherence > 0.84 with phase shift less than one cardiac beat). These results highlighted the potential value of PTT and its respiratory variation in characterizing the pathophysioloigcal hemodynamic change in endotoxic shock.

  2. Examining the Effects of Geomorphology on Hydrologic Transit Times Using Liquid Water Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, D.; Troch, P.; Lyon, S.; Desilets, S.; Guardiola, M.; Broxton, P.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years there has been resurgence in improving physically based and spatially distributed hydrological response models. However there continues to be many obstacles in accurately representing the basic processes governing rainfall runoff responses. Much of these inaccuracies can be attributed to such problems as a lack of understanding in runoff processes, unknown heterogeneity both at the surface and subsurface, variations in driving forces and the effects of geomorphology on the transformation of rainfall to stream flow. We hope to improve on such ambiguity is by examining the relationships between geomorphology and hydrology through the investigation of transit time distributions, which can be used as a fundamental descriptor of catchments" characteristics such as storage and flow pathways. By examining stable isotopic variability in precipitation, soil moisture and stream flow to determine transit times, we hope to better understand the effects of topographic land structures on the hydrologic response system. The first step in this process has been to fully instrument a series of hill slopes with similar structural and pedologic characteristics, located in the Marshall Gulch region of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Equipment including suction and non- suction lysimeters, tipping bucket rain gauges and automatic flow samplers with data loggers positioned to take stream flow and precipitation samples have been used to collect samples throughout the region. A description of preliminary results will be presented.

  3. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenwald, J., E-mail: jgruenwald@gmx.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-08-15

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  4. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodoro Cordova-Fraga; Modesto Sosa; Cados Wiechers; Jose Maria De la Roca-Chiapas; Alejandro Maldonado Moreles; Jesus BernaI-Alvarado; Raquel Huerta-Franco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT)and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI).METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright,fowler,and supine positions; 90°,45° and 0°,respectively).RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions.The ETT means were 5.2 ±1.1 s,6.1±1.5 s,and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90°,45° and 0°,respectively.Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects' anatomical position,and r =-0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject's BHI.CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique,it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT.

  5. Detection of Laplace-resonant three-planet systems from transit timing variations

    CERN Document Server

    Libert, A -S

    2013-01-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are useful to constrain the existence of perturbing planets, especially in resonant systems where the variations are strongly enhanced. Here we focus on Laplace-resonant three-planet systems, and assume the inner planet transits the star. A dynamical study is performed for different masses of the three bodies, with a special attention to terrestrial planets. We consider a maximal time-span of ~ 100 years and discuss the shape of the inner planet TTVs curve. Using frequency analysis, we highlight the three periods related to the evolution of the system: two periods associated with the Laplace-resonant angle and the third one with the precession of the pericenters. These three periods are clearly detected in the TTVs of an inner giant planet perturbed by two terrestrial companions. Only two periods are detected for a Jupiter-Jupiter-Earth configuration (the ones associated with the giant interactions) or for three terrestrial planets (the Laplace periods). However, the latter sy...

  6. Sport Transition of JPSS VIIRS Imagery for Night-time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuell, Kevin; LeRoy, Anita; Smith, Matt; Miller, Steve; Kann, Diedre; Bernhardt, David; Reydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program and NOAA/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) work within the NOAA/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Ground to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the VIIRS instrument. Very similar to MODIS, the VIIRS instrument provides many high-resolution visible and infrared channels in a broad spectrum. In addition, VIIRS is equipped with a low-light sensor that is able to detect light emissions from the land and atmosphere as well as reflected sunlight by the lunar surface. This band is referred to as the Day-Night Band due to the sunlight being used at night to see cloud and topographic features just as one would typically see in day-time visible imagery. NWS forecast offices that collaborate with SPoRT and CIRA have utilized MODIS imagery in operations, but have longed for more frequent passes of polar-orbiting data. The VIIRS instrument enhances SPoRT collaborations with WFOs by providing another day and night-time pass, and at times two additional passes due to its large swath width. This means that multi-spectral, RGB imagery composites are more readily available to prepare users for their use in GOES-R era and high-resolution imagery for use in high-latitudes is more frequently able to supplement standard GOES imagery within the SPoRT Hybrid GEO-LEO product. The transition of VIIRS also introduces the new Day-Night Band capability to forecast operations. An Intensive Evaluation Period (IEP) was conducted in Summer 2013 with a group of "Front Range" NWS offices related to VIIRS night-time imagery. VIIRS single-channel imagery is able to better analyze the specific location of fire hotspots and other land features, as well as provide a more true measurement of various cloud and aerosol properties than geostationary measurements, especially at night. Viewed within the SPoRT Hybrid imagery, the VIIRS data allows forecasters to better interpret the more frequent, but

  7. Search for time-independent Lorentz violation using muon neutrino to muon antineutrino transitions in MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Chen, R; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; de Rijck, S; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Pfützner, M M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2016-01-01

    Data from the MINOS experiment has been used to search for mixing between muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos using a time-independent Lorentz-violating formalism derived from the Standard-Model Extension (SME). MINOS is uniquely capable of searching for muon neutrino-antineutrino mixing given its long baseline and ability to distinguish between neutrinos and antineutrinos on an event-by-event basis. Neutrino and antineutrino interactions were observed in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors from an exposure of 10.56$\\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target from the NuMI neutrino-optimized beam. No evidence was found for such transitions and new, highly stringent limits were placed on the SME coefficients governing them. We place the first limits on the SME parameters $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} $ and $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau}$ at $-8.4\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} < 8.0\\times10^{-23}$ and $-8.0\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau} < 8.4\\times10^{-23}$, and the world's best limits on the $\\tilde{g}^{Z...

  8. Spectral analysis of finite-time correlation matrices near equilibrium phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak; Prosen, T.; Buča, B.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-10-01

    We study spectral densities for systems on lattices, which, at a phase transition display, power-law spatial correlations. Constructing the spatial correlation matrix we prove that its eigenvalue density shows a power law that can be derived from the spatial correlations. In practice time series are short in the sense that they are either not stationary over long time intervals or not available over long time intervals. Also we usually do not have time series for all variables available. We shall make numerical simulations on a two-dimensional Ising model with the usual Metropolis algorithm as time evolution. Using all spins on a grid with periodic boundary conditions we find a power law, that is, for large grids, compatible with the analytic result. We still find a power law even if we choose a fairly small subset of grid points at random. The exponents of the power laws will be smaller under such circumstances. For very short time series leading to singular correlation matrices we use a recently developed technique to lift the degeneracy at zero in the spectrum and find a significant signature of critical behavior even in this case as compared to high temperature results which tend to those of random matrix models.

  9. Cortical phase transitions, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, W J; Obinata, M; Vitiello, G

    2011-01-01

    The formation of amplitude modulated and phase modulated assemblies of neurons is observed in the brain functional activity. The study of the formation of such structures requires that the analysis has to be organized in hierarchical levels, microscopic, mesoscopic, macroscopic, each with its characteristic space-time scales and the various forms of energy, electric, chemical, thermal produced and used by the brain. In this paper, we discuss the microscopic dynamics underlying the mesoscopic and the macroscopic levels and focus our attention on the thermodynamics of the non-equilibrium phase transitions. We obtain the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the non-stationary regime and consider the formation of topologically non-trivial structures such as the vortex solution. The power laws observed in functional activities of the brain is also discussed and related to coherent states characterizing the many-body dissipative model of brain.

  10. Pulse wave transit time measured by imaging photoplethysmography in upper extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynsky, M. A.; Mamontov, O. V.; Sidorov, I. S.; Kamshilin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe highly reliable measurement method of the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to human limbs by using simultaneous recordings of imaging photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. High accuracy of measurements was achieved by access to a larger number of statistically independent data obtained simultaneously in different points. The method is characterized by higher diagnostic reliability because of automatic selection of the regions less affected by environmental noise. The technique was tested in the group of 12 young healthy subjects aged from 21 to 33 years. Even though PWTT in right and left hands was comparable after averaging over the whole group of subjects, significant difference in the time delay of pulse wave between the hands was found in several individuals. The technique can be used for early-stage diagnostics of various vascular diseases.

  11. Short-time Lyapunov exponent analysis and the transition to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, John A.; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The physical mechanism driving the weakly chaotic Taylor-Couette flow is investigated using the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis. In this procedure, the transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos is studied using direct numerical 3D simulations of axially periodic Taylor-Couette flow, and a partial Liapunov exponent spectrum for the flow is computed by simultaneously advancing the full solution and a set of perturbations. It is shown that the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis yields more information on the exponents and dimension than that obtained from the common Liapunov exponent calculations. Results show that the chaotic state studied here is caused by a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability of the outflow boundary jet of Taylor vortices.

  12. Understanding Flow Pathways, Mixing and Transit Times for Water Quality Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, S. M.; Bacon, J. R.; Soulsby, C.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2007-12-01

    Water quality modelling requires representation of the physical processes controlling the movement of solutes and particulates at an appropriate level of detail to address the objective of the model simulations. To understand and develop mitigation strategies for diffuse pollution at catchment scales, it is necessary for models to be able to represent the sources and age of water reaching rivers at different times. Experimental and modelling studies undertaken on several catchments in the north east of Scotland have used natural hydrochemical and isotopic tracers as a means of obtaining spatially integrated information about mixing processes. Methods for obtaining and integrating appropriate data are considered together with the implications of neglecting it. The tracer data have been incorporated in a conceptual hydrological model to study the sensitivity of the modelled tracer response to factors that may not affect runoff simulations but do affect mixing and transit times of the water. Results from the studies have shown how model structural and parameter uncertainties can lead to errors in the representation of: the flow pathways of water; the degree to which these flow pathways have mixed and the length of time for which water has been stored within the soil / groundwater system. It has been found to be difficult to eliminate structural uncertainty regarding the mechanisms of mixing, and parameter uncertainty regarding the role of groundwater. Simulations of nitrate pollution, resulting from the application of agricultural fertilisers, have been undertaken to demonstrate the sensitivity of water quality simulations to the potential errors in physical transport mechanisms, inherent in models that fail to account correctly for flow pathways, mixing and transit times.

  13. Factors controlling inter-catchment variation of mean transit time with consideration of temporal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Yamanaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    The catchment transit time, a lumped descriptor reflecting both time scale and spatial structure of catchment hydrology can provide useful insights into chemical/nuclear pollution risks within a catchment. Despite its importance, factors controlling spatial variation of mean transit time (MTT) are not yet well understood. In this study, we estimated time-variant MTTs for about ten years (2003-2012) in five mesoscale sub-catchments of the Fuji River catchment, central Japan, to establish the factors controlling their inter-catchment variation with consideration of temporal variability. For this purpose, we employed a lumped hydrological model that was calibrated and validated by hydrometric and isotopic tracer observations. Temporal variation patterns of estimated MTT were similar in all sub-catchments, but with differing amplitudes. Inter-catchment variation of MTT was greater in dry periods than wet periods, suggesting spatial variation of MTT is controlled by water 'stock' rather than by 'flow'. Although the long-term average MTT (LAMTT) in each catchment was correlated with mean slope, coverage of forest (or conversely, other land use types), coverage of sand-shale conglomerate, and groundwater storage, the multiple linear regression revealed that inter-catchment variation of LAMTT is principally controlled by the amount of groundwater storage. This is smaller in mountainous areas covered mostly by forests and greater in plain areas with less forest coverage and smaller slope. This study highlights the topographic control of MTT via groundwater storage, which might be a more important factor in mesoscale catchments, including both mountains and plains, rather than in smaller catchments dominated by mountainous topography.

  14. Signal Transceiver Transit Times and Propagation Delay Corrections for Ranging and Georeferencing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kaufmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of ranging measurements depends critically on the knowledge of time delays undergone by signals when retransmitted by a remote transponder and due to propagation effects. A new method determines these delays for every single pulsed signal transmission. It utilizes four ground-based reference stations, synchronized in time and installed at well-known geodesic coordinates and a repeater in space, carried by a satellite, balloon, aircraft, and so forth. Signal transmitted by one of the reference bases is retransmitted by the transponder, received back by the four bases, producing four ranging measurements which are processed to determine uniquely the time delays undergone in every retransmission process. A minimization function is derived comparing repeater’s positions referred to at least two groups of three reference bases, providing the signal transit time at the repeater and propagation delays, providing the correct repeater position. The method is applicable to the transponder platform positioning and navigation, time synchronization of remote clocks, and location of targets. The algorithm has been demonstrated by simulations adopting a practical example with the transponder carried by an aircraft moving over bases on the ground.

  15. Dynamic contrast optical coherence tomography: quantitative measurement of microvascular transit-time distributions in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2016-03-01

    Transit time is a fundamental microcirculatory parameter that is critical in determining oxygen delivery from capillaries to surrounding tissue. Recently, it was demonstrated theoretically that capillary transit-time heterogeneity potentially leads to non-uniform oxygen extraction in micro-domains. However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit-time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of the kinetics of an intravascular tracer during its passage through the field-of-view. DyC-OCT is used to quantitatively measure the transit-time distribution in microvascular networks in cross-section at the single-capillary level. Transit-time metrics are derived from analysis of the temporal characteristics of the dynamic scattering signal, related to tracer concentration, using indicator-dilution theory. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against the dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in the surface pial vessels of a mouse brain, imaged through a thinned-skull, glass coverslip-reinforced cranial window, the laminar transit-time distribution was investigated in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with the earliest transit times in the middle cortical layers, and the lowest heterogeneity in cortical layer 4. The new DyC-OCT technique affords a novel perspective of microvascular networks, with the unique capability of performing simultaneous measurements of transit-time distributions across cortical laminae.

  16. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  17. VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY: A TOOL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF SMALL BOWEL TRANSIT TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza A Hejazi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Video capsule endoscopy (VCE is a procedure that uses a wireless camera to take pictures of the gastrointestinal tract. A wireless motility capsule (WMC of a similar size has been developed, which measures pH, pressure, and temperature, and can be used to assess regional and total gastrointestinal transit times. VCE could also potentially be used as a tool for measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT.Methods: This study was designed to obtain SBTT from VCE and compare it with historical data generated by WMC. Gastric transit time (GTT was also measured. Patients were included if the indication for VCE was either iron deficiency anemia (IDA or overt obscure GI bleed (OOGIB and they did not have any known motility disorder. Results from VCE were also compared in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients. Results: There were a total of 147 VCE studies performed, including 42 for OOGIB and 105 for IDA. Median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively. The overall median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively, in the IDA group compared with 0.3 and 3.4 hours in the OOGIB group. When compared with WMC, the GTT and SBTT were significantly faster in both groups (GTT: 3.6 hours and SBTT: 4.6 hours. The median GTT and SBTT were not significantly different in diabetics versus non-diabetics: (GTT: 17.5 vs. 18.0 minutes (P=0.86 and SBTT: 3.9 hours (237 minutes vs. 3.8 hours (230 minutes, respectively (P=0.90.Conclusion: SBTT as measured using VCE is not significantly different in OOGIB compared with IDA. Both GTT and SBTT are significantly faster as assessed by VCE, which is initiated in the fasting state, compared with WMC measurement, which is initiated after a standard meal. In summary, VCE could potentially be used for measuring SBTT in the fasting state.

  18. Phase Transition for the Mixing Time of the Glauber Dynamics for Coloring Regular Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Tetali, Prasad; Vigoda, Eric; Yang, Linji

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics for random $k$-colorings of the complete tree with branching factor $b$ undergoes a phase transition at $k=b(1+o_b(1))/\\ln{b}$. Our main result shows nearly sharp bounds on the mixing time of the dynamics on the complete tree with $n$ vertices for $k=Cb/\\ln{b}$ colors with constant $C$. For $C\\geq 1$ we prove the mixing time is $O(n^{1+o_b(1)}\\ln^2{n})$. On the other side, for $C< 1$ the mixing time experiences a slowing down, in particular, we prove it is $O(n^{1/C + o_b(1)}\\ln^2{n})$ and $\\Omega(n^{1/C-o_b(1)})$. The critical point C=1 is interesting since it coincides (at least up to first order) to the so-called reconstruction threshold which was recently established by Sly. The reconstruction threshold has been of considerable interest recently since it appears to have close connections to the efficiency of certain local algorithms, and this work was inspired by our attempt to understand these connections in this particular setting.

  19. A Continuous Time Random Walk Description of Monodisperse, Hard-Sphere Colloids below the Ordering Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechman, Jeremy; Pierce, Flint

    2012-02-01

    Diffusive transport is a ubiquitous process that is typically understood in terms of a classical random walk of non-interacting particles. Here we present the results for a model of hard-sphere colloids in a Newtonian incompressible solvent at various volume fractions below the ordering transition (˜50%). We numerically simulate the colloidal systems via Fast Lubrication Dynamics -- a Brownian Dynamics approach with corrected mean-field hydrodynamic interactions. Colloid-colloid interactions are also included so that we effectively solve a system of interacting Langevin equations. The results of the simulations are analyzed in terms of the diffusion coefficient as a function of time with the early and late time diffusion coefficients comparing well with experimental results. An interpretation of the full time dependent behavior of the diffusion coefficient and mean-squared displacement is given in terms of a continuous time random walk. Therefore, the deterministic, continuum diffusion equation which arises from the discrete, interacting random walkers is presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  1. Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Galen T; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product -for example, an energy barrier- becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically-expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  2. A transit timing analysis of nine RISE light curves of the exoplanet system TrES-3

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, N P; Skillen, I; Simpson, E K; Barros, S; Joshi, Y C; Todd, I; Benn, C; Christian, D; Hrudková, M; Keenan, F P; Steele, I A

    2009-01-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be Rp/Rstar=0.1664^{+0.0011}_{-0.0018} and i = 81.73^{+0.13}_{-0.04} respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving chi^2 = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a con...

  3. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  4. Anomalous parity-time-symmetry transition away from an exceptional point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li

    2016-07-01

    Parity-time (PT ) symmetric systems have two distinguished phases, e.g., one with real-energy eigenvalues and the other with complex-conjugate eigenvalues. To enter one phase from the other, it is believed that the system must pass through an exceptional point, which is a non-Hermitian degenerate point with coalesced eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Here we reveal an anomalous PT transition that takes place away from an exceptional point in a nonlinear system: as the nonlinearity increases, the original linear system evolves along two distinct PT -symmetric trajectories, each of which can have an exceptional point. However, the two trajectories collide and vanish away from these exceptional points, after which the system is left with a PT -broken phase. We first illustrate this phenomenon using a coupled-mode theory and then exemplify it using paraxial wave propagation in a transverse periodic potential.

  5. Anomalous Parity-Time Symmetry Transition away from an Exceptional Point

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems have two distinguished phases, e.g., one with real energy eigenvalues and the other with complex conjugate eigenvalues. To enter one phase from the other, it is believed that the system must pass through an exceptional point, which is a non-Hermitian degenerate point with coalesced eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In this letter we reveal an anomalous PT transition that takes place away from an exceptional point in a nonlinear system: as the nonlinearity increases, the original linear system evolves along two distinct PT-symmetric trajectories, each of which can have an exceptional point. However, the two trajectories collide and vanish away from these exceptional points, after which the system is left with a PT-broken phase. We first illustrate this phenomenon using a coupled mode theory and then exemplify it using paraxial wave propagation in a transverse periodic potential.

  6. The experimental investigation of the X-band transit-time tube oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    MaQiaoSheng; Fan Zhi Kai; Hu Hai Ying; LiuQingXiang; Su Chang

    2002-01-01

    The experimental investigation of X-band transit-time tube oscillator on the accelerator Sinus-700 is described. The accelerator is adjusted so that it can work stably; some parameters which influence the operation of the microwave device are adjusted so that the appropriate values of the parameters are obtained. The appropriate values of the parameters are described as follow: the length of the 1/4 wavelength stand equals 8 mm, the strength of the magnetic field 1.75 T, the voltage of the diode 700 kV and the shape of the cathode is annular. As a result, the microwave frequency is 9.18 GHz, the microwave power 1.5 GW, the pulse width 26 ns and the power conversion efficiency 31%

  7. The $\\eta^\\prime$ transition form factor from space- and time-like experimental data

    CERN Document Server

    Escribano, Rafel; Masjuan, Pere; Sanchez-Puertas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The $\\eta^\\prime$ transition form factor is reanalysed in view of the recent BESIII first observation of the Dalitz decay $\\eta^\\prime\\to\\gamma e^+e^-$ in both space- and time-like regions at low and intermediate energies using the Pad\\'e approximants method. The present analysis provides a suitable parameterization for reproducing the measured form factor in the whole energy region and allows to extract the corresponding low-energy parameters together with a prediction of its values at the origin, related to $\\Gamma_{\\eta^\\prime\\to\\gamma\\gamma}$, and the asymptotic limit. The $\\eta$-$\\eta^\\prime$ mixing is reassessed, with particular attention to the OZI-rule violating parameters, and the $J/\\psi\\to\\eta^{(\\prime)}\\gamma$ decays discussed.

