WorldWideScience

Sample records for artefactual subcortical hyperperfusion

  1. Artefactual subcortical hyperperfusion in PET studies normalized to global mean: lessons from Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Aanerud, Joel; Gjedde, Albert

    2008-01-01

    either the global mean or to the white matter mean. RESULTS: In Simulation I, global normalization robustly created artefactual subcortical increases, irrespective of analysis methodology. Simulation II demonstrated that an increased signal from the small subcortical structures involved in PD can......AIM: Recent studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) report subcortical increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc), after conventional normalization to the global mean. However, if the global mean CBF or CMRglc is decreased in the PD group, this normalization...... necessarily generates artificial relative increases in regions unaffected by the disease. This potential bias may explain the reported subcortical increases in PD. To test this hypothesis, we performed simulations with manipulation and subsequently analysis of sets of quantitative CBF maps by voxel...

  2. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishii, Ryuuichi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi

    2000-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a well-known brain SPECT finding in stroke patients. Few reports, however, have described supratentorial and contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion (crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion, CCH). We assessed the incidence of CCH in 33 patients with cerebral hyperperfusion. Brain SPECT showed CCH in five patients out of 20 epilepsy and three of 13 patients with acute encephalitis. These eight patients with CCH had recent epileptic attack. CCH was found in ECD SPECT as well as HM-PAO. The contralateral cerebellar activity correlated with the cerebral activity in patients with CCH. CCH would have a relation with supratentrial hyperfunction in epilepsy and acute encephalitis. (author)

  3. Hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the incidence and causes of hyperperfusion syndrome occurring after carotid artery stenting (CAS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical database of 417 consecutive patients who were treated with CAS in our department to identify patients who developed hyperperfusion syndrome and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging was performed before and after CAS in 269 cases. A Spearman's rho nonparametric correlation was performed to determine whether there was a correlation between the occurrence/development of hyperperfusion syndrome and the patient's age, degree of stenosis on the stented and contralateral side, risk factors such as diabetes, smoking, hypertension, adiposity, gender and fluoroscopy time, and mean area of postprocedural lesions as well as preexisting lesions. Significance was established at p < 0.05. Of the 417 carotid arteries stented and where MRI was also completed, we found hyperperfusion syndrome in 2.4% (ten cases). Patients who had preexisting brain lesions (previous or acute stroke) were at a higher risk of developing hyperperfusion syndrome (p = 0.022; Spearman's rho test). We could not validate any correlation with the other patient characteristics. Extensive microvascular disease may be a predictor of hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent placement. We believe that further studies are warranted to predict more accurately which patients are at greater risk of developing this often fatal complication. (orig.)

  4. Hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Reith, W.; Krick, C.; Karp, K.; Zimmer, A.; Struffert, T.; Kuehn, A.L.; Papanagiotou, P. [University of the Saarland, Department for Interventional and Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Roth, C.; Haass, A. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Neurology, Homburg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    This study assesses the incidence and causes of hyperperfusion syndrome occurring after carotid artery stenting (CAS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical database of 417 consecutive patients who were treated with CAS in our department to identify patients who developed hyperperfusion syndrome and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging was performed before and after CAS in 269 cases. A Spearman's rho nonparametric correlation was performed to determine whether there was a correlation between the occurrence/development of hyperperfusion syndrome and the patient's age, degree of stenosis on the stented and contralateral side, risk factors such as diabetes, smoking, hypertension, adiposity, gender and fluoroscopy time, and mean area of postprocedural lesions as well as preexisting lesions. Significance was established at p < 0.05. Of the 417 carotid arteries stented and where MRI was also completed, we found hyperperfusion syndrome in 2.4% (ten cases). Patients who had preexisting brain lesions (previous or acute stroke) were at a higher risk of developing hyperperfusion syndrome (p = 0.022; Spearman's rho test). We could not validate any correlation with the other patient characteristics. Extensive microvascular disease may be a predictor of hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent placement. We believe that further studies are warranted to predict more accurately which patients are at greater risk of developing this often fatal complication. (orig.)

  5. Topographic changes of ictal hyperperfusion during progression of clinical seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate ictal hyperperfusion patterns during semiologic progression of seizures, we performed SPECT subtraction in 50 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The patients were categorized into five groups according to semiologic progression during ictal SPECT (group-1 having only aura; group-2 having motionless staring with or without aura; group-3 having motionless staring and then automatism with or without aure; group-4 having motionless staring and then automatism with or withour aura; group-4 having motionless staring and then dystonic posturing with or without aura and automatism; group-5 having motionless staring, automatism, then head version and generalized seizures with or without aura and dystonic posturing). In group-1, three patients showed ipsilateral temporal hyperperfusion and two had bilateral temporal hyperperfusion with ipsilateral predominance. In group-2, three (42.9%) patients showed bilateral temporal hyperperfusion with unilateral predominance and four (57.1%) revealed insular hyperperfusion of epileptic side. In group-3, 15 patients (88.2%) showed bilateral temporal hyperperfusion with unilateral predominance and 12 (70.6%) insular hyperperfusion. In group-4, 11 patients (84.6%) showed basal ganglia hyperperfusion on the opposite hemisphere to the side of the dystonic posturing. In group-5, there were multiple hyperperfusion areas in the frontal, temporal and basal ganglia regions. However, the injection times of radiotracer in five groups were relatively short and similar. The semiologic progression in TLE seizures were related to the propagation of hyperperfusion from ipsilateral temporal lobe to contralateral temporal lobe, insula, basal ganglia, and frontal lobe. Not only the radiotracer injection time but also semiologic progression after the injection was significant in determining hyperperfusion pattern of ictal SPECT

  6. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called luxury perfusion, has been defined using intra-arterial 133Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern

  7. Hyperperfusion on Perfusion Computed Tomography Following Revascularization for Acute Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the findings of hyperperfusion on perfusion computed tomography (CT) in four patients following revascularization for acute stroke. Material and Methods: In 2002-2003, among a series of 6 patients presenting with an acute stroke and treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis, we observed the presence of hyperperfusion in 3 patients on the follow-up CT perfusion. We included an additional patient who was treated with intravenous thrombolysis and who had hyperperfusion on the follow-up CT perfusion. We retrospectively analyzed their CT perfusion maps. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were compared between the affected territory and the normal contralateral hemisphere. Results: In the four patients, the mean CBV and CBF were 3.6±2.0 ml/100 g and 39±25 ml/100 g/min in the affected territory compared to the normal side (mean CBV 2.7±2.1 ml/100 g, mean CBF = 27±23 ml/100 g/min). There was no intracranial hemorrhage in the hyperperfused territories. At follow-up CT, some hyperperfused brain areas progressed to infarction, while others retained normal white to gray matter differentiation. Conclusion: CT perfusion can demonstrate hyperperfusion, which can be seen in an ischemic brain territory following recanalization

  8. Cerebral infarction showed hyperperfusion pattern on radionuclide cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four patients of middle cerebral infarctin showed hyperperfusion on radionuclide cerebral angiography and fan-shape accumulation at the area of middle cerebral artery on early and delayed brain scan. In these patients, bone scanning agents such as sup(99m)Tc-EHDP or sup(99m)Tc-MDP also prominently accumulated at the area of infarction. These findings were observed on the study when it was performed within seventeen days after attack, but reexamination tended to show normal or decreased perfusion on radionuclide cerebral angiography and improve abnormal accumulation on brain scans. The clinical diagnosis of these three patients were cerebral embolism with heart disease, but one patient was internal carotid artery occlusion. The prognosis of all patients were very good. The hyperperfusion on radionuclide cerebral angiography of these patients represents the luxury perfusion in the lesion and these infarction has been called hot stroke by Yarnell et al. (author)

  9. Ictal hyperperfusion of cerebellum and basal ganglia in temporal lobe epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ictal perfusion patterns of cerebellum and basal ganglia have not been systematically investigated in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Their ictal perfusion patterns were analyzed in relation with temporal lobe and frontal lobe hyperperfusion during TLE seizures using SPECT subtraction. Thirty-three TLE patients had interictal and ictal SPECT, video-EEG monitoring. SPGR MRI, and SPECT subtraction with MRI co-registration. The vermian cerebellar hyperperfusion (CH) was observed in 26 patients (78.8%) and hemispheric CH in 25 (75.8%). Compared to the side of epileptogenic temporal lobe, there were seven ipsilateral hemispheric CH (28.0%), fifteen contralateral hemispheric CH( 60.0%) and three bilateral hemispheric CH( 12.0%). CH was more frequently observed in patients with additional frontal hyperperfusion (15/15, 93.3%) than in patients without frontal hyperperfusion (11/18, 61.1 %). The basal ganglia hyperperfusion (14/15, 93.3%) than in patients without frontal hyperperfusion (BGH) was seen in 11 of the 15 patients with frontotemporal hyperperfusion (73.3%) and 11 of the 18 with temporal hyperperfusion only (61.1%). In 17 patients with unilateral BGH, contralateral CH to the BGH was observed in 14 (82.5%) and ipsilateral CH to BGH in 2 (11.8%) and bilateral CH in 1 (5.9%). The cerebellar hyperperfusion and basal ganglia hyperperfusion during seizures of TLE can be contralateral, ipsilateral or bilateral to the seizure focus. The presence of additional frontal or basal ganglia hyperperfusion was more frequently associated with contralateral hemispheric CH to their sides. However, temporal lobe hyperperfusion appears to be related with both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheric CH

  10. Cortical and subcortical hyperfusion during migraine and cluster headache measured by Xe CT-CBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution, color-coded images of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) were made utilizing stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography among patients with common migraine (n=18), classic migraine (n=12) and cluster headache (n=5). During spontaneously occurring headache in common and classic migraine patients, LCBF values for cerebral cortex and subcortical gray and white matter were diffusely increased by 20-40% with the exception of the occipital lobes. LCBF increases involved both hemispheres whether the head pain was unilateral or bilateral. No significant differences were noted in the degree or pattern of LCBF increases during headaches of common and classic migraineurs. Similar cerebral hyperperfusion of greater magnitude was observed during cluster headaches but was more prominent on the side of the head pain. Present observations do not support the hypothesis of spreading cortical depression as a cause of classic migraine. From a hemodynamic viewpoint, LCBF increases during headaches of common or classic migraine or cluster appear similar. Evidence is adduced that sympathetic hypofunction with denervation hypersensitivity of cerebral vessels plays a role in the cerebral hyperperfusion of migraine headaches. More pronounced unilateral autonomic derangements appear to account for the symptoms and cerebral hyperperfusion associated with cluster headaches. (orig.)

  11. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA. An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Methods: Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR] were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Results: Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%. The area under the curve (AUC of receiver operating characteristic: AUC VBI = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC VR = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. Conclusions: The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  12. Public Policy and Individual Labor Market Discrimination: An Artefactual Field Experiment in China

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Dulleck; Jonas Fooken; Yumei He

    2012-01-01

    We study discrimination based on the hukou system, a policy segregating migrants and locals in urban China. We hired household aids as participants in our artefactual field experiment and use a gift exchange game to study labor market discrimination. We fi nd that social discrimination based on hukou status also implies individual level discrimination. To identify whether discrimination is statistical or taste-based we introduce the wage promising game, a gift exchange game with a cheap talk ...

  13. Psychological Incentives, Financial Incentives, and Risk Attitudes in Tournaments: An Artefactual Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Cadsby, Bram; ENGLE-WARNICK, Jim; Fang, Tony; Song, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Tournaments are widely used to assign bonuses and determine promotions. Tournament-based compensation is motivating because of the link between relative performance and financial rewards. However, performing relatively well (poorly) may also yield psychological benefits (pain). This may also stimulate effort. Through a real-effort artefactual field experiment with factory workers in China, we examine how both psychological and financial incentives, together with attitudes toward risk, may inf...

  14. Relative hyperperfusion by SPECT in a family with a presenilin 1 (T245P) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Lee, Terri; Wen, Johnny; Chung, Julia A; Vasinrapee, Panukorn; Mishkin, Frederick S

    2008-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease often differ clinically from sporadic disease with the onset of seizures, spasticity and myoclonus early in the disease course. Similarly imaging characteristics may also differ. We report the findings of relative hyperperfusion by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobe in four affected family members carrying a presenilin 1 mutation. SPECT of the four individuals was compared to an age-matched normal database. We speculate that the findings of relative medial orbitofrontal and anterior temporal lobe hyperperfusion may be a marker of early onset Alzheimer's disease in this family. PMID:19085559

  15. Ipsilateral Cerebral and Contralateral Cerebellar Hyperperfusion in Patients with Unilateral Cerebral Infarction; SPM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sun Pyo; Yoon, Joon Kee; Choi, Bong Hoi; Joo, In Soo; Yoon, Seok Nam [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Cortical reorganization has an important role in the recovery of stroke. We analyzed the compensatory cerebral and cerebellar perfusion change in patients with unilateral cerebral infarction using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Fifty seven {sup 99m}Tc-Ethylene Cystein Diethylester (ECD) cerebral perfusion SPECT images of 57 patients (male/female=38/19, mean age=56{+-}17 years) with unilateral cerebral infarction were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the location (left, right) and the onset (acute, chronic) of infarction. Each subgroup was compared with normal controls (male/female=11/1, mean age =36{+-}10 years) in a voxel-by-voxel manner (two sample t-test, p<0.001) using SPM. All 4 subgroups showed hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex, but not in the contralateral cerebral cortex. Chronic left and right infarction groups revealed hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex, meanwhile, acute subgroups did not. Contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion was also demonstrated in the chronic left infarction group. Using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT, we observed ipsilateral cerebral and contralateral cerebeller hyperperfusion in patients with cerebral infarction. However, whether these findings are related to the recovery of cerebral functions should be further evaluated.

  16. Transient hyperperfusion after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery on brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We designed this study to investigate the transient relative hyperperfusion and its clinical implication after STA (superficial temporal artery) to MCA (middle cerebral artery) bypass surgery in patients with ischemic cerebral stroke. In 25 patients, comprising of 11 moyamoya disease (MMD) and 14 atherosclerotic disease (ASD), STA-MCA anastomosis was performed to distal cortical branches of middle cerebral artery for revascularization. 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT was performed before, 3 days and then 10 days after bypass surgery. Each image was spatially normalized into the standard space and changes of brain perfusion in the entire internal carotid artery (ICA) territory were evaluated using standardized ROIs. In the overall analysis including all patients, the surgery effectively increased ICA territory perfusion on the 3rd and 10th day after bypass surgery in comparison with the preoperative one (p<0.01 and p=0.03). The 3rd day perfusion was significantly higher than the 10th day one (p<0.01), demonstrating transient relative hyperperfusion on the 3rd day compared with the 10th day. In MMD group, such transient increase of perfusion was most severe in the vicinity of the anastomosis site, and more definite than the ASD group. Three patients, 2 ASD and one MMD, showed temporary neurological deterioration (dysphasia or dysarthria) beginning within 3 days after surgery and resolving completely within 2 weeks after onset, without hemorrhage, infarction or other serious defects on CT scan. Their neurological changes correlated well with the focal perfusion changes confirmed by SPECT images on the 3rd and 10th postoperative day. Transient relative hyperperfusion was observed on postoperative 3rd day compared with the 10th day following STA-MCA bypass surgery. In some patients, such transient increase of focal perfusion seems to provoke temporary neurological deterioration

  17. Transient hyperperfusion after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery on brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Oh, Chang Wan; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Eun Ju; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We designed this study to investigate the transient relative hyperperfusion and its clinical implication after STA (superficial temporal artery) to MCA (middle cerebral artery) bypass surgery in patients with ischemic cerebral stroke. In 25 patients, comprising of 11 moyamoya disease (MMD) and 14 atherosclerotic disease (ASD), STA-MCA anastomosis was performed to distal cortical branches of middle cerebral artery for revascularization. 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT was performed before, 3 days and then 10 days after bypass surgery. Each image was spatially normalized into the standard space and changes of brain perfusion in the entire internal carotid artery (ICA) territory were evaluated using standardized ROIs. In the overall analysis including all patients, the surgery effectively increased ICA territory perfusion on the 3rd and 10th day after bypass surgery in comparison with the preoperative one (p<0.01 and p=0.03). The 3rd day perfusion was significantly higher than the 10th day one (p<0.01), demonstrating transient relative hyperperfusion on the 3rd day compared with the 10th day. In MMD group, such transient increase of perfusion was most severe in the vicinity of the anastomosis site, and more definite than the ASD group. Three patients, 2 ASD and one MMD, showed temporary neurological deterioration (dysphasia or dysarthria) beginning within 3 days after surgery and resolving completely within 2 weeks after onset, without hemorrhage, infarction or other serious defects on CT scan. Their neurological changes correlated well with the focal perfusion changes confirmed by SPECT images on the 3rd and 10th postoperative day. Transient relative hyperperfusion was observed on postoperative 3rd day compared with the 10th day following STA-MCA bypass surgery. In some patients, such transient increase of focal perfusion seems to provoke temporary neurological deterioration.

  18. Ipsilateral Cerebral and Contralateral Cerebellar Hyperperfusion in Patients with Unilateral Cerebral Infarction; SPM Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortical reorganization has an important role in the recovery of stroke. We analyzed the compensatory cerebral and cerebellar perfusion change in patients with unilateral cerebral infarction using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Fifty seven 99mTc-Ethylene Cystein Diethylester (ECD) cerebral perfusion SPECT images of 57 patients (male/female=38/19, mean age=56±17 years) with unilateral cerebral infarction were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the location (left, right) and the onset (acute, chronic) of infarction. Each subgroup was compared with normal controls (male/female=11/1, mean age =36±10 years) in a voxel-by-voxel manner (two sample t-test, p99mTc-ECD SPECT, we observed ipsilateral cerebral and contralateral cerebeller hyperperfusion in patients with cerebral infarction. However, whether these findings are related to the recovery of cerebral functions should be further evaluated

  19. The role of perfusion computed tomography in the prediction of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien Hung Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS following carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no reliable parameters to predict HPS. The aim of this study was to clarify whether perfusion computed tomography (CT is a feasible and reliable tool in predicting HPS after CAS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a retrospective case-control study of 54 patients (11 HPS patients and 43 non-HPS with unilateral severe stenosis of the carotid artery who underwent CAS. We compared the prevalence of vascular risk factors and perfusion CT parameters including regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF, and time to peak (TTP within seven days prior to CAS. Demographic information, risk factors for atherosclerosis, and perfusion CT parameters were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The rCBV index was calculated as [(ipsilateral rCBV - contralateral rCBV/contralateral rCBV], and indices of rCBF and TTP were similarly calculated. We found that eleven patients had HPS, including five with intracranial hemorrhages (ICHs of whom three died. After a comparison with non-HPS control subjects, independent predictors of HPS included the severity of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis, 3-hour mean systolic blood pressure (3 h SBP after CAS, pre-stenting rCBV index >0.15 and TTP index >0.22. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of severe ipsilateral carotid stenosis, 3 h SBP after CAS, rCBV index and TTP index provides a potential screening tool for predicting HPS in patients with unilateral carotid stenosis receiving CAS. In addition, adequate management of post-stenting blood pressure is the most important treatable factor in preventing HPS in these high risk patients.

  20. Prediction of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid artery stenting by CT perfusion imaging with acetazolamide challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshie, Tomohide; Ueda, Toshihiro; Takada, Tatsuro; Nogoshi, Shinji; Fukano, Takayuki [St. Marianna University Toyoko Hospital, Department of Strokology, Stroke Center, Kawasaki (Japan); Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Neurology, Kawasaki (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS) is an uncommon but serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of CT perfusion imaging (CTP) with acetazolamide challenge to identify patients at risk for HPS after CAS. We retrospectively analyzed 113 patients who underwent CTP with rest and acetazolamide challenge before CAS. CTP maps were assessed for absolute and relative cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), and change of each parameter before and after acetazolamide challenge. Patients were divided into two groups according to the HPS after the CAS. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the most accurate CTP parameter for the prediction of HPS. Nine of 113 patients had HPS. There were significant differences for absolute and relative values of resting CBF (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026), resting MTT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.004), post-acetazolamide CBF (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001), post-acetazolamide MTT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002), and %changes of CBF (p = 0.009) between the HPS and non-HPS groups. ROC curve analysis showed that the CTP parameters with the maximal area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) for HPS was the absolute value of post-acetazolamide MTT (AUC 0.909) and the absolute value of resting MTT (AUC 0.896). Pretreatment CTP with acetazolamide challenge could identify patients at risk for HPS after CAS. Although the CTP parameter that most accurately identified patients at risk for HPS was the absolute value of post-acetazolamide MTT, resting MTT was sufficiently accurate. (orig.)

  1. Subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity throughout the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Velte, Caroline; Göttfert, Fabian; Simons, Mikael; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy recently revealed a ~190 nm periodic cytoskeleton lattice consisting of actin, spectrin, and other proteins underneath the membrane of cultured hippocampal neurons. Whether the periodic cytoskeleton lattice is a structural feature of all neurons and how it is modified when axons are ensheathed by myelin forming glial cells is not known. Here, STED nanoscopy is used to demonstrate that this structure is a commonplace of virtually all neuron types in vitro. To check how the subcortical meshwork is modified during myelination, we studied sciatic nerve fibers from adult mice. Periodicity of both actin and spectrin was uncovered at the internodes, indicating no substantial differences between unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Remarkably, the actin/spectrin pattern was also detected in glial cells such as cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Altogether our work shows that the periodic subcortical cytoskeletal meshwork is a fundamental characteristic of cells in the nervous system and is not a distinctive feature of neurons, as previously thought. PMID:26947559

  2. Subcortical Correlates of Individual Differences in Aptitude

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Rex E.; Ryman, Sephira G.; Vakhtin, Andrei A.; Jessica Carrasco; Chris Wertz; Flores, Ranee A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of individual differences encompasses broad constructs including intelligence, creativity, and personality. However, substantially less research is devoted to the study of specific aptitudes in spite of their importance to educational, occupational, and avocational success. We sought to determine subcortical brain structural correlates of several broad aptitudes including Math, Vocabulary, Foresight, Paper Folding, and Inductive Reasoning in a large (N = 107), healthy, young (age ra...

  3. Subcortical correlates of individual differences in aptitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E; Ryman, Sephira G; Vakhtin, Andrei A; Carrasco, Jessica; Wertz, Chris; Flores, Ranee A

    2014-01-01

    The study of individual differences encompasses broad constructs including intelligence, creativity, and personality. However, substantially less research is devoted to the study of specific aptitudes in spite of their importance to educational, occupational, and avocational success. We sought to determine subcortical brain structural correlates of several broad aptitudes including Math, Vocabulary, Foresight, Paper Folding, and Inductive Reasoning in a large (N = 107), healthy, young (age range  = 16-29) cohort. Subcortical volumes were measured using an automated technique (FreeSurfer) across structures including bilateral caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala, and five equal regions of the corpus callosum. We found that performance on measures of each aptitude was predicted by different subcortical structures: Math--higher right nucleus accumbens volume; Vocabulary--higher left hippocampus volume; Paper Folding--higher right thalamus volume; Foresight--lower right thalamus and higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume; Inductive Reasoning--higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume. Our results support general findings, within the cognitive neurosciences, showing lateralization of structure-function relationships, as well as more specific relationships between individual structures (e.g., left hippocampus) and functions relevant to particular aptitudes (e.g., Vocabulary). PMID:24586770

  4. Subcortical correlates of individual differences in aptitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex E Jung

    Full Text Available The study of individual differences encompasses broad constructs including intelligence, creativity, and personality. However, substantially less research is devoted to the study of specific aptitudes in spite of their importance to educational, occupational, and avocational success. We sought to determine subcortical brain structural correlates of several broad aptitudes including Math, Vocabulary, Foresight, Paper Folding, and Inductive Reasoning in a large (N = 107, healthy, young (age range  = 16-29 cohort. Subcortical volumes were measured using an automated technique (FreeSurfer across structures including bilateral caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala, and five equal regions of the corpus callosum. We found that performance on measures of each aptitude was predicted by different subcortical structures: Math--higher right nucleus accumbens volume; Vocabulary--higher left hippocampus volume; Paper Folding--higher right thalamus volume; Foresight--lower right thalamus and higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume; Inductive Reasoning--higher mid anterior corpus callosum volume. Our results support general findings, within the cognitive neurosciences, showing lateralization of structure-function relationships, as well as more specific relationships between individual structures (e.g., left hippocampus and functions relevant to particular aptitudes (e.g., Vocabulary.

  5. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion on ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT: clinical significance for differentiation of mesial or lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and related factors for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion (CCH) was helpful in discriminating mesial from lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and what other factors were related in the development of CCH on ictal brain SPECT. We conducted retrospective analysis in 59 patients with TLE (M:41, F:18; 27.4±7.8 years old; mesial TLE: 51, lateral TLE: 8), which was confirmed by invasive EEG and surgical outcome (Engel class 1, 2). All the patients underwent ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT and their injection time from ictal EEG onset on video EEG monitoring ranged from 11 sec to 75 sec (32.6±19.5 sec) in 39 patients. Multiple factors including age, TLE subtype (mesial TLE or lateral TLE), propatation pattern (hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobes, spread to adjacent lobes or contralateral hemisphere) and injection time were evaluated for their relationship with CCH using multiple logistic regression analysis CCH was observed in 18 among 59 patients. CCH developed in 29% (15/51) of mesial TLE patients and 38% (3/8) of lateral TLE patients. CCH was associated with propagation pattern; no CCH (0/13) in patients with hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobe, 30% (7/23) in patients with propagation to adjacent lobes, 48% (11/23) to contralateral hemisphere. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that propagation pattern (p=3D0.01) and age (p=3D0.02) were related to the development of CCH. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in ictal brain SPECT did not help differentiate mesial from lateral remporal lobe epilepsy. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion was associated with propagation pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy and age.=20

  6. Gait and Equilibrium in Subcortical Vascular Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Moretti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcortical vascular dementia is a clinical entity, widespread, even challenging to diagnose and correctly treat. Patients with this diagnosis are old, frail, often with concomitant pathologies, and therefore, with many drugs in therapy. We tried to diagnose and follow up for three years more than 600 patients. Study subjects were men and women, not bedridden, aged 68–94 years, outpatients, recruited from June, 1st 2007 to June, 1st 2010. We examined them clinically, neurologically, with specific consideration on drug therapies. Our aim has been to define gait and imbalance problem, if eventually coexistent with the pathology of white matter and/or with the worsening of the deterioration. Drug intake interference has been detected and considered.

  7. Individual Subject Classification of Mixed Dementia from Pure Subcortical Vascular Dementia Based on Subcortical Shape Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Jeonghun; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yoon, Cindy W.; Noh, Young; Kim, Geon Ha; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Jae Seung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Chang-Hun; Seo, Sang Won; Weiner, Michael W.; Na, Duk L.

    2013-01-01

    Subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD), one of common causes of dementia, has concomitant Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in over 30%, termed “mixed dementia”. Identifying mixed dementia from SVaD is important because potential amyloid-targeted therapies may be effective for treatment in mixed dementia. The purpose of this study was to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We measured brain amyloid deposition using the 11C-Pittsburgh compound B po...

  8. Portal Hyperperfusion after Extended Hepatectomy Does Not Induce a Hepatic Arterial Buffer Response (HABR but Impairs Mitochondrial Redox State and Hepatocellular Oxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dold

    Full Text Available Portal hyperperfusion after extended hepatectomy or small-for-size liver transplantation may induce organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms, however, are still not completely understood. Herein, we analysed whether hepatectomy-associated portal hyperperfusion induces a hepatic arterial buffer response, i.e., an adaptive hepatic arterial constriction, which may cause hepatocellular hypoxia and organ dysfunction.Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 30%, 70% and 90% hepatectomy. Baseline measurements before hepatectomy served as controls. Hepatic arterial and portal venous flows were analysed by ultrasonic flow measurement. Microvascular blood flow and mitochondrial redox state were determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Hepatic tissue pO2 was analysed by polarographic techniques. Hepatic function and integrity were studied by bromosulfophthalein bile excretion and liver histology.Portal blood flow was 2- to 4-fold increased after 70% and 90% hepatectomy. This, however, did not provoke a hepatic arterial buffer response. Nonetheless, portal hyperperfusion and constant hepatic arterial blood flow were associated with a reduced mitochondrial redox state and a decreased hepatic tissue pO2 after 70% and 90% hepatectomy. Microvascular blood flow increased significantly after hepatectomy and functional sinusoidal density was found only slightly reduced. Major hepatectomy further induced a 2- to 3-fold increase of bile flow. This was associated with a 2-fold increase of bromosulfophthalein excretion.Portal hyperperfusion after extended hepatectomy does not induce a hepatic arterial buffer response but reduces mitochondrial redox state and hepatocellular oxygenation. This is not due to a deterioration of microvascular perfusion, but rather due to a relative hypermetabolism of the remnant liver after major resection.

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from...

  10. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magn...

  11. Forgetting in Dementia With and Without Subcortical Lacunes

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Joel H.; Mungas, Dan; Reed, Bruce R.; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Chui, Helena C.

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) are common causes of dementia, often co-occur, and can present quite similarly, making differential diagnosis clinically challenging. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with SIVD retain information better than AD patients. Participants were 35 dementia patients with subcortical lacunes (SIVD group), 27 dementia patients without lacunar infarction (AD group), and 56 normal controls. Results indicated that des...

  12. Computed tomography perfusion study of hemodynamic changes and portal hyperperfusion in a rabbit model of small-for-size liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-GuoZhuang; Jian-RongXu; Li-JunQian; QiangXia; Jia-ChangChi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Portal hyperperfusion in the small-for-size (SFS) liver can threaten survival of rabbits. Therefore, it is important to understand the hemodynamic changes in the SFS liver. METHODS: Twenty rabbits were divided into two groups:a control group and a modulation group. The control group underwent an extended hepatectomy. The modulation group underwent the same procedure plus splenectomy to reduce portal blood flow. CT perfusion examinations were performed on all rabbits before and after operation. Perfusion parameter values,especiallyportalveinperfusion(PVP),wereanalyzed. RESULTS: PVP in the modulation group was lower than in the control group after operation (P=0.002). In the control group, postoperative PVP increased by 193.7±55.1% compared with preoperative PVP. A weak correlation was found between the increased percentage of PVP and resected liver-to-body weight ratio (RLBWR) (r=0.465, P=0.033). In the modulation group, postoperative PVP increased by 101.4±32.5%. No correlation was foundbetweentheincreasedpercentageofPVPand RLBWR (r=0.167, P=0.644). Correlations were found between PVP and serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin after surgery (P CONCLUSION: We successfully evaluated the characteristics of hemodynamic changes as well as the effects of splenectomy in the SFS liver in rabbits by the CT technique.

  13. Removal of pulse artefact from EEG data recorded in MR environment at 3T. Setting of ICA parameters for marking artefactual components: application to resting-state data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Maggioni

    Full Text Available Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI allow for a non-invasive investigation of cerebral functions with high temporal and spatial resolution. The main challenge of such integration is the removal of the pulse artefact (PA that affects EEG signals recorded in the magnetic resonance (MR scanner. Often applied techniques for this purpose are Optimal Basis Set (OBS and Independent Component Analysis (ICA. The combination of OBS and ICA is increasingly used, since it can potentially improve the correction performed by each technique separately. The present study is focused on the OBS-ICA combination and is aimed at providing the optimal ICA parameters for PA correction in resting-state EEG data, where the information of interest is not specified in latency and amplitude as in, for example, evoked potential. A comparison between two intervals for ICA calculation and four methods for marking artefactual components was performed. The performance of the methods was discussed in terms of their capability to 1 remove the artefact and 2 preserve the information of interest. The analysis included 12 subjects and two resting-state datasets for each of them. The results showed that none of the signal lengths for the ICA calculation was highly preferable to the other. Among the methods for the identification of PA-related components, the one based on the wavelets transform of each component emerged as the best compromise between the effectiveness in removing PA and the conservation of the physiological neuronal content.

  14. Removal of pulse artefact from EEG data recorded in MR environment at 3T. Setting of ICA parameters for marking artefactual components: application to resting-state data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Arrubla, Jorge; Warbrick, Tracy; Dammers, Jürgen; Bianchi, Anna M; Reni, Gianluigi; Tosetti, Michela; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow for a non-invasive investigation of cerebral functions with high temporal and spatial resolution. The main challenge of such integration is the removal of the pulse artefact (PA) that affects EEG signals recorded in the magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Often applied techniques for this purpose are Optimal Basis Set (OBS) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The combination of OBS and ICA is increasingly used, since it can potentially improve the correction performed by each technique separately. The present study is focused on the OBS-ICA combination and is aimed at providing the optimal ICA parameters for PA correction in resting-state EEG data, where the information of interest is not specified in latency and amplitude as in, for example, evoked potential. A comparison between two intervals for ICA calculation and four methods for marking artefactual components was performed. The performance of the methods was discussed in terms of their capability to 1) remove the artefact and 2) preserve the information of interest. The analysis included 12 subjects and two resting-state datasets for each of them. The results showed that none of the signal lengths for the ICA calculation was highly preferable to the other. Among the methods for the identification of PA-related components, the one based on the wavelets transform of each component emerged as the best compromise between the effectiveness in removing PA and the conservation of the physiological neuronal content. PMID:25383625

  15. Subcortical mapping of calculation processing in the right parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; Lazzarini, Anna; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Rustemi, Oriela; Cagnin, Annachiara; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Preservation of calculation processing in brain surgery is crucial for patients' quality of life. Over the last decade, surgical electrostimulation was used to identify and preserve the cortical areas involved in such processing. Conversely, subcortical connectivity among different areas implicated in this function remains unclear, and the role of surgery in this domain has not been explored so far. The authors present the first 2 cases in which the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation were identified during right parietal lobe surgery. Two patients affected by a glioma located in the right parietal lobe underwent surgery with the aid of MRI neuronavigation. No calculation deficits were detected during preoperative assessment. Cortical and subcortical mapping were performed using a bipolar stimulator. The current intensity was determined by progressively increasing the amplitude by 0.5-mA increments (from a baseline of 1 mA) until a sensorimotor response was elicited. Then, addition and multiplication calculation tasks were administered. Corticectomy was performed according to both the MRI neuronavigation data and the functional findings obtained through cortical mapping. Direct subcortical electrostimulation was repeatedly performed during tumor resection. Subcortical functional sites for multiplication and addition were detected in both patients. Electrostimulation interfered with calculation processing during cortical mapping as well. Functional sites were spared during tumor removal. The postoperative course was uneventful, and calculation processing was preserved. Postoperative MRI showed complete resection of the tumor. The present preliminary study shows for the first time how functional mapping can be a promising method to intraoperatively identify the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation processing. This report therefore supports direct electrical stimulation as a promising tool to improve the current knowledge on

  16. Statistical shape analysis of subcortical structures using spectral matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Lombaert, Herve; Datta, Alexandre N; Oser, Nadine; Létourneau-Guillon, Laurent; Lapointe, Laurence Vincent; Martin, Florence; Malfait, Domitille; Tucholka, Alan; Lippé, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Studying morphological changes of subcortical structures often predicate neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Hence, methods for quantifying morphological variations in the brain anatomy, including groupwise shape analyses, are becoming increasingly important for studying neurological disorders. In this paper, a novel groupwise shape analysis approach is proposed to detect regional morphological alterations in subcortical structures between two study groups, e.g., healthy and pathological subjects. The proposed scheme extracts smoothed triangulated surface meshes from segmented binary maps, and establishes reliable point-to-point correspondences among the population of surfaces using a spectral matching method. Mean curvature features are incorporated in the matching process, in order to increase the accuracy of the established surface correspondence. The mean shapes are created as the geometric mean of all surfaces in each group, and a distance map between these shapes is used to characterize the morphological changes between the two study groups. The resulting distance map is further analyzed to check for statistically significant differences between two populations. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated on two separate subcortical structures (hippocampus and putamen). Furthermore, the proposed methodology is validated in a clinical application for detecting abnormal subcortical shape variations in Alzheimer's disease. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art algorithms, has less computational cost, and is more sensitive to small morphological variations in patients with neuropathologies. PMID:27025904

  17. Neuropsychological Profile of Children with Subcortical Band Heterotopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer-Smith, Megan; Leventer, Richard; Jacobs, Rani; De Luca, Cinzia; Anderson, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) or "double cortex" is a malformation of cortical development resulting from impaired neuronal migration. So far, research has focused on the neurological, neuroimaging, and genetic correlates of SBH. More recently, clinical reports and small sample studies have documented neuropsychological dysfunction in…

  18. Automated localization of periventricular and subcortical white matter lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Vernooij, Meike W.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vrooman, Henri A.; Rueckert, Daniel; Hammers, Alexander; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2007-03-01

    It is still unclear whether periventricular and subcortical white matter lesions (WMLs) differ in etiology or clinical consequences. Studies addressing this issue would benefit from automated segmentation and localization of WMLs. Several papers have been published on WML segmentation in MR images. Automated localization however, has not been investigated as much. This work presents and evaluates a novel method to label segmented WMLs as periventricular and subcortical. The proposed technique combines tissue classification and registration-based segmentation to outline the ventricles in MRI brain data. The segmented lesions can then be labeled into periventricular WMLs and subcortical WMLs by applying region growing and morphological operations. The technique was tested on scans of 20 elderly subjects in which neuro-anatomy experts manually segmented WMLs. Localization accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results of the automated method with a manual localization. Similarity indices and volumetric intraclass correlations between the automated and the manual localization were 0.89 and 0.95 for periventricular WMLs and 0.64 and 0.89 for subcortical WMLs, respectively. We conclude that this automated method for WML localization performs well to excellent in comparison to the gold standard.

  19. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Puetz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzah, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mahnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.; van't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, Rene S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Voelzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Joensson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigat

  20. Characteristic pattern of cerebral perfusion in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia compared with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain perfusion SPECT has been commonly used to evaluate several different types of dementia. The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia (SVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, and to compare the differences between the two conditions. Sixteen SVD (mean age; 68.0±7.0 years, educational period; 6.3±5.6 years, CDR; 0.80±0.26). 46 AD (mean age; 69.9±7.4 years, educational period; 5.4±4.7 years, CDR; 0.86±0.23) and 12 normal control subjects (mean age; 67.1±7.7 years, educational period; 6.2±4.2 years) participated in this study. We included the patients with SVD and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD and NINDS-AIREN criteria for probable or possible VD. They were all matched for age, education and clinical dementia scale scores. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits on the right temporal region and right thalamus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus, both cingulate gyri and frontal subgyral regions in patients with SVD and on the left supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, right fugiform gyrus and both cingulate gyri in patients with AD compared with control subjects (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hypoperfusion in the right parahippocampal gyrus, right cingulated gyrus, left insula, and both frontal subgyral regions compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hyperperfusion in right superior frontal gyrus, left pre- and postcentral gyri, left paracentral lobule, left precuneus and both medial frontal gyri compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). Our study shows characteristic and different pattern of perfusion deficits in patients with SVD and AD, and these results may be helpful to discriminate the two conditions in the early stage of illness

  1. Individual subject classification of mixed dementia from pure subcortical vascular dementia based on subcortical shape analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD, one of common causes of dementia, has concomitant Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology in over 30%, termed "mixed dementia". Identifying mixed dementia from SVaD is important because potential amyloid-targeted therapies may be effective for treatment in mixed dementia. The purpose of this study was to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We measured brain amyloid deposition using the 11C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET in 68 patients with SVaD. A PiB retention ratio greater than 1.5 was considered PiB(+. Hippocampal and amygdalar shape were used in the incremental learning method to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD because these structures are known to be prominently involved by AD pathologies. Among 68 patients, 23 (33.8% patients were positive for PiB binding. With use of hippocampal shape analysis alone, PiB(+ SVaD could be discriminated from PiB(- SVaD with 77.9% accuracy (95.7% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity. With use of amygdalar shape, the discrimination accuracy was 75.0% (87.0% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity. When hippocampal and amygdalar shape were analyzed together, accuracy increased to 82.4% (95.7% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity. An incremental learning method using hippocampal and amygdalar shape distinguishes mixed dementia from pure SVaD. Furthermore, our results suggest that amyloid pathology and vascular pathology have different effects on the shape of the hippocampus and amygdala.

  2. Paradoxical selective recovery in a bilingual aphasic following subcortical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglioti, S; Fabbro, F

    1993-09-30

    In monolinguals, not only cortical areas but also specific subcortical structures are crucial for language and speech processing. While the role of the left basal ganglia in monolingual aphasia has been defined, its relevance in bilingual and polyglot aphasia is still unknown. Data have now been obtained on a patient who, following an ischaemic lesion not involving cortical structures and mainly confined to the left basal ganglia, showed severe impairments in mother tongue production, with significantly better performance in her hardly spoken second language. This dissociation remained stable for over a year and was observed both in spontaneous speech and in translation tasks. This pattern of linguistic performance, which has never been described in relation to subcortical lesions, suggests that the left basal ganglia play a relevant role in the output of a highly automatized language. PMID:8260621

  3. Subcortical representation of speech fine structure relates to reading ability

    OpenAIRE

    Hornickel, Jane; Anderson, Samira; Skoe, Erika; Yi, Han-Gyol; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Impaired perception of consonants by poor readers is reflected in poor subcortical encoding of speech timing and harmonics. We assessed auditory brainstem representation of higher harmonics within a consonant-vowel formant transition to identify relationships between speech fine structure and reading. Responses were analyzed in three ways: a single stimulus polarity, adding responses to inverted polarities (emphasizing low harmonics), and subtracting responses to inverted polarities (emphasiz...

  4. Mapping abnormal subcortical brain morphometry in an elderly HIV+ cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S.C. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50% of HIV+ individuals exhibit neurocognitive impairment and subcortical atrophy, but the profile of brain abnormalities associated with HIV is still poorly understood. Using surface-based shape analyses, we mapped the 3D profile of subcortical morphometry in 63 elderly HIV+ participants and 31 uninfected controls. The thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, amygdala, brainstem, accumbens, callosum and ventricles were segmented from high-resolution MRIs. To investigate shape-based morphometry, we analyzed the Jacobian determinant (JD and radial distances (RD defined on each region's surfaces. We also investigated effects of nadir CD4+ T-cell counts, viral load, time since diagnosis (TSD and cognition on subcortical morphology. Lastly, we explored whether HIV+ participants were distinguishable from unaffected controls in a machine learning context. All shape and volume features were included in a random forest (RF model. The model was validated with 2-fold cross-validation. Volumes of HIV+ participants' bilateral thalamus, left pallidum, left putamen and callosum were significantly reduced while ventricular spaces were enlarged. Significant shape variation was associated with HIV status, TSD and the Wechsler adult intelligence scale. HIV+ people had diffuse atrophy, particularly in the caudate, putamen, hippocampus and thalamus. Unexpectedly, extended TSD was associated with increased thickness of the anterior right pallidum. In the classification of HIV+ participants vs. controls, our RF model attained an area under the curve of 72%.

  5. Dopamine-dependent architecture of cortico-subcortical network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David M; Oei, Nicole Y L; Soeter, Roelof P; Both, Stephanie; van Gerven, Joop M A; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Beckmann, Christian F

    2013-07-01

    Maladaptive dopaminergic mediation of reward processing in humans is thought to underlie multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Mechanisms responsible for the development of such disorders may depend on individual differences in neural signaling within large-scale cortico-subcortical circuitry. Using a combination of functional neuroimaging and pharmacological challenges in healthy volunteers, we identified opposing dopamine agonistic and antagonistic neuromodulatory effects on distributed functional interactions between specific subcortical regions and corresponding neocortical "resting-state" networks, known to be involved in distinct aspects of cognition and reward processing. We found that, relative to a placebo, levodopa and haloperidol challenges, respectively, increased or decreased the functional connectivity between (1) the midbrain and a "default mode" network, (2) the right caudate and a right-lateralized frontoparietal network, and (3) the ventral striatum and a fronto-insular network. Further, we found drug-specific associations between brain circuitry reactivity to dopamine modulation and individual differences in trait impulsivity, revealing dissociable drug-personality interaction effects across distinct dopamine-dependent cortico-subcortical networks. Our findings identify possible systems underlying pathogenesis and treatment efficacy in disorders of dopamine deficiency. PMID:22645252

  6. Parietal network underlying movement control: disturbances during subcortical electrostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almairac, Fabien; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of brain movement control has changed over the last two decades. Recent findings in the monkey and in humans have led to a parallel and interconnected network. Nevertheless, little is known about these networks. Here, we present two cases of patients with a parietal low-grade glioma. They underwent surgery under local anesthesia with cortical and subcortical mapping. For patient 1, subcortical electrostimulation immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced movement disorders, with an inhibition of leg and arm movements medially and, more laterally, an acceleration of arm movement. For patient 2, electrostimulation of white matter immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced an inhibition of both arm movement. It means that the detected fibers in the parietal lobe may be involved in the motor control modulation. They are distributed veil-like immediately posterior to thalamocortical pathways and could correspond to a fronto-parietal movement control subnetwork. These two cases highlight the major role of the subcortical connectivity in movement regulation, involving parietal lobe, thus the necessity to be identified and preserved during brain surgery. PMID:24526369

  7. Aspects of Subcortical Ischaemic Vascular Disease : Early clinical manifestations and associations with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Harten, van, B.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD) is an important cause of cognitive impairment in elderly patients. Screening and diagnostic tests are needed to identify these patients. The HIV dementia scale (HDS) is a reliable and quantitative scale for identifying HIV dementia1. The cognitive profile of HIV dementia has subcortical features that resemble subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD). The clinical syndrome is characterized by early impairment of attention and executive...

  8. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C.; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference—misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action—is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7–54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9–51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07–2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15–2.23, p<0.001; Cohen’s effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05–2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12–2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40–2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM

  9. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guihu; Denisova, Kristina; Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference-misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action-is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7-54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9-51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07-2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15-2.23, p<0.001; Cohen's effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05-2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12-2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40-2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM surface detected in

  10. Sub-cortical brain structure segmentation using F-CNN's

    OpenAIRE

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Tsogkas, Stavros; Ferrante, Enzo; Lippe, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel; Paragios, Nikos; Kokkinos, Iasonas

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a deep learning approach for segmenting sub-cortical structures of the human brain in Magnetic Resonance (MR) image data. We draw inspiration from a state-of-the-art Fully-Convolutional Neural Network (F-CNN) architecture for semantic segmentation of objects in natural images, and adapt it to our task. Unlike previous CNN-based methods that operate on image patches, our model is applied on a full blown 2D image, without any alignment or registration steps at testing t...

  11. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  12. Saccade learning with concurrent cortical and subcortical basal ganglia loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve eN'guyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Basal Ganglia is a central structure involved in multiple cortical and subcortical loops. Some of these loops are believed to be responsible for saccade target selection. We study here how the very specific structural relationships of these saccadic loops can affect the ability of learning spatial and feature-based tasks.We propose a model of saccade generation with reinforcement learning capabilities based onour previous basal ganglia and superior colliculus models. It is structured around the interactions of two parallel cortico-basal loops and one tecto-basal loop. The two cortical loops separately deal with spatial and non-spatial information to select targets in a concurrent way. The subcortical loop is used to make the final target selection leading to the production of thesaccade. These different loops may work in concert or disturb each other regarding reward maximization. Interactions between these loops and their learning capabilities are tested on different saccade tasks.The results show the ability of this model to correctly learn basic target selection based on different criteria (spatial or not. Moreover the model reproduces and explains training dependent express saccades toward targets based on a spatial criterion. Finally, the model predicts that in absence of prefrontal control, the spatial loop should dominate.

  13. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  14. Mapping Subcortical Brain Maturation during Adolescence: Evidence of Hemisphere-and Sex-Specific Longitudinal Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Meg; Whittle, Sarah; Yücel, Murat; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Kline, Alexandria; Simmons, Julian; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    Early to mid-adolescence is an important developmental period for subcortical brain maturation, but longitudinal studies of these neurodevelopmental changes are lacking. The present study acquired repeated magnetic resonance images from 60 adolescent subjects (28 female) at ages 12.5 and 16.5 years to map changes in subcortical structure volumes.…

  15. Assessment of Hyperperfusion by Brain Perfusion SPECT in Transient Neurological Deterioration after Superficial Temporal Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient neurological deterioration (TND) is one of the complications after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery, and it has been assumed to be caused by postoperative transient hyperperfusion. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between TND and preoperative and postoperative cerebral perfusion status on brain perfusion SPECT following superficial temporal artery.middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis surgery. A total of 60 STA-MCA anastomosis surgeries of 56 patients (mean age: 50±16 yrs; M:F=29:27; atherosclerotic disease: 33, moyamoya disease: 27) which were done between September 2003 and July 2006 were enrolled. The resting cerebral perfusion and cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) after acetazolamide challenge were measured before and 10 days after surgery using 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT. Moreover, the cerebral perfusion was measured on the third postoperative day. With the use of the statistical parametric mapping and probabilistic brain atlas, the counts for the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory were calculated for each image, and statistical analyses were performed. In 6 of 60 cases (10%), TND occurred after surgery. In all patients, the preoperative cerebral perfusion of affected MCA territory was significantly lower than that of contralateral side (p=0.002). The cerebral perfusion on the third and tenth day after surgery was significantly higher than preoperative cerebral perfusion (p=0.001, p=0.02). In TND patients, basal cerebral perfusion and CVR on preoperative SPECT were significantly lower than those of non-TND patients (p=0.01, p=0.05). Further, the increases in cerebral perfusion on the third day after surgery were significant higher than those in other patients (p=0.008). In patients with TND, the cerebral perfusion ratio of affected side to contralateral side on third postoperative day was significantly higher than that of other patients (p=0.002). However, there was no significant difference of the

  16. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts: MRI and proton spectroscopic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekar H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC is a rare, recently described disease.1 This disorder, reported predominantly in infants and children, was originally described by van der Knaap as 'leukoencephalopathy with swelling and a discrepantly mild clinical course'. The gene locus for this autosomal recessive disease has been assigned to chromosome 22qtel, and a gene has been identified, presently called MLC1.2,3 It is characterized clinically by a large head and mild neurological symptoms such as ataxia, spasticity and remarkably slow course of functional deterioration. The MRI features described include 'swollen white matter' with large symmetrical cystic changes in the cerebral hemispheres.1,2,4 The MRS findings in this disorder include mild to moderate decreases in the NAA to choline and choline to creatine ratios.5 We report a child with this disease and discuss the MRI and MRS features.

  17. CT diagnosis and clinical findings of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: A study of the pathology, clinical characteristics and major CT manifestations, in order to obtain a better understanding of the SAE. Methods: In total 94 cases of SAE were enrolled in the study in Jun-an hospital, included 58 males and 36 females, aged from 62-92 years (averagely 77 years). The clinical presentations of SAE included hyper- tension, diabetics, arteriosclerotisc eyeground, and stupor, characterized by progressive decline of intellectual function, different-level of paralysis, aphasia, swirl, dazzle, naupathia, extremity numbness. Results: A predominance was found in the patients aged more than 60 years. CT scan showed symmetrical hypodense shadows with poorly-defined border, complicated with the sign of lacunar infarction, cerebral atrophy, parenchymal hemorrhage and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage in some cases. Conclusion: A good understanding of the clinical and CT features of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy is valuable for CT diagnosis and differentiated diagnosis. (authors)

  18. Detection of neuroendocrine tumours in the small intestines using contrast-enhanced multiphase Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT: the potential role of arterial hyperperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interpretation of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) by Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT can be difficult. The potential benefit of arterial hyperperfusion for the detection of NETs was evaluated. Between 2006 and 2009, 320 consecutive Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT examinations, performed for NETs, revealed 40 lesions suggesting intestinal NETs in 25 patients. Two groups of lesions were distinguished: epigastric lesions evaluable in the arterial and venous CT scan (Group 1) and hypogastrial lesions evaluable in the venous CT scan only (Group 2). Lesions were jointly rated by two radiologists and a nuclear medicine physician. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of lesions and background were assessed. The reference standard was histology (available for 28 lesions) or follow-up (for a mean of 22.9 months). PET detected all suspicious lesions but was false positive in 3 lesions. In Group 1 the arterial scan performed significantly better than the venous scan (p = 0.008). Diagnostic performance was better in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p < 0.001). SUVmax of true positive lesions were significantly higher than background SUVmax (p < 0.001) and SUVmax of false positive lesions (p = 0.005). The arterial phase of multiphase Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT might improve the localization of intestinal NETs and, thereby, improve the overall diagnostic accuracy of this modality in the assessment of intestinal NETs by adding information about lesion perfusion not available when only venous CT is performed

  19. Arithmetic procedural knowledge: a cortico-subcortical circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşca, Elena Cecilia

    2009-12-11

    The disturbances of arithmetic procedural knowledge form a heterogeneous picture, in which we can distinguish "memory" impairments and "monitoring" problems. Patients with "memory" disturbances reported in the literature present left parietal lesions, while "monitoring" impairments have been assumed to be due to frontal damage. Procedural knowledge has been less investigated in basal ganglia lesions, in which there has been no analysis of procedural impairments. The present study investigates and compares the patterns of acalculia in two patients, one with a left parietal lesion and the other with a left basal ganglia lesion. The patients were tested on a broad range of neuropsychological abilities, with the main focus on number processing and calculation. The results show many similarities between their deficits, with some difficulties in simple arithmetic, arithmetical rules and mental and written complex calculations. The errors made in complex mental and written calculations were due to memory-based procedural impairments in both patients. These findings, corroborated with other studies reported in the literature, suggest the existence of a fronto-parieto-subcortical circuit responsible for arithmetic complex calculations and that procedural knowledge relies on a visuo-spatial sketchpad that contains a representation of each sub-step of the procedure. PMID:19765552

  20. Intraoperative use of ultrasonography by small subcortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to present the possibilities for use of intraoperative ultrasound (US) diagnostics as a method of image guided surgical navigation in neurosurgery. During an US scan of normal and pathologically changed tissues as well as volume taking lesion images are received in real time intraoperative display allowing dynamic control of the surgical radicalism and at the same time minimal invasiveness to the neural structures. Intraoperative ultrasound with real-time display characteristics finds a very wide application: subcortical and deeply localized tumour lesions, haematomas, large and giant aneurysms, arteriovenous (AV) malformations, spinal tumours and cysts. The real time dynamic scan is based on the B-mod. This method is founded on the US characteristic of reflecting in a different manner at the borderline of two mediums with different density as well as tissues with various physical and chemical characteristics. The reflection is partially absorbed depending on the acoustic impedance of the biologic field. We use a LOGIC200PRO unit with two probes I-type and T-type having a 'wedge of space' - 35 mm and working frequencies of 6 MHz and 7 MHz appropriate for visualizing lesions at a depth of 25 to 60 mm.The advantages of the Intraoperative US diagnostics are: non-invasiveness; real time display - i.e. presents the imminent intraoperative changes; it is a good alternative to other image-guided technologies; accessible price of the US unit

  1. Brain lipidomes of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and mixed dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Yuting; Duan, Xinrui; Wenk, Markus R; Kalaria, Raj N; Chen, Christopher P; Lai, Mitchell K P; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-10-01

    Despite its importance as the leading cause of vascular dementia, the primary pathogenic mechanisms in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) have remained elusive. Because of the lack of approved therapeutic agents for SIVD, there is a pressing need to identify novel therapeutic targets. Comparative lipidomic analyses of SIVD and mixed dementia (i.e., SIVD and Alzheimer's disease, MixD) may also confer new insights pertaining to the possible interaction between neurodegenerative and vascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dementia. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively analyze the lipidomes of white and gray matter from the temporal cortex of nondemented controls, SIVD, and MixD subjects. Detailed molecular profiles highlighted the pathologic relevance of gray matter sphingolipid fatty acyl chain heterogeneity in dementia. In addition, the levels of sulfatides and lysobisphosphatidic acids were progressively increased in the temporal cortex gray matter from control to SIVD to MixD. White matter phospholipid profiles indicated possible adaptive mechanisms (i.e., increased unsaturation) to chronic ischemia in SIVD and elevated membrane degradation in MixD. PMID:24684787

  2. Occipital seizures and subcortical T2 hypointensity in the setting of hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna L. Putta

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Hyperglycemia should be considered in the etiology of differential diagnosis of patients with visual abnormalities suspicious for seizures, especially when the MRI shows focal subcortical T2 hypointensity with or without leptomeningeal enhancement.

