WorldWideScience

Sample records for arsine evolution methods

  1. Arsine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arsine was investigated as a warfare agent during World War II, but it was never used on the battlefield. ... arsine, symptoms are likely to occur within the first 24 hours after exposure. However, exposure to high ...

  2. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  3. Arsine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed June ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  4. [Arsine: an unknown industrial chemical toxic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantamura, J; Dorandeu, F; Burnat, P; Renard, C

    2011-07-01

    Arsines family includes many compounds with various toxicities. Arsenic trihydride or arsine is the most toxic form of arsenic. Powerful haemolytic gas, it has never been used as a chemical weapon because its toxicity is not immediate and it is non persistent. However, cases of industrial poisoning with arsine are still identified in spite of a strict regulation at work. It is also identified as a potential toxic of chemical terrorism. This agent, of which the mechanism of action is still not well defined, is badly recognized because of intoxications rarity. However, fast detection means are available. Health professionals and especially those who are involved in piratox plan need to learn to recognize arsine intoxication (hematuria, oliguria, haemolytic anemia) in order to provide early, specific treatment and avoid damages. PMID:21840437

  5. Development of an arsenic trioxide vapor and arsine sampling train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sampling train was evaluated using 76As tracer for the measurement of particulate arsenic, arsine, and arsenic trioxide vapor in air and industrial process gas streams. In this train, a demister was used to remove droplets of water and oil, and particulates were removed by a filter. Vapor arsenic trioxide was collected in an impinger solution, and arsine gas was collected on silvered quartz beads. Hydrogen sulfide gas did not reduce the arsine trapping efficiency of the silvered beads, and charcoal proved to be an effective trap for both arsine and arsenic trioxide vapor. 1 figure, 2 tables

  6. Silver and gold nanocluster catalyzed reduction of methylene blue by arsine in micellar medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Kundu; Sujit Kumar Ghosh; Madhuri Mandal; Tarasankar Pal

    2002-11-01

    Arsenic can be determined in parts-per-million (ppm) level by absorbance measurement. This method is based on the quantitative colour bleaching of the dye, methylene blue by arsine catalyzed by nanoparticles in micellar medium. The arsine has been generated in situ from sodium arsenate by NaBH4 reduction. The absorbance measurement was carried out at the max of the dye at 660 nm. The calibration graph set-up for three linear dynamic ranges (LDR) are 0–8.63 ppm, 0–1.11 ppm and 0–0.11 ppm and limit of detections (LODs) are 1.3, 0.53 and 0.03 ppm, respectively. This method is simple, sensitive and easy to carry out. It is free from phosphate and silicate interference and applicable to real sample analysis.

  7. The role of arsine in the deactivation of methanol synthesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, R.; Mebrahtu, T.; Dahl, T.A.; Lucrezi, F.A.; Toseland, B.A. [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Adsorption Technology Center, 7201 Hamilton Boulevard, Allentown, PA 18195-1501 (United States)

    2004-06-18

    The liquid phase methanol (LPMEOH) process is successfully producing methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas on an industrial scale. This process uses a standard copper, zinc oxide, and alumina catalyst suspended in an inert mineral oil in a slurry bubble column reactor. An arsenic-containing species, most reasonably arsine, was found in the feed to the LPMEOH commercial demonstration facility located at Eastman Chemical Company's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, TN. Laboratory testing showed that arsine is, in fact, a powerful methanol synthesis catalyst poison. At levels as low as 150ppbv, arsine results in a rapid deactivation of the catalyst. Removal of arsine results in a deactivation rate consistent with a clean synthesis gas feed; that is, arsine poisoning stops when it is removed from the feed. We infer that arsine reacts irreversibly with the catalyst under the methanol synthesis conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of arsenic-containing used catalyst indicated the presence of zero-valent arsenic in an intermetallic surface phase that is structurally related to Domeykite (Cu{sub 3}As). Experimental evidence, thermodynamics, and literature relating to other metal-arsine chemistry were consistent with dissociative adsorption of arsine on the copper surface to form gaseous H{sub 2} and Cu{sub 3}As. To deal with arsine poisoning, we have developed adsorption technology that can remove arsine to levels low enough that catalyst performance is unaffected.

  8. Stibine/arsine monitoring during EV operation: summary report on preliminary tests at ANL and at LILCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutfy, R.O.; Graczyk, D.G.; Varma, R.; Hayes, E.R.; Williams, F.L.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-02-01

    A series of tests was performed to monitor the evolution and dispersal of stibine and arsine from the lead-acid propulsion batteries in three different Electra-Van Model 600 vehicles operated by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and by the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO). Ambient air was sampled at several locations inside the vehicles and in the garages where testing was done during charge, equalization charge, and on-the-road discharge operations. In addition, direct sampling of cell off-gases was performed with the ANL van. Interpretation of the individual test results was carried out in the context of vehicle characteristics, sampling protocol, and operating conditions. The test results demonstrated that under the test conditions only small concentrations of stibine and arsine accumulated in occupiable work areas. Measured concentrations in the vehicles and in the garages never exceeded 25% of the Threshold Limit Value-Time Weighted Average (TLV-TWA) standards. A threshold voltage for hydride production, at about 2.45 V per cell, was reflected in the results of the experiments performed during charging of the batteries. Hydride evolution rates were lower during equalization charge than during the overcharge portion of a charge cycle when the on-board charger was used in a normal operating mode. A delayed release of the metal hydrides from the battery cells was observed during on-the-road operation of the vehicles. The implications of these observations for electric vehicle (EV) operation are discussed. An engineering analysis of the generation and dispersal of the metal hydrides is presented, and equations are derived for estimating minimum ventilation requirements for the EV battery compartment and for garages housing EV operations. Recommendations are made regarding safe handling procedures for battery off-gases, procedures for conducting stibine/arsine monitoring tests and future work.

  9. Qualification of the GASGUARD® SAS GGT Arsine Sub-Atmospheric Gas Delivery System for Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James P.; Rolland, James L.; Grim, James S.; Machado, Reinaldo M.; Hartz, Christopher L.

    2006-11-01

    A beta level evaluation of the GASGUARD® SAS GGT Arsine ion implant dopant supply developed by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. was conducted by Atmel Corporation. The evaluation included characterization of the normalized wafer yield, mass spectra, ionization efficiency, flow rate, beam current, extraction of usable material and cylinder lifetime. This new and novel sub-atmospheric dopant gas delivery system utilizes a unique electrochemical process, which can generate, on demand, high flows of arsine at a constant 400 torr pressure while limiting net inventory of arsine to only 1 gram. This paper illustrates how Atmel Corporation evaluated and released this new arsine dopant delivery system for commercial production and verified high delivery capacity, resulting in reduced gas costs and increased cylinder life compared to the traditional adsorbent based technology.

  10. Speciation analysis of arsenic compounds in the serum and urine of a patient with acute arsine poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanaka K.; Yamano Y.; Yoshimura Y.; Shimoda Y.; Endo Y; Endo G.

    2013-01-01

    Arsine is one of the most potent hemolytic agents. It is important to clarify arsine metabolism as well as its chemical interactions with biological components. The aim of the present study was to clarify arsine metabolism by arsenic speciation analysis in serum and urine from an acute poisoning patient with hematuria, anemia, and renal and liver dysfunction. Speciation analysis of arsenics in serum and urine was performed using HPLC-ICP-MS. The total arsenic (T-As) concentration in serum was...

  11. Oxidation state specific generation of arsines from methylated arsenicals based on L-cysteine treatment in buffered media for speciation analysis by hydride generation-automated cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated system for hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer is described. Arsines are preconcentrated and separated in a Chromosorb filled U-tube. An automated cryotrapping unit, employing nitrogen gas formed upon heating in the detection phase for the displacement of the cooling liquid nitrogen, has been developed. The conditions for separation of arsines in a Chromosorb filled U-tube have been optimized. A complete separation of signals from arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine, and trimethylarsine has been achieved within a 60 s reading window. The limits of detection for methylated arsenicals tested were 4 ng l-1. Selective hydride generation is applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic and methylated arsenicals. The arsines are generated either exclusively from trivalent or from both tri- and pentavalent inorganic and methylated arsenicals depending on the presence of L-cysteine as a prereductant and/or reaction modifier. A TRIS buffer reaction medium is proposed to overcome narrow optimum concentration range observed for the L-cysteine modified reaction in HCl medium. The system provides uniform peak area sensitivity for all As species. Consequently, the calibration with a single form of As is possible. This method permits a high-throughput speciation analysis of metabolites of inorganic arsenic in relatively complex biological matrices such as cell culture systems without sample pretreatment, thus preserving the distribution of tri- and pentavalent species

  12. Arsine toxicity is induced by inhalation but not by percutaneous exposure in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koichi; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Shimoda, Yasuyo; Yamano, Yuko; Nagano, Kasuke; Hata, Akihisa; Endo, Yoko; Tachikawa, Mariko; Endo, Ginji

    2014-04-01

    Arsine (AsH₃) is used in many industries, but there is insufficient knowledge about the potential for percutaneous absorption. In order to examine possible percutaneous absorption of arsine, we conducted inhalation studies. Arsine was generated by reducing arsenic trioxide with NaBH₄. Male 5-week-old Hos:HR-1 hairless mice were subjected to a single percutaneous exposure or whole-body inhalation exposure of ca. 300 ppm arsine for 5 min. The examination was performed 0-6 hr after the exposure. Total arsenic in whole blood and hematocrit (Ht) values were measured. Generation of an arsenic-hemoglobin (As-Hb) adduct in the blood was detected using high-performance liquid chromatography with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HPLC-ICP-MS). Ht values in the inhalation group significantly decreased after 3 hr, but those in the percutaneous exposure group did not. Total arsenic in the inhalation group was 9.0-14.2 mg/l, which was significantly higher than that in the percutaneous group. The As-Hb adduct was detected only in mice in the inhalation group. Histopathological changes were noted only in the inhalation group, with marked deposition of eosinophilic globules in the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys, the Kupffer cells of the liver, and the red pulp in the spleen, but not in the lungs. Immunohistochemically, these eosinophilic globules were stained positively by hemoglobin (Hb) antibody. In the present study, arsine-induced hemolysis and deposition of Hb occurred in the kidney via the inhalation route but not via percutaneous exposure. The presence of As-Hb adduct may be a useful indicator for confirming arsine poisoning. PMID:24646712

  13. TAYLOR EXPANSION METHOD FOR NONLINEAR EVOLUTION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yin-nian

    2005-01-01

    A new numerical method of integrating the nonlinear evolution equations, namely the Taylor expansion method, was presented. The standard Galerkin method can be viewed as the 0-th order Taylor expansion method; while the nonlinear Galerkin method can be viewed as the 1-st order modified Taylor expansion method. Moreover, the existence of the numerical solution and its convergence rate were proven. Finally, a concrete example,namely, the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a non slip boundary condition,was provided. The result is that the higher order Taylor expansion method is of the higher convergence rate under some assumptions about the regularity of the solution.

  14. Heck Arylation of Acrylonitrile with Aryl Iodides Catalyzed by a Silica-bound Arsine Palladium(0) Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhong CAI; Hong ZHAO; Rong Li ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Acrylonitrile reacts with aryl iodides in the presence of tri-n-butylamine and a catalytic amount of a silica-bound arsine palladium(0) complex to afford stereoselectively (E)-cinnamonitriles in high yields.

  15. The metabolism of inorganic arsenic oxides, gallium arsenide, and arsine: a toxicochemical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this review is to compare the metabolism, chemistry, and biological effects to determine if either of the industrial arsenicals (arsine and gallium arsenide) act like the environmental arsenic oxides (arsenite and arsenate). The metabolism of the arsenic oxides has been extensively investigated in the past 4 years and the differences between the arsenic metabolites in the oxidation states +III versus +V and with one or two methyl groups added have shown increased importance. The arsenic oxide metabolism has been compared with arsine (oxidation state -III) and arsenide (oxidation state between 0 to -III). The different metabolites appear to have different strengths of reaction for binding aresenic (III) to thiol groups, their oxidation-reduction reactions and their forming an arsenic-carbon bond. It is unclear if the differences in parameters such as the presence or absence of methyl metabolities, the rates of AsV reduction compared to the rates of AsIII oxidation, or the competition of phosphate and arsenate for cellular uptake are large enough to change biological effects. The arsine rate of decomposition, products of metabolism, target organ of toxic action, and protein binding appeared to support an oxidized arsenic metabolite. This arsine metabolite was very different from anything made by the arsenic oxides. The gallium arsenide had a lower solubility than any other arsenic compound and it had a disproportionate intensity of lung damage to suggest that the GaAs had a site of contact interaction and that oxidation reactions were important in its toxicity. The urinary metabolites after GaAs exposure were the same as excreted by arsenic oxides but the chemical compounds responsible for the toxic effects of GaAs are different from the aresnic oxides. The review concludes that there is insufficient evidence to equate the different arsenic compounds. There are several differences in the toxicity of the arsenic compounds that will require substantial

  16. A DFT study of arsine adsorption on palladium doped graphene: Effects of palladium cluster size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai; Mudchimo, Tanabat; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated the size effects of palladium (Pd) doped single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to the adsorption of AsH3 and its dehydrogenated products on Pd using density functional theory calculations. Here, Pd cluster binding study revealed that Pd6 nanocluster bound strongest to the SDG surface, while adsorption of AsHx (x = 0-3) on the most stable Pdn doped SDG showed that dehydrogenated arsine compounds adsorbed onto the surface stronger than the pristine AsH3 molecule. Charge analysis revealed that considerable amount of charge migration from Pd to dehydrogenated arsine molecules after adsorption may constitute strong adsorption for dehydrogenated arsine. In addition, study of thermodynamic pathways of AsH3 dehydrogenation on Pdn doped SDG adsorbents indicated that Pd cluster doping on SDG adsorbent tends to be thermodynamically favorable for AsH3 decomposition than the single-Pd atom doped SDG. Hence, our study has indicated that Pd6 clusters doped SDG is more advantageous as adsorbent material for AsH3 removal.

  17. Metalation of carborane phosphines and arsines by Rh(1) and Ir(1) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is being given to results of investigation on using reactions of cyclometallation by Rh(1) and Ir(1) complexes in the series of carborane phosphines and arsines for preparation of five-membered exocyclic compounds, containing B-M σ-bond. Stereochemical composition of cyclometallated carborane complexes of rhodium and iridium has been established on the basis of the data on 1H, 31P and 11B NMR spectroscopy. It is shown that boron atoms of o-carborane nucleus, being in 3(6)-position, are subjected to metallation

  18. Speciation analysis of arsenic compounds in the serum and urine of a patient with acute arsine poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka K.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsine is one of the most potent hemolytic agents. It is important to clarify arsine metabolism as well as its chemical interactions with biological components. The aim of the present study was to clarify arsine metabolism by arsenic speciation analysis in serum and urine from an acute poisoning patient with hematuria, anemia, and renal and liver dysfunction. Speciation analysis of arsenics in serum and urine was performed using HPLC-ICP-MS. The total arsenic (T-As concentration in serum was 244.8 μg/l at admission and 97.1 μg/l at discharge. In the speciation analysis, four kinds of As compounds derived from arsine metabolism were detected in serum and urine. The concentration of arsenite (AsIII, arsenate (AsV, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA in serum at admission were 45.8, 5.2, 17.9 and 9.3 μg/l, respectively. The concentrations of AsIII, AsV, and MMA decreased with biological half time (BHT of 30.1, 43.0, and 96.3 h, respectively. Only DMA was increased at discharge. The urinary AsIII, AsV, MMA and DMA concentrations were 223.0, 12.1, 317.5 and 1053.5 μg/l at discharge, and decreased with BHT of 15.1, 20.8, 14.7, and 16.0 d, respectively. The results indicate that arsine was quickly metabolized to AsIII and subsequently up to DMA, with the result that the toxic effects of inorganic arsenic were added to those of arsine toxicity.

  19. Sequence Hiberarchy Evolution Measurement Method and its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Ding QIU; Ru Ping LIANG; Jin Yuan MO; Xiao Yong ZOU

    2005-01-01

    A novel method based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and cross-covariance for revealing the evolution of species at different spatial resolutions is presented. The trypsin proteins of different species are chosen as an example to describe the evolution relationship according to the evolution vectors by using this method. The results indicated that this method is a promising approach to reveal species evolution at different spatial resolutions.

  20. Evolution of calculation methods taking into account severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the first decade of PWRs operation in France the calculation methods used for design and operation have improved very much. This paper gives a general analysis of the calculation methods evolution in parallel with the evolution of safety approach concerning PWRs. Then a comprehensive presentation of principal calculation tools is presented as applied during the past decade. An effort is done to predict the improvements in near future

  1. Semigroup methods for evolution equations on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mugnolo, Delio

    2014-01-01

    This concise text is based on a series of lectures held only a few years ago and originally intended as an introduction to known results on linear hyperbolic and parabolic equations.  Yet the topic of differential equations on graphs, ramified spaces, and more general network-like objects has recently gained significant momentum and, well beyond the confines of mathematics, there is a lively interdisciplinary discourse on all aspects of so-called complex networks. Such network-like structures can be found in virtually all branches of science, engineering and the humanities, and future research thus calls for solid theoretical foundations.      This book is specifically devoted to the study of evolution equations – i.e., of time-dependent differential equations such as the heat equation, the wave equation, or the Schrödinger equation (quantum graphs) – bearing in mind that the majority of the literature in the last ten years on the subject of differential equations of graphs has been devoted to ellip...

  2. An Approach for Evolution-Driven Method Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ralyte, Jolita; Rolland, Colette; Ben Ayed, Mohamed

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers the evolutionary perspective of the method engineering. It presents an approach for method engineering based on the evolution of an existing method, model or meta-model into a new one satisfying different engineering objective. This approach proposes several different strategies to evolve the initial paradigm model into a new one and provides guidelines supporting these strategies. The approach has been evaluated in the Franco-Japanese research project around the Lyee meth...

  3. Evolution of Research Methods for Probing and Understanding Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Nashon, Samson M.; Thomas, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the development, self-critique and evolution of research methods for interpreting and understanding students' metacognition that were developed through the Metacognition and Reflective Inquiry (MRI) collaborative study. The MRI collaborative was a multi-year, multi-case, research study that investigated the elusive nature and…

  4. Evolution of Research Methods for Probing and Understanding Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Nashon, Samson M.; Thomas, Gregory P.

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports on the development, self-critique and evolution of research methods for interpreting and understanding students’ metacognition that were developed through the Metacognition and Reflective Inquiry (MRI) collaborative study. The MRI collaborative was a multi-year, multi-case, research study that investigated the elusive nature and character of high school students’ metacognition across formal and informal science learning contexts. The study’s research design comprised a series of integrated, layered, interpretive case studies which were conducted in a hermeneutic fashion over a 3 year period. The implementation of each case study provided an opportunity for the researchers to reflect critically on the research methods used to elucidate metacognition and hence refine the individual and collective capacity, responsiveness and fruitfulness of the methods used. This paper discusses the evolution of these methods and the lessons that the entire study provides for the conceptualization of other qualitative-interpretivist studies.

  5. High Throughput Screening and Selection Methods for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Bao, Zehua; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Successful evolutionary enzyme engineering requires a high throughput screening or selection method, which considerably increases the chance of obtaining desired properties and reduces the time and cost. In this review, a series of high throughput screening and selection methods are illustrated with significant and recent examples. These high throughput strategies are also discussed with an emphasis on compatibility with phenotypic analysis during directed enzyme evolution. Lastly, certain li...

  6. Time evolution of the wave equation using rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2010-07-01

    Forward modeling of seismic data and reverse time migration are based on the time evolution of wavefields. For the case of spatially varying velocity, we have worked on two approaches to evaluate the time evolution of seismic wavefields. An exact solution for the constant-velocity acoustic wave equation can be used to simulate the pressure response at any time. For a spatially varying velocity, a one-step method can be developed where no intermediate time responses are required. Using this approach, we have solved for the pressure response at intermediate times and have developed a recursive solution. The solution has a very high degree of accuracy and can be reduced to various finite-difference time-derivative methods, depending on the approximations used. Although the two approaches are closely related, each has advantages, depending on the problem being solved. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Evolution method and HOMFLY polynomials for virtual knots

    CERN Document Server

    Bishler, Ludmila; Morozov, Andrey; Morozov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Following the suggestion of arXiv:1407.6319 to lift the knot polynomials for virtual knots and links from Jones to HOMFLY, we apply the evolution method to calculate them for an infinite series of twist-like virtual knots and antiparallel 2-strand links. Within this family one can check topological invariance and understand how differential hierarchy is modified in virtual case. This opens a way towards a definition of colored (not only cabled) knot polynomials, though problems still persist beyond the first symmetric representation.

  8. Harmonic analysis method for nonlinear evolution equations, I

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Baoxiang; Hao, Chengchun

    2011-01-01

    This monograph provides a comprehensive overview on a class of nonlinear evolution equations, such as nonlinear Schrödinger equations, nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations, KdV equations as well as Navier-Stokes equations and Boltzmann equations. The global wellposedness to the Cauchy problem for those equations is systematically studied by using the harmonic analysis methods. This book is self-contained and may also be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students in analysis and PDE subjects and even ambitious undergraduate students.

  9. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a species graphic that shows relationship among organisms or particularly among their gene sequences. The sequence separation are referred as taxa (singular taxon that is defined as phylogenetically distinct units on the tree. The tree consists of outer branches or leaves that represents taxa and nodes and branch represent correlation among taxa. When the nucleotide sequence from two different organism are similar, they were inferred to be descended from common ancestor. There were three methods which were used in phylogenetic, namely (1 Maximum parsimony, (2 Distance, and (3 Maximum likehoood. Those methods generally are applied to construct the evolutionary tree or the best tree for determine sequence variation in group. Every method is usually used for different analysis and data.

  10. A Direct Algebraic Method in Finding Particular Solutions to Some Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUChun-Ping; CHENJian-Kang; CAIFan

    2004-01-01

    Firstly, a direct algebraic method and a routine way in finding traveling wave solutions to nonlinear evolution equations are explained. And then some new exact solutions for some evolution equations are obtained by using the method.

  11. Extremal Optimization: Methods Derived from Co-Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, S.; Percus, A.G.

    1999-07-13

    We describe a general-purpose method for finding high-quality solutions to hard optimization problems, inspired by self-organized critical models of co-evolution such as the Bak-Sneppen model. The method, called Extremal Optimization, successively eliminates extremely undesirable components of sub-optimal solutions, rather than ''breeding'' better components. In contrast to Genetic Algorithms which operate on an entire ''gene-pool'' of possible solutions, Extremal Optimization improves on a single candidate solution by treating each of its components as species co-evolving according to Darwinian principles. Unlike Simulated Annealing, its non-equilibrium approach effects an algorithm requiring few parameters to tune. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance proves competitive with, and often superior to, more elaborate stochastic optimization procedures. We demonstrate it here on two classic hard optimization problems: graph partitioning and the traveling salesman problem.

  12. The early evolution of Jean Piaget's clinical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Susan Jean

    2005-11-01

    This article analyzes the early evolution of Jean Piaget's renowned "clinical method" in order to investigate the method's strikingly original and generative character. Throughout his 1st decade in the field, Piaget frequently discussed and justified the many different approaches to data collection he used. Analysis of his methodological progression during this period reveals that Piaget's determination to access the genuine convictions of children eventually led him to combine 3 distinct traditions in which he had been trained-naturalistic observation, psychometrics, and the psychiatric clinical examination. It was in this amalgam, first evident in his 4th text, that Piaget discovered the clinical dynamic that would drive the classic experiments for which he is most well known. PMID:17152748

  13. Silica-Supported Arsine Palladium(0) Complex: a Highly Active and Stereoselective Catalyst for Arylation of Butyl Acrylate and Acrylamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡明中; 赵红; 胡文英

    2005-01-01

    A silica-supported arsine palladium(O) complex has been prepared from y-chloropropyltriethoxysilane via immobilization on fumed silica, followed by reaction with potassium diphenylarsenide and palladium chloride, and then reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The complex has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and it is a highly active and stereoselective catalyst for arylation of butyl acrylate and acrylamide with aryl halides, affording a variety of tram-butyl cinnamates and trans-cinnamamides in high yields.