  8. Transition among synchronous schemes in coupled nonidentical multiple time delay systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang Manh Hoang [Department of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Electronics and Telecommunications, Hanoi University of Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: hmt@mail.hut.edu.vn

    2009-10-30

    We present the transition among possible synchronous schemes in coupled nonidentical multiple time delay systems, i.e., lag, projective-lag, complete, anticipating and projective-anticipating synchronization. The number of nonlinear transforms in the master's equation can be different from that in slave's, and nonlinear transforms can be in various forms. The driving signal is the sum of nonlinearly transformed components of delayed state variable. Moreover, the equation representing for driving signal is constructed exactly so that the difference between the master's and slave's structures is complemented. The sufficient condition for synchronization is considered by the Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory. The specific examples will demonstrate and verify the effectiveness of the proposed models.

  9. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T; Mestha, Lalit K; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work toward putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach.

  10. The City: Spaces, Times and Subjects in the Global Transition (edited by Niccolò Cuppini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Cuppini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the entering in the global era, the city is come back again as a strategic architrave of the world's infrastructure – while the State, the historical figure through which Modernity was organized, has been declared in crisis long time ago. Despite the broad spectrum of urban reflections, there still is a deep lack of political theory of the city. The globalization of the city – within the pathway of the planetary urbanization – is the object of the article, that elaborates on a twofold level: on one hand, a genealogical trace of that process is proposed – articulating it by distilling urban political thought from different authors and historical episodes; on the other hand, the article suggests a theoretical and methodological horizon through which to grasp the contemporary global transitions, labelled as “seeing like a city”.

  11. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  12. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  13. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  14. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  15. Pathways and transit time of meltwater in the englacial drainage system of Rabots Glacier, Kebnekaise, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Caroline; Clason, Caroline; Rosqvist, Gunhild; Jarsjö, Jerker; Brugger, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Following the crash of a Norwegian Hercules plane in the Kebnekaise mountain range in March 2012, a field campaign was initiated in order to assess the fate of the hydrocarbon pollution in the glacial system. Monitoring of pollution was conducted in the snow pack of Rabots glacier, as well as in the proglacial stream, and the preferential pathways for transport of pollutants were assessed. Since it is likely that soluble components of the aircraft fuel are transported within the glacial meltwater, our study focuses on constraining the likely transit time and dispersion of these components. The hydrologic configuration of Rabots glacier was thus studied during the 2013 ablation season by means of dye tracing experiments and discharge monitoring in the proglacial stream. The analyses of the dye return curves and stream monitoring suggest different hydrological configurations on the north and south side of the glacier, perhaps influenced by shading and the ice thermal structure. The system on the north side seems to be distributed, with extensive interaction of meltwater with the bed, as typified in the turbid proglacial outlet. The distinct peaks of the return curves on the south side indicate efficient transport, perhaps largely through englacial channels, given the relatively clear nature of the proglacial outlet. The evaluation of transit speed along a longitudinal profile contributed to the understanding of drainage efficiency with distance upglacier. The higher up the injection location on the glacier, the more distributed and less efficient the system. The seasonal evolution of efficiency was also assessed, showing an increase inefficiency with time. Furthermore, we hypothesize a disconnect in the glacial hydrological systems on the north and south side of the glacier. Pollution that is transported with the meltwater down from the crash site on the southern side most likely does not reach the drainage system on the northern side. Besides revealing potential

  16. Empirical Assessment on Factors Affecting Travel Time of Bus Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergyanto E Gunawan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the century, many cities around the world adopt the bus rapid transit (BRT system to fulfill their need of mass transportation system. The system features with platform-level boarding, bus lanes in the central verge of the road, off-vehicle fare collection, and physically protected busway. So far, these criteria are considered to be the most important aspects with respect to the BRT performance. In this research, we intend to study to what extent the BRT performance may be affected by the interference of the mixed traffic during the BRT operation. We adopt an empirical approach by observing the phenomenon unfolding in the eleven TransJakarta BRT corridors. The TransJakarta BRT operates in the city of Jakarta, the capital of the Republic of Indonesia. We record the travel time data from station to station for the case where the TransJakarta bus can travel smoothly and the case where the traveling bus is interfered with the mixed traffic. For the cases, we evaluate the travel time variation. As the results, we found that the Corridor 1 of TransJakarta BRT has the best performance in term of the travel time variation. For the two directions, the corridor has the mean travel time of 34 min, the standard deviation of 3 min, and the travel time variation of 8%. On this corridor, the mixed-traffic interference is relatively negligible. On the Corridor 7, the two-direction travel times have the mean of 45 min, the standard deviation of 8 min, and the travel time variation of 16%. On the Corridor 9, the twodirection travel times have the mean of 1 hr and 25 min, the standard deviation of 11 min, and the travel time variation of 14%. On the last two corridors, the busways are heavily interfered by the mixed traffic; thus, the end-to-end travel times are significantly uncertain although only very few road segments are interfered. The research leads us to a conclusion that the interference, although only occurs on a road segment, may

  17. Left Coronary Artery-Pulmonary Artery Fistula in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Veli Doğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Coroner artery fistula which is rare and congenital or acquired arise from whole coroner artery drainage all of cardiac chamber and great artery. Although coroner artery fistula is uncommon, it can cause significant mortality and morbidity rates. The article is presented which coroner artery disease and coroner-pulmonary artery fistula was accomplishment committed. Sixty three year-old male patient admitted to the hospital with chest pain. Non-ST myocardial infarction was diagnosed in the examinations. After coroner angiography, it was found coronary artery disease in addition between LAD proximal portion and main pulmonary artery fistula. Fistula repair and coronary bypass were performed successfully under cardiopulmonary bypass. Without hemodynamic problem in intensive care and service follow-up, the patient was discharged from the hospital in the seventh postoperative day. We think that surgical treatment of coronary fistulas in patients with coronary artery lesion is done at the earliest time would enable improvement in mortality and morbidity rates.

  18. Motion artefact reduction of the photoplethysmographic signal in pulse transit time measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, J Y A; Wilson, S J; Williams, G R; Harris, M; Cooper, D M

    2004-12-01

    Motion artefact is a common occurrence that contaminates photoplethysmographic (PPG) measurements. To extract timing information from signals during artefact is challenging. PPG signal is very sensitive to artefacts and can be used in applications like, pulse transit time (PTT) as part of the polysomnographic studies. A correlation cancellation or signal processing approach is implemented with the adaptive cancelling filter concept and a triaxial accelerometry. PPG signals obtained from a Masimo (Reference) pulse oximeter is used as reference to compare with the reconstructed PPG signals. Different hands are used for each PPG source, one stationary while the other involves typical movements during sleep. A second Masimo pulse oximeter is used to register intensity of timing errors on commercial PPG signals. 108 PTT measurements are recorded in three different movements with PTT estimates from unprocessed PPG signals showing 35.51+/-27.42%, Masimo 50.02+/-29.40% and reconstructed 4.32+/-3.59% difference against those from the Reference PPG. The triaxial accelerometry can be used to detect the presence of artefact on PPG signals. This is useful in PTT measurements when signal contaminated with artefacts are required for further analysis, especially after and during arousals in sleep. The suggested filtering model can then reconstruct these corrupted PPG signals.

  19. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Thomas; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooß, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Non-collinear four-wave mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step towards this goal we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multi-electron interactions,...

  20. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique 'two-step' dynamics, with a robust 'plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  1. Inflationary spectra from near $\\Omega$-deformed space-time transition point in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Anomaly-free perturbations of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections reveal a $\\Omega$ -deformed space-time structure, $\\Omega:=1-2\\rho/\\rho_c$, where $\\Omega0$ means a Lorentz-like space. It would be reasonable to give the initial value at the space-time transition point, $\\rho=\\rho_c/2$, but we find it is impossible to define a Minkowski-like vacuum even for large $k$-modes at that time. However if we loose the condition and give the initial value near after $\\Omega=0$, e.g. $\\Omega\\simeq 0.2$, the vacuum state can be well defined and furthermore the slow roll approximation also works well in that region. Both scalar and tensor spectra are considered in the framework of loop quantum cosmology with holonomy corrections. We find that if the energy density is not too small compared with $\\rho_c/2$ when the considered $k$-mode crossing the horizon, effective theory can give a much smaller scalar power spectrum than classical theory and the spectrum of tensor perturbations could blue shift. But when co...

  2. Losartan renography for the detection of renal artery stenosis: comparison with captopril renography and evaluation of dose and timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenay, Emel Ceylan; Erguen, Eser Lay; Salanci, Bilge Volkan; Ugur, Oemer; Caner, Biray [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Oeztuerk, M. Halil; Hekimoglu, Baki [Social Security Hospital Clinic of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Altun, Buelent [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nephrology, Ankara (Turkey); Cil, Barbaros [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01

    Radionuclide renography with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition plays an important role in the diagnosis of haemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis. Angiotensin receptor antagonists inhibit the renin angiotensin system at different levels from ACE inhibitors by selectively blocking the binding of angiotensin II to AT1 receptors. The AT1 angiotensin receptor antagonist losartan has recently been used clinically in the treatment of hypertension. However, the available data on the use of losartan with renography for the detection of renovascular hypertension are limited and contradictory. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare the effectiveness of losartan renography and captopril scintigraphy in revealing renal artery stenosis. A total of 61 renal units in 32 patients with hypertension were studied in two groups based on the losartan dosage (50 mg in group A and 100 mg in group B). Group A consisted of 17 patients, in whom 19 renal units had angiographically proven renal artery stenosis ({>=}50%). In group B, there were 15 patients, in whom 20 renal arteries were stenotic. All of the patients underwent three renographies (baseline, captopril renography and early losartan renography). Early losartan renography was performed at 1 h after oral losartan administration in both groups. In group B, seven patients underwent additional losartan renography (late losartan) performed 3 h after oral losartan administration; these patients composed group B1. The sensitivities of captopril and losartan studies were 63.2% and 42% in group A, 65% and 65% in group B and 55.6% and 66.6% in group B1, respectively. From our preliminary results, we conclude that losartan is not superior to captopril renography for the detection of haemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis. However, a high dose (100 mg) of losartan provided higher sensitivity than the lower dose (50 mg). Late losartan scintigraphy provided similar diagnostic efficacy to early

  3. Arterial waveform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  4. Estimation of Catchment Transit Time in Fuji River Basin by using an improved Tank model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenchao, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Wakiyama, Y.; Wang, P.

    2013-12-01

    As an important parameter that reflects the characteristics of catchments, the catchment transit time (CTT) has been given much more widely attentions especially in recent years. The CTT is defined as the time water spends travelling through a catchment to the stream network [1], and it describes how catchments retain and release water and solutes and thus control geochemical and biogeochemical cycling and contamination persistence [2]. The objectives of the present study are to develop a new approach for estimating CTT without prior information on such TTD functions and to apply it to the Fuji River basin in the Central Japan Alps Region. In this study, an improved Tank model was used to compute mean CTT and TTD functions simultaneously. It involved water fluxes and isotope mass balance. Water storage capacity in the catchment, which strongly affects CTT, is reflected in isotope mass balance more sensitively than in water fluxes. A model calibrated with observed discharge and isotope data is used for virtual age tracer computation to estimate CTT. This model does not only consider the hydrological data and physical process of the research area but also reflects the actual TTD with considering the geological condition, land use and the other catchment-hydrological conditions. For the calibration of the model, we used river discharge record obtained by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation, and are collecting isotope data of precipitation and river waters monthly or semi-weekly. Three sub-catchments (SC1~SC3) in the Fuji River basin was selected to test the model with five layers: the surface layer, upper-soil layer, lower-soil layer, groundwater aquifer layer and bedrock layer (Layer 1- Layer 5). The evaluation of the model output was assessed using Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean square error-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR), and percent bias (PBIAS). Using long time-series of discharge records for calibration, the simulated

  5. Higher-order time-symmetry-breaking phase transition due to meeting of an exceptional point and a Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Garmon, Savannah; Kanki, Kazuki; Petrosky, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically investigated the time-symmetry-breaking phase-transition process for two discrete states coupled with a one-dimensional continuum by solving the nonlinear eigenvalue problem for the effective Hamiltonian associated with the discrete spectrum. We obtain the effective Hamiltonian with use of the Feshbach-Brillouin-Wigner projection method. Strong energy dependence of the self-energy appearing in the effective Hamiltonian plays a key role in the time-symmetry-breaking phase transition: As a result of competition in the decay process between the Van Hove singularity and the Fano resonance, the phase transition becomes a higher-order transition when both the two discrete states are located near the continuum threshold.

  6. Estimation of Time-Varying Channel State Transition Probabilities for Cognitive Radio Systems by means of Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akbulut

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Particle Swarm Optimization is applied for the estimation of the channel state transition probabilities. Unlike most other studies, where the channel state transition probabilities are assumed to be known and/or constant, in this study, these values are realistically considered to be time-varying parameters, which are unknown to the secondary users of the cognitive radio systems. The results of this study demonstrate the following: without any a priori information about the channel characteristics, even in a very transient environment, it is quite possible to achieve reasonable estimates of channel state transition probabilities with a practical and simple implementation.

  7. Enzymatically Modified Starch Favorably Modulated Intestinal Transit Time and Hindgut Fermentation in Growing Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. A.; Zebeli, Q.; Velde, K.; Grüll, D.; Molnar, T.; Kandler, W.; Metzler-Zebeli, B. U.

    2016-01-01

    Aside from being used as stabilizing agents in many processed foods, chemically modified starches may act as functional dietary ingredients. Therefore, development of chemically modified starches that are less digestible in the upper intestinal segments and promote fermentation in the hindgut receives considerable attention. This study aimed to investigate the impact of an enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on nutrient flow, passage rate, and bacterial activity at ileal and post-ileal level. Eight ileal-cannulated growing pigs were fed 2 diets containing 72% purified starch (EMS or waxy cornstarch as control) in a cross-over design for 10 d, followed by a 4-d collection of feces and 2-d collection of ileal digesta. On d 17, solid and liquid phase markers were added to the diet to determine ileal digesta flow for 8 h after feeding. Reduced small intestinal digestion after the consumption of the EMS diet was indicated by a 10%-increase in ileal flow and fecal excretion of dry matter and energy compared to the control diet (Pfeeding reduced ileal transit time of both liquid and solid fractions compared to the control diet (P<0.05). The greater substrate flow to the large intestine with the EMS diet increased the concentrations of total and individual short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in feces (P<0.05). Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected by diet, whereas the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus group decreased (P<0.01) by 50% and of Enterobacteriaceae tended (P<0.1) to increase by 20% in ileal digesta with the EMS diet compared to the control diet. In conclusion, EMS appears to resemble a slowly digestible starch by reducing intestinal transit and increasing SCFA in the distal large intestine. PMID:27936165

  8. Transitions and Time: Dissonance between Social and Political Aging in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jee Cho

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explored multidimensional meanings related to “becoming old” for the young-old in South Korean society. Six persons aged 62 to 68 were interviewed in-depth. They chronologically, physically, and socially experienced the transition to old age at different times determined through “Hwan-Gap” (at age 60 and through current social policies that define entry into elderhood (at age 65. However, most did not psychologically accept their own aging as beginning at age 60 with “Hwan-Gap.” They reported that they were “forced” to become old at that time, even though they did not yet qualify for old age benefits provided by the South Korean government. In addition, they did not consider others’ perceptions of them as “old” as a psychological obstacle to defining themselves as young. Knowledge about young-old persons’ dissonance between their identities and sociopolitical views of entry into elderhood is important for understanding their experiences during the five-year gap between sociocultural entry into old age at age 60 and entry into the nationally defined elderhood at age 65.

  9. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  10. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schaefer, Dirk; Grass, Michael [Philips Research Europe-Hamburg, Roentgenstr. 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Rasche, Volker [University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: ujandt@gmx.de

    2009-01-07

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  11. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Morehead, Robert C.; /Florida U.; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  12. Violation of the transit-time limit toward generation of ultrashort electron bunches with controlled velocity chirp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seok-Gy; Shin, Dongwon; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-09-01

    Various methods to generate ultrashort electron bunches for the ultrafast science evolved from the simple configuration of two-plate vacuum diodes to advanced technologies such as nanotips or photocathodes excited by femtosecond lasers. In a diode either in vacuum or of solid-state, the transit-time limit originating from finite electron mobility has caused spatiotemporal bunch-collapse in ultrafast regime. Here, we show for the first time that abrupt exclusion of transit-phase is a more fundamental origin of the bunch-collapse than the transit-time limit. We found that by significantly extending the cathode-anode gap distance, thereby violating the transit-time limit, the conventional transit-time-related upper frequency barrier in diodes can be removed. Furthermore, we reveal how to control the velocity chirp of bunches leading to ballistic bunch-compression. Demonstration of 0.707 THz-, 46.4 femtosecond-bunches from a 50 μm-wide diode in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations shows a way toward simple and compact sources of ultrafast electron bunches for diverse ultrafast sciences.

  13. New BSN nurses' perspectives on the transition to practice in changing economic times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Carol; Moscato, Susan; Moyce, Sally

    2012-04-01

    Helping nursing graduates transition to practice is a concern for nursing educators and employers. This article reports graduates' perceptions of transition both when jobs were plentiful and when jobs were scarce. Survey results from comparison of 2008 and 2010 graduates demonstrated few differences. Key indicators of successful transition were positive feedback at the work site, increased self-confidence on the part of the new graduate, and acceptance by the care team. Presence of good role models, ability to ask questions safely, and ongoing feedback on performance assisted successful transition.

  14. Characterization of the K2-19 Multiple-Transiting Planetary System via High-Dispersion Spectroscopy, AO Imaging, and Transit Timing Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Fukui, Akihiko; Hori, Yasunori; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Delrez, Laetitia; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; McCormac, James; Holman, Matthew; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Takeda, Yoichi; Tamura, Motohide; Yanagisawa, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is a unique planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ~ 7 $R_{Earth}$ (inner planet b) and ~ 4 $R_{Earth}$ (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2m telescope. We find that the host star is relatively old (>8 Gyr) late G-type star ($T_{eff}$ ~ 5350 K, $M_s$ ~ 0.9 $M_{Sun}$, and $R_{s}$ ~ 0.9 $R_{Sun}$). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star which could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit-timing variations, as previously re...

  15. Impact of neonate haematocrit variability on the longitudinal relaxation time of blood: Implications for arterial spin labelling MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. De Vis

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrated a wide variability of the T1b in neonates and the implications it could have in methods relying on the actual T1b as for instance ASL. It was concluded that arterial-drawn Hct values obtained from a point-of-care device can be used to infer the T1b whereas our data did not support the use of capillary-drawn Hct for T1b correction.

  16. Optimal Blood Suppression inversion time based on breathing rates and heart rates to improve renal artery visibility in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yi Gang; Li, Fang; Long, Xue Ying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Jin Kang; Li, Wen Zheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shen, Hao [GE Healthcare, Waukesha (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency.

  17. Comparison of efficacy of cryotherapy and chlorhexidine to oral nutrition transition time in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Y; Ipekcoban, G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cryotherapy and chlorhexidine to oral nutrition transition time in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. This randomised controlled trial with random assignments to the experimental and control groups was conducted with cancer patients. Study data were collected from 90 cancer patients. The first experimental group (n = 30) received chlorhexidine mouthwash, the second experimental group (n = 30) received oral cryotherapy and the control group (n = 30) received routine care. To collect data we used the 'Mucositis Rating Index'. Changes in patients' oral mucosa in each group were checked and oral feeding transition periods were recorded. There was an important statistical difference between the times of transition to oral nutrition for patients (P < 0.01). Oral nutrition transition time of patients in the first experimental group who had applied chlorhexidine was shorter than in other groups. Following the tests, we detected a significant shortening in oral nutrition transition time of patients in first group who used chlorhexidine gargle as compared to the second group and control group. There was no significant difference between cryotherapy application and control group. In parallel with these findings, we detected that the degree of oral mucositis decreased.