  3. MR imaging of tuberous sclerosis : emphasis on the cortical and subcortical tubers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Kab Chul; Park, Sung Tae; Choi, Choong Gon; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency, location, and signal intensities of parenchymal (cortical and subcortical) tubers and white matter lesion, as seen on MR images of patients with tuberous sclerosis. Twenty patients diagnosed on the basis of clinical and MR findings as suffering from tuberous sclerosis, were retrospectively reviewed. Their ages ranged from 6 days to 21 years (mean, 5.2 years), and they were divided into two groups according to age : under 18 months (n=9) and over 18 months (n=11). We analyzed the frequency, location, and enhancement patterns of tubers and white matter lesions, and the difference of signal intensities between cortical and subcortical tubers according to age. Both cortical and subcortical tubers were commonly located in the frontal lobe, but the latter were more frequently observed than the former. Subcortical tubers by MR imaging may therefore help analyze the parenchymal tubers seen in tuberous sclerosis. (author). 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  4. MR imaging of tuberous sclerosis : emphasis on the cortical and subcortical tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency, location, and signal intensities of parenchymal (cortical and subcortical) tubers and white matter lesion, as seen on MR images of patients with tuberous sclerosis. Twenty patients diagnosed on the basis of clinical and MR findings as suffering from tuberous sclerosis, were retrospectively reviewed. Their ages ranged from 6 days to 21 years (mean, 5.2 years), and they were divided into two groups according to age : under 18 months (n=9) and over 18 months (n=11). We analyzed the frequency, location, and enhancement patterns of tubers and white matter lesions, and the difference of signal intensities between cortical and subcortical tubers according to age. Both cortical and subcortical tubers were commonly located in the frontal lobe, but the latter were more frequently observed than the former. Subcortical tubers by MR imaging may therefore help analyze the parenchymal tubers seen in tuberous sclerosis. (author). 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  5. The Dysexecutive Syndrome Associated with Ischaemic Vascular Disease and Related Subcortical Neuropathology: A Boston Process Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa Lamar; Price, Cate C.; Tania Giovannetti; Rod Swenson; Libon, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia has helped to re-define the impact of various subcortical neuropathologies on aging; however, state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques and autopsy studies suggest that not all structural brain alterations associated with vascular dementia are exclusive to this neurodegenerative process alone. Thus, a detailed analysis of the cognitive phenotype associated with ischaemic vascular disease is key to our understanding of subcortical ne...

  6. Ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by sound in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V; Grinenko, Olesya A

    2016-03-15

    It is now recognized that both generalized and focal seizures may originate in subcortical structures. The well-known types of focal subcortically-driven seizures are gelastic seizures in patients with the hypothalamic hamartoma and sound-induced seizures in rodents with audiogenic epilepsy. The seizures are generated by subcortical intrinsically epileptogenic focus, the hamartoma in humans and the inferior colliculus (IC) in rodents. In patients with gelastic epilepsy additional seizure types may develop with time that are supposed to result from secondary epileptogenesis and spreading of epileptic discharges to the cortex. Repeated audiogenic seizures can also lead to development of additional seizure behavior and secondary epileptic activation of the cortex. This process, named audiogenic kindling, may be useful for studying secondary subcortico-cortical epileptogenesis. Using intracollicular and intracortical recordings, we studied an ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by repeated sound stimulation in Wistar audiogenic-susceptible rats. The audiogenic seizures, representing brief attacks of paroxysmal unidirectional running, were accompanied by epileptiform abnormalities in the IC, mostly on the side ipsilateral to run direction, and enhanced rhythmic 8-9Hz activity in the cortex. With repetition of the subcortical seizures and kindling development, a secondary cortical discharge began to follow the IC seizure. The secondary discharge initially involved the cortex homolateral to the side of dominant subcortical epileptiform abnormalities and behaviorally expressed as limbic (partial) clonus. Kindling progression was associated with bilateralization of the secondary cortical discharge, an increase in its amplitude and duration, intensification of associated behavioral seizures (from partial clonus to generalized tonic-clonic convulsions). Thus, ictal recordings during brief audiogenic running seizures showed their focal

  7. Association between Subcortical Lesions and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Sarwari, Agmall; Wattmo, Carina; Bronge, Lena; ZHANG Yi; Wahlund, Lars Olof; Nägga, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: The most devastating features of Alz-heimer's disease (AD) are often the behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). There is controversy as to whether subcortical lesions contribute to BPSD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BPSD and subcortical lesions (white-matter lesions and lacunes) in AD. Methods: CT or MRI from 259 patients with mild-to-moderate AD were assessed with the Age-Related White Matter Changes scale. Line...

  8. Male brain ages faster: the age and gender dependence of subcortical volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, András; Szabó, Nikoletta; Tóth, Eszter; Csete, Gergő; Faragó, Péter; Kocsis, Krisztián; Must, Anita; Vécsei, László; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Effects of gender on grey matter (GM) volume differences in subcortical structures of the human brain have consistently been reported. Recent research evidence suggests that both gender and brain size influences volume distribution in subcortical areas independently. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of the interplay between brain size, gender and age contributing to volume differences of subcortical GM in the human brain. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 53 healthy males and 50 age-matched healthy females. Total GM volume was determined using voxel-based morphometry. We used model-based subcortical segmentation analysis to measure the volume of subcortical nuclei. Main effects of gender, brain volume and aging on subcortical structures were examined using multivariate analysis of variance. No significant difference was found in total brain volume between the two genders after correcting for total intracranial volume. Our analysis revealed significantly larger hippocampus volume for females. Additionally, GM volumes of the caudate nucleus, putamen and thalamus displayed a significant age-related decrease in males as compared to females. In contrast to this only the thalamic volume loss proved significant for females. Strikingly, GM volume decreases faster in males than in females emphasizing the interplay between aging and gender on subcortical structures. These findings might have important implications for the interpretation of the effects of unalterable factors (i.e. gender and age) in cross-sectional structural MRI studies. Furthermore, the volume distribution and changes of subcortical structures have been consistently related to several neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g. Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, etc.). Understanding these changes might yield further insight in the course and prognosis of these disorders. PMID:26572143

  9. Frequency and pathogenesis of silent subcortical brain infarction in acute first-ever ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have often observed silent subcortical brain lesions on CT or MRI in first-ever ischemic stroke, but there is little published information on the relationship of these lesions to stroke subtypes. Here, we describe the incidence of MRI-detected silent subcortical brain lesions, including infarctions and white matter lesions, in a series of patients with first-ever ischemic stroke classified according to stroke subtypes. We also discuss the pathogenesis of these silent subcortical lesions. We evaluated 171 patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into three groups: lacunar, atherothrombotic and cardioembolic infarction groups. We evaluated silent subcortical brain infarction (SSBI), enlargement of perivascular space (EPS), and other white-matter lesions using MRI. Hypertension was observed in 67.6% of lacunar infarction, 57.1% of atherosclerotic infarction, and 54.1% of cardioembolic infarction. SSBI was more frequently observed in lacunar infarction than the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 81.5% vs. 44.4% vs. 42.1%, p=0.006). High-grade EPS (grade 2 or higher) was also observed more frequently in lacunar infarction than in the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 63.3% vs. 24.2% vs. 0%, p<0.001). Scheltens' score of silent subcortical lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in the others. The frequency of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in atherosclerotic or cardioembolic infarction. We suggest that the pathogenesis of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions is common to that of lacunar infarction, that is, small-vessel vasculopathy. (author)

  10. Double Cortex Syndrome (Subcortical Band Heterotopia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar MOMEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveApproximately 5–10% of preschool age children are considered developmentally disabled. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI plays a key role in the diagnostic evaluation in these children. Many congenital or acquired brain anomalies are revealed with MRIs. Although the majority of these abnormalities are sporadic but patients with subcortical band heterotopia or double cortex syndrome have sex-linked inheritance. We are going to present the first case in Iran from Ahvaz city, which was presented with status epilepticus associated with developmental delay and finally diagnosed as double cortex syndrome, because band heterotopia cases especially for continuous or generalized form is rare.A 4.5-year-old developmentally delayed girl was admitted for generalized tonic clonic seizure attack of 1 hr, upward gaze, locked mouth, and urinary incontinence (status epilepticus in the child neurology ward. She had a history of recurrent seizures that started as febrile seizures since she was 12 months of age and had frequent admissions for having recurrent seizure attacks. She was the only child of consanguineous parents with negative family history of any neurologic problems. She was a product of uneventful term pregnancy, vaginal delivery with a low Apgar score at birth who was admitted for six days in the neonatal ward for hypotonia and cyanosis. At 4.5 years of age, she had HC: 45cm (<3% Length: 102 cm (25–75%, and BW: 18kg (75%.She was able to sit, walk with support, speak a few words, and communicate with others. A physical exam was unremarkable. Lab data including CBC, blood biochemical, and urinalysis results were all within normal limits, but the electroencephalography (EEG revealed generalized poly spike-wave discharges. A brain MRI showed corpus callosal dysplasia, generalized band heterotopia, and polymicrogyria. She was discharged home with oral valproate and regular outpatient follow-ups.In the diagnostic evaluation of

  11. Pattern of cerebral hyperperfusion in Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment using voxel-based analysis of 3D arterial spin-labeling imaging: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bei Ding,1 Hua-wei Ling,1 Yong Zhang,2 Juan Huang,1 Huan Zhang,1 Tao Wang,3 Fu Hua Yan11Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, 3Department of Gerontology, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: A three-dimensional (3D continuous pulse arterial spin labeling (ASL technique was used to investigate cerebral blood flow (CBF changes in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, and age- and sex-matched healthy controls.Materials and methods: Three groups were recruited for comparison, 24 AD patients, 17 MCI patients, and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Three-dimensional ASL scans covering the entire brain were acquired with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance scanner. Spatial processing was performed with statistical parametric mapping 8. A second-level one-way analysis of variance analysis (threshold at P<0.05 was performed on the preprocessed ASL data. An average whole-brain CBF for each subject was also included as group-level covariates for the perfusion data, to control for individual CBF variations.Results: Significantly increased CBF was detected in bilateral frontal lobes and right temporal subgyral regions in aMCI compared with controls. When comparing AD with aMCI, the major hyperperfusion regions were the right limbic lobe and basal ganglia regions, including the putamen, caudate, lentiform nucleus, and thalamus, and hypoperfusion was found in the left medial frontal lobe, parietal cortex, the right middle temporo-occipital lobe, and particularly, the left anterior cingulate gyrus. We also found decreased CBF in the bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortices and left limbic lobe in AD patients, relative to the control group. aMCI subjects showed decreased blood flow in the left occipital lobe, bilateral inferior temporal cortex, and right middle temporal cortex

  12. Quantitative analysis of [18F]FDDNP PET using subcortical white matter as reference region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subcortical white matter is known to be relatively unaffected by amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the use of subcortical white matter as a reference region to quantify [18F]FDDNP binding in the human brain. Dynamic [18F]FDDNP PET studies were performed on 7 control subjects and 12 AD patients. Population efflux rate constants (k'2) from subcortical white matter (centrum semiovale) and cerebellar cortex were derived by a simplified reference tissue modeling approach incorporating physiological constraints. Regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) estimates were derived using Logan and simplified reference tissue approaches, with either subcortical white matter or cerebellum as reference input. Discriminant analysis with cross-validation was performed to classify control subjects and AD patients. The population estimates of k'2 in subcortical white matter did not differ significantly between control subjects and AD patients but the variability of individual estimates of k'2 determined in white matter was lower than that in cerebellum. Logan DVR showed dependence on the efflux rate constant in white matter. The DVR estimates in the frontal, parietal, posterior cingulate, and temporal cortices were significantly higher in the AD group (p18F]FDDNP with the Logan method which allows more accurate and less biased binding estimates, but a population efflux rate constant has to be determined a priori. (orig.)

  13. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. PMID:26911691

  14. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O;

    1987-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 56 patients before and one to four times after uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy. The findings were related to the ratio between internal carotid artery (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) mean pressures. Within the 1st...... ratio suggests a temporary impairment of autoregulation. Special care should be taken to avoid postoperative hypertension in such patients, who typically have preoperative hypoperfusion, to avoid the occurrence of cerebral edema or hemorrhage....

  15. Is Intraoperative Diffusion tensor Imaging at 3.0T Comparable to Subcortical Corticospinal tract Mapping?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostrý, S.; Belšan, T.; Otáhal, Jakub; Beneš, V.; Netuka, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 5 (2013), s. 797-807. ISSN 0148-396X Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : corticospinal tract * intraoperative tractography * intraoperative image distortion * motor-evoked potentials * subcortical mapping Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2013

  16. Aspects of Subcortical Ischaemic Vascular Disease : Early clinical manifestations and associations with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harten, van B.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD) is an important cause of cognitive impairment in elderly patients. Screening and diagnostic tests are needed to identify these patients. The HIV dementia scale (HDS) is a reliable and quantitative scale for identifying HIV dementia1. The cogniti

  17. Formulaic Language in Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: Complementary Effects of Subcortical and Cortical Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana; Choi, JiHee; Alken, Amy; Sidtis, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The production of formulaic expressions (conversational speech formulas, pause fillers, idioms, and other fixed expressions) is excessive in the left hemisphere and deficient in the right hemisphere and in subcortical stroke. Speakers with Alzheimer's disease (AD), having functional basal ganglia, reveal abnormally high proportions of…

  18. CT findings and clinical analysis of subcortical hematomas in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten elderly patients (73-87 years, 78.4 years on the average) with subcortical hematomas were divided into two groups according to the shape of the hematoma on a CT scan: a lobulated group (6 patients) and a global group (4 patients). The lobulated group had a history of hypertension in one patient. The hematomas extended widely around the parietal lobe and were accompanied by perifocal edema, brain shifts and subarachnoid hemorrhages, deep consciousness disturbances, and poor prognosis of life and function. Amyloid depositions in the arteries around the hematomas were confirmed histologically in one patient. The global group had a history of hypertension in two patients. The hematomas were localized in the parietal, temporal, or occipital lobe without perifocal edema, brain shift and subarachnoid hemorrhages, and accompanied by mild consciousness disturbances. The life prognosis was good, but the functional prognosis was poor, with a subsequent development of dementia. A lobulated subcortical hematoma is thought to be due to amyloid angiopathy, while a global subcortical hematoma is thought to be due to hypertension. A surgical evacuation is seldom indicated for either type of subcortical hematoma in elderly patients. (author)

  19. Application of Intraoperative Ultrasonography for Guiding Microneurosurgical Resection of Small Subcortical Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia; Duan, Yun You; Liu, Xi; Wang, Yu; Gao, Guo Dong; Qin, Huai Zhou; Wang, Liang [Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medicine University, Xi an (China)

    2011-10-15

    We wanted to evaluate the clinical value of intraoperative ultrasonography for real-time guidance when performing microneurosurgical resection of small subcortical lesions. Fifty-two patients with small subcortical lesions were involved in this study. The pathological diagnoses were cavernous hemangioma in 25 cases, cerebral glioma in eight cases, abscess in eight cases, small inflammatory lesion in five cases, brain parasite infection in four cases and the presence of an intracranial foreign body in two cases. An ultrasonic probe was sterilized and lightly placed on the surface of the brain during the operation. The location, extent, characteristics and adjacent tissue of the lesion were observed by high frequency ultrasonography during the operation. All the lesions were located in the cortex and their mean size was 1.3 {+-} 0.2 cm. Intraoperative ultrasonography accurately located all the small subcortical lesions, and so the neurosurgeon could provide appropriate treatment. Different lesion pathologies presented with different ultrasonic appearances. Cavernous hemangioma exhibited irregular shapes with distinct margins and it was mildly hyperechoic or hyperechoic. The majority of the cerebral gliomas displayed irregular shapes with indistinct margins, and they often showed cystic and solid mixed echoes. Postoperative imaging identified that the lesions had completely disappeared, and the original symptoms of all the patients were significantly alleviated. Intraoperative ultrasonography can help accurately locate small subcortical lesions and it is helpful for selecting the proper approach and guiding thorough resection of these lesions.

  20. Síndrome de hiperperfusão (pós-operatória) após três semanas da endarterectomia de carótida Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome occurring three weeks after carotid endarterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Josh Torgovnick; Nitin Sethi; Edward Arsura

    2007-01-01

    A síndrome de hiperperfusão pós-operatória (SH) é uma complicação conhecida após a endarterectomia de carótida. Vários estudos têm demonstrado uma incidência de 0,3% a 1,2%. Isso ocorre em situações de reperfusão súbita de um hemisfério com hipoperfusão crônica. Apresentamos, neste trabalho, o caso de uma paciente de 48 anos que desenvolveu SH três meses após ser submetida a uma endarterectomia de carótida por estenose grave da artéria carótida.Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a recognized...

  1. Contralateral diaphragmatic palsy after subcortical middle cerebral artery infarction without capsular involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Ni; Chen, Po-Nien; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Liou, Li-Min

    2011-06-01

    Diaphragmatic palsy after acute stroke is a novel clinical entity and may result in a high incidence of respiratory dysfunction and pneumonia, which especially cause greater morbidity and mortality. Generally, internal capsule and complete middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions are major risk-factors for developing diaphragmatic palsy. Herein, we present a case with contralateral diaphragmatic palsy after a subcortical MCA infarction without capsular involvement. Dyspnea occurred after stroke, while a chest X-ray and CT study disclosed an elevated right hemidiaphragm without significant infiltration or patch of pneumonia. A phrenic nerve conduction study showed bilateral mild prolonged onset-latency without any significant right-left difference. This suggested a lesion causing diaphragmatic palsy was not in the phrenic nerve itself, but could possibly originate from an above central location (subcortical MCA infarction). We also discussed the role of transcranial magnetic stimulation study in the survey of central pathway and demonstrated diaphragmatic palsy-related orthopnea. PMID:21365293

  2. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  3. Genetic influences on schizophrenia and subcortical brain volumes: large-scale proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Barbara; Stein, Jason L; Ripke, Stephan; Anttila, Verneri; Hibar, Derrek P; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Smoller, Jordan W; Nichols, Thomas E; Neale, Michael C; McIntosh, Andrew M; Lee, Phil; McMahon, Francis J; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Andreassen, Ole A; Gruber, Oliver; Sachdev, Perminder S; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Saykin, Andrew J; Ehrlich, Stefan; Mather, Karen A; Turner, Jessica A; Schwarz, Emanuel; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Yao, Yin; Ho, Yvonne Y W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Thompson, Paul M; Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. Brain structure and function differ, on average, between people with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. As common genetic associations are emerging for both schizophrenia and brain imaging phenotypes, we can now use genome-wide data to investigate genetic overlap. Here we integrated results from common variant studies of schizophrenia (33,636 cases, 43,008 controls) and volumes of several (mainly subcortical) brain structures (11,840 subjects). We did not find evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical volume measures either at the level of common variant genetic architecture or for single genetic markers. These results provide a proof of concept (albeit based on a limited set of structural brain measures) and define a roadmap for future studies investigating the genetic covariance between structural or functional brain phenotypes and risk for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26854805

  4. A Case of Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts in an Iranian Consanguineous Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Amoeian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by macrocephaly, and slowly progressive clinical course marked by ataxia, spasticity and mental decline. MLC is caused by mutations in the gene MLC1 which encodes a novel protein, MLC1. Conclusion:A 4-year-old girl with macrocephaly, spasticity, ataxia and abnormal cerebral white matter and subcortical cysts in brain MRI diagnosed with MLC. This is the first report of MLC in an Iranian family. Conclusion:MLC1 should be considered in children with macrocephaly and slowly progressive psychomotor decline. This disease can be prenatally diagnosed and genetic counseling offered for future pregnancies.

  5. A Case of Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts in an Iranian Consanguineous Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud-Reza Ashrafi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by macrocephaly, and slowly progressive clinical course marked by ataxia, spasticity and mental decline. MLC is caused by mutations in the gene MLC1 which encodes a novel protein, MLC1.Conclusion:A 4-year-old girl with macrocephaly, spasticity, ataxia and abnormal cerebral white matter and subcortical cysts in brain MRI diagnosed with MLC. This is the first report of MLC in an Iranian family.Conclusion:MLC1 should be considered in children with macrocephaly and slowly progressive psychomotor decline. This disease can be prenatally diagnosed and genetic counseling offered for future pregnancies.

  6. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts in an adult: quantitative proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 37-year-old macrocephalic woman was investigated for increasing gait disturbance due to longstanding spasticity and ataxia. MRI showed widespread bilateral increase in signal from cerebral white matter on T2-weighted images. Numerous subcortical cysts were visible in anterior-temporal and parietal regions. These clinical and neuroradiological features are those of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC), a recently delineated white-matter disease with onset in childhood. Quantitative localised proton MR spectroscopy of white matter revealed marked reduction of N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and choline with normal values for myoinositol, consistent with axonal loss and astrocytic proliferation. Diffusion tensor imaging showed an increased apparent diffusion coefficient and reduced anisotropy in affected white matter pointing to reduced cell density with an increased extracellular space. These findings are in line with histological changes alterations known to occur in MLC. (orig.)

  7. Are all subcortical dementias alike? Verbal learning and memory in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massman, P J; Delis, D C; Butters, N; Levin, B E; Salmon, D P

    1990-10-01

    The utility of the concept of 'subcortical dementia' was investigated by comparing the verbal learning and memory abilities of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with those of Huntington's disease (HD) patients. Many similarities between the PD and HD groups emerged, including impaired immediate memory spans, inconsistency of recall across learning trials, deficient use of a semantic clustering learning strategy, elevated intrusion rates on delayed recall, impaired recognition memory performance, normal retention of information over delay periods, normal vulnerability to proactive or retroactive interference, and normal types of intrusion errors. The HD subjects, however, displayed inferior free recall, deficient improvement across learning trials, abnormal serial position recall effects, higher perseveration rates, and supranormal improvement on recognition testing compared with free recall. Implications of these results for characterizing memory deficits associated with subcortical system dysfunction are discussed. PMID:2147923

  8. The application of surface anatomy scanning by MRI in the operative approach to cerebral subcortical angioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mamoru (Yachiyo Hospital, Anjo, Aichi (Japan)); Katada, Kazuhiro; Abe, Masato; Sano, Hirotoshi; Kanno, Tetsuo; Sugiishi, Shoji

    1990-02-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS), a new MR imaging technique that permits the direct and noninvasive visualization of brain-surface structures, was applied to surgical planning in a case of subcortical thrombosed arteriovenous malformation located close to the motor cortex. SAS can clearly demonstrate cortical sulci, gyri, major cortical veins, and subcortical lesions as well as skin marking, and shows an excellent correlation with the macroscopic operative field. Based on the SAS findings, a surgical approach was planned, and the lesion was successfully excised with minimal parenchymal damage. The advantages of SAS are: the precise localization of the lesion(s), the accurate evaluation of the site and size of the skin incision, and a better orientation for the neurosurgeons. As a result, SAS can minimize the brain damage from surgical intervention. In conclusion, SAS is thought to be a useful tool for neurosurgery as a preoperative examination. (author).

  9. In vivo three-photon microscopy of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Nicholas G.; Wang, Ke; Kobat, Demirhan; Clark, Catharine G.; Wise, Frank W.; Schaffer, Chris B.; Xu, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy enables scientists in various fields including neuroscience, embryology and oncology to visualize in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissue. However, tissue scattering limits the maximum imaging depth of two-photon fluorescence microscopy to the cortical layer within mouse brain, and imaging subcortical structures currently requires the removal of overlying brain tissue or the insertion of optical probes. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive, high-resolution, in vivo imaging of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain using three-photon fluorescence microscopy at a spectral excitation window of 1,700 nm. Vascular structures as well as red fluorescent protein-labelled neurons within the mouse hippocampus are imaged. The combination of the long excitation wavelength and the higher-order nonlinear excitation overcomes the limitations of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, enabling biological investigations to take place at a greater depth within tissue.

  10. Metabolic abnormalities in lobar and subcortical brain regions of abstinent polysubstance users: Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Abé, C.; Mon, A.; Hoefer, ME; Durazzo, TC; Pennington, DL; Schmidt, TP; Meyerhoff, DJ

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to explore neurometabolic and associated cognitive characteristics of patients with polysubstance use (PSU) in comparison with patients with predominant alcohol use using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods: Brain metabolite concentrations were examined in lobar and subcortical brain regions of three age-matched groups: 1-monthabstinent alcohol-dependent PSU, 1-month-abstinent individuals dependent on alcohol alone (ALC) and light drinking controls (...

  11. Analysis of CLCN2 as candidate gene for megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Scheper, G.C.; van Berkel, C.G.; Leisle, L.; de Groot, K.E.; Errami, A; Jentsch, T. J.; Van der Knaap, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the gene MLC1 are found in approximately 80% of the patients with inherited childhood white matter disorder megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC). Genetic linkage studies have not led to the identification of another disease gene. We questioned whether mutations in CLCN2, coding for the chloride channel protein 2 (ClC-2), are involved in MLC. Mice lacking this protein develop white matter abnormalities, which are characterized by vacuole formation in th...

  12. Homocysteine in cerebrovascular disease: An independent risk factor for subcortical vascular encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, Thomas; Mielke, Orell; Höly, Sabine; Zimmer, Wilma; Casarin, Wendy; Aufenanger, Johannes; Walter, Silke; Muehlhauser, Frank; Kuehl, Sandra; Ragoschke, Andreas; Fassbender, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for obstructive large-vessel disease. Here, we studied plasma concentrations of homocysteine and vitamins in patients suffering from subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), a cerebral small-vessel disease leading to dementia. These results were compared to the homocysteine and vitamin plasma concentrations from patients with cerebral large vessel disease and healthy control subjects. Plasma concentrations of homocysteine, vascular risk factors and vita...

  13. Regionally selective atrophy of subcortical structures in prodromal HD as revealed by statistical shape analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Younes, L.; Ratnanather, JT; Brown, T.; Aylward, E; Nopoulos, P.; Johnson, H.; Magnotta, VA; Paulsen, JS; Margolis, RL; Albin, RL; Miller, MI; Ross, CA; Wassink, T; Cross, S.; Kimble, M

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that involves preferential atrophy in the striatal complex and related subcortical nuclei. In this article, which is based on a dataset extracted from the PREDICT-HD study, we use statistical shape analysis with deformation markers obtained through "Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping" of cortical surfaces to highlight specific atrophy patterns in the caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus, at different prodromal stages of the ...

  14. Occipital seizures and subcortical T2 hypointensity in the setting of hyperglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Putta, Swapna L.; Daniel Weisholtz; Milligan, Tracey A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Occipital lobe seizures are a recognized manifestation of diabetic nonketotic hyperglycemia, though not as common as focal motor seizures. Occipital lobe white matter T2 hypointensity may suggest this diagnosis. Methods: We present a case of a 66-year-old man with hyperglycemia-related occipital lobe seizures who presented with confusion, intermittent visual hallucinations, and homonymous hemianopia. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging showed subcortical T2 hypointensity w...

  15. Genetic influences on schizophrenia and subcortical brain volumes: large-scale proof of concept

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, B.; Stein, J.; Ripke, S; Anttila, V; Hibar, D.; Van Hulzen, K.; Arias-Vasquez, A; Smoller, J; Nichols, T.; Neale, M.; McIntosh, A.; Lee, P; McMahon, F.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Mattheisen, M

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. Brain structure and function differ, on average, between people with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. As common genetic associations are emerging for both schizophrenia and brain imaging phenotypes, we can now use genome-wide data to investigate genetic overlap. Here we integrated results from common variant studies of schizophrenia (33,636 cases, 43,008 controls) and volumes of several (mainly subcortical) brain...

  16. Hearing it again and again: on-line subcortical plasticity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Skoe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human brainstem activity is sensitive to local sound statistics, as reflected in an enhanced response in repetitive compared to pseudo-random stimulus conditions [1]. Here we probed the short-term time course of this enhancement using a paradigm that assessed how the local sound statistics (i.e., repetition within a five-note melody interact with more global statistics (i.e., repetition of the melody. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that subcortical repetition enhancement builds over time, we recorded auditory brainstem responses in young adults to a five-note melody containing a repeated note, and monitored how the response changed over the course of 1.5 hrs. By comparing response amplitudes over time, we found a robust time-dependent enhancement to the locally repeating note that was superimposed on a weaker enhancement of the globally repeating pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first demonstration of on-line subcortical plasticity in humans. This complements previous findings that experience-dependent subcortical plasticity can occur on a number of time scales, including life-long experiences with music and language, and short-term auditory training. Our results suggest that the incoming stimulus stream is constantly being monitored, even when the stimulus is physically invariant and attention is directed elsewhere, to augment the neural response to the most statistically salient features of the ongoing stimulus stream. These real-time transformations, which may subserve humans' strong disposition for grouping auditory objects, likely reflect a mix of local processes and corticofugal modulation arising from statistical regularities and the influences of expectation. Our results contribute to our understanding of the biological basis of statistical learning and initiate a new investigational approach relating to the time-course of subcortical plasticity. Although the reported time

  17. Cortical and subcortical predictive dynamics and learning during perception, cognition, emotion and action

    OpenAIRE

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    An intimate link exists between the predictive and learning processes in the brain. Perceptual/cognitive and spatial/motor processes use complementary predictive mechanisms to learn, recognize, attend and plan about objects in the world, determine their current value, and act upon them. Recent neural models clarify these mechanisms and how they interact in cortical and subcortical brain regions. The present paper reviews and synthesizes data and models of these processes, and outlines a unifi...

  18. PET studies of brain energy metabolism in a model of subcortical dementia: progressive supranuclear Palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 41 patients with clinically determined Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, a model of degenerative subcortical dementia, alterations in regional brain energy metabolism with respect to control subjects have been investigated using positron computed tomography and correlated to clinical and neuropsychological scores. A generalized significant reduction in brain metabolism was found, which predominated in the prefrontal cortex in accordance with, and statistically correlated to, the frontal neuropsychological score

  19. Common late-onset subcortical cerebral hemorrhage following excessive alcohol consumption: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 50 year old male patient who was suffering from cooperation disorder and bilaterally blindness was admitted to our emergency service. He was addicted to alcohol and had excessive alcohol consumption the day before. Cranial nonenhanced CT was normal. T2 weighed MR imaging performed at 1,5 T unit showed high signal intensity in bilateral putaminal foci. In this localization diffusion-weighed images (DWI) were hyperintense due to restricted diffusion and low ADC values. After two weeks, drowsiness and confusion were appeared suddenly. Cranial nonenhanced CT was showed extensive subcortical white matter and basal ganglia abnormalities consistent with edema and hemorrhagic changes. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit and died after one day. In methanol intoxication, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, cerebellar necrosis, diffuse cerebral edema, bilateral subcortical white matter necrosis and edema were defined It should also be known that 2 or 3 weeks after ingestion of methyl alcohol, the deterioration of the patient's general situation is responsible for cerebral subcortical hemorrhage. We have also thought that patients' mortality and morbidity can be reduced with radiological imaging due to early diagnosis

  20. Intra- and interhemispheric variations of diffusivity in subcortical white matter in normal human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to reveal potential regional variations in water molecular diffusivity within each cerebral hemisphere and across the right and left hemispheres. Diffusion-weighted images of 44 healthy right-handed adult male subjects were obtained using a diffusion tensor imaging sequence. Mean diffusivity (MD) values in subcortical white matter (WM) within 39 regions in each hemisphere were measured using an automated method. Intrahemispheric comparisons of MDs in subcortical WM were performed among six brain regions (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes and pre- and postcentral gyri). Interhemispheric comparisons of MDs were performed between the right and left counterparts of the 39 regions. In both hemispheres, diffusivity in the precentral gyrus was lower than those in other regions, while diffusivity in the parietal lobe was higher than others. MD asymmetry in which the left was lower than the right was found in the parietal lobe, middle occipital gyrus, and medial and orbital aspects of the frontal lobe. The converse asymmetry was revealed in the frontal operculum, supplementary motor cortex, temporal lobe, limbic cortices, precuneus and cuneus. Our results revealed significant intra- and interhemispheric regional variations in MD in subcortical WM, which may be related to different densities of axons and myelin sheaths. (orig.)

  1. Longitudinal Evaluation of Residual Cortical and Subcortical Motor Evoked Potentials in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier; García-Alías, Guillermo

    2016-05-15

    We have applied transcranial electrical stimulation to rats with spinal cord injury and selectively tested the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) conveyed by descending motor pathways with cortical and subcortical origin. MEPs were elicited by electrical stimulation to the brain and recorded on the tibialis anterior muscles. Stimulation parameters were characterized and changes in MEP responses tested in uninjured rats, in rats with mild or moderate contusion, and in animals with complete transection of the spinal cord. All injuries were located at the T8 vertebral level. Two peaks, termed N1 and N2, were obtained when changing from single pulse stimulation to trains of 9 pulses at 9 Hz. Selective injuries to the brain or spinal cord funiculi evidenced the subcortical origin of N1 and the cortical origin of N2. Animals with mild contusion showed small behavioral deficits and abolished N1 but maintained small amplitude N2 MEPs. Substantial motor deficits developed in rats with moderate contusion, and these rats had completely eliminated N1 and N2 MEPs. Animals with complete cord transection had abolished N1 and N2 and showed severe impairment of locomotion. The results indicate the reliability of MEP testing to longitudinally evaluate over time the degree of impairment of cortical and subcortical spinal pathways after spinal cord injuries of different severity. PMID:26560177

  2. The Association Between Specific Substances of Abuse and Subcortical Intracerebral Hemorrhage versus Ischemic Lacunar Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma H Kaplan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension damages small vessels, resulting in both lacunar infarction and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Substance abuse has also been linked to small vessel pathology. This study explores whether the use of specific substances (eg., cocaine, tobacco is associated with subcortical ICH over ischemia in hypertensive individuals.Methods: Patients with hypertension, admitted with lacunar infarcts (measuring 1 drink per day (women, >2 drinks per day (men. Logistic regression was performed with ICH as the dependent variable comparing those presenting with ICH to those presenting with ischemia.Results: Of the 580 patients included in analysis, 217 (37% presented with ICH. The average age was similar between the two groups (64.7 versus 66.3 years. Illicit/controlled drug use was associated with a significantly increased risk of ICH over stroke in unadjusted models (25% versus 15%, p=0.02, with the largest effect seen in users ≥65 years old (not statistically significant. Smoking was associated with ischemia over ICH in a dose-dependent manner: any history of smoking OR 1.84, CI 1.19-2.84; current use OR 2.23, CI 1.37-3.62; heavy use OR 2.48, CI 1.50-4.13. Alcohol use was not preferentially associated with either outcome (p=0.29.Conclusions: In hypertensive patients, tobacco use is associated with an increased risk of subcortical ischemia compared to ICH; while use of illicit/controlled substances appears to be predictive of hemorrhage.

  3. Early developmental gene enhancers affect subcortical volumes in the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin; Guadalupe, Tulio; Franke, Barbara; Hibar, Derrek P; Renteria, Miguel E; Stein, Jason L; Thompson, Paul M; Francks, Clyde; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association screens aim to identify common genetic variants contributing to the phenotypic variability of complex traits, such as human height or brain morphology. The identified genetic variants are mostly within noncoding genomic regions and the biology of the genotype-phenotype association typically remains unclear. In this article, we propose a complementary targeted strategy to reveal the genetic underpinnings of variability in subcortical brain volumes, by specifically selecting genomic loci that are experimentally validated forebrain enhancers, active in early embryonic development. We hypothesized that genetic variation within these enhancers may affect the development and ultimately the structure of subcortical brain regions in adults. We tested whether variants in forebrain enhancer regions showed an overall enrichment of association with volumetric variation in subcortical structures of >13,000 healthy adults. We observed significant enrichment of genomic loci that affect the volume of the hippocampus within forebrain enhancers (empirical P = 0.0015), a finding which robustly passed the adjusted threshold for testing of multiple brain phenotypes (cutoff of P functional biology of identified associations. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1788-1800, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890892

  4. Cortical–Subcortical Interactions in Hypersomnia Disorders: Mechanisms Underlying Cognitive and Behavioral Aspects of the Sleep–Wake Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Linda J Larson-Prior; Ju, Yo-El; Galvin, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical circuits mediating sleep–wake functions have been well characterized in animal models, and corroborated by more recent human studies. Disruptions in these circuits have been identified in hypersomnia disorders (HDs) such as narcolepsy and Kleine–Levin Syndrome, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders expressing excessive daytime sleepiness. However, the behavioral expression of sleep–wake functions is not a simple on-or-off state determined by subcortical circuits, but encompass...

  5. Bilingualism at the core of the brain. Structural differences between bilinguals and monolinguals revealed by subcortical shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgaleta, Miguel; Sanjuán, Ana; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sebastian-Galles, Núria; Ávila, César

    2016-01-15

    Naturally acquiring a language shapes the human brain through a long-lasting learning and practice process. This is supported by previous studies showing that managing more than one language from early childhood has an impact on brain structure and function. However, to what extent bilingual individuals present neuroanatomical peculiarities at the subcortical level with respect to monolinguals is yet not well understood, despite the key role of subcortical gray matter for a number of language functions, including monitoring of speech production and language control - two processes especially solicited by bilinguals. Here we addressed this issue by performing a subcortical surface-based analysis in a sample of monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals (N=88) that only differed in their language experience from birth. This analysis allowed us to study with great anatomical precision the potential differences in morphology of key subcortical structures, namely, the caudate, accumbens, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. Vertexwise analyses revealed significantly expanded subcortical structures for bilinguals compared to monolinguals, localized in bilateral putamen and thalamus, as well as in the left globus pallidus and right caudate nucleus. A topographical interpretation of our results suggests that a more complex phonological system in bilinguals may lead to a greater development of a subcortical brain network involved in monitoring articulatory processes. PMID:26505300

  6. Species characterization and responses of subcortical insects to trap-logs and ethanol in a hardwood biomass plantation: Subcortical insects in hardwood plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, David R. [D. B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; University of Georgia; 180 E. Green Street Athens GA 30602 U.S.A.; Brissey, Courtney L. [D. B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; University of Georgia; 180 E. Green Street Athens GA 30602 U.S.A.; Gandhi, Kamal J. K. [D. B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; University of Georgia; 180 E. Green Street Athens GA 30602 U.S.A.

    2015-01-02

    1. We characterized subcortical insect assemblages in economically important eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantations in the southeastern U.S.A. Furthermore, we compared insect responses between freshly-cut plant material by placing traps directly over cut hardwood logs (trap-logs), traps baited with ethanol lures and unbaited (control) traps. 2. We captured a total of 15 506 insects representing 127 species in four families in 2011 and 2013. Approximately 9% and 62% of total species and individuals, respectively, and 23% and 79% of total Scolytinae species and individuals, respectively, were non-native to North America. 3. We captured more Scolytinae using cottonwood trap-logs compared with control traps in both years, although this was the case with sycamore and sweetgum only in 2013. More woodborers were captured using cottonwood and sweetgum trap-logs compared with control traps in both years, although only with sycamore in 2013. 4. Ethanol was an effective lure for capturing non-native Scolytinae; however, not all non-native species were captured using ethanol lures. Ambrosiophilus atratus (Eichhoff) and Hypothenemus crudiae (Panzer) were captured with both trap-logs and control traps, whereas Coccotrypes distinctus (Motschulsky) and Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff were only captured on trap-logs. 5. Indicator species analysis revealed that certain scolytines [e.g. Cnestus mutilates (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky)] showed significant associations with trap-logs or ethanol baits in poplar or sweetgum trap-logs. In general, the species composition of subcortical insects, especially woodboring insects, was distinct among the three tree species and between those associated with trap-logs and control traps.

  7. Formulaic language in cortical and subcortical disease: Evidence of the dual process model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Bridges

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that an intact cortical left hemisphere is crucial for language production. Recently, more credit is given to the right hemisphere and subcortical areas in the production of non-novel language, including formulaic language. John Hughlings Jackson (1874/1958, first described how propositional and non-propositional speech are differentially affected by neural impairment. Non-propositional language is often preserved following left hemisphere stroke even when aphasia is present (Code, 1982; Sidtis et al., 2009; Van Lancker Sidtis & Postman, 2006. With right hemisphere and subcortical stroke, formulaic language is reduced (Sidtis et al., 2009; Van Lancker Sidtis & Postman, 2006; Speedie et al., 1993. The dual process model of language competence states that propositional and non-propositional speech are processed differently in the brain, with novel speech controlled by the left hemisphere, and a right hemisphere/subcortical circuit modulating formulaic language (Van Lancker Sidtis, 2004; 2012. Two studies of formulaic language will be presented as further evidence of the dual process model: a study of formulaic language in Alzheimer’s disease, and a study of recited speech in Parkinson’s disease. Formulaic language includes overlearned words, phrases or longer linguistic units that are known to the native speaker, occur naturally in discourse, and are important for normal social interaction (Fillmore, 1979; Pawley & Syder, 1983; Van Lancker, 1988; Van Lancker Sidtis, 2004; Wray, 2002. Formulaic expressions include conversational speech formulas, idioms, proverbs, expletives, pause fillers, discourse elements, and sentence stems (stereotyped sentence-initials. Longer units of linguistic material, such as prayers, rhymes, and poems, termed recited speech, is another subtype of formulaic language that is learned in childhood and recited periodically throughout life. Cortical disease: Alzheimer’s disease and formulaic

  8. The Fezf2–Ctip2 genetic pathway regulates the fate choice of subcortical projection neurons in the developing cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Song S.; HATTOX, ALEXIS M.; Rayburn, Helen; Nelson, Sacha B.; McConnell, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the deep layers of the cerebral cortex can be classified into two major classes: callosal projection neurons and long-range subcortical neurons. We and others have shown that a gene expressed specifically by subcortical projection neurons, Fezf2, is required for the formation of axonal projections to the spinal cord, tectum, and pons. Here, we report that Fezf2 regulates a decision between subcortical vs. callosal projection neuron fates. Fezf2−/− neurons adopt the fate o...

  9. Involvement of Subcortical Brain Structures During Olfactory Stimulation in Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrini, Marco; Micarelli, Alessandro; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Bruno, Ernesto; Danieli, Roberta; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Öberg, Johanna; Pagani, Marco; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-03-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) patients usually react to odour compounds and the majority of neuroimaging studies assessed, especially at the cortical level, many olfactory-related correlates. The purpose of the present study was to depict sub-cortical metabolic changes during a neutral (NC) and pure (OC) olfactory stimulation by using a recently validated (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computer tomography procedure in 26 MCS and 11 healthy (HC) resting subjects undergoing a battery of clinical tests. Twelve subcortical volumes of interest were identified by the automated anatomical labeling library and normalized to thalamus FDG uptake. In both groups, when comparing OC to NC, the within-subjects ANOVA demonstrated a relative decreased metabolism in bilateral putamen and hippocampus and a relative increased metabolism in bilateral amygdala, olfactory cortex (OLF), caudate and pallidum. The between-groups ANOVA demonstrated in MCS a significant higher metabolism in bilateral OLF during NC. As in HC subjects negative correlations were found in OC between FDG uptake in bilateral amygdala and hippocampus and odor pleasantness scale, the latter positively correlated with MCS subjects' bilateral putamen FDG uptake in OC. Besides FDG uptake resemblances in both groups were found, for the first time a relative higher metabolism increase in OLF in MCS subjects at rest with respect to HC was found. When merging this aspect to the different subcortical FDG uptake correlations patterns in the two groups, the present study demonstrated to describe a peculiar metabolic index of behavioral and neurological aspects of MCS complaints. PMID:26438099

  10. Executive function and cerebral blood flow on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in cases of subcortical infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the extent of dysexecutive function of patients with subcortical infarctions, participants of this study underwent neuropsychological tests and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). These participants were categorized into two groups; patients with basal ganglia lesions (BG group) (n=5) and those with white matter lesions (WM group) (n=12). Participants were administered executive function tests as a part of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Administered executive measures included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFFT), the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT), and the Trait Making Test; Parts A and B. There were no group differences in their age, years of education and global cognitive performance. Student's t-tests were conducted to determine group differences in executive function. As a result, the number of total errors, the number of perseverative errors and the number of categories completed on the WCST were significantly worse for the BG group than for the WM group. These groups did not differ on other measures administered. In addition, all participants underwent SPECT, and their results were compared with the normal control data. Hypoperfusion was found on parts of the bilateral frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes for the BG and WM groups. These tendencies stood out in the right hemisphere of the BG group. The BG group exhibited decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) on the area of right side dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (e.g., Brodmann area 44). These analyses revealed that individuals with BG lesions showed significant executive declines that might be associated with decreased CBF in the subcortical-frontal system. It may support the idea that BG is connected with DLPFC via frontal-subcortical neuronal circuit. Patients with BG lesions may experience dysexecutive function due to the phenomenon of diaschisis from the disruption of this circuit. (author)

  11. Regional brain differences in cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume in individuals with Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashwath A Meda

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by increased non-social anxiety, sensitivity to sounds and hypersociability. Previous studies have reported contradictory findings with regard to regional brain variation in WS, relying on only one type of morphological measure (usually volume in each study. The present study aims to contribute to this body of literature and perhaps elucidate some of these discrepancies by examining concurrent measures of cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume between WS subjects and typically-developing (TD controls. High resolution MRI scans were obtained on 31 WS subjects and 50 typically developing control subjects. We derived quantitative regional estimates of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and subcortical volume using FreeSurfer software. We evaluated between-group ROI differences while controlling for total intracranial volume. In post-hoc exploratory analyses within the WS group, we tested for correlations between regional brain variation and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. Consistent with our hypothesis, we detected complex patterns of between-group cortical variation, which included lower surface area in combination with greater thickness in the following cortical regions: post central gyrus, cuneus, lateral orbitofrontal cortex and lingual gyrus. Additional cortical regions showed between-group differences in one (but not both morphological measures. Subcortical volume was lower in the basal ganglia and the hippocampus in WS versus TD controls. Exploratory correlations revealed that anxiety scores were negatively correlated with gray matter surface area in insula, OFC, rostral middle frontal, superior temporal and lingual gyrus. Our results were consistent with previous reports showing structural alterations in regions supporting the socio-affective and visuospatial impairments in WS. However, we also were able to effectively capture novel and

  12. Apraxia for differentiating Alzheimer’s disease from subcortical vascular dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Serhat Ozkan,1 Demet Ozbabalik Adapinar,1 Nese Tuncer Elmaci,2 Didem Arslantas31Department of Neurology, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, Turkey; 2Department of Neurology, Marmara University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Public Health, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, TurkeyAbstract: Although ideomotor limb apraxia is considered to be a typical sign of cortical pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, it has been also reported in subcortical neurodegenerative diseases and vascular lesions. We aimed to investigate the difference between AD, subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients by means of ideomotor limb apraxia frequency and severity. Ninety-six AD, 72 SVaD, and 84 MCI patients were assessed with the mini-mental status examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating (CDR and the apraxia screening test of TULIA (AST. Apraxia was significantly more frequent in the AD patients (32.3% than in both of the SVaD (16.7% and MCI (4.8% patients. The frequency of apraxia was also significantly higher in SVaD patients than in MCI patients. AD patients had significantly lower apraxia scores than both SVaD and MCI patients. In addition, a significant difference was found between SVaD and MCI patients in terms of apraxia scores. These results suggest that the widespread belief of the association between apraxia and cortical dementias is not exactly correct. The significant difference between both of the dementia groups and the MCI patients suggests that the absence of apraxia can be an indicator for MCI diagnosis.Keywords: apraxia, Alzheimer’s disease, subcortical vascular dementia, mild cognitive impairment

  13. Marchiafava-Bignami disease: magnetic resonance imaging findings in corpus callosum and subcortical white matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawarabuki, Kentaro E-mail: bukky@h2.dion.ne.jp; Sakakibara, Takehiko; Hirai, Makoto; Yoshioka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Yamaki, Tarumi

    2003-11-01

    A case of Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is presented using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A patient with a long history of alcoholism developed a gait disturbance with involuntary movements at the lower extremities. MRI scans taken at the onset showed no particular abnormalities. He progressed to a coma 10 days later. MRI scans taken 20 days after the onset showed a focal lesion at the genu of the corpus callosum and he was diagnosed as having MBD. In addition, multiple lesions were observed in bilateral frontoparietal subcortical white matter. These lesions demonstrated similar intense MRI signals as the corpus callosum.

  14. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts in all three siblings of a non-Aggarwal Indian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Kant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC is a rare neurodegenerative disease seen mainly in the Aggarwal community in India. It is characterized by early-onset macrocephaly with mild motor developmental delay, gradual onset ataxia, spasticity, seizures and usually late onset mild cognitive deterioration. Very few familial cases of MLC have been reported in the world literature, and to the best of our knowledge, there is no published study of all three siblings affected with MLC in a same family. Here, we are reporting three siblings belonging to a non-Aggarwal Hindu family, affected with MLC, who presented with early-onset macrocephaly and gradual onset ataxia.

  15. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy with severe factor XII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternic Nadezda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL is an inherited adult-onset microangiopathy caused by missense mutations in the Notch3gene on chromosome 19. However, common vascular risk factors may additionally modify clinical expression and progression of the disease. The role of various prothrombotic factors has also been implied. We report a case of a middle-aged man with typical clinical, neuroimaging and histological features of CADASIL, but with notably prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hematological investigations revealed severe clotting Factor XII deficiency. This case illustrates that the occurrence of vascular risk factors should not be overlooked in patients with CADASIL.

  16. Intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications: cortical erosions, subcortical migration and extensive intramedullary diffusion, a SIMS series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malghem, Jacques; Omoumi, Patrick; Lecouvet, Frederic; Berg, Bruno vande [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Departement de radiologie et d' imagerie medicale, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is a common disorder, which sometimes causes acute pain as calcifications dissolve and migrate into adjacent soft tissue. Intraosseous calcium penetration has also been described. We illustrate the appearance of these lesions using a series of 35 cases compiled by members of the French Society of Musculoskeletal Imaging (Societe d'Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, SIMS). The first group in our series (7 cases) involved calcification-related cortical erosions of the humeral and femoral diaphyses, in particular at the pectoralis major and gluteus maximus insertions. A second group (28 cases) involved the presence of calcium material in subcortical areas. The most common site was the greater tubercle of the humerus, accompanying a calcifying tendinopathy of the supraspinatus. In addition, an extensive intramedullary diffusion of calcium deposits was observed in four of these cases, associated with cortical erosion in one case and subcortical lesions in three cases. Cortical erosions and intraosseous migration of calcifications associated with calcific tendinitis may be confused with neoplasm or infection. It is important to recognize atypical presentations of hydroxyapatite deposition to avoid unnecessary investigation or surgery. (orig.)

  17. Intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications: cortical erosions, subcortical migration and extensive intramedullary diffusion, a SIMS series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is a common disorder, which sometimes causes acute pain as calcifications dissolve and migrate into adjacent soft tissue. Intraosseous calcium penetration has also been described. We illustrate the appearance of these lesions using a series of 35 cases compiled by members of the French Society of Musculoskeletal Imaging (Societe d'Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, SIMS). The first group in our series (7 cases) involved calcification-related cortical erosions of the humeral and femoral diaphyses, in particular at the pectoralis major and gluteus maximus insertions. A second group (28 cases) involved the presence of calcium material in subcortical areas. The most common site was the greater tubercle of the humerus, accompanying a calcifying tendinopathy of the supraspinatus. In addition, an extensive intramedullary diffusion of calcium deposits was observed in four of these cases, associated with cortical erosion in one case and subcortical lesions in three cases. Cortical erosions and intraosseous migration of calcifications associated with calcific tendinitis may be confused with neoplasm or infection. It is important to recognize atypical presentations of hydroxyapatite deposition to avoid unnecessary investigation or surgery. (orig.)

  18. Normative data for subcortical regional volumes over the lifetime of the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Olivier; Mouiha, Abderazzak; Dieumegarde, Louis; Duchesne, Simon

    2016-08-15

    Normative data for volumetric estimates of brain structures are necessary to adequately assess brain volume alterations in individuals with suspected neurological or psychiatric conditions. Although many studies have described age and sex effects in healthy individuals for brain morphometry assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, proper normative values allowing to quantify potential brain abnormalities are needed. We developed norms for volumetric estimates of subcortical brain regions based on cross-sectional magnetic resonance scans from 2790 healthy individuals aged 18 to 94years using 23 samples provided by 21 independent research groups. The segmentation was conducted using FreeSurfer, a widely used and freely available automated segmentation software. Models predicting subcortical regional volumes of each hemisphere were produced including age, sex, estimated total intracranial volume (eTIV), scanner manufacturer, magnetic field strength, and interactions as predictors. The mean explained variance by the models was 48%. For most regions, age, sex and eTIV predicted most of the explained variance while manufacturer, magnetic field strength and interactions predicted a limited amount. Estimates of the expected volumes of an individual based on its characteristics and the scanner characteristics can be obtained using derived formulas. For a new individual, significance test for volume abnormality, effect size and estimated percentage of the normative population with a smaller volume can be obtained. Normative values were validated in independent samples of healthy adults and in adults with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:27165761

  19. Awake brain mapping of cortex and subcortical pathways in brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyschlag, C F; Duffau, H

    2014-12-01

    Awake surgery is not a new technique: this is a new philosophy. Indeed, in surgery for diffuse gliomas performed in awake patients, the goal is not anymore to remove a "tumor mass" according to oncological boundaries (which in essence do not exist in infiltrating neoplasms), but to resect a part of the brain invaded by a chronic tumoral disease, according to functional limits both at cortical and subcortical levels. Therefore, intraoperative electrical mapping is accepted as the gold standard in order to gain information about the functionality of the underlying tissue when performing neuro-oncological surgery. This review should give the reader an overview of principles and indications of mapping of eloquent cortex and subcortical pathways with practical considerations for cerebral tumors. In gliomas, awake mapping has been demonstrated as increasing the surgical indications in so-called "critical areas" with nonetheless a significant decrease of postoperative morbidity‑while maximizing the extent of resection. Beyond clinical implications, awake surgery represents a unique opportunity to study neural networks underpinning sensorimotor, visuospatial, language, executive and even behavioral functions in humans. This led to propose new models of connectomics, breaking with the localizationist view of brain processing, and opening the window to the concept of neuroplasticity. In summary, awake mapping enables to make a link between surgical neurooncology and cognitive neurosciences, to improve both survival and quality of life of glioma patients. PMID:25418274

  20. Modulation of Cortical-subcortical Networks in Parkinson’s Disease by Applied Field Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher William Hess

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that endogenous field effects may play a role in neuronal oscillations and communication. Non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation with low-intensity currents can also have direct effects on the underlying cortex as well as distant network effects. While Parkinson's disease (PD is amenable to invasive neuromodulation in the basal ganglia by deep brain stimulation, techniques of non-invasive neuromodulation like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS are being investigated as possible therapies. tDCS and tACS have the potential to influence the abnormal cortical-subcortical network activity that occurs in PD through sub-threshold changes in cortical excitability or through entrainment or disruption of ongoing rhythmic cortical activity. This may allow for the targeting of specific features of the disease involving abnormal oscillatory activity, as well as the enhancement of potential cortical compensation for basal ganglia dysfunction and modulation of cortical plasticity in neurorehabilitation. However, little is currently known about how cortical stimulation will affect subcortical structures, the size of any effect, and the factors of stimulation that will influence these effects.