  14. Origin, Methods, and Evolution of the Three Nurses’ Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoia, Monica L.; Lenart, Elizabeth B.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Speizer, Frank E.; Chavarro, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    We have summarized the evolution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), a prospective cohort study of 121 700 married registered nurses launched in 1976; NHS II, which began in 1989 and enrolled 116 430 nurses; and NHS3, which began in 2010 and has ongoing enrollment. Over 40 years, these studies have generated long-term, multidimensional data, including lifestyle- and health-related information across the life course and an extensive repository of various biological specimens. We have described the questionnaire data collection, disease follow-up methods, biorepository resources, and data management and statistical procedures. Through integrative analyses, these studies have sustained a high level of scientific productivity and substantially influenced public health recommendations. We have highlighted recent interdisciplinary research projects and discussed future directions for collaboration and innovation. PMID:27459450

  15. Origin, Methods, and Evolution of the Three Nurses' Health Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ying; Bertoia, Monica L; Lenart, Elizabeth B; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Speizer, Frank E; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    We have summarized the evolution of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), a prospective cohort study of 121 700 married registered nurses launched in 1976; NHS II, which began in 1989 and enrolled 116 430 nurses; and NHS3, which began in 2010 and has ongoing enrollment. Over 40 years, these studies have generated long-term, multidimensional data, including lifestyle- and health-related information across the life course and an extensive repository of various biological specimens. We have described the questionnaire data collection, disease follow-up methods, biorepository resources, and data management and statistical procedures. Through integrative analyses, these studies have sustained a high level of scientific productivity and substantially influenced public health recommendations. We have highlighted recent interdisciplinary research projects and discussed future directions for collaboration and innovation. PMID:27459450

  16. Profile Evolution Simulation in Etching Systems Using Level Set Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    1998-01-01

    Semiconductor device profiles are determined by the characteristics of both etching and deposition processes. In particular, a highly anisotropic etch is required to achieve vertical sidewalls. However, etching is comprised of both anisotropic and isotropic components, due to ion and neutral fluxes, respectively. In Ar/Cl2 plasmas, for example, neutral chlorine reacts with the Si surfaces to form silicon chlorides. These compounds are then removed by the impinging ion fluxes. Hence the directionality of the ions (and thus the ion angular distribution function, or IAD), as well as the relative fluxes of neutrals and ions determines the amount of undercutting. One method of modeling device profile evolution is to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma as a string of nodes. The velocity of each node is calculated and then the nodes are advanced accordingly. Although this technique appears to be relatively straightforward, extensive looping schemes are required at the profile corners. An alternate method is to use level set theory, which involves embedding the location of the interface in a field variable. The normal speed is calculated at each mesh point, and the field variable is updated. The profile comers are more accurately modeled as the need for looping algorithms is eliminated. The model we have developed is a 2-D Level Set Profile Evolution Simulation (LSPES). The LSPES calculates etch rates of a substrate in low pressure plasmas due to the incident ion and neutral fluxes. For a Si substrate in an Ar/C12 gas mixture, for example, the predictions of the LSPES are identical to those from a string evolution model for high neutral fluxes and two different ion angular distributions.(2) In the figure shown, the relative neutral to ion flux in the bulk plasma is 100 to 1. For a moderately isotropic ion angular distribution function as shown in the cases in the left hand column, both the LSPES (top row) and rude's string

  17. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    OpenAIRE

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a spec...

  18. Synthesis of bidentate o-carborane-containing phosphine and arsine ligands and preparation of their complexes with chromium-, molybdenum-, tungsten-, iron- and nickel carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of bidentate o-carborane phosphine and arsine ligands have been synthesized and their chelate complexes with carbonyls of chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and nickel are obtained. 1-mercapto-2-dimethylarsnomethyl-o-carborane and 1-mercapto-2-diethylaminomethyl-o-carborane with molybdenum and tungsten carbonyls provide substitution products of only one CO group. 1-diphenylphosphino-2-diphenylphosphinomethyl-o-carborane and 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)-o-carborane form complexes with NiCl2. Simplicity of complex formation of bidentate carborane ligands with group 6 metal carbonyls increases in the series Cr(CO)6 6 6

  19. Analytic treatment of nonlinear evolution equations using first integral method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmet Bekir; Ömer Ünsal

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we show the applicability of the first integral method to combined KdV-mKdV equation, Pochhammer–Chree equation and coupled nonlinear evolution equations. The power of this manageable method is confirmed by applying it for three selected nonlinear evolution equations. This approach can also be applied to other nonlinear differential equations.

  20. A Socratic Method for Surveying Students' Readiness to Study Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Before beginning a series of presentations on evolution, it would be prudent to survey the general level of students' understanding of prerequisite basic concepts of reproduction, heredity, ontology, and phenotypic diversity so that teachers can avoid devoting time to well-known subjects of general knowledge and can spend more time on subjects…

  1. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A {sub O} = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f{sub H{sub 2}} can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A {sub O}-D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A {sub O} is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H{sub 2} and stellar masses and higher f{sub H{sub 2}}. Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z.

  2. A New Screening Method for the Directed Evolution of Thermostable Bacteriolytic Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Heselpoth, Ryan D.; Nelson, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution is defined as a method to harness natural selection in order to engineer proteins to acquire particular properties that are not associated with the protein in nature. Literature has provided numerous examples regarding the implementation of directed evolution to successfully alter molecular specificity and catalysis1. The primary advantage of utilizing directed evolution instead of more rational-based approaches for molecular engineering relates to the volume and diversity ...

  3. The nonsinglet structure function evolution by Laplace method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroun, G. R., E-mail: grboroun@gmail.com, E-mail: boroun@razi.ac.ir; Zarrin, S. [Razi University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We derive a general scheme for the evolution of the nonsinglet structure function at the leadingorder (LO) and next-to-leading-order (NLO) by using the Laplace-transform technique. Results for the nonsinglet structure function are compared with MSTW2008, GRV, and CKMT parameterizations and also EMC experimental data in the LO and NLO analysis. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data and other parameterizations in the low- and large-x regions.

  4. A novel method of screening thrombin-inhibiting DNA aptamers using an evolution-mimicking algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Okumura, Yuji; SUMIKURA, Koichi; Karube, Isao

    2005-01-01

    Thrombin-inhibiting DNA aptamers have already been obtained through the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). However, SELEX is a method that screens DNA aptamers that bind to their target molecules, and it sometimes fails to screen good inhibitors. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method of screening DNA aptamers based on their inhibitory effects on the target molecules. We developed a novel method of detecting aptamers using an evolution-mimicking algorit...

  5. ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF CEREALS AND METHODS OF STUDYING THEIR BIOMORPHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Belyuchenko I. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the article, the main issues of development of perennial cereals (morphology, phenology, formation of buds, physiology, biochemistry and research methods) are discussed. Peculiarities of regulation of development and the character of their evolution are considered. Problems of evolution of the cereals with widespread use of the data of Russian and foreign authors are discussed

  6. Genetic-evolution-based optimization methods for engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. S.; Pan, T. S.; Dhingra, A. K.; Venkayya, V. B.; Kumar, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the applicability of a biological model, based on genetic evolution, for engineering design optimization. Algorithms embodying the ideas of reproduction, crossover, and mutation are developed and applied to solve different types of structural optimization problems. Both continuous and discrete variable optimization problems are solved. A two-bay truss for maximum fundamental frequency is considered to demonstrate the continuous variable case. The selection of locations of actuators in an actively controlled structure, for minimum energy dissipation, is considered to illustrate the discrete variable case.

  7. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes containing chalconates and triphenylphosphine/arsine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Viswanathamurthi; M Muthukumar

    2011-09-01

    A series of new hexa-coordinated ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes of the type [RuCl(CO)(EPh3)(B)(L1−4)] (4-15) (E = P or As; B = PPh3, AsPh3 or Py; L = 2'-hydroxychalcone) were synthesized from the reaction of [RuHCl(CO)(EPh3)2(B)] (1-3) (E = P or As; B = PPh3, AsPh3 or Py) with equimolar chalcone in benzene under reflux. The new complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic, 1H, 31P{1H}, and 13C NMR) methods. On the basis of data obtained, an octahedral structure has been assigned for all the complexes. The complexes exhibit catalytic activity for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of -methylmorpholine--oxide (NMO) as co-oxidant and were also found to be efficient transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The antifungal properties of the ligands and their complexes have also been examined and compared with standard Bavistin.

  8. The evolution of methods for establishing evolutionary timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Philip C J; Yang, Ziheng

    2016-07-19

    The fossil record is well known to be incomplete. Read literally, it provides a distorted view of the history of species divergence and extinction, because different species have different propensities to fossilize, the amount of rock fluctuates over geological timescales, as does the nature of the environments that it preserves. Even so, patterns in the fossil evidence allow us to assess the incompleteness of the fossil record. While the molecular clock can be used to extend the time estimates from fossil species to lineages not represented in the fossil record, fossils are the only source of information concerning absolute (geological) times in molecular dating analysis. We review different ways of incorporating fossil evidence in modern clock dating analyses, including node-calibrations where lineage divergence times are constrained using probability densities and tip-calibrations where fossil species at the tips of the tree are assigned dates from dated rock strata. While node-calibrations are often constructed by a crude assessment of the fossil evidence and thus involves arbitrariness, tip-calibrations may be too sensitive to the prior on divergence times or the branching process and influenced unduly affected by well-known problems of morphological character evolution, such as environmental influence on morphological phenotypes, correlation among traits, and convergent evolution in disparate species. We discuss the utility of time information from fossils in phylogeny estimation and the search for ancestors in the fossil record.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325838

  9. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  10. The evolution of credit risk: phenomena, methods and management

    OpenAIRE

    George A. Christodoulakis

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a conference at the Bank of Greece on credit risk. The papers presented focused on innovations in risk management methods which contribute to systemic financial stability, calculation of capital adequacy in financial institutions as well as the validation of credit rating methods in the context of Basel II.

  11. A hybrid differential evolution/Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving inverse transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, Keith C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favorite, Jeffrey A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Differential Evolution (DE) optimization method was applied to solve inverse transport problems in finite cylindrical geometries and was shown to be far superior to the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method at finding a global optimum for problems with several unknowns. However, while extremely adept at finding a global optimum solution, the DE method often requires a large number (hundreds or thousands) of transport calculations, making it much slower than the Levenberg-Marquardt method. In this paper, a hybridization of the Differential Evolution and Levenberg-Marquardt approaches is presented. This hybrid method takes advantage of the robust search capability of the Differential Evolution method and the speed of the Levenberg-Marquardt technique.

  12. Evolution of microbiological analytical methods for dairy industry needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eSohier

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, culture-based methods have been used to enumerate microbial populations in dairy products. Recent developments in molecular methods now enable faster and more sensitive analyses than classical microbiology procedures. These molecular tools allow a detailed characterization of cell physiological states and bacterial fitness and thus, offer new perspectives to integration of microbial physiology monitoring to improve industrial processes. This review summarizes the methods described to enumerate and characterize physiological states of technological microbiota in dairy products, and discusses the current deficiencies in relation to the industry’s needs. Recent studies show that PCR-based methods can successfully be applied to quantify fermenting microbes and probiotics in dairy products. Flow cytometry and omics technologies also show interesting analytical potentialities. However, they still suffer from a lack of validation and standardization for quality control analyses, as reflected by the absence of performance studies and official international standards.

  13. Failure Analysis of Wind Turbines by Probability Density Evolution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Liu, W.F.;

    2013-01-01

    of the response of wind turbine. However this approach may contain high amount of uncertainty due to the arbitrariness of the data and the distributions chosen. Therefore less uncertain methods are meaningful in this direction. The most natural approach in this respect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation...

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Method for Determination of Texture Evolution in Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Tomov, I.; Banova, R.; Surnev, S.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction method for the determination of texture evolution in electrodeposited and vapour-deposited layers was developed. It was applied to the study of the texture of electrodeposited bright zinc. It was established that the arising of texture in the concrete models is due to oriented nucleation as well as to a growth selection process. The substrate structure also has an effect on the character of the texture evolution.

  15. Evolution of Hydrogen Storage Alloys Prepared by Special Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Zhang Ximin; Jing Hai; Li Chengdong; Xu Jun

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure characteristics and electrochemical properties of hydrogen storage alloys prepared by gas atomization, melt spinning and strip casting respectively were outlined.The advantages, disadvantages and research development of the above methods for preparing hydrogen storage alloys were explained.The strip casting is a new special means for preparing AB5 rare earth hydrogen storage alloys of high performance and low cost, and the study of the strip casting for preparing hydrogen storage alloys is presented specially.

  16. Decoupling of the DGLAP evolution equations by Laplace method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroun, G. R.; Zarrin, S.; Teimoury, F.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we derive two second-order differential equations for the gluon and singlet distribution functions by using the Laplace transform method. We decoupled the solutions of the singlet and gluon distributions into the initial conditions (function and derivative of the function) at the virtuality Q 0 2 separately as these solutions are defined by F 2 s ( x, Q 2) = F( F 0 ,∂ F s0 and G( x, Q 2)= G( G 0, ∂ G 0. We compared our results with the MSTW parameterization and the experimental measurements of F 2 p ( x, Q 2.

  17. Evolution of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Yamini, Yadollah; Faraji, Mohammad

    2010-04-16

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) has become a very popular environmentally benign sample-preparation technique, because it is fast, inexpensive, easy to operate with a high enrichment factor and consumes low volume of organic solvent. DLLME is a modified solvent extraction method in which acceptor-to-donor phase ratio is greatly reduced compared with other methods. In this review, in order to encourage further development of DLLME, its combination with different analytical techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) will be discussed. Also, its applications in conjunction with different extraction techniques such as solid-phase extraction (SPE), solidification of floating organic drop (SFO) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are summarized. This review focuses on the extra steps in sample preparation for application of DLLME in different matrixes such as food, biological fluids and solid samples. Further, the recent developments in DLLME are presented. DLLME does have some limitations, which will also be discussed in detail. Finally, an outlook on the future of the technique will be given. PMID:20005521

  18. Application of the trial equation method for solving some nonlinear evolution equations arising in mathematical physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yusuf Gurefe; Abdullah Sonmezoglu; Emine Misirli

    2011-12-01

    In this paper some exact solutions including soliton solutions for the KdV equation with dual power law nonlinearity and the (, ) equation with generalized evolution are obtained using the trial equation method. Also a more general trial equation method is proposed.

  19. A new method for judging the computational stability of the difference schemes of nonlinear evolution equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For the non-conservative difference schemes of nonlinear evolution equations with aperiodic boundary conditions, taken one-dimensional nonlinear advection equation as an example, a new method for judging the computational stability is given. It is proved to be practical and effective through several numerical examples. The stability criteria obtained by this method are really the necessary conditions of computational stability.

  20. The evolution of analytical chemistry methods in foodomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Monica; Ferranti, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    The methodologies of food analysis have greatly evolved over the past 100 years, from basic assays based on solution chemistry to those relying on the modern instrumental platforms. Today, the development and optimization of integrated analytical approaches based on different techniques to study at molecular level the chemical composition of a food may allow to define a 'food fingerprint', valuable to assess nutritional value, safety and quality, authenticity and security of foods. This comprehensive strategy, defined foodomics, includes emerging work areas such as food chemistry, phytochemistry, advanced analytical techniques, biosensors and bioinformatics. Integrated approaches can help to elucidate some critical issues in food analysis, but also to face the new challenges of a globalized world: security, sustainability and food productions in response to environmental world-wide changes. They include the development of powerful analytical methods to ensure the origin and quality of food, as well as the discovery of biomarkers to identify potential food safety problems. In the area of nutrition, the future challenge is to identify, through specific biomarkers, individual peculiarities that allow early diagnosis and then a personalized prognosis and diet for patients with food-related disorders. Far from the aim of an exhaustive review of the abundant literature dedicated to the applications of omic sciences in food analysis, we will explore how classical approaches, such as those used in chemistry and biochemistry, have evolved to intersect with the new omics technologies to produce a progress in our understanding of the complexity of foods. Perhaps most importantly, a key objective of the review will be to explore the development of simple and robust methods for a fully applied use of omics data in food science. PMID:26363946

  1. Periodic Solutions of Evolution Variational Inequalities-a Method of Guiding Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir ADLY; Daniel GOELEVEN; Michel TH(E)RA

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on a part of the presentation given by the third author at the Shanghai Forum on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Shanghai 2006). It is related to the existence of a periodic solution of evolution variational inequalities. The approach is based on the method of guiding functions.

  2. Long term evolution of waste disposal sites: scenario selection and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety analysis of long term radioactive waste disposal projects must take into account the evolution of the sites natural environment. The present paper aims at reassessing some questions relating to the methods and to some lack of knowledge which may appear when we try to forecast such evolutions and their results, and to some solutions that can be considered. We will particularly discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the deterministic approaches and the construction and working out of scenarios. The presentation is illustrated by reference to recent examples. 5 refs., 6 figs

  3. Laboratory test method for the prediction of the evolution of road-skid resistance with traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Minh Tan; Tang, Z.; Kane, Malal; De Larrard, François

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a laboratory test method for the prediction of the skit-resistance evolution due to the traffic. This work has been carried out at LCPC since 2004 and aims at providing road engineers and managers with tools to optimize asphalt mixes and forecast the road maintenance. Results are first presented on the test method simulating the polishing process on road specimens. The so-called Wehner/Schulze (WS) polishing and friction machine is briefly described. The polishing procedur...

  4. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nannemann, David P.; Birmingham, William R.; Scism, Robert A.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2011-01-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. ‘Directed evolution’ is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaign...

  5. THE DELPHI METHOD AS A TOOL FOR ANALYZING TECHNOLOGY EVOLUTION: CASE OPEN SOURCE THIN COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    MATTI KARVONEN; VILLE RYYNÄNEN; TUOMO KÄSSI

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to show how the Delphi method works as a management tool when analyzing technology evolution. The paper also provides insights on how thin computing and open source can affect the future IT infrastructure development. The primary data was collected in a three round Delphi study consisting of the following interest groups: (1) Developers of open source thin computing, (2) Industrial experts, (3) Representatives of academic institutes. The Delphi method represents...

  6. A new method of research on molecular evolution of pro-teinase superfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The molecular evolutionary tree, also known as a phylogenetic tree, of the serine proteinase superfamily was constructed by means of structural alignment. Three-dimensional structures of proteins were aligned by the SSAP program of Orengo and Taylor to obtain evolutionary dis-tances. The resulting evolutionary tree provides a topology graph that can reflect the evolution of structure and function of homology proteinase. Moreover, study on evolution of the serine proteinase superfamily can lead to better under-standing of the relationship and evolutionary difference among proteins of the superfamily, and is of significance to protein engineering, molecular design and protein structure prediction. Structure alignment is one of the useful methods of research on molecular evolution of protein.

  7. Multiple (′/)-expansion method and its applications to nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Junchao Chen; Biao Li

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an extended multiple (′/)-expansion method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. The validity and advantages of the proposed method is illustrated by its applications to the Sharma–Tasso–Olver equation, the sixth-order Ramani equation, the generalized shallow water wave equation, the Caudrey–Dodd–Gibbon–Sawada–Kotera equation, the sixth-order Boussinesq equation and the Hirota–Satsuma equations. As a result, various complexiton solutions consisting of hyperbolic functions, trigonometric functions, rational functions and their mixture with parameters are obtained. When some parameters are taken as special values, the known double solitary-like wave solutions are derived from the double hyperbolic function solution. In addition, this method can also be used to deal with some high-dimensional and variable coefficients’ nonlinear evolution equations.

  8. Multiple travelling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations using a unified algebraic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new direct and unified algebraic method for constructing multiple travelling wave solutions of general nonlinear evolution equations is presented and implemented in a computer algebraic system. Compared with most of the existing tanh methods, the Jacobi elliptic function method or other sophisticated methods, the proposed method not only gives new and more general solutions, but also provides a guideline to classify the various types of the travelling wave solutions according to the values of some parameters. The solutions obtained in this paper include (a) kink-shaped and bell-shaped soliton solutions, (b) rational solutions, (c) triangular periodic solutions and (d) Jacobi and Weierstrass doubly periodic wave solutions. Among them, the Jacobi elliptic periodic wave solutions exactly degenerate to the soliton solutions at a certain limit condition. The efficiency of the method can be demonstrated on a large variety of nonlinear evolution equations such as those considered in this paper, KdV-MKdV, Ito's fifth MKdV, Hirota, Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov, Broer-Kaup, generalized coupled Hirota-Satsuma, coupled Schroedinger-KdV, (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave, (2+1)-dimensional Davey-Stewartson equations. In addition, as an illustrative sample, the properties of the soliton solutions and Jacobi doubly periodic solutions for the Hirota equation are shown by some figures. The links among our proposed method, the tanh method, extended tanh method and the Jacobi elliptic function method are clarified generally. (author)

  9. Development of efficient time-evolution method based on three-term recurrence relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akama, Tomoko, E-mail: a.tomo---s-b-l-r@suou.waseda.jp; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    The advantage of the real-time (RT) propagation method is a direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation which describes frequency properties as well as all dynamics of a molecular system composed of electrons and nuclei in quantum physics and chemistry. Its applications have been limited by computational feasibility, as the evaluation of the time-evolution operator is computationally demanding. In this article, a new efficient time-evolution method based on the three-term recurrence relation (3TRR) was proposed to reduce the time-consuming numerical procedure. The basic formula of this approach was derived by introducing a transformation of the operator using the arcsine function. Since this operator transformation causes transformation of time, we derived the relation between original and transformed time. The formula was adapted to assess the performance of the RT time-dependent Hartree-Fock (RT-TDHF) method and the time-dependent density functional theory. Compared to the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, our new approach decreased computational time of the RT-TDHF calculation by about factor of four, showing the 3TRR formula to be an efficient time-evolution method for reducing computational cost.

  10. Dynamic and Quantitative Method of Analyzing Service Consistency Evolution Based on Extended Hierarchical Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA. Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service’s evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA, which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12% is the second biggest one, and the service version’s confusion (1.2% is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  11. Using maximum likelihood method to detect adaptive evolution of HCV envelope protein-coding genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wenjuan; ZHANG Yuan; ZHONG Yang

    2006-01-01

    Nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate ratio (dN/dS) is an important measure for evaluating selective pressure based on the protein-coding sequences. Maximum likelihood (ML) method with codon-substitution models is a powerful statistic tool for detecting amino acid sites under positive selection and adaptive evolution. We analyzed the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein-coding sequences from 18 general geno/ subtypes worldwide, and found 4 amino acid sites under positive selection. Since these sites are located in different immune epitopes, it is reasonable to anticipate that our study would have potential values in biomedicine. It also suggests that the ML method is an effective way to detect adaptive evolution in virus proteins with relatively high genetic diversity.

  12. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: A comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Witzke, V; Favier, B

    2016-01-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermo-chemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the e...

  13. Standard test methods for arsenic in uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 These test methods are applicable to the determination of total arsenic in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by atomic absorption spectrometry. Two test methods are given: Test Method A—Arsine Generation-Atomic Absorption (Sections 5-10), and Test Method B—Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption (Appendix X1). 1.2 The test methods are equivalent. The limit of detection for each test method is 0.1 μg As/g U when using a sample containing 0.5 to 1.0 g U. Test Method B does not have the complete collection details for precision and bias data thus the method appears as an appendix. 1.3 Test Method A covers the measurement of arsenic in uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) solutions by converting arsenic to arsine and measuring the arsine vapor by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. 1.4 Test Method B utilizes a solvent extraction to remove the uranium from the UO2F2 solution prior to measurement of the arsenic by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. 1.5 Both insoluble and soluble arsenic are measured when UF6 is...

  14. The evolution of nonlinear dynamics in political science and public administration: Methods, modeling and momentum

    OpenAIRE

    L. Douglas Kiel

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of the application of nonlinear dynamics and related methods to the study of political science and public administration throughout the 20th century. Some analysts understood the importance of nonlinearity to political and administrative studies in the early part of the century. More recently, a growing number of scholars understand that the political and administrative worlds are ripe with nonlinearity and thus amenable to nonlinear dynamical techniques and...

  15. METHOD FOR FORECASTING DI BASED ON TRIZ TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM EVOLUTION THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    JIANGUANG SUN; RUNHUA TAN

    2012-01-01

    Disruptive Innovation (DI) is an effective method for a new firm to enter mature market. According to the composing analysis of the technical system for the product, six kinds of typical state in the technical system process can be detected. In accordance with technology system evolution analysis, two kinds of evolutionary technologies — mainstream evolutionary technologies and laggard evolutionary technologies — can be detected. Then, the conditions for forecasting DI technologies are establ...

  16. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: A comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2016-08-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermo-chemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the energetics provides a comprehensive understanding of the energy exchange during the system's evolution. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of each forcing method and their relation with natural mechanisms generating shear flows.

  17. Evolution of self-reporting methods for identifying discrete emotions in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Hudson, Peter; Bellocchi, Alberto; Henderson, Senka; King, Donna; Tobin, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Emotion researchers have grappled with challenging methodological issues in capturing emotions of participants in naturalistic settings such as school or university classrooms. Self-reporting methods have been used frequently, yet these methods are inadequate when used alone. We argue that the self-reporting methods of emotion diaries and cogenerative dialogues can be helpful in identifying in-the-moment emotions when used in conjunction with the microanalysis of video recordings of classroom events. We trace the evolution of our use of innovative self-reporting methods through three cases from our research projects, and propose new directions for our ongoing development and application of these methods in both school and university classrooms.