  18. Transit Timing Variation Measurements of WASP-12b and Qatar-1b: No Evidence Of Additional Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-02-01

    WASP-12b and Qatar-1b are transiting hot Jupiters for which previous works have suggested the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs) indicative of additional bodies in these systems—an Earth-mass planet in WASP-12 and a brown-dwarf mass object in Qatar-1. Here, we present 23 new WASP-12b and 18 new Qatar-1b complete (or nearly complete) transit observations. We perform global system fits to all of our light curves for each system, as well as RV and stellar spectroscopic parameters from the literature. The global fits provide refined system parameters and uncertainties for each system, including precise transit center times for each transit. The transit model residuals of the combined and five minute binned light curves have an rms of 183 and 255 parts per million (ppm) for WASP-12b and Qatar-1b, respectively. Most of the WASP-12b system parameter values from this work are consistent with values from previous studies, but have ∼40%–50% smaller uncertainties. Most of the Qatar-1b system parameter values and uncertainties from this work are consistent with values recently reported in the literature. We find no convincing evidence for sinusoidal TTVs with a semi-amplitude of more than ∼35 and ∼25 s in the WASP-12b and Qatar-1b systems, respectively.

  19. Adolescents' Changing Future Expectations Predict the Timing of Adult Role Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Sarah J.; Crockett, Lisa J.; Peugh, James

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in the transition to adulthood are well established. This study examines the extent to which heterogeneity in pathways to adulthood that have been observed in the broader U.S. population are mirrored in adolescents' expectations regarding when they will experience key adult role transitions (e.g., marriage). Patterns of…

  20. Kepler-9: A System of Multiple Planets Transiting a Sun-Like Star, Confirmed by Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Cochran, William D.; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  1. Stochastic Stability for Time-Delay Markovian Jump Systems with Sector-Bounded Nonlinearities and More General Transition Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with delay-dependent stochastic stability for time-delay Markovian jump systems (MJSs with sector-bounded nonlinearities and more general transition probabilities. Different from the previous results where the transition probability matrix is completely known, a more general transition probability matrix is considered which includes completely known elements, boundary known elements, and completely unknown ones. In order to get less conservative criterion, the state and transition probability information is used as much as possible to construct the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and deal with stability analysis. The delay-dependent sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee the stability of systems. Finally, numerical examples are exploited to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  3. [Transposition of Great Artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Takeshi; Shimpo, Hideto

    2015-07-01

    Transposition of the great artery is one of common congenital cardiac disease resulting cyanosis. Death occurs easily in untreated patients with transposition and intact ventricular septal defect (VSD) in infancy at a few days of age when posterior descending coronary artery (PDA) closed. Since there are 2 parallel circulations, flow from pulmonary to systemic circulation is necessary for systemic oxygenation, and Balloon atrial septostomy or prostaglandin infusion should be performed especially if patient do not have VSD. Although the advent of fetal echocardiography, it is difficult to diagnose the transposition of the great arteries (TGA) as abnormality of great vessels is relatively undistinguishable. The diagnosis of transposition is in itself an indication for surgery, and arterial switch procedure is performed in the case the left ventricle pressure remains more than 2/3 of systemic pressure. Preoperative diagnosis is important as associated anomalies and coronary artery branching patterns are important to decide the operative indication and timing of surgery.

  4. Characterization of the K2-19 Multiple-transiting Planetary System via High-dispersion Spectroscopy, AO Imaging, and Transit Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Fukui, Akihiko; Hori, Yasunori; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Delrez, Laetitia; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; McCormac, James; Holman, Matthew; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Takeda, Yoichi; Tamura, Motohide; Yanagisawa, Kenshi

    2015-12-01

    K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is an interesting planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ∼7 R⊕ (inner planet b) and ∼4 R⊕ (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We find that the host star is a relatively old (≥8 Gyr) late G-type star (Teff ∼ 5350 K, Ms ∼ 0.9 M⊙, and Rs ∼ 0.9 R⊙). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star that could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2 m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6 m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88 m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs), as previously reported by Armstrong and coworkers. We model the observed TTVs of the inner planet using the synodic chopping formulae given by Deck & Agol. We find two statistically indistinguishable solutions for which the period ratios (Pc/Pb) are located slightly above and below the exact 3:2 commensurability. Despite the degeneracy, we derive the orbital period of the inner planet Pb ∼ 7.921 days and the mass of the outer planet Mc ∼ 20 M⊕. Additional transit photometry (especially for the outer planet) as well as precise radial-velocity measurements would be helpful to break the degeneracy and to determine the mass of the inner planet.

  5. Comparison of colonic transit time findings between spastic pelvic floor syndrome and normal on defecogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Choi, Sang Hee; Chung, Il Gyu; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choo, Sung Wook; Rhee, Poong Lyul [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate colonic transit time (CTT) in patients with spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS) diagnosed by defecography and compare findings with those of patients with normal defecography. Over a recent 15-month period, 140 patients underwent both defecography and CTT test because of chronic idiopathic constipation. Of these, 54 with SPFS diagnosed by defecography and 49 controls with normal defecography were included in our study. CTT test involved the radiopaque marker method. Subjects ingested 24 markers at 9:00 Am on three consecutive days and a plain film of the abdomen was obtained on day 4. We calculated total and segmental CTT test findings in the two groups. Delayed total CTT was found in 35% of patients (19/54) with SPFS. Segmental CTT in the right, left and rectosigmoid colon was delayed in 31 % of patients (15/49) with SPFS. Segmental CTT in the right, left and rectosigmoid colon was delayed in 19 % (10/54), 44 % (24/54), and 31 % of cases (17/54), respectively. Total CTT was delayed in 31 % of patients (15/49) with normal defecography. In this group, segmental CTT in the left colon was delayed in 39 % of cases. There was no significant difference in CTT findings between the SPFS and normal groups on defecogram. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Transit timing variation and transmission spectroscopy analyses of the hot Neptune GJ3470b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awiphan, S.; Kerins, E.; Pichadee, S.; Komonjinda, S.; Dhillon, V. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Poshyachinda, S.; Marsh, T. R.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    GJ3470b is a hot Neptune exoplanet orbiting an M dwarf and the first sub-Jovian planet to exhibit Rayleigh scattering. We present transit timing variation (TTV) and transmission spectroscopy analyses of multiwavelength optical photometry from 2.4-m and 0.5-m telescopes at the Thai National Observatory, and the 0.6-m PROMPT-8 telescope in Chile. Our TTV analysis allows us to place an upper mass limit for a second planet in the system. The presence of a hot Jupiter with a period of less than 10 d or a planet with an orbital period between 2.5 and 4.0 d are excluded. Combined optical and near-infrared transmission spectroscopy favour an H/He-dominated haze (mean molecular weight 1.08 ± 0.20) with high particle abundance at high altitude. We also argue that previous near-infrared data favour the presence of methane in the atmosphere of GJ3470b.

  7. Transit timing variation and transmission spectroscopy analyses of the hot Neptune GJ3470b

    CERN Document Server

    Awiphan, S; Pichadee, S; Komonjinda, S; Dhillon, V S; Rujopakarn, W; Poshyachinda, S; Marsh, T R; Reichart, D E; Ivarsen, K M; Haislip, J B

    2016-01-01

    GJ3470b is a hot Neptune exoplanet orbiting an M dwarf and the first sub-Jovian planet to exhibit Rayleigh scattering. We present transit timing variation (TTV) and transmission spectroscopy analyses of multi-wavelength optical photometry from 2.4-m and 0.5-m telescopes at the Thai National Observatory, and the 0.6-m PROMPT-8 telescope in Chile. Our TTV analysis allows us to place an upper mass limit for a second planet in the system. The presence of a hot Jupiter with a period of less than 10 days or a planet with an orbital period between 2.5 and 4.0 days are excluded. Combined optical and near-infrared transmission spectroscopy favour a H/He dominated haze (mean molecular weight 1.18$\\pm$0.22) with high particle abundance at high altitude. We also argue that previous near-infrared data favour the presence of methane in the atmosphere of GJ3470b.

  8. An analysis of microcirculatory flow heterogeneity using measurements of transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarelius, I H

    1990-07-01

    Heterogeneity of blood flow distribution was measured in capillary networks in cremaster muscles of anesthetized Golden hamsters (nembutal, 70 mg/kg, ip). The relative dispersion of Q/PS, where Q is blood flow, P is permeability, and S is exchange surface area, was estimated; in microvascular terms (and assuming uniform permeability) this ratio reduces to vr/l, where v is plasma velocity, r is vessel radius, and l is vessel length, and where v/l = 1/T, where T is transit time. Distributions of 1/T across complete capillary networks significantly increased in relative dispersion from 68.2 to 97.8% during hyperemia, suggesting an increase in flow heterogeneity with increased inflow. In contrast, relative dispersion of 1/T did not change significantly from rest (72.0%) to hyperemia (66.1%) in capillary segments sampled randomly across the tissue. Other microvascular indices of flow (velocity, cell content) did not reflect the changes in relative flow dispersion shown by the changes in 1/T. The analysis demonstrates that estimates of flow heterogeneity are sensitive both to the selection of an appropriate flow variable and to the manner in which this variable is sampled in the capillary bed.

  9. Men, maternity and moral residue: negotiating the moral demands of the transition to first time fatherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses men's transition to first time fatherhood, with a focus on the way they recognise various in-tension moral demands and negotiate an appropriate role for themselves. The findings are taken from a longitudinal study, drawing on elements of grounded theory, comprising a series of face-to-face and telephone interviews with 11 men over a 9-month period from the 12(th) week of pregnancy to 8 weeks after the birth. The analysis focuses on men's feelings and experience of exclusion and participation, and their response and reaction to that experience. The findings present two descriptive themes, 'on the inside looking in' and 'present but not participating', followed by third theme 'deference and support: a moral response' that exposes the dilemmatic nature of men's experience and explains the participants' apparent acceptance of being less involved. The discussion explores the concept of moral residue, arguing that while deference and support may be an appropriate role for fathers in the perinatal period it may also be a compromise that leads to feelings of uncertainty and frustration, which is a consequence of being in a genuinely dilemmatic situation.

  10. Transit Time Distribution based on the ECCO-JPL Ocean Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takamitsu; Wang, Ou

    2017-03-01

    Oceanic water mass is a mixture of waters with varying ages, and the Transit Time Distribution (TTD) measures its age spectrum. We construct a model-based TTD using the data-constrained circulation fields from the ECCO-JPL Ocean Data Assimilation, and test it against the observed and directly simulated distribution of pCFC-11 from the Pacific and Atlantic basins. The ECCO-JPL circulation provides overall reliable estimates of the upper ocean ventilation rates suitable for biogeochemical studies. Observed distributions of pCFC-11 in the upper ocean thermocline are well reproduced by the convolution integral of the model-based TTD (mean bias 0.87) but there are significant regional biases in particular near the base of the thermocline and in the deep water formation regions. The model underestimates the deep pCFC-11 (> 2000 m) in the North Atlantic and in the Southern Ocean. The ratio between the mean and the spread of the age spectrum (Γ/Δ) is close to unity (mean = 1.04, median = 0.99) in the ventilated thermocline of the Pacific basin but there are significant regional variations of the ratio.

  11. A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator with a four-gap buncher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A novel Ka-band coaxial transit-time oscillator (TTO) with a four-gap buncher is proposed and investigated. Simulation results show that an output power of 1.27 GW and a frequency of 26.18 GHz can be achieved with a diode voltage of 447 kV and a beam current of 7.4 kA. The corresponding power efficiency is 38.5%, and the guiding magnetic field is 0.6 T. Studies and analysis indicate that a buncher with four gaps can modulate the electron beam better than the three-gap buncher in such a Ka-band TTO. Moreover, power efficiency increases with the coupling coefficient between the buncher and the extractor. Further simulation demonstrates that power efficiency can reach higher than 30% with a guiding magnetic field of above 0.5 T. Besides, the power efficiency exceeds 30% in a relatively large range of diode voltage from 375 kV to 495 kV.

  12. The timing of tectonic transition from compression to extension in Dabieshan:Evidence from Mesozoic granites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Changqian; YANG Kunguang; MING Houli; LIN Guangchun

    2004-01-01

    With the methods of single grain zircon U-Pb and hornblende-biotite Ar-Ar dating, a U-Pb zircon age (135.4(2.7) Ma of Liujiawa high Sr/Y granite and 40Ar-39Ar plateau ages (139.0(1.0) Ma and (125.3(0.2) Ma of hornblende and biotite respectively of Fenliupu high Sr/Y granite in the Dabieshan high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic belt are yielded. Following the emplacement of the high Sr/Y granites, extension-related mafic intrusions and late granitoids with negative Sr and Eu anomalies and isotopic ages of 105-130 Ma were emplaced. Geochemical comparison between the two types of granitoids shows that, from early to late, the alkalinities, the K2O contents and the Sr/Y ratios as well as FeO/(FeO+MgO) ratios of the rocks increase, while the abundance of Sr reduces, suggesting that as time goes on the depth of crustal melting decreases. Rheological stratification of the crust due to early Cretaceous partial melting of crustal rocks resulted in crustal extension and deep-buried rock exhumation. Therefore, the high Sr/Y granite that appeared at ~135 Ma is the product of the tectonic transition from early shortening to late overall extension.

  13. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groiss, H., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Daruka, I., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Springholz, G.; Schäffler, F. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Koike, K.; Yano, M. [Nanomaterials Microdevices Research Center, Osaka Institute of Technology, Asahi-ku Ohmiya, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Hesser, G. [Center for Surface- and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Zakharov, N.; Werner, P. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle 06120 (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  14. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  15. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  16. Timing, cause and consequences of mid-Holocene climate transition in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Rajeev; Naik, Dinesh Kumar; Nigam, Rajiv; Gaur, Anuruddh Singh

    2016-09-01

    We reconstruct centennial scale quantitative changes in surface seawater temperature (SST), evaporation-precipitation (from Mg/Ca and δ18O of surface dwelling planktic foraminifera), productivity (from relative abundance of Globigerina bulloides), carbon burial (from %CaCO3 and organic carbon [%Corg]) and dissolved oxygen at sediment-water interface, covering the entire Holocene, from a core collected from the eastern Arabian Sea. From the multi-proxy record, we define the timing, consequences and possible causes of the mid-Holocene climate transition (MHCT). A distinct shift in evaporation-precipitation (E-P) is observed at 6.4 ka, accompanied by a net cooling of SST. The shift in SST and E-P is synchronous with a change in surface productivity. A concurrent decrease is also noted in both the planktic foraminiferal abundance and coarse sediment fraction. A shift in carbon burial, as inferred from both the %CaCO3 and %Corg, coincides with a change in surface productivity. A simultaneous decrease in dissolved oxygen at the sediment-water interface, suggests that changes affected both the surface and subsurface water. A similar concomitant change is also observed in other cores from the Arabian Sea as well as terrestrial records, suggesting a widespread regional MHCT. The MHCT coincides with decreasing low-latitude summer insolation, perturbations in total solar intensity and an increase in atmospheric CO2.

  17. Developments in Time-Division Multiplexing of X-ray Transition-Edge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W. B.; Morgan, K. M.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Joe, Y. I.; Mates, J. A. B.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Robbins, N. O.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-07-01

    Time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a mature scheme for the readout of arrays of transition-edge sensors (TESs). TDM is based on superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID) current amplifiers. Multiple spectrometers based on gamma-ray and X-ray microcalorimeters have been operated with TDM readout, each at the scale of 200 sensors per spectrometer, as have several astronomical cameras with thousands of sub-mm or microwave bolometers. Here we present the details of two different versions of our TDM system designed to read out X-ray TESs. The first has been field-deployed in two 160-sensor (8 columns × 20 rows) spectrometers and four 240-sensor (8 columns × 30 rows) spectrometers. It has a three-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 320 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.41 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. The second, which is presently under development, has a two-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 160 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.19 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. Both quoted noise values are non-multiplexed and referred to the first-stage SQUID. In a demonstration of this new architecture, a multiplexed 1-column × 32-row array of NIST TESs achieved average energy resolution of 2.55± 0.01 eV at 6 keV.

  18. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018{sub −0.004}{sup +0.005}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕}. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm{sup –3} × (R/3 R {sub ⊕}){sup –2.3} for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  19. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Evolution of a Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Thomas, R. J.; Longcope, D.

    2007-12-01

    Transition Region Explosive Events (TREEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548A,1550A) and Si IV (1393A, 1402A). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a TREE in He II 304A. With the MOSES sounding rocket, a novel type of imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial and spectral structure of the event. It consists of a bright core expelling two jets, oppositely directed but not collinear, which curve away from the axis of the core. The jets have both line-of-sight and sky-plane motion. The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of TREEs. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components. MOSES captured approximately 150 sec of time evolution before the rocket flight ended. We see the beginning (core activation) and middle (jet ejection), but not the end. It is clear from our data-set that TREEs in He II 304A are much less common than observed in other wavelengths.

  20. Three-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography Detection of Duplication of the Vertebral Artery in a Large Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhua; Li, Yunyun; Bai, Min; Zhang, Chuanchen

    2016-10-17

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate duplication of the vertebral artery (VA) using three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a large study population to further our understanding of vascular variations. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of 3D TOF-MRA data in 12 826 cases was performed. The occurrence rate of VA duplication was calculated and accompanied vascular anomalies were recoded. RESULTS Twenty-one VA duplication patients were found, with an occurrence rate of 0.164%; 12 of them had left VA duplication with 2 branches initially arising from the aortic arch and left subclavian artery; 9 of them were right VA duplication with the branches originating from the right subclavian artery. In the 21 cases, 11 had other vascular abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS VA duplication is very rare and often associated with other vascular abnormalities. 3D TOF-MRA can accurately display the duplication variation. Better understanding of the variation is instrumental for disease diagnosis, interventional therapy, and surgical operation.

  1. Three-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography Detection of Duplication of the Vertebral Artery in a Large Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhua; Li, Yunyun; Bai, Min; Zhang, Chuanchen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate duplication of the vertebral artery (VA) using three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a large study population to further our understanding of vascular variations. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of 3D TOF-MRA data in 12 826 cases was performed. The occurrence rate of VA duplication was calculated and accompanied vascular anomalies were recoded. Results Twenty-one VA duplication patients were found, with an occurrence rate of 0.164%; 12 of them had left VA duplication with 2 branches initially arising from the aortic arch and left subclavian artery; 9 of them were right VA duplication with the branches originating from the right subclavian artery. In the 21 cases, 11 had other vascular abnormalities. Conclusions VA duplication is very rare and often associated with other vascular abnormalities. 3D TOF-MRA can accurately display the duplication variation. Better understanding of the variation is instrumental for disease diagnosis, interventional therapy, and surgical operation. PMID:27749814

  2. Towards a Fully Distributed Characterization of Water Residence and Transit Time by Coupled Hydrology-Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondi, F.; Fatichi, S.; Burlando, P.

    2015-12-01

    Water residence and transit time are crucial elements in flow pathways and catchment response characterization. The temporal distribution of catchment transit times has been generally studied and modelled with lumped parameter approaches. However, understanding the dominant controls in a more holistic manner requires attention to the spatially distributed catchment properties also in relation to their control on the basin response to different type of precipitation events. A tool that looks both at the time and space distribution of water residence and transport can be useful for predicting water and solute fluxes and ultimately for better understanding the dependence of catchment transit and residence times on geomorphological and climatic factors. To this purpose we couple a fully distributed, yet essential, process-based watershed model with a component to simulate solute transport. Key features of the developed tool include: (a) reduced complexity spatially-distributed hydrological model; (b) spatially-distributed water age and conservative tracer concentration; (c) possibility to explicitly compute transit time distributions for different precipitation events and locations. The presented framework is tested on the Plynlimon watershed (UK), where long-term records of hydrological variables are available. Among them, discharge and chloride concentration are used to investigate the model behavior. We present the integrated model concept, the underlying methodologies, the results from the case study application, as well as preliminary virtual experiments that allow exploring the full statistical space of travel and residence times.

  3. Transition Path Times for Nucleic Acid Folding Determined from Energy-Landscape Analysis of Single-Molecule Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Krishna; Ritchie, Dustin B.; Yu, Hao; Foster, Daniel A. N.; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T.

    2012-08-01

    The duration of structural transitions in biopolymers is only a fraction of the time spent searching diffusively over the configurational energy landscape. We found the transition time, τTP, and the diffusion constant, D, for DNA and RNA folding using energy landscapes obtained from single-molecule trajectories under tension in optical traps. DNA hairpins, RNA pseudoknots, and a riboswitch all had τTP˜10μs and D˜10-13-14m2/s, despite widely differing unfolding rates. These results show how energy-landscape analysis can be harnessed to characterize brief but critical events during folding reactions.