  1. First- and second-generation antipsychotic drug treatment and subcortical brain morphology in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Nesvåg, Ragnar; Gunleiksrud, Sindre; Raballo, Andrea; Jönsson, Erik G; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic medication may influence brain structure, but to what extent effects of first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) differ is still not clear. Here we aimed to disentangle the effects of FGA and SGA on variation in volumes of subcortical structures in patients with long-term treated schizophrenia. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from 95 patients with schizophrenia and 106 healthy control subjects. Among the patients, 40 received only FGA and 42 received only SGA. FreeSurfer 5.3.0 was used to obtain volumes of 27 subcortical structures as well as total brain volume and estimated intracranial volume. Findings of reduced total brain volume, enlarged ventricular volume and reduced hippocampal volume bilaterally among patients were replicated, largely independent of medication class. In the basal ganglia, FGA users had larger putamen bilaterally and right caudate volume compared to healthy controls, and the right putamen was significantly larger than among SGA users. FGA and SGA users had similar and larger globus pallidus volumes compared to healthy controls. Post hoc analyses revealed that the difference between FGA and SGA could be attributed to smaller volumes in the clozapine users specifically. We therefore conclude that basal ganglia volume enlargements are not specific to FGA. PMID:26547434

  2. Minimally Invasive Subcortical Parafascicular Transsulcal Access for Clot Evacuation (Mi SPACE for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ritsma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is common and causes significant mortality and morbidity. To date, optimal medical and surgical intervention remains uncertain. A lack of definitive benefit for operative management may be attributable to adverse surgical effect, collateral tissue injury. This is particularly relevant for ICH in dominant, eloquent cortex. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS offers the potential advantage of reduced collateral damage. MIS utilizing a parafascicular approach has demonstrated such benefit for intracranial tumor resection. Methods. We present a case of dominant hemisphere spontaneous ICH evacuated via the minimally invasive subcortical parafascicular transsulcal access clot evacuation (Mi SPACE model. We use this report to introduce Mi SPACE and to examine the application of this novel MIS paradigm. Case Presentation. The featured patient presented with a left temporal ICH and severe global aphasia. The hematoma was evacuated via the Mi SPACE approach. Postoperative reassessments showed significant improvement. At two months, bedside language testing was normal. MRI tractography confirmed limited collateral injury. Conclusions. This case illustrates successful application of the Mi SPACE model to ICH in dominant, eloquent cortex and subcortical regions. MRI tractography illustrates collateral tissue preservation. Safety and feasibility studies are required to further assess this promising new therapeutic paradigm.

  3. Subcortical physiology deformed into a patient-specific brain atlas for image-guided stereotaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnis, Kirk; Starreveld, Yves P.; Parrent, Andrew; Peters, Terence M.

    2002-05-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery for movement disorders involves the accurate localization of functionally distinct subcortical anatomy that appears homogeneous on magnetic resonance or computed tomographic images. To aid localization of these surgical targets on patient images, we have developed a visualization oriented searchable and expandable database of functional organization representing bilaterally the sensorimotor thalamus, pallidum, internal capsule, and subthalamic nucleus. Data were obtained through microelectrode recording and stimulation mapping routinely performed during 123 functional stereotactic procedures. Electrophysiologic data were standardized using a multi-parameter coding system and annotated to their respective MRIs at the appropriate position in patient stereotactic space. To accommodate for normal anatomical variability, we have developed an intensity-based nonlinear registration algorithm that rapidly warps a patient's volumetric MRI to a high-resolution MRI average brain. The annotated functional data are subsequently transformed into the average brain coordinate system using the displacement grids generated by the algorithm. When the database is searched, clustering of like inter-patient physiologic responses within target anatomy and adjacent structures is revealed. These data may in turn be registered to a preoperative MRI using a desktop computer enabling prior to surgery interactive delineation of surgical targets. The database is expandable, fully searchable, and provides a visual 3D representation of subcortical functional organization.

  4. Global Developmental Delay in a Mexican Patient With Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy With Subcortical Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Misael Cerecedo Zapata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC is a neurologic disorder characterized by macrocephaly within the first year of life and the delayed onset of motor function deterioration with ataxia and spasticity. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is diagnostic and shows diffusely abnormal, mildly swollen cerebral white matter and subcortical cysts. MLC exhibits an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Two genes have been associated with MLC. The first and most important gene is MLC1, The other gene involved is HEPACAM. Case Presentation: We studied a Mexican patient with a compatible diagnosis of MLC. The patient exhibited the c.353C > T, p.Thr118Met mutation, and both parents were carriers for the same mutation. To the best of our knowledge, no other cases of MLC have been reported in Mexican patient. This patient exhibited rapid deterioration of motor function. Conclusions: A diagnosis of MLC, which can be facilitated by imaging studies, should be considered in all patients who exhibit global developmental delay.

  5. Subcortical elevation of metabolism in Parkinson's disease--a critical reappraisal in the context of global mean normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Aanerud, Joel;

    2009-01-01

    of the entire deoxyglucose autoradiography literature on acquired parkinsonism in experimental animals. Based on this evidence, we conclude that (1) there is no quantitative evidence for widespread subcortical hypermetabolism in PD, (2) very similar patterns of subcortical hyperactivity are evident......In a recent issue of NeuroImage, we presented evidence that biased global mean (GM) normalization of brain PET data can generate the appearance of subcortical foci with relative hypermetabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and other degenerative disorders. In a commentary to our...... in various other brain disorders whenever GM normalization is utilized, and (3) the PDRP is not evident in animal models of PD. In the absence of quantitative evidence for the PDRP, our alternative interpretation of normalization bias seems the more parsimonious explanation for the reports of...

  6. Magnetisation transfer measurements of the subcortical grey and white matter in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia and in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in the subcortical grey and white matter of 11 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia, six with PD with dementia (PDD), six with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 12 elderly control subjects to assess regional differences in structural brain damage. There were no significant differences in MTR in any region between PD and controls. However, patients with PDD had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical white matter, including the frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum than the controls, whereas PSP had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical grey matter, including the putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus, in addition to the subcortical white matter. This suggests that regional patterns of structural brain damage can be detected using the magnetisation transfer technique. Measurement of MTR in the subcortical grey and white matter may be useful in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. STED Nanoscopy Reveals the Ubiquity of Subcortical Cytoskeleton Periodicity in Living Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa D’Este

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the axons of cultured hippocampal neurons, actin forms various structures, including bundles, patches (involved in the preservation of neuronal polarity, and a recently reported periodic ring-like structure. Nevertheless, the overlaying organization of actin in neurons and in the axon initial segment (AIS is still unclear, due mainly to a lack of adequate imaging methods. By harnessing live-cell stimulated emission depletion (STED nanoscopy and the fluorescent probe SiR-Actin, we show that the periodic subcortical actin structure is in fact present in both axons and dendrites. The periodic cytoskeleton organization is also found in the peripheral nervous system, specifically at the nodes of Ranvier. The actin patches in the AIS co-localize with pre-synaptic markers. Cytosolic actin organization strongly depends on the developmental stage and subcellular localization. Altogether, the results of this study reveal unique neuronal cytoskeletal features.

  8. Longitudinal cognitive decline in subcortical ischemic vascular disease--the LADIS Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Hanna; Kalska, Hely; Ylikoski, Raija;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have indicated that subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD), as defined according to imaging criteria, is associated with a specific clinical and cognitive profile. Much less is known about the long-term cognitive consequences of SIVD. The aim of the study...... was to investigate the longitudinal cognitive performance and incident dementia in subjects with and without SIVD in a sample of older adults with white matter lesions. METHODS: In the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS) study, 639 participants were examined with annual clinical and......-up independently of age, sex, education and medial temporal lobe atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: SIVD, as a manifestation of cerebral small vessel disease, is related to progressive cognitive impairment and a considerable risk of developing dementia. SIVD seems to specifically contribute to the deterioration of psychomotor...

  9. MRI study of periventricular regions in multiple sclerosis and in subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy of Binswanger's type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periventricular regions are predominantly involved either in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) or in Subcortical Arteriosclerotic Encephalopathy (SAE) of Bingswanger's type. The presence of focal, as well as diffuse lesions in these areas is well known in both pathologies. While focal lesions are linked to plaques or lacunar softening in MS and SAE respectively, the pathogenesis of the diffuse degenerative change is still unclear, either in MS or in SAE. Previous studies have suggested that periventricular alterations may be related to an abnormal Cerebrospinal Dluid (CSF) dynamics either in MS or in SAE, and to the chronic effect of interstitial edema due to an abnormal transependymal flow. In order to further investigate these mechanisms an MRI study of periventricular regions was performed in patients afflicted by MS or SAE as well as in normal volunteers

  10. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaal, L; Veltman, D J; van Erp, T G M; Sämann, P G; Frodl, T; Jahanshad, N; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H; Hofman, A; Niessen, W J; Vernooij, M W; Ikram, M A; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, H J; Block, A; Hegenscheid, K; Völzke, H; Hoehn, D; Czisch, M; Lagopoulos, J; Hatton, S N; Hickie, I B; Goya-Maldonado, R; Krämer, B; Gruber, O; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Rentería, M E; Strike, L T; Mills, N T; de Zubicaray, G I; McMahon, K L; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Gillespie, N A; Wright, M J; Hall, G B; MacQueen, G M; Frey, E M; Carballedo, A; van Velzen, L S; van Tol, M J; van der Wee, N J; Veer, I M; Walter, H; Schnell, K; Schramm, E; Normann, C; Schoepf, D; Konrad, C; Zurowski, B; Nickson, T; McIntosh, A M; Papmeyer, M; Whalley, H C; Sussmann, J E; Godlewska, B R; Cowen, P J; Fischer, F H; Rose, M; Penninx, B W J H; Thompson, P M; Hibar, D P

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to identify subcortical brain volumes that robustly discriminate MDD patients from healthy controls. Relative to controls, patients had significantly lower hippocampal volumes (Cohen's d=-0.14, % difference=-1.24). This effect was driven by patients with recurrent MDD (Cohen's d=-0.17, % difference=-1.44), and we detected no differences between first episode patients and controls. Age of onset ⩽21 was associated with a smaller hippocampus (Cohen's d=-0.20, % difference=-1.85) and a trend toward smaller amygdala (Cohen's d=-0.11, % difference=-1.23) and larger lateral ventricles (Cohen's d=0.12, % difference=5.11). Symptom severity at study inclusion was not associated with any regional brain volumes. Sample characteristics such as mean age, proportion of antidepressant users and proportion of remitted patients, and methodological characteristics did not significantly moderate alterations in brain volumes in MDD. Samples with a higher proportion of antipsychotic medication users showed larger caudate volumes in MDD patients compared with controls. This currently largest worldwide effort to identify subcortical brain alterations showed robust smaller hippocampal volumes in MDD patients, moderated by age of onset and first episode versus recurrent episode status. PMID:26122586

  11. Multi-atlas segmentation of subcortical brain structures via the AutoSeg software pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahui Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Automated segmenting and labeling of individual brain anatomical regions, in MRI are challenging, due to the issue of individual structural variability. Although atlas-based segmentation has shown its potential for both tissue and structure segmentation, due to the inherent natural variability as well as disease-related changes in MR appearance, a single atlas image is often inappropriate to represent the full population of datasets processed in a given neuroimaging study. As an alternative for the case of single atlas segmentation, the use of multiple atlases alongside label fusion techniques has been introduced using a set of individual “atlases” that encompasses the expected variability in the studied population. In our study, we proposed a multi-atlas segmentation scheme with a novel graph-based atlas selection technique. We first paired and co-registered all atlases and the subject MR scans. A directed graph with edge weights based on intensity and shape similarity between all MR scans is then computed. The set of neighboring templates is selected via clustering of the graph. Finally, weighted majority voting is employed to create the final segmentation over the selected atlases. This multi-atlas segmentation scheme is used to extend a single-atlas-based segmentation toolkit entitled AutoSeg, which is an open-source, extensible C++ based software pipeline employing BatchMake for its pipeline scripting, developed at the Neuro Image Research and Analysis Laboratories of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. AutoSeg performs N4 intensity inhomogeneity correction, rigid registration to a common template space, automated brain tissue classification based skull-stripping, and the multi-atlas segmentation. The multi-atlas-based AutoSeg has been evaluated on subcortical structure segmentation with a testing dataset of 20 adult brain MRI scans and 15 atlas MRI scans. The AutoSeg achieved mean Dice coefficients of 81.73% for the

  12. Subcortical processing of speech regularities underlies reading and music aptitude in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strait Dana L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities supports fundamental human behaviors such as hearing in noise and reading. Although the failure to encode acoustic regularities in ongoing speech has been associated with language and literacy deficits, how auditory expertise, such as the expertise that is associated with musical skill, relates to the brainstem processing of speech regularities is unknown. An association between musical skill and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities would not be surprising given the importance of repetition and regularity in music. Here, we aimed to define relationships between the subcortical processing of speech regularities, music aptitude, and reading abilities in children with and without reading impairment. We hypothesized that, in combination with auditory cognitive abilities, neural sensitivity to regularities in ongoing speech provides a common biological mechanism underlying the development of music and reading abilities. Methods We assessed auditory working memory and attention, music aptitude, reading ability, and neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities in 42 school-aged children with a wide range of reading ability. Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities was assessed by recording brainstem responses to the same speech sound presented in predictable and variable speech streams. Results Through correlation analyses and structural equation modeling, we reveal that music aptitude and literacy both relate to the extent of subcortical adaptation to regularities in ongoing speech as well as with auditory working memory and attention. Relationships between music and speech processing are specifically driven by performance on a musical rhythm task, underscoring the importance of rhythmic regularity for both language and music. Conclusions These data indicate common brain mechanisms underlying reading and music abilities that relate to how the nervous system responds to

  13. Partly segregated cortico-subcortical pathways support phonologic and semantic verbal fluency: A lesion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouiter, Leila; Holmberg, Josefina; Manuel, Aurelie L; Colombo, Françoise; Clarke, Stephanie; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Spierer, Lucas

    2016-08-01

    Verbal fluency refers to the ability to generate as many words as possible in a limited time interval, without repetition and according to either a phonologic (each word begins with a given letter) or a semantic rule (each word belongs to a given semantic category). While current literature suggests the involvement of left fronto-temporal structures in fluency tasks, whether the same or distinct brain areas are necessary for each type of fluency remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis for an involvement of partly segregated cortico-subcortical structures between phonologic and semantic fluency by examining with a voxel-based lesion symptom mapping approach the effects of brain lesions on fluency scores corrected for age and education level in a group of 191 unselected brain-damaged patients with a first left or right hemispheric lesion. There was a positive correlation between the scores to the two types of fluency, suggesting that common mechanisms underlie the word generation independent of the production rule. The lesion-symptom mapping revealed that lesions to left basal ganglia impaired both types of fluency and that left superior temporal, supramarginal and rolandic operculum lesions selectively impaired phonologic fluency and left middle temporal lesions impaired semantic fluency. Our results corroborate current neurocognitive models of word retrieval and production, and refine the role of cortical-subcortical interaction in lexical search by highlighting the common executive role of basal ganglia in both types of verbal fluency and the preferential involvement of the ventral and dorsal language pathway in semantic and phonologic fluency, respectively. PMID:27217213

  14. Increased Functional Connectivity Between Subcortical and Cortical Resting-State Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerliani, Leonardo; Mennes, Maarten; Thomas, Rajat M.; Di Martino, Adriana; Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Importance Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating the presence of abnormalities in the interaction across large-scale brain networks. To date, studies have focused either on constrained sets of brain regions or whole-brain analysis, rather than focusing on the interaction between brain networks. Objectives To compare the intrinsic functional connectivity between brain networks in a large sample of individuals with ASD and typically developing control subjects and to estimate to what extent group differences would predict autistic traits and reflect different developmental trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants We studied 166 male individuals (mean age, 17.6 years; age range, 7-50 years) diagnosed as having DSM-IV-TR autism or Asperger syndrome and 193 typical developing male individuals (mean age, 16.9 years; age range, 6.5-39.4 years) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were matched for age, IQ, head motion, and eye status (open or closed) in the MRI scanner. We analyzed data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), an aggregated MRI data set from 17 centers, made public in August 2012. Main Outcomes and Measures We estimated correlations between time courses of brain networks extracted using a data-driven method (independent component analysis). Subsequently, we associated estimates of interaction strength between networks with age and autistic traits indexed by the Social Responsiveness Scale. Results Relative to typically developing control participants, individuals with ASD showed increased functional connectivity between primary sensory networks and subcortical networks (thalamus and basal ganglia) (all t ≥ 3.13, P < .001 corrected). The strength of

  15. Right Frontoinsular Cortex and Subcortical Activity to Infant Cry Is Associated with Maternal Mental State Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary L.; Swain, James E.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to examine neural correlates of a specific component of human caregiving: maternal mental state talk, reflecting a mother's proclivity to attribute mental states and intentionality to her infant. Using a potent, ecologically relevant stimulus of infant cry during fMRI, we tested hypotheses that postpartum neural response to the cry of “own” versus a standard “other” infant in the right frontoinsular cortex (RFIC) and subcortical limbic network would be associated with independent observations of maternal mental state talk. The sample comprised 76 urban-living, low socioeconomic mothers (82% African American) and their 4-month-old infants. Before the fMRI scan, mothers were filmed in face-to-face interaction with their infant, and maternal behaviors were coded by trained researchers unaware of all other information about the participants. The results showed higher functional activity in the RFIC to own versus other infant cry at the group level. In addition, RFIC and bilateral subcortical neural activity (e.g., thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, putamen) was associated positively with maternal mental state talk but not with more global aspects of observed caregiving. These findings held when accounting for perceptual and contextual covariates, such as maternal felt distress, urge to help, depression severity, and recognition of own infant cry. Our results highlight the need to focus on specific components of caregiving to advance understanding of the maternal brain. Future work will examine the predictive utility of this neural marker for mother–child function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study advances extant literature examining the neural underpinning of early parenting behavior. The findings highlight the special functional importance of the right frontoinsular cortex–thalamic–limbic network in a mother's proclivity to engage in mental state talk with her preverbal infant, a circumscribed aspect of maternal caregiving

  16. A clinical case of a patient with probable cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL from Chuvashia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vladimirovna Mokina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL syndrome is a congenital small-vessel disease running with recurrent lacunar infarcts and leading to gradually progressive subcortical, pseudobulbar, and cerebellar syndromes and dementia. Neuroimaging reveal multiple lacunar infarcts in the basal ganglia, thalamus, pons Varolii, and cerebral hemispheric white matter, as well as cerebral atrophy. The specific feature of the disease is white matter lesion adjacent to the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles and to the external capsules. The paper describes a patient with CADASIL syndrome. The latter runs a progressive course and includes the following neurological disorders: cognitive, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, and axial ones. This clinical case was differentially diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, including with consideration for neuroimaging findings. The CADASIL syndrome is a rare potentially menacing neurological condition that is observed in young patients and requires a detailed examination using current diagnostic techniques.

  17. Subcortical cerebral blood flow and metabolic changes elicited by cortical spreading depression in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mraovitch, S.; Calando, Y.; Goadsby, P.J.; Seylaz, J. (Laboratoire de Recherches Cerebrovasculaire, Paris (France))

    1992-06-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical perfusion (CBF{sub LDF}), local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) elicited by unilateral cortical spreading depression (SD) were monitored and measured in separate groups of rats anesthetized with {alpha}-chloralose. CBF{sub LDF} was recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry, while lCBF and lCGU were measured by the quantitative autoradiographic ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine and ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose methods, respectively. SD elicited a wave of hyperemia after a latency of 2 to 3 min followed by an oligemic phase. Ninety minutes following the onset of SD cortical lCBF and lCGU were essentially the same as on the contralateral side and in sham-treated rats. However, alteration in the lCBF and lCGU in upper and lower brainstem persisted. The present results demonstrate that long-lasting cerebrovascular and metabolic alterations take place within the subcortical regions following SD. These regions provide an attractive site to integrate observations in man concerning spreading depression and the aura of migraine with the other features of the syndrome. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Molecular pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts: mutations in MLC1 cause folding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarri, Anna; Teijido, Oscar; López-Hernández, Tania; Scheper, Gert C.; Barriere, Herve; Boor, Ilja; Aguado, Fernando; Zorzano, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Martínez, Albert; Lukacs, Gergely L.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Nunes, Virginia; Estévez, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare type of leukodystrophy, most often caused by mutations in the MLC1 gene. MLC1 is an oligomeric plasma membrane (PM) protein of unknown function expressed mainly in glial cells and neurons. Most disease-causing missense mutations dramatically reduced the total and PM MLC1 expression levels in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. The impaired expression of the mutants was verified in primary cultures of rat astrocytes, as well as human monocytes, cell types that endogenously express MLC1, demonstrating the relevance of the tissue culture models. Using a combination of biochemical, pharmacological and imaging methods, we also demonstrated that increased endoplasmatic reticulum-associated degradation and endo-lysosomal-associated degradation can contribute to the cell surface expression defect of the mutants. Based on these results, we suggest that MLC1 mutations reduce protein levels in vivo. Since the expression defect of the mutants could be rescued by exposing the mutant-protein expressing cells to low temperature and glycerol, a chemical chaperone, we propose that MLC belongs to the class of conformational diseases. Therefore, we suggest the use of pharmacological strategies that improve MLC1 expression to treat MLC patients. PMID:18757878

  19. Psychotic disorder in the course of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with subcortical calcifications – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malec, Michalina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is autoimmunological disease of connective tissue which is characterized with clinical symptoms of many systems and organs injury. There are often neuropsychiatric symptoms. Psychotic disorder is the least frequent syndrome. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are important because they deteriorate the quality of life and are poor prognostic factor. Aim: The aim of the study is to present the patient with chronic, lasting for many years, skin lesions and laboratory tests results characteristic for SLE, who had psychotic disorder diagnosed as schizophrenia and in the next few years there were observed other neuropsychiatric symptoms including cognitive impairment and mood disorder. Conclusions: Psychotic disorder is rare syndrome of neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE. It may primarily originate from SLE or be secondary either to the therapy or the complications of the disease. It is not possible to define if the psychosis is the primary schizophrenic process or secondary to the autoimmune disease in presented patient. However the clinical picture pays attention to the significance of careful diagnostic process, including neuroimaging. In head CT of presented patient there were revealed massive, bilateral, calcifications of subcortical structures which probably substantially enhanced neuropsychiatric symptoms. Key words: Neuropsychiatric Lupus Erythematosus, schizophrenia, calcification of the basal ganglia

  20. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Niels J H M; van Loenhoud, Anita C; van den Berg, Stan F; Berendse, Henk W; Foncke, Elisabeth M J; Klein, Martin; Stoffers, Diederick; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; van den Heuvel, Odile A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM) volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA), which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i) CTh, SA, and (sub)cortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii) the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i) CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii) SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii) volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i) CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii) VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes. PMID:26919667

  1. Cortical and subcortical anatomy of chronic spatial neglect following vascular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Armin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL and superior temporal gyrus (STG or subcortical pathways as possible anatomical correlates of spatial neglect is currently intensely discussed. Some of the conflicting results might have arisen because patients were examined in the acute stage of disease. Methods We examined the anatomical basis of spatial neglect in a sample of patients examined in the post-acute stage following right-hemispheric vascular brain damage. Lesions of 28 patients with chronic spatial neglect were contrasted to lesions of 22 control patients without neglect using lesion subtraction techniques and voxel-wise comparisons. Results The comparisons identified the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ with underlying white matter, the supramarginal gyrus, the posterior STG, and the insula as brain regions damaged significantly more often in neglect compared to non-neglect patients. In a subgroup of neglect patients showing particularly large cancellation bias together with small errors on line bisection damage was prevalent deep in the frontal lobe while damage of patients with the reverse pattern was located in the white matter of the TPJ. Conclusion Considering our results and the findings of previous studies, spatial neglect appears to be associated with a network of regions involving the TPJ, inferior IPL, posterior STG, the insular cortex, and posterior-frontal projections. Frontal structures or projections may be of particular relevance for spatial exploration, while the IPL may be important for object-based attention as required for line bisection.

  2. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Cortical and Subcortical Regions in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jie; Jia, Xiuqin; Li, Huizhuo; Qin, Jiawei; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The present study aimed to explore the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) at rest in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Twenty-four PD patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study. ALFF was measured on the whole brain of all participants. A two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with age, gender, education level, head motion, and gray matter volume as covariates. Results. It was showed that PD patients had significantly decreased ALFF in the left thalamus/caudate and right insula/inferior prefrontal gyrus, whereas they had increased ALFF in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 8/6) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10). Conclusions. Our results indicated that significant alterations of ALFF in the subcortical regions and prefrontal cortex have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education, head motion, and structural atrophy. The current findings further provide insights into the biological mechanism of the disease.

  3. Mechanisms of placebo analgesia: rACC recruitment of a subcortical antinociceptive network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingel, U; Lorenz, J; Schoell, E; Weiller, C; Büchel, C

    2006-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception and the underlying mechanisms are finally beginning to be understood. According to pharmacological studies, the endogenous opioid system is essential for placebo analgesia. Recent functional imaging data provides evidence that the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) represents a crucial cortical area for this type of endogenous pain control. We therefore hypothesized that placebo analgesia recruits other brain areas outside the rACC and that interactions of the rACC with these brain areas mediate opioid-dependent endogenous antinociception as part of a top-down mechanism. Nineteen healthy subjects received and rated painful laser stimuli to the dorsum of both hands, one of them treated with a fake analgesic cream (placebo). Painful stimulation was preceded by an auditory cue, indicating the side of the next laser stimulation. BOLD-responses to the painful laser-stimulation during the placebo and no-placebo condition were assessed using event-related fMRI. After having confirmed placebo related activity in the rACC, a connectivity analysis identified placebo dependent contributions of rACC activity with bilateral amygdalae and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). This finding supports the view that placebo analgesia depends on the enhanced functional connectivity of the rACC with subcortical brain structures that are crucial for conditioned learning and descending inhibition of nociception. PMID:16364549

  4. Training conquers multitasking costs by dividing task representations in the frontoparietal-subcortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, K G; Dux, Paul E

    2015-11-17

    Negotiating the information-rich sensory world often requires the concurrent management of multiple tasks. Despite this requirement, humans are thought to be poor at multitasking because of the processing limitations of frontoparietal and subcortical (FP-SC) brain regions. Although training is known to improve multitasking performance, it is unknown how the FP-SC system functionally changes to support improved multitasking. To address this question, we characterized the FP-SC changes that predict training outcomes using an individual differences approach. Participants (n = 100) performed single and multiple tasks in pre- and posttraining magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions interspersed by either a multitasking or an active-control training regimen. Multivoxel pattern analyses (MVPA) revealed that training induced multitasking improvements were predicted by divergence in the FP-SC blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response patterns to the trained tasks. Importantly, this finding was only observed for participants who completed training on the component (single) tasks and their combination (multitask) and not for the control group. Therefore, the FP-SC system supports multitasking behavior by segregating constituent task representations. PMID:26460014

  5. Vestibular and Attractor Network Basis of the Head Direction Cell Signal in Subcortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Clark

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate navigation depends on a network of neural systems that encode the moment-to-moment changes in an animal’s directional orientation and location in space. Within this navigation system are head direction (HD cells, which fire persistently when an animal’s head is pointed in a particular direction (Sharp et al., 2001a; Taube, 2007. HD cells are widely thought to underlie an animal’s sense of spatial orientation, and research over the last 25+ years has revealed that this robust spatial signal is widely distributed across subcortical and cortical limbic areas. Much of this work has been directed at understanding the functional organization of the HD cell circuitry, and precisely how this signal is generated from sensory and motor systems. The purpose of the present review is to summarize some of the recent studies arguing that the HD cell circuit is largely processed in a hierarchical fashion, following a pathway involving the dorsal tegmental nuclei → lateral mammillary nuclei → anterior thalamus → parahippocampal and retrosplenial cortical regions. We also review recent work identifying “bursting” cellular activity in the HD cell circuit after lesions of the vestibular system, and relate these observations to the long held view that attractor network mechanisms underlie HD signal generation. Finally, we summarize the work to date suggesting that this network architecture may reside within the tegmento-mammillary circuit.

  6. "Closing-in" phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwak Yong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'closing-in' phenomenon is defined as a tendency to close in on a model while copying it. This is one of several constructional apraxia observed in dementia, particularly in Alzheimer's disease (AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of it in the differential diagnosis of AD and subcortical vascular dementia (SVD and to clarify the factors associated with it. Methods We operationally defined and classified it into three types, namely overlap, adherent, and near type. We analyzed the incidence of it in patients with AD (n = 98 and SVD (n = 48. Results AD patients exhibited a significantly higher occurrence of it as compared to SVD patients. Among the different types of it, the overlap and adherent types occurred almost exclusively in AD patients. A discriminant analysis in AD subjects revealed that the scores obtained from the MMSE, CDR, Barthel index, and the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure test were correlated significantly with the occurrence of it. There was no statistical difference between the Q-EEG parameters of patients that exhibited the closing-in phenomenon and those that did not. Conclusions This study suggests that the closing-in phenomenon is phase- and AD-specific and might be a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of AD and SVD.

  7. Top-Down-Mediated Facilitation in the Visual Cortex Is Gated by Subcortical Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafundo, Diego E; Nicholas, Mark A; Zhang, Ruilin; Kuhlman, Sandra J

    2016-03-01

    Response properties in primary sensory cortices are highly dependent on behavioral state. For example, the nucleus basalis of the forebrain plays a critical role in enhancing response properties of excitatory neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) during active exploration and learning. Given the strong reciprocal connections between hierarchically arranged cortical regions, how are increases in sensory response gain constrained to prevent runaway excitation? To explore this, we used in vivo two-photon guided cell-attached recording in conjunction with spatially restricted optogenetic photo-inhibition of higher-order visual cortex in mice. We found that the principle feedback projection to V1 originating from the lateral medial area (LM) facilitated visual responses in layer 2/3 excitatory neurons by ∼20%. This facilitation was reduced by half during basal forebrain activation due to differential response properties between LM and V1. Our results demonstrate that basal-forebrain-mediated increases in response gain are localized to V1 and are not propagated to LM and establish that subcortical modulation of visual cortex is regionally distinct. PMID:26961946

  8. Subcortical cerebral blood flow and metabolic changes elicited by cortical spreading depression in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in cerebral cortical perfusion (CBFLDF), local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) elicited by unilateral cortical spreading depression (SD) were monitored and measured in separate groups of rats anesthetized with α-chloralose. CBFLDF was recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry, while lCBF and lCGU were measured by the quantitative autoradiographic (14C)iodoantipyrine and (14C)-2-deoxyglucose methods, respectively. SD elicited a wave of hyperemia after a latency of 2 to 3 min followed by an oligemic phase. Ninety minutes following the onset of SD cortical lCBF and lCGU were essentially the same as on the contralateral side and in sham-treated rats. However, alteration in the lCBF and lCGU in upper and lower brainstem persisted. The present results demonstrate that long-lasting cerebrovascular and metabolic alterations take place within the subcortical regions following SD. These regions provide an attractive site to integrate observations in man concerning spreading depression and the aura of migraine with the other features of the syndrome. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. The brain lipidomes of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and mixed dementia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Yuting; Duan, Xinrui; Wenk, Markus R.; Kalaria, Raj N.; Chen, Christopher P.; Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance as the leading cause of vascular dementia, the primary pathogenic mechanisms in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) have remained elusive. Because of the lack of approved therapeutic agents for SIVD, there is a pressing need to identify novel therapeutic targets. Comparative lipidomic analyses of SIVD and mixed dementia (i.e., SIVD and Alzheimer's disease, MixD) may also confer new insights pertaining to the possible interaction between neurodegenerative and vascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dementia. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively analyze the lipidomes of white and gray matter from the temporal cortex of nondemented controls, SIVD, and MixD subjects. Detailed molecular profiles highlighted the pathologic relevance of gray matter sphingolipid fatty acyl chain heterogeneity in dementia. In addition, the levels of sulfatides and lysobisphosphatidic acids were progressively increased in the temporal cortex gray matter from control to SIVD to MixD. White matter phospholipid profiles indicated possible adaptive mechanisms (i.e., increased unsaturation) to chronic ischemia in SIVD and elevated membrane degradation in MixD. PMID:24684787

  10. Loss of Microstructural Integrity in the Limbic-Subcortical Networks for Acute Symptomatic Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported discrepant white matter diffusivity in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI on the base of Glasgow Coma Scale, which are unreliable for some TBI severity indicators and the frequency of missing documentation in the medical record. In the present study, we adopted the Mayo classification system for TBI severity. In this system, the mTBI is also divided into two groups as “probable and symptomatic” TBI. We aimed to investigate altered microstructural integrity in symptomatic acute TBI (<1 week by using tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. A total of 12 patients and 13 healthy volunteers were involved and underwent MRI scans including conventional scan, and SWI and DTI. All the patients had no visible lesions by using conventional and SWI neuroimaging techniques, while showing widespread declines in the fractional anisotropy (FA of gray matter and white matter throughout the TBSS skeleton, particularly in the limbic-subcortical structures. By contrast, symptomatic TBI patients showed no significant enhanced changes in FA compared to the healthy controls. A better understanding of the acute changes occurring following symptomatic TBI may increase our understanding of neuroplasticity and continuing degenerative change, which, in turn, may facilitate advances in management and intervention.

  11. Structure of Phoretic Mite Assemblages Across Subcortical Beetle Species at a Regional Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Jesse A; Coyle, David R; Gandhi, Kamal J K; Hernandez, Natalie; Hofstetter, Richard W; Moser, John C; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-02-01

    Mites associated with subcortical beetles feed and reproduce within habitats transformed by tree-killing herbivores. Mites lack the ability to independently disperse among these habitats, and thus have evolved characteristics that facilitate using insects as transport between resources. Studies on associations between mites and beetles have historically been beetle-centric, where an assemblage of mite species is characterized on a single beetle species. However, available evidence suggests there may be substantial overlap among mite species on various species of beetles utilizing similar host trees. We assessed the mite communities of multiple beetle species attracted to baited funnel traps in Pinus stands in southern Wisconsin, northern Arizona, and northern Georgia to better characterize mite dispersal and the formation of mite-beetle phoretic associations at multiple scales. We identified approximately 21 mite species totaling 10,575 individuals on 36 beetle species totaling 983 beetles. Of the mites collected, 97% were represented by eight species. Many species of mites were common across beetle species, likely owing to these beetles' common association with trees in the genus Pinus. Most mite species were found on at least three beetle species. Histiostoma spp., Iponemus confusus Lindquist, Histiogaster arborsignis Woodring and Trichouropoda australis Hirschmann were each found on at least seven species of beetles. While beetles had largely similar mite membership, the abundances of individual mite species were highly variable among beetle species within each sampling region. Phoretic mite communities also varied within beetle species between regions, notably for Ips pini (Say) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff). PMID:26496952

  12. Subcortical brain volume abnormalities in 2028 individuals with schizophrenia and 2540 healthy controls via the ENIGMA consortium

    OpenAIRE

    van Erp, TGM; Hibar, DP; Rasmussen, JM; Glahn, DC; Pearlson, GD; Andreassen, OA; Agartz, I.; Westlye, LT; Haukvik, UK; Dale, AM; Melle, I; Hartberg, CB; Gruber, O.; Kraemer, B; Zilles, D

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited The profile of brain structural abnormalities in schizophrenia is still not fully understood, despite decades of research using brain scans. To validate a prospective meta-analysis approach to analyzing multicenter neuroimaging data, we analyzed brain MRI scans from 2028 schizophrenia patients and 2540 healthy controls, assessed with standardized methods at 15 centers worldwide. We identified subcortical brain volumes that differentiated patients from contr...

  13. Executive function assessment in patients with subcortical cerebral infarction using the Trail Making Test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess executive function in patients with subcortical cerebral infarctions, we implemented a Trail Making Test (TMT) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). We recruited 19 patients who had subcortical cerebral infarction on magnetic resonance images (MRI). The patients were classified into two categories depending on the degree of deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) on MRI. On comparing MRI and pathological findings, the punctate DWMH was not associated with infarction, but large confluent DWMH suggests subcortical ischemia. On this basis, the low grade DWMH group consisted of 12 patients with punctate foci, and seven patients with large confluent areas were classified in the high grade DWMH group. All patients were right-handed and without symptomatic hemiparesis. To exclude demented patients, cognitive function was examined. The vascular lesions were confirmed by brain magnetic resonance angiography and ultrasonography of the carotid arteries, and we excluded patients with severe stenotic or occlusive vascular lesions in cerebral or carotid arteries. On TMT, we analyzed the time required for Part A and Part B, and the difference in time required (required time difference). We also subtracted the time required for Part A form that required for Part B. To exclude the influence of potential hemiparesis, we also calculated the time required ratio expressed as follows; time required for Part B/time required for Part A. There was no significant increase in the time required for Part A, but we found significant increase in the time required for Part B, the required time difference and the required time ratio in the high grade DWMH group. There was no significant difference on WCST. On pathological examination in normal elderly subjects, punctate foci can be found, but not large confluent DWMH. In this study, we found that patients with severe DWMH may have impaired executive functions. These results might be induced by the pathological features of subcortical

  14. Altered Functional Connectivity in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment--A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Ding

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that people with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (sVCI have structural and functional abnormalities in the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites. In this study, we used seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC analysis and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC techniques to investigate the alteration of rsFC in patients with sVCI. rsFC and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired for 51 patients with subcortical cerebrovascular disease. All patients were subdivided based on cognitive status into 29 with sVCI and 22 controls; patient characteristics were matched. rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and VMHC were calculated separately, and rsFC of the PCC and VMHC between the two groups were compared. The regions showing abnormal rsFC of the PCC or VMHC in sVCI patients were adopted as regions of interest for correlation analyses. Our results are as follows: The patients with sVCI exhibited increases in rsFC in the left middle temporal lobe, right inferior temporal lobe and left superior frontal gyrus, and significant decreases in rsFC of the left thalamus with the PCC. sVCI patients showed a significant deficit in VMHC between the bilateral lingual gyrus, putamen, and precentral gyrus. Additionally, the z-memory score was significantly positively associated with connectivity between the left thalamus and the PCC (r = 0.41, p = 0.03, uncorrected in the sVCI group. Our findings suggest that the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites play an important role in the pathogenesis of sVCI. Furthermore, rsFC between the left thalamus and the PCC might indicate the severity of sVCI.

  15. Glutamate Concentration in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Predicts Resting-State Cortical-Subcortical Functional Connectivity in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Niall W.; Wiebking, Christine; Tiret, Brice; Marjańska, Malgoranza; Hayes, Dave J; Lyttleton, Oliver; Doyon, Julien; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Communication between cortical and subcortical regions is integral to a wide range of psychological processes and has been implicated in a number of psychiatric conditions. Studies in animals have provided insight into the biochemical and connectivity processes underlying such communication. However, to date no experiments that link these factors in humans in vivo have been carried out. To investigate the role of glutamate in individual differences in communication between the cortex – specif...

  16. Subcortical Volumes Differ in Parkinson’s Disease Motor Subtypes: New Insights into the Pathophysiology of Disparate Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Herman, Talia; Jacob, Yael; Kliper, Efrat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be classified, based on their motor symptoms into the Postural Instability Gait Difficulty (PIGD) subtype or the Tremor Dominant (TD) subtype. Gray matter changes between the subtypes have been reported using whole brain Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM), however, the evaluation of subcortical gray matter volumetric differences between these subtypes using automated volumetric analysis has only been studied in relatively small sample sizes and needs further study to confirm that the negative findings were not due to the sample size. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate volumetric changes in subcortical regions and their association with PD motor subtypes. Methods: Automated volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis quantified the subcortical gray matter volumes of patients with PD in the PIGD subtype (n = 30), in the TD subtype (n = 30), and in 28 healthy controls (HCs). Results: Significantly lower amygdala and globus pallidus gray matter volume was detected in the PIGD, as compared to the TD subtype, with a trend for an association between globus pallidus degeneration and higher (worse) PIGD scores. Furthermore, among all the patients with PD, higher hippocampal volumes were correlated with a higher (better) dual tasking gait speed (r = 0.30, p < 0.002) and with a higher global cognitive score (r = 0.36, p < 0.0001). Lower putamen volume was correlated with a higher (worse) freezing of gait score (r = −0.28, p < 0.004), an episodic symptom which is common among the PIGD subtype. As expected, differences detected between HCs and patients in the PD subgroups included regions within the amygdala and the dorsal striatum but not the ventral striatum, a brain region that is generally considered to be more preserved in PD. Conclusions: The disparate patterns of subcortical degeneration can explain some of the differences in symptoms between the PD subtypes such as gait disturbances and cognitive functions

  17. Bidirectional encroachment of collagen into the tunica media in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hairong; BLAIVAS, MILA; Michael M Wang

    2012-01-01

    Arteries in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are susceptible to smooth muscle loss and fibrosis, but the molecular components underlying these dramatic vascular changes are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of collagen isoforms in the cerebral vessels of North American CADASIL patients with classical NOTCH3 mutations. Expression of type I-VI collagen in brains obtained at au...

  18. Regulation of the fear network by mediators of stress: Norepinephrine alters the balance between Cortical and Subcortical afferent excitation of the Lateral Amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke R Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pavlovian auditory fear conditioning crucially involves the integration of information about and acoustic conditioned stimulus (CS and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA. The auditory CS reaches the LA subcortically via a direct connection from the auditory thalamus and also from the auditory association cortex itself. How neural modulators, especially those activated during stress, such as norepinephrine (NE, regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity in this network is poorly understood. Here we show that NE inhibits synaptic transmission in both the subcortical and cortical input pathway but that sensory processing is biased towards the subcortical pathway. In addition binding of NE to β-adrenergic receptors further dissociates sensory processing in the LA. These findings suggest a network mechanism that shifts sensory balance towards the faster but more primitive subcortical input.

  19. Glutamate concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex predicts resting-state cortical-subcortical functional connectivity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall W Duncan

    Full Text Available Communication between cortical and subcortical regions is integral to a wide range of psychological processes and has been implicated in a number of psychiatric conditions. Studies in animals have provided insight into the biochemical and connectivity processes underlying such communication. However, to date no experiments that link these factors in humans in vivo have been carried out. To investigate the role of glutamate in individual differences in communication between the cortex--specifically the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC--and subcortical regions in humans, a combination of resting-state fMRI, DTI and MRS was performed. The subcortical target regions were the nucleus accumbens (NAc, dorsomedial thalamus (DMT, and periaqueductal grey (PAG. It was found that functional connectivity between the mPFC and each of the NAc and DMT was positively correlated with mPFC glutamate concentrations, whilst functional connectivity between the mPFC and PAG was negatively correlated with glutamate concentration. The correlations involving mPFC glutamate and FC between the mPFC and each of the DMT and PAG were mirrored by correlations with structural connectivity, providing evidence that the glutamatergic relationship may, in part, be due to direct connectivity. These results are in agreement with existing results from animal studies and may have relevance for MDD and schizophrenia.

  20. Diffusion tensor MRI changes in gray structures of the frontal-subcortical circuits in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Gaetano; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Trotta, Maria; Tallarico, Tiziana; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Nisticò, Rita; Salvino, Dania; Bono, Francesco; Valentino, Paola; Quattrone, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we used an automated segmentation of regions of interest and co-registration to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) images to investigate whether microstructural abnormalities occur in gray structures of the frontal-subcortical circuits in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Twenty-four patients with probable or definite sporadic ALS and 22 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Thirteen out of 24 ALS patients and all of the control subjects underwent a detailed neuropsychological evaluation. DTI was performed to measure mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy in the frontal cortex, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, amygdala and hippocampus. MD values of ALS patients were significantly higher in the frontal cortex (P = 0.023), caudate (P = 0.01), thalamus (P = 0.019), amygdala (P = 0.012) and hippocampus (P = 0.002) compared to controls. MD of these structures significantly correlated to a variable degree with neurological disability and neuropsychological dysfunctions. The increased MD values in several cortical and subcortical gray structures and their correlations with neuropsychological variables substantiate a multisystemic degeneration in ALS and suggest that dysfunctions of frontal-subcortical circuits could play a pivotal role in frontal impairment and behavioral symptoms in ALS patients. PMID:24435432

  1. The Relationship Between Development of Neuronal and Astrocytic Tau Pathologies in Subcortical Nuclei and Progression of Argyrophilic Grain Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Chikako; Yokota, Osamu; Nagao, Shigeto; Ishizu, Hideki; Oshima, Etsuko; Hasegawa, Masato; Okahisa, Yuko; Terada, Seishi; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases frequently have argyrophilic grain disease (AGD). However, the PSP-like tau pathology in AGD cases has not been fully clarified. To address this, we examined tau pathologies in the subcortical nuclei and frontal cortex in 19 AGD cases that did not meet the pathological criteria of PSP or corticobasal degeneration, nine PSP cases and 20 Braak NFT stage-matched controls. Of the 19 AGD cases, five (26.3%) had a few Gallyas-positive tau-positive tufted astrocytes (TAs) and Gallyas-negative tau-positive TA-like astrocytic inclusions (TAIs), and six (31.6%) had only TAIs in the striatum and/or frontal cortex. Subcortical tau pathology was sequentially and significantly greater in AGD cases lacking these tau-positive astrocytic lesions, AGD cases having them, and PSP cases than in controls. There was a significant correlation between three histologic factors, including the AGD stage and the quantities of subcortical neuronal and astrocytic tau pathologies. Tau immunoblotting demonstrated 68- and 64-kDa bands and 33-kDa low-molecular mass tau fragments in PSP cases, and although with lesser intensity, in AGD cases with and without TAs and TAIs also. Given these findings, the progression of AGD may be associated with development of the neuronal and astrocytic tau pathologies characteristic of PSP. PMID:26439704

  2. Subcortical volumes are reduced in short-term and long-term abstinent alcoholics but not those with a comorbid stimulant disorder ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fein, George; Fein, David

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse affects brain structure and function. We examined subcortical structure volumes in 77 short (6–15 week) and 90 long (multi-year) term abstinent alcoholics, along with 74 controls. We used a 3T Siemens MPRAGE sequence for image acquisition and FSL FIRST software for measuring subcortical volumes. When examining alcoholics without a comorbid stimulant disorder we found reduced hippocampal, pallidum and thalamus volumes in short term abstinence compared to a non-substance a...

  3. Alzheimer’s disease—subcortical vascular disease spectrum in a hospital-based setting: Overview of results from the Gothenburg MCI and dementia studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; Jonsson, Michael; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Öhrfelt, Annika; Stålhammar, Jacob; Eckerström, Marie; Carlsson, Mårten; Olsson, Erik; Göthlin, Mattias; Svensson, Johan; Rolstad, Sindre; Eckerström, Carl; Bjerke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between Alzheimer’s disease (AD), subcortical vascular disease, and other cognitive disorders is crucial for diagnostic purposes and clinical trial outcomes. Patients with primarily subcortical vascular disease are unlikely to benefit from treatments targeting the AD pathogenic mechanisms and vice versa. The Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia studies are prospective, observational, single-center cohort studies suitable for both cross-sectional ...

  4. Desire and Dread from the Nucleus Accumbens: Cortical Glutamate and Subcortical GABA Differentially Generate Motivation and Hedonic Impact in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Faure, Alexis; Richard, Jocelyn M.; Berridge, Kent C.

    2010-01-01

    Background GABAergic signals to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell arise from predominantly subcortical sources whereas glutamatergic signals arise mainly from cortical-related sources. Here we contrasted GABAergic and glutamatergic generation of hedonics versus motivation processes, as a proxy for comparing subcortical and cortical controls of emotion. Local disruptions of either signals in medial shell of NAc generate intense motivated behaviors corresponding to desire and/or dread, along a ...

  5. Study of diffusion tensor imaging in subcortical ischemic vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-ying GUO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to explore the microstructure changes of white matter in subcortical ischemic vascular cognitive impairment (SIVCI and its correlation with cognitive function.  Methods Forty-nine patients with subcortical ischemic cerebrovascular diseases were collected. By using Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR, they were classified into 10 cases of vascular dementia (VaD group, 20 cases of vascular cognitive impairment-no dementia (VCIND group and 19 cases of normal cognitive function (control group. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed in all cases. Based on the DTI data, voxel-based analysis was used to assess the whole brain region. Correlation analysis was applied to illustrate the relationship between DTI parameters and cognitive scale in VaD patients.  Results Compared with the control group, fractional anisotropy (FA values of patients in VaD group decreased in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, corpus callosum stem, bilateral parietal lobes, right temporal lobe and bilateral orbitofrontal lobes (P = 0.000, for all, and FA values of patients in VCIND group decreased in right inferior frontal gyrus, right hippocampus and bilateral precuneus (P = 0.000, for all. Compared with VCIND group, FA values of patients in VaD group decreased in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, corpus callosum, bilateral parietal lobes and right temporal lobe (P = 0.000, for all. Compared with the control group, mean diffusivity (MD values in VaD group increased in medial prefrontal cortex, corpus callosum, bilateral parietal lobes, bilateral temporal lobes and anterior cingulate (P = 0.000, for all, while in VCIND group increased in bilateral precuneus and right hippocampus (P = 0.000, for all. Compared with VCIND group, MD values in VaD group increased in right medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, corpus callosum stem, bilateral parietal lobes and bilateral temporal lobes (P = 0

  6. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Richards

    Full Text Available Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM, caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312 and without ADHD (N = 437 from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60. GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far.

  7. Frontal-subcortical protein expression following prenatal exposure to maternal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Y Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal immune activation (MIA during prenatal life is a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia and autism. Such conditions are associated with alterations in fronto-subcortical circuits, but their molecular basis is far from clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, with targeted western blot analyses for confirmation, we investigated the impact of MIA on the prefrontal and striatal proteome from an established MIA mouse model generated in C57B6 mice, by administering the viral analogue PolyI:C or saline vehicle (control intravenously on gestation day (GD 9. In striatum, 11 proteins were up-regulated and 4 proteins were down-regulated in the PolyI:C mice, while 10 proteins were up-regulated and 7 proteins down-regulated in prefrontal cortex (PFC. These were proteins involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway, oxidation and auto-immune targets, including dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4A-II, creatine kinase (CK-B, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-B, WD repeat-containing protein and NADH dehydrogenase in the striatum; and guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein, 14-3-3 protein, alpha-enolase, olfactory maker protein and heat shock proteins (HSP 60, and 90-beta in the PFC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This data fits with emerging evidence for disruption of critical converging intracellular pathways involving MAPK pathways in neurodevelopmental conditions and it shows considerable overlap with protein pathways identified by genetic modeling and clinical post-mortem studies. This has implications for understanding causality and may offer potential biomarkers and novel treatment targets for neurodevelopmental conditions.

  8. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Petrini, Stefania; Caramia, Martino; Veroni, Caterina; Minnone, Gaetana; Bernardo, Antonietta; Franciolini, Fabio; Pessia, Mauro; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara Corinna; Ambrosini, Elena

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in the MLC1 gene, which encodes a protein expressed in brain astrocytes, are the leading cause of MLC, a rare leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, brain edema, subcortical cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation. Although recent studies indicate that MLC1 protein is implicated in the regulation of cell volume changes, the exact role of MLC1 in brain physiology and in the pathogenesis of MLC disease remains to be clarified. In preliminary experiments, we observed that MLC1 was poorly expressed in highly proliferating astrocytoma cells when compared with primary astrocytes, and that modulation of MLC1 expression influenced astrocyte growth. Because volume changes are key events in cell proliferation and during brain development MLC1 expression is inversely correlated to astrocyte progenitor proliferation levels, we investigated the possible role for MLC1 in the control of astrocyte proliferation. We found that overexpression of wild type but not mutant MLC1 in human astrocytoma cells hampered cell growth by favoring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation and by inhibiting EGF-induced Ca(+) entry, ERK1/2 and PLCγ1 activation, and calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channel function, all molecular pathways involved in astrocyte proliferation stimulation. Interestingly, MLC1 did not influence AKT, an EGFR-stimulated kinase involved in cell survival. Moreover, EGFR expression was higher in macrophages derived from MLC patients than from healthy individuals. Since reactive astrocytes proliferate and re-express EGFR in response to different pathological stimuli, the present findings provide new information on MLC pathogenesis and unravel an important role for MLC1 in other brain pathological conditions where astrocyte activation occurs. PMID:26908604

  9. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jan M; Redgrave, Peter; Reynolds, John N J

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC) was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC) to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (∼60; 0.2 Hz) was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n = 13). Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalized to 5-min pre, ranged from potentiation (∼120%) to depression (∼80%). The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n = 10). Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz) followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n = 9). However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R(2) = 0.55, p = 0.009, n = 11 active neurons). These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs. PMID:21423509

  10. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Schulz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (~60; 0.2 Hz was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n=13. Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalised to 5 min pre, ranged from potentiation (~120% to depression (~80%. The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n=10. Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n=9. However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R2=0.55, p=0.009, n=11 active neurons. These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs.

  11. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far. PMID:27218681

  12. Funcionalidad y complementariedad de los conjuntos líticos y óseos en el humedal del nordeste de la Provincia de Buenos Aires: Anahí, un caso de estudio Function and complementary among lithic and bone artefactual assemblages of parana's wetland: anahí, a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Buc

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En trabajos anteriores se ha propuesto, a partir de rasgos morfológicos, la complementariedad funcional entre materias primas líticas y óseas en el humedal del Paraná inferior durante el Holoceno tardío (Loponte y Sacur Silvestre 2002. En esta oportunidad se evalúa dicha hipótesis a partir del análisis funcional microscópico de ambos conjuntos artefactuales del sitio arqueológico Anahí. En un eje metodológico, se observa que en el material lítico y óseo los rastros se desarrollan de manera particular implicando cada uno un abordaje propio. Por otra parte, la comparación entre ambos conjuntos arqueológicos permite discutir la existencia de conductas tendientes al empleo diferencial de materias primas que estarían vinculadas no solo con su disponibilidad sino también con sus propiedades.In previous work, functional complementarity between lithic and bone materials for the Lower Paraná wetlands during the late Holocene based on morphological traits was proposed (Loponte y Sacur Silvestre 2002. In this paper, this hypothesis by applying microscopic functional analysis to both types of artefactual assemblage from Anahí archaeological site is evaluated. From a methodological perspective, it is evident that traces in lithic and bone material develop in different ways, implying that a distinct approach is needed for each material. Even so, comparison of the archaeological assemblages enables to discuss the existence of behaviors related to the differential exploitation of lithic and bone materials that may be linked not only to their availability but also to their distinct properties.