  18. Decoupling the NLO coupled QED $\\otimes$ QCD, DGLAP evolution equations,Using Laplace Transform Method

    CERN Document Server

    Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    We analytically solved the QED $\\otimes$ QCD coupled DGLAP evolution equations at leading order (LO) quantum electrodynamics (QED) and next to leading order (NLO) quantum chromodynamics (QCD) approximations, using the Laplace transform method and then computed the proton structure function in terms of the unpolarized parton distributions functions. Our analyitical solutions for parton densities are in good agreement with those from APFEL (A PDF Evolution Library) (Computer Physics Communications 185, 1647-1668 (2014)) and CT14QED (Phys. Rev. D 93, 114015 (2016)) global parameterizations. We also compared the proton structure function, $F_{2}^{p}(x,Q^{2})$, with experimental data released by the ZEUS and H1 collaborations at HERA. There is a nice agreement between them in the range of low and high x and $Q^{2}$.

  19. Multiscale diffusion method for simulations of long-time defect evolution with application to dislocation climb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. L.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    In many problems of interest to materials scientists and engineers, the evolution of crystalline extended defects (dislocations, cracks, grain boundaries, interfaces, voids, precipitates) is controlled by the flow of point defects (interstitial/substitutional atoms and/or vacancies) through the crystal into the extended defect. Precise modeling of this behavior requires fully atomistic methods in and around the extended defect, but the flow of point defects entering the defect region can be treated by coarse-grained methods. Here, a multiscale algorithm is presented to provide this coupling. Specifically, direct accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) of extended defect evolution is coupled to a diffusing point defect concentration field that captures the long spatial and temporal scales of point defect motion in the presence of the internal stress fields generated by the evolving defect. The algorithm is applied to study vacancy absorption into an edge dislocation in aluminum where vacancy accumulation in the core leads to nucleation of a double-jog that then operates as a sink for additional vacancies; this corresponds to the initial stages of dislocation climb modeled with explicit atomistic resolution. The method is general and so can be applied to many other problems associated with nucleation, growth, and reaction due to accumulation of point defects in crystalline materials.

  20. A Numerical Method for Simulating the Microscopic Damage Evolution in Composites Under Uniaxial Transverse Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jie; Zhao, Libin; Zhang, Jianyu; Liu, Zhanli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method that combines a surface-based cohesive model and extended finite element method (XFEM) without predefining the crack paths is presented to simulate the microscopic damage evolution in composites under uniaxial transverse tension. The proposed method is verified to accurately capture the crack kinking into the matrix after fiber/matrix debonding. A statistical representative volume element (SRVE) under periodic boundary conditions is used to approximate the microstructure of the composites. The interface parameters of the cohesive models are investigated, in which the initial interface stiffness has a great effect on the predictions of the fiber/matrix debonding. The detailed debonding states of SRVE with strong and weak interfaces are compared based on the surface-based and element-based cohesive models. The mechanism of damage in composites under transverse tension is described as the appearance of the interface cracks and their induced matrix micro-cracking, both of which coalesce into transversal macro-cracks. Good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and the in situ experimental observations, demonstrating the efficiency of the presented model for simulating the microscopic damage evolution in composites.

  1. [Reasearch on evolution and transition of processing method of fuzi in ancient and modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chan-Chan; Cheng, Ming-En; Duan, Hai-Yan; Peng, Hua-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Fuzi is a medicine used for rescuing from collapse by restoring yang as well as a famous toxic traditional Chinese medicine. In order to ensure the efficacy and safe medication, Fuzi has mostly been applied after being processed. There have been different Fuzi processing methods recorded by doctors of previous generations. Besides, there have also been differences in Fuzi processing methods recorded in modern pharmacopeia and ancient medical books. In this study, the authors traced back to medical books between the Han Dynasty and the period of Republic of China, and summarized Fuzi processing methods collected in ancient and modern literatures. According to the results, Fuzi processing methods and using methods have changed along with the evolution of dynasties, with differences in ancient and modern processing methods. Before the Tang Dynasty, Fuzi had been mostly processed and soaked. From Tang to Ming Dynasties, Fuzi had been mostly processed, soaked and stir-fried. During the Qing Dynasty, Fuzi had been mostly soaked and boiled. In the modem times, Fuzi is mostly processed by being boiled and soaked. Before the Tang Dynasty, a whole piece of Fuzi herbs or their fragments had been applied in medicines; Whereas their fragments are primarily used in the modern times. Because different processing methods have great impacts on the toxicity of Fuzi, it is suggested to study Fuzi processing methods. PMID:25011281

  2. New approach of (G′/G-expansion method and new approach of generalized (G′/G-expansion method for nonlinear evolution equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibun Naher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, new (G′/G-expansion method and new generalized (G′/G-expansion method is proposed to generate more general and abundant new exact traveling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. The novelty and advantages of these methods is exemplified by its implementation to the KdV equation. The results emphasize the power of proposed methods in providing distinct solutions of different physical structures in nonlinear science. Moreover, these methods could be more effectively used to deal with higher dimensional and higher order nonlinear evolution equations which frequently arise in many scientific real time application fields.

  3. Semi-automated calibration method for modelling of mountain permafrost evolution in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmy, A.; Rajczak, J.; Delaloye, R.; Hilbich, C.; Hoelzle, M.; Kotlarski, S.; Lambiel, C.; Noetzli, J.; Phillips, M.; Salzmann, N.; Staub, B.; Hauck, C.

    2015-09-01

    Permafrost is a widespread phenomenon in the European Alps. Many important topics such as the future evolution of permafrost related to climate change and the detection of permafrost related to potential natural hazards sites are of major concern to our society. Numerical permafrost models are the only tools which facilitate the projection of the future evolution of permafrost. Due to the complexity of the processes involved and the heterogeneity of Alpine terrain, models must be carefully calibrated and results should be compared with observations at the site (borehole) scale. However, a large number of local point data are necessary to obtain a broad overview of the thermal evolution of mountain permafrost over a larger area, such as the Swiss Alps, and the site-specific model calibration of each point would be time-consuming. To face this issue, this paper presents a semi-automated calibration method using the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) as implemented in a 1-D soil model (CoupModel) and applies it to six permafrost sites in the Swiss Alps prior to long-term permafrost evolution simulations. We show that this automated calibration method is able to accurately reproduce the main thermal condition characteristics with some limitations at sites with unique conditions such as 3-D air or water circulation, which have to be calibrated manually. The calibration obtained was used for RCM-based long-term simulations under the A1B climate scenario specifically downscaled at each borehole site. The projection shows general permafrost degradation with thawing at 10 m, even partially reaching 20 m depths until the end of the century, but with different timing among the sites. The degradation is more rapid at bedrock sites whereas ice-rich sites with a blocky surface cover showed a reduced sensitivity to climate change. The snow cover duration is expected to be reduced drastically (between -20 to -37 %) impacting the ground thermal regime. However

  4. Interfacial morphology evolution of a novel room-temperature ultrasonic bonding method based on nanocone arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel ultrasonic bonding method based on Ni nanocone arrays was developed. • Two types of voids were confirmed at the interface. • Type I voids caused by insufficient indentation can be eliminated by increasing time and pressure. • The formation of Type II voids caused by ultrasonic energy has a crucial bonding pressure, 7MPa. • Morphology evolution from cone-like to ladder-like and finally a planar structure was found. - Abstract: The evolution of interfacial morphology is investigated in joints bonded by a newly developed ambient-temperature ultrasonic bonding process based on Ni nano-cone arrays. This confirmed two types of void at the interface: a Type I void in the concave area among the cone-like nanocrystals, and a Type II void on the top of the cone-like nanocrystals. By increasing the bonding pressure or time, the Type I voids can be eliminated; however, a pressure threshold exists for the Type II voids, below which increasing the bonding time accelerates the formation of Type II voids. At pressures above this threshold, on the other hand, increasing the bonding time results in shrinkage of the Type II voids. Varying the pressure and time was also found to induce a change in the interfacial morphology from cone-like to ladder-like and finally a planar structure. In this way, the critical pressure for obtaining a solid bonding joint was found to be 7 MPa

  5. Compartmentalized self-replication: a novel method for the directed evolution of polymerases and other enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadessy, Farid J; Holliger, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) is a novel method for the directed evolution of enzymes and, in particular, polymerases. In its simplest form, CSR consists of a simple feedback loop involving a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene (self-replication). Self-replication occurs in discrete, spatially separate, noncommunicating compartments formed by a heat-stable water-in-oil emulsion. Compartmentalization ensures the linkage of phenotype and genotype (i.e., it ensures that each polymerase replicates only its own encoding gene to the exclusion of those in the other compartments). As a result, adaptive gains by the polymerase directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding polymerase gene. CSR has proven to be a useful strategy for the directed evolution of polymerases directly from diverse repertoires of polymerase genes. In this chapter, we describe some of the CSR protocols used successfully to evolve variants of T. aquaticus Pol I (Taq) polymerase with novel and useful properties, such as increased thermostability or resistance to the potent inhibitor, heparin, from a repertoire of randomly mutated Taq polymerase genes. PMID:17041269

  6. Development of methods for the directed evolution of penicillin G acylase by in vitro compartmentalization

    OpenAIRE

    Woronoff, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic catalysts have been finely tuned for their specific function though natural evolution, by iterative mutations and selections cycles. Directed evolution mimics natural evolution at the laboratory scale and allows the selection, in large collections of variants, of enzymes bearing new properties. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) is the directed evolution technique used in this work, and consists of aqueous microdroplets dispersed in oil acting as artificial cells. Single genes can ...

  7. Generalization of the cavity method for adiabatic evolution of Gibbs states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdeborová, Lenka; Krzakala, Florent

    2010-06-01

    Mean-field glassy systems have a complicated energy landscape and an enormous number of different Gibbs states. In this paper, we introduce a generalization of the cavity method in order to describe the adiabatic evolution of these glassy Gibbs states as an external parameter, such as the temperature, is tuned. We give a general derivation of the method and describe in details the solution of the resulting equations for the fully connected p -spin model, the XOR-satisfiability (SAT) problem and the antiferromagnetic Potts glass (coloring problem). As direct results of the states following method we present a study of very slow Monte Carlo annealings, the demonstration of the presence of temperature chaos in these systems and the identification of an easy/hard transition for simulated annealing in constraint optimization problems. We also discuss the relation between our approach and the Franz-Parisi potential, as well as with the reconstruction problem on trees in computer science. A mapping between the states following method and the physics on the Nishimori line is also presented.

  8. A Model Parameter Extraction Method for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ozone Chamber using Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, M.; Salam, Z.; Ishaque, K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to design an efficient resonant power supply for ozone gas generator, it is necessary to accurately determine the parameters of the ozone chamber. In the conventional method, the information from Lissajous plot is used to estimate the values of these parameters. However, the experimental setup for this purpose can only predict the parameters at one operating frequency and there is no guarantee that it results in the highest ozone gas yield. This paper proposes a new approach to determine the parameters using a search and optimization technique known as Differential Evolution (DE). The desired objective function of DE is set at the resonance condition and the chamber parameter values can be searched regardless of experimental constraints. The chamber parameters obtained from the DE technique are validated by experiment.

  9. Nonlinear evolution of cylindrical gravitational waves: Numerical method and physical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, Juliana; de Oliveira, H. P.; Rodrigues, E. L.

    2016-05-01

    General cylindrical waves are the simplest axisymmetrical gravitational waves that contain both + and × modes of polarization. In this paper, we have studied the evolution of general cylindrical gravitational waves in the realm of the characteristic scheme with a numerical code based on the Galerkin-Collocation method. The investigation consists of the numerical realization of concepts such as Bondi mass and the news functions adapted to cylindrical symmetry. The Bondi mass decays due to the presence of the news functions associated with both polarization modes. We have interpreted each polarization mode as channels from which mass is extracted. Under this perspective, we have presented the enhancement effect of the polarization mode + due to the nonlinear interaction with the mode ×. After discussing the role of matter in cylindrical symmetry, we have extended the numerical code to include electromagnetic fields.

  10. Differential Evolution Based Intelligent System State Search Method for Composite Power System Reliability Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, Ashok; Kumarappan, N.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach for evaluating the reliability indices of a composite power system that adopts binary differential evolution (BDE) algorithm in the search mechanism to select the system states. These states also called dominant states, have large state probability and higher loss of load curtailment necessary to maintain real power balance. A chromosome of a BDE algorithm represents the system state. BDE is not applied for its traditional application of optimizing a non-linear objective function, but used as tool for exploring more number of dominant states by producing new chromosomes, mutant vectors and trail vectors based on the fitness function. The searched system states are used to evaluate annualized system and load point reliability indices. The proposed search methodology is applied to RBTS and IEEE-RTS test systems and results are compared with other approaches. This approach evaluates the indices similar to existing methods while analyzing less number of system states.

  11. Comparing wave shoaling methods used in large-scale coastal evolution modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, P. W.; Adams, P. N.; Murray, A.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of methods are available to simulate wave propagation from the deep ocean to the surf zone. They range from simple and computationally fast (e.g. linear wave theory applied to shore-parallel bathymetric contours) to complicated and computationally intense (e.g., Delft's ';Simulating WAves Nearshore', or SWAN, model applied to complex bathymetry). Despite their differences, the goal of each method is the same with respect to coastline evolution modeling: to link offshore waves with rates of (and gradients in) alongshore sediment transport. Choosing a shoaling technique for modeling coastline evolution should be partly informed by the spatial and temporal scales of the model, as well as the model's intent (is it simulating a specific coastline, or exploring generic coastline dynamics?). However, the particular advantages and disadvantages of each technique, and how the advantages/disadvantages vary over different model spatial and temporal scales, are not always clear. We present a wave shoaling model that simultaneously computes breaking wave heights and angles using three increasingly complex wave shoaling routines: the most basic approach assuming shore-parallel bathymetric contours, a wave ray tracing method that includes wave energy convergence and divergence and non-shore-parallel contours, and a spectral wave model (SWAN). Initial results show reasonable agreement between wave models along a flat shoreline for small (1 m) wave heights, low wave angles (0 to 10 degrees), and simple bathymetry. But, as wave heights and angles increase, bathymetry becomes more variable, and the shoreline shape becomes sinuous, the model results begin to diverge. This causes different gradients in alongshore sediment transport between model runs employing different shoaling techniques and, therefore, different coastline behavior. Because SWAN does not approximate wave breaking (which drives alongshore sediment transport) we use a routine to extract grid cells from SWAN

  12. Cyndi: a multi-objective evolution algorithm based method for bioactive molecular conformational generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Honglin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformation generation is a ubiquitous problem in molecule modelling. Many applications require sampling the broad molecular conformational space or perceiving the bioactive conformers to ensure success. Numerous in silico methods have been proposed in an attempt to resolve the problem, ranging from deterministic to non-deterministic and systemic to stochastic ones. In this work, we described an efficient conformation sampling method named Cyndi, which is based on multi-objective evolution algorithm. Results The conformational perturbation is subjected to evolutionary operation on the genome encoded with dihedral torsions. Various objectives are designated to render the generated Pareto optimal conformers to be energy-favoured as well as evenly scattered across the conformational space. An optional objective concerning the degree of molecular extension is added to achieve geometrically extended or compact conformations which have been observed to impact the molecular bioactivity (J Comput -Aided Mol Des 2002, 16: 105–112. Testing the performance of Cyndi against a test set consisting of 329 small molecules reveals an average minimum RMSD of 0.864 Å to corresponding bioactive conformations, indicating Cyndi is highly competitive against other conformation generation methods. Meanwhile, the high-speed performance (0.49 ± 0.18 seconds per molecule renders Cyndi to be a practical toolkit for conformational database preparation and facilitates subsequent pharmacophore mapping or rigid docking. The copy of precompiled executable of Cyndi and the test set molecules in mol2 format are accessible in Additional file 1. Conclusion On the basis of MOEA algorithm, we present a new, highly efficient conformation generation method, Cyndi, and report the results of validation and performance studies comparing with other four methods. The results reveal that Cyndi is capable of generating geometrically diverse conformers and outperforms

  13. Modelling of the evolutional methods to satisfy the consumer’s needs in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.K. Hlinenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is development of evolutional models of methods and means of satisfying the consumer needs in a form of corresponding lines of development represented by sets of successive discrete states regularly passed by these methods and means in the process of evolution. Such models are supposed to match demands of the NPD process providing objective appraisal and predicting of the consumer value of innovation taking into account the change of consumer needs of and attitude toward the methods of satisfying them under global market changes and consumer trends that these changes reflect. The results of the analysis. New product correspondence with customer needs is one of the critical terms of their market success. Existing methods of estimation of this correspondence make it possible to estimate only “obvious” needs and demands in the moment or during the period of interaction with the consumer while latent and future needs remain beyond the investigation. Consumers are not static in their needs and behaviour, their demands to level and means of satisfaction of needs change under the influence of volatile environment and as a result of consumer self-development. Collected and proceeded by traditional marketing research technologies data does not provide in-depth and reliable understanding even of present state of consumer needs structure because of difficulties of synchronization and integration of varied consumer inputs and fuzziness of consumer segments; a problem of future needs identification for successful new product development is still left in abeyance. Satisfaction of any need evolves in direction of “idealization” i.e. satisfying in a moment and place of emergence of the need free of charge on the process of satisfying. The idealization trend is realized through: 1 dynamization, integration and specialization of needs; 2 increase of level of satisfaction of every need and number of

  14. A simple and general method for solving detailed chemical evolution with delayed production of iron and other chemical elements

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; Spitoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a new theoretical method for solving the chemical evolution of galaxies, by assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation for chemical elements restored by massive stars and the Delay Time Distribution formalism for the delayed chemical enrichment by Type Ia Supernovae. The galaxy gas mass assembly history, together with the assumed stellar yields and initial mass function, represent the starting point of this method. We derive a very simple and general equation which closely relates the Laplace transforms of the galaxy gas accretion and star formation history, which can be used to simplify the problem of retrieving these quantities in most of current galaxy evolution models. We find that - once the galaxy star formation history has been reconstructed from our assumptions - the differential equation for the evolution of the chemical element $X$ can be suitably solved with classical methods. We apply our model to reproduce the $[\\text{O/Fe}]$ and $[\\text{Si/Fe}]$ vs. $[\\text{Fe/...

  15. Predicting the Evolution of CO2 Emissions in Bahrain with Automated Forecasting Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Tudor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The 2012 Doha meeting established the continuation of the Kyoto protocol, the legally-binding global agreement under which signatory countries had agreed to reduce their carbon emissions. Contrary to this assumed obligation, all G20 countries with the exception of France and the UK saw significant increases in their CO2 emissions over the last 25 years, surpassing 300% in the case of China. This paper attempts to forecast the evolution of carbon dioxide emissions in Bahrain over the 2012–2021 decade by employing seven Automated Forecasting Methods, including the exponential smoothing state space model (ETS, the Holt–Winters Model, the BATS/TBATS model, ARIMA, the structural time series model (STS, the naive model, and the neural network time series forecasting method (NNAR. Results indicate a reversal of the current decreasing trend of pollution in the country, with a point estimate of 2309 metric tons per capita at the end of 2020 and 2317 at the end of 2021, as compared to the 1934 level achieved in 2010. The country’s baseline level corresponding to year 1990 (as specified by the Doha amendment of the Kyoto protocol is approximately 25.54 metric tons per capita, which implies a maximum level of 20.96 metric tons per capita for the year 2020 (corresponding to a decrease of 18% relative to the baseline level in order for Bahrain to comply with the protocol. Our results therefore suggest that Bahrain cannot meet its assumed target.

  16. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants. PMID:27068539

  17. Mean protein evolutionary distance: a method for comparative protein evolution and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are under tight evolutionary constraints, so if a protein changes it can only do so in ways that do not compromise its function. In addition, the proteins in an organism evolve at different rates. Leveraging the history of patristic distance methods, a new method for analysing comparative protein evolution, called Mean Protein Evolutionary Distance (MeaPED), measures differential resistance to evolutionary pressure across viral proteomes and is thereby able to point to the proteins' roles. Different species' proteomes can also be compared because the results, consistent across virus subtypes, concisely reflect the very different lifestyles of the viruses. The MeaPED method is here applied to influenza A virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), dengue virus, rotavirus A, polyomavirus BK and measles, which span the positive and negative single-stranded, doubled-stranded and reverse transcribing RNA viruses, and double-stranded DNA viruses. From this analysis, host interaction proteins including hemagglutinin (influenza), and viroporins agnoprotein (polyomavirus), p7 (hepatitis C) and VPU (HIV) emerge as evolutionary hot-spots. By contrast, RNA-directed RNA polymerase proteins including L (measles), PB1/PB2 (influenza) and VP1 (rotavirus), and internal serine proteases such as NS3 (dengue and hepatitis C virus) emerge as evolutionary cold-spots. The hot spot influenza hemagglutinin protein is contrasted with the related cold spot H protein from measles. It is proposed that evolutionary cold-spot proteins can become significant targets for second-line anti-viral therapeutics, in cases where front-line vaccines are not available or have become ineffective due to mutations in the hot-spot, generally more antigenically exposed proteins. The MeaPED package is available from www.pam1.bcs.uwa.edu.au/~michaelw/ftp/src/meaped.tar.gz. PMID:23613826

  18. Mean protein evolutionary distance: a method for comparative protein evolution and its application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Wise

    Full Text Available Proteins are under tight evolutionary constraints, so if a protein changes it can only do so in ways that do not compromise its function. In addition, the proteins in an organism evolve at different rates. Leveraging the history of patristic distance methods, a new method for analysing comparative protein evolution, called Mean Protein Evolutionary Distance (MeaPED, measures differential resistance to evolutionary pressure across viral proteomes and is thereby able to point to the proteins' roles. Different species' proteomes can also be compared because the results, consistent across virus subtypes, concisely reflect the very different lifestyles of the viruses. The MeaPED method is here applied to influenza A virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, dengue virus, rotavirus A, polyomavirus BK and measles, which span the positive and negative single-stranded, doubled-stranded and reverse transcribing RNA viruses, and double-stranded DNA viruses. From this analysis, host interaction proteins including hemagglutinin (influenza, and viroporins agnoprotein (polyomavirus, p7 (hepatitis C and VPU (HIV emerge as evolutionary hot-spots. By contrast, RNA-directed RNA polymerase proteins including L (measles, PB1/PB2 (influenza and VP1 (rotavirus, and internal serine proteases such as NS3 (dengue and hepatitis C virus emerge as evolutionary cold-spots. The hot spot influenza hemagglutinin protein is contrasted with the related cold spot H protein from measles. It is proposed that evolutionary cold-spot proteins can become significant targets for second-line anti-viral therapeutics, in cases where front-line vaccines are not available or have become ineffective due to mutations in the hot-spot, generally more antigenically exposed proteins. The MeaPED package is available from www.pam1.bcs.uwa.edu.au/~michaelw/ftp/src/meaped.tar.gz.

  19. Optimal the tilt angles for photovoltaic modules using PSO method with nonlinear time-varying evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particle-swarm optimization method with nonlinear time-varying evolution (PSO-NTVE) is employed in determining the tilt angle of photovoltaic (PV) modules in Taiwan. The objective is to maximize the output electrical energy of the modules. In this study, seven Taiwanese cities were selected for analysis. First, the sun's position at any time and location was predicted by the mathematical procedure of Julian dating, and then the solar irradiation was obtained at each site under a clear sky. By combining the temperature effect, the PSO-NTVE method is adopted to calculate the optimal tilt angles for fixed south-facing PV modules. In this method, the parameters are determined by using matrix experiments with an orthogonal array, in which a minimal number of experiments have an effect that approximates the full factorial experiments. Statistical error analysis was performed to compare the results between the four PSO methods and experimental results. Hengchun city in which the minimum total error value of 6.12% the reasons for the weather more stability and less building shade. A comparison of the measurement results in electrical energy between the four PSO methods and the PV modules set a six tilt angles. Obviously four types of PSO methods simulation of electrical energy value from 231.12 kWh/m2 for Taipei to 233.81 kWh/m2 for Hengchun greater than the measurement values from 224.71 kWh/m2 for Taichung to 228.47 kWh/m2 for Hengchun by PV module which is due to instability caused by climate change. Finally, the results show that the annual optimal angle for the Taipei area is 18.16o; for Taichung, 17.3o; for Tainan, 16.15o; for Kaosiung, 15.79o; for Hengchung, 15.17o; for Hualian, 17.16o; and for Taitung, 15.94o. It is evident that the authorized Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) recommends that tilt angle of 23.5o was not an appropriate use of Taiwan's seven cities. PV modules with the installation of the tilt angle should be adjusted in different

  20. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  1. Galactic cold cores. VII. Filament formation and evolution: Methods and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Tóth, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The association of filaments with protostellar objects has made these structures a priority target in star formation studies. However, little is known about the link between filament properties and their local environment. Aims: The datasets from the Herschel Galactic Cold cores key programme allow for a statistical study of filaments with a wide range of intrinsic and environmental characteristics. Characterisation of this sample can therefore be used to identify key physical parameters and quantify the role of the environment in the formation of supercritical filaments. These results are necessary to constrain theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods: Filaments were extracted from fields at distance D< 500 pc with the getfilaments algorithm and characterised according to their column density profiles and intrinsic properties. Each profile was fitted with a beam-convolved Plummer-like function, and the filament structure was quantified based on the relative contributions from the filament "core", represented by a Gaussian, and "wing" component, dominated by the power-law behaviour of the Plummer-like function. These filament parameters were examined for populations associated with different background levels. Results: Filaments increase their core (Mline,core) and wing (Mline,wing) contributions while increasing their total linear mass density (Mline,tot). Both components appear to be linked to the local environment, with filaments in higher backgrounds having systematically more massive Mline,core and Mline,wing. This dependence on the environment supports an accretion-based model of filament evolution in the local neighbourhood (D ≤ 500 pc). Structures located in the highest backgrounds develop the highest central AV, Mline,core, and Mline,wing as Mline,tot increases with time, favoured by the local availability of material and the enhanced gravitational potential. Our results indicate that filaments acquiring a significantly

  2. Evolution of heavy quark distribution function in quark-gluon plasma: using the Iterative Laplace Transform Method

    CERN Document Server

    Pari, Sharareh Mehrabi; Shahri, Fatemeh Taghavi

    2015-01-01

    The "Iterative Laplace Transform Method" is used to solve the Fokker-Planck equation for finding the time evolution of the heavy quarks distribution functions such as charm and bottom in quark gluon plasma. These solutions will lead us to calculation of nuclear suppression factor RAA. The results have good agreement with available experiment data from the PHENIX collaboration.