  4. Real time transit dosimetry for the breath-hold radiotherapy technique: An initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca (Istituto di Fisica, Universitagrave Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma (Italy)) (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. The breath-hold is one of the techniques to obtain the dose escalation for lung tumors. However, the change of the patient's breath pattern can influence the stability of the inhaled air volume, IAV, used in this work as a surrogate parameter to assure the tumor position reproducibility during dose delivery. Materials. and method. In this paper, an Elekta active breathing coordinator has been used for lung tumor irradiation. This device is not an absolute spirometer and the feasibility study here presented developed (i) the possibility to select a specific range epsilon of IAV values comfortable for the patient and (ii) the ability of a transit signal rate, obtained by a small ion-chamber positioned on the portal image device, to supply in real time the in vivo isocenter dose reproducibility. Indeed, while the selection of the IAV range depends on the patient's ability to follow instructions for breath-hold, the monitoring can supply to the radiation therapist a surrogate of the tumor irradiation reproducibility. Results. The detection of the (image) in real time during breath-hold was used to determine the interfraction isocenter dose variations due to the reproducibility of the patient's breathing pattern. The agreement between the reconstructed and planned isocenter dose in breath-hold at the interfraction level was well within 1.5%, while in free breathing a disagreement up to 8% was observed. The standard deviation of the [image omitted] in breath-hold observed at the intrafraction level is a bit higher than the one obtained without the patient and this can be justified by the presence of a small residual tumor motion as heartbeat. Conclusion. The technique is simple and can be implemented for routine use in a busy clinic

  5. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidney can often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury or trauma to ...

  6. Constraints or Preferences? Identifying Answers from Part-time Workers’ Transitions in Denmark, France and the United-Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Gash, V.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates whether women work part-time through preference or constraint and argues that different countries provide different opportunities for preference attainment. It argues that women with family responsibilities are unlikely to have their working preferences met without national policies supportive of maternal employment. Using event history analysis the article tracks part-time workers' transitions to both full-time employment and to labour market drop-out.The article co...

  7. The life course in the making: gender and the development of adolescents' expected timing of adult role transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Lisa J; Beal, Sarah J

    2012-11-01

    Adolescents' expectations about the timing of adult role transitions have the potential to shape their actual transitions, setting the stage for their adult lives. Although expectations about timing emerge by early adolescence, little is known about how these expectations develop across adolescence. This longitudinal study examined developmental trajectories of adolescents' anticipated ages of school completion, job entry, marriage, and parenthood over the high school years, focusing on gender differences. Latent growth curve analysis of data from 411 rural youths followed from Grades 9 through 12 (age at Grade 9: M = 14.35, SD = 0.77) indicated a significant increase in adolescents' anticipated ages of entry into work and parenthood as well as gender differences in the trajectory of the expected age of marriage. Gender role attitudes, school performance, romantic relationships, and expected educational and occupational attainment were associated with the anticipated timing of role transitions, with significant variations by gender. Adolescents' expected ages of entry into adult family roles predicted their educational attainment and family role transitions in early adulthood. The findings provide insights into the process through which adolescent boys and girls construct their expectations regarding the transition to adulthood and, in turn, their future life course.

  8. Real-time Arterial Performance Measurement Using BRT Probe Data and Signal Timing Data%基于BRT及信号配时的干道通行能力估计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹平; 李志恒; 李萌

    2012-01-01

    由于城市道路交通行为的复杂性以及高质量交通数据的缺乏,实时估计城市主干道的旅行时间具有一定的难度.基于实时的快速公交(BRT)以及信号配时数据,作了一系列研究,用以估计主干道旅行时间以及交通服务水平(LOS).本文通过将公交车的排队延误时间、平均信号灯等待时间和自由流旅行时间综合在一起来实现旅行时间的估计.并以Valley Transportation Authority(VTA) BRT和智能驾驶系统作为数据源进行实验.实验结果表明,本文提出的估计主干道性能的方法非常有效.其中根均方误差(RMSE)和根均方百分比误差(RMSPE)分别为49s和9%,LOS估计的精度高达73%.%Real-time arterial travel time estimation has been a very challengeable task due to the complexity of urban street traffic behaviors and lack of high resolution and high quality data. However, travel time information is considered as one of the most important tools to manage arterial flow. This study developed a series of data processing methods to estimate arterial travel time and LOS based on real-time BRT bus data and signal timing data. BRT buses have a few advantages over local buses to serve as probe vehicles to measure arterial performance. A few data processing procedures were introduced in this paper to estimate the arterial travel time by converting bus trajectory to general traffic travel time. The arterial travel time is estimated by adding the bus queuing delay, average traffic signal waiting time and free-flow travel time. To verify the effectiveness of the developed method, a field test was conducted. The Valley Transportation Authority ( VTA) BRT buses together with IntelliDrive corridor were selected as the data sources. The testing results demonstrate that the proposed method estimated arterial travel time and level of service well based on BRT probe data and traffic signal data. The root mean square error (RMSE) and rootmean square percentage

  9. A transit timing analysis with combined ground- and space-based photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raetz St.

    2015-01-01

    The CoRoT satellite looks back on six years of high precision photometry of a very high number of stars. Thousands of transiting events are detected from which 27 were confirmed to be transiting planets so far. In my research I search and analyze TTVs in the CoRoT sample and combine the unprecedented precision of the light curves with ground-based follow-up photometry. Because CoRoT can observe transiting planets only for a maximum duration of 150 days the ground-based follow-up can help to refine the ephemeris. Here we present first examples.

  10. Robust Guaranteed Cost Observer Design for Singular Markovian Jump Time-Delay Systems with Generally Incomplete Transition Probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the investigation of the design of robust guaranteed cost observer for a class of linear singular Markovian jump time-delay systems with generally incomplete transition probability. In this singular model, each transition rate can be completely unknown or only its estimate value is known. Based on stability theory of stochastic differential equations and linear matrix inequality (LMI technique, we design an observer to ensure that, for all uncertainties, the resulting augmented system is regular, impulse free, and robust stochastically stable with the proposed guaranteed cost performance. Finally, a convex optimization problem with LMI constraints is formulated to design the suboptimal guaranteed cost filters for linear singular Markovian jump time-delay systems with generally incomplete transition probability.

  11. Time-of-flight measurements in atomic beam devices using adiabatic high frequency transitions and sextupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarten, C; Brunn, I; Court, G; Ciullo, G; Ferretti, P; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Haeberli, W; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Koch, N; Kolster, H; Lenisa, P; Nass, A; Podyachev, S P; Reggiani, D; Rith, K; Simani, M C; Steffens, E; Stewart, J; Wise, T

    2002-01-01

    Atomic beam devices are frequently equipped with sextupole magnets to focus the beam or to act as spin filters in combination with RF-transitions for manipulating the hyperfine population within the atomic beam. A useful tool for the analysis of sextupole systems, the application of time-of-flight (TOF) measurements is presented. TOF measurements are enabled without mechanical beam chopper by utilizing adiabatic radio frequency transitions to select atoms within a certain time interval. This method is especially interesting for the use in atomic beam devices that are already equipped with RF-transitions and sextupole magnets and where space limitations or the required quality of the vacuum do not allow the installation of a mechanical chopper. The measurements presented here were performed with the atomic beam polarimeter of the HERMES polarized deuterium target and the results have been used to optimize the sextupole system of the polarimeter.

  12. Regional in vivo transit time measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity in mice with high-field CMR at 17.6 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Eberhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mouse models are increasingly used to study the pathophysiology of human cardiovascular diseases. The aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV is an indirect measure for vascular stiffness and a marker for cardiovascular risk. Results This study presents a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR transit time (TT method that allows the determination of the PWV in the descending murine aorta by analyzing blood flow waveforms. Systolic flow pulses were recorded with a temporal resolution of 1 ms applying phase velocity encoding. In a first step, the CMR method was validated by pressure waveform measurements on a pulsatile elastic vessel phantom. In a second step, the CMR method was applied to measure PWVs in a group of five eight-month-old apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/- mice and an age matched group of four C57Bl/6J mice. The ApoE(-/- group had a higher mean PWV (PWV = 3.0 ± 0.6 m/s than the C57Bl/6J group (PWV = 2.4 ± 0.4 m/s. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.014. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that high field CMR is applicable to non-invasively determine and distinguish PWVs in the arterial system of healthy and diseased groups of mice.

  13. An antithrombotic fucoidan, unlike heparin, does not prolong bleeding time in a murine arterial thrombosis model: a comparative study of Undaria pinnatifida sporophylls and Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Soon-Ki; Kwon, Oh-Choon; Lee, Sub; Park, Ki-Hyuk; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-05-01

    The antithrombotic activities and bleeding effects of selected fucoidans (source from either Undaria pinnatifida sporophylls or from Fucus vesiculosus) have been compared with heparin in the ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombus mouse model. Thrombosis was induced by applying 5% ferric chloride for 3 min on the carotid artery region of Balb/c mouse. Five minutes prior to thrombus induction, mice were infused through the tail vein with either saline (control) or polysaccharides. Either fucoidan or heparin was dosed at 0.1, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) The carotid blood flow was monitored until more than 60 min post-thrombus induction. Mouse tail transection bleeding time was measured up to 60 min after making a cut in the mouse tail. Both antithrombotic and bleeding effects were observed in a dose-dependent manner for both fucoidans and heparin. Thrombus formation was totally (reflected by Doppler flow meter) inhibited at either 5 or 50 mg/kg of unfractionated Undaria fucoidan or a low-molecular-weight Undaria fucoidan fraction, respectively, without prolonging the time-to-stop bleeding compared with the control (p Fucus fucoidan at 25 mg/kg where the time-to-stop bleeding was still significantly prolonged, by as much as 8 ± 1.7 min (p < 0.02). In contrast the heparin-treated group showed total inhibition of thrombus formation even at a small dose of 0.8 mg/kg (400 IU) at which bleeding continued until 60 min. In conclusion algal fucoidans are highly antithrombotic without potential haemorrhagic effects compared with heparin in the arterial thrombus model, but this property differs from algal species to species, and from the molecular structure of fucoidans.

  14. Usefulness of colon transit time and defecography in patients with chronic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Seuk; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myung Hyun; Park, Su Mi; Yang, Hee Chul [NHIC Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to evaluate whether both the colonic transit time (CTT) and defecography are necessary for diagnosing constipated patients, and we also wanted to assess the defecographic findings of patients with outlet obstruction on CTT. Over the recent 3 years, 26 patients (21 women and 5 men, mean age: 59 years) underwent both CTT and defecography because of their chronic constipations or defecation difficulty. The mean interval between the 2 studies was 48 days. Colonoscopy, barium enema and manometry were performed in 22, 8 and all the patients, respectively. On CTT, 13 patients (50.0%) were normal and 13 patients (50.0%) were abnormal; the abnormal results were composed of outlet obstruction (n = 8, 30.8%), outlet obstruction and colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), and outlet obstruction and hindgut dysfunction (n = 1, 3.8%). On defecography, 6 patients (23.1%) were normal and 20 patients (76.9%) were abnormal; the results were composed of rectocele (n = 8, 30.7%), rectocele and perineal descent syndrome (PDS; n = 4, 15.4%), PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 3, 11.5%), spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS; n = 3, 11.5%), rectocele and SPFS (n = 1, 3.8%), and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 3.8%). Of the 11 patients with outlet obstruction on CTT, rectocele (n = 4, 36.4%), SPFS (n = 1, 9.1%), rectocele and PDS (n = 1, 9.1%), and PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 9.1%) were demonstrated on defecography, except for the 4 normal cases. Both CTT and defecography were necessary for diagnosing the patients with chronic constipation in compensation, and 63.6% of the patients with pelvic outlet obstruction showed an abnormal pelvic defecation function.

  15. Malabsorption, Orocecal Transit Time and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, S V; Malik, Aastha; Bhadada, Sanjay K; Sachdeva, Naresh; Morya, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Gaurav

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus consists of dysfunctions characterized by hyperglycemia and resulting from combination of resistance to insulin action and inadequate insulin secretion. Most of diabetic patients report significant gastrointestinal symptoms. Entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from oral cavity to large bowel and anorectal region. Proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and most fluids are absorbed in small intestine. Malabsorption may occurs when proper absorption of nutrients does not take place due to bacterial overgrowth or altered gut motility. The present study was planned to measure various malabsorption parameters in type 2 diabetic patients. 175 patients and 175 age and sex matched healthy controls attending Endocrinology Clinic in PGI, Chandigarh were enrolled. Lactose intolerance was measured by using non-invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Urinary d-xylose and fecal fat were estimated using standard methods. Orocecal transit time and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth were measured using non-invasive lactulose and glucose breath test respectively. Out of 175 diabetic patients enrolled, 87 were males while among 175 healthy subjects 88 were males. SIBO was observed in 14.8 % type 2 diabetic patients and in 2.8 % of controls. There was statistically significant increase (p diabetic patients compared with controls. OCTT was observed to be more delayed (p diabetic patients and 39.4 % in controls. Urinary d-xylose levels were also lower in case of diabetic patients but no significant difference was found in 72 h fecal fat excretion among diabetic patients and controls. Urinary d-xylose and lactose intolerance in SIBO positive type 2 diabetic patients was more severe as compared to SIBO negative diabetic patients. From this study we can conclude that delayed OCTT may have led to SIBO which may have instigated the process of malabsorption among type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. Baseflow mean transit times in natural and human-altered catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, J.; Sanchez-Murillo, R.; Brooks, E. S.; Elliot, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Baseflow is one of the most important components of the ecosystem since it provides continuous habitat to aquatic biota; regulates water chemistry, temperature, and dissolved oxygen during summer; and functions as an essential supply for drinking water and food production worldwide. This study will evaluate baseflow mean transit times (MTTs) in five natural (i.e. pristine forest) and human-altered (i.e. agricultural, urban, and mining) catchments in eastern Washington and northern Idaho during 2011-2013. Drainage area ranges from small (6.35 km2) to meso scale (342 km2) and mean annual precipitation varies from 670 mm to 1,313 mm. MTTs were evaluated by applying d18O input precipitation and output stream waters to a lumped parameter model (FlowPC 3.2) using four main theoretical distribution models: piston flow, exponential, dispersion, and piston-exponential. Precipitation samples (N=307) were collected on weekly to biweekly basis and stream samples (N=690) were collected weekly using automated samplers. Precipitation showed a strong seasonal periodicity with a sine-wave modeled amplitude of 3.03‰ and a mean annual average of d18O= -15.13‰. Mean annual stream d18O ranged from -14.87‰ to -15.80‰ across the study catchments. Our modeling results will show information for examining solute transport and water availability under current and future land use practices and climate variability within a variety of watersheds in the inland Pacific Northwest that share similar underlying geology and climate attributes.

  17. Measurement of oro-caecal transit time by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savarino, Edoardo; De Cassan, Chiara [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, Padua (Italy); Savarino, Vincenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; Moscatelli, Alessandro [University of Genoa, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Fox, Mark [Queen' s Medical Center, NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    To assess prospectively the agreement of orocaecal transit time (OCTT) measurements by lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects. Volunteers underwent abdominal 1.5-T MRI using axial and coronal single-shot fast-spin-echo T2-weighted sequences, having fasted and after lactulose ingestion (10 g/125 mL). Imaging and H{sub 2} excretion gas-chromatography were performed concurrently every 15 min up to 180 min. MR images were analyzed using semiautomatic segmentation to calculate small bowel gas volume (SBGV) and visually to detect bolus arrival in the caecum. Agreement between MRI- and LHBT-OCTT was assessed. Twenty-eight subjects (17 men/11 women; mean age ± standard deviation 30 ± 8 years) were evaluated. Two H{sub 2} non-producers on LHBT were excluded. OCTT measured by MRI and LHBT was concordant in 18/26 (69 %) subjects (excellent agreement, k = 0.924). Median SBGV was 49.0 mL (interquartile interval 44.1 - 51.6 mL). In 8/26 (31 %) subjects, MRI showed that the lactulose bolus was in the terminal ileum and not the caecum when H{sub 2}E increased on LHBT. Median OCTT measured by MRI was significantly longer than OCTT measured by LHBT [135 min (120 - 150 min) vs. 127.5 min (105 - 150 min); p = 0.008]. Above baseline levels, correlation between [H{sub 2}] and SBGV was significant (r = 0.964; p < 0.001). MRI provides valid measurements of OCTT and gas production in the small bowel. (orig.)

  18. Enhanced Diagnostic Yield with Prolonged Small Bowel Transit Time during Capsule Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Buscaglia, Sumit Kapoor, John O. Clarke, Juan Carlos Bucobo, Samuel A. Giday, Priscilla Magno, Elaine Yong, Gerard E. Mullin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of small bowel transit time (SBTT on diagnostic yield during capsule endoscopy (CE has not been previously evaluated. Our study aim was to assess the effect of SBTT on the likelihood of detecting intestinal pathology during CE. Methods: We reviewed collected data on CE studies performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital from January 2006 to June 2007. In patients investigated for anemia or obscure bleeding, the following lesions were considered relevant: ulcers, erosions, AVMs, red spots, varices, vascular ectasias, and presence of blood. In patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain, ulcers, erosions, and blood were considered relevant. Age, gender, study indication, hospital status, and quality of bowel preparation were identified as candidate risk factors affecting SBTT. Univariate logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to study the effect of SBTT on diagnostic yield. Results: Total of 212 CE studies were analyzed; most were in outpatients (n=175, 82.9% and with excellent bowel preparation (n=177, 83.5%. Mean SBTT was 237.0min (3.9hrs. Age, gender, bowel prep, hospital status, and study indication did not significantly affect SBTT. However, increased SBTT was independently associated with increased diagnostic yield; OR=1.7 in SBTT=2-4hr (p=0.41, OR=1.8 in SBTT=4-6hrs (p=0.30, OR=9.6 in SBTT=6-8hrs (p=0.05. Conclusion: Prolonged SBTT during CE (>6 hr is associated with an increased diagnostic yield. This may be due to a positive effect on image quality during a “slower” study. The use of promotility agents may adversely affect the ability of CE to detect significant intestinal pathology.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound duplex scanning for measurement of portal venous flow. Validation against transit time ultrasound flowmetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E F; Strandberg, C; Bendtsen, F;

    1999-01-01

    with that of transit time ultrasound (TTU) in healthy pigs. The ability of EUS to detect changes in the portal venous flow after pharmacologic intervention was also investigated. METHODS: Six anaesthetized pigs were studied. Portal venous flow was measured simultaneously by EUS duplex scanning, using a Pentax FG-32UA...

  20. Remark about Transition Probabilities Calculation for Single Server Queues with Lognormal Inter-Arrival or Service Time Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Ho; Dudin, Alexander; Shaban, Alexy; Pokhrel, Subash Shree; Ma, Wen Ping

    Formulae required for accurate approximate calculation of transition probabilities of embedded Markov chain for single-server queues of the GI/M/1, GI/M/1/K, M/G/1, M/G/1/K type with heavy-tail lognormal distribution of inter-arrival or service time are given.

  1. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  2. Dating of streamwater using tritium in a post nuclear bomb pulse world: continuous variation of mean transit time with streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Morgenstern

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tritium measurements of streamwater draining the Toenepi catchment, a small dairy farming area in Waikato, New Zealand, have shown that the mean transit time of the water varies with the flow rate of the stream. Mean transit times through the catchment are 2–5 years during high baseflow conditions in winter, increasing to 30–40 years as baseflow decreases in summer, and then dramatically older water during drought conditions with mean transit time of more than 100 years. Older water is gained in the lower reaches of the stream, compared to younger water in the headwater catchment. The groundwater store supplying baseflow was estimated from the mean transit time and average baseflow to be 15.4 × 106 m3 of water, about 1 m water equivalent over the catchment and 2.3 times total annual streamflow. Nitrate is relatively high at higher flow rates in winter, but is low at times of low flow with old water. This reflects both lower nitrate loading in the catchment several decades ago as compared to current intensive dairy farming, and denitrification processes occurring in the older groundwater. Silica, leached from the aquifer material and accumulating in the water in proportion to contact time, is high at times of low streamflow with old water. There was a good correlation between silica concentration and streamwater age, which potentially allows silica concentrations to be used as a proxy for age when calibrated by tritium measurements. This study shows that tritium dating of stream water is possible with single tritium measurements now that bomb-test tritium has effectively disappeared from hydrological systems in New Zealand, without the need for time-series data.