  13. Development of the subcortical brain structures in the second trimester: assessment with 7.0-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to obtain the signal intensity changes and quantitative measurements of the subcortical brain structures of 12-22 weeks gestational age (GA). Sixty-nine fetal specimens were selected and scanned by 7.0-T MR. The signal intensity changes of the subcortical brain structures were analyzed. The three-dimensional visualization models of the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and dorsal thalamus were rebuilt with Amira 4.1, and the developmental trends between the measurements and GA were analyzed. The germinal matrix was delineated on 7.0-T MR images at 12 weeks GA, with high signals on T1-weighted images (WI). While at 16 weeks GA, the caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and internal and external capsules could be distinguished. The caudate nucleus was high signal intensity on T1WI. The signal intensity of the putamen was high on T1WI during 15-17 weeks GA and was delineated as an area with uneven signal intensities. The signal intensity of the peripheral area of the putamen became higher after 18 weeks GA. The signal intensity of the globus pallidus was high on T1WI and low on T2WI after 20 weeks GA. At 18 weeks GA, the claustrum was delineated with low signals on T2WI. Measurements of the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and dorsal thalamus linearly increased with the GA. Development of the subcortical brain structures during 12-22 weeks GA could be displayed with 7.0-T MRI. The measurement provides significant reference beneficial to the clinical evaluation of fetal brain development. (orig.)

  14. Assessments of executive function in patients with subcortical cerebral infarction using the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess executive functions in patients with subcortical cerebral infarctions, we performed neuropsychological tests including the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). BADS is an executive function test constructing of 6 subtests. We recruited 24 patients who had subcortical ischemia on magnetic resonance image (MRI). The BADS Japanese version, Trail Making Test (TMT) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were employed. TMT and WCST are recognized executive function tests. We classified the participants into two categories in relation to the degree of deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) according to the classification of Fazekas. The low grade DWMH group consisted of 11 patients with punctate foci on MRI. The 13 patients showing the beginning of confluence of foci on MRI were categorized as the high grade DWMH group. All patients were right handed, and had no right hand disability impeding the test. We excluded patients with severe stenotic or occlusive lesions in cerebral arteries on brain magnetic resonance angiography. The Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) was employed to exclude demented participants. To assess the mood of participant, we introduced the Japan Stroke Scale of Depression Scale (JSS-D). Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test. There was no significant difference in length of education, TMT, MMSE and JSS-D scores. The high grade DWMH group was significantly older. The WCST score were significantly impaired in the high grade DWMH group. Scores of BADS subtests showed no significant difference, but the age-matched standardized score was significantly low in the high grade DWMH group. Pathological findings showed that the greater the spread of DWMH, the more ischemia on cerebral whitematter progressed. In this study, we found that patients with severe subcortical ischemia may have impaired executive functions. These results might be conducted by the pathological features of DWMH. (author)

  15. Combined Invasive Subcortical and Non-invasive Surface Neurophysiological Recordings for the Assessment of Cognitive and Emotional Functions in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenado, Carlos; Elben, Saskia; Petri, David; Hirschmann, Jan; Groiss, Stefan J; Vesper, Jan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the success in applying non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG), magneto-encephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for extracting crucial information about the mechanism of the human brain, such methods remain insufficient to provide information about physiological processes reflecting cognitive and emotional functions at the subcortical level. In this respect, modern invasive clinical approaches in humans, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), offer a tremendous possibility to record subcortical brain activity, namely local field potentials (LFPs) representing coherent activity of neural assemblies from localized basal ganglia or thalamic regions. Notwithstanding the fact that invasive approaches in humans are applied only after medical indication and thus recorded data correspond to altered brain circuits, valuable insight can be gained regarding the presence of intact brain functions in relation to brain oscillatory activity and the pathophysiology of disorders in response to experimental cognitive paradigms. In this direction, a growing number of DBS studies in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) target not only motor functions but also higher level processes such as emotions, decision-making, attention, memory and sensory perception. Recent clinical trials also emphasize the role of DBS as an alternative treatment in neuropsychiatric disorders ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). Consequently, we focus on the use of combined invasive (LFP) and non-invasive (EEG) human brain recordings in assessing the role of cortical-subcortical structures in cognitive and emotional processing trough experimental paradigms (e.g. speech stimuli with emotional connotation or paradigms of cognitive control such as the Flanker task), for patients undergoing DBS treatment. PMID:27286467

  16. Development of the subcortical brain structures in the second trimester: assessment with 7.0-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Haiwei; Geng, Hequn; Lin, Xiangtao; Feng, Lei; Liu, Shuwei [Shandong University, Research Center for Sectional and Imaging Anatomy, School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Zhang, Zhonghe [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan, Shandong (China); Teng, Gaojun; Fang, Fang; Zang, Fengchao [Southeast University School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Zhong Da Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-10-15

    This study aims to obtain the signal intensity changes and quantitative measurements of the subcortical brain structures of 12-22 weeks gestational age (GA). Sixty-nine fetal specimens were selected and scanned by 7.0-T MR. The signal intensity changes of the subcortical brain structures were analyzed. The three-dimensional visualization models of the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and dorsal thalamus were rebuilt with Amira 4.1, and the developmental trends between the measurements and GA were analyzed. The germinal matrix was delineated on 7.0-T MR images at 12 weeks GA, with high signals on T1-weighted images (WI). While at 16 weeks GA, the caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and internal and external capsules could be distinguished. The caudate nucleus was high signal intensity on T1WI. The signal intensity of the putamen was high on T1WI during 15-17 weeks GA and was delineated as an area with uneven signal intensities. The signal intensity of the peripheral area of the putamen became higher after 18 weeks GA. The signal intensity of the globus pallidus was high on T1WI and low on T2WI after 20 weeks GA. At 18 weeks GA, the claustrum was delineated with low signals on T2WI. Measurements of the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, and dorsal thalamus linearly increased with the GA. Development of the subcortical brain structures during 12-22 weeks GA could be displayed with 7.0-T MRI. The measurement provides significant reference beneficial to the clinical evaluation of fetal brain development. (orig.)

  17. Neuropsychological performance in patients with subcortical stroke Perfil neuropsicológico em pacientes com lesões vasculares subcorticais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviane Pinheiro Campos de Andrade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI is characterized by cognitive compromise predominantly of executive dysfunction. OBJECTIVES: To assess cognitive functions in VCI, focusing on executive functions, to observe functional losses in relation to activities of daily living (ADLs and to detect early symptoms prior to the onset of dementia. METHODS: We evaluated healthy subjects matched for gender, education and age to patients with diagnosis of subcortical vascular disease who had a stroke classified into three groups: 1 vascular lesions and no impairment; 2 vascular cognitive impairment with no dementia (VCIND; 3 vascular dementia (VaD. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The performance on neuropsychological tests differed among groups, worsening with increased impairment level. The probable VaD group demonstrated impaired performance in memory, processing speed and verbal production, while the VCIND group showed attention deficits. CONCLUSION: Impairment in executive functions and difficulties in ADLs allow us to differentiate levels of impairment in groups of subcortical vascular disease.O comprometimento cognitivo vascular (CCV é caracterizado por comprometimento cognitivo predominantemente sob a forma de disfunção executiva. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar as funções cognitivas no CCV, enfocando as funções executivas, observar as perdas funcionais em relação às atividades cotidianas (AVDs e detectar os primeiros sintomas antes do início da demência. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados indivíduos controles saudáveis pareados por sexo, escolaridade e idade com pacientes com diagnóstico de doença vascular subcortical que sofreram derrame classificados em três grupos: 1 lesões vasculares sem déficit; 2 comprometimento cognitivo vascular sem demência (CCVSD; 3 demência vascular (DV. RESULTADOS E DISCUSSÃO: O desempenho em testes neuropsicológicos diferiu entre os grupos, sendo o desempenho tanto pior quanto maior o comprometimento. O grupo DV prov

  18. Mutations of MLC1 (KIAA0027), Encoding a Putative Membrane Protein, Cause Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Yuan, Bao Qiang; van der Steen, Jeffrey; Mulders, Joyce; Könst, Andrea A. M.; Boor, P. K. Ilja; Mejaski-Bosnjak, Vlatka; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Frants, Rune R.; Oudejans, Cees B. M.; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Pronk, Jan C.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2001-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by macrocephaly, deterioration of motor functions with ataxia, and spasticity, eventuating in mental decline. The brain appears swollen on magnetic resonance imaging, with diffuse white-matter abnormalities and the invariable presence of subcortical cysts. MLC was recently localized on chromosome 22qtel. We have narrowed down the critical region by linkage analysis of 11 informative families with MLC to a region of ∼250 kb, containing four known genes. One family with two patients who were siblings did not display linkage between the MLC phenotype and any of the analyzed microsatellite markers on chromosome 22qtel, suggesting genetic heterogeneity and the existence of at least a second MLC locus. The maximum two-point LOD score for the 11 families was 6.6 at recombination fraction .02. Twelve different mutations in seven informative and six uninformative families were found in one of the candidate genes, KIAA0027, which we renamed “MLC1.” The gene encodes a putative membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane domains. The patients of one family were compound heterozygotes for mutations that both introduced stop codons. The mutations further included frameshifts, splice-acceptor mutations, a putative splice-donor mutation, and amino acid substitutions of residues in predicted transmembrane domains. These data provide strong evidence that mutations of MLC1 cause the disease. PMID:11254442

  19. Identification of the pyramidal tract by neuronavigation based on intraoperative magnetic resonance tractography: correlation with subcortical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the accuracy of magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) in localizing the cortical spinal tract (CST) close to brain tumours by using intraoperative electric subcortical stimulation. Nine patients with intra-axial brain tumours underwent neurosurgery. Planning was based on analysis of the course of streamlines compatible with the CST. After tumour removal, intraoperative MRT was reacquired. Sites at various distance from the CST were repeatedly stimulated to assess whether registered motor evoked potential (MEP) could be elicited. All patients were assessed clinically both pre- and postoperatively. The motor function was preserved in all patients. In all patients intraoperative MRT demonstrated shift of the bundle position caused by the surgical procedure. The distance between the estimated intraoperative CST and the point of elicited MEP was 1 cm or less in all nine patients. At distances greater than 2 cm, no patient reported positive MEP. Intraoperative MRT is a reliable technique for localization of CST. In all patients MEP were elicited by direct subcortical electrical stimulation at a distance below 1 cm from the CST as represented by MRT. Brain shifting might impact this evaluation since CST position may change during surgery in the range of 8 mm. (orig.)

  20. Identification of the pyramidal tract by neuronavigation based on intraoperative magnetic resonance tractography: correlation with subcortical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Romano, Andrea; Calabria, Luigi Fausto; Coppola, Valeria; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neuroradiology, Rome (Italy); Angelini, Albina; D' Andrea, Giancarlo; Mastronardi, Luciano; Ferrante, Luigi [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    To demonstrate the accuracy of magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) in localizing the cortical spinal tract (CST) close to brain tumours by using intraoperative electric subcortical stimulation. Nine patients with intra-axial brain tumours underwent neurosurgery. Planning was based on analysis of the course of streamlines compatible with the CST. After tumour removal, intraoperative MRT was reacquired. Sites at various distance from the CST were repeatedly stimulated to assess whether registered motor evoked potential (MEP) could be elicited. All patients were assessed clinically both pre- and postoperatively. The motor function was preserved in all patients. In all patients intraoperative MRT demonstrated shift of the bundle position caused by the surgical procedure. The distance between the estimated intraoperative CST and the point of elicited MEP was 1 cm or less in all nine patients. At distances greater than 2 cm, no patient reported positive MEP. Intraoperative MRT is a reliable technique for localization of CST. In all patients MEP were elicited by direct subcortical electrical stimulation at a distance below 1 cm from the CST as represented by MRT. Brain shifting might impact this evaluation since CST position may change during surgery in the range of 8 mm. (orig.)

  1. Effect of the Presence of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism on the Recovery in Patients With Acute Subcortical Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Won-Seok; Lim, Jong Youb; Shin, Joon Ho; Park, Hye Kyung; Tan, Samuel Arnado; Park, Kyoung Un; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism on the recovery after subcortical stroke, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Methods Subcortical stroke patients with copies of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (n=7) were compared to their controls (n=7) without a copy of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism after matching for initial severity, location and type of stroke. The mRS scores at 1 and 3 months after discharge from the neurorehabilitation uni...

  2. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy resulting in stroke in an 11-year-old male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granild-Jensen, Jakob; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Schwartz, Marianne;

    2009-01-01

    . The patient suffered from common migraine with five to six attacks per month for 3 years 6 months before the stroke. Attacks occurred early in the morning with severe one-sided headache, photophobia, nausea, and vomiting. Antimigraine medications had no effect. The family history revealed more cases......Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is caused by mutations in the Notch3 gene on chromosome 19. The condition manifests itself clinically typically in the third to fifth decade with migraine and recurrent episodes of stroke or...... transient ischaemic attacks. We report the case of an 11-year-old male with CADASIL resulting in stroke with right hemiparesis and dysphasia. Acute magnetic resonance imaging suggested infarction in the left hemisphere; magnetic resonance angiography revealed calibre variation of the intracerebral arteries...

  3. Altered modulation of prefrontal and subcortical brain activity in newly diagnosed schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder. A regional cerebral blood flow study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, P; Holm, S; Friberg, L;

    1991-01-01

    To measure prefrontal and subcortical activity during a cognitive task, we examined 19 newly diagnosed schizophrenics and patients with schizophreniform psychosis. Seven healthy volunteers served as controls. The patients were drug naive or had received neuroleptics for a few days only. Cerebral ...

  4. Alzheimer's disease--subcortical vascular disease spectrum in a hospital-based setting: Overview of results from the Gothenburg MCI and dementia studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; Jonsson, Michael; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Öhrfelt, Annika; Stålhammar, Jacob; Eckerström, Marie; Carlsson, Mårten; Olsson, Erik; Göthlin, Mattias; Svensson, Johan; Rolstad, Sindre; Eckerström, Carl; Bjerke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between Alzheimer's disease (AD), subcortical vascular disease, and other cognitive disorders is crucial for diagnostic purposes and clinical trial outcomes. Patients with primarily subcortical vascular disease are unlikely to benefit from treatments targeting the AD pathogenic mechanisms and vice versa. The Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia studies are prospective, observational, single-center cohort studies suitable for both cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis that outline the cognitive profiles and biomarker characteristics of patients with AD, subcortical vascular disease, and other cognitive disorders. The studies, the first of which started in 1987, comprise inpatients with manifest dementia and patients seeking care for cognitive disorders at an outpatient memory clinic. This article gives an overview of the major published papers (neuropsychological, imaging/physiology, and neurochemical) of the studies including the ongoing Gothenburg MCI study. The main findings suggest that subcortical vascular disease with or without dementia exhibit a characteristic neuropsychological pattern of mental slowness and executive dysfunction and neurochemical deviations typical of white matter changes and disturbed blood-brain barrier function. Our findings may contribute to better healthcare for this underrecognized group of patients. The Gothenburg MCI study has also published papers on multimodal prediction of dementia, and cognitive reserve. PMID:26219595

  5. Persistent developmental stuttering as a cortical-subcortical dysfunction: evidence from muscle activation Gagueira persistente do desenvolvimento como disfunção córtico-subcortical: evidências pela ativação muscular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One contemporary view of stuttering posits that speech disfluencies arise from anomalous speech motor control. PURPOSE: To verify the rest muscle tension and speech reaction time of fluent and stuttering adults. METHOD: 22 adults, divided in two groups: G1 - 11 fluent individuals; G2 - 11 stutterers. Electromyography recordings (inferior orbicularis oris were collected in two different situations: during rest and in a reaction time activity. RESULTS: The groups were significantly different considering rest muscle tension (G2 higher recordings and did not differ when considering speech reaction time and muscle activity during speech. There was a strong positive correlation between speech reaction time and speech muscle activity for G2 - the longer the speech reaction time, the higher the muscle activity during speech. CONCLUSION: In addition to perceptible episodes of speech disfluency, stutterers exhibit anomalies in speech motor output during fluent speech. Correlations with a possible cortical-subcortical disorder are discussed.INTRODUÇÃO: Atualmente considera-se que as disfluências da fala na gagueira sejam decorrentes de controle motor anormal. OBJETIVO: Verificar o repouso e tempo de reação para fala em adultos fluentes e gagos. MÉTODO: 22 adultos, divididos em dois grupos: G1 - 11 fluentes; G2 - 11 gagos. Os dados eletromiográficos (orbicular dos lábios inferior foram obtidos em duas situações: repouso e atividade de tempo de reação. RESULTADOS: Os grupos apresentaram diferenças significantes para a tensão muscular de repouso (G2 valores maiores e não se diferenciaram quanto ao tempo de reação e atividade muscular de fala. Houve correlação positiva entre o tempo de reação e a atividade muscular de fala para G2 - quanto maior o tempo de reação maior a atividade muscular de fala. CONCLUSÃO: Além dos episódios perceptíveis de disfluência, gagos apresentam alterações no output motor de fala durante a

  6. Subcortical brain segmentation of two dimensional T1-weighted data sets with FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool (FIRST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Amann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain atrophy has been identified as an important contributing factor to the development of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS. In this respect, more and more interest is focussing on the role of deep grey matter (DGM areas. Novel data analysis pipelines are available for the automatic segmentation of DGM using three-dimensional (3D MRI data. However, in clinical trials, often no such high-resolution data are acquired and hence no conclusions regarding the impact of new treatments on DGM atrophy were possible so far. In this work, we used FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool (FIRST to evaluate the possibility of segmenting DGM structures using standard two-dimensional (2D T1-weighted MRI. In a cohort of 70 MS patients, both 2D and 3D T1-weighted data were acquired. The thalamus, putamen, pallidum, nucleus accumbens, and caudate nucleus were bilaterally segmented using FIRST. Volumes were calculated for each structure and for the sum of basal ganglia (BG as well as for the total DGM. The accuracy and reliability of the 2D data segmentation were compared with the respective results of 3D segmentations using volume difference, volume overlap and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs. The mean differences for the individual substructures were between 1.3% (putamen and −25.2% (nucleus accumbens. The respective values for the BG were −2.7% and for DGM 1.3%. Mean volume overlap was between 89.1% (thalamus and 61.5% (nucleus accumbens; BG: 84.1%; DGM: 86.3%. Regarding ICC, all structures showed good agreement with the exception of the nucleus accumbens. The results of the segmentation were additionally validated through expert manual delineation of the caudate nucleus and putamen in a subset of the 3D data. In conclusion, we demonstrate that subcortical segmentation of 2D data are feasible using FIRST. The larger subcortical GM structures can be segmented with high consistency. This forms the basis for the application of

  7. Neurological Impairment Linked with Cortico-Subcortical Infiltration of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas at Initial Diagnosis Supports Early Brain Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anja; Zetterling, Maria; Lundin, Margareta; Melin, Beatrice; Fahlström, Markus; Grabowska, Anna; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGG) are slow-growing brain tumors that in spite of an indolent behavior at onset show a continuous expansion over time and inevitably transform into malignant gliomas. Extensive tumor resections may be performed with preservation of neurological function due to neuroplasticity that is induced by the slow tumor growth. However, DLGG prefer to migrate along subcortical pathways, and white matter plasticity is considerably more limited than gray matter plasticity. Whether signs of functional decompensating white matter that may be found as early as at disease presentation has not been systematically studied. Here, we examined 52 patients who presented with a DLGG at the time of radiological diagnosis. We found a significant correlation between neurological impairment and eloquent cortico-subcortical tumor localization, but not between neurological function and tumor volume. These results suggest that even small tumors invading white matter pathways may lack compensatory mechanisms for functional reorganization already at disease presentation. PMID:26113841

  8. Noninvasive, in vivo imaging of subcortical mouse brain regions with 1.7  μm optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shau Poh; Merkle, Conrad W; Cooke, Dylan F; Zhang, Tingwei; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Krubitzer, Leah; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2015-11-01

    A spectral/Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) intravital microscope using a supercontinuum light source at 1.7 μm was developed to study subcortical structures noninvasively in the living mouse brain. The benefits of 1.7 μm for deep tissue brain imaging are demonstrated by quantitatively comparing OCT signal attenuation characteristics of cortical tissue across visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Imaging of hippocampal tissue architecture and white matter microvasculature are demonstrated in vivo through thinned-skull, glass coverslip-reinforced cranial windows in mice. Applications of this novel platform include monitoring disease progression and pathophysiology in rodent models of Alzheimer's disease and subcortical dementias, including vascular dementia. PMID:26512481

  9. Comparative study of muscular tonus in spastic tetra paretic cerebral palsy in children with predominantly cortical and subcortical lesions in computerized tomography of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to compare distribution and intensity of muscular tonus in spastic tetra paretic cerebral palsy (CP), correlating the clinical data with lesion location in the central nervous system. Twelve children aged two to four years old with predominantly cortical lesions (six children) and subcortical lesions (six children) were included. The tonus was analyzed in the upper (UULL) and lower limbs (LLLL) based on Durigon and Piemonte protocol. The result showed that there was no significant difference regarding tonus intensity and distribution in the UULL and LLLL in both groups. Comparing the upper and lower limbs of subjects in the same group, the LLLL presented more asymmetry and higher tonus intensity than the UULL. It was concluded that in this study children with CP as a result of predominantly cortical or subcortical lesions present a similar deficit in tonus modulation, causing a symmetric and homogeneous distribution of hypertonicity, which is predominant in the LLLL. (author)

  10. On the role of suppression in spatial attention: evidence from negative BOLD in human subcortical and cortical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, André D; Alvarez, Ivan; Watson, David M; Uesaki, Maiko; Rodgers, Jessica; Rogers, Jessica; Morland, Antony B

    2014-07-30

    There is clear evidence that spatial attention increases neural responses to attended stimuli in extrastriate visual areas and, to a lesser degree, in earlier visual areas. Other evidence shows that neurons representing unattended locations can also be suppressed. However, the extent to which enhancement and suppression is observed, their stimulus dependence, and the stages of the visual system at which they are expressed remains poorly understood. Using fMRI we set out to characterize both the task and stimulus dependence of neural responses in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), primary visual cortex (V1), and visual motion area (V5) in humans to determine where suppressive and facilitatory effects of spatial attention are expressed. Subjects viewed a lateralized drifting grating stimulus, presented at multiple stimulus contrasts, and performed one of three tasks designed to alter the spatial location of their attention. In retinotopic representations of the stimulus location, we observed increasing attention-dependent facilitation and decreasing dependence on stimulus contrast moving up the visual hierarchy from the LGN to V5. However, in the representations of unattended locations of the LGN and V1, we observed suppression, which was not significantly dependent on the attended stimulus contrast. These suppressive effects were also found in the pulvinar, which has been frequently associated with attention. We provide evidence, therefore, for a spatially selective suppressive mechanism that acts at a subcortical level. PMID:25080595

  11. Relative activity of cerebral subcortical gray matter in varying states of attention and awareness in normal subjects and patient studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important aspect of the study of brain function involves measurement of the relationships; between activities in the subcortical gray matter of the caudate and of the thalamus; and between these structures and functional cortical areas. The authors have studied these relationships in 22 subjects under different conditions of activation, sleep and sensory deprivation using a PET VI system and F-18-2DG to determine regional cerebral metabolism. Subject activating conditions were maintained throughout the period of equilibration of F-18-2DG and E.E.G.'s were monitored. Multiple tomographic slices of 1-2 million counts were obtained simultaneously with slice separation of 14mm and each plane parallel to the cantho-meatal line. In activated and non-activated awake conditions for normal subjects, left and right thalmus-to-caudate ratios were similar and greater than unity. This relationship was maintained in non-REM sleep, but was reversed and divergent in REM sleep and sensory deprivation; this was also evident in 3/4 narcoleptics awake and asleep in non-REM and REM and 2/3 schizophrenics and affective disorder, subjects. This approach appears to have potential for characterizating normal and disordered regional cerebral function

  12. Brain metabolite changes in subcortical regions after exposure to cuprizone for 6 weeks: potential implications for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gen; Xuan, Yinghua; Dai, Zhuozhi; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Guishan; Xu, Haiyun; Wu, Renhua

    2015-01-01

    Cuprizone is a copper chelating agent able to selectively damage the white matter in the mouse brain. Recent studies have reported behavioral abnormalities relevant to some of schizophrenia symptoms. While associating white matter damage to the behavioral abnormalities, these previous studies did not rule out the possible impairment in neuronal functions in cuprizone-exposed mice. The aim of this study was to examine brain metabolites of the cuprizone-exposed mice by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). The examined brain regions were the caudoputamen, midbrain, and thalamus; these subcortical regions showed different susceptibilities to cuprizone in terms of demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss in previous studies. Young C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard rodent chow without or with cuprizone (0.2 %) for 6 weeks. At the end, open-field and Y-maze tests were performed to measure the emotional and cognitive behaviors of the animals, followed by (1)H-MRS procedure to evaluate the brain metabolites. Cuprizone-exposure increased anxiety levels and impaired spatial working memory. The same treatment increased T2 signal intensity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and caudoputamen, but not in the thalamus. Cuprizone-exposure decreased the concentrations of NAA and NAA+NAAG in caudoputamen, but not in thalamus and midbrain. It decreased levels of Cr+PCr, GPC+PCh and myo-inositol in all the three brain regions. These results provided neurochemical evidence for the impairment in neuronal functions by cuprizone treatment. PMID:25347963

  13. Evidence for a role of a cortico-subcortical network for automatic and unconscious motor inhibition of manual responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ostilio, Kevin; Collette, Fabienne; Phillips, Christophe; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that non-consciously perceived stimuli can bias our decisions. Although previous researches highlighted the importance of automatic and unconscious processes involved in voluntary action, the neural correlates of such processes remain unclear. Basal ganglia dysfunctions have long been associated with impairment in automatic motor control. In addition, a key role of the medial frontal cortex has been suggested by administrating a subliminal masked prime task to a patient with a small lesion restricted to the supplementary motor area (SMA). In this task, invisible masked arrows stimuli were followed by visible arrow targets for a left or right hand response at different interstimuli intervals (ISI), producing a traditional facilitation effect for compatible trials at short ISI and a reversal inhibitory effect at longer ISI. Here, by using fast event-related fMRI and a weighted parametric analysis, we showed BOLD related activity changes in a cortico-subcortical network, especially in the SMA and the striatum, directly linked to the individual behavioral pattern. This new imaging result corroborates previous works on subliminal priming using lesional approaches. This finding implies that one of the roles of these regions was to suppress a partially activated movement below the threshold of awareness. PMID:23110158

  14. Assessment of T2- and T1-weighted MRI brain lesion load in patients with subcortical vascular encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous cross-sectional studies in patients with subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE) have shown little or no correlation between brain lesion load and clinical disability, which could be due to the low specificity of T2-weighted MRI. Recent studies have indicated that T1-weighted MRI may be more specific than T2-weighted MRI for severe tissue destruction. We studied 37 patients with a diagnosis of SVE and 11 normal controls with standardised T1- and T2-weighted MRI. All patients underwent detailed clinical assessment including a neuropsychological test battery and computerised gait analysis. Both the T2- and T1-weighted total MRI lesion loads different between patients and controls different, particularly T1. The ratio of T2-/T1-weighted lesion load was lower in controls than in patients. There was no overall correlation of T1- or T2-weighted lesion load with clinical disability, but group comparison of patients with severe and mild clinical deficits showed different lesion loads. We suggest that T1- and T2-weighted MRI lesion loads demonstrate relevant structural abnormality in patients with SVE. (orig.)

  15. Resting state connectivity and cognitive performance in adults with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Breda; Moreton, Fiona C; Stringer, Michael S; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Kalladka, Dheeraj; López-González, Maria R; Santosh, Celestine; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Muir, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is an inevitable feature of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), affecting executive function, attention and processing speed from an early stage. Impairment is associated with structural markers such as lacunes, but associations with functional connectivity have not yet been reported. Twenty-two adults with genetically-confirmed CADASIL (11 male; aged 49.8 ± 11.2 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest. Intrinsic attentional/executive networks were identified using group independent components analysis. A linear regression model tested voxel-wise associations between cognitive measures and component spatial maps, and Pearson correlations were performed with mean intra-component connectivity z-scores. Two frontoparietal components were associated with cognitive performance. Voxel-wise analyses showed an association between one component cluster and processing speed (left middle temporal gyrus; peak -48, -18, -14; ZE = 5.65, pFWE corr = 0.001). Mean connectivity in both components correlated with processing speed (r = 0.45, p = 0.043; r = 0.56, p = 0.008). Mean connectivity in one component correlated with faster Trailmaking B minus A time (r = -0.77, p cognitive performance and attentional network connectivity in CADASIL. Functional connectivity may be a useful biomarker of cognitive performance in this population. PMID:26929239

  16. Dynamic subcortical blood flow during male sexual activity with ecological validity: a perfusion fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Farrell, Michael J; Boessen, Ruud; Denton, Derek A; Gavrilescu, Maria; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Egan, Gary F

    2010-03-01

    This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure brain perfusion in a group of healthy men under conditions that closely resembled customary sexual behavior. Serial perfusion measures for 30 min during two self-limited periods of partnered penis stimulation, and during post-stimulatory periods, revealed novel sexual activity-related cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes, mainly in subcortical parts of the brain. Ventral pallidum rCBF was highest during the onset of penile erection, and lowest after the termination of penis stimulation. The perceived level of sexual arousal showed the strongest positive association with rCBF in the right basal forebrain. In addition, our results demonstrate that distinct subregions of the hypothalamus and cingulate cortex subserve opposite functions during human male sexual behavior. The lateral hypothalamus and anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex showed increased rCBF correlated with penile erection. By contrast, the anteroventral hypothalamus and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited rCBF changes correlated with penile detumescence after penile stimulation. Continuous rapid and high-resolution brain perfusion imaging during normal sexual activity has provided novel insights into the central mechanisms that control male sexual arousal. PMID:20006720

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in chronic dialysis patients. Evaluation of high signal lesions in cerebral subcortical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed to evaluate the incidence of cerebral subcortical high signal lesions (SHS) on T2 weighted images of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in chronic dialysis patients. The incidence of SHS was investigated in three clinically different groups of patients (196 divided into 3 age groups (20-40, 41-60, 61-83 years old). SHS were graded according to size and number. The incidence and severity of SHS increased with advancing age in all groups of patients and were higher in hypertensive and dialysis patients. Patchy confluent SHS were not identified in any patient younger than 60 years old in normal subjects and hypertensive patients. They were present in 9% in patients 41 to 60 years old of dialysis patients. In patients over than 61 years old, patchy confluent SHS were present in 1% of normal subjects, 11% of hypertensive patients, and 30% of dialysis patients. Duration, methods of dialysis therapy or previous history of hypertension in dialysis patients did not affect the incidence of SHS. SHS were mainly located in the territory of anterior, middle carebral and lenticulostriate arteries. In one autopsy case of chronic dialysis patient with severe SHS on magnetic resonance images, microscopic finding at pathological examination showed dilated perivascular space and increased water content in white matter. The results demonstrate a high incidence of severe SHS in chronic dialysis patients, and suggest that the SHS in dialysis patients appear to represent increased water content in perivascular brain tissue. (author)

  18. Bispectral index correlates with regional cerebral blood flow during sleep in distinct cortical and subcortical structures in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirhomme, Q; Boly, M; Bonhomme, V; Boveroux, P; Phillips, C; Peigneux, P; Soddu, A; Luxen, A; Moonen, G; Maquet, P; Laureys, S

    2009-03-01

    The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS values during natural sleep and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) variations, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Data were obtained from six young, healthy, right-handed, male volunteers (20-30 years old) using the H2(15)O infusion method. PET scans were performed both during waking and various stages of sleep. BIS values were monitored continuously and recorded during each PET scan. Positive correlations were detected between BIS and rCBF values in dorsolateral prefontal, parietal, anterior and posterior cingulate, precuneal, mesiofrontal, mesiotemporal and insular cortices. These areas belong to a frontoparietal network known to be related to awareness of self conscious sensory perception, attention and memory. BIS values also positively correlated with activity in brainstem and thalami, both structures known to be involved in arousal and wakefulness. These results show that BIS changes associated with physiological sleep depth co-vary with the activity of specific cortical and subcortical areas. The latter are known to modulate arousal, which in turn allows sustained thalamo-cortical enhancement of activity in a specific frontoparietal network known to be related to the content of consciousness. Thus, although mainly derived from frontal EEG, BIS could represent a wider index of cerebral activity. PMID:19678596

  19. Anesthetic Management and Postoperative Care of a Patient with CADASIL (Cerebral Arteriopathy, Autosomal Dominant, with Subcortical Infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Sousan Rasooli; Farnaz Moslemi; Simin Tagavi

    2014-01-01

    CADASIL (cerebral arteriopathy, autosomal dominant, with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) is an infrequent inherited small artery disease that could have anesthetic implications. However these have rarely been reported. We present an anesthetic experience of a female patient previously diagnosed with CADASIL, who had suffered an ischemic vascular cerebral accident with a MRI compatible with leukoencephalopathy, and who was dependent for daily activities, mood alterations, apathy,...

  20. Regulation of the Fear Network by Mediators of Stress: Norepinephrine Alters the Balance between Cortical and Subcortical Afferent Excitation of the Lateral Amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Luke R.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian auditory fear conditioning crucially involves the integration of information about and acoustic conditioned stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US) in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA). The auditory CS reaches the LA subcortically via a direct connection from the auditory thalamus and also from the auditory association cortex itself. How neural modulators, especially those activated during stress, such as norepinephrine (NE), regulate synaptic transmission...

  1. Mutant GlialCAM Causes Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts, Benign Familial Macrocephaly, and Macrocephaly with Retardation and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Tania; Ridder, Margreet C.; Montolio, Marisol; Capdevila-Nortes, Xavier; Polder, Emiel; Sirisi, Sònia; Duarri, Anna; Schulte, Uwe; Fakler, Bernd; Nunes, Virginia; Scheper, Gert C.; Martínez, Albert; Estévez, Raúl; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2011-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a leukodystrophy characterized by early-onset macrocephaly and delayed-onset neurological deterioration. Recessive MLC1 mutations are observed in 75% of patients with MLC. Genetic-linkage studies failed to identify another gene. We recently showed that some patients without MLC1 mutations display the classical phenotype; others improve or become normal but retain macrocephaly. To find another MLC-related gene, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity-purified MLC1 as an alternative approach and found that GlialCAM, an IgG-like cell adhesion molecule that is also called HepaCAM and is encoded by HEPACAM, is a direct MLC1-binding partner. Analysis of 40 MLC patients without MLC1 mutations revealed multiple different HEPACAM mutations. Ten patients with the classical, deteriorating phenotype had two mutations, and 18 patients with the improving phenotype had one mutation. Most parents with a single mutation had macrocephaly, indicating dominant inheritance. In some families with dominant HEPACAM mutations, the clinical picture and magnetic resonance imaging normalized, indicating that HEPACAM mutations can cause benign familial macrocephaly. In other families with dominant HEPACAM mutations, patients had macrocephaly and mental retardation with or without autism. Further experiments demonstrated that GlialCAM and MLC1 both localize in axons and colocalize in junctions between astrocytes. GlialCAM is additionally located in myelin. Mutant GlialCAM disrupts the localization of MLC1-GlialCAM complexes in astrocytic junctions in a manner reflecting the mode of inheritance. In conclusion, GlialCAM is required for proper localization of MLC1. HEPACAM is the second gene found to be mutated in MLC. Dominant HEPACAM mutations can cause either macrocephaly and mental retardation with or without autism or benign familial macrocephaly. PMID:21419380

  2. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Stan F.; Berendse, Henk W.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.; Klein, Martin; Stoffers, Diederick; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM) volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA), which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i) CTh, SA, and (sub)cortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii) the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i) CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii) SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii) volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i) CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii) VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes. PMID:26919667

  3. Basal ganglia lesions and the theory of fronto-subcortical loops: neuropsychological findings in two patients with left caudate lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Thomas; Delazer, Margarete; Bartha, Lisa; Auer, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Basal ganglia lesions have a high prevalence for associated behavioural impairments. However, the exact pattern of cognitive impairments and its relationship to individual basal ganglia lesion have rarely been investigated by means of a detailed neuropsychological and lesion study. Furthermore, different mechanisms have been proposed as relevant for the observed cognitive deficits; among these, the hypothesis of fronto-subcortical loops (Alexander et al., 1986) has made predictions regarding the relationship between the damage of particular striato-frontal circuits and the resulting behavioural impairment which await clinical confirmation. We present a study of two subjects who suffered a MRI-documented focal left basal ganglia hematoma. The two patients differed in their lesions; in one patient (PJ) large parts of the caudate nucleus were destroyed whereas in the other (AS) mainly the pallidum and putamen were lesioned and the caudate suffered only minor damage. In the acute phase, the behavioural and neuropsychological abnormalities were similar in both cases and included mainly abulia, an impairment of executive and attentional functions, and a severe amnestic syndrome. After several months many functions were restored in AS, whereas PJ's abilities remained largely defective. Based on these data and on previous case studies several conclusions are drawn. Left caudate lesions induce marked and long-lasting behavioural and neuropsychological impairments comprising predominantly drive, executive control, attention, and memory. The extent of lesion in the head of the caudate nucleus is the critical factor regarding the severity and the outcome of the syndrome, whereas damage to the putamen and pallidum is less crucial for cognitive functions. A subset of behavioural alterations, among them abulia, attentional and frontal-executive dysfunctions, can well be attributed to lesions of the anterior cingulate circuit and the dorsolateral-frontal circuit at the basal

  4. Acute alcohol effects on attentional bias are mediated by subcortical areas associated with arousal and salience attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Kyriaki; Field, Matt; Critchley, Hugo; Duka, Theodora

    2013-06-01

    Acute alcohol ingestion increases attentional bias to alcohol-related stimuli; however, the underlying cognitive and brain mechanisms remain unknown. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with performance of a dual task that probed attentional distraction by alcohol-related stimuli during 'conflict' processing: the Concurrent Flanker/Alcohol-Attentional bias task (CFAAT). In this task, an Eriksen Flanker task is superimposed on task-unrelated background pictures with alcohol-associated or neutral content. Participants respond to the direction of a central 'target' arrow and ignore adjacent congruent (low cognitive load) or incongruent (high cognitive load) 'flanking' arrows. Using a between-subject design, 40 healthy moderate-to-heavy social drinkers received either no alcohol (placebo), 0.4 g/kg (low dose), or 0.8 g/kg (high dose) of alcohol, and underwent fMRI while performing the CFAAT. The low alcohol dose, relative to placebo, increased response latencies on trials with alcohol-associated backgrounds and, under low cognitive load, increased the activity evoked by these pictures within a medial hypothalamic region. Under high cognitive load, the low alcohol dose, relative to placebo, elicited greater activity within a more lateral hypothalamic region, and reduced activity within frontal motor areas. The high alcohol dose, relative to placebo, did not reliably affect response latencies or neural responses to background images, but reduced overall accuracy under high cognitive load. This effect correlated with changes in reactivity within medial and dorsal prefrontal cortices. These data suggest that alcohol at a low dose primes attentional bias to alcohol-associated stimuli, an effect mediated by activation of subcortical hypothalamic areas implicated in arousal and salience attribution. PMID:23361162

  5. Achieved Blood Pressures in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) Study: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Pablo E.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Talbert, Robert; del Brutto, Oscar; Castellanos, Mar; Graves, John W.; Matamala, Gonzalo; Pretell, Edwin Javier; Yee, Jerry; Rebello, Rosario; Zhang, Yu; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lowering blood pressure (BP) after stroke remains a challenge, even in the context of clinical trials. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) BP protocol, BP management during the study, and achieved BPs are described here. METHODS Patients with recent symptomatic lacunar stroke were randomized to 1 of 2 levels of systolic BP (SBP) targets: lower: <130mm Hg, or higher: 130–149mm Hg. SBP management over the course of the trial was examined by race/ethnicity and other baseline conditions. RESULTS Mean SBP decreased for both groups from baseline to the last follow-up, from 142.4 to 126.7mm Hg for the lower SBP target group and from 143.6 to 137.4mm Hg for the higher SBP target group. At baseline, participants in both groups used an average of 1.7±1.2 antihypertensive medications, which increased to a mean of 2.4±1.4 (lower group) and 1.8±1.4 (higher group) by the end-study visit. It took an average of 6 months for patients to reach their SBP target, sustained to the last follow-up. Black participants had the highest proportion of SBP ≥150mm Hg at both study entry (40%) and end-study visit (17%), as compared with whites (9%) and Hispanics (11%). CONCLUSIONS These results show that it is possible to safely lower BP even to a SBP goal <130mm Hg in a variety of patients and settings, including private and academic centers in multiple countries. This provides further support for protocol-driven care in lowering BP and consequently reducing the burden of stroke. PMID:24610884

  6. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders. PMID:25756805

  7. Anesthetic Management and Postoperative Care of a Patient with CADASIL (Cerebral Arteriopathy, Autosomal Dominant, with Subcortical Infarcts and leukoencephalopathy for Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Rasooli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CADASIL (cerebral arteriopathy, autosomal dominant, with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy is an infrequent inherited small artery disease that could have anesthetic implications. However these have rarely been reported. We present an anesthetic experience of a female patient previously diagnosed with CADASIL, who had suffered an ischemic vascular cerebral accident with a MRI compatible with leukoencephalopathy, and who was dependent for daily activities, mood alterations, apathy, and urine incontinence. We discuss anesthetic management of CADASIL patient, considering protection from further cerebral ischemia.

  8. Joint assessment of white matter integrity, cortical and subcortical atrophy to distinguish AD from behavioral variant FTD: A two-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ability of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM atrophy in combination with white matter (WM integrity to distinguish behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD from Alzheimer's disease (AD and from controls using voxel-based morphometry, subcortical structure segmentation, and tract-based spatial statistics. To determine which combination of MR markers differentiated the three groups with the highest accuracy, we conducted discriminant function analyses. Adjusted for age, sex and center, both types of dementia had more GM atrophy, lower fractional anisotropy (FA and higher mean (MD, axial (L1 and radial diffusivity (L23 values than controls. BvFTD patients had more GM atrophy in orbitofrontal and inferior frontal areas than AD patients. In addition, caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens were smaller in bvFTD than in AD. FA values were lower; MD, L1 and L23 values were higher, especially in frontal areas of the brain for bvFTD compared to AD patients. The combination of cortical GM, hippocampal volume and WM integrity measurements, classified 97–100% of controls, 81–100% of AD and 67–75% of bvFTD patients correctly. Our results suggest that WM integrity measures add complementary information to measures of GM atrophy, thereby improving the classification between AD and bvFTD.

  9. Thyroid Malignancy Association with Cortical and Subcortical Brain SPECT Changes In Patients Presenting with a Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid malignancy in ME/CFS patients greatly exceeds the normal incidence of thyroid malignancy in any known subgroup. The thyroid malignancy incidence in the ME/CFS group may exceed 6,000 / 100,000. As part of their investigation, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) patients should be examined by thyroid ultrasound for evidence of thyroid pathology and malignancy. Thyroid pathology may be missed in this group of patients if investigation relies only upon serum testing for TSH, FT3, FT4, microsomal and thyroglobulin antibodies, which are usually normal. Thyroid uptake scans tend also to be normal and may also miss malignant lesions. A newly recognized syndrome may exist in ME/CFS patients characterized by: (a) thyroid malignancy, (b) persistent abnormal cortical and subcortical SPECT brain scans (NeuroSPECT), (c) failure of thyroidectomy surgery and hormone replacement to correct the fatigue syndrome, and (d) an unusual high incidence of cervical vertebrae osteoarthritic changes. ME/CFS patients with treated non-malignant thyroid disease and abnormal NeuroSPECT scans may also fail to improve despite adequate thyroid hormone replacement. A brief summary of the differences between ME and CFS is discussed. Lee, Hur and Ahn [1] stated that thyroid malignancy is said to be an infrequent occurrence found in 0.5 to 3 patients per 100,000 in the general population. They noted that in a subgroup of patients booked for mammography, a thyroid ultrasound was also performed. In this group, they found thyroid malignancy frequency was as high as 3 per 100,000. It is not known if their subgroup was at a higher risk for malignancy. Mittelstaedt [2] in the Globe and Mail states that thyroid malignancy was 15 per 100,000. In the past 100 patients whom I have investigated for (ME/CFS)[3], with or without associated Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FS), I have found that 6% of these patients had thyroid malignancy. In each of these patients the diagnosis was made by

  10. Oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with reduced volumes of hippocampus and subcortical gray matter in chronically HIV-infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Brooks I.; LiButti, Daniel E.; Umaki, Tracie M.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Chow, Dominic C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional relationships were examined between regional brain volumes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 47 HIV patients [mean age 51 years; 81% with HIV RNA ≤50 copies/mL] on combination antiretroviral therapy. The gene-specific DNA damage and repair assay measured mtDNA 8-oxo-dG break frequency. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 3 T. Higher mtDNA 8-oxo-dG was associated with lateral ventricular enlargement and with decreased volumes of hippocampus, pallidum, and total subcortical gray matter, suggesting the involvement of systemic mitochondrial-specific oxidative stress in chronic HIV-related structural brain changes and cognitive difficulties. Clarification of the mechanism may provide potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26923169

  11. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T. [INSERM U25, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Risk and Determinants of Dementia in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Brain Subcortical Vascular Changes: A Study of Clinical, Neuroimaging, and Biological Markers—The VMCI-Tuscany Study: Rationale, Design, and Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Poggesi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is one of the most disabling conditions. Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia (VaD are the most frequent causes. Subcortical VaD is consequent to deep-brain small vessel disease (SVD and is the most frequent form of VaD. Its pathological hallmarks are ischemic white matter changes and lacunar infarcts. Degenerative and vascular changes often coexist, but mechanisms of interaction are incompletely understood. The term mild cognitive impairment defines a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia. Pre-dementia stages of VaD are also acknowledged (vascular mild cognitive impairment, VMCI. Progression relates mostly to the subcortical VaD type, but determinants of such transition are unknown. Variability of phenotypic expression is not fully explained by severity grade of lesions, as depicted by conventional MRI that is not sensitive to microstructural and metabolic alterations. Advanced neuroimaging techniques seem able to achieve this. Beside hypoperfusion, blood-brain-barrier dysfunction has been also demonstrated in subcortical VaD. The aim of the Vascular Mild Cognitive Impairment Tuscany Study is to expand knowledge about determinants of transition from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in patients with cerebral SVD. This paper summarizes the main aims and methodological aspects of this multicenter, ongoing, observational study enrolling patients affected by VMCI with SVD.

  13. May functional imaging be helpful for behavioral assessment in children? Regions of motor and associative cortico-subcortical circuits can be differentiated by laterality and rostrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. August

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cortico-subcortical circuits are organized into the sensorimotor, associative and limbic loop. These neuronal preconditions play an important role regarding the understanding and treatment of behavioral problems in children. Differencing evidence argues for a lateralized organization of the sensorimotor loop and a bilateral (i.e. non-lateralized organization of the associative loop. However, a firm behavioral-neurobiological distinction of these circuits has been difficult, specifically in children. Objectives: Thus, the aim was a comprehensive functional visualization and differentiation of the sensorimotor and the associative circuit during childhood. As a new approach, laterality and rostrality features were used to distinguish between the two circuits within one single motor task. Methods: 24 healthy boys performed self-paced index finger tapping with each hand separately during functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. Results: A contrast analysis for left against right hand movement revealed lateralized activation in typical sensorimotor regions such as primary sensorimotor cortex, caudal supplementary motor area (SMA, caudal putamen and thalamus. A conjunction analysis confirmed bilateral involvement of known associative regions including pre-SMA, rostral SMA and rostral putamen. Conclusion: A functional visualization of two distinct corticostriatal circuits is provided in childhood. Both, the sensorimotor and associative circuit may be discriminated by their laterality characteristics already in minors. Additionally, the results support the concept of a modified functional subdivision of the SMA in a rostral (associative and caudal (motor part. A further development of this approach might help to nurture behavioral assessment and neurofeedback training in child mental health.

  14. Neuropsychological correlates of behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease, frontal variant of frontotemporal, subcortical vascular, and lewy body dementias: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Roberta; Monaco, Marco; Fadda, Lucia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological correlates of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD) in patients affected by various forms of dementia, namely Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontal-variant frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD). 21 fvFTD, 21 LBD, 22 AD, and 22 SIVD patients matched for dementia severity received a battery of neuropsychological tests and the Neuropsychiatry Inventory (NPI). The possible association between performance on neuropsychological tests and severity of BPSD was assessed by correlational analysis and multivariate regression. BPSD were present in 99% of patients. Most behavioral symptoms were not related to a particular dementia group or to a specific cognitive deficit. Euphoria and disinhibition were predicted by fvFTD diagnosis. Hallucinations correlated with the severity of visuospatial deficits in the whole sample of patients and were predicted by LBD diagnosis. Apathy, which was found in all dementia groups, correlated with executive functions and was predicted by both reduced set-shifting aptitude and fvFTD diagnosis. The results confirm the high prevalence of BPSD in the mild to moderate stages of dementia and show that most BPSD are equally distributed across dementia groups. Most of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms are independent dimensions of the dementia syndromes. Nevertheless, hallucinations in LBD and euphoria and disinhibition in fvFTD are related to the structural brain alterations that are responsible for cognitive decline in these dementia groups. Finally, apathy arises from damage in the frontal cortical areas that are also involved in executive functions. PMID:24254701

  15. The subthalamic microlesion story in Parkinson's disease: electrode insertion-related motor improvement with relative cortico-subcortical hypoactivation in fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jech

    Full Text Available Electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease (PD is associated with a temporary motor improvement occurring prior to neurostimulation. We studied this phenomenon by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI when considering the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III and collateral oedema. Twelve patients with PD (age 55.9± (SD6.8 years, PD duration 9-15 years underwent bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus. The fMRI was carried out after an overnight withdrawal of levodopa (OFF condition: (i before and (ii within three days after surgery in absence of neurostimulation. The motor task involved visually triggered finger tapping. The OFF/UPDRS-III score dropped from 33.8±8.7 before to 23.3±4.8 after the surgery (p<0.001, correlating with the postoperative oedema score (p<0.05. During the motor task, bilateral activation of the thalamus and basal ganglia, motor cortex and insula were preoperatively higher than after surgery (p<0.001. The results became more enhanced after compensation for the oedema and UPDRS-III scores. In addition, the rigidity and axial symptoms score correlated inversely with activation of the putamen and globus pallidus (p<0.0001. One month later, the OFF/UPDRS-III score had returned to the preoperative level (35.8±7.0, p = 0.4.In conclusion, motor improvement induced by insertion of an inactive electrode into the subthalamic nucleus caused an acute microlesion which was at least partially related to the collateral oedema and associated with extensive impact on the motor network. This was postoperatively manifested as lowered movement-related activation at the cortical and subcortical levels and differed from the known effects of neurostimulation or levodopa. The motor system finally adapted to the microlesion within one month as suggested by loss of motor improvement and good efficacy of deep brain stimulation.

  16. Cortical and Subcortical Grey and White Matter Atrophy in Myotonic Dystrophies Type 1 and 2 Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment, Depression and Daytime Sleepiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schneider-Gold

    Full Text Available Central nervous system involvement is one important clinical aspect of myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2. We assessed CNS involvement DM1 and DM2 by 3T MRI and correlated clinical and neuocognitive symptoms with brain volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM.12 patients with juvenile or classical DM1 and 16 adult DM2 patients underwent 3T MRI, a thorough neurological and neuropsychological examination and scoring of depression and daytime sleepiness. Volumes of brain, ventricles, cerebellum, brainstem, cervical cord, lesion load and VBM results of the patient groups were compared to 33 matched healthy subjects.Clinical symptoms were depression (more pronounced in DM2, excessive daytime sleepiness (more pronounced in DM1, reduced attention and flexibility of thinking, and deficits of short-term memory and visuo-spatial abilities in both patient groups. Both groups showed ventricular enlargement and supratentorial GM and WM atrophy, with prevalence for more GM atrophy and involvement of the motor system in DM1 and more WM reduction and affection of limbic structures in DM2. White matter was reduced in DM1 in the splenium of the corpus callosum and in left-hemispheric WM adjacent to the pre- and post-central gyrus. In DM2, the bilateral cingulate gyrus and subgyral medio-frontal and primary somato-sensory WM was affected. Significant structural-functional correlations of morphological MRI findings (global volumetry and VBM with clinical findings were found for reduced flexibility of thinking and atrophy of the left secondary visual cortex in DM1 and of distinct subcortical brain structures in DM2. In DM2, depression was associated with brainstem atrophy, Daytime sleepiness correlated with volume decrease in the middle cerebellar peduncles, pons/midbrain and the right medio-frontal cortex.GM and WM atrophy was significant in DM1 and DM2. Specific functional-structural associations related morphological changes to cognitive impairment

  17. Epistemological, Artefactual and Interactional-Institutional Foundations of Social Impact of Academic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Reijo; Tuunainen, Juha; Esko, Terhi

    2015-01-01

    Because of the gross difficulties in measuring the societal impact of academic research, qualitative approaches have been developed in the last decade mostly based on forms of interaction between university and other societal stakeholders. In this paper, we suggest a framework for qualitative analysis based on the distinction between three…

  18. Artefactual incised wounds due to postmortem predation by the Sri Lankan water monitor (kabaragoya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Sameera A

    2016-09-01

    Monitor lizards are large reptilian animals mostly seen around water based habitats. Sri Lanka has an endemic water monitor lizard called the kabaragoya (Varanus salvator salvator) which is perhaps the most common large animal scavenger in the country. Scavenging by the kabaragoya can result in postmortem incised injuries which are caused by their sharp pointed claws as they grip or crawl over a dead body. The author presents four cases where these claw marks raised significant medicolegal issues. In one case of a young female they mimicked defense injuries that might be seen in a person that was killed with heavy sharp weapon trauma to the head. In another case, claw marks on the face raised homicidal allegations in an immersion death following intoxication. In a case of suicidal drowning these injuries simulated self-inflicted cuts. The fourth case shows how claw marks complicated the investigation of a dismembered upper limb. Kabaragoya claw marks are mostly seen in decomposed and macerated bodies recovered from water. Injuries are mostly superficial and limited to skin and soft tissues. Bony injuries are not seen. Awareness of the creature's scavenging habits and careful analysis of the appearance and distribution of the injuries is essential to differentiate claw marks from sharp weapon trauma. PMID:27216749

  19. Cooperative Attitudes in Nonprofit Firms. Evidence from An Artefactual Field Experiment with Workers of Social Cooperatives

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Mittone; Matteo Ploner

    2011-01-01

    We investigate strategic choices of individuals working for social cooperatives in Italy. Specifically, a 2-players Prisoner’s Dilemma is administered as an attachment to a nationwide survey of nonprofit organizations. We experimentally manipulate social proximity of the participants and efficiency of cooperation. We show that higher efficiency of cooperation has a significant positive impact on the cooperation rate in the game, while closer social proximity does not significantly affect choi...

  20. The Simultaneity of Experience: Cultural Identity, Magical Realism and the Artefactual in Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyford, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how students, as multimodal storytellers, can weave powerful narratives blending modes, genres, artefacts and literary conventions to represent the real and imagined in their lives. Part of a larger ethnographic case study of student writing in a middle years class for immigrant students learning English as an additional…

  1. Using Artefactual Field Experiments to Learn about the Incentives for Sustainable Forest Use in Developing Economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Turley, T.; Kontoleon, A.; Bulte, E.H.; List, J.