  3. A simple and general method for solving detailed chemical evolution with delayed production of iron and other chemical elements

    OpenAIRE

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; Matteucci, Francesca; Spitoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a new theoretical method for solving the chemical evolution of galaxies, by assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation for chemical elements restored by massive stars and the Delay Time Distribution formalism for the delayed chemical enrichment by Type Ia Supernovae. The galaxy gas mass assembly history, together with the assumed stellar yields and initial mass function, represent the starting point of this method. We derive a very simple and general equatio...

  4. Spatial and Temporal Simulation of Human Evolution. Methods, Frameworks and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Benguigui, Macarena; Arenas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of human evolution are fundamental to understand the current gradients of human diversity. In this concern, genetic samples collected from current populations together with archaeological data are the most important resources to study human evolution. However, they are often insufficient to properly evaluate a variety of evolutionary scenarios, leading to continuous debates and discussions. A commonly applied strategy consists of the use of computer simulations based on, as realistic...

  5. A high-fidelity method to analyze perturbation evolution in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, S.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-04-01

    Small perturbation propagation in fluid flows is usually examined by linearizing the governing equations about a steady basic state. It is often useful, however, to study perturbation evolution in the unsteady evolving turbulent environment. Such analyses can elucidate the role of perturbations in the generation of coherent structures or the production of noise from jet turbulence. The appropriate equations are still the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, except that the linearization must be performed about the instantaneous evolving turbulent state, which forms the coefficients of the linearized equations. This is a far more difficult problem since in addition to the turbulent state, its rate of change and the perturbation field are all required at each instant. In this paper, we develop and use a novel technique for this problem by using a pair (denoted "baseline" and "twin") of simultaneous synchronized Large-Eddy Simulations (LES). At each time-step, small disturbances whose propagation characteristics are to be studied, are introduced into the twin through a forcing term. At subsequent time steps, the difference between the two simulations is shown to be equivalent to solving the forced Navier-Stokes equations, linearized about the instantaneous turbulent state. The technique does not put constraints on the forcing, which could be arbitrary, e.g., white noise or other stochastic variants. We consider, however, "native" forcing having properties of disturbances that exist naturally in the turbulent environment. The method then isolates the effect of turbulence in a particular region on the rest of the field, which is useful in the study of noise source localization. The synchronized technique is relatively simple to implement into existing codes. In addition to minimizing the storage and retrieval of large time-varying datasets, it avoids the need to explicitly linearize the governing equations, which can be a very complicated task for viscous terms or

  6. Evolution of regional to global paddy rice mapping methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinwei; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-09-01

    Paddy rice agriculture plays an important role in various environmental issues including food security, water use, climate change, and disease transmission. However, regional and global paddy rice maps are surprisingly scarce and sporadic despite numerous efforts in paddy rice mapping algorithms and applications. With the increasing need for regional to global paddy rice maps, this paper reviewed the existing paddy rice mapping methods from the literatures ranging from the 1980s to 2015. In particular, we illustrated the evolution of these paddy rice mapping efforts, looking specifically at the future trajectory of paddy rice mapping methodologies. The biophysical features and growth phases of paddy rice were analyzed first, and feature selections for paddy rice mapping were analyzed from spectral, polarimetric, temporal, spatial, and textural aspects. We sorted out paddy rice mapping algorithms into four categories: (1) Reflectance data and image statistic-based approaches, (2) vegetation index (VI) data and enhanced image statistic-based approaches, (3) VI or RADAR backscatter-based temporal analysis approaches, and (4) phenology-based approaches through remote sensing recognition of key growth phases. The phenology-based approaches using unique features of paddy rice (e.g., transplanting) for mapping have been increasingly used in paddy rice mapping. Current applications of these phenology-based approaches generally use coarse resolution MODIS data, which involves mixed pixel issues in Asia where smallholders comprise the majority of paddy rice agriculture. The free release of Landsat archive data and the launch of Landsat 8 and Sentinel-2 are providing unprecedented opportunities to map paddy rice in fragmented landscapes with higher spatial resolution. Based on the literature review, we discussed a series of issues for large scale operational paddy rice mapping.

  7. Method of Multiple Scales and Travelling Wave Solutions for (2+1)-Dimensional KdV Type Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Burcu; Özer, M. Naci; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we applied the method of multiple scales for Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equations and we derived nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) type equations. So we get a relation between KdV type equations and NLS type equations. In addition, exact solutions were found for KdV type equations. The ( G'} over G )-expansion methods and the ( {G'} over G, {1 over G}} )-expansion methods were proposed to establish new exact solutions for KdV type differential equations. We obtained periodic and hyperbolic function solutions for these equations. These methods are very effective for getting travelling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs).

  8. Family size evolution in Drosophila chemosensory gene families: a comparative analysis with a critical appraisal of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Francisca C; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Campos, Jose Luis; Rozas, Julio

    2014-07-01

    Gene turnover rates and the evolution of gene family sizes are important aspects of genome evolution. Here, we use curated sequence data of the major chemosensory gene families from Drosophila-the gustatory receptor, odorant receptor, ionotropic receptor, and odorant-binding protein families-to conduct a comparative analysis among families, exploring different methods to estimate gene birth and death rates, including an ad hoc simulation study. Remarkably, we found that the state-of-the-art methods may produce very different rate estimates, which may lead to disparate conclusions regarding the evolution of chemosensory gene family sizes in Drosophila. Among biological factors, we found that a peculiarity of D. sechellia's gene turnover rates was a major source of bias in global estimates, whereas gene conversion had negligible effects for the families analyzed herein. Turnover rates vary considerably among families, subfamilies, and ortholog groups although all analyzed families were quite dynamic in terms of gene turnover. Computer simulations showed that the methods that use ortholog group information appear to be the most accurate for the Drosophila chemosensory families. Most importantly, these results reveal the potential of rate heterogeneity among lineages to severely bias some turnover rate estimation methods and the need of further evaluating the performance of these methods in a more diverse sampling of gene families and phylogenetic contexts. Using branch-specific codon substitution models, we find further evidence of positive selection in recently duplicated genes, which attests to a nonneutral aspect of the gene birth-and-death process. PMID:24951565

  9. A Galerkin-based formulation of the probability density evolution method for general stochastic finite element systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Vissarion; Kalogeris, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    The present paper proposes a Galerkin finite element projection scheme for the solution of the partial differential equations (pde's) involved in the probability density evolution method, for the linear and nonlinear static analysis of stochastic systems. According to the principle of preservation of probability, the probability density evolution of a stochastic system is expressed by its corresponding Fokker-Planck (FP) stochastic partial differential equation. Direct integration of the FP equation is feasible only for simple systems with a small number of degrees of freedom, due to analytical and/or numerical intractability. However, rewriting the FP equation conditioned to the random event description, a generalized density evolution equation (GDEE) can be obtained, which can be reduced to a one dimensional pde. Two Galerkin finite element method schemes are proposed for the numerical solution of the resulting pde's, namely a time-marching discontinuous Galerkin scheme and the StreamlineUpwind/Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) scheme. In addition, a reformulation of the classical GDEE is proposed, which implements the principle of probability preservation in space instead of time, making this approach suitable for the stochastic analysis of finite element systems. The advantages of the FE Galerkin methods and in particular the SUPG over finite difference schemes, like the modified Lax-Wendroff, which is the most frequently used method for the solution of the GDEE, are illustrated with numerical examples and explored further.

  10. Evolution of Humans: Understanding the Nature and Methods of Science through Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of an enquiry-based approach to the study of human evolution in a practical context, integrating role-playing, jigsaw cooperative learning and scientific argumentation. The activity seeks to unravel the evolutionary relationships of five hominids and one ape from rather "messy" evidence. This approach enhanced the…

  11. Morphological evolution and migration of void in bi-piezoelectric interface based on nonlocal phase field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. B.; Wang, X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the result of investigation into the morphological evolution and migration of void in bi-piezoelectric material interface by utilizing nonlocal phase field model and finite element method (FEM), where the small scale effect containing the long-range forces among atoms is considered. The nonlocal elastic strain energy and the nonlocal electric energy around the void are firstly calculated by the finite element method. Then based on the finite difference method (FDM), the thermodynamic equilibrium equation containing the surface energy and anisotropic diffusivity is solved to simulate the morphological evolution and migration of elliptical void in bi-piezoelectric films interface. Results show that the way of load condition plays a significant role in the evolution process, and the boundary of void's long axis gradually collapses toward the center of ellipse. In addition, the evolutionary speed of left boundary gradually decreases with scale effect coefficient growth. This work can provide references for the safety evaluation of piezoelectric materials in micro electro mechanical system.

  12. Structural evolution of LC4 alloy in making thixotropic billet by SIMA method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗守靖; 田文彤; 张广安

    2001-01-01

    The effect of SIMA process parameters on LC4 alloy's microstructure and the microstructural evolution of various soaking times have been studied. The results show that effective strain in cold deformation before reheating has a great influence on microstructural evolution. Grain size decreases and its shape also approaches to sphericity with increasing effective strain. The amount of liquid phase increases at grain boundaries and grain shape becomes smooth with increasing heating temperature. The main mechanism of grain coarsening is coalescence when eutectic liquid is rare and not totally distributed at all boundaries. Otherwise the main mechanism of grain coarsening is Ostwald ripening and the connection coarsening is more difficult to perform when the regions are nearly full of eutectic liquid.

  13. Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

  14. A Differential Evolution Based MPPT Method for Photovoltaic Modules under Partial Shading Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Partially shaded photovoltaic (PV) modules have multiple peaks in the power-voltage (P-V) characteristic curve and conventional maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm, such as perturbation and observation (P&O), which is unable to track the global maximum power point (GMPP) accurately due to its localized search space. Therefore, this paper proposes a differential evolution (DE) based optimization algorithm to provide the globalized search space to track the GMPP. The direction of muta...

  15. Innovation and Evolution of Business Relations and Networks: Theory and Method

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Ian; Young, Louise

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a complex systems perspective on innovation in networks in which innovation is conceptualized as a form of creative act associated with the dynamics and evolution of business network. We show how innovation is a form of creative act that involves the creation of new ideas and their exploitation, in which new ideas come from combining and recombining existing ideas in new ways that have value. We stress the need to move away from traditional linear, comparative static variables ba...

  16. Evolution equation of Lie-type for finite deformations, time-discrete integration, and incremental methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiala, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 226, č. 1 (2015), s. 17-35. ISSN 0001-5970 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : solid mechanics * finite deformations * evolution equation of Lie-type * time-discrete integration Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 1.465, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00707-014-1162-9#page-1

  17. Evolution of Cost Allocation Systems. Implementation ABC methods by Icelandic companies

    OpenAIRE

    Solodovnychenko,Victoría, 1967-

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe the evolution of cost allocation systems from the simplest ones to the most complex – integrated cost allocation system, which use financial and non-financial information to evaluate organizational performance. Then, apply theories into practice by research and analysis of cost allocation systems in the use by Icelandic companies. The first chapter introduces cost accounting and management accounting, and how these disciplines developed over...

  18. Monitoring of firmness evolution of peaches during storage by combining acoustic and impact methods

    OpenAIRE

    Diezma Iglesias, Belen; Valero Ubierna, Constantino; García Ramos, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Altisent, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Firmness is a very important quality property in peach. The storage of peach affects its subsequent softening process and shelf life. The temperature and duration of storage mainly influence the firmness of stored fruit, and monitoring the evolution of fruits enables producers to manage its commercial life. The objective of the present study was to use non-destructive acoustic and impact tests to estimate firmness of peaches and to elucidate the influence of storage temperature and of time on...

  19. The ((G')/G )-expansion method and travelling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ((G')/G )-expansion method is firstly proposed, where G=G(ξ) satisfies a second order linear ordinary differential equation (LODE for short), by which the travelling wave solutions involving parameters of the KdV equation, the mKdV equation, the variant Boussinesq equations and the Hirota-Satsuma equations are obtained. When the parameters are taken as special values the solitary waves are also derived from the travelling waves. The travelling wave solutions are expressed by the hyperbolic functions, the trigonometric functions and the rational functions. The proposed method is direct, concise, elementary and effective, and can be used for many other nonlinear evolution equations

  20. Research and development of hazardous/toxic waste analytical screening procedures. Available field methods for rapid screening of hazardous-waste materials at waste sites. Final report, December 1981-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.E.; Schulte, B.E.; Mangoba; McHale, E.T.

    1983-06-01

    The objective of this study was to perform preliminary laboratory evaluation of as many of the selected Class A poison detection techniques as possible within the time constraints of the program. Each of these methods was tested, when possible, for their limits of detection, reproducibility of test results, accuracy, maximum sample volume necessary, and cross sensitivities to other Class A poisons. The methods to be evaluated were for arsine, hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, lewisite, phosgene, mustard gas, and phosphine.

  1. Numerical evolutions of fields on the 2-sphere using a spectral method based on spin-weighted spherical harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Florian; Frauendiener, Jörg; Whale, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in science call for the numerical simulation of systems on manifolds with spherical topology. Through use of integer spin weighted spherical harmonics we present a method which allows for the implementation of arbitrary tensorial evolution equations. Our method combines two numerical techniques that were originally developed with different applications in mind. The first is Huffenberger and Wandelt's spectral decomposition algorithm to perform the mapping from physical to spectral space. The second is the application of Luscombe and Luban's method, to convert numerically divergent linear recursions into stable nonlinear recursions, to the calculation of reduced Wigner d-functions. We give a detailed discussion of the theory and numerical implementation of our algorithm. The properties of our method are investigated by solving the scalar and vectorial advection equation on the sphere, as well as the 2+1 Maxwell equations on a deformed sphere.

  2. Numerical evolutions of fields on the 2-sphere using a spectral method based on spin-weighted spherical harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many applications in science call for the numerical simulation of systems on manifolds with spherical topology. Through the use of integer spin-weighted spherical harmonics, we present a method which allows for the implementation of arbitrary tensorial evolution equations. Our method combines two numerical techniques that were originally developed with different applications in mind. The first is Huffenberger and Wandelt’s spectral decomposition algorithm to perform the mapping from physical to spectral space. The second is the application of Luscombe and Luban’s method, to convert numerically divergent linear recursions into stable nonlinear recursions, to the calculation of reduced Wigner d-functions. We give a detailed discussion of the theory and numerical implementation of our algorithm. The properties of our method are investigated by solving the scalar and vectorial advection equation on the sphere, as well as the 2 + 1 Maxwell equations on a deformed sphere. (paper)

  3. Numerical evolutions of fields on the 2-sphere using a spectral method based on spin-weighted spherical harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Florian; Daszuta, Boris; Frauendiener, Jörg; Whale, Ben

    2014-04-01

    Many applications in science call for the numerical simulation of systems on manifolds with spherical topology. Through the use of integer spin-weighted spherical harmonics, we present a method which allows for the implementation of arbitrary tensorial evolution equations. Our method combines two numerical techniques that were originally developed with different applications in mind. The first is Huffenberger and Wandelt’s spectral decomposition algorithm to perform the mapping from physical to spectral space. The second is the application of Luscombe and Luban’s method, to convert numerically divergent linear recursions into stable nonlinear recursions, to the calculation of reduced Wigner d-functions. We give a detailed discussion of the theory and numerical implementation of our algorithm. The properties of our method are investigated by solving the scalar and vectorial advection equation on the sphere, as well as the 2 + 1 Maxwell equations on a deformed sphere.

  4. The Parallel Asynchronous Differential Evolution Method as a Tool to Analyze Synchrotron Scattering Experimental Data from Vesicular Systems*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhabitskaya Evgeniya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use an Asynchronous Differential Evolution (ADE method to estimate parameters of the Separated Form Factor (SFF model which is used to investigate a structure of drug delivery Phospholipid Transport Nano System (PTNS unilamellar vesicles by experimental small angle synchrotron X-ray scattering spectra (SAXS. We compare the efficiency of different optimizing procedures (OP for the search for the SFF-model parameters. It is shown that the probability to find the global solution of this problem by ADE-methods is significantly higher than that by either Nelder-Mead method or a Quasi-Newton method with Davidon-Fletcher-Powell formula. The parallel realization of ADE accelerates the calculations significantly. The speed-up obtained by the parallel realization of ADE and results of the model are presented.

  5. Directed Evolution Method in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Mutant Library Creation and Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña-Gonzalez, Javier; Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Directed evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers many attractive advantages when designing enzymes for biotechnological applications, a process that involves the construction, cloning and expression of mutant libraries, coupled to high frequency homologous DNA recombination in vivo. Here, we present a protocol to create and screen mutant libraries in yeast based on the example of a fungal aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO) to enhance its total activity. Two protein segments were subjected to focused-directed evolution by random mutagenesis and in vivo DNA recombination. Overhangs of ~50 bp flanking each segment allowed the correct reassembly of the AAO-fusion gene in a linearized vector giving rise to a full autonomously replicating plasmid. Mutant libraries enriched with functional AAO variants were screened in S. cerevisiae supernatants with a sensitive high-throughput assay based on the Fenton reaction. The general process of library construction in S. cerevisiae described here can be readily applied to evolve many other eukaryotic genes, avoiding extra PCR reactions, in vitro DNA recombination and ligation steps. PMID:27077451

  6. Chemo-dynamical evolution of tidal dwarf galaxies. I. Method and IMF dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Ploeckinger, S; Recchi, S; Mitchell, N; Kroupa, P

    2013-01-01

    We present high-resolution simulations of tidal dwarf galaxies (TDG) to investigate their early chemo-dynamical evolution and test their survivability. In this work the simulation setup is introduced and the response of TDGs to self-consistent star formation (SF) and an external tidal field is examined. Throughout the simulation star cluster particles with variable masses down to $5\\,M_{\\odot}$ form, depending on the local gas reservoir. For low cluster masses $M_{\\mathrm{cl}}$, the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is considered to be either filled or truncated at a maximal star mass $m_\\mathrm{max}$ to represent the observed $m_{\\mathrm{max}} - M_{\\mathrm{cl}}$ relation (IGIMF theory). The evolution of TDGs with fully-populated and truncated IMFs are compared to study the impact of stellar energy feedback on their survivability. Both TDGs experience an initial starburst but after a dynamical time they evolve into dwarf galaxies with self-regulated and continuous SF. At this stage the truncated-IMF model c...

  7. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  8. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A, E-mail: davide.masera@polito.it [Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering - Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2011-07-19

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  9. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masera, D.; Bocca, P.; Grazzini, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a "damage-gauge" for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  10. Evolution of transport properties along a semi-insulating CdTe crystal grown by vertical gradient freeze method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of transport properties along a chlorine-doped CdTe crystal grown by the gradient freeze (GF) method has been investigated by time of flight (TOF) measurement. Drift mobilities as high as 1100 cm2/(Vs) and 80 cm2/(Vs) for electrons and holes, respectively, are measured at the initial part of the grown crystal, and were found to decrease with increasing solidified fraction (g). On the other hand, the specific resistivity increases with increasing g. These behaviors can be understood as the dopant (Cl) concentration variation due to segregation during growth. The change in γ-detection properties between crystals having different g is demonstrated. (author)

  11. Orbit and spin evolution of synchronous binary stars on the main sequence (a theoretical improvement to the analytical method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a method to study the solution of equations for synchronous binary stars with large eccentricity on the main sequence. The theoretical results show that the evolution of the eccentricity is linear with time or follows an exponential form, and the semi-major axis and spin vary with time in an exponential form that are different from the results given in a previous paper. The improved method is applicable in both cases of large eccentricity and small eccentricity. In addition, the number of terms in the expansion of a series with small eccentricity is very long due to the series converging slowly. The advantage of this method is that it is applicable to cases with large eccentricity due to the series converging quickly. This paper chooses the synchronous binary star V1143 Cyg that is on the main sequence and has a large eccentricity (e = 0.54) as an example calculation and gives the numerical results. Lastly, the evolutionary tendency including the evolution of orbit and spin, the time for the speed up of spin, the circularization time, the orbital collapse time and the life time are given in the discussion and conclusion. The results shown in this paper are an improvement on those from the previous paper. (paper)

  12. Laplace method for the evolution of the fragmentation function of Bc mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroun, G. R.; Zarrin, S.; Dadfar, S.

    2016-09-01

    In high-energy processes, the predominant mechanism for b bar c bound states is the production of a high-energy b bar or c quark, which fragments into the b bar c state. An approximate approach for the evolution of the fragmentation functions for the production of the S-wave states of Bc and Bc* is presented using Laplace transform technique in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) analyses. The cross sections, as a function of the transverse momentum for the direct hadro-production b bar (c) →Bc and b bar (c) →Bc* based on the nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (QCD) factorization, are determined and compared with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data at the 1S-wave state.

  13. The Power of Principled Bayesian Methods in the Study of Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    von Hippel, Ted; Stenning, David C; Robinson, Elliot; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Stein, Nathan; Jefferys, William H; O'Malley, Erin

    2016-01-01

    It takes years of effort employing the best telescopes and instruments to obtain high-quality stellar photometry, astrometry, and spectroscopy. Stellar evolution models contain the experience of lifetimes of theoretical calculations and testing. Yet most astronomers fit these valuable models to these precious datasets by eye. We show that a principled Bayesian approach to fitting models to stellar data yields substantially more information over a range of stellar astrophysics. We highlight advances in determining the ages of star clusters, mass ratios of binary stars, limitations in the accuracy of stellar models, post-main-sequence mass loss, and the ages of individual white dwarfs. We also outline a number of unsolved problems that would benefit from principled Bayesian analyses.

  14. CURRENT STATE AND EVOLUTION PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING IN THE ENERGY SECTOR BY IMPLEMENTING THE ABC METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rof Letitia Maria

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a controversial issue, namely determining and controlling costs in the energy sector, the present study falls within the scope of management accounting and control. This scientific approach was initiated as a result of personal research concerns in the area of accounting, starting from the need to know and quantify costs in a sector of the economy that is less exploited. The main objective of this scientific approach is to address the evolution of the energy sector in a national and international context, in terms of economy and finances, with the aim to underline the need to organize and conduct management accounting in this sector. We will present a few particularities of the energy system, the current status of implementation of a medium and long term strategy aimed at developing the energy sector, as well as the need to adopt modern costing methods in this sector, which ensure operative cost control and performance growth of the entities that operate in this sector. Information on the reviewed topic was conducted by studying the national and international literature in the field, by analyzing the associated legislation, by consulting specialized web-sites and various articles in the database. The main research methods used in this scientific approach were analysis and synthesis, and qualitative research was the type of used research. The results of the research will materialize in providing the necessary conditions for designing an econometric model for implementing the ABC method, the conceptual and ideological delimitation of the ABC method, the deepening of the positive and negative aspects that the implementation of the Activity Based Costing involves. The major implication for the researched field is ensuring success for the implementation of a modern costing method in the energy sector, underlining the shortcomings of the traditional costing methods. The added value of the paper consists in conducting a rigorous study of the

  15. Estimation of operating parameters of a reheat regenerative power cycle using simplex search and differential evolution based inverse methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Inverse analysis of a reheat regenerative vapor power cycle is presented. • First the energy and exergy based parametric analysis is done. • Next, the inverse analysis is done using simplex search and a differential evolution algorithm. • Results obtained by both the methods are discussed for comparative analysis. • Both the methods are found suitable for inverse solution of ST based power plant. - Abstract: In this study, simplex search method (SSM) and a differential evolution (DE) based inverse algorithm are applied to estimate fuel flow rate (FFR), boiler pressure (BP) and steam turbine (ST) inlet temperature (STIT) of a ST based power cycle. First a theoretical model simulates the cycle performance in terms of net power, efficiency (energy and exergy) and total irreversibility at various FFRs, BPs and STITs. The forward model based results show that the net power increases linearly with FFR while also producing more irreversible losses at higher FFR. The cycle performance also improves at higher BP and STIT. The inverse analysis shows that the DE based method is more appropriate than the SSM where the searching range of parameters is specified and parameter estimation is done from the range of specified parameter values. In SSM, the estimation depends upon the chosen initial guess values and convergence criterion sometimes is not fulfilled with some guessed values of the parameters. Both the inverse methods, however give multiple combinations of parameters and thus provides sufficient scope at the hands of the designer to select the appropriate combinations of parameters required for meeting a particular power requirement

  16. Multidimensional extension of the continuity equation method for debris clouds evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Francesca; Colombo, Camilla; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2016-04-01

    As the debris spatial density increases due to recent collisions and inoperative spacecraft, the probability of collisions in space grows. Even a collision involving small objects may produce thousands of fragments due to the high orbital velocity and the high energy released. The propagation of the trajectories of all the objects produced by a breakup would be prohibitive in terms of computational time; therefore, simplified models are needed to describe the consequences of a collision with a reasonable computational effort. The continuity approach can be applied to this purpose as it allows switching the point of view from the analysis of each single fragment to the study of the evolution of the debris cloud globally. Previous formulations of the continuity equation approach focussed on the representation of the drag effect on the fragment spatial density. This work proposes how the continuity equation approach can be extended to multiple dimensions in the phase space defined by the relevant orbital parameters. This novel approach allows including in the propagation also the effect of the Earth's oblateness and improving the description of the drag effect by considering the distribution of area-to-mass ratio and eccentricity among the fragments. Results for these three applications are shown and discussed in terms of accuracy compared to the numerical propagation and to the one-dimensional approach.