  3. A Capacity-Restraint Transit Assignment Model When a Predetermination Method Indicates the Invalidity of Time Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical independence of time of every two adjacent bus links plays a crucial role in deciding the feasibility of using many mathematical models to analyze urban transit networks. Traditional research generally ignores the time independence that acts as the ground of their models. Assumption is usually made that time independence of every two adjacent links is sound. This is, however, actually groundless and probably causes problematic conclusions reached by corresponding models. Many transit assignment models such as multinomial probit-based models lose their effects when the time independence is not valid. In this paper, a simple method to predetermine the time independence is proposed. Based on the predetermination method, a modified capacity-restraint transit assignment method aimed at engineering practice is put forward and tested through a small contrived network and a case study in Nanjing city, China, respectively. It is found that the slope of regression equation between the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution acts as the indicator of time independence at the same time. Besides, our modified assignment method performs better than the traditional one with more reasonable results while keeping the property of simplicity well.

  4. Estimating subsurface water volumes and transit times in Hokkaido river catchments, Japan, using high-accuracy tritium analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, Maksym; Yamazaki, Yusuke; Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Kashiwaya, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Daisuke; Sawano, Hisaya

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate subsurface water transit times and volumes in headwater catchments of Hokkaido, Japan, using the New Zealand high-accuracy tritium analysis technique. Transit time provides insights into the subsurface water storage and therefore provides a robust and quick approach to quantifying the subsurface groundwater volume. Our method is based on tritium measurements in river water. Tritium is a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years, and is inert in the subsurface after the water enters the groundwater system. Therefore, tritium is ideally suited for characterization of the catchment's responses and can provide information on mean water transit times up to 200 years. Only in recent years has it become possible to use tritium for dating of stream and river water, due to the fading impact of the bomb-tritium from thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and due to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments and estimating subsurface water volume. While many tritium transit time studies have been conducted in New Zealand, only a limited number of tritium studies have been conducted in Japan. In addition, the meteorological, orographic and geological conditions of Hokkaido Island are similar to those in parts of New Zealand, allowing for comparison between these regions. In 2014, three field trips were conducted in Hokkaido in June, July and October to sample river water at river gauging stations operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). These stations have altitudes between 36 m and 860 m MSL and drainage areas between 45 and 377 km2. Each sampled point is located upstream of MLIT dams, with hourly measurements of precipitation and river water levels enabling us to distinguish between the snow melt and baseflow contributions

  5. Investigating flow pathways and transit times for the dispersal of hydrocarbon pollution on Rabots glacier, Kebnekaise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clason, Caroline; Rosqvist, Gunhild; Coch, Caroline; Jarsjö, Jerker; Brugger, Keith

    2014-05-01

    On March 15th 2012 a Royal Norwegian Air Force Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules aircraft crashed into the western face of Kebnekaise in northern Sweden, approximately 50 m below the mountain ridge, during a military exercise. It was carrying c.14000 l of kerosene jet fuel when it left Narvik, and an estimated minimum of 8 m3 of fuel was deposited on the mountain wall. Along with a large amount of debris from the wreckage, the fuel was subsequently buried by an avalanche in a north-west facing cirque on Rabots glacier. To assess the fate of the hydrocarbon pollution, a field campaign was organised to both monitor traces of pollution in the snowpack and the proglacial river system, and to quantify the preferential pathways and transit time for pollution dispersal from the crash source zone, through the glacier, to the proglacial outlet. An intensive series of dye tracing experiments were conducted as a proxy for potential pollution flow pathways during the 2013 ablation season. Percolation pathways through the snowpack and flow rates in the basal saturated layer were investigated in the vicinity of the crash site using rhodamine dye. Flow patterns across the slush and ice surface immediately downstream of the snowline were also investigated in terms of dye dispersion and the speed with which meltwater reaches the englacial system after emerging from the snowpack. The breakthrough of dye following injection in moulins was examined throughout the melt season, with injection sites situated along two longitudinal profiles of the glacier to investigate drainage efficiency with distance from the front. These experiments revealed a drainage axis in the glacial hydrological system, ending in two proglacial outlets of distinctly different turbidity. Furthermore, englacial dye tracing immediately downstream of the crash cirque snowpack revealed storage of dye over a long time period, followed by fast, efficient release of meltwater. This may suggest that pollution is

  6. Molecular Dynamics at Electrical- and Optical-Driven Phase Transitions: Time-Resolved Infrared Studies Using Fourier-Transform Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterseim, Tobias; Dressel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The time-dependent optical properties of molecular systems are investigated by step-scan Fourier-transform spectroscopy in order to explore the dynamics at phase transitions and molecular orientation in the milli- and microsecond range. The electrical switching of liquid crystals traced by vibrational spectroscopy reveals a rotation of the molecules with a relaxation time of 2 ms. The photo-induced neutral-ionic transition in TTF-CA takes place by a suppression of the dimerization in the ionic phase and creation of neutral domains. The time-dependent infrared spectra, employed to investigate the domain-wall dynamics, depend on temperature and laser pulse intensity; the relaxation of the spectra follows a stretched-exponential decay with relaxation times in the microsecond range strongly dependent on temperature and laser intensity. We present all details of the experimental setups and thoroughly discuss the technical challenges.

  7. Groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective-dispersive systems: 1. Generalized reservoir theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornaton, F; 10.1016/j.advwatres.2005.10.009

    2011-01-01

    We present a methodology for determining reservoir groundwater age and transit time probability distributions in a deterministic manner, considering advective-dispersive transport in steady velocity fields. In a first step, we propose to model the statistical distribution of groundwater age at aquifer scale by means of the classical advection-dispersion equation for a conservative and nonreactive tracer, associated to proper boundary conditions. The evaluated function corresponds to the density of probability of the random variable age, age being defined as the time elapsed since the water particles entered the aquifer. An adjoint backward model is introduced to characterize the life expectancy distribution, life expectancy being the time remaining before leaving the aquifer. By convolution of these two distributions, groundwater transit time distributions, from inlet to outlet, are fully defined for the entire aquifer domain. In a second step, an accurate and efficient method is introduced to simulate the tr...

  8. Nonlinearities and transit times in soil organic matter models: new developments in the SoilR package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Müller, Markus

    2016-04-01

    SoilR is an R package for implementing diverse models representing soil organic matter dynamics. In previous releases of this package, we presented the implementation of linear first-order models with any number of pools as well as radiocarbon dynamics. We present here new improvements of the package regarding the possibility to implement models with nonlinear interactions among state variables and the possibility to calculate ages and transit times for nonlinear models with time dependencies. We show here examples on how to implement model structures with Michaelis-Menten terms for explicit microbial growth and resource use efficiency, and Langmuir isotherms for representing adsorption of organic matter to mineral surfaces. These nonlinear terms can be implemented for any number of organic matter pools, microbial functional groups, or mineralogy, depending on user's requirements. Through a simple example, we also show how transit times of organic matter in soils are controlled by the time-dependencies of the input terms.

  9. Molecular Dynamics at Electrical- and Optical-Driven Phase Transitions: Time-Resolved Infrared Studies Using Fourier-Transform Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterseim, Tobias; Dressel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent optical properties of molecular systems are investigated by step-scan Fourier-transform spectroscopy in order to explore the dynamics at phase transitions and molecular orientation in the milli- and microsecond range. The electrical switching of liquid crystals traced by vibrational spectroscopy reveals a rotation of the molecules with a relaxation time of 2 ms. The photo-induced neutral-ionic transition in TTF-CA takes place by a suppression of the dimerization in the ionic phase and creation of neutral domains. The time-dependent infrared spectra, employed to investigate the domain-wall dynamics, depend on temperature and laser pulse intensity; the relaxation of the spectra follows a stretched-exponential decay with relaxation times in the microsecond range strongly dependent on temperature and laser intensity. We present all details of the experimental setups and thoroughly discuss the technical challenges.

  10. Relationship between small bowel transit time and absorption of a solid meal. Influence of metoclopramide, magnesium sulfate, and lactulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgate, A M; Read, N W

    1983-09-01

    The times taken for a radiolabeled solid meal to empty from the stomach and terminal ileum and the absorption of the components of that meal were measured in 14 patients with terminal ileostomies under control conditions and after administration of either lactulose (40 g) or metoclopramide (20 mg tds), or magnesium sulfate (0.1 g/kg body weight). Absorption of each of the components of the meal was determined by chemical analysis of the ileostomy effluent. The radioisotope proved an excellent marker for the delivery of fat, protein, and carbohydrate residues. All three agents significantly reduced the time taken for the meal to empty from the ileum. This was associated with significant reductions in the absorption of fat, carbohydrate, protein, water, and electrolytes in the case of lactulose and magnesium sulfate. Although metoclopramide reduced transit time to the same degree as the other agents, its effect on absorption of fat, fluid, and electrolytes was much less, and absorption of protein and carbohydrate was unaffected. We therefore conclude that, although agents that accelerate postprandial transit of a meal may diminish absorption of the component of that meal in the small bowel, the extent to which this occurs cannot be predicted by a knowledge of transit kinetics alone and depends on the means by which transit is altered. The action of lactulose on the small intestine causes fluid and fat losses, sufficient to result in diarrhea and steatorrhea in a normal subject.

  11. [Reseach on THz Time Domain Spectrum of Photo-Induced Insulator-Metal Phase Transition of VO₂ Films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-lei; Wu, Shuai; Li, Yan-feng; Liu, Bo-wen; Hu, Ming-lie; Chai, Lu; Xing, Qi-rong; Wang, Qing-yue

    2015-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO₂) film will be phase-transitioned from insulator into metal, accompanied with dramatic change on conductivity, which is named as photo-induced insulator-metal phase transition. Such phase transition of VO₂ film has important application potentials in modulators or other functional devices for terahertz waves. In this paper, the transmission spectrum variations before and after the photo-induced insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide film are investigated, and the phase transition properties in terahertz(THz) region are analyzed. In the experiment, the phase transition of the VO₂ film was induced by a continuous wave (CW) laser source and a femtosecond (fs) laser source, respectively. Obvious changes on the THz waveforms were observed for the both mentioned means of excitation, and the amplitude attenuation, as well as the signal distortion, was intensified with the increase of the impinging optical power. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) spectra of the transmitted THz time-domain signals were analyzed and it was found that the amplitude of the transmitted spectrum decreased synchronously with the increase of the optical power, accompanied with deformation of the spectrum line shape at the same time. The reason was that the macroscopic dielectric properties of the VO₂ film approached gradually to that of a metal as laser power was increased. A parameter, transmission modulation function, was defined in the paper as the amplitude difference between the transmission spectra of the VO₂ film before and after the laser excitation, to describe the dispersivity of the photo-induced phase transition more clearly. From the curve of the transmission modulation function, strong frequency-dependent properties at THz frequencies were found to vary regularly with the incident light power. After furthermore comparison, it was found that, though the insulator-metal phase transition could be trigged by both CW laser source and fs laser

  12. Simulations of time harmonic blood flow in the Mesenteric artery: comparing finite element and lattice Boltzmann methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hose Rod

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systolic blood flow has been simulated in the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. The simulations were carried out using two different computational hemodynamic methods: the finite element method to solve the Navier Stokes equations and the lattice Boltzmann method. Results We have validated the lattice Boltzmann method for systolic flows by comparing the velocity and pressure profiles of simulated blood flow between methods. We have also analyzed flow-specific characteristics such as the formation of a vortex at curvatures and traces of flow. Conclusion The lattice Boltzmann Method is as accurate as a Navier Stokes solver for computing complex blood flows. As such it is a good alternative for computational hemodynamics, certainly in situation where coupling to other models is required.

  13. MicroRNA Expression in a Readily Accessible Common Hepatic Artery Lymph Node Predicts Time to Pancreatic Cancer Recurrence Postresection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai V; Gore, Jesse; Zhong, Xin; Savant, Sudha S; Deitz-McElyea, Samantha; Schmidt, C Max; House, Michael G; Korc, Murray

    2016-10-01

    Lymph node involvement in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) predicts postresection survival, but early lymph node metastasis detection is not easily accomplished. We assessed a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a common hepatic artery lymph node (station 8) that is readily accessible during pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) to determine if increased miRNA levels correlate with postresection recurrence. Station 8 lymph nodes overlying the common hepatic artery collected during PD were assayed for miRNA-10b, miRNA-30c, miRNA-21, and miRNA-155 and cytokeratin-19 (CK19), an epithelial cell marker, using quantitative PCR. Expression was correlated with disease recurrence, recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Station 8 lymph nodes from 37 patients (30 periampullary carcinomas (PCs), 2 chronic pancreatitis, 5 other cancers) exhibited increased miRNA-10b levels in 14/30 PCs, and in 10 of these 14 patients, cancer recurred during the study period (2012-2015). High miRNA-10b was also associated with shorter RFS (42.5 vs. 92.4 weeks, p < 0.05) but not OS, whereas miRNA-30c, miRNA-21, and miRNA-155 levels and CK19 mRNA levels in station 8 nodes were variable and did not correlate with RFS or OS. We conclude that elevated miRNA-10b levels in station 8 lymph nodes could be utilized to assess risk for early disease progression in patients with periampullary tumors.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE K2-19 MULTIPLE-TRANSITING PLANETARY SYSTEM VIA HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY, AO IMAGING, AND TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Norio; Hori, Yasunori; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Takeda, Yoichi; Tamura, Motohide [Astrobiology Center, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Fukui, Akihiko; Yanagisawa, Kenshi [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ryu, Tsuguru; Onitsuka, Masahiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Kudo, Tomoyuki [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Delrez, Laetitia; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel [Institut d’Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); McCormac, James [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Holman, Matthew [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Izumiura, Hideyuki, E-mail: norio.narita@nao.ac.jp [SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-12-10

    K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is an interesting planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ∼7 R{sub ⊕} (inner planet b) and ∼4 R{sub ⊕} (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We find that the host star is a relatively old (≥8 Gyr) late G-type star (T{sub eff} ∼ 5350 K, M{sub s} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}, and R{sub s} ∼ 0.9 R{sub ⊙}). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star that could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2 m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6 m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88 m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs), as previously reported by Armstrong and coworkers. We model the observed TTVs of the inner planet using the synodic chopping formulae given by Deck and Agol. We find two statistically indistinguishable solutions for which the period ratios (P{sub c}/P{sub b}) are located slightly above and below the exact 3:2 commensurability. Despite the degeneracy, we derive the orbital period of the inner planet P{sub b} ∼ 7.921 days and the mass of the outer planet M{sub c} ∼ 20 M{sub ⊕}. Additional transit photometry (especially for the outer planet) as well as precise radial-velocity measurements would be helpful to break the degeneracy and to determine the mass of the inner planet.

  15. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  16. On the use of spring baseflow recession for a more accurate parameterization of aquifer transit time distribution functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Farlin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Baseflow recession analysis and groundwater dating have up to now developed as two distinct branches of hydrogeology and have been used to solve entirely different problems. We show that by combining two classical models, namely the Boussinesq equation describing spring baseflow recession, and the exponential piston-flow model used in groundwater dating studies, the parameters describing the transit time distribution of an aquifer can be in some cases estimated to a far more accurate degree than with the latter alone. Under the assumption that the aquifer basis is sub-horizontal, the mean transit time of water in the saturated zone can be estimated from spring baseflow recession. This provides an independent estimate of groundwater transit time that can refine those obtained from tritium measurements. The approach is illustrated in a case study predicting atrazine concentration trend in a series of springs draining the fractured-rock aquifer known as the Luxembourg Sandstone. A transport model calibrated on tritium measurements alone predicted different times to trend reversal following the nationwide ban on atrazine in 2005 with different rates of decrease. For some of the springs, the actual time of trend reversal and the rate of change agreed extremely well with the model calibrated using both tritium measurements and the recession of spring discharge during the dry season. The agreement between predicted and observed values was however poorer for the springs displaying the most gentle recessions, possibly indicating a stronger influence of continuous groundwater recharge during the summer months.

  17. Demonstration of the DSST State Transition Matrix Time-Update Properties Using the Linux GTDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    semigroup property of the state transition matrix. In Section 4 we describe the DSST orbit determination test cases. The test cases demonstrate the...via the semigroup property and its corollary (Test 3 and Test 3B) Closure Test with Mean Elements Only (Test Case 1 and 1B) This test starts with a 10

  18. A time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau phase field formalism for shock-induced phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Belof, Jonathan L.; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-field models have become popular in the last two decades to describe a host of free-boundary problems. The strength of the method relies on implicitly describing the dynamics of surfaces and interfaces by a continuous scalar field that enters the global grand free energy functional of the system. Here we explore the potential utility of this method in order to describe shock-induced phase transitions. To this end we make use of the Multiphase Field Theory (MFT) to account for the existence of multiple phases during the transition, and we couple MFT to a hydrodynamic model in the context of a new LLNL code for phase transitions, SAMSA. As a demonstration of this approach, we apply our code to the α - ɛ-Fe phase transition under shock wave loading conditions and compare our results with experiments of Jensen et. al. [J. Appl. Phys., 105:103502 (2009)] and Barker and Hollenbach [J. Appl. Phys., 45:4872 (1974)].

  19. 77 FR 77180 - Notice of Transportation Services' OMB Designation, timely return of excess transit benefits to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... development, these transit benefit programs have become an important tool in addressing urban roadway... accumulated fare media (acquired with tax-exempt subsidies) to offset commuting costs in the future. In this... with the security controls identified in the DOT's System of Records Notice, DOT/ALL 8...

  20. Identifying transit corridors for elephant using a long time-series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittiglio, C.; Skidmore, A.K.; Gils, van H.A.M.J.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2012-01-01

    The role of corridors in mitigating the effects of landscape fragmentation on biodiversity is controversial. Recent studies have highlighted the need for new approaches in corridor design using long-term datasets. We present a method to identify transit corridors for elephant at a population scale o

  1. Single-frequency dielectric relaxation used to characterize the glass transition time of polydextrose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Campbell, Zachary J.; Carter, Brady P.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric relaxation methods are applicable to powdery materials such as carbohydrates. These materials have relaxations that occur in the milli-Hz range while samples are held at fixed temperatures and fixed water activities, a w, (relativity humidity). Under proper conditions these materials undergo physical changes where the initially glassy powder transitions to an amorphous equilibrium state at the glass transition temperature, T g. Determining this transition involves characterizing the boundary curve (T g versus a w) which determines T g and a w conditions where materials are stable with long-shelf life or unstable with very a short shelf-life. This paper serves to illustrate multiple methodologies which can be used to characterize glass transition from frequency-spectra. Three methodologies are described: peak-broadening, peak-shift, and single-frequency. The new single frequency method not only provides results that identical to those of the peak-shift method but increases the data acquisition speeds by a factor of 5. This method is illustrated on polydextrose, a common sugar substitute. The information gathered can then be used to construct the boundary curve which is used to characterize the shelf-life of a material at various conditions.

  2. Contribution of potassium conductances to a time-dependent transition in electrical properties of a cockroach motoneuron soma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J D; Pitman, R M

    1999-05-01

    Contribution of potassium conductances to a time-dependent transition in electrical properties of a cockroach motoneuron soma. The cell body of the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) fast coxal depressor motoneuron (Df) displays a time-dependent change in excitability. Immediately after dissection, depolarization evokes plateau potentials, but after several hours all-or-none action potentials are evoked. Because K channel blockers have been shown to produce a similar transition in electrical properties, we have used current-clamp, voltage-clamp and action-potential-clamp recording to elucidate the contribution of different classes of K channel to the transition in electrical activity of the neuron. Apamin had no detectable effect on the neuron, but charybdotoxin (ChTX) caused a rapid transition from plateau potentials to spikes in the somatic response of Df to depolarization. In neurons that already produced spikes when depolarized, ChTX increased spike amplitude but did not increase their duration nor decrease the amplitude of their afterhyperpolarization. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) (which selectively blocks transient K currents) did not cause a transition from plateau potentials to spikes but did enhance oscillations superimposed on plateau potentials. When applied to neurons that already generated spikes when depolarized, 4-AP could augment spike amplitude, decrease the latency to the first spike, and prolong the afterhyperpolarization. Evidence suggests that the time-dependent transition in electrical properties of this motoneuron soma may result, at least in part, from a fall in calcium-dependent potassium current (IK,Ca), consequent on a gradual reduction in [Ca2+ ]i. Voltage-clamp experiments demonstrated directly that outward K currents in this neuron do fall with a time course that could be significant in the transition of electrical properties. Voltage-clamp experiments also confirmed the ineffectiveness of apamin and showed that ChTX blocked most of IK

  3. Distal shift of arterial pressure wave reflection sites with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-11-01

    An early return of reflected waves, the backward propagation of the arterial pressure wave from the periphery to the heart, is associated with the augmentation of central pulse pressure and cardiovascular risks. The locations of arterial pressure wave reflection, along with arterial stiffening, have a major influence on the timing of the reflected wave. To determine the influence of aging on the location of a major reflection site, arterial length (via 3D artery tracing of MRI) and central (carotid-femoral) and peripheral (femoral-ankle) pulse wave velocities were measured in 208 adults varying in age. The major reflection site was detected by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the reflected wave transit time (via carotid arterial pressure wave analysis). The length from the aortic valve to the major reflection site (eg, effective reflecting length) significantly increased with aging. The effective reflecting length normalized by the arterial length demonstrated that the major reflection sites were located between the aortic bifurcation and femoral site in most of the subjects. The normalized effective reflecting length did not alter with aging until 65 years of age and increased remarkably thereafter in men and women. The effective reflecting length was significantly and positively associated with the difference between central and peripheral pulse wave velocities (r=0.76). This correlation remained significant even when the influence of aortic pulse wave velocity was partial out (r=0.35). These results suggest that the major reflection site shifts distally with aging partly because of the closer matching of impedance provided by central and peripheral arterial stiffness.