    2011-01-01

    We implement a public goods game and a social intervention modeled after a public goods game in rural Sierra Leone near the Gola Forest Reserve. We also collect demographic, economic and forest conservation data on households in the area. We use this data to assess the mapping of social preferences

  2. Dominant X linked subcortical laminar heterotopia and lissencephaly syndrome (XSCLH/LIS): evidence for the occurrence of mutation in males and mapping of a potential locus in Xq22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    des Portes, V; Pinard, J M; Smadja, D; Motte, J; Boespflüg-Tanguy, O; Moutard, M L; Desguerre, I; Billuart, P; Carrie, A; Bienvenu, T; Vinet, M C; Bachner, L; Beldjord, C; Dulac, O; Kahn, A; Ponsot, G; Chelly, J

    1997-01-01

    X linked subcortical laminar heterotopia and lissencephaly syndrome (XSCLH/ LIS) is an intriguing disorder of cortical development, which causes classical lissencephaly with severe mental retardation and epilepsy in hemizygous males, and subcortical laminar heterotopia (SCLH) associated with milder mental retardation and epilepsy in heterozygous females. Here we report an exclusion mapping study carried out in three unrelated previously described families in which males are affected with lissencephaly and females with SCLH, using 38 microsatellite markers evenly distributed on the X chromosome. Most of the X chromosome was excluded and potential intervals of assignment in Xq22.3-q23 or in Xq27 are reported. Although the number of informative meioses did not allow a decision between these two loci, it is worth noting that the former interval is compatible with the mapping of a breakpoint involved in a de novo X;autosomal balanced translocation 46,XX,t(X;2)(q22;p25) previously described in a female with classical lissencephaly. In addition, haplotype inheritance in two families showed a grandpaternal origin of the mutation and suggested in one family the presence of mosaicism in germline cells of normal transmitting males. Images PMID:9132485

  3. Hipersinais subcorticais no exame de ressonância magnética: comparação entre idosos deprimidos e idosos normais Subcortical hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of normal and depressed elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria da Silva Novaretti

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available É relatado em alguns estudos que idosos deprimidos apresentam maior frequência de hipersinais ao exame de ressonância magnética do que controles normais. No entanto os indivíduos estudados tinham fatores de risco para doenças cerebrovasculares. Este estudo analisou pacientes com história de depressão maior e indivíduos controles compatíveis, excluindo-se fatores de risco cerebrovasculares, com o objetivo de determinar se indivíduos deprimidos apresentam maior frequência de hipersinais em substância branca e outras lesões. Avaliamos a prevalência e a severidade dos hipersinais à ressonância magnética de encéfalo em 30 pacientes idosos deprimidos e 20 controles pareados para a idade. Hipersinais de substância branca profunda, hipersinais periventriculares e hipersinais em substância cinzenta subcortical foram classificados em escala padrão 0-3, por dois radiologistas que desconheciam o diagnóstico clínico. Não foram encontradas diferenças significativas entre os grupos para hipersinais subcorticais. Estes achados sugerem que os fatores de risco cerebrovasculares provavelmente medeiam a relação entre depressão e hipersinais, encontrada em estudos anteriores.Previous studies reported that depressed subjects had more signal hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging scans than control subjects, but the subjects had cerebrovascular disease risk factors. This study used subjects with a history of major depression and matched comparison subjects, screened to exclude cerebrovascular risk factors, to determine whether depressed subjects had more white matter hyperintensities and other lesions. We evaluated the prevalence and severity of MRI signal hyperintensities in 30 elderly depressed patients and 20 controls matched for age. Deep matter hyperintensities, periventricular hyperintensities and subcortical gray hyperintensities were rated on a standard 0-3 scale by two radiologists blind to clinical diagnosis. No

  4. Clinical and CT, MRI Analysis of 53 Cases of Subcortical Arteriosclerotic Encephalopathy%皮质下动脉硬化脑病53例临床与CT、MRI分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹哲; 尹嘉奇

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To deepen the understanding of clinical and CT, MRI imaging changes of subcortical arterioscle-rotic encephalopathy. Methods:The data of 53 patients with arteriosclerotic encephalopathy who were treated in our department from 2008 to 2012 was summarized. The diagnosis applied Lots Barnett Diagnostic Criterion, and the intel-ligence tests adopted Hasegawa Dementia Scale(HDS). Results:The characteristics of patients including:more com-mon in over 60 years old people, most slow onset, a few acute attack, gradual ingravescence and stepwise development. Clinical manifestations were hypertension, stroke and chronic progressive dementia three characteristics. The signs of CT and MIR examination were the white matter haveⅢtoⅣdegree of leukoaraiosis, there were lacunar infarcts in periventricular white matter, centrum semiovale, cerebellum and brain stem. Conclusion:The MIR and CT images of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy showesⅢtoⅣdegree of leukoariosis. The disease is closely related with age, hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia, and combined with multiple subcortical lacunar infarcts. However, for subcortical lacunar infarcts, MRI can locate more precisely and image more clearly than CT.%目的:加深对皮质下动脉硬化性脑病的临床与CT、MRI影像学改变的认识.方法:总结我科2008~2012年间收治的皮质下动脉硬化性脑病53例.符合Lots Barnett诊断标准,智能测试采用仿长谷川简易智力量表〔HDS〕.结果:本组病例特点,多见60岁以上老年人,大多数缓慢起病,少数急性发作,逐渐加重,呈阶梯式发展.临床表现高血压、脑卒中、慢性进行性痴呆三大特征.CT及MIR检查:脑白质有Ⅲ~Ⅳ度的白质疏松,脑室周围白质及半卵圆中心,小脑及脑干腔隙性梗死灶.结论:皮质下动脉硬化性脑病在CT及MIR影像上表现为Ⅲ~Ⅳ度的白质疏松,同年龄、高血压、糖尿病及高脂血症密切相

  5. A contrast between the cognitive function of patients with simple leukoaraeosis and subcortical arterioselerotic encephalopathy%单纯脑白质疏松症和皮质下动脉硬化性脑病患者认知功能的对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁临平; 贺燕; 郭洪志

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive function of simple leukoaraeosis (LA) and subcortical arterioselerotic encephalopathy (SAE) is a part of research in cerebrovascular neuropsychology, however, there is no contrast study on cognitive function between the two diseases. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the different features in cognitive function among patients with simple leukoaraeosis, subcortical arterioselerotic encephalopathy and simple leukoaraeosis combined with cerebral infarction. DESIGN: Randomized controlled observation SETTING: Department of Neurological Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 91 cases of patients with cerebrovascular disease diagnosed in Department of Neurological Medicine of Qilu Hospital of Shandong University from March 1997 to May 2000 were selected. All the patients participated in the observation voluntarily. They were divided into 3 groups according to the type of disease, with 27 cases in simple leukoaraeosis group, 33 cases in subcortical arterioselerotic encephalopathy group and 31 cases in simple leukoaraeosis + cerebral infarction group.Additionally, 30 healthy cases were selected as control group. All the subjects in the above groups participated in the observation voluntarily. METHODS: Assessment on cognitive function and memory ability was conducted on the subjects in each group, and contrast analysis was performed. Mini-mental state examination was used for detecting cognitive function. Patients whose score was less than 17, 20, 22, 23 respectively according to different educational degree (illiteracy, primary school, middle school, university), would be diagnosed as dementia. Clinical me mory scale A edited by Psychology Institute of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences was used for detecting memory ability including associative learning, directive memory, recognition of nonsense figure, image free recall and portrait characteristics associative recall. Conversed the above 5 items of detecting results to scores

  6. Contribution to the evaluation of language disturbances in subcortical lesions: a piloty study Contribuição à avaliação dos distúrbios de linguagem em lesões subcorticais: estudo piloto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Radanovic

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Subcortical structures are in a strategic functional position within the cognitive networks and their lesion can interfere with a great number of functions. In this study, we describe fourteen subjects with exclusively subcortical vascular lesions (eight in the basal ganglia and six in the thalamus and the interrelation between their language alterations and other cognitive abilities, as attention, memory and frontal executive functions. All patients were evaluated through the following batteries: Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Boston Naming Test, Token Test, Benton Visual Retention Test, Trail Making, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and a frontal scripts task. All patients underwent MRI and twelve underwent SPECT. Results show that these patients present impairment in several cognitive domains, especially attention and executive functions. These alterations affect language abilities, and this fact must be considered in the rehabilitation efforts.As estruturas subcorticais ocupam posição funcional estratégica nas redes cognitivas e sua lesão pode interferir com um grande número de funções. Neste estudo, descrevemos 14 indivíduos com lesões vasculares exclusivamente subcorticais (oito em núcleos da base e seis no tálamo e a interrelação entre suas alterações de linguagem e de outras funções cognitivas, como atenção, memória e funções executivas. Todos os pacientes foram avaliados através dos seguintes testes: Teste de Boston para Diagnóstico da Afasia, Teste de Nomeação Boston, Teste Token, Teste Benton de Retenção Visual, Trail Making, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test e uma tarefa de scripts frontais. Todos os pacientes realizaram RM de crânio e doze realizaram SPECT. Os resultados mostram que estes pacientes apresentam prejuízo nas várias funções cognitivas, especialmente atenção e funções executivas. Estas alterações afetam as habilidades lingüísticas e devem ser levadas em consideração nos esfor

  7. Comparative study of muscular tonus in spastic tetra paretic cerebral palsy in children with predominantly cortical and subcortical lesions in computerized tomography of the skull; Estudo comparativo do tono muscular na paralisia cerebral tetraparetica em criancas com lesoes predominantemente corticais ou subcorticais na tomografia computadorizada de cranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwabe, Cristina [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia; Piovesana, Ana Maria Sedrez Gonzaga [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Ambulatorio Multidisciplinar de Paralisia Cerebral e Neurologia Infantil

    2003-09-01

    The objective was to compare distribution and intensity of muscular tonus in spastic tetra paretic cerebral palsy (CP), correlating the clinical data with lesion location in the central nervous system. Twelve children aged two to four years old with predominantly cortical lesions (six children) and subcortical lesions (six children) were included. The tonus was analyzed in the upper (UULL) and lower limbs (LLLL) based on Durigon and Piemonte protocol. The result showed that there was no significant difference regarding tonus intensity and distribution in the UULL and LLLL in both groups. Comparing the upper and lower limbs of subjects in the same group, the LLLL presented more asymmetry and higher tonus intensity than the UULL. It was concluded that in this study children with CP as a result of predominantly cortical or subcortical lesions present a similar deficit in tonus modulation, causing a symmetric and homogeneous distribution of hypertonicity, which is predominant in the LLLL. (author)

  8. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure sensory stroke (PSS) is typically caused by a lacunar infarct located in the ventral-posterior (VP) thalamic nucleus contralateral to the paresthetic symptoms. The lesion is usually so small that it cannot be seen on computerized tomography (CT), as illustrated by our case. In our moderately hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In addition, NMRI unexpectedly showed diffuse periventricular demyelinization as well as three other lacunar infarcts, i.e., findings characteristic of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE). This prompted psychometric testing, which revealed signs of mild (subclinical) dementia, in particular involving visiospatial apraxia; this pointed to decreased function of the right parietal cortex, which was structurally intact on CT and NMRI. Single photon emission computerized tomography by Xenon-133 injection and by hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxim labeled with Technetium-99m showed asymmetric distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with an 18% lower value in the right parietal cortex compared to the left side; this indicated asymmetric disconnection of the cortex by the SAE. Thus, the tomograms of the functional parameter, CBF, correlated better with the deficits revealed by neuropsychological testing than by CT or NMRI

  9. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management. PMID:27104483

  10. Diagnosis of ictal hyperperfusion using subtraction image of ictal and interictal brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robust algorithm to disclose and display the difference of ictal and interictal perfusion may facilitate the detection of ictal hyperfusion foci. Diagnostic performance of localizing epileptogenic zones with subtracted SPECT images was compared with the visual diagnosis using ictal and interictal SPECT, MR, or PET. Ictal and interictal Tc-99m-HMPAO cerebral perfusion SPECT images of 48 patients(pts) were processed to get parametric subtracted images. Epileptogenic foci of all pts were diagnosed by seizure free state after resection of epileptogenic zones. In subtraction SPECT, we used normalized difference ratio of pixel counts(ictal-interictal)/interictal X 100%) after correcting coordinates of ictal and interictal SPECT in semi-automatized 3-dimensional fashion. We found epileptogenic zones in subtraction SPECT and compared the performance with visual diagnosis of ictal and interictal SPECT, MR and PET using post-surgical diagnosis as gold standard. The concordance of subtraction SPECT and ictal-interictal SPECT was moderately good(kappa=0.49). The sensitivity of ictal-interictal SPECT was 73% and that of subtraction SPECT 58%. Positive predictive value of ictal-interictal SPECT was 76% and that of subtraction SPECT was 64%. There was no statistical difference between sensitivity or positive predictive values of subtraction SPECT and ictal-interictal SPECT, MR or PET. Such was also the case when we divided patients into temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy. We conclude that subtraction SPECT we produced had equivalent diagnostic performance compared with ictal-interictal SPECT in localizing epileptogenic zones. Additional value of these subtraction SPECT in clinical interpretation of ictal and interictal SPECT should be further evaluated

  11. Ictal SPECT in neocortical epilepsies: clinical usefulness and factors affecting the pattern of hyperperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this analysis were to: (1) determine the value of ictal SPECT in the localization of neocortical epileptogenic foci, (2) evaluate the relationships between the results of ictal SPECT and other potential affecting factors, and (3) compare traditional visual analysis and the subtraction method. We retrospectively analyzed 81 consecutive patients with neocortical epilepsy who underwent epilepsy surgery and achieved a favourable surgical outcome, including 36 patients with normal MRI. Side-by-side visual analysis and subtraction images were classified as correctly localizing,correctly lateralizing, or non-localizing/non-lateralizing images according to the resected lobe. Side-by-side visual analysis and subtraction SPECT correctly localized the epileptogenic lobe in 58.9% and 63.0% of patients, respectively. The two methods were complementary and the diagnostic sensitivity of ictal SPECT using the two methods was 79.0%. Ictal SPECT using the visual method correctly localized the epileptogenic lobe more frequently in patients with a localizing pattern of ictal scalp EEG at the time of radioligand injection. When using subtraction images, an injection delay of less than 20 s after seizure onset was significantly correlated with correct localization. The subtraction method was superior to the visual method for localizing frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE), and in patients with non-localizing/non-lateralizing EEG at onset. Ictal SPECT analyses using visual and subtraction methods are useful and complementary for the localization of the epileptogenic foci of neocortical epilepsy. Early radioligand injection and ictal EEG patterns are related to ictal SPECT localization. The subtraction method may be more useful in some epileptic syndromes. (orig.)

  12. The value of diffusion tensor imaging in the differential diagnosis of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease in patients with only mild white matter alterations on T2-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jian-Liang; Zhang, Ting (Dept. of Neurology, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)); Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Li, Wen-Bin (Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)), Email: liwenbin@sh163.net

    2012-04-15

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a form of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows examination of the microstructural integrity of white matter in the brain. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease, and DTI can provide indirect insights of the microstructural characteristics of brains in individuals with different forms of dementia. Purpose: To evaluate the value of DTI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: The study included 40 patients (20 AD patients and 20 SIVD patients) and 20 normal controls (NC). After routine MRI and DTI, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured and compared in regions of interest (ROI). Results: Compared to NC and AD patients, SIVD patients had lower FA values and higher ADC values in the inferior-fronto-occipital fascicles (IFOF), genu of the corpus callosum (GCC), splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Compared to controls and SIVD patients, AD patients had lower FA values in the anterior frontal lobe, temporal lobe, hippocampus, IFOF, GCC, and CF; and higher ADC values in the temporal lobe and hippocampus. Conclusion: DTI can be used to estimate the white matter impairment in dementia patients. There were significant regional reductions of FA values and heightened ADC values in multiple regions in SIVD patients compared to AD patients. When compared with conventional MRI, DTI may provide a more objective method for the differential diagnosis of SIVD and AD disease patients who have only mild white matter alterations on T2-weighted imaging

  13. The value of diffusion tensor imaging in the differential diagnosis of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease in patients with only mild white matter alterations on T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a form of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows examination of the microstructural integrity of white matter in the brain. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease, and DTI can provide indirect insights of the microstructural characteristics of brains in individuals with different forms of dementia. Purpose: To evaluate the value of DTI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: The study included 40 patients (20 AD patients and 20 SIVD patients) and 20 normal controls (NC). After routine MRI and DTI, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured and compared in regions of interest (ROI). Results: Compared to NC and AD patients, SIVD patients had lower FA values and higher ADC values in the inferior-fronto-occipital fascicles (IFOF), genu of the corpus callosum (GCC), splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Compared to controls and SIVD patients, AD patients had lower FA values in the anterior frontal lobe, temporal lobe, hippocampus, IFOF, GCC, and CF; and higher ADC values in the temporal lobe and hippocampus. Conclusion: DTI can be used to estimate the white matter impairment in dementia patients. There were significant regional reductions of FA values and heightened ADC values in multiple regions in SIVD patients compared to AD patients. When compared with conventional MRI, DTI may provide a more objective method for the differential diagnosis of SIVD and AD disease patients who have only mild white matter alterations on T2-weighted imaging

  14. 四种不同脑部位卒中后认知功能状况比较%A comparison study on cognitive function in patients with single subcortical lesion stroke of four different areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚文苹; 丁美萍; 郭起浩; 裘林秋; 黄思宇; 周新祥

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较4种皮质下单灶性卒中患者的认知损害的特点,了解丘脑和基底节的认知功能,为早期识别血管性认知功能损害(VCI)患者提供依据.方法 使用成套的神经心理测验评估63例皮质下单灶卒中患者和34名健康对照组,病例组患者分为左丘脑卒中组(14例)、左基底节卒中组(17例)、右丘脑卒中组(15例)和右基底节卒中组(17例)4个组进行比较,5个组别的年龄、性别、教育程度比较差异无统计学意义.结果 (1)在记忆、注意/执行功能、语言能力、空间功能等存在广泛的认知功能损害,病例组明显差于对照组(P<0.05).(2)与其他3个卒中组相比,左侧丘脑卒中组在言语功能(BNT:16.6分±2.6分)、听觉即刻回忆(12.8个±4.4个)、听觉长延迟记忆回忆(2.4个±2.3个)、听觉再认(19.1个±3.1个)、结构延迟记忆(9.1分±4.7分)、SDMT偶然记忆(0.9分±1.1分)方面都比较差,左丘脑的损害对认知功能影响最严重(P<0.05).(3)左基底节组患者在与右手操作相关的项目(TMT-A耗时数75 8±22 s、TMT-B耗时数204 s±81 s、CIY123.5分±4.6分、SDMT24个±9个)表现优于另外3个卒中组,而接近健康对照组(P<0.05).结论 卒中后认知功能可能存在一般的、非选择性的认知功能损害,同时,不同部位卒中所致认知损害各有特点,其中左丘脑卒中相对最为严重,而左基底节卒中后右手的功能训练有助于改善操作相关的心理测验的表现.%Objective Comparing the characteristics of cognitive impairment of patients with single subcortical lesion stroke of four different areas,we are to explore the cognitive function of the thalamus and basal ganglia and this is help for early identification of vascular cognitive impairment(VCI).Methods 63 patients with single subcortical lesion stroke(including 14 left thalamic stoke group,17 left basal ganglia stroke group,15 right thalamic stroke group,17 right basal ganglia stroke group

  15. Modes of Collective Action in Village Economies:Evidence from Natural and Artefactual Field Experiments in a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    SAWADA Yasuyuki; Kasahara, Ryuji; Aoyagi, Aoyagi; Shoji, Masahiro; Ueyama, Mika

    2012-01-01

    In a canonical model of collective action, individual contribution to collective action is negatively correlated with group size. Yet, empirical evidence on the group size effect has been mixed, partly due to heterogeneities in group activities. In this paper, we first construct a simple model of collective action with the free rider problem, altruism, public goods, and positive externalities of social networks. We then empirically test the theoretical implications of the group size effect on...

  16. Comparative genomics-based investigation of resequencing targets in Vibrio fischeri: Focus on point miscalls and artefactual expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Edward G

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence closure often represents the end-point of a genome project, without a system in place for subsequent improvement and refinement. Building on the genome project of Vibrio fischeri ES114, we used a comparative approach to identify and investigate genes that had a high likelihood of sequence error. Results Comparison of the V. fischeri ES114 genome with that of conspecific strain MJ11 identified 82 target loci in ES114 as containing likely errors, and thus of high-priority for resequencing. Analysis of the targets identified 75 loci in which an error had occurred, resulting in the correction of 10,457 base pairs to generate the new ES114 genomic sequence. A majority of the inaccurate loci involved frameshift errors, correction of which fused adjacent ORFs. Although insertions/deletions are thought to be rare in microbial genome assemblies, fourteen of the loci contained extraneous sequence of over 300 bp, likely due to imperfect contig ends that were misassembled in tandem rather than as overlapping segments. Additionally we updated the entire genome annotation with 113 new features including previously uncalled protein-coding genes, regulatory RNA genes and operon leader peptides, and we analyzed the transcriptional apparatus encoded by ES114. Conclusion We demonstrate that errors in microbial genome sequences, thought to largely be confined to point mutations, may also consist of other prevalent large-scale rearrangements such as insertions. Ongoing genome quality control and annotation programs are necessary to accompany technological advancements in data generation. These updates further advance V. fischeri as an important model for understanding intercellular communication and colonization of animal tissue.

  17. Longitudinal investigation on the feature-binding working memory after subcortical infarction%皮层下脑梗死患者特征-整合工作记忆的动态观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘中华; 袁小敏; 曾进胜

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨单一病灶皮层下脑梗死患者在发病后不同时间点分别从事特征工作记忆和整合工作记忆时的认知行为特点.方法 28例单一病灶皮层下脑梗死患者,25名年龄、性别及文化程度相匹配的健康志愿者为对照在实验期间进行一次相同任务测试.在发病基线(W1)、发病3个月(M3)以及发病6个月(M6)分别从事颜色、空间和颜色-空间整合3种工作记忆延迟匹配样本任务,计算机记录其行为反应时间和正确率,并统计学分析.结果 W1与M3比较,3种记忆任务的正确率[(61.06±7.78)%,(64.92±5.47)%;(90.59±2.95)%,(92.88±2.98)%;(77.06±5.58)%,(82.35±7.44)%]均有提高,其反应时间[(914.02±110.53) ms,(868.31±118.91) ms;(859.89±139.94)ms,(833.37±120.99)ms;(1150.17 ±92.02) ms,(918.72±101.28)ms]缩短,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);M6与M3比较,空间任务的正确率[(93.91±2.86)%;(92.88±2.98)%]进一步提高,反应时间[(813.24±119.54)ms;(833.37±120.99) ms]缩短,而颜色任务的正确率[(64.50±4.49)%;(64.92±5.47)%]和反应时间[(866.47±123.87)ms; (868.31±118.91)ms]差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),整合任务的正确率[(78.49±7.85)%;(82.35±7.44)%]却有显著性下降(P<0.05),几乎降至发病基线水平[(77.06±5.58)%];与对照组相比,除M6时空间记忆指标[(93.91±2.86)%;(813.24±119.54)ms]差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),其余均差异有统计学意义.结论 单一病灶皮层下脑梗死患者在发病后特征及整合记忆均有不同程度损害,半年时空间记忆基本恢复至正常,但整合记忆存在继发性损害,这可能与脑梗死后神经纤维继发性损害有关.%Objective To investigate the cognitive behavioral characteristic longitudinally of the patients after subcortical infarction engaged in feature and binding working memory tasks.Methods The behavioral performances were recorded from 28 patients after subcortical

  18. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  19. 皮质下缺血性脑血管病认知功能障碍研究%Study of cognitive impairment in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董艳红; 贾彩云; 靳玮; 李玲; 吕佩源; 崔文柱; 张维娜

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cognitive profile of patients with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment by using a set of cognitive measures. Methods Extensive neuropsychological tests including MMSE and covering 5 cognitive domains were performed on 53 patients with SIVD diagnosed according to the MRI criteria of Erkinjuntti and 25 normal elderly controls (NC) matched in age and gender. The patients were divided into VaD(n = 21) and VCIND group ( n = 26 ). Results ①The overall level of cognitive performance in these tests was significant inferior in VaD subjects as compared to NC subjects (P < 0.05). ②The patients with VCIND were worse than the normal elders in the tests including MMSE, digit span test ( DST) backwards and trail making test (TMT) (P<0.05). ③Between VaD and VCIND patients, significant differences were found in many fields. Compared with VCIND patients, VaD subjects showed decline on the word recall, TMT, clock drawing test and DST (P<0.05). Conclusion ①SIVD is related to comprehensive cognitive impairment, specifically contributed to the deterioration of executive and attention function. The impairments of language and memory are affected slightly. ② The predominant impairments in patients with VCIND are executive and attention deficits, while in patients with VaD suffered from the progressive cognitive impairment and overall cognitive decline.%目的 应用系列神经心理学测试分析皮质下缺血性脑血管病(SIVD)患者的认知损害特征.方法 入选SIVD患者53例,年龄及性别相当的健康老年人25例为正常对照组.SIVD患者按照认知损害的诊断标准分为血管性痴呆(VaD)组27例和血管性认知障碍非痴呆(VCIND)组26例.进行MMSE及血管性痴呆包括记忆力、注意力、语言、视空间结构及执行功能5个认知域在内的神经心理学测试,确定VCIND患者受损的认知域.结果 ①与正常对照组比较,VaD组患者各项量表测试均严重

  20. 脑皮质下缺血性血管性痴呆60例患者临床研究%The clinical study of 60 patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永进; 周树虎; 曹茂红

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析脑皮质下缺血性血管性痴呆(subcortical ischemic vascular dementia,SIVD)患者的临床特征.方法:收集60例SIVD患者和45例年龄匹配的非痴呆对照者.收集一般资料,进行全面的体格检查,实验室检查包括同型半胱氨酸(homocysteine,Hcy)、高敏感C反应蛋白(high sensitive C-reactive protein,hs-CRP)及白细胞介素-6(interleukin-6,IL-6).所有对象进行头颅MRI扫描,记录颅内腔隙性病灶的数量,根据年龄相关白质改变(age related white matter changes,ARWMC)分级方法对侧脑室周围脑白质变性程度进行评分.应用简易智能状态检查量表(mini-mental state examination,MMSE)、蒙特利尔认知测评量表(Montreal cognitive assessment,MoCA)和画钟试验(clock drawing test,CDT)进行认知功能评估.结果:60例SIVD组中临床症状表现为步态不稳19例(31.7%)、构音障碍7例(11.7%)、饮水呛咳5例(8.3%)和尿失禁5例(8.3%),神经系统体征为上运动神经元受损体征27例(45.0%)、共济失调8例(13.3%)和假性延髓麻痹7例(11.7%).与对照组比较,SIVD组的危险因素是高血压(P<0.01)、高脂血症和高血清Hcy(均P<0.05).SIVD组脑腔隙性病灶为216个,对照组为28个,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).MMSE及MoCA量表评分两组之间差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:(1)SIVD患者主要的临床症状为步态不稳、构音障碍、饮水呛咳和尿失禁,主要的神经系统体征为上运动神经元受损体征、共济失调和假性延髓麻痹.高血压、高血脂和高血清Hcy是SIVD的重要的危险因素.(2)MMSE和MoCA是测评SIVD较敏感的痴呆评定量表.

  1. Multi-model MRI Study of Patients with Subcortical Vascular Mild Cognitive Impairment%皮质下血管性轻度认知障碍患者的多模式磁共振研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐群; 曹雯炜; 周滟; 李焰生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices for early cognitive impairment in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD). Methods Thirty two SIVD patients were thoughtfully interviewed and evaluated by a set of neuropsychological tests. The patients were divided into no cognitive impairment (NCI), vascular mild cognition impairment (VaMCI) groups. The correlations between MRI indices and cognitive characteristics of these patients were assessed. Results The mean diffusivity (MD) values within whole brain white matter (WBWM) were (0.84±0.03)×10-9·m2·s-1 and (0.89±0.05) ×10-9·m2·s-1, while the MD values within normal appearing white matter (NAWM) were (0.87±0.04)×10-9·m2·s-1 and (0.92±0.05)×10-9·m2·s-1 respectively. There were significant differences between two groups (all P=0.003). The fractional anisotropy (FA) values within the WBWM were (0.37±0.02) and (0.35±0.02), while the FA within the NAWM were (0.35±0.02) and (0.33±0.02) respectively. There were also significant differences between two groups (P=0.002, P=0.001). The correlation coefficients of WBWM MD, NAWM MD and NAWM FA with attention-executive function were-0.401 (P=0.031),-0.422 (P=0.023) and 0.409 (P=0.027) respectively, while the correlation coefifcient of NAWM MD with memory function was -0.377 (P=0.044). Multi-factor stepwise regression analysis showed that the NAWM MD correlated negatively with attention-executive (β=-0.453, P=0.009), memory (β=-0.414, P=0.019) and general cognition (β=-0.410, P=0.02) independently. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be regarded as an effective method for identiifcation of early cognitive impairment among SIVD patients. The MD value within NAWM decreased signiifcantly during early phase of cognitive impairment, and it correlated independently with manifestations of different cognitive domains, which suggested it may be regarded as a sensitive measurement of DTI.%目的:明确

  2. 脑萎缩对皮质下缺血性血管病患者认知功能的影响%Effect of brain atrophy on the cognition in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童宣霞; 王龙; 周霞; 张超; 方良; 周雅婕; 孙中武

    2016-01-01

    立的预测指标,且脑萎缩、LI数目、LA程度在认知损害中的作用可能依次减小.%Objective To explore the effect of brain atrophy on the cognition in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD).Methods A total of 116 SIVD patients were enrolled from the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University between September 2013 and December 2014.Lobar atrophy, leukoaraiosis (LA), lacunar infarcts (LI) and vascular risk factors were analyzed in the 116 SIVD patients who were divided into three groups according to the diagnostic criteria: non-cognitive impairment group (SIVD-NCI) , mild cognitive impairment group (SIVD-MCI) and dement group (SIVD-VaD).All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 3.0-T system.The cognitive functions were evaluated by mini-metal state examination (MMSE), the Cambridge cognitive examination-Chinese version (CAMCOG-C), etc.A widely used visual atrophy rating method (0 to 3) was adopted to rate the severity of frontal, parietal and temporal lobe atrophy.The degree of LA and the numbers of LI in 4 brain regions (frontal, parieto-occipital, temporal, and basal ganglia) were evaluated meanwhile.Results Firstly, both the SIVD-MCI and SIVD-VaD groups showed significantly higher total scores of atrophy, higher frontal lobe atrophy scores, higher LA scores and larger LI numbers than SIVD-NCI (H=6.138, P=0.013;H=45.845, P=0.000;H=36.818, P=0.000;H=37.46, P =0.000).There were no significant differences in temporal lobe atrophy scores between SIVD-NCI group and SIVD-MCI group.Parietal lobe atrophy scores also showed no differences among the three groups.Secondly, as well as total numbers of LI, total scores of atrophy and LA were negatively correlated with SIVD cognition,especially frontal lobe atrophy scores, parieto-occipital LA scores and basal ganglia LI numbers had a remarkable negative correlation with MMSE scores, CAMCOG-C scores and partial subitems in CAMCOG

  3. Acute tryptophan depletion potentiates 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced cerebrovascular hyperperfusion in adult male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Kelly, Paul A T; Dawson, Neil; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Ferrington, Linda

    2010-05-15

    The serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) dysfunction found in depression may affect not only brain function (mood) but also cerebrovascular control. Similar, but possibly occult, disturbances may also be induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity (MDMA, or "ecstasy"). Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is widely used to identify vulnerability to depression, and we hypothesized that repeated MDMA administration would increase the sensitivity of rats to this acute serotonergic challenge. In this study, male Wistar rats were injected with MDMA (20 mg kg(-1), twice daily for 4 days) and challenged 3 weeks later with ATD, induced by intragastric administration of a nutritional mixture with tryptophan (TRP) removed. Cerebral metabolism (CMRG) and blood flow (CBF) were measured in parallel groups of animals following ATD by using quantitative [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose and [(14)C]iodoantipyrine autoradiographic techniques, respectively. A significant reduction in paroxetine binding to 5-HT transporter sites in MDMA-treated rats indicated 5HT terminal depletion, whereas the plasma TRP/sum large neutral amino acids ratio was reduced by 40% following ATD. Under all experimental conditions, the normal close correlation between CBF and metabolic demand was maintained. However, a global analysis of all brain regions revealed a significant decrease in the overall ratio of CBF to CMRG after ATD in control animals, whereas a higher ratio was observed after ATD in the MDMA-treated group. This increase in blood flow relative to cerebral metabolism suggests an ATD-induced loss of cerebrovascular tone in MDMA-treated animals that could have pathophysiological consequences and might conceivably contribute to the behavioral dysfunction of depression. PMID:19998482

  4. Hypermagnesemia does not prevent intracranial hypertension and aggravates cerebral hyperperfusion in a rat model of acute hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Eefsen, Martin; Larsen, Fin Stolze;

    2011-01-01

    whether hypermagnesemia had an influence on brain content of glutamate, glutamine, and aquaporin-4 expression. The study consisted of three experiments: The first was a dose-finding study of four different dosing regimens of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in healthy rats. The second involved four groups of PCA......Intravenous infusion of magnesium sulfate prevents seizures in patients with eclampsia and brain edema after traumatic brain injury. Neuroprotection is achieved by controlling cerebral blood flow (CBF), intracranial pressure, neuronal glutamate release, and aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) expression. These...... rats receiving ammonia infusion/vehicle and MgSO4) /saline. The effect of MgSO(4) on mean arterial pressure (MAP), intracranial pressure (ICP), CBF, cerebral glutamate and glutamine, and aquaporin-4 expression was studied. Finally, the effect of MgSO4 on MAP, ICP, and CBF was studied, using two...

  5. Hemichorea-hemiballismus caused by postoperative hyperperfusion after clipping of a giant unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Oya

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case appears consistent with the theory that the connecting fibers responsible for the development of HC-HB are also located in the frontal lobe. The treatment of giant aneurysms involving the M1 portion can cause abrupt hemodynamic changes in both frontal cortex and the basal ganglia, which can potentially induce postoperative movement disorders.

  6. Variation and significance of serum uric acid in the patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease and mild cognitive impairment%皮质下缺血性疾病伴轻度认知功能障碍患者血尿酸水平分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小容; 聂本刚; 曾春; 王秀容; 方登富; 陈秋

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨皮质下缺血性血管性疾病(subcortical ischemic vascular disease,SIVD)伴轻度认知功能障碍(mild cognitive impairment,MCI)患者血尿酸(Uric acid,UA)的变化及临床意义.方法 按入院先后顺序,依据认知功能评定结果及相应的诊断标准将皮质下缺血性血管性疾病患者60例分为两组:30例血管性轻度认知功能障碍(vascular mild cognitive impairment,VMCI)患者(VMCI组)和30例认知功能正常患者(对照组).取患者外周血,分离血清,检测血清UA水平,对所得数据进行组间比较.结果 VMCI组血清UA水平明显高于对照组,不同性别SIVD患者血清UA水平与MoCA评分呈负相关,均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 高尿酸血症可能是皮质下缺血性血管性疾病伴轻度认知功能障碍的病理机制之一.

  7. 急性皮质下小梗死的影像学特征:大动脉粥样硬化性与小动脉病变性卒中的比较%Imaging features of acute small subcortical infarcts: comparison of large artery atherosclerotic and small artery disease stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兰玉; 李焰生

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨大动脉粥样硬化与小动脉病变所致皮质下小梗死(small subcortical infarction,SSI)的影像学差异。方法连续住院的急性SSI患者根据循证缺血性卒中病因分型(SSS- TOAST)标准分为大动脉粥样硬化性卒中组和小动脉闭塞性卒中组,比较其影像学特征。结果共 纳入118例急性SSI患者,剔除7例为心源性脑栓塞,3例为其他明确病因所致卒中,7例为原因不明性 卒中。26例大动脉粥样硬化性卒中组新发梗死灶平均(3.69±5.79)个,50%为多个病灶,以半卵圆中 心为主(P<0.01);75例小动脉闭塞性卒中组新发梗死灶平均(1.08±0.51)个,仅3例(3.7%)为多 个病灶,且位于不同动脉供血区。与大动脉粥样硬化性卒中组相比,小动脉闭塞性卒中组脑白质病变 程度较重(P=0.04)、多伴有无症状梗死(P=0.012)。结论大动脉粥样硬化性SSI多为半卵圆中 心的多发性梗死,而小动脉闭塞性SSI则多为单发性梗死,易伴严重的脑白质病变和无症状梗死。%Objective To investigate the differences in neuroimaging between large artery atherosclerosis and small subcortical infarction (SSI). Methods The consecutive hospitalized patients with acute SSI were divided into large atherosclerotic stroke group and small-artery occlusive stroke group according to the evidence-based etiolologic classification of ischemic stroke (the SSS-TOAST criteria). The neuroimaging features between the two groups were compared.Results A total of 118 patients with SSI were recruited. Seven patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism were excluded from the study. Three were stroke of other determined etiology and 7 were cryptogenic stroke. Twenty-six patients in the large artery atherosclerotic stroke group had new infarcts (3.69 ± 5. 79), 50% of them were multiple lesions, mainly a half oval in the center (P <0. 01); 75 patients in the small-artery occlusive stroke group had

  8. 磁共振弥散张量成像与术中皮层下电刺激定位锥体束的初步对照研究%Diffusion tensor imaging correlates with subcortical stimulation for intraoperative pyramidal tract mapping: a preliminary study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱凤平; 吴劲松; 姚成军; 郎黎琴; 许耿; 张军; 孙申; 毛颖; 周良辅

    2010-01-01

    目的 采用术中皮层下刺激定位技术(ISM),验证磁共振弥散张量成像(DTI)显示锥体束的精确性和可靠性.方法 前瞻性研究11例运动皮层和(或)皮层下邻近锥体束的脑肿瘤.采用基于DTI锥体束成像的功能神经导航,引导手术切除肿瘤.术中以ISM记录靶肌群的复合肌肉动作电位,比较DTI锥体束成像与ISM的符合率,验证DTI锥体束成像的灵敏度和特异性.结果 DTI锥体束成像与ISM定位锥体束的符合率为86%,敏感度为100%,特异度为79%.16个ISM(+)位点距离锥体束的截距平均为(3.8±1.5)mm.结论 DTI可显示锥体束结构,可用于运动区肿瘤的术前计划并引导手术操作,有条件者应联合应用ISM.%Objective To evaluate the reliability of diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)-based pyramidal tract(PT)mapping, and to compare with intraoperative subcortical mapping(ISM). Method A prospective study comprised 11 subjects with various intracerebral neoplasms located within or adjacent to PTs was conducted. The PTs were illustrated by the DTI FA maps, and merged with the anatomical structure. During the procedure,DTI- based functional neuronavigation was used for presurgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance ,whereas ,ISM was regarded as "Gold Standard" for motor function monitoring. The white matter beneath the resection cavity was electrically stimulated near the PT shown on the functional neuronavigation. Motor response was recorded by compound muscle action potential(cMAP). The distance between PT and the stimulation site was measured. Both techniques of DTI and ISM were compared to assess the accordance for PT mapping.Results ISM verified a high accordance rate with DTI PT mapping in 86% of all subjects(19/22). The cMAP was consistently elicited in 16 stimulation sites. The mean intercept between the positive subcortical stimulation sites and the imaged PTs on DTI was(3.8 ± 1.5)mm. The sensitivity of DTI PT mapping was 100% ,whereas

  9. Value of serum β amyloid protein and tau protein in early diagnosis of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia%血清β-淀粉样蛋白与tau蛋白在皮质下缺血性血管性痴呆早期诊断的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘扬; 孙中武

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To explore the value of serum β amydoid protein(Aβ) and tau(tau) protein in carly diagnosis of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia(SIVD). Methods: ELISA method was used to detect the levels of serum Aβ38, Aβ40, Aβ42, tau protein and cxcessive phosphorylated tau protein( p-tau) in 38 patients with SIVD,42 patients with mild cognitive impairment accompanicd by subcortical vascular features( MCI-V) and 36 controls. Results :The Aβ40 level of SIVD group was significantly higher than that of the other two groups(P < 0.01 ) ,and the Aβ40 level of MCI-V group was higher than that of the controls(P < 0.05) ;The levels of Aβ38 and Aβ42 did not differ among the three groups(P > 0.05). The tau level of SIVD group was significantly higher than that of the other two groups ( P < 0.01 ) , and the tau level of MCI-V group was higher than that of the controls ( P < 0.05). The p-tau level of SIVD group was significantly higher than that of the MCI-V group and the controls(P < 0.05). Conclusions :The levels of the serum Aβ40 and tau protein may act as meaningful biomarkers in early diagnosis of SIVD.%目的:探讨血清β-淀粉样蛋白(Aβ)与tau蛋白在皮质下缺血性血管性痴呆(SIVD)早期诊断中的应用价值.方法:采用ELISA法分别检测38例SIVD患者、42例伴皮层下血管性特征的轻度认知功能损害(MCI-V)患者以及36名正常对照者的血清Aβ38、Aβ40、Aβ42、总tau(tau)蛋白和磷酸化tau(p-tau)蛋白的水平.结果:SIVD组的Aβ40水平均显著高于MCI-V组和对照组(P0.05).SIVD组的tau水平均显著高于MCI-V组和对照组(P<0.01),MCI-V组高于对照组(P<0.05);SIVD组p-tau水平均高于MCI-V组和对照组(P<0.05).结论:血清Aβ40和tau蛋白可以作为SIVD早期诊断的生物学指标.

  10. Removal of Pulse Artefact from EEG Data Recorded in MR Environment at 3T. Setting of ICA Parameters for Marking Artefactual Components: Application to Resting-State Data

    OpenAIRE

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Arrubla, Jorge; Warbrick, Tracy; Dammers, Jürgen; Bianchi, Anna M.; Reni, Gianluigi; TOSETTI, Michela; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N J

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow for a non-invasive investigation of cerebral functions with high temporal and spatial resolution. The main challenge of such integration is the removal of the pulse artefact (PA) that affects EEG signals recorded in the magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Often applied techniques for this purpose are Optimal Basis Set (OBS) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The combination of OBS and ICA is i...

  11. A voxel-based analysis of cerebral perfusion with 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many neuroimaging studies, especially metabolic imaging with PET, showed a specific frontal-subcortical brain circuit connecting the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate gyrus, elements of basal ganglia and thalamus is involved in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite consistent metabolic alteration on PET, blood flow studies with SPECT were inconsistent and various cortical and subcortical structures showed abnormal perfusion patterns. In this study, brain SPECT images of seven patients with OCD were evaluated with a sophisticated method of statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Seven patients with severe, primary OCD (6 males and 1 female) with mean age of 25.4 4.7 yrs (20-32 yrs) were studied. The SPECT data of the patients were compared with those of healthy subjects and patients with drug nave schizophrenia using SPM. The SPM parameters were p value of 0.001 with Z value of 3.09 (higher threshold ) or p value of 0.005 with Z value 2.58 (lower threshold). On a higher threshold (p<0.01),five of the seven patients showed hyperperfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex, however, hyperperfusion within OFC or caudate nucleus was seen in only one patient. On a lower threshold (p<0.005), hyperperfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex was seen in all patients, and followed by thalamus (n=5), lentiform nucleus (n=4), caudate nucleus (n=3), and OFC (n=3). Perfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex was also increased in OCD compared with drug nave schizophrenia. Anterior cingulate cortex appears to be an important anatomical structure in the pathogenesis of OCD symptoms. Brain SPECT using a sophisticated analysis method of SPM is useful for the diagnosis of OCD and differentiation from schizophrenia

  12. A voxel-based analysis of cerebral perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Hee Joung; Chang, Jin Woo; Kim, Chan Hyung; Lee, Hong Shick; Min, Sung Kil; Chung, Sang Sup [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Many neuroimaging studies, especially metabolic imaging with PET, showed a specific frontal-subcortical brain circuit connecting the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate gyrus, elements of basal ganglia and thalamus is involved in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite consistent metabolic alteration on PET, blood flow studies with SPECT were inconsistent and various cortical and subcortical structures showed abnormal perfusion patterns. In this study, brain SPECT images of seven patients with OCD were evaluated with a sophisticated method of statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Seven patients with severe, primary OCD (6 males and 1 female) with mean age of 25.4 4.7 yrs (20-32 yrs) were studied. The SPECT data of the patients were compared with those of healthy subjects and patients with drug nave schizophrenia using SPM. The SPM parameters were p value of 0.001 with Z value of 3.09 (higher threshold ) or p value of 0.005 with Z value 2.58 (lower threshold). On a higher threshold (p<0.01),five of the seven patients showed hyperperfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex, however, hyperperfusion within OFC or caudate nucleus was seen in only one patient. On a lower threshold (p<0.005), hyperperfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex was seen in all patients, and followed by thalamus (n=5), lentiform nucleus (n=4), caudate nucleus (n=3), and OFC (n=3). Perfusion within the anterior cingulate cortex was also increased in OCD compared with drug nave schizophrenia. Anterior cingulate cortex appears to be an important anatomical structure in the pathogenesis of OCD symptoms. Brain SPECT using a sophisticated analysis method of SPM is useful for the diagnosis of OCD and differentiation from schizophrenia.

  13. Glucose metabolism in small subcortical structures in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Hansen, Søren B; Eggers, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests a characteristic pattern of metabolic perturbation in discrete, very small basal ganglia structures. These structures are generally too small to allow valid investigation by conventional positron emission tomography (PE...

  14. Dopamine-Dependent Architecture of Cortico-Subcortical Network Connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, D.M.; Oei, N.Y.; Soeter, R.P.; Both, S.; Gerven, van J.M.; Rombouts, S.A.; Beckmann, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Maladaptive dopaminergic mediation of reward processing in humans is thought to underlie multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Mechanisms responsible for the development of such disorders may depend on individual differences in neural signa

  15. Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts-a New Child Leukoencephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanBao-Qiang; MarjoSvanderKnaap

    2004-01-01

    Here we review a new variety of leukoencephalopathy with infantile megalencephaly and discrepant clinical course (MLC, MIM: 604004). These children had megalencephaly in the first year of life, with or without mild delay of motor function and/or seizures. After a few years, motor handicap was slowly progressive with unsteady gait, serious cerebeliar ataxia and mild plasticity. Eventually most of patients were confined to a wheelchair. Meanwhile mental development was relatively preserved, although the learning problems was increased from the midway of elementary school. Most of patients had tonic-clonic seizure and some might advance to status epilepticus. Antiepileptic drugs may effectively control seizure. The disorders of known metabolic defects were excluded. Neurophysiological examination showed that EEG had interictal epileptic discharges on the generalized slow wave background in most patients. The cerebral white matter had diffuse abnormality, with swelling of white matter, and cysts in the frontoparietal and anterior-temporal lobes on MRI examination. Some central white matter structures were spared, such as corpus caliosum. The severity of lesions on MRI is inconsistent with the clinical signs. Pathogenesis of this disease was unknown. The pathological findings found a spongiform leukoencephalopathy due to myelin splitting and intramyelinic vacuole formation but without myelin loss, This disease had probably an autosomal recessive inheritance, The geneKIAA027 on 22qtel was responsible for M LC.

  16. Subcortical neuromorphometry in schizophrenia spectrum and bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mamah

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Few similarities in surface deformation patterns were seen across groups, which may reflect differing neuropathologies. Posterior thalamic contraction in SCZ and BP suggest common genetic or environmental antecedents. Surface deformities in SCZ basal ganglia may have been due to antipsychotic drug effects.

  17. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infacts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that tested Donepezil (Aricept), a drug recommended for Alzheimer’s disease, did not find it to be effective in CADASIL. However, some patients may benefit in terms of improved concentration and attention. Other forms of supportive therapies such as physicial therapy and speech therapy are ...

  18. The role of diffusion tensor imaging in motor outcome prediction in subcortical cerebral infarction in the acute period%弥散张量成像对急性期皮质下脑梗死肢体运动功能恢复的预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周克贵; 柯开富

    2010-01-01

    目的 对急性期内的运动功能残疾的皮质下脑梗死患者进行观察,探讨弥散张量纤维素成像(DTT)显示的锥体束累及程度等多个预测因素对运动功能改变的影响,以期发现最可靠和最密切的预测因素.方法 对82例急性脑梗死残疾患者(mRS评分≥3分),结合其基线临床特征、实验室与影像学等辅助检查及治疗方法 ,选取性别、年龄、高血压、糖尿病、高胆固醇血症、心房颤动或心绞痛史、吸烟史、酗酒史、初始残疾程度、同型半胱氨酸、C反应蛋白、治疗方式、梗死灶体积大小及锥体束累及程度作为观测指标,对患者发病后第90天的情况进行随访分析.结果 单因素差异检验采用x2检验,发现年龄(χ2=47.492,P<0.01)、糖尿病(χ2=5.126,P=0.024)、高胆固醇血症(χ2=6.242,P=0.012)、初始残疾程度(χ2=45.359,P<0.01)、锥体束累及程度(χ2=51.467,P<0.01)均可影响残疾患者的康复.采用多因素Logistic回归分析对其进行多因素回归分析,结果提示年龄(OR=0.068,P=0.042)、锥体束累及程度(OR=0.026,P=0.002)是患者运动功能康复的独立预测因素,而糖尿病、高胆固醇血症、初始残疾程度无明显相关性.结论 通过DTT反映出的锥体束累及程度为对在急性期内的运动功能残疾的皮质下脑梗死患者的康复最有价值的预测因素.%Objective To observe the patients with subcortical cerebral infarction in the acute period, disabled in the motor function, and explore the extent of impact of several predictive factors to the recovery of motor function, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTF) displaying the involving extent of pyramidal tract, in order to find the most reliable and closely predictors. Methods 82 patients with acute cerebral infarction and disability (mRS score ≥ 3 points) were followed up on the 90 d after the symptom onset, respectively. Combining the baseline clinical characteristics, the laboratory

  19. The diffusion tensor imaging study of cognitive functions in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease%皮质下缺血性血管病患者认知功能的弥散张量磁共振研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐群; 周滟; 曹雯炜; 林岩; 李焰生

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate correlations between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices and cognitive dysfunction in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD). Methods Forty-two SIVD patients were thoughtfully interviewed and evaluated by a set of neuropsychological tests. The patients were divided into no cognition impairment (NCI), vascular cognition impairment no dementia (VCIND) and vascular dementia (VaD) groups. The correlations between DTI indices and cognitive characteristics of these patients were assessed. Results The mean diffu-sivity (MD) values within whole brain white matter (WBWM) were (0.84 ± 0.03) × 10-9 m2 ·s-1, (0.89 ± 0.05) × 10-9 m2·s-1 and (0.93 + 0.05) × 10-9 m2 ·s-1 in NCI, VCIND and VaD groups, respectively. Compared with NCI group, The MD was significantly increased in VCIND and VaD groups (all P < 0.01). The fractional anisotropy (FA) values within WBWM were (0.37 ± 0.02), (0.35 ± 0.02) and (0.34 ± 0.02) in NCI, VCIND and VaD groups, respectively. Compared with NCI group, The FA was significantly decreased in VCIND and VaD groups (all P< 0.01). The correlation coefficients of WBWM MD with attention-executive function and memory function were -0.538 and -0.500, respectively (P < 0.01 for both). The correlation coefficients of WBWM FA with attention-executive function and memory function were 0.439 and 0.411 respectively (both P < 0.01). After excluding VaD, the correlation between WBWM MD and attention-executive function still remained significant with the correlation coefficient of -0.401 (P < 0.05). Conclusions The FA and MD in either VCIND or VaD are significantly different from those in NCI, suggesting that attention-executive and memory functions may be independently related to white matter integrity.%目的 明确弥散张量成像(diffusion tensor imaging,DTI)对皮质下型血管性认知障碍的识别作用.方法 42例皮质下缺血性血管病(subcortical ischemic vascular desease,SIVD)患

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Analysis of Association Fibers in Patients with Subcortical Ischemic Vascular Disease and Correlations with Cognitive Function%皮质下缺血性血管病患者联络纤维的扩散张量成像分析和认知功能相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林霖; 薛蕴菁; 段青; 康正武; 林海龙; 孙斌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate microstructure changes of association fibers in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) patients using atlas-based analyses (ABA) of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and clinical correlations of ischemic changes. Methods Forty SIVD patients (18 vascular cognitive impairment [VCI] patients and 22 non-cognitive impairment [NCI] patients) and 20 normal controls were performed with neuropsychological tests and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including DTI scans. The rating score of white matter change, ABA of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were computed. The correlation between DTI parameters and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores were evaluated. Results Compared with NCI group, VCI group patients had lower FA value and higher MD value in bilateral sagittal stratum (inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus), cingulate gyrus (cingulum), hippocampus (cingulum), superior longitudinal fasciculus, superior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus. However, the rating score of white matter change showed no signiifcant difference. In addition, MoCA scores of SIVD patients positively correlated with FA values and negatively correlated with MD values of association ifbers, including bilateral sagittal stratum (inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus), cingulate gyrus (cingulum), superior longitudinal fasciculus, superior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus and left hippocampus (cingulum). Conclusion FA values increase and MD values decrease in association ifbers of SIVD patients. Moreover, it is signiifcantly related with cognitive function.%目的运用磁共振成像(magnetic resonance imaging,MRI)基于白质地图的扩散张量成像(diffusion tensor imaging,DTI)技术研究皮质下缺血性血管病(subcortical ischemic vascular disease,SIVD)患者联络纤维的超微结构改变,并分析DTI参数

  1. Arqueofaunas, osteometría y evidencia artefactual en Pastos Grandes, Puna de Salta: secuencia de cambio a lo largo del Holoceno temprano, medio y tardío en el sitio Alero Cuevas Archaeofaunal, Osteometrical And Artefactual Evidence In Pastos Grandes, Puna Of Salta: The Sequence Of Change Through The Early, Middle And Late Holocene In Alero Cuevas Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel E. J. López

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta los análisis de diversidad taxonómica y osteometría del sitio Alero Cuevas, en Pastos Grandes, Puna de Salta, con el fin de analizar los cambios en el consumo de recursos faunísticos y en el nicho económico a lo largo del Holoceno. Las estrategias de caza primero, y pastoreo posteriormente, fueron predominantes en el nicho económico de los grupos humanos de Pastos Grandes. La osteometría es una línea de evidencia que sirve como punto de partida para el estudio de los cambios relacionados con la domesticación y/o introducción de camélidos domesticados. En este sentido, se considera relevante distinguir la domesticación de la consolidación de una estrategia pastoril. Este último proceso ocurrió a lo largo del Holoceno tardío, convirtiéndose en la estrategia predominante del nicho económico. De todas formas la caza siguió siendo importante como estrategia económica. Finalmente, de manera complementaria se consideraron otras evidencias arqueológicas, principalmente los artefactos líticos, que en asociación con la información proveniente de los conjuntos arqueofaunísticos, fueron relevantes para comprender los cambios ocurridos en el nicho económico.This paper presents an analysis of the taxonomic and osteometric diversity of the Alero Cuevas site, Pastos Grandes, Puna of Salta, in order to analyze changes in the consumption of faunal resources and this economic niche throughout the Holocene. Hunting and subsequently pastoralism were the predominant strategies in the economic niche of the human groups of Pastos Grandes. The osteometríc data is a line of evidence that serves as a starting point for the study of the changes related to the domestication and/or introduction of domesticated camelids. In this sense, it is important to distinguish domestication from the consolidation of a pastoralist strategy. This latter process occurred throughout the Late Holocene, becoming the predominant strategy of the economic niche. Nevertheless, hunting continued as an important economic strategy. Finally, complementary archaeological evidence is considered, chiefly the lithic artifacts. The lithic technology presents significant information for understanding the changes that occurred in the economic niche.