  17. A Differential Evolution Based MPPT Method for Photovoltaic Modules under Partial Shading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Soon Tey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Partially shaded photovoltaic (PV modules have multiple peaks in the power-voltage (P-V characteristic curve and conventional maximum power point tracking (MPPT algorithm, such as perturbation and observation (P&O, which is unable to track the global maximum power point (GMPP accurately due to its localized search space. Therefore, this paper proposes a differential evolution (DE based optimization algorithm to provide the globalized search space to track the GMPP. The direction of mutation in the DE algorithm is modified to ensure that the mutation always converges to the best solution among all the particles in the generation. This helps to provide the rapid convergence of the algorithm. Simulation of the proposed PV system is carried out in PSIM and the results are compared to P&O algorithm. In the hardware implementation, a high step-up DC-DC converter is employed to verify the proposed algorithm experimentally on partial shading conditions, load variation, and solar intensity variation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is able to converge to the GMPP within 1.2 seconds with higher efficiency than P&O.

  18. A new method to obtain approximate symmetry of nonlinear evolution equation from perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhi-Yong; Yong Xue-Lin; Chen Yu-Fu

    2009-01-01

    A novel method for obtaining the approximate symmetry of a partial differential equation with a small parameter is introduced. By expanding the independent variable and the dependent variable in the small parameter series, we obtain more affluent approximate symmetries. The method is applied to two perturbed nonlinear partial differential equations and new approximate solutions are derived.

  19. Evolution of the SCS curve number method and its applications to continuous runoff simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) [previously Soil Conservation Service (SCS)] developed the SCS runoff curve-number (CN) method for estimating direct runoff from storm rainfall. The NRCS uses the CN method for designing structures and for evaluating their effectiveness. Structural...

  20. Evolution of quantitative methods for the study and management of avian populations: on the importance of individual contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Evolution of quantitative methods for the study and management of avian populations: on the importance of individual contributions.-The EURING meetings and the scientists who have attended them have contributed substantially to the growth of knowledge in the field of estimating parameters of animal populations. The contributions of David R. Anderson to process modeling, parameter estimation and decision analysis are briefly reviewed. Metrics are considered for assessing individual contributions to a field of inquiry, and it is concluded that Anderson's contributions have been substantial. Important characteristics of Anderson and his career are the ability to identify and focus on important topics, the premium placed on dissemination of new methods to prospective users, the ability to assemble teams of complementary researchers, and the innovation and vision that characterized so much of his work. The paper concludes with a list of interesting current research topics for consideration by EURING participants.

  1. Curve Evolution in Subspaces and Exploring the Metameric Class of Histogram of Gradient Orientation based Features using Nonlinear Projection Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatu, Aditya Jayant

    nonlinear subspace of curves. We also deal with cases where a non-Euclidean metric is induced on such a subspace. We build differential geometric tools like the Exponential map and Log map which are essential for the study of such nonlinear spaces. We demonstrate these tools on a particular implicitly...... the statistical moments of the gradient orientations. This is another case for use of nonlinear projection methods since such an equivalence class is nonlinear. We use an approximation of the Exponential map developed in the first part of the thesis to evolve a given patch in the equivalence class...... tracking interfaces, active contour based segmentation methods and others. It can also be used to study shape spaces, as deforming a shape can be thought of as evolving its boundary curve. During curve evolution a curve traces out a path in the infinite dimensional space of curves. Due to application...

  2. Genetic algorithms: An evolution from Monte Carlo Methods for strongly non-linear geophysical optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kerry; Sambridge, Malcolm; Drijkoningen, Guy

    In providing a method for solving non-linear optimization problems Monte Carlo techniques avoid the need for linearization but, in practice, are often prohibitive because of the large number of models that must be considered. A new class of methods known as Genetic Algorithms have recently been devised in the field of Artificial Intelligence. We outline the basic concept of genetic algorithms and discuss three examples. We show that, in locating an optimal model, the new technique is far superior in performance to Monte Carlo techniques in all cases considered. However, Monte Carlo integration is still regarded as an effective method for the subsequent model appraisal.

  3. Development of the correction method of 14C groundwater dating. Evaluating the groundwater evolution and dating at the Rokkasho site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the 14C groundwater age, groundwater evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) needs to be investigated at a site. Groundwater evolution depends on the geochemical setting at a site. This paper proposed a correction method of 14C groundwater dating by evaluating the DIC groundwater evolution at the site of low level radioactive waste disposal in Rokkasho, Aomori prefecture, Japan. The δ13C of DICs in the shallow part of the Rokkasho site (shallower than ∼-100m elevation) showed inhomogeneous values. From the rock core chemical analysis, no inorganic carbon exited and concentrations of DIC were unchanged with depths in the shallow part. It indicates that carbonate mineral has no effect on δ13C values in the shallow part but recharging system affected on the δ13C of DIC. It is expected that both of open system and closed system or partially open and closed system recharging were taken place in shallower depth of the site. On the other hand, in the deep of the site (deeper than approx. = -100m elevation), there are shell fossils in aquifer consisting rocks. The shell fossils are dissolved based on the Na-(Ca, Mg) ion exchange reaction. It causes higher δ13C and lower 14C in the groundwater DIC at the deep part. The result of mass balance calculation of DIC concentrations and δ13C of DIC showed that DIC concentrations and δ13C was affected by some sort of reaction other than shell fossil dissolution in the deep part in the site. Correction of 14C was conducted by the IAEA equation. The corrected 14C groundwater age in this study shows good correlation with the result of other dating study derived by hydrological flow analysis compare to uncorrected age. (author)

  4. Co-evolution of strain design methods based on flux balance and elementary mode analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    optimization to couple cellular growth with the production of a target product. This initiated the development of a family of strain design methods based on the concept of flux balance analysis. Another family of strain design methods, based on the concept of elementary mode analysis, has also been growing....... Although the computation of elementary modes is hindered by computational complexity, recent breakthroughs have allowed applying elementary mode analysis at the genome scale. Here we review and compare strain design methods and look back at the last 10 years of in silico strain design with constraint......More than a decade ago, the first genome-scale metabolic models for two of the most relevant microbes for biotechnology applications, Escherichia coli and Saccaromyces cerevisiae, were published. Shortly after followed the publication of OptKnock, the first strain design method using bilevel...

  5. 3D etching profile evolution simulation using sparse field level set method

    CERN Document Server

    Radenovic, B; Lee, J K; Radenovic, Branislav

    2004-01-01

    Level set method, introduced by Osher and Sethian [1], is a highly robust and accurate computational technique for tracking of moving interfaces in etching, deposition and photolithography processes. It originates from the idea to view the moving front as a particular level set of a higher dimensional function, so the topological merging and breaking, sharp gradients and cusps can form naturally, and the effects of curvature can be easily incorporated. The corresponding equations of motion for the propagating surfaces, which resemble Hamilton-Jacobi equations with parabolic right-hand sides, can be solved using methods for solving hyperbolic conservation laws, ensuring in that the way correct entropy-satisfying solution [2]. In this paper we describe an application of the sparse field method for solving level set equations in 3D plasma etching simulations. Sparse field method itself, developed by Whitaker [3] and broadly used in image processing community, is an alternative to the usual combination of narrow ...

  6. A method to visualize the evolution of multiple interacting spatial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Magnus; Hackl, Jürgen; Adey, Bryan T.; Iosifescu-Enescu, Ionut; Lam, Juan Carlos; Hurni, Lorenz

    2016-07-01

    Integrated modeling approaches are being increasingly used to simulate the behavior of, and the interaction between, several interdependent systems. They are becoming more and more important in many fields, including, but not being limited to, civil engineering, hydrology and climate impact research. It is beneficial when using these approaches to be able to visualize both, the intermediary and final results of scenario-based analyses that are conducted in both, space and time. This requires appropriate visualization techniques that enable to efficiently navigate between multiple such scenarios. In recent years, several innovative visualization techniques have been developed that allow for such navigation purposes. These techniques, however, are limited to the representation of one system at a time. Improvements are possible with respect to the ability to visualize the results related to multiple scenarios for multiple interdependent spatio-temporal systems. To address this issue, existing multi-scenario navigation techniques based on small multiples and line graphs are extended by multiple system representations and inter-system impact representations. This not only allows to understand the evolution of the systems under consideration but also eases identifying events where one system influences another system significantly. In addition, the concept of selective branching is described that allows to remove otherwise redundant information from the visualization by considering the logical and temporal dependencies between these systems. This visualization technique is applied to a risk assessment methodology that allows to determine how different environmental systems (i.e. precipitation, flooding, and landslides) influence each other as well as how their impact on civil infrastructure affects society. The results of this work are concepts for improved visualization techniques for multiple interacting spatial systems. The successful validation with domain experts of

  7. Computer analysis of weight evolution – a method to improve the children population health

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Muşuroi; Doina Mot

    2006-01-01

    The improvement of the assessment of the children’s growth development has been explained by the introduction of new methods for monitoring the growth parameters and the computer analysis of this data. The necessity of this new technologies appeared because the clinicians noticed that there are new types of data, in large amounts, which are difficult to be analyzed using the traditional methods. So, in order to receive the maxim information, the implementation of the computer analysis and of ...

  8. A (fast) 'precipiton' method to calculate river hydrodynamics with applications to landscape evolution models as well as flood prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, P.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based methods have been popular to develop models of landscape evolution able to reproduce complex features such as dynamical braided patterns. Such a high-resolution high-frequency geomorphical structures are beyond the scope of simple landscape evolution model, whose hydrodynamics description is much too rudimentary, and hardly modeled with sophisticated CFD models because of computational time. Solving hydrodynamics remains however a major issue for the particle-based models, which may cast doubt on the relevance of the modeled dynamics. The 'precipiton' method consists in routing elementary water volumes (i.e. precipitons) on top of topography with erosive and deposition actions. The basic method assumes that precipitons move down the steepest descent slope of topography, which is a very crude approximation of the river hydrodynamics. Here we present an original way to calculate both river depth and velocity, from a method that remains intimately embedded into the precipiton framework. The method consists in solving water depth from a differential equation where the water depth is increased by a constant (small) quantity at each precipiton passage, and decreased by a mass balance 1st-order differential equation, where the flux is related to water depth from a Manning-type flow resistance equation. The precipiton are then routed on top of the water surface so calculated, towards lowest zones. The method is applicable even if the precipitons are routed one by one, i.e. independently of each others. It is not subject to the classical drying-wetting issue. The method has been applied to a large number of geomorphic cases including lake filling, circular channels, flow over topographic bumps, flow over vegetation patches and river banks, dam gate, or real cases with high resolution LIDAR topography. In all cases, the method is very fast to find a solution for water depths, which fits the shallow water solution without inertia. For real topographies, the

  9. Estimation of fatigue evolution of aluminum alloy plated with electroless NI–CO–P by using electromagnetic impedance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Katsuyuki

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a method for detecting fatigue in aluminum alloys that is based on a applying a ferromagnetic electroless Ni–Co–P plating and then using an electromagnetic impedance (EMI) method to determine its permeability properties by measuring the high-frequency AC impedance of a coil sensor in the presence of a static magnetic field. The results obtained confirmed that this method can estimate the fatigue evolution of a specimen until the point at which the cumulative strain becomes saturated by using measurements obtained by the EMI method under tensile deformation and FEM analysis results. - Highlights: • Plating aluminum alloy with Ni–Co–P film increases its fatigue strength by 13−16%. • The tensile direction is the stress induced “hard axis” of the Ni–Co–P plating. • In-plane permeability determines the coil impedance for out-of-plane excitation. • This method can measure fatigue up to saturation of the substrate's residual strain.

  10. Estimation of fatigue evolution of aluminum alloy plated with electroless NI–CO–P by using electromagnetic impedance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method for detecting fatigue in aluminum alloys that is based on a applying a ferromagnetic electroless Ni–Co–P plating and then using an electromagnetic impedance (EMI) method to determine its permeability properties by measuring the high-frequency AC impedance of a coil sensor in the presence of a static magnetic field. The results obtained confirmed that this method can estimate the fatigue evolution of a specimen until the point at which the cumulative strain becomes saturated by using measurements obtained by the EMI method under tensile deformation and FEM analysis results. - Highlights: • Plating aluminum alloy with Ni–Co–P film increases its fatigue strength by 13−16%. • The tensile direction is the stress induced “hard axis” of the Ni–Co–P plating. • In-plane permeability determines the coil impedance for out-of-plane excitation. • This method can measure fatigue up to saturation of the substrate's residual strain

  11. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  12. Determination of organic acids evolution during apple cider fermentation using an improved HPLC analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Ji, B.; Nout, M.J.R.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing ten organic acids in food, namely citric, pyruvic, malic, lactic, succinic, formic, acetic, adipic, propionic and butyric acids, using HPLC was developed. Boric acid was added into the mobile phase to separate lactic and succinic acids, and a post-column buffer solu

  13. Green's function-stochastic methods framework for probing nonlinear evolution problems: Burger's equation, the nonlinear Schrodinger's equation, and hydrodynamic organization of near-molecular-scale vorticity

    OpenAIRE

    Keanini, Russell G.

    2010-01-01

    A framework which combines Green's function (GF) methods and techniques from the theory of stochastic processes is proposed for tackling nonlinear evolution problems. The framework, established by a series of easy-to-derive equivalences between Green's function and stochastic representative solutions of linear drift-diffusion problems, provides a flexible structure within which nonlinear evolution problems can be analyzed and physically probed. As a preliminary test bed, two canonical, nonlin...

  14. Non-stationary random vibration analysis of a 3D train-bridge system using the probability density evolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-wu; Mao, Jian-feng; Guo, Feng-qi; Guo, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Rail irregularity is one of the main sources causing train-bridge random vibration. A new random vibration theory for the coupled train-bridge systems is proposed in this paper. First, number theory method (NTM) with 2N-dimensional vectors for the stochastic harmonic function (SHF) of rail irregularity power spectrum density was adopted to determine the representative points of spatial frequencies and phases to generate the random rail irregularity samples, and the non-stationary rail irregularity samples were modulated with the slowly varying function. Second, the probability density evolution method (PDEM) was employed to calculate the random dynamic vibration of the three-dimensional (3D) train-bridge system by a program compiled on the MATLAB® software platform. Eventually, the Newmark-β integration method and double edge difference method of total variation diminishing (TVD) format were adopted to obtain the mean value curve, the standard deviation curve and the time-history probability density information of responses. A case study was presented in which the ICE-3 train travels on a three-span simply-supported high-speed railway bridge with excitation of random rail irregularity. The results showed that compared to the Monte Carlo simulation, the PDEM has higher computational efficiency for the same accuracy, i.e., an improvement by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Additionally, the influences of rail irregularity and train speed on the random vibration of the coupled train-bridge system were discussed.

  15. Charge evolution of swift-heavy-ion beams explored by matrix method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmani, O. [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Kaiserslautern and Research Center OPTIMAS, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Sigmund, P. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2011-05-01

    The approach to charge equilibrium of a beam of swift ions can be expressed by a matrix with rows and columns expressing the initial and instantaneous charge state, respectively. We have explored the capability of this matrix formalism in comparison with the standard method, i.e., numerical solution of linear rate equations as implemented in the ETACHA code. The matrix method is computationally more efficient, and the acceptable numerical error can be pre-defined. The agreement with predictions based on ETACHA is generally good. Significant discrepancies are primarily due to differences in the applied cross sections for electron capture and loss. Comparisons have been made also with experimental results for sulphur in carbon.

  16. Estimation of Extreme Response and Failure Probability of Wind Turbines under Normal Operation using Probability Density Evolution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Liu, W. F.;

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of extreme response and failure probability of structures subjected to ultimate design loads is essential for structural design of wind turbines according to the new standard IEC61400-1. This task is focused on in the present paper in virtue of probability density evolution method (PDEM......), which underlies the schemes of random vibration analysis and structural reliability assessment. The short-term rare failure probability of 5-mega-watt wind turbines, for illustrative purposes, in case of given mean wind speeds and turbulence levels is investigated through the scheme of extreme value...... distribution instead of any other approximate schemes of fitted distribution currently used in statistical extrapolation techniques. Besides, the comparative studies against the classical fitted distributions and the standard Monte Carlo techniques are carried out. Numerical results indicate that PDEM exhibits...

  17. Gravitational Radiation Damping and Evolution of the Orbit of Compact Binary Stars (Solution by the Second Perturbation Method)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lin-Sen Li

    2014-06-01

    The influence of the gravitational radiation damping on the evolution of the orbital elements of compact binary stars is examined by using the method of perturbation. The perturbation equations with the true anomaly as an independent variable are given. This effect results in both the secular and periodic variation of the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, the mean longitude at the epoch and the mean longitude. However, the longitude of periastron exhibits no secular variation, but only periodic variation. The effect of secular variation of the orbit would lead to collapse of the system of binary stars. The deduced formulae are applied to the calculation of secular variation of the orbital elements for three compact binary stars: PSR 1913+16, PSR J0737-3039 and M33X-7. The results obtained are discussed.

  18. CHIME dating method and its application to the analysis of evolutional history of orogenic belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Adachi, Mamoru; Kato, Takenori; Yogo, Setsuo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    This paper outlines the CHIME (chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron method: Suzuki and Adachi, 1991a, b; Adachi and Suzuki, 1992) dating method and reviews its application to the event analysis of orogenic belts. The reviewed examples of the CHIME geochronology include (1) the electron microprobe observations of Pb diffusion in metamorphosed detrital monazites from high-grade Ryoke paragneisses (Suzuki et al., 1994), (2) the recycled Precambrian clastic materials from the Mino terrane (Adachi and Suzuki, 1993, 1994), (3) the late Permian-early Triassic metamorphism and plutonism in the Hida terrane (Suzuki and Adachi, 1991b, 1994), (4) the relationship between the Hikami Granite and Siluro-Devonian clastic rocks in the South Kitakami terrane (Suzuki et al, 1992; Adachi et al., 1994), and (5) the denudation history of the high T/P Ryoke metamorphic belt (Suzuki and Adachi, 1998). The CHIME dating method is based on precise electron microprobe analyses of Th, U and Pb as low as 0.01wt.% in an area of 5 {mu}m across within a single grain of compositionally ununiformed Th-and U-bearing accessory minerals like monazite and zircon. This method has an advantage of high spatial resolution, and provides a new vista on the study of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks that underwent complex thermo-tectonic history. Monazite is most suitable to the CHIME dating, since it shows a concordant Th-U-Pb relation, contains 5-20 wt.% ThO{sub 2} and 0.1-1.5wt.% UO{sub 2} that can produce 0.01-0.06wt.% PbO during 50 Myr, and remains immune to significant Pb-loss during the sillimanite grade metamorphism; it has great chronological potential for the analysis of the detailed sequence of geologic events. (author)

  19. CHIME dating method and its application to the analysis of evolutional history of orogenic belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the CHIME (chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron method: Suzuki and Adachi, 1991a, b; Adachi and Suzuki, 1992) dating method and reviews its application to the event analysis of orogenic belts. The reviewed examples of the CHIME geochronology include (1) the electron microprobe observations of Pb diffusion in metamorphosed detrital monazites from high-grade Ryoke paragneisses (Suzuki et al., 1994), (2) the recycled Precambrian clastic materials from the Mino terrane (Adachi and Suzuki, 1993, 1994), (3) the late Permian-early Triassic metamorphism and plutonism in the Hida terrane (Suzuki and Adachi, 1991b, 1994), (4) the relationship between the Hikami Granite and Siluro-Devonian clastic rocks in the South Kitakami terrane (Suzuki et al, 1992; Adachi et al., 1994), and (5) the denudation history of the high T/P Ryoke metamorphic belt (Suzuki and Adachi, 1998). The CHIME dating method is based on precise electron microprobe analyses of Th, U and Pb as low as 0.01wt.% in an area of 5 μm across within a single grain of compositionally ununiformed Th-and U-bearing accessory minerals like monazite and zircon. This method has an advantage of high spatial resolution, and provides a new vista on the study of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks that underwent complex thermo-tectonic history. Monazite is most suitable to the CHIME dating, since it shows a concordant Th-U-Pb relation, contains 5-20 wt.% ThO2 and 0.1-1.5wt.% UO2 that can produce 0.01-0.06wt.% PbO during 50 Myr, and remains immune to significant Pb-loss during the sillimanite grade metamorphism; it has great chronological potential for the analysis of the detailed sequence of geologic events. (author)

  20. Bed Evolution under Rapidly Varying Flows by a New Method for Wave Speed Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawar Rehman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a sediment-transport model based on coupled Saint-Venant and Exner equations. A finite volume method of Godunov type with predictor-corrector steps is used to solve a set of coupled equations. An efficient combination of approximate Riemann solvers is proposed to compute fluxes associated with sediment-laden flow. In addition, a new method is proposed for computing the water depth and velocity values along the shear wave. This method ensures smooth solutions, even for flows with high discontinuities, and on domains with highly distorted grids. The numerical model is tested for channel aggradation on a sloping bottom, dam-break cases at flume-scale and reach-scale with flat bottom configurations and varying downstream water depths. The proposed model is tested for predicting the position of hydraulic jump, wave front propagation, and for predicting magnitude of bed erosion. The comparison between results based on the proposed scheme and analytical, experimental, and published numerical results shows good agreement. Sensitivity analysis shows that the model is computationally efficient and virtually independent of mesh refinement.

  1. Optimization of air quantity regulation in mine ventilation networks using the improved differential evolution algorithm and critical path method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Kaiyan; Si Junhong; Zhou Fubao; Zhang Renwei; Shao He; Zhao Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    In mine ventilation networks, the reasonable airflow distribution is very important for the production safety and economy. Three basic problems of the natural, full-controlled and semi-controlled splitting were reviewed in the paper. Aiming at the high difficulty semi-controlled splitting problem, the general nonlinear multi-objectives optimization mathematical model with constraints was established based on the theory of mine ventilation networks. A new algorithm, which combined the improved differential evaluation and the critical path method (CPM) based on the multivariable separate solution strategy, was put forward to search for the global optimal solution more efficiently. In each step of evolution, the feasible solutions of air quantity distribution are firstly produced by the improved differential evolu-tion algorithm, and then the optimal solutions of regulator pressure drop are obtained by the CPM. Through finite steps iterations, the optimal solution can be given. In this new algorithm, the population of feasible solutions were sorted and grouped for enhancing the global search ability and the individuals in general group were randomly initialized for keeping diversity. Meanwhile, the individual neighbor-hood in the fine group which may be closely to the optimal solutions were searched locally and slightly for achieving a balance between global searching and local searching, thus improving the convergence rate. The computer program was developed based on this method. Finally, the two ventilation networks with single-fan and multi-fans were solved. The results show that this algorithm has advantages of high effectiveness, fast convergence, good robustness and flexibility. This computer program could be used to solve large-scale generalized ventilation networks optimization problem in the future.

  2. Generalized Kudryashov method for solving some (3+1-dimensional nonlinear evolution equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shafiqul Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have applied the generalized Kudryashov methods to obtain the exact travelling wave solutions for the (3+1-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa (JM equation, the (3+1-dimensional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP equation and the (3+1-dimensional Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK. The attained solutions show distinct physical configurations. The constraints that will guarantee the existence of specific solutions will be investigated. These solutions may be useful and desirable for enlightening specific nonlinear physical phenomena in genuinely nonlinear dynamical systems.