  4. Real-time origin-destination matrices estimation for urban rail transit network based on structural state-space model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚向明; 赵鹏; 禹丹丹

    2015-01-01

    The major objective of this work was to establish a structural state-space model to estimate the dynamic origin-destination(O-D) matrices for urban rail transit network, using in- and out-flows at each station from automatic fare collection(AFC) system as the real time observed passenger flow counts. For lacking of measurable passenger flow information, the proposed model employs priori O-D matrices and travel time distribution from historical travel records in AFC system to establish the dynamic system equations. An arriving rate based on travel time distribution is defined to identify the dynamic interrelations between time-varying O-D flows and observed flows, which greatly decreases the computational complexity and improve the model’s applicability for large-scale network. This methodology is tested in a real transit network from Beijing subway network in China through comparing the predicted matrices with the true matrices. Case study results indicate that the proposed model is effective and applicative for estimating dynamic O-D matrices for large-scale rail transit network.

  5. Real-time origin-destination matrices estimation for urban rail transit network based on structural state-space model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚向明; 赵鹏; 禹丹丹

    2015-01-01

    The major objective of this work was to establish a structural state-space model to estimate the dynamic origin-destination (O-D) matrices for urban rail transit network, using in- and out-flows at each station from automatic fare collection (AFC) system as the real time observed passenger flow counts. For lacking of measurable passenger flow information, the proposed model employs priori O-D matrices and travel time distribution from historical travel records in AFC system to establish the dynamic system equations. An arriving rate based on travel time distribution is defined to identify the dynamic interrelations between time-varying O-D flows and observed flows, which greatly decreases the computational complexity and improve the model’s applicability for large-scale network. This methodology is tested in a real transit network from Beijing subway network in China through comparing the predicted matrices with the true matrices. Case study results indicate that the proposed model is effective and applicative for estimating dynamic O-D matrices for large-scale rail transit network.

  6. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulation on behavior of phase transition of a random magnetic system in finite observation time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazaki, Tamotsu; Kato, Tomohiko, E-mail: katou@fit.ac.jp

    2014-03-15

    Random magnets generally exhibit gradual phase transitions more or less. The origin of the phenomena has been controversial for a long time: intrinsic phenomena of disordered magnets or non-equilibrium effect due to finite observation time. We now support the latter, but there have not been clear evidences experimentally and theoretically. We show that the behavior of phase transition of a simple random magnetic system differs in the observation time by using a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. The target of the simulation is experiments of the line width of NMR spin-echo spectra, a type of the order parameter, on Mn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x} (HCOO){sub 2}·2(NH{sub 2})2CO. The calculated results indicate that, as the averaging time becomes shorter, the phase transition becomes more gradual. This tendency is most pronounced around the percolation concentration. The calculated results coincide well with the characteristic features of the experimental results. This coincidence supports that the smearing behavior of the order parameter is a non-equilibrium effect, though Ising model employed in the simulation is different with Heisenberg system of the target substance.

  7. A Numerical Scheme for Ordinary Differential Equations Having Time Varying and Nonlinear Coefficients Based on the State Transition Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    A variable order method of integrating initial value ordinary differential equations that is based on the state transition matrix has been developed. The method has been evaluated for linear time variant and nonlinear systems of equations. While it is more complex than most other methods, it produces exact solutions at arbitrary time step size when the time variation of the system can be modeled exactly by a polynomial. Solutions to several nonlinear problems exhibiting chaotic behavior have been computed. Accuracy of the method has been demonstrated by comparison with an exact solution and with solutions obtained by established methods.

  8. Dating of streamwater using tritium in a post-bomb world: continuous variation of mean transit time with streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Morgenstern

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tritium measurements of streamwater draining the Toenepi catchment, a small dairy farming area in Waikato, New Zealand, have shown that the mean transit time of the water varies with the flow of the stream. Mean transit times through the catchment are 2–5 years during high baseflow conditions (in winter, becoming older as streamflow decreases (in summer, and then quite dramatically older during drought conditions, with ages of more than 100 years. Older water seems to be gained in the lower reaches of the stream, compared to younger water in the headwater catchment. The groundwater store supplying baseflow was estimated from the mean transit time and average baseflow to be 15.4×106 m3 of water, about 1 m water equivalent over the catchment and 2.3 times total annual streamflow. Nitrate from recent intensified land use is relatively high at normal streamflow, but is low at times of low flow with old water. This reflects both lower nitrate loading in the catchment several decades ago, and active denitrification processes in older groundwater. Silica, leached from the aquifer material and accumulating in the water in proportion to contact time, is high at times of low streamflow. There was a good correlation between silica and streamwater age, which potentially allows silica concentrations to be used as a proxy for age when calibrated by tritium measurements. This study shows that tritium dating of stream water is possible with single tritium measurements now that bomb-test tritium has effectively disappeared from hydrological systems in New Zealand, without the need for time-series data.

  9. Transitions between child and adult mental health services: service design, philosophy and meaning at uncertain times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcott, W J

    2014-09-01

    A young person's transition of care from child and adolescent mental health services to adult mental health services can be an uncertain and distressing event that can have serious ramifications for their recovery. Recognition of this across many countries and recent UK media interest in the dangers of mental health services failing young people has led practitioners to question the existing processes. This paper reviews the current theories and research into potential failings of services and encourages exploration for a deeper understanding of when and how care should be managed in the transition process for young people. Mental health nurses can play a vital role in this process and, by adopting the assumptions of this paradigm, look at transition from this unique perspective. By reviewing the current ideas related to age boundaries, service thresholds, service philosophy and service design, it is argued that the importance of the therapeutic relationship, the understanding of the cultural context of the young person and the placing of the young person in a position of autonomy and control should be central to any decision and process of transfer between two mental health services.

  10. Transit time distributions and StorAge Selection functions in a sloping soil lysimeter with time-varying flow paths: Direct observation of internal and external transport variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseok; Pangle, Luke A.; Cardoso, Charléne; Lora, Marco; Volkmann, Till H. M.; Wang, Yadi; Harman, Ciaran J.; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Transit times through hydrologic systems vary in time, but the nature of that variability is not well understood. Transit times variability was investigated in a 1 m3 sloping lysimeter, representing a simplified model of a hillslope receiving periodic rainfall events for 28 days. Tracer tests were conducted using an experimental protocol that allows time-variable transit time distributions (TTDs) to be calculated from data. Observed TTDs varied with the storage state of the system, and the history of inflows and outflows. We propose that the observed time variability of the TTDs can be decomposed into two parts: "internal" variability associated with changes in the arrangement of, and partitioning between, flow pathways; and "external" variability driven by fluctuations in the flow rate along all flow pathways. These concepts can be defined quantitatively in terms of rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions, which is a theory describing lumped transport dynamics. Internal variability is associated with temporal variability in the rSAS function, while external is not. The rSAS function variability was characterized by an "inverse storage effect," whereby younger water is released in greater proportion under wetter conditions than drier. We hypothesize that this effect is caused by the rapid mobilization of water in the unsaturated zone by the rising water table. Common approximations used to model transport dynamics that neglect internal variability were unable to reproduce the observed breakthrough curves accurately. This suggests that internal variability can play an important role in hydrologic transport dynamics, with implications for field data interpretation and modeling.

  11. Dose-response effect of Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 on whole gut transit time and functional gastrointestinal symptoms in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 supplementation on whole gut transit time (WGTT) and frequency of functional gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in adults. Material and methods. We randomized 100 subjects (mean age: 44 years; 64% female) with functional GI symptoms to consume a proprietary probiotic strain, B. lactis HN019 (Fonterra Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand), at daily doses of 17.2 billion colony forming units (CFU) (high dose; n = 33), 1.8 bil...

  12. Crossing the dividing surface of transition state theory. II. Recrossing times for the atom-diatom interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, J. C.

    2014-04-01

    We consider a triatomic system with zero total angular momentum and demonstrate that, no matter how complicated the anharmonic part of the potential energy function, classical dynamics in the vicinity of a saddle point is constrained by symmetry properties. At short times and at not too high energies, recrossing dynamics is largely determined by elementary local structural parameters and thus can be described in configuration space only. Conditions for recrossing are given in the form of inequalities involving structural parameters only. Explicit expressions for recrossing times, valid for microcanonical ensembles, are shown to obey interesting regularities. In a forward reaction, when the transition state is nonlinear and tight enough, one-fourth of the trajectories are expected to recross the plane R = R* (where R* denotes the position of the saddle point) within a short time. Another fourth of them are expected to have previously recrossed at a short negative time, i.e., close to the saddle point. These trajectories do not contribute to the reaction rate. The reactive trajectories that obey the transition state model are to be found in the remaining half. However, no conclusion can be derived for them, except that if recrossings occur, then they must either take place in the distant future or already have taken place in the remote past, i.e., far away from the saddle point. Trajectories that all cross the plane R = R* at time t = 0, with the same positive translational momentum P_{R_* } can be partitioned into two sets, distinguished by the parity of their initial conditions; both sets have the same average equation of motion up to and including terms cubic in time. Coordination is excellent in the vicinity of the saddle point but fades out at long (positive or negative) times, i.e., far away from the transition state.

  13. Semi-automatic detection of Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules for colonic transit time assessment in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Christian; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Lienemann, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders result in a significant number of consultations in primary care facilities. Chronic constipation and diarrhea are regarded as two of the most common diseases affecting between 2% and 27% of the population in western countries 1-3. Defecatory disorders are most commonly due to dysfunction of the pelvic floor or the anal sphincter. Although an exact differentiation of these pathologies is essential for adequate therapy, diagnosis is still only based on a clinical evaluation1. Regarding quantification of constipation only the ingestion of radio-opaque markers or radioactive isotopes and the consecutive assessment of colonic transit time using X-ray or scintigraphy, respectively, has been feasible in clinical settings 4-8. However, these approaches have several drawbacks such as involving rather inconvenient, time consuming examinations and exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Therefore, conventional assessment of colonic transit time has not been widely used. Most recently a new technique for the assessment of colonic transit time using MRI and MR-contrast media filled capsules has been introduced 9. However, due to numerous examination dates per patient and corresponding datasets with many images, the evaluation of the image data is relatively time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a computer tool to facilitate the detection of the capsules in MRI datasets and thus to shorten the evaluation time. We present a semi-automatic tool which provides an intensity, size 10, and shape-based 11,12 detection of ingested Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules. After an automatic pre-classification, radiologists may easily correct the results using the application-specific user interface, therefore decreasing the evaluation time significantly.

  14. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krix, Martin, E-mail: martin.krix@kabelbw.de [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, D-78467 Konstanz (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Translational Oncology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Armarteifio, Erick [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fuerstenberger, Susanne [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [{approx}mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [{approx}mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [{approx}mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [{approx}mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 {+-} 257.5 compared to 482.2 {+-} 187.5 [{approx}mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method ({+-}2.1 s vs. {+-}9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  15. Transit timing of TrES-2: a combined analysis of ground- and space-based photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Raetz, St; Ginski, Ch; Mugrauer, M; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Adam, Ch; Raetz, M; Roell, T; Seeliger, M; Marka, C; Vanko, M; Bukowiecki, L; Errmann, R; Kitze, M; Ohlert, J; Pribulla, T; Schmidt, J G; Sebastian, D; Puchalski, D; Tetzlaff, N; Hohle, M M; Schmidt, T O B; Neuhäuser, R

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous observations and careful analysis of transit light curves can lead to the identification of transit timing variations (TTVs). TrES-2 is one of few exoplanets, which offer the matchless possibility to combine long-term ground-based observations with continuous satellite data. Our research aimed at the search for TTVs that would be indicative of perturbations from additional bodies in the system. We also wanted to refine the system parameters and the orbital elements. We obtained 44 ground-based light curves of 31 individual transit events of TrES-2. Eight 0.2 - 2.2-m telescopes located at six observatories in Germany, Poland and Spain were used. In addition, we analysed 18 quarters (Q0-Q17) of observational data from NASA's space telescope Kepler including 435 individual transit events and 11 publicly available ground-based light curves. Assuming different limb darkening (LD) laws we performed an analysis for all light curves and redetermined the parameters of the system. We also carried out a join...

  16. An investigation of natural and forced transition in a laminar separation bubble via time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurelek, John; Yarusevych, Serhiy

    2015-11-01

    The transition process in a laminar separation bubble (LSB) formed on the suction surface of a NACA 0018 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 100,000 and an angle of attack of 5° is studied experimentally. Both natural and forced transition are evaluated using controlled acoustic disturbances. Time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are used to investigate the streamwise and spanwise flow development in the bubble. For all the cases examined, the transition process is characterized by the formation of strongly periodic shear layer vortices in the LSB due to the amplification of disturbances in the bubble's fore portion. These structures feature strong spanwise coherence at roll-up; however, they deform rapidly and begin to break down upstream of the mean reattachment point. The vortex breakup is shown to be initiated by spanwise deformation of the vortex filaments, linked to the formation of streamwise structures. This is followed by the formation of turbulent spots, which expand rapidly near mean reattachment. The results demonstrate that the acoustic disturbance environment can have a strong influence on the characteristics of the vortices and their breakup, thereby affecting flow transition and the overall dynamics of the LSB.

  17. Transitional B cells in early human B cell development - time to revisit the paradigm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria G Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig genes, and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, then cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire, and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDR-H3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small and only the size of the CDR-H3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages.

  18. Macroscopic time-reversal symmetry breaking at a nonequilibrium phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Pyoung-Seop; Chun, Hyun-Myung; Noh, Jae Dong

    2016-01-01

    We study the entropy production in a globally coupled Brownian particles system that undergoes an order-disorder phase transition. Entropy production is a characteristic feature of nonequilibrium dynamics with broken detailed balance. We find that the entropy production rate is subextensive in the disordered phase and extensive in the ordered phase. It is found that the entropy production rate per particle vanishes in the disordered phase and becomes positive in the ordered phase following critical scaling laws. We derive the scaling relations for associated critical exponents. The disordered phase exemplifies a case where the entropy production is subextensive with the broken detailed balance.

  19. Empirical Assessment on Factors Affecting Travel Time of Bus Rapid Transit

    OpenAIRE

    Fergyanto E Gunawan

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the century, many cities around the world adopt the bus rapid transit (BRT) system to fulfill their need of mass transportation system. The system features with platform-level boarding, bus lanes in the central verge of the road, off-vehicle fare collection, and physically protected busway. So far, these criteria are considered to be the most important aspects with respect to the BRT performance. In this research, we intend to study to what extent the BRT performance ma...

  20. Changes in regional cerebral hemodynamics and its significance after internal carotid artery stenting in patients with moderate/severe internal carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-chuan YAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the cerebral hemodynamic changes before and after carotid artery angioplasty and stenting.Methods Thirty-eight patients with moderate/severe internal carotid artery stenosis underwent carotid artery angioplasty and stenting.CT perfusion imaging was performed pre-and post-surgery to determine the cerebral blood flow(CBF,cerebral blood volume(CBV and mean transit time(MTT in the ipsilateral and contralateral cerebrum.Results Before angioplasty and stenting,the CBF and CBV decreased,and MTT increased in the ipsilateral cerebrum than in contralateral cerebrum.After intervention,the CBF and CBV increased and CTT shortened obviously in comparison with that of pre-surgery(P 0.05.Conclusion Angioplasty and stenting may improve the cerebral hemodynamics of patients with severe/moderate internal carotid artery stenosis.

  1. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs.

  2. Abnormal shortened diastolic time length at increasing heart rates in patients with abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombardini Tonino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The degree of pulmonary hypertension is not independently related to the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction but is frequently associated with diastolic filling abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic times at increasing heart rates in normal and in patients with and without abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PASP. Methods. We enrolled 109 patients (78 males, age 62 ± 13 years referred for exercise stress echocardiography and 16 controls. The PASP was derived from the tricuspid Doppler tracing. A cut-off value of PASP ≥ 50 mmHg at peak stress was considered as indicative of abnormal increase in PASP. Diastolic times and the diastolic/systolic time ratio were recorded by a precordial cutaneous force sensor based on a linear accelerometer. Results At baseline, PASP was 30 ± 5 mmHg in patients and 25 ± 4 in controls. At peak stress the PASP was normal in 95 patients (Group 1; 14 patients (Group 2 showed an abnormal increase in PASP (from 35 ± 4 to 62 ± 12 mmHg; P Conclusion The first and second heart sound vibrations non-invasively monitored by a force sensor are useful for continuously assessing diastolic time during exercise. Exercise-induced abnormal PASP was associated with reduced diastolic time at heart rates beyond 100 beats per minute.

  3. Prolonged transition time between colostrum and mature milk in a bear, the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kate; Hou, Rong; Wang, Hairui; Zhang, Zhihe; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G; Burchmore, Richard J S; Loeffler, I Kati; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2015-10-01

    Bears produce the most altricial neonates of any placental mammal. We hypothesized that the transition from colostrum to mature milk in bears reflects a temporal and biochemical adaptation for altricial development and immune protection. Comparison of bear milks with milks of other eutherians yielded distinctive protein profiles. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis of serial milk samples collected from six giant pandas showed a prolonged transition from colostrum to main-phase lactation over approximately 30 days. Particularly striking are the persistence or sequential appearance of adaptive and innate immune factors. The endurance of immunoglobulin G suggests an unusual duration of trans-intestinal absorption of maternal antibodies, and is potentially relevant to the underdeveloped lymphoid system of giant panda neonates. Levels of certain milk oligosaccharides known to exert anti-microbial activities and/or that are conducive to the development of neonatal gut microbiomes underwent an almost complete changeover around days 20-30 postpartum, coincident with the maturation of the protein profile. A potential metabolic marker of starvation was detected, the prominence of which may reflect the natural postpartum period of anorexia in giant panda mothers. Early lactation in giant pandas, and possibly in other ursids, appears to be adapted for the unique requirements of unusually altricial eutherian neonates.

  4. Time Delay and Long-Range Connection Induced Synchronization Transitions in Newman-Watts Small-World Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay and long-range connection (LRC) probability have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs. PMID:24810595

  5. Time delay and long-range connection induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay τ and long-range connection (LRC) probability P have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability P = 1.0 as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability P is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs.

  6. Dissociation between the time courses of femoral artery blood flow and pulmonary VO2 during repeated bouts of heavy knee extension exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Ohe, Yukie; Miura, Akira; Kitano, Asami; Endo, Masako; Sato, Hironori; Miyachi, Motohiko; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuda, Osamu

    2004-05-01

    It has frequently been demonstrated that prior heavy cycling exercise facilitates pulmonary O(2) kinetics at the onset of subsequent heavy exercise. This might be due to improved muscle perfusion via acidosis-induced vasodilating effects. However, it is difficult to measure the blood flow (BF) to the working muscles (via the femoral artery) during cycling exercise. We therefore selected supine knee extension (KE) exercise as an alternative, and investigated whether the faster O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout was matched by proportionally faster BF kinetics to the exercising muscle. Nine healthy subjects (aged 21-44 years) volunteered to participate in this study. The protocol consisted of two consecutive 6-min KE exercise bouts in a supine position (work rate: 70-75% of peak power) separated by a 6-min baseline rest (EX1 to EX2). During the protocol, a pulsed Doppler ultrasound technique was utilized to continuously measure the BF in the right femoral artery. The protocol was repeated at least 6 times to characterize the precise kinetics. In agreement with previous studies using cycling exercise, the O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout were facilitated compared with that in the 1st bout [mean +/-s.d. of the 'effective' time constant (tau): EX1, 68.6 +/- 15.9, versus EX2, 58.0 +/- 14.4 s. Phase II-tau: EX1, 48.7 +/- 9.0, versus EX2, 41.2 +/- 13.3 s. Empirical index of the slow component (Delta O(2(6-3))): EX1, 78 +/- 44, versus EX2, 57 +/- 36 ml min(-1) (P 0.05)]. It was concluded that the faster pulmonary O(2) kinetics during heavy KE exercise following prior heavy exercise was not associated with a similar modulation in the BF to the working muscles.