  2. Attentional deficit Syndrome in adults: Correlation of clinical findings of imaging using brain SPECT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Attention Deficit Syndrome (ADS) in the adult is a clinical entity of difficult diagnosis and with a rewarding improvement of quality of life when this entity is diagnosed and treated successfully. There is an absence of diagnostic tests and therefore there is full justification for research applications for Functional NeuroIMaging techniques in ADS. Objectives We report functional imaging findings by means of HMPAO NeuroSPECT in a group of 23 adult SDA patients. These findings submit diagnostic Neuroimaging functional patterns that are characteristic of adult SDA. Method We report results in a group of 23 adult patients (17 males and 6 females) with clinical diagnosis of SDA. Patients were subjected to NeuroSPECT imaging and 58 Brodmann areas ROIS were analyzed including cortex and subcortical structures. Results Analysis of MAXIMAL perfusion within the Brodmann Area (2.5% higher pixel counts, expressed as % of higher pixel in cortex or cerebellum, whichever was smaller) demonstrates bilateral focal hyperperfusion in areas 9,10, 17,18,22,23,24 and 31 of Brodmann. In the analysis of MINIMAL values (2.5% minimal values within the Brodmann area) there is bilateral focal hypoperfusion in areas 4,11,12,18,19, and 36 and area 20 left. MEAN uptake in these Broadmann areas was diminished in area 24 left and bilateral areas 25. In the subcortical structures there is bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. Conclusions Our results support the concept of the role of structures outside of the cerebral frontal cortex in the pathogenic of SDA. We refer to areas in the intersection of temporo-occipital lobes and also the parietal lobes. We analyzed the clinical weight of medial frontal hyperperfusion as part of the default mode, and the explanation that this model might have in the variance of neuropsychological performances observed in these patients. Furthermore our findings support also the significance of subcortical structures in the bottom-up regulation. This current report

  3. Restrained cerebral hyperperfusion in response to superimposed acute hypoxemia in growth-restricted human fetuses with established brain-sparing blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jing; Olofsson, Per

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral circulatory response to superimposed acute hypoxemia in growth-restricted fetuses with established brain-sparing flow (BSF) during basal conditions. Material and methods: 76 term fetuses suspected of growth restriction were exposed to Doppler velocimetry in the umbitical artery (UA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA), and in 38-39 cases also in Galen's vein (GV), straight sinus (SS), and transverse sinus (TS), before and during an oxytocin challenge te...

  4. Functional brain imaging in Sydenham's chorea and streptococcal tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Elvan Caglar; Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Karabacak, Nese Ilgin; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe; Okuyaz, Cetin; Aydin, Kurşad

    2004-05-01

    Group A streptococcal infections cause a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Sydenham's chorea, tics, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Structural (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) and functional (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies in patients with Sydenham's chorea have suggested reversible striatal abnormalities. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebral perfusion patterns of the subcortical structures by using hexamethylpropylenamine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography (HMPAO-SPECT) in seven cases of Sydenham's chorea and two cases of streptococcal tic disorder. HMPAO-SPECT studies revealed a hyperperfusion pattern in two and a hypoperfusion pattern in five of the chorea patients and in two patients with tic disorder. The results are discussed in relation to the duration and severity of the symptoms and the response to therapy. Functional imaging findings can be variable in Sydenham's chorea, and hyperperfusion of the striatum and thalamus could be an indicator of the response to therapy and the severity of symptoms. However, the number of cases so far investigated by either SPECT or positron emission tomography is still too limited to draw any firm conclusions. PMID:15224712

  5. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  6. La aplicación del análisis funcional sobre el conjunto artefactual lítico del componente temprano del sitio Casa del Minero 1 para la determinación de operaciones técnicas.

    OpenAIRE

    Cueto, Manuel; Paunero, Rafael S.; Castro, Alicia Susana

    2012-01-01

    Analizamos el conjunto lítico de la unidad 4 del sitio Casa del Minero 1 (Santa Cruz, Argentina), fechado ca. 11.000 años 14C AP. Este conjunto se halla asociado a numerosos restos óseos y fogones. El sitio se encuentra en la meseta santacruceña, una de las regiones más ricas en cuanto a ocupaciones asignables a momentos de colonización inicial de la Patagonia Extra-Andina. En este trabajo, pretendemos avanzar en el conocimiento de las cadenas operativas, el repertorio tecnológico implementad...

  7. 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT in hyperalgesic fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuro-imaging studies with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in fibromyalgia (FM) patients have reported only limited subcortical hypoperfusion. 99mTc-ECD SPECT is known to provide better evaluation of areas of high cerebral blood flow and regional metabolic rate. We evaluated a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic patients with FM using 99mTc-ECD SPECT. The aim of this study was to investigate brain processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 49 years, range 25-63 years; American College of Rheumatology criteria) and ten healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Visual Analogue Scale score for pain was 82±4 at the time of the SPECT study. Compared with control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis, with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. In the present study, performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in the sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective-attentional dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on the two components of pain, we hypothesise that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic strategy and provide objective follow-up of pain processing recovery under treatment. (orig.)

  8. {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT in hyperalgesic fibromyalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedj, Eric; Taieb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; Laforte, Catherine de; Mundler, Olivier [Assistance Publique des Hopitaux de Marseille, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Niboyet, Jean [Clinique La Phoceanne, Unite d' Etude et de Traitement de la Douleur, Marseille (France)

    2007-01-15

    Neuro-imaging studies with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT in fibromyalgia (FM) patients have reported only limited subcortical hypoperfusion. {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT is known to provide better evaluation of areas of high cerebral blood flow and regional metabolic rate. We evaluated a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic patients with FM using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT. The aim of this study was to investigate brain processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 49 years, range 25-63 years; American College of Rheumatology criteria) and ten healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Visual Analogue Scale score for pain was 82{+-}4 at the time of the SPECT study. Compared with control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis, with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. In the present study, performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in the sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective-attentional dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on the two components of pain, we hypothesise that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic strategy and provide objective follow-up of pain processing recovery under treatment. (orig.)

  9. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, DJ; Van Erp, TG; Sämann, PG; Frodl, T; Jahanshad, N.; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Niessen, WJ; Vernooij, MW; Ikram, MA; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, HJ; Block, A

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to ide...

  10. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal an...

  11. Reversible brain atrophy and subcortical high signal on MRI in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), usually seen in young girls, is characterised by severe emaciation induced by self-imposed starvation. Enlargement of the ventricular system and sulci has been reported, as has high signal on T2-weighted images. We present a case with atrophic changes and high signal on T2-weighted images, which resolved completely following weight gain. (orig.)

  12. Unusual MRI appearance of diffuse subcortical heterotopia or "double cortex" in two children.

    OpenAIRE

    Livingston, J H; Aicardi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Two children with mild epilepsy and learning and behaviour problems had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing an almost identical generalised disorders of neuronal migration. Their computer tomography (CT) scans showed abnormal hypodense white matter. The MRI showed a four layered appearance of the cerebral parenchyma extending from the frontal to the occipital region. There was a normal appearance to the white matter in the periventricular region which had an abnormally smooth junct...

  13. Alexander Disease and Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts: Leukodystrophies Arising from Astrocyte Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorospe, J. Rafael; Maletkovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of white matter are some of the most commonly encountered conditions in the practice of child neurology. For a child presenting with evidence of neurological impairment, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is usually performed and often proves informative in suggesting the diagnosis. Traditionally, primary white matter…

  14. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg;

    2013-01-01

    matched controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. RESULTS: Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in...

  15. Acute Psychosis Associated with Subcortical Stroke: Comparison between Basal Ganglia and Mid-Brain Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron McMurtray; Ben Tseng; Natalie Diaz; Julia Chung; Bijal Mehta; Erin Saito

    2014-01-01

    Acute onset of psychosis in an older or elderly individual without history of previous psychiatric disorders should prompt a thorough workup for neurologic causes of psychiatric symptoms. This report compares and contrasts clinical features of new onset of psychotic symptoms between two patients, one with an acute basal ganglia hemorrhagic stroke and another with an acute mid-brain ischemic stroke. Delusions and hallucinations due to basal ganglia lesions are theorized to develop as a result ...

  16. Acute Psychosis Associated with Subcortical Stroke: Comparison between Basal Ganglia and Mid-Brain Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron McMurtray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset of psychosis in an older or elderly individual without history of previous psychiatric disorders should prompt a thorough workup for neurologic causes of psychiatric symptoms. This report compares and contrasts clinical features of new onset of psychotic symptoms between two patients, one with an acute basal ganglia hemorrhagic stroke and another with an acute mid-brain ischemic stroke. Delusions and hallucinations due to basal ganglia lesions are theorized to develop as a result of frontal lobe dysfunction causing impairment of reality checking pathways in the brain, while visual hallucinations due to mid-brain lesions are theorized to develop due to dysregulation of inhibitory control of the ponto-geniculate-occipital system. Psychotic symptoms occurring due to stroke demonstrate varied clinical characteristics that depend on the location of the stroke within the brain. Treatment with antipsychotic medications may provide symptomatic relief.

  17. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: Findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    OpenAIRE

    Schmaal, Lianne; Veltman, Dick; van Erp, T G M; Smann, P.G.; Frodl, Thomas; Jahanshad, N; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Tiemeier, Henning; Hofman, A; Niessen, W. J.; Vernooij, Meike; Ikram, Arfan; Wittfeld, Katharina; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Block, A

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples world...

  18. Contribution of subcortical structures to cognition assessed with invasive electrophysiology in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Münte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS electrodes via stereotactic neurosurgery has become a standard procedure for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. More recently, the range of neuropsychiatric conditions and the possible target structures suitable for DBS have greatly increased. The former include obsessive compulsive disease, depression, obesity, tremor, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome and cluster-headache. In this article we argue that several of the target structures for DBS (nucleus accumbens, posterior inferior hypothalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nuclei in the thalamus, globus pallidus internus, nucleus pedunculopontinus are located at strategic positions with brain circuits related to motivational behaviors, learning, and motor regulation. Recording from DBS electrodes either during the operation or post-operatively from externalized leads while the patient is performing cognitive tasks tapping the functions of the respective circuits provides a new window on the brain mechanisms underlying these functions. This is exemplified by a study of a patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease from whom we recorded in a flanker task designed to tap action monitoring processes while he received a DBS electrode in the right nucleus accumbens. Clear error-related modulations were obtained from the target structure, demonstrating a role of the nucleus accumbens in action monitoring. Based on recent conceptualizations of several different functional loops and on neuroimaging results we suggest further lines of research using this new window on brain functions.

  19. The Anterior Thalamus Provides A Subcortical Circuit Supporting Memory And Spatial Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M O‘Mara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The anterior thalamic nuclei, a central component of Papez’ circuit, are generally assumed to be key constituents of the neural circuits responsible for certain categories of learning and memory. Supporting evidence for this contention is that damage to either of two brain regions, the medial temporal lobe and the medial diencephalon, is most consistently associated with anterograde amnesia. Within these respective regions, the hippocampal formation and the anterior thalamic nuclei (anteromedial, anteroventral, anterodorsal are the particular structures of interest. The extensive direct and indirect hippocampal-anterior thalamic interconnections and the presence of theta-modulated cells in both sites further support the hypothesis that these structures constitute a neuronal network crucial for memory and cognition. The major tool in understanding how the brain processes information is the analysis of neuronal output at each hierarchical level along the pathway of signal propagation coupled with neuroanatomical studies. Here, we discuss the electrophysiological properties of cells in the anterior thalamic nuclei with an emphasis on their role in spatial navigation. In addition, we describe neuroanatomical and functional relationships between the anterior thalamic nuclei and hippocampal formation.

  20. The anterior thalamus provides a subcortical circuit supporting memory and spatial navigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Shane M O‘Mara

    2013-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei, a central component of Papez’ circuit, are generally assumed to be key constituents of the neural circuits responsible for certain categories of learning and memory. Supporting evidence for this contention is that damage to either of two brain regions, the medial temporal lobe and the medial diencephalon, is most consistently associated with anterograde amnesia. Within these respective regions, the hippocampal formation and the anterior thalamic nuclei (anteromed...

  1. The anterior thalamus provides a subcortical circuit supporting memory and spatial navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Jankowski, Maciej M.; Ronnqvist, Kim C.; Tsanov, Marian; Vann, Seralynne D.; Wright, Nicholas F.; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Aggleton, John P.; O'Mara, Shane M.

    2013-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN), a central component of Papez' circuit, are generally assumed to be key constituents of the neural circuits responsible for certain categories of learning and memory. Supporting evidence for this contention is that damage to either of two brain regions, the medial temporal lobe and the medial diencephalon, is most consistently associated with anterograde amnesia. Within these respective regions, the hippocampal formation and the ATN (anteromedial, anterovent...

  2. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano A Hawkes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CADASIL is the most common cause of hereditary stroke and vascular dementia. Published information about this disease in South America is scant. We describe clinical and demographic characteristics of 13 patients (10 families with CADASIL from Argentina.Methods Medical records, diagnostic tests and family history of patients with CADASIL were reviewed.Results Thirteen patients with CADASIL (10 families were included. All patients had European ancestry. Initial presentation was stroke in most patients (n = 11. Stroke patients later developed cognitive complaints (n = 9, migraine with aura (n = 1, apathy (n = 4 and depression (n = 6. External capsule and temporal lobe involvement on MRI were characteristic imaging findings. Two patients died after intracerebral hemorrhage.Conclusion This is the first report of non-related patients with CADASIL in South America addressing ancestry. Since European ancestry is not highly prevalent in all South American countries, there may be variable incidence of CADASIL within this region.

  3. [The modulation of cerebral cortex and subcortical nuclei on NRM and their role in acupuncture analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X

    1996-01-01

    The vast research have demonstrated that the acupuncture analgesia is effected through a physiological mechanism brought about by the nervous system, particularly the central nervous system. We combined the acupuncture effects and theory of channels and collaterals with the new advance of pain neurophysiology, and centred attention on nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), that is one of the origins of the important descending inhibitory pathways of the intrinsic analgesic systems in brain. The unit discharges of NRM neurons and their nociceptors/ph responses were recorded extracellularly with glass microelectrode at 1495 neurons on 634 wastar rats. The modulation of cerebral cortex, the head of N. caudatum (NCa), N. Accumbens (N. Ac), N lateral habenular (NHa) and Periaquaeductal gray matter (PAG) on NRM and their role in acupuncture analgesia were studied by central locational stimulation, lesion and microinjection. The result were as follows: 1. The most NRM neurons could respond to noxious stimulation of tail tip with increasing or decreasing firing rate. Electroacupuncture (EA) at "Zusanli" could activate the NRM neuron, increasing discharges, and inhibit their nociceptive responses, producing analgesia. 2. The activity of NRM neuron was modulated by PAG, NAc, and NCa. Stimulation at one of them can activate neuron of NRM, increasing firing rate, and induce analgesia. When the lesion or microinjection naloxone were made in PAG, NAc or NCa, EA analgesia could be weakened or lost, even the nociceptive responses might be increased. It is suggest that the nuclei participated in EA analgesia with their endogenous opiate like substance, and were playing an important role. It is also indicated that the electroacupuncture was used on the patients with some nuclei lesion or pathological changes should be careful to avoid making patients feel more painful. 3. Somatosensory area II (Sm II) of cerebral cortex participated in EA analgesia. The analgesic effects of EA at "Zusanli" were reduced after lesion of Sm II. The nociceptive responses could be inhibited by stimulation of Sm II. We have further demonstrated that analgesic effects of Sm II stimulation were achieved by the modulation of Sm II on NRM, via NAc and NHa closely related to limbic-midbrain system, and with NRM descending inhibitory pathways through dorsal lateral fasciculus (DLF) in the level of spinal cord. 4. The sensorimotor area (SM) of cerebral cortex seems was not necessary structure for EA analgesia. Either of hindlimb areas or larger range of bilateral SM were resected, the analgesic effects of EA at "Zusanli" were not obviously influenced. The stimulation of somatosensory area I (Sm I) of SM could inhibit the nociceptive responses of NRM neurons. It was also demonstrated the Sm I could modulate NRM by mediation of NCa of extrapyramidal system enhancing EA analgesia. Stimulation of Sm I could directly inhibit the nociceptive responses through pyramidal system in the level of spinal cord, producing analgesia. But the information of electroacupuncture was noxious stimulation, so it could be also inhibited by Sm I stimulation, playing an antagonism to EA analgesia. Thus when patient's emotion was very nervous or physical exercise was very strong, EA analgesic effects would be decreased. Therefore, in order to guarantee EA analgesic effects, it is necessary that patients should take a rest and calm down before electroacupuncture. The contrary action between pyramidal and extrapyramidal systems in EA analgesia may be the one of mechanisms of that EA analgesia to be not full and changeful. PMID:9387347

  4. A Multiatlas Approach for Segmenting Subcortical Brain Structures using Local Patch Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neela RAMAMOORTHI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, often segmenting the brain structures from MRI data is the key step. Since there are larger variations in the anatomical structures of the brain, segmentation becomes a crucial process. Using only the intensity information is not enough to segment structures since two or more structures may share the same tissues. Recently, the use of multiple pre-labeled images called atlases or templates are used in the process of segmentation of image data. Both single atlas and multiple atlases can be used. However, using multiple atlases in the segmentation process proves a dominant method in segmenting brain structures with challenging and overlapping structures. In this paper, we propose two multi atlas segmentation methods: Local Patch Distance Segmentation (LPDS and Weighted Local Patch Distance Segmentation (WLPDS. These methods use local patch distance in the label fusion step. LPDS uses local patch distance to find the best patch match for label propagation. WLPDS uses local patch distance to calculate local weights. The brain MRI images from the MICCAI 2012 segmentation challenge are chosen for experimental purposes. These datasets are publicly available and can be downloaded from MIDAS. The proposed techniques are compared with existing fusion methods such as majority voting and weighted majority voting using the similarity measures such as Dice overlap (DC, Jaccard coefficient (JC and Kappa statistics. For 20 test data sets, LPDS gives DICE=0.95±0.05, JACCARD=0.91±0.04 and KAPPA=0.94±0.07. WLPDS gives DICE=0.98±0.02, JACCARD=0.92±0.03 and KAPPA=0.95±0.04.

  5. Reduced frontal-subcortical white matter connectivity in association with suicidal ideation in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, W; Han, C E; Fava, M; Mischoulon, D; Papakostas, G I; Heo, J-Y; Kim, K W; Kim, S T; Kim, D J H; Kim, D K; Seo, S W; Seong, J-K; Jeon, H J

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and suicidal behavior have been associated with structural and functional changes in the brain. However, little is known regarding alterations of brain networks in MDD patients with suicidal ideation. We investigated whether or not MDD patients with suicidal ideation have different topological organizations of white matter networks compared with MDD patients without suicidal ideation. Participants consisted of 24 patients with MDD and suicidal ideation, 25 age- and gender-matched MDD patients without suicidal ideation and 31 healthy subjects. A network-based statistics (NBS) and a graph theoretical analysis were performed to assess differences in the inter-regional connectivity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to assess topological changes according to suicidal ideation in MDD patients. The Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) and the Korean version of the Barrett Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) were used to assess the severity of suicidal ideation and impulsivity, respectively. Reduced structural connectivity in a characterized subnetwork was found in patients with MDD and suicidal ideation by utilizing NBS analysis. The subnetwork included the regions of the frontosubcortical circuits and the regions involved in executive function in the left hemisphere (rostral middle frontal, pallidum, superior parietal, frontal pole, caudate, putamen and thalamus). The graph theoretical analysis demonstrated that network measures of the left rostral middle frontal had a significant positive correlation with severity of SSI (r=0.59, P=0.02) and BIS (r=0.59, P=0.01). The total edge strength that was significantly associated with suicidal ideation did not differ between MDD patients without suicidal ideation and healthy subjects. Our findings suggest that the reduced frontosubcortical circuit of structural connectivity, which includes regions associated with executive function and impulsivity, appears to have a role in the emergence of suicidal ideation in MDD patients. PMID:27271861

  6. Frontal-subcortical circuits in obsessive-compulsive disorder: role of the dopamine D1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder which is increasingly being recognised as a neurobiological disorder. While serotonergic mechanisms have been proposed, the major competing theory in the pathophysiology of OCD involves the neurotransmitter dopamine. The Dopamine D1 receptor is implicated in OCD following the finding of specific spatial working memory abnormalities in a series of neuropsychological studies. Spatial working memory is known to depend on the integrity of D1 receptor function in the Dorso-lateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC) of primates. This study aims to examine the role of dopamine in patients with OCD and in particular to test the hypothesis that there is an upregulation of dopamine D1 receptors in the DLPFC which correlates with spatial working memory deficits in OCD. Three OCD patients and three normal controls underwent Positron Emission Tomography (PET) following intravenous injection of the D1 antagonist PET ligand SCH23390. Reconstructed PET images were co registered with subject Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) and regions of interest drawn manually. We will present the analysis of the Binding Potentials of SCH23390 in the regions of interest of the first three OCD patients and compare them with three normal control patients. In conclusion Dopamine-Serotonergic interactions are involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Subcortical, modality-specific pathways contribute to multisensory processing in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. van den Brink; M.X. Cohen; E. van der Burg; D. Talsma; M.E. Vissers; H.A. Slagter

    2013-01-01

    Oftentimes, we perceive our environment by integrating information across multiple senses. Recent studies suggest that such integration occurs at much earlier processing stages than once thought possible, including in thalamic nuclei and putatively unisensory cortical brain regions. Here, we used di

  8. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder : findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; van Erp, T. G. M.; Saemann, P. G.; Frodl, T.; Jahanshad, N.; Loehrer, E.; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Niessen, W. J.; Vernooij, M. W.; Ikram, M. A.; Wittfeld, K.; Grabe, H. J.; Block, A.; Hegenscheid, K.; Voelzke, H.; Hoehn, D.; Czisch, M.; Lagopoulos, J.; Hatton, S. N.; Hickie, I. B.; Goya-Maldonado, R.; Kraemer, B.; Gruber, O.; Couvy-Duchesne, B.; Renteria, M. E.; Strike, L. T.; Mills, N. T.; de Zubicaray, G. I.; McMahon, K. L.; Medland, S. E.; Martin, N. G.; Gillespie, N. A.; Wright, M. J.; Hall, G.B.; MacQueen, G. M.; Frey, E. M.; Carballedo, A.; van Velzen, L. S.; van Tol, M. J.; van der Wee, N. J.; Veer, I. M.; Walter, H.; Schnell, K.; Schramm, E.; Normann, C.; Schoepf, D.; Konrad, C.; Zurowski, B.; Nickson, T.; McIntosh, A. M.; Papmeyer, M.; Whalley, H. C.; Sussmann, J. E.; Godlewska, B. R.; Cowen, P. J.; Fischer, F. H.; Rose, M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Thompson, P. M.; Hibar, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristic

  9. Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine Inhibit Social Play Behavior through Prefrontal and Subcortical Limbic Mechanisms in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that methylphenidate and atomoxetine, drugs widely used for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suppress social play in rats through a noradrenergic mechanism of action. Here, we aimed t...

  10. Neuronal–glial alterations in non-primary motor areas in chronic subcortical stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen M. Cirstea; Nudo, Randolph J.; Craciunas, Sorin C.; Popescu, Elena A.; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Savage, Cary R.; Brooks, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Whether functional changes of the non-primary motor areas, e.g., dorsal premotor (PMd) and supplementary motor (SMA) areas, after stroke, reflect reorganization phenomena or recruitment of a pre-existing motor network remains to be clarified. We hypothesized that cellular changes in these areas would be consistent with their involvement in post-stroke reorganization. Specifically, we expected that neuronal and glial compartments would be altered in radiologically normal-appearing, i.e., spare...

  11. Cortico-Striatal Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity After Activation of Subcortical Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Jan M.; Redgrave, Peter; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline...

  12. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Redgrave; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicucullin...

  13. Methylphenidate and atomoxetine inhibit social play behavior through prefrontal and subcortical limbic mechanisms in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that methylphenidat

  14. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  15. Subcortical Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in Healthy Bipolar Offspring: Potential Neuroanatomical Risk Marker for Bipolar Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Nau, Sharon; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to examine the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with gray matter volume abnormalities in brain regions in healthy bipolar offspring relative to age-matched controls. Results show increased gray matter volume in the parahippocampus/hippocampus in healthy offspring at genetic risk for BD.

  16. A mu–delta opioid receptor brain atlas reveals neuronal co-occurrence in subcortical networks

    OpenAIRE

    Erbs, Eric; Faget, Lauren; Scherrer, Gregory; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Hentsch, Didier; Birling, Marie-Christine; Koutsourakis, Manoussos; Vasseur, Laurent; Veinante, Pierre; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Massotte, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration, including autonomic, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. Mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) opioid receptors functionally interact in vivo, but whether interactions occur at circuitry, cellular or molecular levels remains unsolved. To challenge the hypothesis of MOR/DOR heteromerization in the brain, we generated redMOR/greenDOR double knock-in mice and report dual recepto...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CADASIL cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy ...

  18. 11.74T fMRI of cortical and subcortical visual networks in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Christopher; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Siefert, Alyssa; Peter, Herman; Gjedde, Albert; Hyder, Fahmeed

    Though a predominantly nocturnal animal, the rat has a functional visual system, albeit of low acuity, and has at least a basic form of color vision extending into the UV range. Our aim here was to develop methods to probe this system with both high field fMRI and electrophysiological techniques...

  19. 11.74T fMRI of cortical and subcortical visual networks in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Christopher; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Siefert, Alyssa; Peter, Herman; Gjedde, Albert; Hyder, Fahmeed

    . Experimental setups in an imaging spectrometer are not ideally suited for studying the visual pathway of the rodent due to stringent physical constraints imposed by the imaging bore size and strong magnetic field. Here we report a method, applicable to both data acquisition scenarios, for specific...... and reproducible delivery of visual stimuli in fMRI as well as neurophysiology environments. It has the advantage of allowing variation of the stimulus source (e.g. colour of LED) without the need for manipulating the subject in the bore....

  20. Increased subcortical neural activity among HIV+ individuals during a lexical retrieval task

    OpenAIRE

    Thames, AD; Sayegh, P; Terashima, K.; Foley, JM; Cho, A.; Arentoft, A; Hinkin, CH; Bookheimer, SY

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Background: Deficits in lexical retrieval, present in approximately 40% of HIV. + patients, are thought to reflect disruptions to frontal-striatal functions and may worsen with immunosuppression. Coupling frontal-striatal tasks such as lexical retrieval with functional neuroimaging may help delineate the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying HIV-associated neurological dysfunction. Objective: We examined whether HIV infection confers brain functional changes during lexic...

  1. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesi...

  2. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesis that brainstem encoding of the temporal envelope is greater in humans with sensorineural hearing loss, speech-evoked brainstem responses were recorded in normal hearing and hearing impaired age-matched groups of older adults. In the hearing impaired group, there was a disruption in the balance of envelope-to-fine structure representation compared to that of the normal hearing group. This imbalance may underlie the difficulty experienced by individuals with sensorineural hearing loss when trying to understand speech in background noise. This finding advances the understanding of the effects of sensorineural hearing loss on central auditory processing of speech in humans. Moreover, this finding has clinical potential for developing new amplification or implantation technologies, and in developing new training regimens to address this relative deficit of fine structure representation. PMID:23654406

  3. Divergent subcortical activity for distinct executive functions: stopping and shifting in obsessive compulsive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Voon, Valerie; Dodds, Chris; Sule, Akeem; van Niekerk, Jan; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of executive function impairment in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) that potentially contributes to symptom development and maintenance. Nevertheless, the precise nature of these executive impairments and their neural basis remains to be defined. Methods: We compared stopping and shifting, two key executive functions previously implicated in OCD, in the same task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in patients with virt...

  4. Reversible brain atrophy and subcortical high signal on MRI in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelengas, A. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Chourmouzi, D.; Boulogianni, G. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Pitsavas, G. [Paediatric Clinic, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Charitandi, A. [Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), usually seen in young girls, is characterised by severe emaciation induced by self-imposed starvation. Enlargement of the ventricular system and sulci has been reported, as has high signal on T2-weighted images. We present a case with atrophic changes and high signal on T2-weighted images, which resolved completely following weight gain. (orig.)

  5. Subcortical processing of speech regularities underlies reading and music aptitude in children

    OpenAIRE

    Strait Dana L; Hornickel Jane; Kraus Nina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Neural sensitivity to acoustic regularities supports fundamental human behaviors such as hearing in noise and reading. Although the failure to encode acoustic regularities in ongoing speech has been associated with language and literacy deficits, how auditory expertise, such as the expertise that is associated with musical skill, relates to the brainstem processing of speech regularities is unknown. An association between musical skill and neural sensitivity to acoustic re...

  6. MRI-defined subcortical ischemic vascular disease: baseline clinical and neuropsychological findings. The LADIS Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Hanna; Kalska, Hely; Ylikoski, Raija;

    2009-01-01

    lower education, hypertension and, independently, with obesity. The subjects with SIVD had more often motor impairment, a history of falls, and subtle impairment in activities of daily living, but they did not differ for depressive symptoms. SIVD subjects performed significantly inferiorly in tests of...... slowing as well as deficits in attention and executive functions....

  7. Increased functional connectivity between subcortical and cortical resting-state networks in autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerliani, L.; Mennes, M.J.J.; Thomas, R.M.; Di Martino, A.; Thioux, M.; Keysers, C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating

  8. Increased Functional Connectivity Between Subcortical and Cortical Resting-State Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerliani, Leonardo; Mennes, Maarten; Thomas, Rajat M.; Di Martino, Adriana; Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating t

  9. Increased Functional Connectivity Between Subcortical and Cortical Resting-State Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerliani, Leonardo; Mennes, Maarten; Thomas, Rajat M; Di Martino, Adriana; Thioux, Marc; Keysers, C.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating

  10. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Miyashita A, Yokoseki A, Kawata H, Koyama A, Arima K, Takahashi T, Ikeda M, Shiota H, Tamura ... Oide T, Nakayama H, Yanagawa S, Ito N, Ikeda S, Arima K. Extensive loss of arterial medial smooth muscle ...

  11. Hiperperfusão no território orbital de gestantes portadoras de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico Orbital territory hyperperfusion in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aires Rodrigues de Freitas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar o comportamento da artéria oftálmica em grávidas portadoras de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (GL, sem doença renal em atividade, comparando com não-grávidas com lúpus (NGL, sem doença renal em atividade e grávidas normais (GN. MÉTODOS: estudo observacional que analisou as variáveis doplervelocimétricas da artéria oftálmica de 20 GN, 10 GL e 17 NGL. As variáveis analisadas foram os índices de pulsatilidade (IP, a velocidade diastólica final (VDF e a razão entre picos de velocidade (RPV. Foram calculadas as médias dos índices e respectivos desvios padrões. Para comparação das médias dos índices dos três grupos, utilizou-se o teste de variância (ANOVA e prova pós-análise de Tukey, com intervalo de confiança de 95% (pPURPOSE: to analyze the ophthalmic artery functioning in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus (PL without active renal disease as compared to non-pregnant women with lupus (NPL without active renal disease, and to normal pregnant women (PN. METHODS: observational study that analyzed ophthalmic artery dopplervelocimetric variables of 20 PN, 10 PL and 17 NPL women. The variables analyzed were: pulsatility index (PI, final diastolic velocity (FDV and velocity peak ratio (VPR. Mean and standard deviation of these indexes were calculated. For group mean comparison, analysis of variance (ANOVA and the post-hoc Tukey test have been used, with confidence interval of 95% (p<0.05. RESULTS: the PN group showed the following means and standard deviations of ophthalmic artery parameters: PI=2,4±0,3; VPR=0,5±0,1 e FDV=5,1±2,1 cm/s. The PL and NPL groups showed the following values, respectively: PI=2,0±0,4 and 1,9±0,4; VPR=0,6±0,1 and 0,6±0,1; FDV=9,7±3,9 cm/s and 8,1±4,3 cm/s. There was not significant mean difference between the PL and NPL groups for PI, VPR or FDV. However, statistically significant mean differences were observed between PN and PL for PI, VPR and FDV, with higher values of FDV and VPR in the PL group. CONCLUSIONS: there was a reduction of ophthalmic artery vascular impedance with orbital hyperfusion in the two groups of women with lupus erythematosus as compared to normal pregnant women. These results may help to improve the understanding on pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, the present method may be applied in future studies as a complementary procedure for the differential diagnosis between pre-eclampsia and renal failure due to lupus.

  12. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.=20

  13. The visual system in subterranean African mole-rats (Rodentia, Bathyergidae): Retina, subcortical visual nuclei and primary visual cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, P.; Cveková, P.; Benada, Oldřich; Wielkopolska, E.; Olkowitz, S.; Turlejski, K.; Burda, H.; Bennett, N. C.; Peichl, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, 2-4 (2008), s. 356-364. ISSN 0361-9230 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) GA206/06/1469; ZA(ZA) 2069070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : microphthalmia * ocular regression * subterranean mammals Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.281, year: 2008

  14. Vector Affinity and Diversity of Geosmithia Fungi Living on Subcortical Insects Inhabiting Pinaceae Species in Central and Northeastern Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Miroslav; Jankowiak, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2013), s. 682-700. ISSN 0095-3628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/11/2302 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : SCOLYTIDAE COLONIZING BRANCHES * PINUS-SYLVESTRIS L * BARK BEETLES Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.118, year: 2013

  15. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder:findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    OpenAIRE

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, D J; van Erp, T G M; Sämann, P. G.; Frodl, T.; Jahanshad, N.; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H; Hofman, A; Niessen, W.J.; Vernooij, M.W.; Ikram, M A; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, H J; Block, A

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to ide...

  16. Juxtacellular Monitoring and Localization of Single Neurons within Sub-cortical Brain Structures of Alert, Head-restrained Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey D; Deschênes, Martin; Kleinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of techniques to monitor extracellular activity of single neuronal units. However, monitoring this activity from deep brain structures in behaving animals remains a technical challenge, especially if the structures must be targeted stereotaxically. This protocol describes convenient surgical and electrophysiological techniques that maintain the animal's head in the stereotaxic plane and unambiguously isolate the spiking activity of single neurons. The protocol combines head restraint of alert rodents, juxtacellular monitoring with micropipette electrodes, and iontophoretic dye injection to identify the neuron location in post-hoc histology. While each of these techniques is in itself well-established, the protocol focuses on the specifics of their combined use in a single experiment. These neurophysiological and neuroanatomical techniques are combined with behavioral monitoring. In the present example, the combined techniques are used to determine how self-generated vibrissa movements are encoded in the activity of neurons within the somatosensory thalamus. More generally, it is straightforward to adapt this protocol to monitor neuronal activity in conjunction with a variety of behavioral tasks in rats, mice, and other animals. Critically, the combination of these methods allows the experimenter to directly relate anatomically-identified neurophysiological signals to behavior. PMID:25938559

  17. White Matter Compromise of Callosal and Subcortical Fiber Tracts in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dinesh K.; Keehn, Brandon; Lincoln, Alan J.; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasingly viewed as a disorder of functional networks, highlighting the importance of investigating white matter and interregional connectivity. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter integrity for the whole brain and for corpus callosum, internal capsule, and middle…

  18. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Wilson, M. T.; Sleigh, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2 , the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2≈0.6cm2 . We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent with the spatial variations in brain activity patterns detected with the BOLD (blood oxygen-level-dependent) signal detected with magnetic resonance imaging, and may provide a natural substrate for synchronous gamma-band rhythms observed across separated EEG (electroencephalogram) electrodes.

  19. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrits, Niels J. H. M.; van Loenhoud, Anita C.; van den Berg, Stan F.; Berendse, Henk W; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.; Klein, Martin; Stoffers, Diederick; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM) volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA), which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurf...

  20. Subcortical white matter pathology as a mediating factor for age-related decreased performance in dichotic listening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gootjes, Liselotte; Scheltens, Philip; Van Strien, Jan W.; Bouma, Anke

    2007-01-01

    Cortical 'disconnection', involving disruption of white matter tracts in the brain, has been hypothesized as a mechanism of age-related cognitive decline. Diffuse hyperintensities in the white matter (so called white matter hyperintensities, WMH) on T2-weighted MRI scans are regarded to represent is

  1. Subcortical BOLD responses during visual sexual stimulation vary as a function of implicit porn associations in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Charmaine; de Jong, Peter J; Georgiadis, Janniko R

    2014-02-01

    Lifetime experiences shape people's attitudes toward sexual stimuli. Visual sexual stimulation (VSS), for instance, may be perceived as pleasurable by some, but as disgusting or ambiguous by others. VSS depicting explicit penile-vaginal penetration (PEN) is relevant in this respect, because the act of penetration is a core sexual activity. In this study, 20 women without sexual complaints participated. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a single-target implicit association task to investigate how brain responses to PEN were modulated by the initial associations in memory (PEN-'hot' vs PEN-disgust) with such hardcore pornographic stimuli. Many brain areas responded to PEN in the same way they responded to disgust stimuli, and PEN-induced brain activity was prone to modulation by subjective disgust ratings toward PEN stimuli. The relative implicit PEN-disgust (relative to PEN-'hot') associations exclusively modulated PEN-induced brain responses: comparatively negative (PEN-disgust) implicit associations with pornography predicted the strongest PEN-related responses in the basal forebrain (including nucleus accumbens and bed nucleus of stria terminalis), midbrain and amygdala. Since these areas are often implicated in visual sexual processing, the present findings should be taken as a warning: apparently their involvement may also indicate a negative or ambivalent attitude toward sexual stimuli. PMID:23051899

  2. Subcortical BOLD responses during visual sexual stimulation vary as a function of implicit porn associations in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Charmaine; de Jong, Peter J.; Georgiadis, Janniko R.

    2014-01-01

    Lifetime experiences shape people's attitudes toward sexual stimuli. Visual sexual stimulation (VSS), for instance, may be perceived as pleasurable by some, but as disgusting or ambiguous by others. VSS depicting explicit penile-vaginal penetration (PEN) is relevant in this respect, because the act

  3. Subcortical brain segmentation of two dimensional T1-weighted data sets with FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool (FIRST)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Amann; Michaela Andělová; Armanda Pfister; Nicole Mueller-Lenke; Stefan Traud; Julia Reinhardt; Stefano Magon; Kerstin Bendfeldt; Ludwig Kappos; Ernst-Wilhelm Radue; Christoph Stippich; Till Sprenger

    2014-01-01

    Brain atrophy has been identified as an important contributing factor to the development of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this respect, more and more interest is focussing on the role of deep grey matter (DGM) areas. Novel data analysis pipelines are available for the automatic segmentation of DGM using three-dimensional (3D) MRI data. However, in clinical trials, often no such high-resolution data are acquired and hence no conclusions regarding the impact of new treatments on DGM...

  4. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI reveals a causally connected subcortical-cortical network during reward anticipation

    OpenAIRE

    Plichta, Michael M; Wolf, Isabella; Hohmann, Sarah; Baumeister, Sarah; Boecker, Regina; Schwarz, Adam J.; Zangl, Maria; Mier, Daniela; Diener, Carsten; Meyer, Patric; Holz, Nathalie; Ruf, Matthias; Gerchen, Martin F; Bernal-Casas, David; Kolev, Vasil

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used to study the neural correlates of reward anticipation, but the interrelation of EEG and fMRI measures remains unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate this relationship in response to a well established reward anticipation paradigm using simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording in healthy human subjects. Analysis of causal interactions between the thalamus (THAL), ventral-striatum (VS), and su...

  5. Selective optical control of synaptic transmission in the subcortical visual pathway by activation of viral vector-expressed halorhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Kaneda

    Full Text Available The superficial layer of the superior colliculus (sSC receives visual inputs via two different pathways: from the retina and the primary visual cortex. However, the functional significance of each input for the operation of the sSC circuit remains to be identified. As a first step toward understanding the functional role of each of these inputs, we developed an optogenetic method to specifically suppress the synaptic transmission in the retino-tectal pathway. We introduced enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light-sensitive, membrane-targeting chloride pump, into mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs by intravitreously injecting an adeno-associated virus serotype-2 vector carrying the CMV-eNpHR-EYFP construct. Several weeks after the injection, whole-cell recordings made from sSC neurons in slice preparations revealed that yellow laser illumination of the eNpHR-expressing retino-tectal axons, putatively synapsing onto the recorded cells, effectively inhibited EPSCs evoked by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve layer. We also showed that sSC spike activities elicited by visual stimulation were significantly reduced by laser illumination of the sSC in anesthetized mice. These results indicate that photo-activation of eNpHR expressed in RGC axons enables selective blockade of retino-tectal synaptic transmission. The method established here can most likely be applied to a variety of brain regions for studying the function of individual inputs to these regions.

  6. Subcortical brain volume abnormalities in 2028 individuals with schizophrenia and 2540 healthy controls via the ENIGMA consortium

    OpenAIRE

    van Erp, T G M; Hibar, D P; Rasmussen, J M; Glahn, D. C.; Pearlson, G. D.; Andreassen, O. A.; Agartz, I.; Westlye, L. T.; Haukvik, U. K.; Dale, A M; Melle, I.; Hartberg, C B; Gruber, O.; B. Kraemer; Zilles, D

    2015-01-01

    The AMC study was supported by grants from ZonMW (grant numbers: 3160007, 91676084, 31160003, 31180002, 31000056, 2812412, 100001002, 100002034), NWO (grant numbers: 90461193, 40007080, 48004004, 40003330), and grants from the Amsterdam Brain Imaging Platform, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam and the Dutch Brain foundation. The processing with Freesurfer was performed on the Dutch e-Science Grid through BiG Grid project and COMMIT project “e-Biobanking with imaging for healthcare”, which are fun...

  7. Acute Alcohol Effects on Attentional Bias are Mediated by Subcortical Areas Associated with Arousal and Salience Attribution

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaou, Kyriaki; Field, Matt; Critchley, Hugo; Duka, Theodora

    2013-01-01

    Acute alcohol ingestion increases attentional bias to alcohol-related stimuli; however, the underlying cognitive and brain mechanisms remain unknown. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with performance of a dual task that probed attentional distraction by alcohol-related stimuli during ‘conflict' processing: the Concurrent Flanker/Alcohol-Attentional bias task (CFAAT). In this task, an Eriksen Flanker task is superimposed on task-unrelated background pictures with alcoho...

  8. The Role of Anterior Nuclei of the Thalamus: A Subcortical Gate in Memory Processing: An Intracerebral Recording Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štillová, K.; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Chrastina, J.; Halámek, Josef; Bočková, M.; Goldemundová, S.; Říha, I.; Rektor, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 11 (2015), e140778:1-13. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : anterior nuclei * thalamus * hippocampus * visual * verbal memory * DBS * P300 * ERP * intracerebral EEG Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  9. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Steyn-Ross, D A; Wilson, M T; Sleigh, J W

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2, the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2 approximately 0.6cm2. We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent with the spatial variations in brain activity patterns detected with the BOLD (blood oxygen-level-dependent) signal detected with magnetic resonance imaging, and may provide a natural substrate for synchronous gamma-band rhythms observed across separated EEG (electroencephalogram) electrodes. PMID:17677503

  10. The Role of Anterior Nuclei of the Thalamus: A Subcortical Gate in Memory Processing: An Intracerebral Recording Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štillová, K.; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Chrastina, J.; Halámek, Josef; Bočková, M.; Goldemundová, S.; Říha, I.; Rektor, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, S1 (2015), s. 162. ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /31./. 05.09.2015-09.09.2015, Istanbul] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : anterior nuclei * thalamus * hippocampus * visual * verbal memory Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  11. Dopamine Modulation of Emotional Processing in Cortical and Subcortical Neural Circuits: Evidence for a Final Common Pathway in Schizophrenia?

    OpenAIRE

    Laviolette, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    The neural regulation of emotional perception, learning, and memory is essential for normal behavioral and cognitive functioning. Many of the symptoms displayed by individuals with schizophrenia may arise from fundamental disturbances in the ability to accurately process emotionally salient sensory information. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and its ability to modulate neural regions involved in emotional learning, perception, and memory formation has received considerable research attent...

  12. Detecting microdamage in bone.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, T Clive; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Parkesh, Raman; Gunnlaugsson, TThorfinnur; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Giehl, Michael; Gowin, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue-induced microdamage in bone contributes to stress and fragility fractures and acts as a stimulus for bone remodelling. Detecting such microdamage is difficult as pre-existing microdamage sustained in vivo must be differentiated from artefactual damage incurred during specimen preparation. This was addressed by bulk staining specimens in alcohol-soluble basic fuchsin dye, but cutting and grinding them in an aqueous medium. Nonetheless, some artefactual cracks are partially stained and ...

  13. Technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT in patients with hemiconvulsions followed by Todd's paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene- amineoxime (Tc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography in two patients with prolonged hemiconvulsions followed by transient hemiparesis (Todd's paralysis). In both cases, a prolonged post-ictal cerebral hyperperfusion state of approximately 24 h was observed, even after the neurological deficits had resolved. The cerebral hyperperfusion in both cases was of much longer duration than that in previously reported cases of single and uncomplicated focal seizures. The prolonged cerebral hyperperfusion might have been due to impairment of the cerebrovascular autoregulation in seizures followed by Todd's paralysis. (orig.)

  14. Technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT in patients with hemiconvulsions followed by Todd`s paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M.; Sejima, Hitoshi; Ozasa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji [Department of Pediatrics, Shimane Medical University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, Shimane 693 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    We performed technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene- amineoxime (Tc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography in two patients with prolonged hemiconvulsions followed by transient hemiparesis (Todd`s paralysis). In both cases, a prolonged post-ictal cerebral hyperperfusion state of approximately 24 h was observed, even after the neurological deficits had resolved. The cerebral hyperperfusion in both cases was of much longer duration than that in previously reported cases of single and uncomplicated focal seizures. The prolonged cerebral hyperperfusion might have been due to impairment of the cerebrovascular autoregulation in seizures followed by Todd`s paralysis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 9 refs.

  15. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X.; Guilarte, T.R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb2+) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb2+ is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic intern...

  16. Visualization of cortical, subcortical and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Shanna L; Jennings, Josh H; Ung, Randall L; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-03-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, owing to the light-scattering properties of the brain, as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head-fixed behavioral tasks. These limitations can now be circumvented by using miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here we describe steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate that the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6-11 weeks to complete. PMID:26914316

  17. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  18. Cortical and Subcortical Grey and White Matter Atrophy in Myotonic Dystrophies Type 1 and 2 Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment, Depression and Daytime Sleepiness

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Bellenberg, Barabara; Prehn, Christian; Krogias, Christos; Schneider, Ruth; Klein, Jan; Gold, Ralf; Lukas, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Central nervous system involvement is one important clinical aspect of myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2). We assessed CNS involvement DM1 and DM2 by 3T MRI and correlated clinical and neuocognitive symptoms with brain volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods 12 patients with juvenile or classical DM1 and 16 adult DM2 patients underwent 3T MRI, a thorough neurological and neuropsychological examination and scoring of depression and daytime sleepiness. Volumes...

  19. Direction-Specific Disruption of Subcortical Visual Behavior and Receptive Fields in Mice Lacking the Beta2 Subunit of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lupeng; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Lawhn-Heath, Courtney A.; Sarnaik, Rashmi; Wang, Bor-Shuen; Liu, Xiaorong; Cang, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Retinotopic mapping is a basic feature of visual system organization, but its role in processing visual information is unknown. Mutant mice lacking β2 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor have imprecise maps in both visual cortex (V1) and the superior colliculus (SC) due to the disruption of spontaneous retinal activity during development. Here, we use behavioral and physiological approaches to study their visual functions. We find that β2−/− mice fail to track visual stimuli moving al...

  20. Biofeedback of Real-Time Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data from the Supplementary Motor Area Reduces Functional Connectivity to Subcortical Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, Michelle; Scheinost, Dustin; Qiu, Maolin; Bhawnani, Jitendra; Lacadie, Cheryl M.; James F. Leckman; Constable, R. Todd; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that biofeedback of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging data can enable people to gain control of activity in specific parts of their brain and can alter functional connectivity between brain areas. Here we describe a study using biofeedback of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging data to train healthy subjects to control activity in their supplementary motor area (SMA), a region of interest in Tourette syndrome (TS). Although a significant ...

  1. BMI not WHR modulates BOLD fMRI responses in a sub-cortical reward network when participants judge the attractiveness of human female bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian E Holliday

    Full Text Available In perceptual terms, the human body is a complex 3d shape which has to be interpreted by the observer to judge its attractiveness. Both body mass and shape have been suggested as strong predictors of female attractiveness. Normally body mass and shape co-vary, and it is difficult to differentiate their separate effects. A recent study suggested that altering body mass does not modulate activity in the reward mechanisms of the brain, but shape does. However, using computer generated female body-shaped greyscale images, based on a Principal Component Analysis of female bodies, we were able to construct images which covary with real female body mass (indexed with BMI and not with body shape (indexed with WHR, and vice versa. Twelve observers (6 male and 6 female rated these images for attractiveness during an fMRI study. The attractiveness ratings were correlated with changes in BMI and not WHR. Our primary fMRI results demonstrated that in addition to activation in higher visual areas (such as the extrastriate body area, changing BMI also modulated activity in the caudate nucleus, and other parts of the brain reward system. This shows that BMI, not WHR, modulates reward mechanisms in the brain and we infer that this may have important implications for judgements of ideal body size in eating disordered individuals.

  2. Comparison of P300 and MMN protocols in subthalamicus nucleus, internal globus pallidus and thalamus. Are these subcortical structures involved in thinking?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Minks, E.; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Hummelová, Z.; Halámek, Josef; Minksová, A.; Bareš, M.

    Brno: Česká a slovenská společnost pro klinickou neurofyziologii, 2015. s. 273. [European Congress on Clinical Neuro­physiology /15./. 30.09.2015-04.10.2015, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ERP * P300 * MMN * STN * subthalamic nucleus * internal globus pallidus * thalamus * EEG * DBS Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Airway vascular reactivity and vascularisation in human chronic airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Simon R; Boustany, Sarah; Burgess, Janette K; Hirst, Stuart J; Sharma, Hari S; Simcock, David E; Suravaram, Padmini R; Weckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Altered bronchial vascular reactivity and remodelling including angiogenesis are documented features of asthma and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Expansion of the bronchial vasculature under these conditions involves both functional (vasodilation, hyperperfusion, increased microvascular

  4. Chronic myocardial infarction detection and characterization during coronary artery calcium scoring acquisitions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rodríguez-Granillo, Gastón A

    2012-01-05

    Hypoenhanced regions on multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiography correlate with myocardial hyperperfusion. In addition to a limited capillary density, chronic myocardial infarction (MI) commonly contains a considerable amount of adipose tissue.

  5. Improved transvenous liver biopsy needle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Matzen, P; Christoffersen, P;

    1979-01-01

    A modified type of the standard transvenous cholangiography biopsy needle is described. The modified tranvenous liver biopsy needle caused only minimal artefactual changes of the liver biopsy specimens. The new type of biopsy needle is a modified Menghini needle. The conventional Menghini needle...... should be avoided for transvenous catheter biopsies because of risk of leaving catheter fragments in the liver....

  6. Original Copies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2013-01-01

    This article explores inter-artefactual relations in the Nordic Bronze Age. Notions of copying and imitation have been dominant in the description of a number of bronze and flint artefacts from period I of the Nordic Bronze Age (ca. 1700–1500 BC). It has been argued that local bronze manufacturer...

  7. STAINING SECTIONS OF WATER-MISCIBLE RESINS .2. EFFECTS OF STAINING-REAGENT LIPOPHILICITY ON THE STAINING OF GLYCOL-METHACRYLATE-EMBEDDED TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOROBIN, RW; GERRITS, PO; WRIGHT, DJ

    1992-01-01

    Glycol methacrylate (GMA) sections of animal tissues were stained with a group of twenty-seven reagents of very varied chemical characteristics. The artefactual background staining of the resin was found to be dependent on the hydrophilic/lipophilic character of the staining reagent, as estimated fr

  8. Segmental abnormal perfusion in the liver: Relation between hepatic arterial and portal vein blood flow in the fast contrast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty seven cases of segmental arterial hyperperfusion and thirty one cases of segmental portal hypoperfusion detected among 803 cases of arterial and portal dominant CT were studied for the evaluation of etiology and mechanism casuing intrahepatic segmental abnormal perfusion in normal portion of the liver around hepatic mass. Hepatic masses casuing segmental abnormal perfusion were hepatocellular carcinoma, peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, metastasis, abscess, and cavernous hemangioma. Segmental portal hypoperfusion was seen on the area of segmental arterial hyperperfusion in all the cases and segmental arterial hyperperfusion was seen on the area of segmental portal hypoperfusion in 77% of cases. In conclusion, there are intrahepatic segmental portal and arterial abnormal perfusions in normal portion around hepatic mass, and these phenomena may be developed with close reciprocal alteration between both portal and hepatic arterial flows

  9. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiara, S; Lassen, N A; Andersen, A R;

    1987-01-01

    hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In...

  10. Theoretical Exploration of the Neural Bases of Behavioural Disinhibition, Apathy and Executive Dysfunction in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease in People with Down's Syndrome: Potential Involvement of Multiple Frontal-Subcortical Neuronal Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, S. L.; Holland, A. J.; Watson, P. C.; Huppert, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recent research has suggested a specific impairment in frontal-lobe functioning in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in people with Down's syndrome (DS), characterised by prominent changes in personality or behaviour. The aim of the current paper is to explore whether particular kinds of change (namely executive…

  11. The Study of Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in Subcortical Gray Matter Nuclei of Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy%内侧颞叶癫痫皮层下核团改变的MR磁敏感加权成像研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁翠平; 卢光明; 张志强; 王正阁; 谭启富; 陈光辉

    2010-01-01

    目的 采用MR磁敏感加权成像(susceptibility weighted imaging,SWI)技术,研究内侧颞叶癫痫(mTLE)患者基底节、丘脑、脑干等区域铁物质含量的改变,揭示皮层下核团在mTLE病理生理机制中的作用.资料与方法 13例临床诊断的mTLE患者及相同数目年龄、性别匹配的正常自愿者参与了本研究,SWI数据采集在Siemens Magnetom Trio 3.0 T下进行.采用基于体素分析的方法(voxel-based analysis,VBA)比较病例组与正常对照组皮层下灰质核团信号的差异(P<0.05,联合强度与范围校正).结果 与正常对照组相比,mTLE患者双侧基底节、丘脑及脑干磁敏感信号明显降低,并且基底节、丘脑等区域的SWI信号与癫痫发病时间呈明显负相关.结论 皮层下灰质核团SWI信号的改变反映其铁含量发生改变,提示其在颞叶癫痫发生发展过程中起到重要作用.SWI可能成为一种新的应用于颞叶癫痫皮层下核团改变的研究手段.