  3. On the evolution of statistical methods as applied to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, D

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes how statistical methods have evolved in parallel with activities associated with randomized control trials. In particular we emphasize the pivotal role of two papers published in British Journal of Cancer, and the paper describing the Cox proportional hazards model. In addition, the importance of early papers on estimating the sample size required for trials is highlighted. Later developments including the increasing roles for competing risks, multilevel modelling and Bayesian methodologies are described. The interplay between computer software and statistical methodological developments is stressed. Finally some future directions are indicated. PMID:15078495

  4. Spectroscopic bulge-disc decomposition: a new method to study the evolution of lenticular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, E J; Merrifield, M R; Bedregal, A G

    2012-01-01

    A new method for spectroscopic bulge-disc decomposition is presented, in which the spatial light profile in a two-dimensional spectrum is decomposed wavelength-by-wavelength into bulge and disc components, allowing separate one-dimensional spectra for each component to be constructed. This method has been applied to observations of a sample of nine S0s in the Fornax Cluster in order to obtain clean high-quality spectra of their individual bulge and disc components. So far this decomposition has only been fully successful when applied to galaxies with clean light profiles, consequently limiting the number of galaxies that could be separated into bulge and disc components. Lick index stellar population analysis of the component spectra reveals that in those galaxies where the bulge and disc could be distinguished, the bulges have systematically higher metallicities and younger stellar populations than the discs. This correlation is consistent with a picture in which S0 formation comprises the shutting down of s...

  5. An analytic electromagnetic calculation method for performance evolution of doubly fed induction generators for wind turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文娟; 黄守道; 高剑; CHEN; Zhe

    2013-01-01

    An analytic electromagnetic calculation method for doubly fed induction generator(DFIG) in wind turbine system was presented. Based on the operation principles, steady state equivalent circuit and basic equations of DFIG, the modeling for electromagnetic calculation of DFIG was proposed. The electromagnetic calculation of DFIG was divided into three steps: the magnetic flux calculation, parameters derivation and performance checks. For each step, the detailed numeric calculation formulas were all derived. Combining the calculation formulas, the whole electromagnetic calculation procedure was established, which consisted of three iterative calculation loops, including magnetic saturation coefficient, electromotive force and total output power. All of the electromagnetic and performance data of DIFG can be calculated conveniently by the established calculation procedure, which can be used to evaluate the new designed machine. A 1.5 MW DFIG designed by the proposed procedure was built, for which the whole type tests including no-load test, load test and temperature rising test were carried out. The test results have shown that the DFIG satisfies technical requirements and the test data fit well with the calculation results which prove the correctness of the presented calculation method.

  6. Advanced X-Ray scattering methods for the study of structure and its evolution in soft materials with fiber symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three recently developed evaluation methods for the automated quantitative analysis of X-ray scattering data (small-angle (SAXS) and wide-angle (WAXS)) are presented. They are applicable to extensive series of 2D patterns that are recorded in studies of polymer materials with uniaxial symmetry. The experiments comprise time-resolved studies (melting, crystallization, mechanical properties and fatigue) as well as microbeam-scanning for the study of nanostructure gradients. The methods appear suitable to manage the data flood from modern synchrotron radiation setups aiming at the extraction of quantitative information on the structure evolution inside the material. In microbeam-scanning experiments the recorded scattering patterns are smeared. It is proposed to reconstruct desmeared scattering patterns by an X-ray scattering fiber-computer-tomography (XS-FCT). Reconstruction aberrations yield additional structure information. The true structure variation along the fiber radius is established. Compared to general tomography the experiment is faster by a factor of 100, and reconstruction is faster by a factor of 104. In WAXS fiber patterns should first be mapped into reciprocal space before analysis. After having corrected an erroneous tilt-angle equation, automatic tilt-angle tracking and mapping becomes possible. If polymers fail at low strain, the determination of strain and of structural parameters from the scattering patterns require very high accuracy because the observed variations are subtle. Suitable methods are presented both for the high-precision determination of the macroscopic strain, and for the determination of subtle variations of structure parameters.

  7. An analytic electromagnetic calculation method for performance evolution of doubly fed induction generators for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen-juan; Huang, Shou-dao; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    An analytic electromagnetic calculation method for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) in wind turbine system was presented. Based on the operation principles, steady state equivalent circuit and basic equations of DFIG, the modeling for electromagnetic calculation of DFIG was proposed. The...... electromagnetic calculation of DFIG was divided into three steps: the magnetic flux calculation, parameters derivation and performance checks. For each step, the detailed numeric calculation formulas were all derived. Combining the calculation formulas, the whole electromagnetic calculation procedure was...... established, which consisted of three iterative calculation loops, including magnetic saturation coefficient, electromotive force and total output power. All of the electromagnetic and performance data of DIFG can be calculated conveniently by the established calculation procedure, which can be used to...

  8. Evolution of platinum hierarchical microstructure amine - Assisted growth via solvothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Here we studied the formation of Platinum hierarchical microstructure by varying the synthesis time using amine assisted growth via solvothermal method. A small cluster of particles was produced at a shorter synthesis time (5h) while fully grown flower-like microstructure were formed at 9h of reaction. The synthesized Pt particles exhibit high absorption peak at 230 nm corresponding to Pt absorption peak. The catalytic property of the synthesized Pt is greatly influenced by its geometrical shape. The fully grown flower-like particles exhibit large electrochemical surface area (4.88 cm-2 g-1) and catalytic stability at a longer period, which can serve as a potential catalyst for electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF MARKETING METHODS IN A TOURISM ASSOCIATION FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA STOIAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present how to apply marketing methods, older and newer ones, to the action plan of a tourism association. I chose for this study the National Association of Rural, Ecological and Cultural Tourism from Romania (ANTREC, since I had available a series of chronological information on which I was capable to adapt the idea that I wanted to highlight. The conclusions that I reached from this analysis are closely related to the idea that, like other industries, the type of marketing practiced in a tourism association must adapt continually, to be innovative and to highlight by his unique style and his results. For the preparation work I used only the database of ANTREC Romania.

  10. Level set method for the evolution of defect and brane networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory for studying the dynamic scaling properties of branes and relativistic topological defect networks is presented. The theory, based on a relativistic version of the level set method, well known in other contexts, possesses self-similar 'scaling' solutions, for which one can calculate many quantities of interest. Here, the length and area densities of cosmic strings and domain walls are calculated in Minkowski space, and radiation, matter, and curvature-dominated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with two and three space dimensions. The scaling exponents agree with the naive ones based on dimensional analysis, except for cosmic strings in three-dimensional Minkowski space, which are predicted to have a logarithmic correction to the naive scaling form. The scaling amplitudes of the length and area densities are a factor of approximately 2 lower than the results from numerical simulations of classical field theories. An expression for the length density of strings in the condensed matter literature is corrected

  11. Evolution of chemical species during electrodeposition of uranium for alpha spectrometry by the Hallstadius method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beesley, A.M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Crespo, M.T. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: teresa.crespo@ciemat.es; Weiher, N.; Tsapatsaris, N. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Cozar, J.S. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Esparza, H.; Mendez, C.G. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Ind. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. CP 31109 (Mexico); Hill, P. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Schroeder, S.L.M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Montero-Cabrera, M.E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Ind. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. CP 31109 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The morphology and composition of uranium alpha sources with co-deposited platinum have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies. Combined SEM and EDX measurements reveal the effect of porous platinum on the morphology of the sources which in turn affects their alpha-spectral resolution. The XPS analysis suggests that the presence of platinum initially increases the concentration of hydroxyl species in the deposits, which then act as centres for subsequent preferential uranium precipitation. XPS and XAFS analysis also provide for first time an indication of oxidation states of uranium present in the sources prepared by the Hallstadius method. These results are in line with Hansen's theory of electrodeposition of actinides.

  12. Evolution of chemical species during electrodeposition of uranium for alpha spectrometry by the Hallstadius method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphology and composition of uranium alpha sources with co-deposited platinum have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies. Combined SEM and EDX measurements reveal the effect of porous platinum on the morphology of the sources which in turn affects their alpha-spectral resolution. The XPS analysis suggests that the presence of platinum initially increases the concentration of hydroxyl species in the deposits, which then act as centres for subsequent preferential uranium precipitation. XPS and XAFS analysis also provide for first time an indication of oxidation states of uranium present in the sources prepared by the Hallstadius method. These results are in line with Hansen's theory of electrodeposition of actinides.

  13. A new generalized compound Riccati equations rational expansion method to construct many new exact complexiton solutions of nonlinear evolution equations with symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on symbolic computation and the idea of rational expansion method, a new generalized compound Riccati equations rational expansion method (GCRERE) is suggested to construct a series of exact complexiton solutions for nonlinear evolution equations. Compared with most existing rational expansion methods and other sophisticated methods, the proposed method not only recover some known solutions, but also find some new and general complexiton solutions. The validity and reliability of the method is tested by its application to the (2+1)-dimensional Burgers equation. It is shown that more complexiton solutions can be found by this new method.

  14. The structure of an earthward propagating magnetic flux rope early in its evolution: comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Möstl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a magnetic signature associated with the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow observed by Cluster at −19 RE downtail on 22 August 2001. A distinct rotation of the magnetic field was seen by all four spacecraft. This event was previously examined by Slavin et al. (2003b using both linear force-free modeling as well as a curlometer technique. Extending this work, we apply here single- and multi-spacecraft Grad-Shafranov (GS reconstruction techniques to the Cluster observations and find good evidence that the structure encountered is indeed a magnetic flux rope and contains helical magnetic field lines. We find that the flux rope has a diameter of approximately 1 RE, an axial field of 26.4 nT, a velocity of ≈650 km/s, a total axial current of 0.16 MA and magnetic fluxes of order 105 Wb. The field line twist is estimated as half a turn per RE. The invariant axis is inclined at 40° to the ecliptic plane and 10° to the GSM equatorial plane. The flux rope has a force-free core and non-force-free boundaries. When we compare and contrast our results with those obtained from minimum variance, single-spacecraft force-free fitting and curlometer techniques, we find in general fair agreement, but also clear differences such as a higher inclination of the axis to the ecliptic. We further conclude that single-spacecraft methods have limitations which should be kept in mind when applied to THEMIS observations, and that non-force-free GS and curlometer techniques are to be preferred in their analysis. Some properties we derived for this earthward– moving structure are similar to those inferred by Lui et al. (2007, using a different approach, for a tailward-moving flux rope observed during the expansion phase of the same substorm.

  15. Optimization of tri-reformer reactor to produce synthesis gas for methanol production using differential evolution (DE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study on optimization of a fixed bed tri-reformer reactor (TR). This reactor has been used instead of conventional steam reformer (CSR) and auto thermal reformer (CAR). A theoretical investigation has been performed in order to evaluate the optimal operating conditions and enhancement of methane conversion, hydrogen production and desired H2/CO ratio as a synthesis gas for methanol production. A mathematical heterogeneous model has been used to simulate the reactor. The process performance under steady state conditions was analyzed with respect to key operational parameters (inlet temperature, O2/CH4, CO2/CH4 and steam/CH4 ratios). The influence of these parameters on gas temperature, methane conversion, hydrogen production and H2/CO ratio was investigated. Model validation was carried out by comparison of the reforming model results with industrial data of CSR. Differential evolution (DE) method was applied as a powerful method for optimization. Optimum feed temperature and reactant ratios (CH4/CO2/H2O/O2) are 1100 K and 1/1.3/2.46/0.47 respectively. The optimized TR has enhanced methane conversion by 3.8% relative to industrial reformers in a single reactor. Methane conversion, hydrogen yield and H2/CO ratio in optimized TR are 97.9%, 1.84 and 1.7 respectively. The optimization results of tri-reformer were compared with the corresponding predictions from process simulation software operated at the same feed conditions.

  16. Improvement of feature-scale profile evolution in a silicon dioxide plasma etching simulator using the level set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu, C.; Baer, E.; Cerdá, J.; Colom, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional simulator of silicon dioxide etching in a fluorocarbon plasma process. Explicit parametrization of the surface is currently one of the most frequently used methods to evolve the etched surface according to the equipment simulation results. These techniques update the coordinates of the vertices and need to add and/or remove faces to keep an accurate surface representation. These processes can introduce errors and produce unrealistic results, especially in complex structures. In this paper we prove the effectiveness of our level set (LS) implementation to evolve the etched surface according to etching models, resulting in a fully operational plasma etching simulator. The LS implementation is based on a surface reconstruction algorithm from scattered points enabling the simulation of complex topological changes such as coalescing or splitting of contiguous regions. Additionally, our algorithm is based on the sparse field method for reducing computational time of the surface evolution process and it is perfectly suited to be used with the Anetch software package. Finally, several structures are simulated and an experimental result is used to compare and validate the effectiveness of the simulator we have developed.

  17. An elegant and fast method to solve QCD evolution equations. Application to the determination of the gluon content of the Pomeron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an original implementation of a very elegant method to solve Q2 evolution equations of perturbative QCD at NLO: the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. Based on a seminal idea of Furmanski and Petronzio, our numerical treatment consists in expanding parton distributions and splitting functions on Laguerre polynomials, which reduces DGLAP integro-differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations defined by recurrence. Then, we apply our evolution method to determine the gluon content of the Pomeron by realizing QCD fits on diffractive structure function

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In this book the use of inhomogeneous models in cosmology, both in modelling structure formation and interpreting cosmological observations, is discussed. The authors concentrate on exact solutions, and particularly the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) and Szekeres models (the important topic of averaging is not discussed). The book serves to demonstrate that inhomogeneous metrics can generate realistic models of cosmic structure formation and nonlinear evolution and shows that general relativity has a lot more to offer to cosmology than just the standard spatially homogeneous FLRW model. I would recommend this book to people working in theoretical cosmology. In the introduction (and in the concluding chapter and throughout the book) a reasonable discussion of the potential problems with the standard FLRW cosmology is presented, and a list of examples illustrating the limitations of standard FLRW cosmology are discussed (including potential problems with perturbation methods). In particular, the authors argue that the assumptions of isotropy and spatial homogeneity (and consequently the Copernican principle) must be properly challenged and revisited. Indeed, it is possible for `good old general relativity' to be used to explain cosmological observations without introducing speculative elements. In part I of the book the necessary background is presented (readers need a background in general relativity theory at an advanced undergraduate or graduate level). There is a good (and easy to read) review of the exact spherically symmetric dust Lemaitre-Tolman model (LT) (often denoted the LTB model) and the Lemaitre and Szekeres models. Light propogation (i.e. null geodesics, for both central and off-center observers) in exact inhomogeneous (LT) models is reviewed. In part II a number of applications of exact inhomogeneous models are presented (taken mainly from the authors' own work). In chapter 4, the evolution of exact inhomogeneous models (primarily the LT model, but also the

  19. Dosimetric methods: evolution, novelties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of dosimetry the last five years is reviewed. First, inert dosemeters are considered: calorimeter, chemical dosemeter, for absolute measurements of doses, solid track detectors and solid detectors for relative measurements. Then, electronic dosemeters are studied: detectors for dose rate measurements, but limited to ionization chambers (filled with gaz or liquid), semi-conductors and micro-dosemeters. At least, novelties are presented for data extraction (thermocurrent, holographic interferometers) or in dosimetry (lyoluminescence, space charge measurements, transition radiation, Moessbauer effect

  20. Green's function-stochastic methods framework for probing nonlinear evolution problems: Burger's equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation, and hydrodynamic organization of near-molecular-scale vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Systematic approach for physically probing nonlinear and random evolution problems. → Evolution of vortex sheets corresponds to evolution of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. → Organization of near-molecular scale vorticity mediated by hydrodynamic modes. → Framework allows calculation of vorticity evolution within random strain fields. - Abstract: A framework which combines Green's function (GF) methods and techniques from the theory of stochastic processes is proposed for tackling nonlinear evolution problems. The framework, established by a series of easy-to-derive equivalences between Green's function and stochastic representative solutions of linear drift-diffusion problems, provides a flexible structure within which nonlinear evolution problems can be analyzed and physically probed. As a preliminary test bed, two canonical, nonlinear evolution problems - Burgers' equation and the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation - are first treated. In the first case, the framework provides a rigorous, probabilistic derivation of the well known Cole-Hopf ansatz. Likewise, in the second, the machinery allows systematic recovery of a known soliton solution. The framework is then applied to a fairly extensive exploration of physical features underlying evolution of randomly stretched and advected Burger's vortex sheets. Here, the governing vorticity equation corresponds to the Fokker-Planck equation of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a correspondence that motivates an investigation of sub-sheet vorticity evolution and organization. Under the assumption that weak hydrodynamic fluctuations organize disordered, near-molecular-scale, sub-sheet vorticity, it is shown that these modes consist of two weakly damped counter-propagating cross-sheet acoustic modes, a diffusive cross-sheet shear mode, and a diffusive cross-sheet entropy mode. Once a consistent picture of in-sheet vorticity evolution is established, a number of analytical results, describing the

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Phosphine and Arsine Complexes of Ruthenium (Ii & Iii Ligated With 3-(4-Pyridyl-4-Substituted-Triazoline-5-Thione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Pandey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Organometallic complexes of ruthenium (II & III with the formula [RuH(CO(Ef32L] and [RuCl2(Ef32L] (E = P/As; L = deprotonated mononegative bidentate 3-(4-pyridyl-triazoline-5-thione and its 4-phenyl substituted derivative were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. All new compounds were iso-structural with precursor complexes. Two triphenyl phosphine or triphenylarsine molecules are at trans-disposition and thioamide ligands behaves as bidentate (N, S donor in assigned octahedral structure.

  2. Construction of a mutant library of horseradish peroxidase gene by directed evolution and development of an in situ screening method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Mendive

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A process of directed evolution applied to obtain a library of mutants of horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzyme is described. We have introduced slight variations into the original DNA shuffling protocol. A DNA template was prepared by PCR amplification and digested with Dnase I during 1 hour. Dnase I products were concentrated by precipitation with isopropanol. Gel electrophoresis showed fragments of the desired size range (20-600 pb without a full-length template remaining in the reaction mixture. A high concentration of fragments was crucial for performing PCR without primers. In this case, a template concentration of 32.5 ng/mu l was appropriate. Amplification of recombinant genes in a standard PCR reaction (template dilution 1:100 produced a smear with a low yield for the full-length sequence. A single product of the correct size was obtained by PCR with nested primers separated from the previously used primers by 40 pb. In our laboratory, native HRP has been functionally expressed in a baculovirus expression vector system. The purpose is to develop the screening of the first generation of random mutants in this system. To facilitate detection of those clones that have high peroxidase activity, we developed a rapid method: after five days postinfection agarose plates with six wells were covered with DAB (3,3´-diaminobenzidine and H2O2. The appearance of brown-black stain allows visualization of up to 100 active clones/well in only 1 min.

  3. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (ΔG of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi......-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ΔΔG vs. ΔG we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model....../mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche...

  4. Selection by interaction matrix method of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) required in developing evolution scenarios specific to low and intermediate level radioactive waste final repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The paper proposes a method which can be used in the safety analyses required during the licensing process of low and intermediate level radioactive waste final repository. According to the recommended methodology of International Atomic Energy Agency (the coordinated research project on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities - ISAM), the safety analyses specific to a low and intermediate level radioactive waste final repository must contain the assessment of representative evolution scenarios for the repository. Development of these scenarios have to be achieved for whole life time of repository, taking into account both normal and alternative evolution of facility. Scenarios have to be generated in a systematic, transparent, reproducible and auditable manner. Main step of scenario generation process is the development of Features, Events and Processes List - FEPs List, specific to any repository, and the systematic selection of the FEPs important for repository evolution. Authors propose a selection method of FEPs, based on an interaction matrix; the proposed method is applicable to evolution scenarios generation (both normal and alternative scenarios), for Low Level Radioactive Waste Repository Baita Bihor and, also, for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Final Repository in Cernavoda (DFDSMA). (authors)

  5. New extended (G'/G)-expansion method to solve nonlinear evolution equation: the (3 + 1)-dimensional potential-YTSF equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshid, Harun-Or-; Akbar, M Ali; Alam, Md Nur; Hoque, Md Fazlul; Rahman, Nizhum

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a new extended (G'/G) -expansion method has been proposed for constructing more general exact traveling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations with the aid of symbolic computation. In order to illustrate the validity and effectiveness of the method, we pick the (3 + 1)-dimensional potential-YTSF equation. As a result, abundant new and more general exact solutions have been achieved of this equation. It has been shown that the proposed method provides a powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear wave equations in applied mathematics, engineering and mathematical physics. PMID:25674431

  6. Evolution of heavy quark distribution function on quark-gluon plasma: Using the Iterative Laplace Transform Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Sharareh Mehrabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Laplace Transform Method” is used to solve the Fokker-Plank equation for finding the time evolution of the heavy quarks distribution functions such as charm and bottom in quark gluon plasma. These solutions will lead us to calculation of nuclear suppression factor RAA. The results have good agreement with available experiment data from the PHENIX collaboration.

  7. Investigation on the evolution of microstructure and texture of electroplated Ni-Ti composite coating by Rietveld method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuantao; Cai, Fei; Wang, Chengxi; Chai, Ze; Zhu, Kaiyuan; Xu, Zhou; Jiang, Chuanhai

    2015-10-01

    Rietveld refinement was utilized to investigate the evolution of microstructure and texture of the Ni-Ti composite coatings electroplated at different applied current densities. Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the morphology and chemical composition of the coatings. Relative texture coefficients (RTC) and measured pole figures were utilized to investigate the texture evolution of the coatings. The results showed that the surface morphology of the coatings changed from a colonial structure to a polyhedral one. And the incorporated Ti content decreased with increasing applied current density. As the applied current density increased, the crystallite sizes increased and their distribution got less uniform, and the microstrain and dislocation density decreased. The results of simulated pole figures obtained from Rietveld refinement illustrated that the texture of the coatings changed from no obvious texture to a strong [2 0 0] fiber texture with increasing applied current density. The texture evolution obtained from simulated pole figures was confirmed by the result of RTC and the measured pole figures. The evolutions of the microstructure and texture were derived from the change of the applied current density and incorporated Ti content in the Ni-Ti composite coatings.

  8. Practical splitting methods for the adaptive integration of nonlinear evolution equations. Part I: Construction of optimized schemes and pairs of schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Auzinger, Winfried

    2016-07-28

    We present a number of new contributions to the topic of constructing efficient higher-order splitting methods for the numerical integration of evolution equations. Particular schemes are constructed via setup and solution of polynomial systems for the splitting coefficients. To this end we use and modify a recent approach for generating these systems for a large class of splittings. In particular, various types of pairs of schemes intended for use in adaptive integrators are constructed.

  9. Evolution of elastic and thermal properties during TMOS-gel formation determined by ringing bottle acoustic resonance spectroscopy, impulsive stimulated scattering, photopyroelectric spectroscopy and the hot ball method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the elastic and thermal properties of a tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS)-based gel that exhibits an extraordinary ringing effect when enclosed in a bottle is investigated during the sol–gel transition. The results demonstrate the feasibility of three proposed experimental methods for monitoring of gels during their formation. The shear stiffening evolution during gelation is monitored by ringing bottle, resonant acoustic spectroscopy and by an ultrasonic technique using piezo electric excitation and detection. The evolution of the longitudinal modulus and the thermal diffusivity of the gel during stiffening are simultaneously determined by a combined photoacoustic and photothermal method based on heterodyne diffraction detection of impulsive stimulated scattering by, respectively, a propagating acoustic wave grating and a decaying thermal expansion grating that were both thermo elastically generated using a pulsed laser. Also, the feasibility of an inverse photopyroelectric method and a hot ball technique to monitor the thermal transport efficiency and thermal impedance of a forming gel by tracking the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal effusivity is demonstrated. The network polymerization and stiffening during the sol–gel transition in TMOS-gel corresponds with substantial changes in the shear acoustic velocity and in all thermal properties, while the longitudinal acoustic velocity is only weakly affected. (paper)

  10. Equivolumetric Evolution of Planar Curves

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present the equivolumetric evolution of planar curves, which is a new type of curvature dependent evolution for a flame propagation model. This evolution reflects the nonlinear contribution of the curvature of the front to the flame propagation speed. We also present some numerical results of the equivolumetric evolution using the level set method.

  11. Construction of a mutant library of horseradish peroxidase gene by directed evolution and development of an in situ screening method

    OpenAIRE

    F.M. Mendive; M.M. Segura; Targovnik, H M; O. Cascone; M.V. Miranda

    2003-01-01

    A process of directed evolution applied to obtain a library of mutants of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme is described. We have introduced slight variations into the original DNA shuffling protocol. A DNA template was prepared by PCR amplification and digested with Dnase I during 1 hour. Dnase I products were concentrated by precipitation with isopropanol. Gel electrophoresis showed fragments of the desired size range (20-600 pb) without a full-length template remaining in the reaction mi...

  12. Modeling urban evolution by identifying spatiotemporal patterns and applying methods of artificial intelligence.Case study: Athens, Greece.

    OpenAIRE

    Photis, Yorgos N.; Manetos, Panos; Grekoussis, George

    2003-01-01

    While during the past decades, urban areas experience constant slow population growth, the spatial patterns they form, by means of their limits and borders, are rapidly changing in a complex way. Furthermore, urban areas continue to expand to the expense of "rural” intensifying urban sprawl. The main aim of this paper is the definition of the evolution of urban areas and more specifically, the specification of an urban model, which deals simultaneously with the modification of population and ...