  7. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku [Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, 17-1 Kitakazan-ohmine-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura [Astronomical Institute, Osaka Kyoiku University, Asahigaoka, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi [Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Koichi [Kurume, Fukuoka-ken (Japan); Kabashima, Fujio, E-mail: yamanaka@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Miyaki-cho, Saga-ken (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  8. Laparoscopic gastric bypass to robotic gastric bypass: time and cost commitment involved in training and transitioning an academic surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn-Sue, Jerome R; Winder, Josh S; Kotch, Shannon; Colello, Jacob; Docimo, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the gold standard procedure for weight loss. This relatively complex procedure has excellent outcomes when performed via laparoscopy. The advent of the DaVinci robotic platform has been a technological advancement. Our goal is to provide information regarding the cost, time commitment, and advantages of transitioning an LRYGB program to an RRYGB program in an academic setting. We retrospectively reviewed the last 25 laparoscopic gastric bypass procedures and the first 25 robotic gastric bypass procedures performed by a single surgeon. We compared clinical outcomes and focused on time and hospital cost during this transition phase. There was no significant demographic difference between the groups. The mean age was 41.7 (RRYGB) years vs 43.4 (LRYGM) years. The mean BMI were similar between groups, 45.3 vs 46.5 kg/m(2) for RRYGB and LRYGB. No anastomotic leaks or mortalities were noted. There was one anastomotic stricture in both groups. Excess weight loss was similar in both groups at 1 year. There was a significant increase in operative time with RRYGB, mean 241 min vs mean 174 min (p = 0.0005). Operative time fell by 25 min after the first 10 cases. The hospital cost was also increased with RRYGB mean $5922 vs $4395 (p = 0.03). Transitioning from a laparoscopic to a robotic practice can be done safely, however, the initial operative times were longer and the hospital cost was higher for robotic gastric bypass. We hope in the future that these will decrease after overcoming the learning and as the technology becomes widespread.

  9. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition.

  10. Glass transition dynamics of anti-inflammatory ketoprofen studied by Raman scattering and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Tomohiko; Igawa, Hikaru; Kim, Tae Hyun; Mori, Tatsuya; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    A liquid-glass transition and a crystalline state of pharmaceutical racemic ketoprofen were studied by Raman scattering and the broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the frequency range from 9 to 260 cm-1. The low-frequency Raman scattering spectra clearly shows the remarkable change related to a liquid-glass transition at about Tg = 267 K. After melt-quenching at liquid nitrogen temperature, a boson peak appears at about 16.5 cm-1 near and below Tg and the intensity of quasi-elastic scattering related to structural relaxation increases markedly on heating. The crystalline racemic ketoprofen of "conformer A" shows the noncoincidence effect of mode frequencies below 200 cm-1 between Raman scattering spectra and dielectric spectra observed by THz-TDS.

  11. Space-Time geometry and thermodynamic properties of a self-gravitating ball of fluid in phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Polanco, J D; Ujevic, M; Polanco, Jose D.; Letelier, Patricio S.; Ujevic, Maximiliano

    2004-01-01

    A numerical solution of Einstein field equations for a spherical symmetric and stationary system of identical and auto-gravitating particles in phase transition is presented. The fluid possess a perfect fluid energy momentum tensor, and the internal interactions of the system are represented by a van der Walls like equation of state able to describe a first order phase transition of the type gas-liquid. We find that the space-time curvature, the radial component of the metric, and the pressure and density show discontinuities in their radial derivatives in the phase coexistence region. This region is found to be a spherical surface concentric with the star and the system can be thought as a foliation of acronal, concentric and isobaric surfaces in which the coexistence of phases occurs in only one of these surfaces. This kind of system can be used to represent a star with a high energy density core and low energy density mantle in hydrodynamic equilibrium.

  12. A Search and Exploration of Multi-Exoplanet Systems Via Transit Timing Variation (TTV) Algorithms for the K2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Shishir; Dholakia, Shashank; Cody, Ann Marie

    2017-01-01

    We use the K2 mission to search for and analyze multi-planet systems with the goal of performing a scalable search for multi-planet systems using the transit timing variation (TTV) method. We developed an algorithm in Python to perform a search for synodic TTVs from multi-planet systems. The algorithm analyzes images taken by the K2 mission, creates light curves, and searches for TTVs on the order of a few minutes for every star in the images. We detected 4 potential TTV signals of which 3 are possible new discoveries. One of the systems has known multiple transiting planets and exhibits TTVs consistent with theoretical and previously published TTVs from n-body simulations. Another exoplanet system exhibits possible TTVs consistent with at least two giant planets. Our results demonstrate that a search for TTVs with the K2 mission is possible, though difficult.

  13. Determination of Scheduled Travel Time for a Fixed Transit Route Based on Multistate Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shukai Chen; Daniel Jian Sun; and Rui Xue

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide the guideline for bus drivers to adjust speed to minimize scheduled deviation, the method for setting bus scheduled travel time is proposed. Firstly, multistate model is introduced to fit historical travel time data and identify different service states. Based on the calibrated travel time distribution parameters, an optimization model is proposed, followed by a Monte Carlo ( MC) simulation based genetic algorithm ( GA) procedure to obtain the optimal scheduled time. A case study from a fixed bus route from Shenzhen is used to demonstrate the model applicability. The sensitivity analysis is conducted to study the effects of parameters setting on optimal slack time for each segment. The results show that multistate model fits travel time under peak hours better than Lognormal distribution, and the length of scheduled travel time basically reflects travel time reliability.

  14. The nonequilibrium phase transition and the symmetry revival induced by time delay in an asymmetric bistable system with correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Fei; Du Lu-Chun; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The nonequilibrium phase transition and the symmetry revival induced by time delay in a bistable system are investigated. The stationary probability distribution function (SPDF) of the bistable system with time delay and correlated noises are calculated by an analytical method and stochastic simulation respectively. The analytical and simulative results indicate that: (1) There is a certain value of λ(λ denotes the strength of correlations between the multiplicative and additive noises) to make the SPDF symmetric under some time delay; however, above or below the given value, the symmetry will be broken; (2) With the monotonic change of λ, the unimodal peak structure of SPDF becomes bimodal at the beginning, then it becomes unimodal again; this means that there is a reentrance phenomenon in the process; (3) There is a critical value of delay time, which makes the lower peak of SPDF equal to the higher one under the critical condition. This means that the symmetry revival phenomenon emerges.

  15. Factors influencing water transit times in snowmelt-dominated, headwater catchments of the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D. W.; Mast, A.

    2015-12-01

    In catchments, water transit times (TTs) refer to the elapsed time between entry of water at the ground surface and exit of water at the catchment outlet. Transit times are an important characteristic of catchments in that they reflect the time available for interaction between water, soil, and biota within the system. Thus, they exert a strong influence on hydrologic resilience to drought and climate change, and on the sensitivity of aquatic ecosystems to atmospheric pollutants. Transit times may vary spatially due to variations in basin characteristics, such as slope, size, and amount and type of soil and vegetation; however, the relative influence of these factors on TTs is poorly known. In this study, we estimate mean transit times (MTTs) for 11 snowmelt-dominated, headwater catchments in the western U.S. using the convolution integral approach, which relies on differences in the magnitude of seasonal variability in δ18O in precipitation and stream water to estimate MTTs. Seasonal variability in δ18O was calculated based on analyses of precipitation and stream water samples collected at weekly to monthly intervals. Results indicate that MTTs ranged from 0.6 to 2.1 years, and were positively influenced by percent of the catchment covered by forest (r2 = 0.56; p = 0.008), and negatively influenced by barren terrain (e.g., bedrock; r2 = 0.48; p = 0.019). MTTs showed a weak negative relation to mean basin slope (r2 = 0.31; p = 0.076) and no relation to basin size or elevation. These results illustrate the importance of soil as a key factor influencing MTTs, with basin slope acting as a secondary influence. Heavily forested basins tend to have deep, well-developed soils with substantial water storage capacity; these soils help maintain baseflow during drought conditions, providing hydrologic resilience to the system, and they are an important location for geochemical and biological processes that neutralize acidity and assimilate atmospherically deposited nitrogen

  16. Theory for transitions between log and stationary phases: universal laws for lag time

    CERN Document Server

    Himeoka, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of bacterial growth has gathered substantial attention since Monod's pioneering study. Theoretical and experimental work has uncovered several laws for describing the log growth phase, in which the number of cells grows exponentially. However, microorganism growth also exhibits lag, stationary, and death phases under starvation conditions, in which cell growth is highly suppressed, while quantitative laws or theories for such phases are underdeveloped. In fact, models commonly adopted for the log phase that consist of autocatalytic chemical components, including ribosomes, can only show exponential growth or decay in a population, and phases that halt growth are not realized. Here, we propose a simple, coarse-grained cell model that includes inhibitor molecule species in addition to the autocatalytic active protein. The inhibitor forms a complex with active proteins to suppress the catalytic process. Depending on the nutrient condition, the model exhibits the typical transition a...

  17. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT) IV: seven transiting planets in the Praesepe cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Vanderburg, Andrew; Rizzuto, Aaron C; Ansdell, Megan; Medina, Jennifer Vanessa; Mace, Gregory N; Kraus, Adam L

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters and young stellar associations are attractive sites to search for planets and to test theories of planet formation, migration, and evolution. We present our search for, and characterization of, transiting planets in the $\\simeq$800 Myr old Praesepe (Beehive, M44) Cluster from K2 light curves. We identify seven planet candidates, six of which we statistically validate to be real planets. For each host star we obtain high-resolution NIR spectra to measure its projected rotational broadening and radial velocity, the latter of which we use to confirm cluster membership. We obtain low-resolution optical and NIR spectroscopy for each system, which we use in conjunction with the cluster distance and metallicity to provide precise temperatures, masses, radii, and luminosities for the host stars. Combining our measurements of rotational broadening, rotation periods from the K2 light curves, and our derived stellar radii, we show that all planetary orbits are, within errors, aligned with their host star's...

  18. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  19. Neanderthal genomics suggests a pleistocene time frame for the first epidemiologic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Underdown, Simon J

    2016-07-01

    High quality Altai Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes are revealing which regions of archaic hominin DNA have persisted in the modern human genome. A number of these regions are associated with response to infection and immunity, with a suggestion that derived Neanderthal alleles found in modern Europeans and East Asians may be associated with autoimmunity. As such Neanderthal genomes are an independent line of evidence of which infectious diseases Neanderthals were genetically adapted to. Sympathetically, human genome adaptive introgression is an independent line of evidence of which infectious diseases were important for AMH coming in to Eurasia and interacting with Neanderthals. The Neanderthals and Denisovans present interesting cases of hominin hunter-gatherers adapted to a Eurasian rather than African infectious disease package. Independent sources of DNA-based evidence allow a re-evaluation of the first epidemiologic transition and how infectious disease affected Pleistocene hominins. By combining skeletal, archaeological and genetic evidence from modern humans and extinct Eurasian hominins, we question whether the first epidemiologic transition in Eurasia featured a new package of infectious diseases or a change in the impact of existing pathogens. Coupled with pathogen genomics, this approach supports the view that many infectious diseases are pre-Neolithic, and the list continues to expand. The transfer of pathogens between hominin populations, including the expansion of pathogens from Africa, may also have played a role in the extinction of the Neanderthals and offers an important mechanism to understand hominin-hominin interactions well back beyond the current limits for aDNA extraction from fossils alone. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:379-388, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Livergraftvascularvariantwith 3 extra-hepatic arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paulo N Martins

    2010-01-01

     Vascular anatomy of the liver is varied, and the"standard"anatomy is seen in 55%-80%of cases. It is very important that extrahepatic arteries are identiifed precisely at the time of graft procurement to avoid injuries that might compromise the liver function. In the present case the liver donor had the vascular anatomy of Michels type Ⅶ, e.g. a hepatic artery originating from the celiac trunk and going to the left lobe, an accessory left hepatic artery coming from the left gastric artery, and a replaced right hepatic artery coming from the superior mesenteric artery. This pattern of vascular supply is uncommon, representing less than 5%of cases. The replaced hepatic artery was reconstructed in the back-table with polypropylene suture 7.0 by connecting it to the stump of the splenic artery, and the celiac trunk of the graft was anastomosed to the recipient common hepatic artery.

  1. Spatiotemporal interference of photoelectron wave packets and the time scale of nonadiabatic transitions in the high-frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Koudai

    2016-10-01

    The method of the envelope Hamiltonian [K. Toyota, U. Saalmann, and J. M. Rost, New J. Phys. 17, 073005 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073005] is applied to further study a detachment dynamics of a model negative ion in one dimension in the high-frequency regime. This method is based on the Floquet approach, but the time dependency of an envelope function is explicitly kept for arbitrary pulse durations. Therefore, it is capable of describing not only a photon absorption or emission, but also a nonadiabatic transition which is induced by the time-varying envelope of the pulse. It was shown that the envelope Hamiltonian accurately retrieves the results obtained by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the underlying physics were well understood by the adiabatic approximation based on the envelope Hamiltonian. In this paper, we explore two more aspects of the detachment dynamics, which were not considered in our previous work. First, we determine the features of both a spatial and temporal interference of photoelectron wave packets in a photon-absorption process. We conclude that both of the interference mechanisms are universal in ionization dynamics in the high-frequency regime. Second, we extract a pulse duration which maximizes a yield of the nonadiabatic transition as a function of a pulse duration. It is shown that it becomes maximum when the pulse duration is comparable to a time scale of an electron.

  2. Early-phase photometry and spectroscopy of transitional Type Ia SN 2012ht: Direct constraint on the rise time

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Kawabata, Miho; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Masumoto, Kazunari; Kawabata, Koji S; Itoh, Ryosuke; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fumio; Matsumoto, Katsura; Nogami, Daisaku; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from $-15.8$ days to $+49.1$ days after $B$-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is $\\Delta m_{15}$($B$)$=1.39~\\pm~0.05$ mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the `transitional' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the $B$-band maximum is estimated to be $17.6 \\pm 0.5$ days and the time of the explosion is MJD $56277.98 \\pm 0.13$. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the lig...

  3. Characterization of the KOI-94 System with Transit Timing Variation Analysis: Implication for the Planet-Planet Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Kento; Taruya, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Suto, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    The KOI-94 system is a closely-packed, multi-transiting planetary system discovered by the Kepler space telescope. It is known as the first system that exhibited a rare event called a "planet-planet eclipse (PPE)," in which two planets partially overlap with each other in their double-transit phase. In this paper, we constrain the parameters of the KOI-94 system with an analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs). Such constraints are independent of the radial velocity (RV) analysis recently performed by Weiss and coworkers, and valuable in examining the reliability of the parameter estimate using TTVs. We numerically fit the observed TTVs of KOI-94c, KOI-94d, and KOI-94e for their masses, eccentricities, and longitudes of periastrons, and obtain the best-fit parameters including $m_{\\rm c} = 9.4_{-2.1}^{+2.4} M_{\\oplus}$, $m_{\\rm d} = 52.1_{-7.1}^{+6.9} M_{\\oplus}$, $m_{\\rm e} = 13.0_{-2.1}^{+2.5} M_{\\oplus}$, and $e \\lesssim 0.1$ for all the three planets. While these values are mostly in agreement wit...

  4. Time-dependent transition density matrix for visualizing charge-transfer excitations in photoexcited organic donor-acceptor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The time-dependent transition density matrix (TDM) is a useful tool to visualize and interpret the induced charges and electron-hole coherences of excitonic processes in large molecules. Combined with time-dependent density functional theory on a real-space grid (as implemented in the octopus code), the TDM is a computationally viable visualization tool for optical excitation processes in molecules. It provides real-time maps of particles and holes which gives information on excitations, in particular those that have charge-transfer character, that cannot be obtained from the density alone. Some illustration of the TDM and comparison with standard density difference plots will be shown for photoexcited organic donor-acceptor molecules. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1005651

  5. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of cancer cells undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Arumugam, Rameshkumar; Herschman, Harvey; Phelps, Michael E; Levine, R D

    2014-09-09

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) initiates the invasive and metastatic behavior of many epithelial cancers. Mechanisms underlying EMT are not fully known. Surprisal analysis of mRNA time course data from lung and pancreatic cancer cells stimulated to undergo TGF-β1-induced EMT identifies two phenotypes. Examination of the time course for these phenotypes reveals that EMT reprogramming is a multistep process characterized by initiation, maturation, and stabilization stages that correlate with changes in cell metabolism. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of the expression levels throughout the transition in terms of two state variables. The landscape of the free energy changes during the EMT for the lung cancer cells shows a stable intermediate state. Existing data suggest this is the previously proposed maturation stage. Using a single-cell ATP assay, we demonstrate that the TGF-β1-induced EMT for lung cancer cells, particularly during the maturation stage, coincides with a metabolic shift resulting in increased cytosolic ATP levels. Surprisal analysis also characterizes the absolute expression levels of the mRNAs and thereby examines the homeostasis of the transcription system during EMT.

  6. A Comparative Analysis of the Price Index in Transition Countries in the Time of Globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Igor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation with all its features can be divided in two segments - good and bad. When we look at the good side of globalisation, it is obvious that it has erased boundaries between countries in terms of trade, education, knowledge sharing, and other new technologies, while on the other hand, the bad side is that it has created a considerable gap between developed and developing countries, then different types of commercial, political and other conditioning, and dependence on strong, developed states. A great contribution to the negative part of globalisation was of economic instability that occurred at the beginning of this century and which consequences are still present in the world. In this article, we presented the impact of economic instability on the price index trough a comparative analysis of transition countries such as Montenegro, Serbia and Croatia over a period of five years (Croatia has just recently become a member of the European Union and due to that fact it was included in this study. The survey covered price indices relating to the prices of industrial products for the domestic markets, consumer price indices, indices of the hospitality services and the prices of the agricultural products.

  7. [Preventive medicine in times of a rapid epidemiologic transition in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Han

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the foundation of the Korean Society for Preventive Medicine in 1947, members of the Society had made remarkable contributions to the public health development and national health promotion. They had played key roles in establishing national health system, improving environmental hygiene, controlling infectious and chronic diseases, promoting family planning, improving industrial and environmental health, and developing health service management. However, the Society had less actively responded to the changes in health service needs of the population that were caused by a rapid epidemiologic transition in last a few decades. Early detection and treatment of chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular diseases and risk reduction by the life style modification are major approaches to the contemporary national health problems and they are the core contents of preventive medicine. The author proposed to develop the clinical preventive medicine specialist who will have additional training in clinical medicine for health screening and life style modification to the current preventive medicine training program and thus will be able to provide comprehensive preventive medical services. Another area that the Society may take the initiative is training preventive medicine specialist in the disaster, including bioterrorism, preparedness and management. The Society should be more active in proposing health policy and health service program and also participate collectively in a large scale health research project of the government. These approaches may not only contribute more effectively to the national health promotion but also improve the identity of the Society.

  8. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  9. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    We develop a theory for residence times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Forster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of residence time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory is consistent with the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the carbon cycle, which is a simplified version of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach (CASA) model.

  10. Transition from discrete to continuous time of arrival distribution for a quantum particle

    CERN Document Server

    Galapon, E A; Egusquiza, I; Muga, J G; Egusquiza, Inigo; Galapon, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    We show that the Kijowski distribution for time of arrivals in the entire real line is the limiting distribution of the time of arrival distribution in a confining box as its length increases to infinity. The dynamics of the confined time of arrival eigenfunctions is also numerically investigated and demonstrated that the eigenfunctions evolve to have point supports at the arrival point at their respective eigenvalues in the limit of arbitrarilly large confining lengths, giving insight into the ideal physical content of the Kijowsky distribution.