  12. Laboratory of Caribbean Brain Research Organization in the decade of the brain midpoint. Results in reaching behavior--interferences of subcortical motor centers, neurotransmitter blocking and brain function modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Mesa, N; Antón, M; Arza-Marqués, M; Aneiros-Riba, R; Groning-Roque, E

    1996-01-01

    CARIBRO was founded in response to the United Nations declaration that the 1990s be designated the Decade of the Brain. The Program of Action is: 1. Annual meetings; 2. Training courses of the Caribbean School of Neurosciences; 3. Network scientific programs; 4. Fellowship programs; and 5. Dissemination of information on neuroscience. In the same program, a CARIBRO Laboratory was created in one of the Medical Faculties of Havana with the aim to teach students from the Caribbean in neuroscience research. As part of this program, we have been working in lateralized motor functions. Preliminary results in rats show that reaching acquisition allows classification of the animals as right-handed (40%), left-handed (40%), and ambidextrous (20%). Electrolytic lesion of caudate nucleus or amygdala impairs lateralized response. Contralateral lesions increase reaching attempts. Ipsilateral lesions to the preferred forepaw do not affect the reaction. The results remain the same 10, 20, and 90 d after the interference. Pharmacological experiments showed that trihexiphenidil (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) induced handedness reversion in 50% if the animals, whereas haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) produced immobility, tremor, and autonomic symptoms. This effect remained the same in young as well as in old animals. We are also working on mathematical modelation. In this sense, preliminary reports about a model for synaptic modification in the framework of the Fukushima hypothesis is discussed. PMID:8871967

  13. Compositional predictional model of gasoline cuts using detailed hydrocarbon chromatographic analysis of the full range of gasoline; Modelo composicional de subcortes da nafta craqueada a partir dos resultados do PIANIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, William Richard; Santos, Luciana Rego Monteiro dos; Silva, Leandro Correia da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Tecnologia de FCC]. E-mails: gilbertw, lumonteiro, leandrocs@petrobras.com.br

    2007-04-15

    A procedure has been developed to determine the composition of sub-fractions of a gasoline sample, based on the simulated distillation and detailed hydrocarbon analysis (PIANO) of the whole sample. The procedure was implemented in an Excel spreadsheet and will calculate other properties of the sub-fractions in addition to the composition, such as density and octane numbers. The calculations are based on a gasoline composition model which assumes that the concentration of each PIANO pseudo-component (e.g. C8 aromatics) in a TBP fraction will vary with boiling temperature according to a normal distribution curve. The composition model was developed from a data base obtained from the detailed characterization of narrow fractions (cut points varying by 5 deg C) of a cracked naphtha from a PETROBRAS refinery. The model was later used to determine the composition of liquid product fractions of pilot unit tests performed for the design of a new Petrochemical FCC unit. Even without external validation, the model is expected to work well for other kinds of naphtha range streams in a refinery. Differences in composition of different samples are taken into account by the pseudo-component mass balance performed by the spreadsheet. The validity of the gasoline composition model in further attested by the coincidence between the average boiling temperature of the pseudo-component concentration distribution curves and the boiling temperatures of the corresponding pure compounds. (author)

  14. Disassociation of Static and Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulatory Performance in Healthy Volunteers After Lipopolysaccharide Infusion and in Patients with Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Martin Griffin; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Ronit, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is frequently complicated by brain dysfunction, which may be associated with disturbances in cerebral autoregulation rendering the brain susceptible to hypo- and hyperperfusion. The purpose of the present study was to assess static and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (i) in a human-experim...

  15. Repair of abnormal perfusion foci in idiopathic epilepsy patients under long-term antiepileptic treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Wang; Siyu Zhao; Yaqing Liu

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizure control and the disappearance of epileptiform discharge are not indicative of the absence of abnormal perfusion foci.Perfusion abnormalities are a major cause of epileptic discharge, and the existence of abnormal perfusion foci implies possible relapse.Very little is known about perfusion abnormality repair in epilepsy.The present study selected 43 cases of idiopathic epilepsy under antiepileptic drug control for an average of 24 months.Comparisons between interictal single-photon emission CT (SPECT)images and long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) pre- and post-treatment showed that cases of normal SPECT increased by 48% (12/25) following treatment, with a total number of 15 reduced foci (36%, 15/41).Perfusion foci, i.e., region of interest, were altered following treatment.These changes included:normal to abnormal in 3 cases (7%, 3/43; 2 hyperperfusion and 1 hypoperfusion); abnormal to normal in 14 cases (32%, 14/43; 10 pre-treatment hypoperfusion and 4 hyperperfusion); abnormal to abnormal in 7 cases (16%, 7/43; hyperperfusion to hypoperfusion in 5 cases, hypoperfusion to hyperperfusion in 2 cases).Long-term EEG revealed in an increase in the number of normal cases by 20 (40%, 20/39), and there were 25 fewer cases with epileptiform discharges (66%, 25/38).These findings demonstrate that long-term control of anti-epileptic drugs partially repaired cerebral perfusion abnormalities and reduced epileptiform discharges in idiopathic epilepsy.

  16. Posterior reversibile encephalopathic syndrom: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Branko B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1 ]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3,4]. In majority of cases changes are localize in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localized in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. CASE REPORT Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dedinje" two months after succesfull aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid. After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours and iv. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure. Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1 a, b, c. There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f. Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the

  17. Parameters in three-dimensional osteospheroids of telomerized human mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells grown on osteoconductive scaffolds that predict in vivo bone-forming potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Larsen, Kenneth H;

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (hMSC-telomerase re......Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (h...... many characteristics of in vivo bone formation, providing a highly reproducible and resourceful platform for improved in vitro modeling of osteogenesis and refinement of bone tissue engineering....

  18. Factors affecting the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species tree in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    González Víctor; Castillo-Ramírez Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background As originally defined, orthologous genes implied a reflection of the history of the species. In recent years, many studies have examined the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species trees in bacteria. These studies have produced contradictory results that may have been influenced by orthologous gene misidentification and artefactual phylogenetic reconstructions. Here, using a method that allows the detection and exclusion of false positives during identificat...

  19. Skills in the Marketplace: Individual Characteristics and Bargaining Ability in a Field-Based Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Fiala, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Classic economic theory predicts that markets will clear, leaving little or no gains from trade left on the table. Laboratory experiments have largely confirmed this, though the results of recent field experiments have been mixed, with some artefactual markets in developing countries performing relatively inefficiently. I create a realistic multi-round trading market in Uganda with market-experienced individuals to explore the efficiency of trading and test what individual traits predict mark...

  20. Can Farmers Create Efficient Information Networks? Experimental Evidence from Rural India

    OpenAIRE

    A. Stefano Caria; Marcel Fafchamps

    2015-01-01

    We run an artefactual field experiment in rural India which tests whether farmers can create efficient networks in a repeated link formation game, and whether group categorization results in homophily and loss of network efficiency. We find that the efficiency of the networks formed in the experiment is significantly lower than the efficiency which could be achieved under selfish, rational play. Many individual decisions are consistent with selfish rationality and with a concern for overall w...

  1. Needs for animal models of human diseases of the respiratory system.

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    Animal models are of two types those that occur spontaneously and those that the scientist produces by artefact. One value of spontaneously occurring models is that if pathogenetic mechanisms are identified, they give new leads for the study of human disease. There is a need for spontaneously occurring examples of so-called primary or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension (arterial or venous), and emphysema. Acquired or artefactual models of each of these conditions are availa...

  2. FAVR (Filtering and Annotation of Variants that are Rare): methods to facilitate the analysis of rare germline genetic variants from massively parallel sequencing datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Bernard J; Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Odefrey, Fabrice; Hammet, Fleur; Bell, Russell; Tao, Kayoko; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Goldgar, David E; Lonie, Andrew; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Characterising genetic diversity through the analysis of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) data offers enormous potential to significantly improve our understanding of the genetic basis for observed phenotypes, including predisposition to and progression of complex human disease. Great challenges remain in resolving genetic variants that are genuine from the millions of artefactual signals. Results FAVR is a suite of new methods designed to work with commonly used MPS analysis pi...

  3. English as a Foreign Language and Technological Artefacts in School and out of School

    OpenAIRE

    Cabot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Research Question The main purpose of this Master’s thesis was to map and analyse important learning ecologies of English learners at school and out of school. The main research question was: What role do digital and non-digital artefacts and ‘agency’ play in upper secondary students’ self-perceived trajectories of English learning ecologies in the past, present and future? Questions on artefactual (technology), interpersonal (pedagogy) and language learning (content) oriented ...

  4. A note on environmental aspects of penaeid shrimp biology and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Serge

    1984-01-01

    Shrimps are short-lived animals living in highly variable inshore areas during the juvenile phase and are therefore subject to particularly strong environmentally driven variability in recruitment and stock size. This paper examines the likely consequences of this fact on the surplus yield production and stock-recruitment modelling underlining the high risk of generating artefactual models when the data series are short. (Résumé d'auteur)

  5. Risk Preferences and Pesticide Use by Cotton Farmers in China

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Liu; JiKun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Despite insect-resistant Bt cotton has been lauded for its ability to reduce the use of pesticides, studies have shown that Chinese Bt cotton farmers continue to use excessive amounts of pesticides. Using results from a survey and an artefactual field experiment, we find that farmers who are more risk averse use greater quantities of pesticides. We also find that farmers who are more loss averse use lesser quantities of pesticides. This result is consistent with our conceptual framework and s...

  6. Pseudogene-derived small interfering RNAs regulate gene expression in mouse oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Oliver H.; Aravin, Alexei A.; Stein, Paula; Girard, Angelique; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Hodges, Emily; Anger, Martin; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Schultz, Richard M.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudogenes populate the mammalian genome as remnants of artefactual incorporation of coding messenger RNAs into transposon pathways1. Here we show that a subset of pseudogenes generates endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in mouse oocytes. These endo-siRNAs are often processed from double-stranded RNAs formed by hybridization of spliced transcripts from protein-coding genes to antisense transcripts from homologous pseudogenes. An inverted repeat pseudogene can also generate abund...

  7. MRI and SPECT findings as a predictive factor for postencephalitic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationship between postencephalitic epilepsy and acute phase symptoms, CSF, EEG and MRI findings was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Thirteen of 34 patients manifestated epilepsy including four intractable cases. Women (7/11), herpes simplex virus (6/7), seizures in acute phase (12/18), abnormal findings or MRI (6/7) were statistically significant. Four of nine patients with hyperperfusion area by HMPAO-SPECT in acute phase and two of three patients with hypoperfusion area by IMP-SPECT in recovery phase had epilepsy. Hyperperfusion in acute phase reflected acute seizures and inflammations, whereas hypoperfusion in the recovery phase reflected hypometabolism caused by brain damage. These findings suggest epileptogenicity, MRI and SPECT findings may predict prognosis of postencephalitic epilepsy. (author)

  8. MRI and SPECT findings as a predictive factor for postencephalitic epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Tanaka, Chiharu; Sako, Kazuya; Murakami, Nobuto; Nihira, Atsuko [Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Relationship between postencephalitic epilepsy and acute phase symptoms, CSF, EEG and MRI findings was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Thirteen of 34 patients manifestated epilepsy including four intractable cases. Women (7/11), herpes simplex virus (6/7), seizures in acute phase (12/18), abnormal findings or MRI (6/7) were statistically significant. Four of nine patients with hyperperfusion area by HMPAO-SPECT in acute phase and two of three patients with hypoperfusion area by IMP-SPECT in recovery phase had epilepsy. Hyperperfusion in acute phase reflected acute seizures and inflammations, whereas hypoperfusion in the recovery phase reflected hypometabolism caused by brain damage. These findings suggest epileptogenicity, MRI and SPECT findings may predict prognosis of postencephalitic epilepsy. (author)

  9. Life-threatening hypersplenism due to idiopathic portal hypertension in early childhood: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duck Christina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH is a disorder of unknown etiology and is characterized clinically by portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism accompanied by pancytopenia. This study evaluates the pathogenic concept of the disease by a systematic review of the literature and illustrates novel pathologic and laboratory findings. Case Presentation We report the first case of uncontrolled splenic hyperperfusion and enlargement with subsequent hypersplenism leading to life-threatening complications of IPH in infancy and emergent splenectomy. Conclusions Our results suggest that splenic NO and VCAM-1, rather than ET-1, have a significant impact on the development of IPH, even at a very early stage of disease. The success of surgical interventions targeting the splenic hyperperfusion suggests that the primary defect in the regulation of splenic blood flow seems to be crucial for the development of IPH. Thus, beside other treatment options splenectomy needs to be considered as a prime therapeutic option for IPH.

  10. Coexistence of Epileptic Nocturnal Wanderings and an Arachnoid Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L.; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Ávila-Ordoñez, Mario U.

    2007-01-01

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side.

  11. Small-for-size syndrome in adult-to-adult living-related liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salvatore; Gruttadauria; Duilio; Pagano; Angelo; Luca; Bruno; Gridelli

    2010-01-01

    Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) in adult-to-adult living-related donor liver transplantation (LRLT) remains the greatest limiting factor for the expansion of segmental liver transplantation from either cadaveric or living donors. Portal hyperperfusion, venous pathology, and the arterial buffer response signif icantly contribute to clinical and histopathological manifestations of SFSS. Here, we review the technical aspects of surgical and radiological procedures developed to treat SFSS in LRLT, along with the...

  12. Frequencies and implications of discordant findings of interictal SPECT and itcal SPECT in patients with intractable epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interictal SPECT could be used at best as a reference image to ictal SPECT, and cause sometimes confusion if it had given unexplained discordant findings from ictal SPECT. We investigated implications of discordant findings which occurred in 26 among 268 which found their epileptogenic zones using ictal EEG and/or operative outcome. Sensitivity of interictal SPECT was only 36%. Among these 268, 69 patients had no structural lesions on MR, 14 of whom had decreased perfusion on interictal SPECT (8 trues and 6 falses (adjacent or contralateral)). Structural lesion were found in 199 on MR, 103 of whom had decreased perfusion (89 trues and 14 falses). Among 26 having discordant cases, 10 interictal SPECT were proved wrong after operation and/or invasive EEG and the other 16 were on speculation using PET and ictal EEG. Ictal hyperperfusion was observed in 14 patients in these interictal SPECT. Six ictal studies were found postictal accompanied by contralateral propagation or not. Two patients had dual pathology, and the remaining 2 unknown. Interictal SPECT was done on the 2nd day after ictal study(24), the 3rd day (18), the 4th day(16), the 5th day (23). Four among 24 interictal studies (17%) of the 2nd day and the other 4 among 57 of 3rd to 5th day revealed ictal hyperperfusion on interictal SPECT. Six interictal studies (2.7% among 221) acquired on the indifferent day showed also ictal hyperperfusion. We could suggest that the next day is not desirable for interictal SPECT after ictal study, as ictal hyperperfusion on interictal study confounded more than postictal findings of ictal SPECT in the discrete localization than reassuring ictal study

  13. Predictive values of F-18-FDG PET and ictal SPECT to find epileptogenic zones in cryptogenic neocortical epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though cumulated reported sensitivity were 33% (F-18-FDG PET) and 81%(ictal SPECT) in neocortical epilepsy, positive predictive values rather than sensitivity should be referred if we wish to know the reliability of positive findings to predict epileptogenic zones. In cryptogenic neocortical epilepsy which did not have structural lesions on MR, we tried to find performance of F-18-FDG PET and ictal SPECT to find epileptogenic zones. In 77 patients who had no lesion on MR and who were suspected to have neocortical epilepsy on video monitored EEG, ictal SPECT were done in 44 patients and F-18-FDG PET were done in 70 patients. Invasive study and operation was done in 24 patients. The most hyper perfused area or prominently hypometabolic area was suspected to be epileptogenic on ictal SPECT or F-18-FDG PET, respectively. We could find zones of ictal hyperperfusion in 34/44(78%) patients. Positive predictive values of ictal hyperperfusion were 58%, 60%, and 12.5% in frontal lobes (n=12), lateral temporal lobes (20), and parietal lobes (8). We could find hypometabolic areas in 50/70(76%) patients. Positive predictive values of hypometabolism were 78%, 71%, 33%, and 25% in frontal lobes (9), lateral temporal lobes (28), parietal lobes (3) and occipital lobes (4). Among 24 patients who were operated, 17 patients were followed up more than 7 months (15 ± 5). Thirteen patients improved (10 : Engel class I or II, 2: 90% reduction, 1: 75% reduction but multifocal). Five among 11 PET studies were correct, 3 among 10 SPECT studies, and 6 among 11 PET/SPECT studies (55%) were correct for localization. In conclusion, three fourths of patients gave positive results to localized epileptogenic zones in cryptogenic neocortical epilepsy, and predictive values of ictal hyperperfusion or interictal hypometabolism were highest in frontal or lateral temporal lobes if these lobes were found to be culprit though rapid ictal propagation of cortical hyperperfusion confounded the exact

  14. An a contrario approach for the detection of patient-specific brain perfusion abnormalities with arterial spin labelling

    OpenAIRE

    Maumet, Camille; Maurel, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Barillot, Christian

    2016-01-01

    International audience In this paper, we introduce a new locally multivariate procedure to quantitatively extract voxel-wise patterns of abnormal perfusion in individual patients. This a contrario approach uses a multivariate metric from the computer vision community that is suitable to detect abnormalities even in the presence of closeby hypo- and hyper-perfusions. This method takes into account local information without applying Gaussian smoothing to the data. Furthermore, to improve on ...

  15. The Performance of Ictal Brain SPECT Localizing for Epileptogenic Zone in Neocortical Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epileptogenic zones should be localized precisely before surgical resection of these zones in intractable epilepsy. The localization is more difficult in patients with neocortical epilepsy than in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. This study aimed at evaluation of the usefulness of ictal brain perfusion SPECT for the localization of epileptogenic zones in neocortical epilepsy. We compared the performance of ictal SPECT with MRI referring to ictal scalp electroencephalography (sEEG). Ictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT were done in twenty-one patients. Ictal EEG were also obtained during video monitoring. MRI were reviewed. According to the ictal sEEG and semiology, 8 patients were frontal lobe epilepsy, 7 patients were lateral temporal lobe epilepsy, 2 patients were parietal lobe epilepsy, and 4 patients were occipital lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in 14 patients(67%) in the zones which were suspected to be epileptogenic according to ictal EEG and semiology. MRI found morphologic abnormalities in 9 patients(43%). Among the 12 patients, in whom no epileptogenic zones were revealed by MR1, ictal SPECT found zones of hyperperfusion concordant with ictal sEEG in 9 patients(75%). However, no zones of hyperperfusion were found in 4 among 9 patients who were found to have cerebromalacia, abnormal calcification and migration anomaly in MRI. We thought that ictal SPECT was useful for localization of epileptogenic zones in neocortical epilepsy and especially in patients with negative findings in MRI.

  16. Focal hemodynamic patterns of status epilepticus detected by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aellen, Jerome; Kottke, Raimund; Springer, Elisabeth; Weisstanner, Christian; El-Koussy, Marwan; Schroth, Gerhard; Wiest, Roland; Gralla, Jan; Verma, Rajeev K. [University of Bern, University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Bern and Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar [University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Buerki, Sarah E. [Inselspital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate pathological findings in the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of patients experiencing convulsive (CSE) or non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focal hyperperfusion in the acute setting. Twelve patients (six with NCSE confirmed by electroencephalogram (EEG) and six patients with CSE with seizure event clinically diagnosed) underwent MRI in this acute setting (mean time between onset of symptoms and MRI was 3 h 8 min), including SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI sequences were retrospectively evaluated and compared with EEG findings (10/12 patients), and clinical symptoms. Twelve out of 12 (100 %) patients showed a focal parenchymal area with pseudo-narrowed cortical veins on SWI, associated with focal hyperperfused areas (increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) shortening), and cortical DWI restriction in 6/12 patients (50 %). Additionally, these areas were associated with ictal or postical EEG patterns in 8/10 patients (80 %). Most frequent acute clinical findings were aphasia and/or hemiparesis in eight patients, and all of them showed pseudo-narrowed veins in those parenchymal areas responsible for these symptoms. In this study series with CSE and NCSE patients, SWI showed focally pseudo-narrowed cortical veins in hyperperfused and ictal parenchymal areas. Therefore, SWI might have the potential to identify an ictal region in CSE/NCSE. (orig.)

  17. Focal hemodynamic patterns of status epilepticus detected by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate pathological findings in the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of patients experiencing convulsive (CSE) or non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focal hyperperfusion in the acute setting. Twelve patients (six with NCSE confirmed by electroencephalogram (EEG) and six patients with CSE with seizure event clinically diagnosed) underwent MRI in this acute setting (mean time between onset of symptoms and MRI was 3 h 8 min), including SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI sequences were retrospectively evaluated and compared with EEG findings (10/12 patients), and clinical symptoms. Twelve out of 12 (100 %) patients showed a focal parenchymal area with pseudo-narrowed cortical veins on SWI, associated with focal hyperperfused areas (increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) shortening), and cortical DWI restriction in 6/12 patients (50 %). Additionally, these areas were associated with ictal or postical EEG patterns in 8/10 patients (80 %). Most frequent acute clinical findings were aphasia and/or hemiparesis in eight patients, and all of them showed pseudo-narrowed veins in those parenchymal areas responsible for these symptoms. In this study series with CSE and NCSE patients, SWI showed focally pseudo-narrowed cortical veins in hyperperfused and ictal parenchymal areas. Therefore, SWI might have the potential to identify an ictal region in CSE/NCSE. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5±3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis

  19. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul national University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5{+-}3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis.

  20. Evaluation of seizure propagation on ictal brain SPECT using statistical parametric mapping in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ictal brain SPECT has a high diagnostic sensitivity exceeding 90 % in the localization of seizure focus, however, it often shows increased uptake within the extratemporal areas due to early propagation of seizure discharge. This study aimed to evaluate seizure propagation on ictal brian SPECT in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Twenty-one patients (age 27.14 5.79 y) with temporal lobe epilepsy (right in 8, left in 13) who had successful seizure outcome after surgery and nine normal control were included. The data of ictal and interictal brain SPECT of the patients and baseline SPECT of normal control group were analyzed using automatic image registration and SPM96 softwares. The statistical analysis was performed to compare the mean SPECT image of normal group with individual ictal SPECT, and each mean image of the interictal groups of the right or left TLE with individual ictal scans. The t statistic SPM [t] was transformed to SPM [Z] with a threshold of 1.64. The statistical results were displayed and rendered on the reference 3 dimensional MRI images with P value of 0.05 and uncorrected extent threshold p value of 0.5 for SPM [Z]. SPM data demonstrated increased uptake within the epileptic lesion in 19 patients (90.4 %), among them, localized increased uptake confined to the epileptogenic lesion was seen in only 4 (19%) but 15 patients (71.4%) showed hyperperfusion within propagation sites. Bi-temporal hyperperfusion was observed in 11 out of 19 patients (57.9%, 5 in the right and 6 in the left); higher uptake within the lesion than contralateral side in 9, similar activity in 1 and higher uptake within contralateral lobe in one. Extra-temporal hyperperfusion was observed in 8 (2 in the right, 3 in the left, 3 in bilateral); unilateral hyperperfusion within the epileptogenic temporal lobe and extra-temporal area in 4, bi-temporal with extra-temporal hyperperfusion in remaining 4. Ictal brain SPECT is highly

  1. Automatic Denoising of Functional MRI Data: Combining Independent Component Analysis and Hierarchical Fusion of Classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Beckmann, Christian F.; Glasser, Matthew F.; Griffanti, Ludovica; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many sources of fluctuation contribute to the fMRI signal, and this makes identifying the effects that are truly related to the underlying neuronal activity difficult. Independent component analysis (ICA) - one of the most widely used techniques for the exploratory analysis of fMRI data - has shown to be a powerful technique in identifying various sources of neuronally-related and artefactual fluctuation in fMRI data (both with the application of external stimuli and with the subject “at rest...

  2. The Flynn Effect: An Alert to Clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Jamuna, N

    2004-01-01

    Every 30 years or so, there is an increase of approximately 10-20 points in the population IQ; this appears to be a universal finding. Known as the Flynn effect, it is regarded as a largely artefactual situation because there is no evidence for a true transgenerational increase in intelligence. The Flynn effect makes problematic, the use of IQ tests to compare individuals across generations and the use of IQ tests, the norms of which were obtained in previous decades. The Flynn effect is impo...

  3. Arqueología del valle inferior del río Colorado: El sitio La Primavera

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Bayón; Martínez, Gustavo A; Gabriela Armentano; Clara Scabuzzo

    2004-01-01

    Se presentan los principales resultados de las investigaciones arqueológicas llevadas a cabo en el sitio La Primavera (Partido de Villarino, provincia de Buenos Aires). El sitio fue hallado en 1997 cuando, durante la canalización del campo, huesos humanos y otros restos arqueológicos fueron removidos de su posición estratigráfica y quedaron expuestos. A partir de la información recuperada de transectas y de sondeos estratigráficos, se discute la distribución artefactual superficial, la delimi...

  4. Enthalpy–entropy compensation: a phantom phenomenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Athel Cornish-Bowden

    2002-03-01

    Enthalpy–entropy compensation is the name given to the correlation sometimes observed between the estimates of the enthalpy and entropy of a reaction obtained from temperature-dependence data. Although the mainly artefactual nature of this correlation has been known for many years, the subject enjoys periodical revivals, in part because of the frequent excellence of the correlation. As with other cases of impossibly good correlation between two biological variables, the explanation is that what purports to be two variables are very largely the same variable looked at in two different ways.

  5. The Differential Effects of Thalamus and Basal Ganglia on Facial Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Crystal C. Y.; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Yip, James T. H.; King, Kristin E.; Li, Leonard S. W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined if subcortical stroke was associated with impaired facial emotion recognition. Furthermore, the lateralization of the impairment and the differential profiles of facial emotion recognition deficits with localized thalamic or basal ganglia damage were also studied. Thirty-eight patients with subcortical strokes and 19 matched…

  6. Cortical deafness in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tabira, T.; Tsuji, S; Nagashima, T; T. Nakajima; Kuroiwa, Y

    1981-01-01

    Cortical deafness in a patient with multiple sclerosis is reported. Complete recovery from total deafness was seen following stages of auditory agnosia and pure word deafness. The otological and neurophysiological studies suggested lesions in subcortical white matter. This report stresses the rarity of the condition, its subcortical origin and good prognosis.

  7. The development of children's regret and relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Daniel P; Beck, Sarah R

    2012-01-01

    Previous research found that children first experience regret at 5 years and relief at 7. In two experiments, we explored three possibilities for this lag: (1) relief genuinely develops later than regret; (2) tests of relief have previously been artefactually difficult; or (3) evidence for regret resulted from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N=162 4- to 7-year-olds) children chose one of two cards that led to winning or losing tokens. Children rated their happiness then saw a better (regret) or worse (relief) alternative. Children re-rated their happiness. Regret after winning was first experienced at 4, regret after losing and relief after winning were experienced at 5 years and relief after losing at 7 years. Experiment 2 (N=297 5- to 8-year-olds) used a similar task but manipulated children's responsibility for the outcome. Greater responsibility for the outcome resulted in a greater likelihood of an experience of regret and relief. Results support that previous tests of relief were artefactually difficult and regret and relief are experienced earlier than previously thought. PMID:22077850

  8. Determination of benzene in different food matrices by distillation and isotope dilution HS-GC/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is classified by the IARC as carcinogenic to humans. Several sources may contribute for the occurrence of benzene in foods, such as, environmental contamination and the reaction of benzoate salts with ascorbic acid (naturally present or added as food additives). Matrix effect on benzene recovery (e.g. in fatty foods) and artefactual benzene formation from benzoate during analysis in the presence of ascorbate are some of the challenges presented when determining benzene in a wide range of foodstuffs. Design of experiment (DOE) was used to determine the most important variables in benzene recovery from headspace GC/MS. Based on the results of the DOE, a versatile method for the extraction of benzene from all kind of food commodities was developed. The method which consisted of distillation and isotope dilution HS-GC/MS was in-house validated. Artefactual benzene was prevented by addition of a borate buffer solution (pH 11) under distillation conditions. The method presented in this study allows the use of a matrix-independent calibration with detection limits below the legal limit established by the European Council for benzene in drinking water (1 μg L-1).

  9. Correlation between chronological variables of the epileptic seizures and ictal perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ictal SPECT has a high sensitivity to localise the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE). Much is already known about timing of postictal perfusional patterns, while little data analysing ictal perfusion patterns under a chronological frame exists. This study addresses the issue of typical and atypical perfusion patterns in temporal lobes and correlates them with ictal chronological variables. We prospectively evaluated 53 patients (pts) with unilateral TLE through Video-EEG, MRI, ictal, postictal and interictal SPECT, neuropsychological, social and psychiatric evaluations. All patients underwent antero-mesial temporal lobectomy and had a good post surgical seizure outcome. We analysed 51 ictal and 2 postictal scans: 41 pts (77%) showed typical perfusional patterns (TPP, ie, ictal hyperperfusion or postictal hypoperfusion ipsilateral to the EZ); 12 pts (23%) exhibited atypical perfusion patterns (ATT): 7 pts (13%) with bitemporal hyperperfusion (4 pts showed asymmetric predominantly ipsilateral changes), other 4 pts (8%) had contralateral hyperperfusion (associated to ipsilateral hypoperfusion) and 1 patient (2%) had a normal ictal SPECT scan. The earlier injection group (up to 30 sec from seizure onset) had a greater percentage of TPP (p<0,05). There was a significantly greater ictal electroencephalographic pattern exceeding radionuclide injection in TPP than APP group (p<0,04). Later acquisition of SPECT images (between 2 and 6 hours after injection) did not influence the sensitivity of the SPECT. Ictal perfusion patterns in TLE needs detailed morphological analysis to determine TPP and APP. After electro-clinical correlation, APP discloses conspicuous findings that can also render them lateralising information of EZ. Early injection of radionuclide resulted in a greater percentage of TPP. Later SPECT acquisitions had similar sensitivity to the earlier ones. Finally, greater exceeding time of ictal EEG after radionuclide

  10. Precortical Phase of Alzheimer's Disease (AD)-Related Tau Cytoskeletal Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Grinberg, Lea T; Bohl, Jürgen; Wharton, Stephen B; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Rüb, Udo

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most frequent progressive neuropsychiatric disorder worldwide leading to dementia. We systematically investigated the presence and extent of the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology in serial thick tissue sections through all subcortical brain nuclei that send efferent projections to the transentorhinal and entorhinal regions in three individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage 0 cortical cytoskeletal pathology and fourteen individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage I cortical cytoskeletal pathology by means of immunostainings with the anti-tau antibody AT8. These investigations revealed consistent AT8 immunoreactive tau cytoskeletal pathology in a subset of these subcortical nuclei in the Braak and Braak AD stage 0 individuals and in all of these subcortical nuclei in the Braak and Braak AD stage I individuals. The widespread affection of the subcortical nuclei in Braak and Braak AD stage I shows that the extent of the early subcortical tau cytoskeletal pathology has been considerably underestimated previously. In addition, our novel findings support the concept that subcortical nuclei become already affected during an early 'pre-cortical' evolutional phase before the first AD-related cytoskeletal changes occur in the mediobasal temporal lobe (i.e. allocortical transentorhinal and entorhinal regions). The very early involved subcortical brain regions may represent the origin of the AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology, from where the neuronal cytoskeletal pathology takes an ascending course toward the secondarily affected allocortex and spreads transneuronally along anatomical pathways in predictable sequences. PMID:26193084

  11. Serial imaging in MELAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan); Oki, J. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan); Itoh, J. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan); Kusunoki, Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan); Cho, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Medical College, 4-5-3-11 Nishikagura, Asahikawa 078 (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    We report two patients with fatal mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine was more sensitive to the lesions than CT or MRI. SPECT showed focal hyperperfusion before or during the stroke and diffuse hypoperfusion of the brain, sparing the basal ganglia in the terminal stages. These findings support the theory that metabolic disturbance in the brain causes the ``stroke`` in MELAS. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ictal brain SPET during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol: a new diagnostic procedure in drug-resistant epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro; Bruno, Isabella; Di Giuda, Daniela; De Rossi, Giuseppe; Troncone, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Parbonetti, Giovanni; Colicchio, Gabriella [Department of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Functional brain imaging plays an important role in seizure focus localisation. However, truly ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies are not routinely performed owing to technical problems associated with the use of tracers and methodological and logistical difficulties. In this study we tried to resolve both of these issues by means of a new procedure: technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPET performed during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol, a well-known central and respiratory stimulant. We studied 33 drug-resistant epileptic patients. All patients underwent anamnestic evaluation, neuropsychological and psychodynamic assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal and ictal video-EEG monitoring, and interictal and ictal SPET with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD. In order to obtain truly ictal SPET, 65 mg of pentylenetetrazol was injected every 2 minutes and, immediately the seizure began, 740 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was injected. The scintigraphic findings were considered abnormal if a single area of hyperperfusion was present and corresponded to the site of a single area of hypoperfusion at interictal SPET: the ''hypo-hyperperfusion'' SPET pattern. In 27 of the 33 patients (82%), interictal-ictal SPET showed the hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern. Video-EEG showed a single epileptogenic zone in 21/33 patients (64%), and MRI showed anatomical lesions in 19/33 patients (57%). Twenty-two of the 27 patients with hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern underwent ablative or palliative surgery and were seizure-free at 3 years of follow-up. No adverse effects were noted during pharmacologically provoked seizure. It is concluded that ictal brain SPET performed during pharmacologically provoked seizure provides truly ictal images because {sup 99m}Tc-ECD is injected immediately upon seizure onset. Using this feasible procedure it is possible to localise the focus, to avoid the limitations due to the unpredictability

  13. Severe mood dysregulation: findings in cerebral SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We communicate the results of NeuroSPECT in a 9 year-old boy that presents with behavioral changes characterized by impulsivity, intolerance to frustration and increasing violent reactions. NeuroSPECT demonstrated very marked hyperfrontality and also signs of comorbility consistent with OCD and ADHD. In comparison with the bipolar database, there are differences since area 7 in posterior parietal lobe is not hyperperfused in this child, and presents slight increase in the thalamus and lentiform nuclei. Finally, increased cerebellar perfusion appears as a functional substrate that could explain the presence of behavioral changes characterized by aggressiveness and severe impulsivity

  14. Acute CT perfusion changes in seizure patients presenting to the emergency department with stroke-like symptoms: correlation with clinical and electroencephalography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine acute computed tomography perfusion (CTP) changes in seizure patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms and to correlate those changes with clinical presentation and electroencephalography (EEG). Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who presented to the emergency department with acute stroke-like symptoms and underwent CTP (n=1085) over a 5.5-year period were reviewed. Patients were included who had primary seizure as the final diagnosis, and underwent CTP within 3 hours of symptom onset. A subset of patients had a follow-up EEG within 7 days. The perfusion changes and EEG findings were compared between different clinical presentations. Results: Eighteen of 1085 patients (1.7%) who underwent CTP following an acute stroke-like presentation were included. The abnormality on CTP was usually focal, unilateral hyperperfusion — increased relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV) (n=14/18), which most often affected the temporal lobe. Those patients who presented with a motor or speech deficit (n=12) had a higher temporal lobe rCBV, and rCBF, and lower relative mean transit time (rMTT) compared to those with non-focal neurological deficit at presentation. Early EEG was available in 13 patients; a sharp-spike epileptiform EEG discharge pattern (n=5) was associated with higher temporal lobe ipsilateral rCBF and rCBV, and lower rMTT on admission CTP examination. Conclusion: Seizure patients who present with a unilateral motor or speech deficit most commonly have contralateral hyperperfusion in the corresponding eloquent brain regions on the acute-stage CTP examination. In such patients, epileptiform discharges on the early follow-up EEG are associated with ipsilateral hyperperfusion on the admission CTP. -- Highlights: •Seizure patients with stroke-mimic symptoms show contralateral hyperperfusion on acute phase CTP (<3 hours of onset). •Seizure patients with unilateral paralysis/aphasia showed asymmetric perfusion

  15. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    most indirect tests become positive at relatively small pressure gradients. Studies of cerebral blood flow at rest and during cerebral vasodilation makes it possible to identify patients with severe reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure. Such hemodynamic failure of one hemisphere may be identified...... can a significant improvement in baseline flow occur. Flow reserve determined by cerebral vasodilation, however, will improve in most patients with hemodynamic failure. In addition, some patients in the low-pressure group develop marked, but temporary, hyperperfusion after reconstruction of very high...

  16. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  17. White matter of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    White matter is found in the deeper tissues of the brain (subcortical). It contains nerve fibers (axons), which are ... or covering called myelin. Myelin gives the white matter its color. It also protects the nerve fibers ...

  18. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Hervais-Adelman

    2015-10-01

    This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1.

  19. Persistent activation of microglia is associated with neuronal dysfunction of callosal projecting pathways and multiple sclerosis-like lesions in relapsing--remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Wang, Yue; Kivisäkk, Pia;

    2007-01-01

    Cortical pathology, callosal atrophy and axonal loss are substrates of progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we describe cortical, periventricular subcortical lesions and callosal demyelination in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in SJL mice that are similar to...

  20. Social defeat stress potentiates thermal sensitivity in operant models of pain processing

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Green, Megan K.; Devine, Darragh P.; Duarte, Peter; Vierck, Charles J.; Yezierski, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Higher-order processing of nociceptive input is distributed in corticolimbic regions of the brain, including the anterior cingulate, parieto-insular and prefrontal cortices, as well as subcortical structures such as the bed nucleus of stria terminalis and amygdala. In addition to their role in pain processing, these regions encode or modulate emotional, motivational and sensory responses to stress. Thus, pain and stress pathways in the brain intersect at cortical and subcortical forebrain str...

  1. Experience-induced Malleability in Neural Encoding of Pitch, Timbre, and Timing: Implications for Language and Music

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Nina; Skoe, Erika; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Ashley, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Speech and music are highly complex signals that have many shared acoustic features. Pitch, Timbre, and Timing can be used as overarching perceptual categories for describing these shared properties. The acoustic cues contributing to these percepts also have distinct subcortical representations which can be selectively enhanced or degraded in different populations. Musically trained subjects are found to have enhanced subcortical representations of pitch, timbre, and timing. The effects of mu...

  2. Sporadic meningioangiomatosis: imaging findings with histopathologic correlations in seven patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So-Young; Eo, Hong [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ahn, Soomin [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare benign cerebral lesion. We aimed to evaluate the CT and MR features of sporadic MA, with a focus on the correlation between imaging and histopathologic findings. CT (n = 7) and MR (n = 8) images of eight patients (6 men and 2 women; mean age, 12.8 years; range, 4-22 years) with pathologically proven MA were retrospectively reviewed. After dividing the MA lesions according to their distribution into cortical and subcortical white matter components, the morphologic characteristics were analyzed and correlated with histopathologic findings in seven patients. CT and MR images showed cortical (n = 4, 50 %) and subcortical white matter (n = 7, 88 %) components of MA. All four cortical components revealed hyperattenuation on CT scan and T1 isointensity/T2 hypointensity on MR images, whereas subcortical white matter components showed hypoattenuation on CT scan and T1 hypointensity/T2 hyperintensity on MR images. Two cortical components (25 %) demonstrated enhancement and one subcortical white matter component demonstrated cystic change. Seven cases were available for imaging-histopathologic correlation. In all seven cases, the cortex was involved by MA and six patients (86 %) showed subcortical white matter involvement by MA. There were excellent correlations between the imaging and histopathologic findings in subcortical white matter components, and the accuracy was 100 % (seven of seven); whereas there were poor correlations in cortical components, and the accuracy was 43 % (three of seven). The cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter were concomitantly involved by MA. Subcortical white matter components of MA were more apparent than cortical components on CT and MR imaging. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of changes of intracranial blood flow after carotid artery stenting using digital subtraction angiography flow assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime; Wada; Masato; Saito; Kyousuke; Kamada

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the changes of intracranial blood flow after carotid artery stenting(CAS), using the flow assessment application "Flow-Insight", which was developed in our department.METHODS: Twenty patients treated by CAS participated in this study. We analyzed the change in concentration of the contrast media at the anterior-posterior and profile view image with the flow assessment application "Flow-Insight". And we compared the results with N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine-single-photon emission computed tomography(IMP SPECT) performed before and after the treatment. RESULTS: From this study, 200% of the parameter "blood flow" change in the post/pre-treatment is suggested as the critical line of the hyperperfusion syndrome arise. Although the observed blood flow increase in the digital subtraction angiography system did not strongly correlate with the rate of increase of SPECT, the "Flow-Insight" reflected the rate of change of the vessels well. However, for patients with reduced reserve blood flow before CAS, a highly elevated site was in agreement with the site analysis results. CONCLUSION: We concluded that the cerebral angiography flow assessment application was able to more finely reveal hyperperfusion regions in the brain after CAS compared to SPECT.

  4. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  5. Patterns of vascular invasion of intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma examined with angiography and angiographic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the radiological patterns of vascular invasion in peripheral cholangiocarcinomas. Hepatic arteriography and portography in 20 cases with cholangiocarcinoma including 12 cases with angiographic CT were retrospectively analyzed. The arteriography showed no arterioportal shunt, hypertrophy of tumor vessel, or tumor staining extending to central portion of the mass in all cases. However, doughnut shaped peripheral tumor staining was seen until late hepatogram phase in 12 cases and compensatory hyperperfusion around the mass was seen in six cases (eight cases if include arterial CT). Encasement of tumor vessel was seen in 12 cases, and hypertrophy of feeding vessel in nine cases. On portography, the filling defect on segmental portal branch could be demonstrated only in 11 cases. Shape of the portal defect was tapered narrowing in six cases, abrupt narrowing in two cases but intraluminal nodular filling defect was not seen. Remaining three cases were difficult to define the shape. On seven cases of CT during arterial portography, three cases showed mass shaped defect and four showed segmental defect but three of them could demonstrate the partially preserved portal flow in defective portal area. Hepatic arteriography in peripheral cholagiocarcinoma showed no evidence of hypertrophy of tumor vessels and tumor stain extending to central portion but peripheral staining on late hepatogram phase and compensatory hyperperfusion could be seen. Portal vein was more commonly involved through perivascular connective tissue invasion rather than by direct extension into the portal lumen

  6. Patterns of vascular invasion of intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma examined with angiography and angiographic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jae Chun; Cho, Hyun Cheol; Park, Won Kyu [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To evaluate the radiological patterns of vascular invasion in peripheral cholangiocarcinomas. Hepatic arteriography and portography in 20 cases with cholangiocarcinoma including 12 cases with angiographic CT were retrospectively analyzed. The arteriography showed no arterioportal shunt, hypertrophy of tumor vessel, or tumor staining extending to central portion of the mass in all cases. However, doughnut shaped peripheral tumor staining was seen until late hepatogram phase in 12 cases and compensatory hyperperfusion around the mass was seen in six cases (eight cases if include arterial CT). Encasement of tumor vessel was seen in 12 cases, and hypertrophy of feeding vessel in nine cases. On portography, the filling defect on segmental portal branch could be demonstrated only in 11 cases. Shape of the portal defect was tapered narrowing in six cases, abrupt narrowing in two cases but intraluminal nodular filling defect was not seen. Remaining three cases were difficult to define the shape. On seven cases of CT during arterial portography, three cases showed mass shaped defect and four showed segmental defect but three of them could demonstrate the partially preserved portal flow in defective portal area. Hepatic arteriography in peripheral cholagiocarcinoma showed no evidence of hypertrophy of tumor vessels and tumor stain extending to central portion but peripheral staining on late hepatogram phase and compensatory hyperperfusion could be seen. Portal vein was more commonly involved through perivascular connective tissue invasion rather than by direct extension into the portal lumen.

  7. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo, E-mail: juarezbarbara@hotmail.co [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Neurology

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  8. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p < 0.001), while perfusion imaging demonstrated hyper-perfusion in six acute MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage

  9. Consideration for the interpretation of the SISCOM in neocortical epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. K.; Chung, C. K.; Yeo, J. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study is about how to interpretate the SISCOM to improve the sensitivity of ictal SPECT. Seventy-nine cases of surgically proven neocortical epilepsy (14 FLE, 38 latTLE, 7 PLE and 20 OLE) were included. All patients performed ictal and interictal 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT before surgery. After normalization ictal-interictal SPECT subtraction were performed using both attenuation corrected (AC) and noncorrected (NC) images in each scan and coregistrated to MR template. With ictal SPECT, correct lateralization and localization was performed in 79% (62/79) and 51%(4079), respectively. In SISCOM, besides of ictal focus, bilateral ictal hyperperfusion in temporal or frontal area was frequently observed (5/15 FLE, 17/38 latTLE, 6/19 OLE). However, with the consideration of its extent and asymmetry of the hyperperfusion, lateralization could be possible in most cases. With this, SISCOM served additional localization information in 13, but in another 8, it served confusable finding. The overall sensitivity of SISCOM for localization was 57%(45/79) and it was not significant different between ictal SPECT only (McNemur test, p=ns). Also whether AC was performed or not, it did not make any significant difference in lateralization or localization for seizure focus. For improve the sensitivity, SISCOM result should be interpreted with careful consideration of its own ictal SPECT and also asymmetry of ictal perfusion changes or its propagation should be considered.

  10. Effect of injection time on postictal SPET perfusion changes in medically refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) brain imaging in epilepsy has become an increasingly important noninvasive tool in localizing the epileptogenic site. Ictal SPET demonstrates the highest localization sensitivity as compared with postictal and interictal SPET. While ictal SPET consistently reveals hyperperfusion at the epileptogenic site, postictal SPET reveals either hyper- or hypoperfusion depending on the timing of radiopharmaceutical injection. Much discussion in the literature exists about exactly when the transition from hyper- to hypoperfusion occurs at the epileptogenic site in postictal SPET. The systematic examination of two clinical variables - time of injection from seizure onset and offset - was useful in understanding postictal perfusion changes. Twenty-seven patients with medically refractory epilepsy receiving postictal and interictal SPET scans were studied. Quantitative SPET difference imaging was used to evaluate perfusion changes in relationship to injection time. Perfusion changes were found to reflect the time of injection in relation to seizure onset, but to be somewhat independent of seizure offset. Thus, the majority of patients (8/12, 67%) receiving postictal injections within 100 s after seizure onset demonstrated hyperperfusion, while all patients (15/15, 100%) receiving postictal injections more than 100 s after seizure onset showed hypoperfusion. The explanation of this phenomenon is unknown but the findings appear to parallel known changes in cerebral lactate levels. (orig.)

  11. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound to Study Relationship between Serum Uric Acid and Renal Microvascular Perfusion in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the relationship between uric acid and renal microvascular perfusion in diabetic kidney disease (DKD using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS method. Materials and Methods. 79 DKD patients and 26 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Renal function and urine protein markers were tested. DKD patients were subdivided into two groups including a normal serum uric acid (SUA group and a high SUA group. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS was performed, and low acoustic power contrast-specific imaging was used for quantitative analysis. Results. Normal controls (NCs had the highest levels of AUC, AUC1, and AUC2. Compared to the normal SUA DKD group, high SUA DKD patients had significantly higher IMAX, AUC, and AUC1 (P<0.05. DKD patients with low urinary uric acid (UUA excretion had significantly higher AUC2 compared to DKD patients with normal UUA (P<0.05. Conclusion. Hyperuricemia in DKD patients was associated with a renal ultrasound image suggestive of microvascular hyperperfusion. The CEUS parameter AUC1 holds promise as an indicator for renal microvascular hyperperfusion, while AUC2 might be a useful indicator of declining glomerular filtration rate in DKD patients with decreased excretion of uric acid.

  12. The clinical value of X-ray images of the teeth and jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklebank, Laetitia

    2003-08-01

    X-ray images of the teeth and jaws are required for a variety of diagnostic purposes to supplement a clinical examination, and are invaluable for providing pictorial information about the structures that cannot be examined with direct vision. They can be acquired using traditional film systems which produce analogue images, or using a variety of alternative image receptors which result in a digital image. Irrespective of the method of image acquisition they are utilised by the dental surgeon in order to benefit their patients' management. Numerous disease processes can affect the teeth and jaws, in addition to a range of developmental abnormalities. These can be classified according to a radiological sieve, which also includes artefactual and iatrogenic features. The key components of the classification are: developmental, inflammatory, traumatic, cystic, neoplastic, osteodystrophies and systemic disorders. This paper will utilise examples of radiographic images of patients to illustrate components of this classification which are unique to the teeth and jaws.

  13. Renewal Strings for Cleaning Astronomical Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Storkey, Amos J; Williams, Christopher K I; Mann, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Large astronomical databases obtained from sky surveys such as the SuperCOSMOS Sky Surveys (SSS) invariably suffer from a small number of spurious records coming from artefactual effects of the telescope, satellites and junk objects in orbit around earth and physical defects on the photographic plate or CCD. Though relatively small in number these spurious records present a significant problem in many situations where they can become a large proportion of the records potentially of interest to a given astronomer. In this paper we focus on the four most common causes of unwanted records in the SSS: satellite or aeroplane tracks, scratches fibres and other linear phenomena introduced to the plate, circular halos around bright stars due to internal reflections within the telescope and diffraction spikes near to bright stars. Accurate and robust techniques are needed for locating and flagging such spurious objects. We have developed renewal strings, a probabilistic technique combining the Hough transform, renewal...

  14. EDTA Dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia In A Patient With Scrub Typhus - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya P Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of EDTA induced pseudothrombocytopenia (EDTA-PTCP in a patient with scrub typhus who was referred as a case of PUO with marked thrombocytopenia and treated with platelet transfusion. Blood smear examination revealed numerous platelet aggregates. CBC analysis using citrate and lithium-heparin as anticoagulants as well as a peculiar WBC histogram aided in prompt diagnosis of the condition. The prevalence of EDTA-PTCP in general hospital population is approximately 0.1%. It is usually not associated with hemorrhagic manifestations. Hence cases of thrombocytopenia should be carefully evaluated to rule out this form of artefactual thrombocytopenia. Timely diagnosis of this innocuous but misleading in vitro phenomenon can save the patient from unnecessary transfusions and invasive procedures.

  15. Decomposition and classification of electroencephalography data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura

    This thesis is about linear and multi-linear analyses of electroencephalography (EEG) data and classification of estimated EEG sources. One contribution consists of an automatic classification method for independent components (ICs) of EEG data and a freely available implementation as an EEGLab...... plug-in, “IC Classification into Multiple Artefact Classes” (IC_MARC). Four artefact classes (blinks, heart beats, lateral eye movements, and muscle contractions), a neural class, and a mixed class (representing none or a mix of the other classes) were considered. We showed that classification is...... possible between subjects within studies over all classes. When generalising across studies a high classification rate of neural vs. non-neural ICs was retained but the multi-class performance dropped. In another study, we used IC_MARC to compare the ability to separate artefactual from neural sources of...

  16. Pseudogene-derived small interfering RNAs regulate gene expression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Oliver H; Aravin, Alexei A; Stein, Paula; Girard, Angelique; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Cheloufi, Sihem; Hodges, Emily; Anger, Martin; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Schultz, Richard M; Hannon, Gregory J

    2008-05-22

    Pseudogenes populate the mammalian genome as remnants of artefactual incorporation of coding messenger RNAs into transposon pathways. Here we show that a subset of pseudogenes generates endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in mouse oocytes. These endo-siRNAs are often processed from double-stranded RNAs formed by hybridization of spliced transcripts from protein-coding genes to antisense transcripts from homologous pseudogenes. An inverted repeat pseudogene can also generate abundant small RNAs directly. A second class of endo-siRNAs may enforce repression of mobile genetic elements, acting together with Piwi-interacting RNAs. Loss of Dicer, a protein integral to small RNA production, increases expression of endo-siRNA targets, demonstrating their regulatory activity. Our findings indicate a function for pseudogenes in regulating gene expression by means of the RNA interference pathway and may, in part, explain the evolutionary pressure to conserve argonaute-mediated catalysis in mammals. PMID:18404147

  17. Experimental tumor systems: standardization of endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental tumors that are available to research workers and the assay techniques used in measuring their response to therapy are reviewed. The criteria necessary for choosing an appropriate model are discussed in terms of tumor origin, its transplantation history, the presence or absence of artefactual immunity and the site chosen for transplantation. It is recommended that more attention should be paid to the choice of a tumor before any series of experiments is begun. Many suitable rodent tumors are now available. The advantages and disadvantages of human tumors grown as xenografts are discussed. The techniques for measuring tumor response are divided into 2 groups: in situ assays which can also be applied to human tumors in the clinic, and clonogenic assays which involve tests of reproductive capacity of cells removed from the treated hosts. The merits of survival time, regrowth delay, local control and loss of an incorporated label are compared and contrasted with those of cell survival assays

  18. More consistently altered connectivity patterns for cerebellum and medial temporal lobes than for amygdala and striatum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning ePeters

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain architecture can be divided into a cortico-thalamic system and modulatory ‘subcortical-cerebellar’ systems containing key structures such as striatum, medial temporal lobes (MTLs, amygdala, and cerebellum. Subcortical-cerebellar systems are known to be altered in schizophrenia. In particular, intrinsic functional brain connectivity (iFC between these systems has been consistently demonstrated in patients. While altered connectivity is known for each subcortical-cerebellar system separately, it is unknown whether subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns with the cortico-thalamic system are comparably altered across systems, i.e., if separate subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns are consistent across patients. Methods: To investigate this question, 18 patients with schizophrenia (3 unmedicated, 15 medicated with atypical antipsychotics and 18 healthy controls were assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed cortical intrinsic brain networks (NWs with time courses representing proxies for cortico-thalamic system activity. Subcortical-cerebellar systems’ activity was represented by fMRI-based time courses of selected regions-of-interest (ROIs (i.e., striatum, MTL, amygdala, cerebellum. Correlation analysis among ROI- and NWs-time courses yielded individual connectivity matrices (i.e. connectivity between NW and ROIs (allROIs-NW, separateROI-NW, only NWs (NWs-NWs, and only ROIs (allROIs-allROIs as main outcome measures, which were classified by support-vector-machine-based leave-one-out cross-validation. Differences in classification accuracy were statistically evaluated for consistency across subjects and systems. Results: Correlation matrices based on allROIs-NWs yielded 91% classification accuracy, which was significantly superior to allROIs-allROIs and NWs-NWs (56% and 74%, respectively. Considering separate

  19. Evaluation of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome with [99mTc] HMPAO Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GLTS) is a disorder characterized by tics and several behavioral disturbances. Although GLTS is a relatively common disorder, little is known about its pathophysiology. Previous studies with SPECT and PET were performed in a small number of patients and have shown some discordant data. The aim of this study is to evaluate brain perfusion abnormalities in patients with GLTS and to correlate them with the clinical manifestations of the syndrome. Twenty-eight patients were submitted to brain [99mTc]-HMPAO SPECT. 82 percent of the patients had abnormal studies. The most frequent finding was perfusion abnormalities in the thalami in 16 patients (57 percent) and 85 percent of patients with hyperperfusion of one or both thalami had complex motor tics. This investigation has demonstrated that brain perfusion SPECT is able to identify cortical perfusion abnormalities, associated with clinical symptoms in patients with GLTS. These abnormalities involve the pre-frontal-striatal-thalamic-cortical pathways (Au)

  20. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq (15)O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model......Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed......, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq (15)O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion....

  1. Resting brain perfusion and selected vascular risk factors in healthy elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølby Henriksen, Otto; Jensen, Lars T; Krabbe, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    with circulating homocysteine, but not with asymmetric dimethylarginine, dyslipidemia or the carotid intima-media thickness. The relative regional brain perfusion was associated with circulating homocysteine, with a relative parietal hypoperfusion and a frontal hyperperfusion. No effect on regional brain perfusion...... was observed for any of the other risk factors. A multiple regression model including homocysteine, caffeine, hematocrit and end-tidal PCO2, explained nearly half of the observed variability. CONCLUSION: Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors influenced global cerebral perfusion variation between subjects....... Further, the results suggest that the inverse relation between homocysteine and brain perfusion is owing to other mechanisms, than reflected by asymmetric dimethylarginine, and that homocysteine may be a marker of cerebral perfusion in aging brains....

  2. Hot water epilepsy: Phenotype and single photon emission computed tomography observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the anatomical correlates of reflex hot water epilepsy (HWE using multimodality investigations viz. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, electroencephalography (EEG, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Five men (mean age: 27.0 ΁ 5.8 years with HWE were subjected to MRI of brain, video-EEG studies, and SPECT scan. These were correlated with phenotypic presentations. Seizures could be precipitated in three patients with pouring of hot water over the head and semiology of seizures was suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in: left medial temporal - one, left lateral temporal - one, and right parietal - one. Interictal SPECT was normal in all five patients and did not help in localization. MRI and interictal EEG was normal in all the patients. The clinical and SPECT studies suggested temporal lobe as the seizure onset zone in some of the patients with HWE.