  13. Chemical and biochemical strategies for the randomization of protein encoding DNA sequences: library construction methods for directed evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Neylon, Cameron

    2004-01-01

    Directed molecular evolution and combinatorial methodologies are playing an increasingly important role in the field of protein engineering. The general approach of generating a library of partially randomized genes, expressing the gene library to generate the proteins the library encodes and then screening the proteins for improved or modified characteristics has successfully been applied in the areas of protein–ligand binding, improving protein stability and modifying enzyme selectivity. A ...

  14. CURRENT STATE AND EVOLUTION PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING IN THE ENERGY SECTOR BY IMPLEMENTING THE ABC METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    Rof Letitia Maria; Farcane Nicoleta

    2011-01-01

    Based on a controversial issue, namely determining and controlling costs in the energy sector, the present study falls within the scope of management accounting and control. This scientific approach was initiated as a result of personal research concerns in the area of accounting, starting from the need to know and quantify costs in a sector of the economy that is less exploited. The main objective of this scientific approach is to address the evolution of the energy sector in a national and ...

  15. TiO2/CdS porous hollow microspheres rapidly synthesized by salt-assistant aerosol decomposition method for excellent photocatalytic hydrogen evolution performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Chen, Jun; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Linxing; Hu, Lei; He, Min; Gu, Lin; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-01-21

    TiO2/CdS porous hollow microspheres have been one-pot rapidly synthesized by a salt-assisted aerosol decomposition method, and exhibit an excellent photocatalytic activity of 996 μmol h(-1) (50 mg photocatalysts with loading Ru co-catalyst) for hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions containing sacrificial reagents (SO3(2-) and S(2-)) under visible light (λ ≥ 420 nm). Its high photocatalytic performance is attributed to the surface morphology, crystallinity and heterostructures. The present facile method can be extended to fabricate other heterostructures consisting of oxides or sulfides. PMID:26661031

  16. Modelling the chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their...

  17. Multicolour Observations, Inhomogeneity & Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hellaby, Charles

    2000-01-01

    We propose a method of testing source evolution theories that is independent of the effects of inhomogeneity, and thus complementary to other studies of evolution. It is suitable for large scale sky surveys, and the new generation of large telescopes. In an earlier paper it was shown that basic cosmological observations - luminosity versus redshift, area distance versus redshift and number counts versus redshift - cannot separate the effects of cosmic inhomogeneity, cosmic evolution and sourc...

  18. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  19. Stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippernhahn, R. (MPI fur Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (DE)); Weigert, A. (Sternwarte, Hamberg (DE))

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included.

  20. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation–graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation–graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 μg Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L−1 hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 °C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L−1 and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated. - Highlights: ► We determined As in gasoline using hydride generation–graphite furnace AAS. ► We compared three sample preparation procedures. ► A multivariate approach was used to optimize the conditions. ► Analytical performance was best for semi-open digestion.

  1. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Emilene M. [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Bage, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B.; Boschetti, Wiliam [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 {mu}g Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L{sup -1} and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined As in gasoline using hydride generation-graphite furnace AAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compared three sample preparation procedures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multivariate approach was used to optimize the conditions. Black

  2. Microstructure and texture evolution of CeO{sub 2} buffer layers prepared via dip-coating sol-gel method on IBAD-YSZ/Hastelloy substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, P. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: honey00@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, S.S.; Chen, H.; Wang, Z.; Sun, J.C.; Han, Z. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Schmidt, W.; Neumuller, H.W. [Siemens AG, CT PS 3, Erlangen 91052 (Germany)

    2007-10-01

    We have fabricated CeO{sub 2} buffer layers on IBAD-YSZ/Hastelloy substrates via dip-coating sol-gel method using inorganic salts as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning probe microscope (SPM) were applied to investigate the influential factors in film formation and texture evolution. Flat, crack-free CeO{sub 2} films with sharp (0 0 2) c-axis orientation and good texture were obtained by carefully controlling the precursor solution quality, dip-coating and heating process. Compared with IBAD-YSZ/Hastelloy substrates, textures of CeO{sub 2} films were effectively improved.

  3. Evolution of pore-geometry and relative-permeability due to carbonate precipitation within natural rock sample: Insights from a coupled FVM-LBM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, T.; Jiang, F.

    2013-12-01

    To predict long-term CO2 behavior within the reservoir in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, we usually use reservoir simulation. A key parameter in the reservoir simulation is 'relative permeability'. However, since the relative permeability is significantly influenced by mineral precipitation (e.g., change of pore space), we should consider the time evolution of relative permeability in reservoir simulation. To investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation to the relative permeability during CO2 storage, we develop numerical calculation method. Pore spaces of Berea sandstone were extracted by high-resolution micro-CT scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the 3D pore spaces was then calculated using the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The calcite deposition within the pore space was calculated by using an advection-reaction formulation solved by finite volume method; we modeled the precipitated rock by transferring the fluid node to solid node according to the calcium concentration level. To increase the computation efficiency, we applied the graphics processor unit (GPU) parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the rock sample is finally calculated separately by a highly optimized two-phase LB model. The calculated permeability variation due to the carbonate precipitation demonstrates that evolution of pore structure significantly influences the absolute permeability, while it only affects the relative permeability of non-wettable phase at low water saturation conditions.

  4. A comparison of the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy and the Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving multidimensional inverse transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES), a powerful optimization algorithm that mimics the process of evolution in nature, is applied to the inverse transport problems of interface location identification, source composition identification, and material mass density identification (both separately and combined) in cylindrical radioactive source/shield systems. The energies of discrete gamma-ray lines emitted by the source are assumed to be known, while the uncollided line fluxes are assumed to be measured at points external to the system. CMA-ES is compared to the Levenberg-Marquardt method, a standard gradient-based optimization algorithm, on numerical test cases using both simulated data that is perfectly consistent with the optimization process and with realistic data simulated by Monte Carlo. Numerical results indicate that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is more adept at problems with few unknowns (i.e. ≤3), but as the number of unknowns increases, CMA-ES becomes the superior strategy. Results also indicate that a parallel version of CMA-ES would be more robust than, and have competitive run times with, the Levenberg-Marquardt method for many inverse transport problems.

  5. Evolution of different reaction methods resulting in the formation of AgI125 for use in brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer represents about 10% of all cases of cancer in the world. Brachytherapy has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness. The radiotherapy method reduces the damage probability to surrounding healthy tissues. The present study compares several deposition methods of iodine-125 on silver substrate (seed core), in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at IPEN. Four methods were selected: method 1 (assay based on electrodeposition) which presented efficiency of 65.16%; method 2 (assay based on chemical reactions, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the methodology developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80%; new method developed by IPEN with 90.5% efficiency. Based on the results, the new method is the suggested one to be implemented. (authors)

  6. Punctuated evolution of population genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Reuveni, Eli

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis I apply population genetics methods and genotype-phenotype mapping to show that evolution has more discrete rather than linear pace and that this finding may reconcile between two evolution theories (punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism)

  7. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  8. Design of Linear-Phase Digital FIR Filter Using Differential Evolution Optimization with an Improved Ripple Constraint Handling Method

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar Sharma; Sumant Katiyal; L. D. Arya

    2015-01-01

    For the optimal design of frequency-selective digital filters, evolutionary optimization algorithms have been applied. In these design methods the goal of the optimization process is to find the optimal filter coefficients which closely approximate the desired frequency response. In this paper, an efficient alternative method for the design of linear phase digital FIR filter with ripple constraint is discussed. This method of optimization uses DE algorithm with modified selection rule for rip...

  9. Vortex particle method in parallel computations on graphical processing units used in study of the evolution of vortex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the dynamics and the mutual interaction among various types of vortical motions is a key ingredient in clarifying and controlling fluid motion. In the paper several different cases related to vortex tube interactions are presented. Due to problems with very long computation times on the single processor, the vortex-in-cell (VIC) method is implemented on the multicore architecture of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Numerical results of leapfrogging of two vortex rings for inviscid and viscous fluid are presented as test cases for the new multi-GPU implementation of the VIC method. Influence of the Reynolds number on the reconnection process is shown for two examples: antiparallel vortex tubes and orthogonally offset vortex tubes. Our aim is to show the great potential of the VIC method for solutions of three-dimensional flow problems and that the VIC method is very well suited for parallel computation. (paper)

  10. New method of determination of spot welding-adhesive joint fatigue life using full field strain evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, T.; Kneć, M.

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted since more than two hundred years ago. Despite this long period, as fatigue phenomena are very complex, assessment of fatigue response of standard materials or composites still requires a long time. Quite precise way to estimate fatigue parameters is to test at least 30 standardized specimens for the analysed material and further statistical post processing is required. In case of structural elements analysis like hybrid joints (Figure 1), the situation is much more complex as more factors influence the fatigue load capacity due to much more complicated structure of the joint in comparison to standard materials specimen, i.e. occurrence of: welded hot spots or rivets, adhesive layers, local notches creating the stress concentrations, etc. In order to shorten testing time some rapid methods are known: Locati's method [1] - step by step load increments up to failure, Prot's method [2] - constant increase of the load amplitude up to failure; Lehr's method [2] - seeking for the point during regular fatigue loading when an increase of temperature or strains become non-linear. The present article proposes new method of the fatigue response assessment - combination of the Locati's and Lehr's method.

  11. Numerical method for estimating void spaces of rock joints and the evolution of void spaces under different contact states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the void spaces of rock joints under different normal stresses and shear displacements, we mainly introduce a numerical method which was developed based on equivalent void space derived from composite topography. The new method requires the 3D surface data of rock joints, and the normal closure data of the compression test under different shear displacements, while in conventional methods, some disparate materials are inserted between the joint surfaces or special equipments are needed for the measurement of the void space of rock joints without shearing occurs. To apply the technique, a modified 3D box counting method that considers the self-affine fractal property of void spaces was employed to calculate the 3D fractal dimension of the void space. Specially designed experiment was conducted on a cylindrical specimen of artificial joints to explore aperture distribution, and the correlations between void space characteristics, 3D fractal dimension and mean aperture, and normal stress under different shear displacements. The present study focuses on the introduction of the new method for estimating void spaces of rock joints, while the void spaces model obtained contains the combined surfaces roughness and aperture information of rock joints under different normal loads and shear displacements is promising in investigating the mechanical and hydraulic properties during the loading process. (paper)

  12. A semi-automated method for measuring the evolution of both lumen area and blood flow in carotid from Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasquel, Jean-Baptiste; Lécluse, Aldéric; Cavaro-Ménard, Christine; Willoteaux, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Phase-Contrast (PC) velocimetry Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a useful modality to explore cardiovascular pathologies, but requires the automatic segmentation of vessels and the measurement of both lumen area and blood flow evolutions. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated method for extracting lumen boundaries of the carotid artery and compute both lumen area and blood flow evolutions over the cardiac cycle. This method uses narrow band region-based active contours in order to correctly capture the lumen boundary without being corrupted by surrounding structures. This approach is compared to traditional edge-based active contours, considered in related works, which significantly underestimate lumen area and blood flow. Experiments are performed using both a sequence of a homemade phantom and sequences of 20 real carotids, including a comparison with manual segmentation performed by a radiologist expert. Results obtained on the phantom sequence show that the edge-based approach leads to an underestimate of carotid lumen area and related flows of respectively 18.68% and 4.95%. This appears significantly larger than weak errors obtained using the region-based approach (respectively 2.73% and 1.23%). Benefits appear even better on the real sequences. The edge-based approach leads to underestimates of 40.88% for areas and 13.39% for blood flows, compared to limited errors of 7.41% and 4.6% with our method. Experiments also illustrate the high variability and therefore the lack of reliability of manual segmentation. PMID:26453757

  13. Level set methods for the modelling of surface evolution in the abrasive jet micromachining of features used in MEMS and microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent evolution of an abrasive jet micro-machined surface is described by a partial differential equation which is difficult to solve using traditional analytical or numerical techniques. As a result, traditional surface advancement models can give incorrect predicted profile depths. In this work, level set methods were used to develop novel models of the abrasive jet machined surface evolution of unmasked and masked channels and holes in glass and polymethylmethacrylate. The level set-predicted eroded profiles were compared to those experimentally obtained, as well as to those predicted by existing analytical and computer models. For the majority of cases, the level set-predicted surface advancement was closer to the measured profiles than those predicted by existing analytical and computer models. The work demonstrates the potential of the level set methodology as a generally applicable tool for the prediction of abrasive jet machined surface profiles, and provides a foundation for future simulation of more complex abrasive jet micro-machining operations.

  14. Phase-field Simulation of Microstructural Evolution during Preparation of Semi-solid Metal by Electromagnetic Stirring Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolu YU; Fuguo LI; Yuanchun REN; Miaoquan LI

    2006-01-01

    In the process of preparation of semi-solid metal materials, a variety of factors would influence the preparing time and the morphology of non-dendritic microstructure. The aim of this work is using phase-field method to simulate non-dendritic growth during preparation of Al-4Cu-Mg semi-solid alloy by electromagnetic stirring method (EMS method). Several factors such as the disturbance intensity, anisotropy, the thickness of the interface and the ratio of diffusivity in solid and liquid were considered. It is shown that decreasing the thickness of the interface results in more circular outline of particles, and increasing the diffusivity in solid can reduce degree of microsegregation. The disturbance intensity in the model can be connected with current intensity of stator or magnetic induction density impressed. Simulation results show that the larger the disturbance intensity or magnetic induction density, the more globular morphology the original phase in the matrix.

  15. A Forecast Error Correction Method in Numerical Weather Prediction by Using Recent Multiple-time Evolution Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hai-Le; SHEN Xue-Shun; CHOU Ji-Fan

    2013-01-01

    The initial value error and the imperfect numerical model are usually considered as error sources of numerical weather prediction (NWP).By using past multi-time observations and model output,this study proposes a method to estimate imperfect numerical model error.This method can be inversely estimated through expressing the model error as a Lagrange interpolation polynomial,while the coefficients of polynomial are determined by past model performance.However,for practical application in the full NWP model,it is necessary to determine the following criteria:(1) the length of past data sufficient for estimation of the model errors,(2) a proper method of estimating the term "model integration with the exact solution" when solving the inverse problem,and (3) the extent to which this scheme is sensitive to the observational errors.In this study,such issues are resolved using a simple linear model,and an advection-diffusion model is applied to discuss the sensitivity of the method to an artificial error source.The results indicate that the forecast errors can be largely reduced using the proposed method if the proper length of past data is chosen.To address the three problems,it is determined that (1) a few data limited by the order of the corrector can be used,(2) trapezoidal approximation can be employed to estimate the "term" in this study; however,a more accurate method should be explored for an operational NWP model,and (3) the correction is sensitive to observational error.

  16. Method of Express Analysis of Temporal Evolution of the Spectral and Angular Distributions of Seps during Gles Using NM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishev, Alexander; Usoskin, Ilya

    It is important for space weather studies to be estimate radiation environment during major SEP (solar energetic particle) events. For this purpose, the main characteristics, viz. spectra and anisotropy of SEPs, should be derived in near real time. Here we present a method for a quasi-real time analysis of ground level enhancements using neutron monitor (NM) data. The method is based on a precise computations of SEP propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere, namely the assymptotic cones of acceptance of NM, application of the new computed neutron monitor yield function and non-linear optimization. Several examples and a comparison with previously obtained results as well with full scale modeling are demonstrated.

  17. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  18. Longitudinal analysis of the temporal evolution of Acinetobacter baumannii strains in Ohio, USA, by using rapid automated typing methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke K Decker

    Full Text Available Genotyping methods are essential to understand the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii. We examined the representative genotypes of A. baumannii at different time periods in select locations in Ohio, using two rapid automated typing methods: PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, a form of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and repetitive-sequence-based-PCR (rep-PCR. Our analysis included 122 isolates from 4 referral hospital systems, in 2 urban areas of Ohio. These isolates were associated with outbreaks at 3 different time periods (1996, 2000 and 2005-2007. Type assignments of PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR were compared to each other and to worldwide (WW clone types. The discriminatory power of each method was determined using the Simpson's index of diversity (DI. We observed that PCR/ESI-MS sequence type (ST 14, corresponding to WW clone 3, predominated in 1996, whereas ST 12 and 14 co-existed in the intermediate period (2000 and ST 10 and 12, belonging to WW clone 2, predominated more recently in 2007. The shift from WW clone 3 to WW clone 2 was accompanied by an increase in carbapenem resistance. The DI was approximately 0.74 for PCR/ESI-MS, 0.88 for rep-PCR and 0.90 for the combination of both typing methods. We conclude that combining rapid automated typing methods such as PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR serves to optimally characterize the regional molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii. Our data also sheds light on the changing sequence types in an 11 year period in Northeast Ohio.

  19. CrystalMoM: a tool for modeling the evolution of Crystals Size Distributions in magmas with the Method of Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Landi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that nucleation and growth of crystals play a fundamental role in controlling magma ascent dynamics and eruptive behavior. Size- and shape-distribution of crystal populations can affect mixture viscosity, causing, potentially, transitions between effusive and explosive eruptions. Furthermore, volcanic samples are usually characterized in terms of Crystal Size Distribution (CSD), which provide a valuable insight into the physical processes that led to the observed distributions. For example, a large average size can be representative of a slow magma ascent, and a bimodal CSD may indicate two events of nucleation, determined by two degassing events within the conduit. The Method of Moments (MoM), well established in the field of chemical engineering, represents a mesoscopic modeling approach that rigorously tracks the polydispersity by considering the evolution in time and space of integral parameters characterizing the distribution, the moments, by solving their transport differential-integral equations. One important advantage of this approach is that the moments of the distribution correspond to quantities that have meaningful physical interpretations and are directly measurable in natural eruptive products, as well as in experimental samples. For example, when the CSD is defined by the number of particles of size D per unit volume of the magmatic mixture, the zeroth moment gives the total number of crystals, the third moment gives the crystal volume fraction in the magmatic mixture and ratios between successive moments provide different ways to evaluate average crystal length. Tracking these quantities, instead of volume fraction only, will allow using, for example, more accurate viscosity models in numerical code for magma ascent. Here we adopted, for the first time, a quadrature based method of moments to track the temporal evolution of CSD in a magmatic mixture and we verified and calibrated the model again experimental data. We also show how

  20. A STUDY ON NUMERICAL METHOD OF NAVIER-STOKES EQUATION AND NON-LINEAR EVOLUTION OF THE COHERENT STRUCTURES IN A LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-gen; CAO Wei-dong; QIAN Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    A new method for direct numerical simulation of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is studied in the paper. The compact finite difference and the non-linear terms upwind compact finite difference schemes on non-uniform meshes in x and y directions are developed respectively. With the Fourier spectral expansion in the spanwise direction, three-dimensional N-S equation are converted to a system of two-dimensional equations. The third-order mixed explicit-implicit scheme is employed for time integration. The treatment of the three-dimensional non-reflecting outflow boundary conditions is presented, which is important for the numerical simulations of the problem of transition in boundary layers, jets, and mixing layer. The numerical results indicate that high accuracy, stabilization and efficiency are achieved by the proposed numerical method. In addition, a theory model for the coherent structure in a laminar boundary layer is also proposed, based on which the numerical method is implemented to the non-linear evolution of coherent structure. It is found that the numerical results of the distribution of Reynolds stress, the formation of high shear layer, and the event of ejection and sweeping, match well with the observed characteristics of the coherent structures in a turbulence boundary layer.

  1. Modelling dust processing and the evolution of grain sizes in the ISM using the method of moments

    CERN Document Server

    Mattsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar dust grains do not have a single well-defined origin. Stars are demonstrably dust producers, but also efficient destroyers of cosmic dust. Dust destruction in the ISM is believed to be the result of SN shocks hitting the ambient ISM gas (and dust) and lead to an increased rate of ion sputtering, which reduces the dust mass. Grains located in cold molecular clouds can on the other hand grow by condensation, thus providing a replenishment mechanism or even a dominant channel of dust formation. In dense environments grains may coagulate and form large composite grains and aggregates and if grains collide with large enough energies they may be shattered, forming a range of smaller debris grains. The present paper presents a statistical modelling approach using the method of moments, which is computationally very inexpensive and may therefore be an attractive option when combining dust processing with, e.g., detailed simulations of interstellar gas dynamics. A solar-neighbourhood-like toy model of int...

  2. A Preliminary Study on the Calculating Method for the Evolution of Siltation and Erosion of Tidal Flat Based on GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jinglong; GAO Ang; YANG Shilun; ZHANG Wenxiang; ZHAO Huayun; LI Peng

    2005-01-01

    The estuary and coast is an area where the land and the sea interact and a place in which human beings frequently move about so that understanding and controlling the change and development modes of the coastal landform plays a vital part in exploiting and protecting coastal resources. A model is the generalization and abstraction of objective things. This paper summarizes four methods for the landform development of the tidal shore and underwater delta, mainly discusses the model's structural elements, and presents their specific application on the basis of the authors' case study. With the application of the profile model, the dynamic change of coastal landform can be clearly seen by contrasting the different profiles of different years.Through the shrinking, expanding and transformation of the isobath, plane model is used to study the macro-change of the shoal and the coastal landform. Speed model is an efficient means to analyze the trend of erosion and deposition and the local change in a great area of the sea. Statistical survey model is a static analysis, which can be used to establish the relationship between the erosion and deposition of the shoal and the altitude and slope of survey spot.

  3. The MDS Mortality Risk Index: The evolution of a method for predicting 6-month mortality in nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker-Oliver Debra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prognosis is vital to the initiation of advance care planning particularly in a vulnerable, at risk population such as care home residents. The aim of this paper is to report on the revision and simplification of the MDS Mortality Rating Index (MMRI for use in clinical practice to predict the probability of death in six months for care home residents. Methods The design was a secondary analysis of a US Minimum Data Set (MDS for long term care residents using regression analysis to identify predictors of mortality within six months. Results Using twelve easy to collect items, the probability of mortality within six months was accurately predicted within the MDS database. The items are: admission to the care home within three months; lost weight unintentionally in past three months; renal failure; chronic heart failure; poor appetite; male; dehydrated; short of breath; active cancer diagnosis; age; deteriorated cognitive skills in past three months; activities of daily living score. Conclusion A lack of recognition of the proximity of death is often blamed for inappropriate admission to hospital at the end of an older person's life. An accurate prognosis for older adults living in a residential or nursing home can facilitate end of life decision making and planning for preferred place of care at the end of life. The original MMRI was derived and validated from a large database of long term care residents in the USA. However, this simplification of the revised index (MMRI-R may provide a means for facilitating prognostication and end of life discussions for application outside the USA where the MDS is not in use. Prospective testing is needed to further test the accuracy of the MMRI-R and its application in the UK and other non-MDS settings.

  4. Dual phase evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David G; Abbass, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how dual phase evolution operates in all these settings and provides a detailed treatment of the subject. The authors discuss the theoretical foundations for the theory, how it relates to other phase transition phenomena and its advantages in evolutionary computation and complex adaptive systems. The book provides methods and techniques to use this concept for problem solving. Dual phase evolution concerns systems that evolve via repeated phase shifts in the connectivity of their elements. It occurs in vast range of settings, including natural systems (species evolution, landscape ecology, geomorphology), socio-economic systems (social networks) and in artificial systems (annealing, evolutionary computing).

  5. Big science, nano science?: Mapping the evolution and socio-cognitive structure of nanoscience/nanotechnology using mixed methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Stasa

    properties of a transdisciplinary field. The methods I use are powerful tools to empirically study the emergence and the development of scientific fields/disciplines. My hope is that this study is just the first in a series of studies that explore the development of modern scientific fields/disciplines in general, and would ultimately help answer the big question driving my research program: How do modern scientific disciplines/fields form, organize and develop?

  6. Evolution of N/O Abundance Ratios and Ionization Parameters from z~0 to 2 Investigated by the Direct Temperature Method

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takashi; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Harikane, Yuichi; Ono, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We present N/O abundance ratios, ionization parameters $q_{\\rm ion}$, and oxygen abundance O/H of eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies determined by the direct temperature $T_{\\rm e}$ method with [OIII] $\\lambda$4363 and OIII] $\\lambda$1665 lines, and investigate galaxy evolution from $z\\sim 0$ to $2$ in conjunction with $T_{\\rm e}$-method measurements of 208,529 SDSS galaxies and 9 green pea galaxies (GPs). We identify that three out of our eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies clearly fall beyond the local average of N/O-O/H and N/O-stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) relations, while the rest of the $z\\sim 2$ galaxies have N/O ratios comparable with $z\\sim 0$ galaxies. The eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies place the upper limit of N/O ratio $\\log ({\\rm N/O})\\le -1.28$ on average, suggesting that the N/O ratio evolves, if any, by $<0.15$ dex. We find that two of our $z\\sim 2$ galaxies with the significant BPT offsets show both N/O ratio and $q_{\\rm ion}$ about 0.4-dex higher than the local average, while there exist $z\\sim 0$ green-pea galaxie...