  11. Coronary artery fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the coronary arteries ...

  12. Unifying phantom inflation with late-time acceleration: scalar phantom-non-phantom transition model and generalized holographic dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2005-01-01

    The unifying approach to early-time and late-time universe based on phantom cosmology is proposed. We consider gravity-scalar system which contains usual potential and scalar coupling function in front of kinetic term. As a result, the possibility of phantom-non-phantom transition appears in such a way that universe could have effectively phantom equation of state at early time as well as at late time. In fact, the oscillating universe may have several phantom and non-phantom phases. As a second model we suggest generalized holographic dark energy where infrared cutoff is identified with combination of FRW parameters: Hubble constant, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant and universe life-time (if finite). Depending on the specific choice of the model the number of interesting effects occur: the possibility to solve the coincidence problem, crossing of phantom divide and unification of early-time inflationary and late-time accelerating phantom universe. The bound for holographic entropy which d...

  13. Transition in the waiting-time distribution of price-change events in a global socioeconomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guannan; McDonald, Mark; Fenn, Dan; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Nicholas; Johnson, Neil F.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of developing a firmer theoretical understanding of inhomogeneous temporal processes-in particular, the waiting times in some collective dynamical system-is attracting significant interest among physicists. Quantifying the deviations between the waiting-time distribution and the distribution generated by a random process may help unravel the feedback mechanisms that drive the underlying dynamics. We analyze the waiting-time distributions of high-frequency foreign exchange data for the best executable bid-ask prices across all major currencies. We find that the lognormal distribution yields a good overall fit for the waiting-time distribution between currency rate changes if both short and long waiting times are included. If we restrict our study to long waiting times, each currency pair’s distribution is consistent with a power-law tail with exponent near to 3.5. However, for short waiting times, the overall distribution resembles one generated by an archetypal complex systems model in which boundedly rational agents compete for limited resources. Our findings suggest that a gradual transition arises in trading behavior between a fast regime in which traders act in a boundedly rational way and a slower one in which traders’ decisions are driven by generic feedback mechanisms across multiple timescales and hence produce similar power-law tails irrespective of currency type.

  14. Estimation of transit times in a Karst Aquifer system using environmental tracers: Application on the Jeita Aquifer system-Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Estimating transit times is essential for the assessment of aquifer vulnerability to contaminants. Groundwater in karst aquifer is assumed to be relatively young due to fast preferential pathways; slow flow components are present in water stored in the fissured matrix. Furthermore, transit times are site specific as they depend on recharge rates, temperatures, elevation, and flow media; saturated and unsaturated zones. These differences create significant variation in the groundwater age in karst systems as the water sampled will be a mix of different water that has been transported through different flow pathways (fissured matrix and conduits). Several methods can be applied to estimate water transit time of an aquifer such as artificial tracers, which provide an estimate for fast flow velocities. In this study, groundwater residence times in the Jeita spring aquifer (Lebanon) were estimated using several environmental tracers such as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Helium-Tritium (3H, 3H- 3He). Additional stable isotope and major ion analysis was performed to characterize water types. Groundwater samples were collected from six different wells in the Jeita catchment area (Jurassic Kesrouane aquifer) as well as from the spring and cave itself. The results are reproducible for the Tritium-Helium method, unlike for the CFC/SF6 methods that yielded poor results due to sampling problems. Tritium concentrations in all groundwater samples show nearly the same concentration (~2.73 TU) except for one sample with relatively lower tritium concentration (~2.26 TU). Ages ranging from 0.07 ± 0.07 years to 23.59 ± 0.00 years were obtained. The youngest age is attributed to the spring/ cave while the oldest ages were obtained in wells tapping the fissured matrix. Neon in these samples showed considerable variations and high delta Ne in some samples indicating high excess air. Four (4) samples showed extreme excess air (Delta-Ne is greater than 70 %) and

  15. Positron life time and annihilation Doppler broadening measurements on transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, B. (Eoetvoes Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Fizikai Kemiai es Radiologiai Tanszek); Varhelyi, Cs. (Babes-Bolyai Univ., Cluj (Romania)); Burger, K. (Eoetvoes Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Szervetlen es Analitikai Kemiai Intezet)

    1982-01-01

    Positron life time and annihilation Doppler broadening measurements have been carried out on 44 solid coordination compounds. Several correlations have been found between the annihilation life time (tau/sub 1/) and line shape parameters (L) and the chemical structure of the compounds. Halide ligands were the most active towards positrons. This fact supports the assumption on the possible formation of (e/sup +/X/sup -/) positron-halide bound state. The life time was decreasing and the annihilation energy spectra were broadening with the increasing negative character of the halides. The aromatic base ligands affected the positron-halide interaction according to their basicity and space requirement and thus they indirectly affected the annihilation parameters, too. In the planar and tetrahedral complexes the electron density on the central met--al ion affected directly the annihilation parameters, while in the octahedral mixed complexes it had only an ind--irect effect through the polarization of the halide ligands.

  16. What does the time constant of the pulmonary circulation tell us about the progression of right ventricular dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofiore, A; Wang, Z; Chesler, N C

    2015-06-01

    Compliance (C) and resistance (R) maintain a unique, inverse relationship in the pulmonary circulation, resulting in a constant characteristic time [Formula: see text] that has been observed in healthy subjects as well as patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, little is known about the dependence of right ventricular (RV) function on the coupled changes in R and C in the context of this inverse relationship. We hypothesized three simple dependencies of RV ejection fraction (RVEF) on R and C. The first model (linear-R) assumes a linear RVEF-R relation; the second (linear-C) assumes a linear RVEF-C relation; and the third one combines the former two in a mixed linear model. We found that the linear-R model and the mixed linear model are in good agreement with clinical evidence. A conclusive validation of these models will require more clinical data. Longitudinal data in particular are needed to identify the time course of ventricular-vascular impairment in PAH. Simple models like the ones we present here, once validated, will advance our understanding of the mechanisms of RV failure, which could improve strategies to manage RV dysfunction in PAH.

  17. Structural transitions and long-time self-diffusion of interacting colloids confined by a parabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euán-Díaz, Edith C; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Misko, Vyacheslav R; Peeters, François M; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2015-01-14

    We report on the ordering and dynamics of interacting colloidal particles confined by a parabolic potential. By means of Brownian dynamics simulations, we find that by varying the magnitude of the trap stiffness, it is possible to control the dimension of the system and, thus, explore both the structural transitions and the long-time self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the degree of confinement. We particularly study the structural ordering in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the confinement. Further analysis of the local distribution of the first-neighbors layer allows us to identify the different structural phases induced by the parabolic potential. These results are summarized in a structural state diagram that describes the way in which the colloidal suspension undergoes a structural re-ordering while increasing the confinement. To fully understand the particle dynamics, we take into account hydrodynamic interactions between colloids; the parabolic potential constricts the available space for the colloids, but it does not act on the solvent. Our findings show a non-linear behavior of the long-time self-diffusion coefficient that is associated to the structural transitions induced by the external field.

  18. Long-term effect of wholemeal bread on stool weight, transit time, fecal bile acids, fats, and neutral sterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, M A; Elton, R A; Smith, J H

    1986-03-01

    Stool weight, fecal constituents, bile acids, fat, neutral sterols, and intestinal transit time were recorded in 28 subjects over 18 mo. During the first 12 mo the subjects ate white bread. They were studied for an initial period of 7 days, and after 6 mo (study period 1). For the first 6 mo they ate their usual intake of bread, they then increased their white bread intake by 62 g/day for 6 mo (study period 2). The subjects ate a self-selected diet throughout the 18 mo study. During the last 6 mo (study period 3) the subjects replaced white bread by the same amount of wholemeal bread as in study period 2. No increase in stool weight occurred until study period 3 when there was an increase of 20%. There developed a linear relationship between stool weight and intestinal transit time which was not found during the initial first and second study periods. A seasonal influence on serum cholesterol was not observed during the wholemeal bread period. Fecal bile acid excretion was unchanged throughout the experiment.

  19. Short-Time Events, Coherence, and Structural Dynamics in Photochemistry of Aqueous Halogenated Transition Metal Dianions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascher T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved x-ray absorption, and computational photochemistry elucidate the photochemical pathway of hexabromoplatinate dianions that propagates through distortions of nascent penta-bromoplatinate anions caused by Jahn-Teller conical intersections and terminates at aquated product complexes.

  20. Performance impact on nuclear thermal propulsion of piloted Mars missions with short transit times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenheiser, T. J.; Gessner, K. S.; Alexander, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) are examined with respect to a specific mission scenario derived from Stafford Committee recommendations. The recommended mission scenario is a split/sprint opposition mission which includes a piloted vehicle and a cargo vehicle, and the baseline mission is developed from a reference trajectory. Key mision parameters are developed from the baseline mission, including engine-thrust levels, mission opportunity, and engine burn-time requirements. The impact of engine failure is also considered in terms of burn-time requirements, and other mission-performance issues considered include propulsion-technology assumptions, triple-perigee earth-departure burns, and Mars parking-orbit selection. The engine requirements call for a 50-75-klb engine-thrust level, maximum single burn time of 0.6 hours, and a maximum total-mission burn time of 1.7 hours. For a crew of 6, a 475-day total-mission trip with a 90-day stay at Mars is possible.

  1. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, G.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.; Visser, I.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases

  2. Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkeij Wolf, Jurriaan Jh; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Moonen, Justine Ef; van Osch, Matthias Jp; de Craen, Anton Jm; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Mast, Roos C; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurements using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling can be affected by vascular factors other than cerebral blood flow, such as flow velocity and arterial transit time. We aimed to elucidate the effects of common variations in vascular anatomy of the circle of Willis on pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal. In addition, we investigated whether possible differences in pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal could be mediated by differences in flow velocities. Two hundred and three elderly participants underwent magnetic resonance angiography of the circle of Willis and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling scans. Mean pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal was calculated for the gray matter of the main cerebral flow territories. Mean cerebellar gray matter pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in subjects having a posterior fetal circle of Willis variant with an absent P1 segment. The posterior fetal circle of Willis variants also showed a significantly higher pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal in the ipsilateral flow territory of the posterior cerebral artery. Flow velocity in the basilar artery was significantly lower in these posterior fetal circle of Willis variants. This study indicates that pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling measurements underestimate cerebral blood flow in the posterior flow territories and cerebellum of subjects with a highly prevalent variation in circle of Willis morphology. Additionally, our data suggest that this effect is mediated by concomitant differences in flow velocity between the supplying arteries.

  3. Transitional B Cells in Early Human B Cell Development – Time to Revisit the Paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Victoria G.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Townsend, Catherine L.; Lu, Grace H. C.; O’Hare, Joselli Silva; Mozeika, Alexander; Coolen, Anthonius C. C.; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, the cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood, and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDRH3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small, and only the size of the CDRH3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages. PMID:27994589

  4. Door-to-Needle Time Under 60 Minutes and Picture-to-Puncture Under 90 Minutes: Initiatives and Outcomes in Reducing Time to Recanalization for Cerebral Major Artery Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    OTA, Takahiro; SATO, Masayuki; AMANO, Tatsuo; MATSUMARU, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of stent retrievers has significantly improved outcomes of intravenous treatment for acute stroke due to major artery occlusion, and reducing the time to recanalization may achieve further improvements. We reviewed reductions in “door-to-needle time” (DNT) and “picture-to-puncture time” (P2P), as the results of measures to consolidate stroke response capabilities in our hospital, and compared treatment outcomes in acute recanalization patients. We investigated DNT by the route of admission for 96 consecutive patients who received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator between July 2012 and June 2015. We then retrospectively studied 52 patients with acute stroke who underwent endovascular recanalization within 8 h after stroke onset, grouped according to recanalization before (Group I; n = 23) or after (Group II; n = 29) introduction of stent retrievers. Between 2012 and 2015, mean DNT decreased. Significant differences between Groups I and II were only seen in times required, with significantly shorter DNT, picture-to-puncture time, admission to puncture time, and puncture to guiding catheter placement time in Group II. A considerable difference in DNT was seen according to the route of patient admission, and consolidation of hospital stroke response capability successfully reduced the time from admission to recanalization. PMID:27385058

  5. TraMoS project III: Improved physical parameters, timing analysis, and star-spot modelling of the WASP-4b exoplanet system from 38 transit observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, S; Rojo, P; Nascimbeni, V; Hidalgo, S; Astudillo-Defru, N; Concha, F; Contreras, Y; Servajean, E; Hinse, T C

    2013-01-01

    We report twelve new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-4b from the Transit Monitoring in the South Project (TraMoS) project. These transits are combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide an improved radius measurement of Rp = 1.395 +- 0.022 Rjup and improved transit ephemerides. In a new homogeneous analysis in search for Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) we find no evidence of those with RMS amplitudes larger than 20 seconds over a 4-year time span. This lack of TTVs rules out the presence of additional planets in the system with masses larger than about 2.5 M_earth, 2.0 M_earth, and 1.0 M_earth around the 1:2, 5:3 and 2:1 orbital resonances. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. Finally we perform a simple study of stellar spots configurations of the system and conclude that the star rotational period is about 34 days.

  6. Importance of vegetation, topography and flow paths for water transit times of base flow in alpine headwater catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mueller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mean transit time (MTT of water in a catchment gives information about storage, flow paths, sources of water and thus also about retention and release of solutes in a catchment. To our knowledge there are only a few catchment studies on the influence of vegetation cover changes on base flow MTTs. The main changes in vegetation cover in the Swiss Alps are massive shrub encroachment and forest expansion into formerly open habitats. Four small and relatively steep headwater catchments in the Swiss Alps (Ursern Valley were investigated to relate different vegetation cover to water transit times. Time series of water stable isotopes were used to calculate MTTs. The high temporal variation of the stable isotope signals in precipitation was strongly dampened in stream base flow samples. MTTs of the four catchments were 70 to 102 weeks. The strong dampening of the stable isotope input signal as well as stream water geochemistry points to deeper flow paths and mixing of waters of different ages at the catchments' outlets. MTTs were neither related to topographic indices nor vegetation cover. The major part of the quickly infiltrating precipitation likely percolates through fractured and partially karstified deeper rock zones, which increases the control of bedrock flow paths on MTT. Snow accumulation and the timing of its melt play an important role for stable isotope dynamics during spring and early summer. We conclude that, in mountainous headwater catchments with relatively shallow soil layers, the hydrogeological and geochemical patterns (i.e. geochemistry, porosity and hydraulic conductivity of rocks and snow dynamics influence storage, mixing and release of water in a stronger way than vegetation cover or topography do.

  7. Time-Transgressive Nature of the Magnetic Susceptibility Record across the Chinese Loess Plateau at the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Dong

    Full Text Available The loess stratigraphic boundary at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition defined by the magnetic susceptibility (MS has previously been assumed to be synchronous with the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 2/1 boundary, and approximately time-synchronous at different sections across the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP. However, although this assumption has been used as a basis for proxy-age model of Chinese loess deposits, it has rarely been tested by using absolute dating methods. In this study, we applied a single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR protocol to the 45-63 μm quartz grain-size fraction to derive luminescence ages for the last glacial and Holocene sections of three loess sections on a transect from southeast to northwest across the CLP. Based on the 33 closely spaced optically stimulated luminescence (OSL samples from the three sections, OSL chronologies were established using a polynomial curve fit at each section. Based on the OSL chronology, the timing of the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary, as defined by rapid changes in MS values, is dated at ~10.5 ka, 8.5 ka and 7.5 ka in the Yaoxian section, Jingchuan and Huanxian sections respectively. These results are clearly inconsistent with the MIS 2/1 boundary age of 12.05 ka, and therefore we conclude that the automatic correlation of the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, as inferred from the MS record, with the MIS 2/1 boundary is incorrect. The results clearly demonstrate that the marked changes in MS along the southeast to northwest transect are time-transgressive among the different sites, with the timing of significant paleosol development as indicated by the MS record being delayed by 3-4 ka in the northwest compared to the southeast. Our results suggest that this asynchronous paleosol development during the last deglacial was caused by the delayed arrival of the summer monsoon in the northwest CLP compared to the southeast.

  8. Understanding mean transit times in Andean tropical montane cloud forest catchments: combining tracer data, lumped parameter models and uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbe, E.; Windhorst, D.; Crespo, P.; Frede, H.-G.; Feyen, J.; Breuer, L.

    2013-12-01

    Weekly samples from surface waters, springs, soil water and rainfall were collected in a 76.9 km2 mountain rain forest catchment and its tributaries in southern Ecuador. Time series of the stable water isotopes δ18O and δ2H were used to calculate mean transit times (MTTs) and the transit time distribution functions (TTDs) solving the convolution method for seven lumped parameter models. For each model setup, the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology was applied to find the best predictions, behavioral solutions and parameter identifiability. For the study basin, TTDs based on model types such as the Linear-Piston Flow for soil waters and the Exponential-Piston Flow for surface waters and springs performed better than more versatile equations such as the Gamma and the Two Parallel Linear Reservoirs. Notwithstanding both approaches yielded a better goodness of fit for most sites, but with considerable larger uncertainty shown by GLUE. Among the tested models, corresponding results were obtained for soil waters with short MTTs (ranging from 3 to 12 weeks). For waters with longer MTTs differences were found, suggesting that for those cases the MTT should be based at least on an intercomparison of several models. Under dominant baseflow conditions long MTTs for stream water ≥2 yr were detected, a phenomenon also observed for shallow springs. Short MTTs for water in the top soil layer indicate a rapid exchange of surface waters with deeper soil horizons. Differences in travel times between soils suggest that there is evidence of a land use effect on flow generation.

  9. Analysis of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory of Transition Wavelengths of Thioaldehydes and Thioketones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiang; WANG Fan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Thioaldehydes and thioketones are candidates of new photoluminescence materials. The time-dependent density functional theory is applied to calculate the absorption and emission wavelengths of ten thiocarbonyl compounds using both B3LYP and PBE0 functionals. The theoretical results are in agreement with the measurable ones.Furthermore, it is found that the maximum absorption and emission wavelengths are linearly correlated to the C-S bond lengths.

  10. Value of Abdominal Radiography, Colonic Transit Time, and Rectal Ultrasound Scanning in the Diagnosis of Idiopathic Constipation in Children : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Marjolein Y.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Kurver, Miranda J.; Boluyt, Nicole; Benninga, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review evaluating the value of abdominal radiography, colonic transit time (CTT), and rectal ultrasound scanning in the diagnosis of idiopathic constipation in children. Study design Eligible studies were those assessing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal radiography,

  11. On the Feasibility of a Timely Transition to a More Sustainable Energy Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Tomkiewicz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper uses the framework of the IPAT equation, as applied to CO2 emission, to decompose the various driving forces in the global energy use. Data from recent history are superimposed on projections of SRES IPCC scenarios to determine if enough sustainable capacity can be built to prevent irreversible ecological deterioration. The conclusion from the analysis is that, in agreement with the IPCC 4th report, until about 2030 there are no large differences between a sustainable scenario and the one that resembles “business as usual”. The sharp divergence that follows stems from different estimates in population growth and in the percentage of use of fossil fuels in the total energy mix. Decomposition of alternative energy options indicate that the rate of increase of alternatives such as hydroelectric and nuclear start with a relatively high base but a growth rate too short for major contribution to a timely replacement of fossil fuels while wind and solar starts from a much lower base but rate of growth, if maintained, that can satisfy a timely replacement.

  12. Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy of Inner Shell Transitions Using Time-Of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Jiang, Neng; Weiss, A. H.

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) has been shown to have unique advantages over conventional electron collision induced Auger techniques, including the ability to eliminate the secondary electron background and selectively probe the top-most atomic layer on the sample surface. Here we report on the development of a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer which combines features high efficiency magnetic transport and parrallel energy measurment with high resolution by using an innovative timing method. The new TOF-PAES system, was used to make the first quantitative comparative measurements of the Auger intensities associated with the annihilation of positrons with the deep core levels (1s) of S KLL (180eV), C KLL (270eV), N KLL (360eV), and O KLL (510eV). Experimental results of Auger probabilities at outer core level (3s, 3P) of Cu M2,3VV (60eV), M1VV (105eV) are compared with the theoretical value of Jensen and Weiss. Quantitatively study the surface adsorbate process on Cu is performed and concentration changes of surface components are obtained. These results demonstrate that TOF-PAES can be used to obtain quantitative,top-layer specific, information from chemically important elements including those with relatively deep core levels (e.g. C and O).

  13. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Al