  3. An a contrario approach for the detection of patient-specific brain perfusion abnormalities with arterial spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maumet, Camille; Maurel, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Barillot, Christian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new locally multivariate procedure to quantitatively extract voxel-wise patterns of abnormal perfusion in individual patients. This a contrario approach uses a multivariate metric from the computer vision community that is suitable to detect abnormalities even in the presence of closeby hypo- and hyper-perfusions. This method takes into account local information without applying Gaussian smoothing to the data. Furthermore, to improve on the standard a contrario approach, which assumes white noise, we introduce an updated a contrario approach that takes into account the spatial coherency of the noise in the probability estimation. Validation is undertaken on a dataset of 25 patients diagnosed with brain tumours and 61 healthy volunteers. We show how the a contrario approach outperforms the massively univariate general linear model usually employed for this type of analysis. PMID:27039702

  4. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found in...... cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...... µM in brain slices. In vivo recordings showed a tendency towards increased adenosine levels in rats with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation compared to a control group (3.7 ± 0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2 µM, P = 0.06). This was associated with a significant increase in ICP and CBF. Intervention with the...

  5. Correlation of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT with surface EEG, MR, and CT for noninvasive localization of seizure foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some patients with refractory seizure disorders are candidates for surgical management. Correct preoperative lateralization is essential. Of 19 patients with seizure disorders who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, 14 were considered to have ultimately had definitive localization by other means: consistently abnormal surface electroencephalogram (EEG), subdural or deep electrode EEG, EEG response to resection, abnormal histopatholgy, or grossly abnormal MR image. Lateralization with SPECT was (1) focal or regional hypoperfusion (11 patients) or (2) discrete focal hyperperfusion (one patient). Correct lateralization was obtained in ten of 14 with SPECT, nine of 14 with surface EEG, seven of 12 with MR, and one of eight with CT. Preoperative evaluation of patients with medically refractory seizures can be aided by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

  6. Angiographic, cavernosographic and clinical differences between two forms of priapism with a different prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the findings upon arteriography, cavernosography and clinical features two different kinds of priapism are differentiated: Type I ('low flow priapism') is characterized by severe blood stasis within the corpora cavernosa and reduction of arterial perfusion through compression of the deep arteries of the penis. The penis is very hard and painful upon palpation. A delay of treatment over 48 hours will result in a damage of the corpora cavernosa and impotence. Type II ('high flow priapism') is characterized by arterial hyperperfusion. Outflow obstruction is absent. The penis is erected but of an elastic consistence, pain is absent. Even with a delay of treatment of up to 6 months the corpora cavernosa remain intact, normal erectile function is preserved. (orig.)

  7. Preoperative radiological characterization of hepatic angiomyolipoma using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A hepatic angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumor of the liver composed of a mixture of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and a variable amount of adipose tissue. Differentiating them from malignant liver tumors can often be very difficult. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a large liver mass in the right lobe. The results of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were consistent with a well-demarcated adipose tissue- containing tumor, showing prolonged hyperperfusion in comparison with the surrounding liver tissue. Surgery was performed and the diagnosis of hepatic angiomyolipoma was made with histopathology. Conclusion Preoperative radiological characterization using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography may improve diagnostic accuracy of hepatic angiomyolipoma. Identification of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and adipose tissue with a positive immunohistochemical reaction for HMB-45 is the final evidence for an angiomyolipoma.

  8. Digital perfusion images for estimating redistribution of pulmonary perfusion in patients with congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For estimating redistribution of pulmonary perfusion in congestive heart failure (CHF), Tc-99m MAA pulmonary perfusion images were computerized to digital perfusion images (DPLs), and 100%-70% discount area was defined as hyperperfusion area (H). Various types of DPI were obtained from patients with various degree of CHF; however, they were simply classified into six types according to patterns of H, that is, from basal triangle to apical circle. DPIs changed according to aggravation and improvement of CHF. Patients without H in the lower zone suffered from refractory CHF, and their 2-year mortality was high (59%; 13 of 22). DPIs were useful for determining therapeutic policy and estimating prognosis of patients with CHF

  9. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Ph.d. afhandlingen omhandler sammenhængen mellem hjernens blodtilførsel (CBF) og middelarterietrykket (MAP) hos patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis. Hos raske er CBF uafhængig af MAP, hvilket kaldes CBF autoregulation. Svækket autoregulation antages at øge risikoen for cerebral hypoperfusion og...... iskæmi under episoder med lavt MAP, og for cerebral hyperperfusion og vasogent ødem ved højt MAP. CBF autoregulationen undersøgtes hos tyve voksne patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis i den tidlige sygdomsfase (<24 timer efter diagnostisk lumbalpunktur). Idet autoregulationen fandtes svækket hos...... meningitis, men retableres ved klinisk restitution. Autoregulationen kan endvidere delvis retableres ved akut hyperventilation. Fundene har potentiel betydning for valg af supportiv terapi hos patienter med meningitis....

  10. Ventilatory strategy during liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Grocott, Hilary P; Niemann, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) may be reduced by hyperventilation in the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation surgery (LTx). Conversely, the brain may be subjected to hyperperfusion during reperfusion of the grafted liver. We...... liver, ScO2 increased by 5.5% (3.8-7.3%), EtCO2 by 0.7 kPa (0.5-0.8 kPa), and VE by 0.6 L/min (0.3-0.9 L/min; all P < 0.0001). Changes in ScO2 were correlated to those in EtCO2 (Pearson r = 0.74; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: During LTx, changes in ScO2 are closely correlated to those of EtCO2. Thus, this...

  11. Presurgical evaluation of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Panigrahi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the multimodality presurgical evaluation in patients with refractory epilepsy is to establish sufficient concordance among the various investigations. There should be maximum overlap in the epileptogenic zone, the irritative zone, the ictal onset zone, the functional deficit zone and the symptomatogenic zone. The ictal and interictal electroencephalogram measures the localization of epileptiform discharges, which should be concordant with structural abnormalities noted on MRI brain and functional abnormalities in the form of a zone of hypometabolism on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, interictal single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT or hyperperfusion of the epileptogenic zone on ictal SPECT for a good surgical outcome. There should be no conflicting data from any of these studies, neuropsychological evaluation or seizure semiology.

  12. Follow-up findings in regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF)-SPECT in a case of idiopathic childhood hemidystonia. Functional neuroimaging and pathophysiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 9 1/2-year-old girl suffered from intermitting tremor and jitteriness of her left hand and oral muscles every 4 to 6 weeks with long lasting episodes. Clinically myoclonias and dystonic positioning of the left arm, hand and facial muscles were seen. No evidence of trauma, infection or inborn errors of metabolism was found. Successful therapy with carbamazepine was initiated while L-DOPA failed. An ictal 99m-Tc-HMPAO-SPECT showed severe asymmetry with focal hyperperfusion of the contralateral right thalamus and basal ganglia as well as of the bifrontal cortex, whereas no anatomical lesions were found by MRI. In contrast, an interictally performed 99m-Tc-HMPAO SPECT showed hypoperfusion or the right thalamus and normalisation of the frontal perfusion under medical treatment. These 99m-Tc-HMPAO-SPECT findings may provide new insights into the localisation and pathophysiological pathways of idiopathic childhood dystonia. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral malformation induced by prenatal X-irradiation: an autoradiographic and Golgi study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain malformations are produced after X-irradiation at different post-conceptional ages in the rat. Malformed cortical patterns result from abnormal organisation and capricious orientation of the neurons, while a radical migratory pattern of neuroblasts outwards to the cerebral cortex is preserved in animals irradiated on the fourteenth, sixteenth or eighteenth days of gestation. Migratory disturbances are restricted to the large subcortical ectopic masses found in rats irradiated on the fourteenth gestational day and to pyramidal ectopic nodules in the hippocampus in rats irradiated on the sixteenth gestational day. Subcortical ectopic masses develop from ectopic germinal rosettes and are formed by several types of cortical neuron distributed in a stereotyped pattern. The presence of large numbers of intrinsic, afferent and efferent connections are indicative of integrative functions of the subcortical masses. (author)

  14. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedj, Eric [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)]. E-mail: eric.guedj@ap-hm.fr; Taieb, David [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France); Cammilleri, Serge [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France); Lussato, David [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France); Laforte, Catherine de [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France); Niboyet, Jean [Unite d' Etude et de Traitement de la Douleur, Clinique La Phoceanne, Marseille (France); Mundler, Olivier [Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  15. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  16. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of intracerebral tuberculomas and its role in differentiating tuberculomas from metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankhe, Shilpa; Baheti, Akshay [Dept. of Radiology, Seth GS Medical Coll. and KEM Hospital, Thane (India)], e-mail: akshaybaheti@gmail.com; Ihare, Ashish; Mathur, Shobhit; Dabhade, Poonam; Sarode, Ashish [Dept. of Radiology, Seth GS Medical Coll. and KEM Hospital, Thane (India)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Intracerebral tuberculomas usually manifest as ring-enhancing of nodular lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These imaging findings are also observed in other lesions like metastases and toxoplasmosis. Purpose: To study the MRI perfusion characteristics of tuberculomas and its potential role in their definitive diagnosis. Material and Methods: Thirty-four tuberculomas were evaluated by conventional and perfusion MRI. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values of the center, peripheral wall, and perilesional neuroparenchymal tissue were calculated using rCBV maps. Ten ring-enhancing metastases were similarly evaluated and rCBV values of their peripheral walls were calculated. Results: Thirty-one of the 34 tuberculomas were ring-enhancing or conglomerate lesions and revealed hypoperfused centers with hyperperfused peripheral walls, with the mean rCBV {+-} SD being 0.42 {+-} 0.25 and 2.04 {+-} 0.61, respectively. Three nodular enhancing lesions showed predominantly homogenous hyperperfusion, with the mean rCBV measuring 2.96 {+-} 0.39 (mean {+-} SD). The perilesional neuroparenchyma was hypoperfused in both cases. The metastases revealed mean rCBV ratio of the peripheral wall to be 5.43 {+-} 2.1 (mean {+-} SD). Analysis of the values by ROC curve method revealed a cut-off value of {>=}3.745 for differentiating ring-enhancing metastases from ring-enhancing tuberculomas. Conclusion: Perfusion MR is a useful tool for the assessment of tuberculomas and can help differentiate them from neoplasms like metastases. It also has a potential role in monitoring therapy and for early detection of drug resistance.

  17. Ranking of three-phase bone scintigraphy for early diagnosis of Sudeck`s astrophy; Wertigkeit der Drei-Phasen-Skelettszintigraphie zur Fruehdiagnostik des Morbus Sudeck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, H. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany); Hahn, K. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    In a prospective study the value of the three-phase bone scintigraphy in the early diagnosis of Sudeck`s atrophy was analysed. 137 patients with the clinical suspicion on Sudeck`s atrophy in stage I were examined. By means of the clinical course and additional examinations (block response), pain experts confirmed the diagnosis separately. With the findings of hyperperfusion of all 5 phalanges, homogeneous hyperaemia of the affected hand or the foot and periarticular increased uptake of the whole extremity a reliable diagnosis of Sudeck`s atrophy was possible. The sensitivity was 95.9%, the specificity 100%. With bone scintigraphy Sudeck`s atrophy could be clearly differentiated from an inactivity atrophy. Three-phase bone scintigraphy is an excellent tool for the objective diagnosis of Sudeck`s atrophy in stage I. (orig.) [Deutsch] Analyse der Wertigkeit der Drei-Phasen-Skelettszintigraphie zur Fruehdiagnose des Morbus Sudeck in einer prospektiven Studie. 137 Patienten mit dem klinischen Verdacht auf einen Morbus Sudeck im Stadium I wurden untersucht. Die Diagnosesicherung wurde von Schmerzexperten separat anhand des klinischen Verlaufs und Zusatzuntersuchungen vorgenommen. Mit der Befundtrias Hyperperfusion aller 5 Phalangen, homogene Hyperaemie der betroffenen Hand bzw. des Fusses sowie periartikulaer vermehrter Knochenumbau der gesamten Extremitaet war szintigraphisch eine sichere Diagnose des akuten Morbus Sudeck moeglich. Die Sensitivitaet betrug 95,9%, die Spezifitaet 100%. Klinisch vom Morbus Sudeck schwer abgrenzbare Krankheitsbilder wie die Inaktivitaetsatrophie konnten szintigraphisch sicher abgegrenzt werden. Die Drei-Phasen-Skelettszintigraphie hat sich in der vorliegenden Studie somit zur Objektivierung des Morbus Sudeck im Stadium I als hervorragendes diagnostisches Instrument erwiesen. (orig.)

  18. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Eric; Taïeb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; de Laforte, Catherine; Niboyet, Jean; Mundler, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 ( p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  19. Focal and Generalized Patterns of Cerebral Cortical Veins Due to Non-Convulsive Status Epilepticus or Prolonged Seizure Episode after Convulsive Status Epilepticus – A MRI Study Using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar; Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar; Krestel, Heinz; Springer, Elisabeth; Huber, Adrian; Weisstanner, Christian; Hauf, Martinus; Gralla, Jan; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate variant patterns of cortical venous oxygenation during status epilepticus (SE) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 26 patients with clinically witnessed prolonged seizures and/or EEG-confirmed SE. All MRI exams encompassed SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI (MRI-DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We aimed to identify distinct patterns of SWI signal alterations that revealed regional or global increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and DWI restrictions. We hypothesized that SWI-related oxygenation patterns reflect ictal or postictal patterns that resemble SE or sequelae of seizures. Results Sixteen patients were examined during nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) as confirmed by EEG, a further ten patients suffered from witnessed and prolonged seizure episode ahead of imaging without initial EEG. MRI patterns of 15 of the 26 patients revealed generalized hyperoxygenation by SWI in keeping with either global or multifocal cortical hyperperfusion. Eight patients revealed a focal hyperoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF increase and three patients showed a focal deoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF decrease. Conclusions SWI-related hyper- and deoxygenation patterns resemble ictal and postictal CBF changes within a range from globally increased to focally decreased perfusion. In all 26 patients the SWI patterns were in keeping with ictal hyperperfusion (hyperoxygenation patterns) or postictal hypoperfusion (deoxygenation patterns) respectively. A new finding of this study is that cortical venous patterns in SWI can be not only focally, but globally attenuated. SWI may thus be considered as an alternative contrast-free MR sequence to identify perfusion changes related to ictal or postictal conditions. PMID:27486662

  20. Perfusion patterns in CT transit studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transit studies consist of a rapid sequence of single cross-section CT scans performed during and following the bolus injection of contrast medium into the venous system. The low vascular volume of the brain leads to small changes in attenuation thereby reflecting the perfusion of vasculature. Studies were carried out following 45 examinations on 24 stroke patients and 15 tumor patients. Hypo-, normo- and hyperperfusion were observed in different tissue categories and related to specific tissue elements. The comparison of perfusion patterns with pre-contrast CT values and enhancement after 5 min elucidates cerebral hemodynamics in hypodense to hyperdense lesions with or without damage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Cystic lesions and edema were found to have slight damage of the BBB and markedly reduced perfusion. Infarcts demonstrated, depending on their state of evolution to cystic defects or recovery to normal, hypoperfusion and extravasation of contrast medium or hyperperfusion with or without damage of the BBB. A diagnostically valuable difference between edema and infarcts was seen in the phase of stable distribution after 5 min. In most tumors hypervascularity and pathological extravasation were seen, whereby the cause of enhancement could be differentiated. Owing to the properties of the contrast medium used, and to the fact that transit times can not yet be measured, quantification of CBV and CBF was not possible. Definition of large cerebral vessels, especially in the neighbourhood of brain tumors, and the improvement in detectability of small lesions by low dose contrast injection, will be demonstrated as a spin-off of CT transit studies. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reserve in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without central neurological symptoms by means of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET with acetazolamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Bonilla, J.F.; Quirce, R.; Hernandez, A.; Vallina, N.K.; Guede, C.; Banzo, I.; Amado, J.A.; Carril, J.M. [Nuclear Medicine Service, University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain)

    2001-11-01

    The detection of subclinical abnormalities in cerebral blood flow could be of great value in identifying diabetic patients at risk of stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of semiquantified post-acetazolamide technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single-photon emission tomography ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET) in 15 diabetic patients with no clinical history of central neurological disease. After baseline {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET, a second SPET scan was acquired after activation of the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) with an injection of 1 g of acetazolamide (post-ACZ SPET). Semiquantitative analysis was made in 16 regions of interest (ROIs) drawn for each of the three supratentorial slices selected, and in two ROIs in the infratentorial slice. The CVR was calculated in each ROI by subtracting the decay-corrected baseline images from those obtained in the post-ACZ SPET and expressed as the percent increase in the average counts between the two scans. Baseline perfusion and CVR values in the study group were compared with the corresponding values in a control group. Of 750 cortical ROIs studied, 332 showed a decreased CVR (44.3%). The baseline perfusion SPET study showed hypoperfusion in 65 ROIs (8.6%) and hyperperfusion in 56 (7.4%). Of the 65 hypoperfused regions, 66.2% had a normal CVR and 33.8% had a decreased CVR, whereas of the 56 hyperperfused regions, 51.8% had a CVR within normal limits and 48.2% showed a decreased CVR. In conclusion, in comparison with baseline {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET, the ACZ activation test provided additional information in the study of cerebrovascular impairment, and allowed characterisation of the subclinical abnormalities in the population studied. The technique may therefore prove useful in evaluating future preventive strategies for stroke in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  2. Assessment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reserve in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without central neurological symptoms by means of 99mTc-HMPAO SPET with acetazolamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of subclinical abnormalities in cerebral blood flow could be of great value in identifying diabetic patients at risk of stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of semiquantified post-acetazolamide technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single-photon emission tomography (99mTc-HMPAO SPET) in 15 diabetic patients with no clinical history of central neurological disease. After baseline 99mTc-HMPAO SPET, a second SPET scan was acquired after activation of the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) with an injection of 1 g of acetazolamide (post-ACZ SPET). Semiquantitative analysis was made in 16 regions of interest (ROIs) drawn for each of the three supratentorial slices selected, and in two ROIs in the infratentorial slice. The CVR was calculated in each ROI by subtracting the decay-corrected baseline images from those obtained in the post-ACZ SPET and expressed as the percent increase in the average counts between the two scans. Baseline perfusion and CVR values in the study group were compared with the corresponding values in a control group. Of 750 cortical ROIs studied, 332 showed a decreased CVR (44.3%). The baseline perfusion SPET study showed hypoperfusion in 65 ROIs (8.6%) and hyperperfusion in 56 (7.4%). Of the 65 hypoperfused regions, 66.2% had a normal CVR and 33.8% had a decreased CVR, whereas of the 56 hyperperfused regions, 51.8% had a CVR within normal limits and 48.2% showed a decreased CVR. In conclusion, in comparison with baseline 99mTc-HMPAO SPET, the ACZ activation test provided additional information in the study of cerebrovascular impairment, and allowed characterisation of the subclinical abnormalities in the population studied. The technique may therefore prove useful in evaluating future preventive strategies for stroke in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative cerebral perfusion assessment using microscope-integrated analysis of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence angiography versus positron emission tomography in superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intraoperative qualitative indocyanine green (ICG angiography has been used in cerebrovascular surgery. Hyperperfusion may lead to neurological complications after superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA anastomosis. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate intraoperative cerebral perfusion using microscope-integrated dynamic ICG fluorescence analysis, and to assess whether this value predicts hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS after STA-MCA anastomosis. Methods: Ten patients undergoing STA-MCA anastomosis due to unilateral major cerebral artery occlusive disease were included. Ten patients with normal cerebral perfusion served as controls. The ICG transit curve from six regions of interest (ROIs on the cortex, corresponding to ROIs on positron emission tomography (PET study, was recorded. Maximum intensity (I MAX , cerebral blood flow index (CBFi, rise time (RT, and time to peak (TTP were evaluated. Results: RT/TTP, but not I MAX or CBFi, could differentiate between control and study subjects. RT/TTP correlated (|r| = 0.534-0.807; P < 0.01 with mean transit time (MTT/MTT ratio in the ipsilateral to contralateral hemisphere by PET study. Bland-Altman analysis showed a wide limit of agreement between RT and MTT and between TTP and MTT. The ratio of RT before and after bypass procedures was significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.60 ± 0.032 and 0.80 ± 0.056, respectively; P = 0.017. The ratio of TTP was also significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.64 ± 0.081 and 0.85 ± 0.095, respectively; P = 0.017. Conclusions: Time-dependent intraoperative parameters from the ICG transit curve provide quantitative information regarding cerebral circulation time with quality and utility comparable to information obtained by PET. These parameters may help predict the occurrence of postoperative

  4. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of intracerebral tuberculomas and its role in differentiating tuberculomas from metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Intracerebral tuberculomas usually manifest as ring-enhancing of nodular lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These imaging findings are also observed in other lesions like metastases and toxoplasmosis. Purpose: To study the MRI perfusion characteristics of tuberculomas and its potential role in their definitive diagnosis. Material and Methods: Thirty-four tuberculomas were evaluated by conventional and perfusion MRI. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values of the center, peripheral wall, and perilesional neuroparenchymal tissue were calculated using rCBV maps. Ten ring-enhancing metastases were similarly evaluated and rCBV values of their peripheral walls were calculated. Results: Thirty-one of the 34 tuberculomas were ring-enhancing or conglomerate lesions and revealed hypoperfused centers with hyperperfused peripheral walls, with the mean rCBV ± SD being 0.42 ± 0.25 and 2.04 ± 0.61, respectively. Three nodular enhancing lesions showed predominantly homogenous hyperperfusion, with the mean rCBV measuring 2.96 ± 0.39 (mean ± SD). The perilesional neuroparenchyma was hypoperfused in both cases. The metastases revealed mean rCBV ratio of the peripheral wall to be 5.43 ± 2.1 (mean ± SD). Analysis of the values by ROC curve method revealed a cut-off value of ≥3.745 for differentiating ring-enhancing metastases from ring-enhancing tuberculomas. Conclusion: Perfusion MR is a useful tool for the assessment of tuberculomas and can help differentiate them from neoplasms like metastases. It also has a potential role in monitoring therapy and for early detection of drug resistance

  5. Follow-up findings in regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF)-SPECT in a case of idiopathic childhood hemidystonia. Functional neuroimaging and pathophysiological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, A.; Aderbauer, J.; Segerer, H. [St. Hedwig Hospital, Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatrics; Marienhagen, J.; Bock, E.; Eilles, C. [Univ. Hospital, Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1999-05-01

    A 9 1/2-year-old girl suffered from intermitting tremor and jitteriness of her left hand and oral muscles every 4 to 6 weeks with long lasting episodes. Clinically myoclonias and dystonic positioning of the left arm, hand and facial muscles were seen. No evidence of trauma, infection or inborn errors of metabolism was found. Successful therapy with carbamazepine was initiated while L-DOPA failed. An ictal 99m-Tc-HMPAO-SPECT showed severe asymmetry with focal hyperperfusion of the contralateral right thalamus and basal ganglia as well as of the bifrontal cortex, whereas no anatomical lesions were found by MRI. In contrast, an interictally performed 99m-Tc-HMPAO SPECT showed hypoperfusion or the right thalamus and normalisation of the frontal perfusion under medical treatment. These 99m-Tc-HMPAO-SPECT findings may provide new insights into the localisation and pathophysiological pathways of idiopathic childhood dystonia. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein 9 1/2jaehriges Maedchen litt an rezidivierenden, langdauernden Schueben von Tremor und Zittern der linken Hand und der perioralen Muskulatur links. Klinisch fanden sich eine dystone Haltung des linken Armes und unerschoepfliche Myoklonien des Armes, der Hand und der Gesichtsmuskulatur links. Trauma, Infektion oder ein Stoffwechseldefekt als Ursache lagen nicht vor. Ein Therapieversuch mit L-DOPA war erfolglos. Unter Gabe von Carbamazepin wurde Beschwerdefreiheit bleibend erreicht. Ein iktuales 99m-Tc-HMPAO-SPECT zeigte eine fokale Hyperperfusion des rechtsseitigen Thalamus und der Basalganglien, sowie des bifrontalen Kortex. Ein interiktuales 99m-Tc-HMPAOSPECT ergab dann eine deutliche Hypoperfusion des rechtseitigen Thalamus bei normalisierter Perfusion des bifrontalen Kortex. Eine kranielle Magnetresonanztomographie (MRI) ergab einen unauffaelligen Befund. Der Vergleich der iktualen und interiktualen Perfusionsverhaeltnisse weist auf neue pathophysiologische Zusammenhaenge bei idiopathischer kindlicher Dystonie hin. (orig.)

  6. Revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease. Significance of peri-operative management to avoid surgical complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology, which is one of the most common causes of child-onset stroke in Japan. Surgical revascularizations, both direct and indirect procedures, prevent cerebral ischemic attack by improving cerebral blood flow, while neurological deterioration during the acute stage after revascularization is not rare. The objective of this study was to clarify the concept of revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease while considering the risk of surgical complications in the acute stage. The present study includes 19 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease aged from 2 to 14 years old (mean 8.5), who underwent superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for 32 affected hemispheres. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 1 and 7 days after surgery in all cases to evaluate hemodynamic alteration after surgery. Long-term outcome was evaluated by the neurological status 3 months after surgery, and the underlying pathology of surgical complications in the acute stage was diagnosed based on SPECT and magnetic resonance findings. In 28 of 32 hemispheres (87.5%), patients showed a complete disappearance of ischemic attack, 4 of 32 hemispheres (12.5%) showed a reduction of ischemic attack, while none showed deterioration of their symptoms (0%). Transient focal neurologic deterioration due to cerebral hyperperfusion was evident in 2 patients (6.3%), and was resolved by blood pressure lowering. One patient developed pseudo-laminar necrosis probably due to a thrombosis one week after surgery (3.1%), which did not affect his long-term outcome. STA-MCA anastomosis with pial synangiosis is a safe and effective treatment for pediatric moyamoya disease. Routine cerebral blood flow measurement in the acute stage is essential to avoid surgical complications including both cerebral ischemia and hyperperfusion. (author)

  7. A step in embryonic axis specification in Xenopus laevis is simulated by cytoplasmic displacements elicited by gravity and centrifugal force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven D.

    Determination of the body pattern in Xenopus embryos is known to involve at least six steps. One of these steps can be experimentally simulated by inclining the fertilized egg with respect to gravity or centrifugal force (10-30 g × 4 min, directed 90° to the animal-vegetal axis). In these eggs, the dorsal structures of the body axis form from the side of the egg that was uppermost in the gravitational or centrifugal field. This topography is seen even if the sperm entry point side (the prospective ventral side in control eggs) was uppermost. In addition, conjoined twin embryos form at very high frequencies in response to certain conditions of single or double centrifugation. Cytological analysis shows that the dorsal structures invariably form from the side(s) of the egg away from which vegetal cytoplasm was displaced. This is similar to the situation in the unperturbed egg, where the subcortical cytoplasm of the vegetal hemisphere rotates some 30° relative to the surface, and the dorsal structures form from the side of the egg away from which the subcortical cytoplasm moved. The displacements elicited by centrifugation probably substitute for the normal displacements brought about by the subcortical rotation. These and other data suggest that the subcortical rotation is a crucial step in the process of axis determination. The subcortical rotation is an autonomous activity of the activated egg, and can displace cytoplasm against gravity. I believe that the subcortical rotation will function normally at microgravity, and I expect that overall development and axis polarity at microgravity will be normal. This will be tested in spaceflight.

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with cyclosporine A neurotoxicity in a bone-marrow transplant recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teksam, M.; Casey, S.O.; Michel, E.; Truwit, C.L. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-03-01

    We report subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with cyclosporine A (CSA) neurotoxicity after bone-marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. CT showed occipital subarachnoid hemorrhage. MRI confirmed this, and demonstrated cortical and subcortical edema in the posterior temporal, occipital, and posterior frontal lobes bilaterally, which was typical of CSA neurotoxicity. Recognition of CSA neurotoxicity as the cause of the subarachnoid hemorrhage obviated angiographic investigation. After cessation of cyclosporine therapy, the cortical and subcortical edema resolved on follow-up MRI with some residual blood products in the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  9. Two new species of the genus Tinocladia Kylin (chordariales, phaeophyta) from Yellow Sea Coasts of china

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lanping; Lu, Baoren; Huang, Bingxin; Tseng, C. K.

    2004-03-01

    Two new species of the genus Tinocladia Kylin, T. gracilis sp. nov. and T. microsporangii sp. nov., are described. T. gracilis is characterized by its slender frond, variable size, infrequently branched medullary filaments, and short assimilating filaments with 2 7 cells. T. microsporangii is characterized by its medullary cells which are slightly larger than sub-cortical ones; narrow sub-cortical layer, usually consisting of 4 6 cells and very small unilocular sporangia. The holotypes are deposited at the Herbarium of the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, China.

  10. Two New Species of the Genus Tinocladia Kylin(Chordariales, Phaeophyta) from Yellow Sea Coasts of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁兰平; 陆保仁; 黄冰心; 曾呈奎

    2004-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Tinocladia Kylin, T. gracilis sp.nov. and T. microsporangii sp.nov., are described. T. gracilis is characterized by its slender frond, variable size, infrequently branched medullary filaments, and short assimilating filaments with 2-7 cells. T. microsporangii is characterized by its medullary cells which are slightly larger than sub-cortical ones; narrow sub-cortical layer, usually consisting of 4-6 cells and very small unilocular sporangia. The holotypes are deposited at the Herbarium of the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, China.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of Chudley-McCullough syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Teresa; Perez, Francisco A; Ishak, Gisele E; Doherty, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Chudley-McCullough syndrome (CMS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a complex brain malformation and profound congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Postnatal brain imaging findings include ventriculomegaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, inferior cerebellar dysplasia, arachnoid cysts, and malformations of cortical development including frontal subcortical heterotopia and polymicrogyria. Prenatal diagnosis of CMS is important due to the markedly less severe neurodevelopmental prognosis compared to disorders with similar brain imaging findings. We report prenatal imaging features that help distinguish CMS from other disorders, including slit-like frontal horns, agenesis of the corpus callosum, frontal subcortical heterotopia, arachnoid cysts, and cerebellar dysplasia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27312216

  12. The neurology of decreased activity: abulia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Shivani; Gokhale, Sankalp; Rebovich, Gail; Caplan, Louis R

    2011-01-01

    Delirium is sometimes defined as acute onset of either overactivity or underactivity. This article reviews the nature and clinico-anatomical locations of lesions in patients with reduced activity. The term abulia is used to describe global underactivity. Abulia is customarily explained by interruptions in frontal-subcortical circuitry. These interruptions can occur with lesions in the frontal lobes, caudate nuclei, midbrain, and thalamus. The article describes the anatomy of frontal and subcortical circuits and reviews in detail individual cases and series of patients with reduced initiative and activity who have had localized central nervous system lesions. PMID:22249571

  13. Pick 'n' mix: neuropatholgical detection of peri-tumour taupathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin

    2013-11-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat recurrent oligodendrogliomas, WHO grade 2 tumours. Potential morbitities include steroid-responsive radiation necrosis and radiation leucoencephalopathy, characterised pathologically by reactive astrogliosis, focal necrosis, demyelination, axonal loss, and clinically by progressive subcortical deficits (ataxia, amnesia, incontinence, cognitive decline), with relative sparing of cortical function. Although subcortical features may overlap with neurodegenerative conditions (eg frontotemporal dementia), focal cortical atrophy of FTD causes loss of language function in addition to memory, and specific histopathological features characterise FTD subtypes (eg Pick disease). Association between mitotic disease and tauopathy has not been reported widely, but co-existence is possible. Diagnostic accuracy may guide management.

  14. Clinical impact of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To attempt to improve surgical outcome of brain surgery, clinical significance of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during resection of brain tumors was assessed. Seventy four patients with glioma located near eloquent areas underwent surgery while awake. Intraoperative tractography-integrated functional neuronavigation and cortical/subcortical electrical stimulation were correlated with clinical symptoms during and after resection of tumors. Cortical functional areas were safely removed with negative electric stimulation and eloquent cortices could be removed in some circumstances. Subcortical functional mapping was difficult except for motor function. Studying cortical functional compensation allows more extensive removal of brain tumors located in the eloquent areas. (author)

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with cyclosporine A neurotoxicity in a bone-marrow transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with cyclosporine A (CSA) neurotoxicity after bone-marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. CT showed occipital subarachnoid hemorrhage. MRI confirmed this, and demonstrated cortical and subcortical edema in the posterior temporal, occipital, and posterior frontal lobes bilaterally, which was typical of CSA neurotoxicity. Recognition of CSA neurotoxicity as the cause of the subarachnoid hemorrhage obviated angiographic investigation. After cessation of cyclosporine therapy, the cortical and subcortical edema resolved on follow-up MRI with some residual blood products in the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow in a patient with musical hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoyama, Masaru; Ukai, Satoshi; Kitabata, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okumura, Masatoshi; Kose, Asami; Tsuji, Tomikimi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with musical hallucinations was examined using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-ECD. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after carbamazepine treatment were assessed using a three-dimensional stereotaxic ROI template. Following treatment, rCBF was decreased in the subcortical structures and increased in the global cortical regions. From our findings, we propose that rCBF values in subcortical structures represent abnormalities similar to those reported in previous reports or other psychiatric disorders, while those in cortical regions suggest background brain dysfunctions that result in generation of musical hallucinations. PMID:20391182

  17. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-29-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-29-0000 gnl|UG|Tgu#S36163076 Taeniopygia guttata clone 0057P0006B02 megalencephalic leukoencephalo...pathy with subcortical cysts 1-like mRNA, complete sequence /gb=EF191703 /gi=120431699 /ug=Tgu.3485 /len=1532 1.8 21% ...

  18. Differential diagnosis of mesiotemporal lesions: case report of neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Santos, A.; Matias, S.; Saraiva, P.; Goulao, A. [Garcia de Orta Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-09-01

    We report a clinical and imaging case of suspected herpes simplex encephalitis subsequently diagnosed as neurosyphilis based on positive antibodies in the CSF. MRI of the brain showed cortical and subcortical lesions in the mesial temporal region, septal area, insula and cingulated gyrus of the right cerebral hemisphere. Neurosyphilis should be included in the differential diagnosis of mesial temporal region lesions on MRI. (orig.)

  19. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Wojewodzka, Urszula; Gniadecki, Robert

    2008-01-01

    -labeled cholera toxin B subunit which labels ganglioside GM(1) enriched plasma membrane rafts. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced DiI vesiculation, GM(1)/DiI domain separation and was accompanied by a detachment of the subcortical cytoskeleton from the plasma membrane. Based on these...

  20. Spatio-temporal pattern of vestibular information processing after brief caloric stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelli, Vincenzo [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Department of Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: fabrizio.esposito@unina.it; Aragri, Adriana [Department of Neurological Sciences, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Furia, Teresa; Riccardi, Pasquale [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Tosetti, Michela; Biagi, Laura [I.R.C.S.S. ' Stella Maris' , Pisa (Italy); Marciano, Elio [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Di Salle, Francesco [Department of Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); I.R.C.S.S. ' Stella Maris' , Pisa (Italy); Department of Neurosciences, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Processing of vestibular information at the cortical and subcortical level is essential for head and body orientation in space and self-motion perception, but little is known about the neural dynamics of the brain regions of the vestibular system involved in this task. Neuroimaging studies using both galvanic and caloric stimulation have shown that several distinct cortical and subcortical structures can be activated during vestibular information processing. The insular cortex has been often targeted and presented as the central hub of the vestibular cortical system. Since very short pulses of cold water ear irrigation can generate a strong and prolonged vestibular response and a nystagmus, we explored the effects of this type of caloric stimulation for assessing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) dynamics of neural vestibular processing in a whole-brain event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. We evaluated the spatial layout and the temporal dynamics of the activated cortical and subcortical regions in time-locking with the instant of injection and were able to extract a robust pattern of neural activity involving the contra-lateral insular cortex, the thalamus, the brainstem and the cerebellum. No significant correlation with the temporal envelope of the nystagmus was found. The temporal analysis of the activation profiles highlighted a significantly longer duration of the evoked BOLD activity in the brainstem compared to the insular cortex suggesting a functional de-coupling between cortical and subcortical activity during the vestibular response.

  1. Spatio-temporal pattern of vestibular information processing after brief caloric stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of vestibular information at the cortical and subcortical level is essential for head and body orientation in space and self-motion perception, but little is known about the neural dynamics of the brain regions of the vestibular system involved in this task. Neuroimaging studies using both galvanic and caloric stimulation have shown that several distinct cortical and subcortical structures can be activated during vestibular information processing. The insular cortex has been often targeted and presented as the central hub of the vestibular cortical system. Since very short pulses of cold water ear irrigation can generate a strong and prolonged vestibular response and a nystagmus, we explored the effects of this type of caloric stimulation for assessing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) dynamics of neural vestibular processing in a whole-brain event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. We evaluated the spatial layout and the temporal dynamics of the activated cortical and subcortical regions in time-locking with the instant of injection and were able to extract a robust pattern of neural activity involving the contra-lateral insular cortex, the thalamus, the brainstem and the cerebellum. No significant correlation with the temporal envelope of the nystagmus was found. The temporal analysis of the activation profiles highlighted a significantly longer duration of the evoked BOLD activity in the brainstem compared to the insular cortex suggesting a functional de-coupling between cortical and subcortical activity during the vestibular response.

  2. Reduced Prefrontal Hemodynamic Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder as Measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Sawada, Masayuki; Suehiro, Yuko; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishimoto, Naoko; Negoro, Hideki; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have enabled non-invasive clarification of brain functions in psychiatric disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have suggested that the frontal cortex and subcortical structures may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disorder.…

  3. Brain structure in bipolar disorder : A longitudinal neuroimaging study in twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsman, F

    2016-01-01

    In this longitudinal twin study, the goal was to ascertain the extent to which BD shows abnormalities in subcortical and cortical brain regions at baseline and over time. Baseline assessments in this study revealed that BD was associated with smaller volumes of the thalamus, putamen and nucleus accu

  4. Multiple sclerosis, cannabis, and cognition: A structural MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Romero

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation: These results suggest that cannabis use in MS results in more widespread cognitive deficits, which correlate with tissue volume in subcortical, medial temporal, and prefrontal regions. These are the first findings demonstrating an association between cannabis use, cognitive impairment and structural brain changes in MS patients.

  5. Cognitive function impairment in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pathophysiology of dementia in MS brain MRI and PET were used, the latter to measure the metabolic activity of cortical and subcortical structures. he working hypothesis is that dementia in MS is due to differentiation of specific cortical areas. The preliminary results of this study are reported. (author).16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Hypothalamic feedforward inhibition of thalamocortical network controls arousal and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carolina Gutierrez; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Jego, Sonia; Ponomarenko, Alexey; Korotkova, Tatiana; Adamantidis, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, synchronous synaptic activity in the thalamocortical network generates predominantly low-frequency oscillations (transmission increased the duration of NREM sleep and amplitude of delta (1-4 Hz) oscillations. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TRN cells integrate subcortical arousal inputs selectively during NREM sleep and may participate in sleep intensity. PMID:26691833

  7. The ventral striatum in off-line processing: ensemble reactivation during sleep and modulation by hippocampal ripples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. Pennartz; E. Lee; J. Verheul; P. Lipa; C.A. Barnes; B.L. Mc. Naughton

    2004-01-01

    Previously it has been shown that the hippocampus and neocortex can spontaneously reactivate ensemble activity patterns during post-behavioral sleep and rest periods. Here we examined whether such reactivation also occurs in a subcortical structure, the ventral striatum, which receives a direct inpu

  8. The Roles of Sequencing and Verbal Working Memory in Sentence Comprehension Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstadt, Jesse; Nakano, Hiroko; Lieberman, Philip; Friedman, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Studies of sentence comprehension deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suggest that language processing involves circuits connecting subcortical and cortical regions. Anatomically segregated neural circuits appear to support different cognitive and motor functions. To investigate which functions are implicated in PD comprehension…

  9. Linkage of frontotemporal dementia to chromosome 17: clinical and neuropathological characterization of phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaoka, L.H.; Welsh-Bohmer, K.A.; Hulette, C. M.; Gaskell, P. C.; Murray, M.; Rimmler, J. L.; Helms, B. R.; Guerra, M; Roses, A D; Schmechel, D E; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a behavioral disorder of insidious onset and variable progression. Clinically, its early features reflect frontal lobe dysfunction characterized by personality change, deterioration in memory and executive functions, and stereotypical and perseverative behaviors. Pathologically, there is degeneration of the neocortex and subcortical nuclei, without distinctive features such as plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, or Pick or Lewy bodies. Within-family variation in neuro...

  10. The involvement of limbic structures in typical and atypical absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onat, F.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Nehlig, A.; Snead, O.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical and atypical seizures of absence epilepsy are thought to be generated by a rhythmogenic interplay between the cortex and the thalamus. However, the question remains as to which other subcortical and extrathalamic structures are involved in the pathophysiology of typical and atypical absence

  11. Neonatal tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortical, subcortical and subependymal tubers were more completely and more clearly depicted by MR than by CT and US in a 3-week-old infant. These lesions were best shown on T1-weighted images as areas of high signal intensity. (orig.)

  12. CT brainscan in incomplete Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdeigel, M.

    1987-03-01

    The CT brain scan of a 17-year-old patient with primary hyperuricaemia and mental retardation is presented. The examination demonstrates subcortical and cortical atrophy of the brain. The HGPRTase level was below normal. Clinical evidence of selfmutilation or tophi was not found. This patient's condition was interpreted as an incomplete Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

  13. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  14. The Role of the Striatum in Sentence Processing: Evidence from a Priming Study in Early Stages of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Marc; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Cesaro, Pierre; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The role of sub-cortical structures such as the striatum in language remains a controversial issue. Based on linguistic claims that language processing implies both recovery of lexical information and application of combinatorial rules it has been shown that striatal damaged patients have difficulties applying conjugation rules while lexical…

  15. Language Processing within the Striatum: Evidence from a PET Correlation Study in Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Marc; Gaura, Veronique; Demonet, Jean-Francois; Supiot, Frederic; Delliaux, Marie; Verny, Christophe; Renou, Pierre; Remy, Philippe; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The role of sub-cortical structures in language processing, and more specifically of the striatum, remains controversial. In line with psycholinguistic models stating that language processing implies both the recovery of lexical information and the application of combinatorial rules, the striatum has been claimed to be involved either in the…

  16. In vivo evidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebral white matter loss in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fennema-Notestine, C; Archibald, S.L.; Jacobsen, M.W.; Corey-Bloom, J; Paulsen, J.S.; Peavy, G.M.; Gamst, A.C.; Hamilton, J.M.; Salmon, D.P.; Jernigan, Terry Lynne

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the regional pattern of white matter and cerebellar changes, as well as subcortical and cortical changes, in Huntington disease (HD) using morphometric analyses of structural MRI. METHODS: Fifteen individuals with HD and 22 controls were studied; groups were similar in age...

  17. The use of brain imaging to elucidate neural circuit changes in cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Colleen A; Canterberry, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Within substance abuse, neuroimaging has experienced tremendous growth as both a research method and a clinical tool in the last decade. The application of functional imaging methods to cocaine dependent patients and individuals in treatment programs, has revealed that the effects of cocaine are not limited to dopamine-rich subcortical structures, but that the cortical projection areas are also disrupted in cocaine dependent patients. In this review, we will first describe several of the imaging methods that are actively being used to address functional and structural abnormalities in addiction. This will be followed by an overview of the cortical and subcortical brain regions that are most often cited as dysfunctional in cocaine users. We will also introduce functional connectivity analyses currently being used to investigate interactions between these cortical and subcortical areas in cocaine users and abstainers. Finally, this review will address recent research which demonstrates that alterations in the functional connectivity in cocaine users may be associated with structural pathology in these circuits, as demonstrated through diffusion tensor imaging. Through the use of these tools in both a basic science setting and as applied to treatment seeking individuals, we now have a greater understanding of the complex cortical and subcortical networks which contribute to the stages of initial craving, dependence, abstinence, and relapse. Although the ability to use neuroimaging to predict treatment response or identify vulnerable populations is still in its infancy, the next decade holds tremendous promise for using neuroimaging to tailor either behavioral or pharmacologic treatment interventions to the individual. PMID:23162375

  18. Prefrontal cortical thinning in HIV infection is associated with impaired striatal functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Stéfan; Vink, Matthijs; Joska, John A; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Bagadia, Asif; Stein, Dan J; Emsley, Robin

    2016-06-01

    While cortical thinning has been associated with HIV infection, it is unclear whether this reflects a direct effect of the virus, whether it is related to disruption of subcortical function or whether it is better explained by epiphenomena, such as drug abuse or comorbid medical conditions. The present study investigated the relationship between cortical thickness and subcortical function in HIV+ patients. Specifically, we examined the relationship between prefrontal cortical thickness and striatal function. Twenty-three largely treatment naïve, non-substance abusing HIV+ participants and 19 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and educational status were included. Cortical morphometry was performed using FreeSurfer software analysis. Striatal function was measured during an fMRI stop-signal anticipation task known to engage the striatum. Any cortical regions showing significant thinning were entered as dependent variables into a single linear regression model which included subcortical function, age, CD4 count, and a measure of global cognitive performance as independent predictors. The only cortical region that was significantly reduced after correction for multiple comparisons was the right superior frontal gyrus. Striatal activity was found to independently predict superior frontal gyral cortical thickness. While cortical thinning in HIV infection is likely multifactorial, viral induced subcortical dysfunction appears to play a role. PMID:27173383

  19. Development and Assessment of a New 3D Neuroanatomy Teaching Tool for MRI Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A.; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Lopez, Michael J.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in…

  20. Functional neuroanatomy of action selection in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, Liana

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains an enigmatic disorder with unclear neuropathology. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetic research suggest alterations in glutamate-dopamine interactions adversely affecting synaptic plasticity both intracortically and subcortically. Relating these changes to the manifestation of symptoms presents a great challenge, requiring a constrained framework to capture the most salient elements. Here, a biologically-grounded computational model of basal gangli...

  1. The Role of Contingency Awareness in Single-Cue Human Eyeblink Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Best, Erin; Lee, Jessica C; Lovibond, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cue delay eyeblink conditioning is presented as a prototypical example of automatic, nonsymbolic learning that is carried out by subcortical circuits. However, it has been difficult to assess the role of cognition in single-cue conditioning because participants become aware of the simple stimulus contingency so quickly. In this experiment…

  2. Revisiting the Role of the Prefrontal Cortex in the Pathophysiology of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Jeffrey M.; Schulz, Kurt P.

    2006-01-01

    Most neural models for the pathophysiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have centered on the prefrontal cortex and its interconnections with the striatum and other subcortical structures. However, research only partially supports these models, and they do not correspond with the development of the prefrontal cortex and its…

  3. MIR137HG risk variant rs1625579 genotype is related to corpus callosum volume in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, V.S.; Kelly, S.; Wright, C.; Gupta, C.N.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J.R.; Morris, D.; Corvin, A.; Cannon, D.M.; McDonald, C.; Donohoe, G.; Calhoun, V.D.; Turner, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies implicate the MIR137HG risk variant rs1625579 (MIR137HGrv) within the host gene for microRNA-137 as a potential regulator of schizophrenia susceptibility. We examined the influence of MIR137HGrv genotype on 17 subcortical and callosal volumes in a large sample of indi

  4. Transplantation of embryonic porcine neocortical tissue into newborn rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Anthony J; Meyer, Morten; Møller Dall, Annette;

    2003-01-01

    the grafts to course through the corpus callosum to the contralateral cortex or to course ipsilaterally within the subcortical white matter, where labeled fibers could be traced to the midbrain crus cerebri in older transplants. Bundles of axons were also observed coursing within the ipsilateral...

  5. Increased brain water self-diffusion in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Sørensen, P S; Thomsen, C;

    1995-01-01

    within cortical gray matter, the basal nuclei, the internal capsule, or the corpus callosum. Four of 7 patients with increased ADC in subcortical white matter also had increased ADC within gray matter. CONCLUSION: Measurement of diffusion coefficients in vivo demonstrated increased local water mobility...

  6. Right and Left Medial Orbitofrontal Volumes Show an Opposite Relationship to Agreeableness in FTD

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Katherine P.; Rosen, Howard J.; Kramer, Joel H.; Schauer, Guido F; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert; Bruce L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Recent investigations of the neuroanatomy of complex social behaviors suggest that the underlying brain circuits involve multiple cortical and subcortical structures. The neuroanatomic origins of agreeableness have not yet been clearly elucidated. However, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients can evidence dramatic alterations in agreeableness arising from frontal and temporal lobe damage. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that agreeableness would be negatively correlated with left...

  7. Does the Left Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Play a Role in Language? A Brain Stimulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Nouet, Aurelien; Gatignol, Peggy; Capelle, Laurent; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Although advances in diffusion tensor imaging have enabled us to better study the anatomy of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), its function remains poorly understood. Recently, it was suggested that the subcortical network subserving the language semantics could be constituted, in parallel with the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, by…

  8. Voice and Fluency Changes as a Function of Speech Task and Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana; Rogers, Tiffany; Godier, Violette; Tagliati, Michele; Sidtis, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speaking, which naturally occurs in different modes or "tasks" such as conversation and repetition, relies on intact basal ganglia nuclei. Recent studies suggest that voice and fluency parameters are differentially affected by speech task. In this study, the authors examine the effects of subcortical functionality on voice and fluency,…

  9. Simple autonomic seizures and ictal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Varga, Edina T; Akeson, Per; Beniczky, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Human micturition is physiologically controlled via a complex and finely tuned network of cortical and subcortical regions, hitherto not fully understood. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and post-traumatic epilepsy. Ictal enuresis was the only...

  10. Time Processing in Children with Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Martino, Davide; Spata, Felice; Defazio, Giovanni; Giacche, Roberta; Martino, Vito; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Anna Maria; Silvestri, Paola Rosaria; Cardona, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by dysfunctional connectivity between prefrontal cortex and sub-cortical structures, and altered meso-cortical and/or meso-striatal dopamine release. Since time processing is also regulated by fronto-striatal circuits and modulated by dopaminergic transmission, we hypothesized that time…

  11. THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF IPIDACRIN AND PIRIDOXIN INFLUENCE ON THE

    OpenAIRE

    Sharova E.V; Zaitsev O.S; Cheliapina M.V; Korotaeva M.V; Lifshits M.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of neuromedin and piridoksin psichophysiological effects attwo examinees – volunteers is lead. Neuromedin (unlike nonspecific influencepiridoksin) causes: A) similar influence in both supervision on cortical-subcortical brainstructures and B) individual changes (cortical lateralization), dependent on an initialcondition of the cortex.

  12. THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF IPIDACRIN AND PIRIDOXIN INFLUENCE ON THE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharova E.V

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis of neuromedin and piridoksin psichophysiological effects attwo examinees – volunteers is lead. Neuromedin (unlike nonspecific influencepiridoksin causes: A similar influence in both supervision on cortical-subcortical brainstructures and B individual changes (cortical lateralization, dependent on an initialcondition of the cortex.

  13. Infant Brain Development and Vulnerability to Later Internalizing Difficulties: The Generation R Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herba, Catherine M.; Roza, Sabine J.; Govaert, Paul; van Rossum, Joram; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tiemeier, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although clinical studies have demonstrated smaller subcortical volumes in structures such as the amygdala, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, and thalamus in adults and adolescents with depressive disorders and anxiety, no study has assessed such structures in babies, long before the development of the disorders. This study examined whether…

  14. Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Developments: Implications for Clinical Assessment in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Angela Hein; Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of significant physical, social, and emotional developments, accompanied by changes in cognitive and language skills. Underlying these are significant developments in brain structures and functions including changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter tracts. Among the brain regions that develop during…

  15. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  16. Proverb Interpretation Changes in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekermann, Jennifer; Thoma, Patrizia; Daum, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Recent investigations have emphasized the involvement of fronto-subcortical networks to proverb comprehension. Although the prefrontal cortex is thought to be affected by normal aging, relatively little work has been carried out to investigate potential effects of aging on proverb comprehension. In the present investigation participants in three…

  17. Dose-dependent effects of isoflurane on regional activity and neural network function: A resting-state fMRI study of 14 rhesus monkeys: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peilin; Xiao, Yuan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Huaiqiang; Li, Fei; Yao, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Liu, Lu; Gao, Xin; Wu, Min; Tang, Yingying; Chen, Qin; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su

    2016-01-12

    The dose-dependent effect of isoflurane on cerebral regional activity and functional connectivity (FC) in 14 rhesus monkeys was investigated using resting-state functional MRI. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) decreased in the cerebellum, visual cortex, and cortico-subcortical network when the isoflurane dose changed from 1.0 to 1.3 MAC. ALFF decreased in the arousal system, cerebellum, sensory, visual areas, cortico-subcortical network and default mode network and increased in the bilateral dorsal prefrontal cortices, frontal eye fields and motor-related areas from 1.0 to 1.6 MAC. FC of the default mode network, frontal-parietal, cortico-subcortical, motor, sensory, auditory and visual areas was reduced when isoflurane increased from 1.0 to 1.3 MAC. FC decreased in more widespread areas, especially in regions of cortico-subcortical networks and limbic systems, when isoflurane further increased from 1.0 to 1.6 MAC. Both dose-dependent decreased and increased ALFF were separately observed, while FC deteriorated as the anesthesia deepened. These results suggest that changes continue to occur past the loss of consciousness, and the dose-dependent effects of isoflurane are different with regard to regional function and neural network integration. PMID:26633103

  18. Assessment of regional cerebrovascular perfusion reserve (rCPR) employing a quantitative flow/volume (F/V)-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPS (aphasia or neglect) are a regular concomitant symptom of cortical, and, occasionally, subcortical ischemic lesions. In 19 patients with subcortical lesions (eight with NPS, 11 without NPS), F/V-SPECT was employed to search for changes in rCPR in both, lesions and ipsilateral cortex. Results were correlated with NPS and MRI findings. Compared to the unaffected hemisphere, all subcortical lesions showed reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) (-16 to -23%), increased regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) (+34 to +62%), and decreased or missing rCPR (-27 to -28%). Compared to MRI, there was no difference in lesion size in the thromboembolic lesions. Hemodynamic low-flow infarcts, however, were greater with SPECT than in MRI. In patients without NPS, the adjacent cortex was normal in SPECT and MRI. In addition, patients with NPS revealed reduced rCBF (-18%), increased rCBV (+19%), and decreased rCPR (-22%) in the adjacent cortex. MRI was normal in the same cortical area. These results indicate that NPS in subcortical lesions may be caused by a hemodynamic mechanism causing reduction of rCPR in the adjacent cortex. (orig.)

  19. Examination of Alzheimer’s-related positive, negative and reactive pathology in the brainstem of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Vaitheeswaran, Ramanan; Ilkjær, Laura

    Aim: While the positive, negative and reactive lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been extensively characterised in brain areas associated with cognition, such as the cortex and the hippocampus, the status of subcortical structures in AD remains less well characterised. In the present study...

  20. Reactive hyperemia of rat brain following high altitude hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive 85Sr microparticles were used to assess the cardiac output and blood flow through medulla oblongata, cerebellum, subcortical portions and cerebral cortex in adult laboratory rats 20 hours after 8-hour exposure to 7000 m high altitude hypoxia. The local blood supply increased in all parts of the brain, in particular in medulla oblongata and cerebellum. (author). 10 figs., 9 refs