  7. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  8. Nudging Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N. Farrell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Feature, "Nudging Evolution? Critical Exploration of the Potential and Limitations of the Concept of Institutional Fit for the Study and Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems," aims to contribute toward the development of social theory and social research methods for the study of social-ecological system dynamics. Our objective is to help strengthen the academic discourse concerning if, and if so, how, to what extent, and in what concrete ways the concept of institutional "fit" might play a role in helping to develop better understanding of the social components of interlinkages between the socioeconomic-cultural and ecological dynamics of social-ecological systems. Two clearly discernible patterns provide a map of this Special Feature: (1 One pattern is the authors' positions regarding the place and role of normativity within their studies and assessment of institutional fit. Some place this at the center of their studies, exploring phenomena endogenous to the process of defining what constitutes institutional fit, whereas others take the formation of norms as a phenomenon exogenous to their study. (2 Another pattern is the type of studies presented: critiques and elaborations of the theory, methods for judging qualities of fit, and/or applied case studies using the concept. As a body of work, these contributions highlight that self-understanding of social-ecological place, whether explicit or implicit, constitutes an important part of the study object, i.e., the role of institutions in social-ecological systems, and that this is, at the same time, a crucial point of reference for the scholar wishing to evaluate what constitutes institutional fit and how it might be brought into being.

  9. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  10. Synthesis and phase evolution of LiNb0.6Ti0.5O3 powder via a sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Wang; Wei Li; Jianlin Shi

    2010-01-01

    A simple sol-gel route was demonstrated for the synthesis of LiNb0.6Ti0.5O3(M-phase)powder,using cheap and manageable starting materials at a relatively low temperature.The phase transitions in both chemical and solid-state processes were studied by X-ray diffraction(XRD)in detail.The results showed that in the sol-gel process the anatase TiO2 phase first appeared at 400℃ and then LiNbO3 solid solution(LiNbO3 ss)emerged at 500℃.When calcined to 600℃,the M-phase started to appear along with the decrease of TiO2 and LiNbO3 ss.Single M-phase could be formed at 700℃,which is 300℃ lower than that by the traditional solid-state method.A plausible evolution mechanism of the as-synthesized powder in calcination was proposed.The produced powder has potential applications in microelectronics systems.

  11. Development of a microprocessing-assisted cell-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment method for human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Kim, Hyonchol; Nomura, Fumimasa; Yasuda, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    We developed a microprocessing-assisted technique to select single-strand DNA aptamers that bind to unknown targets on the cell surface by modifying the conventional systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX). Our technique involves 1) the specific selection of target-cell-surface-bound aptamers without leakage of intracellular components by trypsinization and 2) cloning of aptamers by microprocessing-assisted picking of single cells using magnetic beads. After cell-SELEX, the enriched aptamers were conjugated with magnetic beads. The aptamer-magnetic beads conjugates attached to target cells were collected individually by microassisted procedures using microneedles under a microscope. After that, the sequences of the collected magnetic-bead-bound aptamers were identified. As a result, a specific aptamer for the surface of target cells, e.g., human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), was chosen and its specificity was examined using other cell types, e.g., HeLa cells. The results indicate that this microprocessing-assisted cell-SELEX method for identifying aptamers is applicable in biological research and clinical diagnostics.

  12. A new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling: Implications for the Cenozoic evolution of 3-D structure and dynamics of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2016-06-01

    The 3-D distribution of buoyancy in the convecting mantle drives a suite of convection-related manifestations. Although seismic tomography is providing increasingly resolved images of the present-day mantle heterogeneity, the distribution of mantle density variations in the geological past is unknown, and, by implication, this is true for the convection-related observables. The one major exception is tectonic plate motions, since geologic data are available to estimate their history and they currently provide the only available constraints on the evolution of 3-D mantle buoyancy in the past. We developed a new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling with a procedure for matching plate velocity data at different instants in the past. The crucial aspect of this reconstruction methodology is to ensure that at all times plates are driven by buoyancy forces in the mantle and not vice versa. Employing tomography-based retrodictions over the Cenozoic, we estimate the global amplitude of the following observables: dynamic surface topography, the core-mantle boundary ellipticity, the free-air gravity anomalies, and the global divergence rates of tectonic plates. One of the major benefits of the new data assimilation method is the stable recovery of much shorter wavelength changes in heterogeneity than was possible in our previous work. We now resolve what appears to be two-stage subduction of the Farallon plate under the western U.S. and a deeply rooted East African Plume that is active under the Ethiopian volcanic fields during the Early Eocene.

  13. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...... reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model of...... economic evolution and added evolutionary contributions to other social sciences. History, which was published by his widow, was based on his evolutionary theory of the history of economic analysis. This sequential analysis of Schumpeter's six books demonstrates the progress he within his research...

  14. Two Level Parallel Grammatical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ošmera, Pavel

    This paper describes a Two Level Parallel Grammatical Evolution (TLPGE) that can evolve complete programs using a variable length linear genome to govern the mapping of a Backus Naur Form grammar definition. To increase the efficiency of Grammatical Evolution (GE) the influence of backward processing was tested and a second level with differential evolution was added. The significance of backward coding (BC) and the comparison with standard coding of GEs is presented. The new method is based on parallel grammatical evolution (PGE) with a backward processing algorithm, which is further extended with a differential evolution algorithm. Thus a two-level optimization method was formed in attempt to take advantage of the benefits of both original methods and avoid their difficulties. Both methods used are discussed and the architecture of their combination is described. Also application is discussed and results on a real-word application are described.

  15. Grammatical Evolution Guided by Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Mingo, Jack Mario; Aler, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Grammatical evolution is an evolutionary algorithm able to develop, starting from a grammar, programs in any language. Starting from the point that individual learning can improve evolution, in this paper it is proposed an extension of Grammatical evolution that looks at learning by reinforcement as a learning method for individuals. This way, it is possible to incorporate the Baldwinian mechanism to the evolutionary process. The effect is widened with the introduction of the Lamarck hypothes...

  16. A rapid in situ method for determining the ages of uranium oxide minerals: Evolution of the Cigar Lake deposit, Athabasca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a rapid and accurate technique for making in situ U-Pb isotopic measurements of uranium oxide minerals that utilizes both electron and ion microprobes. U and Pb concentrations are determined using an electron microprobe, whereas the isotopic composition of Pb for the same area is measured using a high-resolution ion microprobe. The advantages of this approach are: mineral separation and chemical digestion are unnecessary; homogeneous uranium oxide standards, which are difficult to obtain, are not required; and precise and accurate U-Pb ages on ∼10 microm spots can be obtained in a matter of hours. The authors have applied their method to study the distribution of U-Pb ages in complexly intergrown uranium oxides from the unconformity-type Cigar Lake uranium deposit, Saskatchewan, Canada. In situ U-Pb results from early formed uraninite define a well-correlated array on concordia with upper and lower intercepts of 1,467 ± 63 Ma and 443 ± 96 Ma (±1σ), respectively. The 1,467 Ma age is interpreted as the minimum age of mineralization and is consistent with the age of clay-mineral alteration (approximately1477 Ma) and magnetization of diagenetic hematite (1,650 to 1,450 Ma) that is associated with these unconformity-type uranium deposits and early diagenesis of the Athabasca Basin sediments. In situ U-Pb isotopic analysis of uraninite and coffinite can document the Pb*/U heterogeneities that can occur on a scale of 15 to 30 microm, thus providing relatively accurate information regarding the timing of fluid interactions associated with the evolution of these deposits

  17. Micro-droplet based directed evolution outperforms conventional laboratory evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Huang, Mingtao; Nielsen, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    We present droplet adaptive laboratory evolution (DrALE), a directed evolution method used to improve industrial enzyme producing microorganisms for e.g. feedstock digestion. DrALE is based linking a desired phenotype to growth rate allowing only desired cells to proliferate. Single cells...... a whole-genome mutated library of yeast cells for α-amylase activity....

  18. High School Students' Perceptions of Evolution Instruction: Acceptance and Evolution Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.; Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2009-01-01

    Evolution is an important and sometimes controversial component of high school biology. In this study, we used a mixed methods approach to explore students' evolution acceptance and views of evolution teaching and learning. Students explained their acceptance and rejection of evolution in terms of evidence and conflicts with religion and…

  19. 3D temporal evolution and modeling of ground deformation recorded on Mt. Etna from the 2007 to 2008 through the SISTEM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Puglisi, G.

    2012-04-01

    A study of the ground deformation pattern of Mount Etna volcano, based on the results of the SISTEM (Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements) integration method is reported. The SISTEM enables integrating geodetic in situ ground deformation measurements (GPS) with satellite interferometric measurements (ENVISAT), in order to obtain high resolution 3D displacement maps, allowing to overcome the limitations of each technique and take advantage of the particular features of each of them. In this work ground motion data provided by GPS surveys are integrated with the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) Envisat data, collected from 2007 to 2008, to provide 3D displacements maps. We imaged the time evolution of ground displacement measured along the Line Of Sight (LOS) of the Envisat satellite for both ascending and descending Envisat geometries. The main deformation episode occurred on Mt. Etna during the 2007-2008 time period was the May 2008 dike intrusion and the following 2008-2009 eruption. It started on May 13th, 2008, with the opening of an eruptive fissure propagating inside the topographical depression of the Valle del Bove, where the lava flows expanded. The eruption produced a lava flow of about 6 Km length, and it was preceded and accompanied by strong seismic release, and lava fountaining activity. The 3D temporal evolution of ground deformation was analyzed in order to define the dynamics preceding and accompanying the onset of the 2008-2009 Mt. Etna eruption. In particular, this analysis reveals a slight inflation visible on the upper western side of the volcano in the pre-eruptive period (form June 2007 to May 2008) characterized by a small amplitude of the ground deformation, except on the eastern flank. Data inversions detected a pressurizing source located beneath the western flank of the volcano at a depth of about 3Km bsl. In the period encompassing the eruption onset

  20. Enzyme catalysis: Evolution made easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Eugene J. H.; Trau, Matt

    2014-09-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful tool for the development of improved enzyme catalysts. Now, a method that enables an enzyme, its encoding DNA and a fluorescent reaction product to be encapsulated in a gel bead enables the application of directed evolution in an ultra-high-throughput format.

  1. National radiotherapy Observatory. Inquiry report: situation at the end of 2010 and evolution since 2007. Context and method, results of data from 2010, conclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illustrated by data tables and graphs, this document presents and discusses the results of an inquiry made on radiotherapy centres about their equipment (linear accelerators and additional equipment, number of days opened to patients, use, quality control and maintenance duration, treatment preparation, equipment dedicated to quality control), their activities (evolution of the number of treated patients, of treatments, and of treatment sessions between 2007 and 2010, number of sessions per apparatus, dosimetry, techniques), their personnel (evolution of the number of radiotherapists, radio-physicists, operators and dosimetrists, time dedicated to training), and their practices

  2. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  3. Cepheid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the phases of stellar evolution relevant to Cepheid variables of both Types I and II is presented. Type I Cepheids arise as a result of normal post-main sequence evolutionary behavior of many stars in the intermediate to massive range of stellar masses. In contrast, Type II Cepheids generally originate from low-mass stars of low metalicity which are undergoing post core helium-burning evolution. Despite great progress in the past two decades, uncertainties still remain in such areas as how to best model convective overshoot, semiconvection, stellar atmospheres, rotation, and binary evolution as well as uncertainties in important physical parameters such as the nuclear reaction rates, opacity, and mass loss rates. The potential effect of these uncertainties on stellar evolution models is discussed. Finally, comparisons between theoretical predictions and observations of Cepheid variables are presented for a number of cases. The results of these comparisons show both areas of agreement and disagreement with the latter result providing incentive for further research

  4. The theory of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The book The Theory of Evolution: from the Space Vacuum to Neural Ensembles and Moving Forward, an edition of 100 copies, was published in Russian language, in December 2014 in Kiev. Its Russian version is here: http://en.bazaluk.com/journals.html. Introduction, Chapter 10 and Conclusion published in English for the first time. Since 2004 author have been researching in the field of theory of Evolution, Big History. The book was written on the base of analysis of more than 2000 primary sources of this research topic. The volume is 90,000 words (with Reference. The book is for a wide range of professionals, from students to professors and researchers working in the fields of: philosophical anthropology, philosophy, Big History, cosmology, biology, neuroscience and etc. In the book, the author defines the evolution as continuous and nonlinear complication of the structure of matter, the types of interaction and environments; analyzes existing in modern science and philosophy approaches to the research of the process of evolution, degree of development of the factors and causes of evolution. Unifying interdisciplinary researches of evolution in cosmology, biology, neuroscience and philosophy, the author presents his vision of the model of «Evolving Matter», which allows us to consider not only the laws of transition of space vacuum in neural ensembles but also to see our Universe as a complication, heterogeneous organization. Interdisciplinary amount of information on the theory of evolution is systematized and a new method of world perception is proposed in the book.

  5. In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of the Phase and Texture Evolution of Ceria and Superconductor Films Deposited by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; He, Dong;

    2012-01-01

    /differential thermal analysis and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy allows to study the details on the decomposition and crystallization processes of ceria based in form of bulk and film. The success of this work demonstrates the possibility of studying chemical reaction pathway and texture evolution of...

  6. Boussinesq evolution equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Schaffer, H.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the possibility of using methods and ideas from time domain Boussinesq formulations in the corresponding frequency domain formulations. We term such frequency domain models "evolution equations". First, we demonstrate that the numerical efficiency of the deterministic...... Boussinesq evolution equations of Madsen and Sorensen [Madsen, P.A., Sorensen, O.R., 1993. Bound waves and triad interactions in shallow water. Ocean Eng. 20 359-388] can be improved by using Fast Fourier Transforms to evaluate the nonlinear terms. For a practical example of irregular waves propagating over...... a submerged bar, it is demonstrated that evolution equations utilising FFT can be solved around 100 times faster than the corresponding time domain model. Use of FFT provides an efficient bridge between the frequency domain and the time domain. We utilise this by adapting the surface roller model...

  7. Method for determining maximum mileage range of electric vehicle, involves determining moment at which state of change of battery tends to zero following evolution of energy state of vehicle along trajectory

    OpenAIRE

    Granato, Giovanni; Zidani, Hasnaa; Aouchiche, K.

    2013-01-01

    The method involves selecting a trajectory ranging between a starting point and a destination place. An initial energy state of the vehicle is evaluated. A strategy of energy consumption along the selected trajectory is applied by a controller based on optimized use of an auxiliary internal combustion engine and battery so as to support overall length of running distance. A moment at which a state of change of the battery tends to zero is determined following the evolution of energy state of ...

  8. Micro-droplet based directed evolution outperforms conventional laboratory evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Huang, Mingtao; Nielsen, Jens; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2014-01-01

    We present droplet adaptive laboratory evolution (DrALE), a directed evolution method used to improve industrial enzyme producing microorganisms for e.g. feedstock digestion. DrALE is based linking a desired phenotype to growth rate allowing only desired cells to proliferate. Single cells are confined in microfluidic droplets to prevent the phenotype, e.g. secreted enzymes, from leaking between cells. The method was benchmarked against and found to significantly outperform conventional adapti...

  9. Mitochondrial Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineag...

  10. Evolution of the European region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem on geochronological study of the European region is covered. The most ancient age values are determined by U-Pb methods by zircones from paragneisses. The model of evolution, being in agreement with the data obtained by U-Pb and Rb-Sr methods, is considered. The history of the Schwarzwald development is typical for the continent as a whole. The diagram of evolution of primary 87Sr/86Sr for orthogneisses and granites in France is given

  11. Group Evolution Discovery in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Group extraction and their evolution are among the topics which arouse the greatest interest in the domain of social network analysis. However, while the grouping methods in social networks are developed very dynamically, the methods of group evolution discovery and analysis are still uncharted territory on the social network analysis map. Therefore the new method for the group evolution discovery called GED is proposed in this paper. Additionally, the results of the first experiments on the ...

  12. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  13. Evolution of the tapetum.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Ivan R; Yuen, Carlton K; Buyukmihci, Nedim C.; Blankenship, Thomas N.; Fitzgerald, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review, contrast, and compare current known tapetal mechanisms and review the implications for the evolution of the tapetum. METHODS: Ocular specimens of representative fish in key piscine families, including Acipenseridae, Cyprinidae, Chacidae; the reptilian family Crocodylidae; the mammalian family Felidae; and the Lepidopteran family Sphingidae were reviewed and compared histologically. All known varieties of tapeta were examined and classified and compared to the known cladogr...

  14. Evolution of Disk Accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Strom, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    We review the present knowledge of disk accretion in young low mass stars, and in particular, the mass accretion rate and its evolution with time. The methods used to obtain mass accretion rates from ultraviolet excesses and emission lines are described, and the current best estimates of mass accretion rate for Classical T Tauri stars and for objects still surrounded by infalling envelopes are given. We argue that the low mass accretion rates of the latter objects require episodes of high mas...

  15. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel

    2012-12-27

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young\\'s modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  16. Statistical limitations on molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I

    2002-06-01

    Complexity of functions evolving in an evolution process are expected to be limited by the time length of an evolution process among other factors. This paper outlines a general method of deriving function-complexity limitations based on mathematical statistics and independent from details of a biological or genetic mechanism of the evolution of the function. Limitations on the emergence of life are derived, these limitations indicate a possibility of a very fast evolution and are consistent with "RNA world" hypothesis. The discussed method is general and can be used to characterize evolution of more specific biological organism functions and relate functions to genetic structures. The derived general limitations indicate that a co-evolution of multiple functions and species could be a slow process, whereas an evolution of a specific function might proceed very fast, so that no trace of intermediate forms (species) is preserved in fossil records of phenotype or DNA structure; this is consistent with a picture of "punctuated equilibrium". PMID:12023805

  17. Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ZrO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization method in aqueous electrolyte containing (NH42SO4 and NH4F. The morphology and structure of nanotube arrays were characterized through scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectra analysis. The zirconia nanotube arrays were used as catalyst in esterification reaction. The effects of calcination temperature and electrolyte concentration on catalytic esterification activity have been investigated in detail. Experiments indicate that nanotube arrays have highest catalytic activity when the concentration of (NH42SO4 is 1 mol/L, the concentration of NH4F is 1 wt%, and the calcination temperature is 400°C. Esterification reaction yield of as much as 97% could be obtained under optimal conditions.

  18. Biological Evolution and Statistical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Drossel, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    This review is an introduction to theoretical models and mathematical calculations for biological evolution, aimed at physicists. The methods in the field are naturally very similar to those used in statistical physics, although the majority of publications appeared in biology journals. The review has three parts, which can be read independently. The first part deals with evolution in fitness landscapes and includes Fisher's theorem, adaptive walks, quasispecies models, effects of finite popu...

  19. Incremental Evolution with Minimal Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Urzelai, J.; Floreano, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an evolutionary algorithm based on a statistical representation of populations of individuals. Experiments on robot navigation and on numerical fitness functions are presented in order to measure the performance of the algorithm compared to traditional genetic algorithms. Results show that the method is suitable for onboard online evolution because it requires low amount of memory resources. Furthermore, it allows for incremental evolution in dynamic environments in order...

  20. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    kulturens kausale virkning på den menneskelige kognition og ikke mindst den hominine evolution. Ud fra, hvad vi ved om den menneskelige evolution, ses det, at den hominine evolution har en dybde, som sjældent medtænkes i teorier og hypoteser om den menneskelige evolution. Den menneskelige evolution er...

  1. Technologies of directed protein evolution in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Blagodatski, Artem; Katanaev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Directed evolution of proteins for improved or modified functionality is an important branch of modern biotechnology. It has traditionally been performed using various in vitro methods, but more recently, methods of in vivo artificial evolution come into play. In this review, we discuss and compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic-based systems of directed protein evolution in vivo, highlighting their benefits and current limitations and focusing on the biotechnological potential of vertebrate immu...

  2. National radiotherapy Observatory. Inquiry report: situation at the end of 2010 and evolution since 2007. Context and method, results of data from 2010, conclusion; Observatoire national de la radiotherapie. Rapport d'enquete: situation fin 2010 et evolution depuis 2007. Contexte et methode, resultats des donnees 2010, conclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    Illustrated by data tables and graphs, this document presents and discusses the results of an inquiry made on radiotherapy centres about their equipment (linear accelerators and additional equipment, number of days opened to patients, use, quality control and maintenance duration, treatment preparation, equipment dedicated to quality control), their activities (evolution of the number of treated patients, of treatments, and of treatment sessions between 2007 and 2010, number of sessions per apparatus, dosimetry, techniques), their personnel (evolution of the number of radiotherapists, radio-physicists, operators and dosimetrists, time dedicated to training), and their practices

  3. Insect evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    It goes without saying that insects epitomize diversity, and with over a million documented species they stand out as one of the most remarkable lineages in the 3.5-billion-year history of life on earth (Figure 1). This reality is passé to even the layperson and is taken for granted in the same way none of us think much of our breathing as we go about our day, and yet insects are just as vital to our existence. Insects are simultaneously familiar and foreign to us, and while a small fraction are beloved or reviled, most are simply ignored. These inexorable evolutionary overachievers outnumber us all, their segmented body plan is remarkably labile, they combine a capacity for high rates of speciation with low levels of natural extinction, and their history of successes eclipses those of the more familiar ages of dinosaurs and mammals alike. It is their evolution - persisting over vast expanses of geological time and inextricably implicated in the diversification of other lineages - that stands as one of the most expansive subjects in biology. PMID:26439349

  4. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  5. Hydrocarbons dating by Re-Os method: experimental study of the Re-Os couple geochemical behaviour in oils during the evolution of a petroleum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Re-Os radiogenic system is well adapted to the dating of oils and bitumen. However the meaning of the obtained age is ambiguous. This is mainly due to gaps in our knowledge of the geochemical behavior and the speciation of Re and Os in oils. Specifically, use of the Re-Os geo-chronometer requires an understanding of how Re-Os behavior can lead to the fulfillment of the conditions necessary for the development of an isochron. These conditions are: i) the isotopic homogenization of oils at the scale of a petroleum field ii) the fractionation of Re from Os so as to obtain samples with various Re/Os ratios iii) the closure of the system during the period of radiogenic ingrowth of the daughter isotope, that is, from the time of the event of interest to the present day. Experimental investigation of the organic geochemical behavior of Re and Os in oils under various conditions, designed as analogs of the different stages of petroleum generation and evolution, were performed in order to evaluate the use of the Re-Os system as a geo-chronometer in the context of a direct use on petroleum. The possibility of Re-Os fractionation resulting from asphaltene loss during oil evolution was investigated by sequential asphaltene precipitation in the laboratory. This study determined that Re and Os are mainly located in the most polar asphaltene fractions, that is, in the first to precipitate. This study also demonstrated that Re/Os ratios are not disturbed by asphaltene loss during the evolution of oils, unless this loss is unrealistically large. Thus asphaltene precipitation during migration and emplacement is not responsible for the Re/Os fractionation required for the use of the geo-chronometer. The possibility of metal transfer from formation waters to petroleum was studied by performing contact experiments between oils and aqueous solutions of Re and Os of various concentrations over a wide range of temperatures and for varying periods of time. This study demonstrated a

  6. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  7. Enhanced hydrogen evolution from water splitting using Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO{sub 2} synthesized by solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tao [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, No. 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Liu, Enzhou; Liang, Xuhua [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Hu, Xiaoyun [Department of Physics, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Fan, Jun, E-mail: fanjun@nwu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710069 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites displayed a higher hydrogen evolution rate. • TiO{sub 2} showed well optical property of light absorption by Fe, Ni and Ag modified. • More surface vacancies on TiO{sub 2} generated by the low cost metal introduced. • The separation rate of photoinduced electro-hole pairs was considerable improved. - Abstract: In this paper, the Fe-Ni co-doped and Ag deposited anatase TiO{sub 2} (Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by a simple one-pot solvothermal approach. The investigations indicated that all as-prepared TiO{sub 2} samples were single anatase phase, and the impurity level was generated due to the Fe{sup 3+} or Ni{sup 2+} being located in the intrinsic band gap of TiO{sub 2}, while the Ag{sup +} ions could be transformed into metallic silver due to the reduction reaction and then loaded onto the surface of TiO{sub 2}. Compared with pure TiO{sub 2}, Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO{sub 2} composites with the sizes of Ag nanoparticles from 1.0 to 3.0 nm displayed the well optical property including higher visible light absorption activity and lower electron-hole pair recombination rate, and its absorption wavelength edge moved remarkably with a red shift to 700 nm. The photocatalytic water splitting was performed to produce H{sub 2} over the samples, and the experimental results indicate that Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO{sub 2} composites presented the highest H{sub 2} evolution rate, it can reach up to 793.86 μmol h{sup −1} g{sub cat}{sup −1} (λ > 400 nm for 6 h, energy efficiency is 0.25%), which was much higher than that of pure TiO{sub 2} for 9.57 μmol h{sup −1} g{sub cat}{sup −1}. In addition, a tentative photocatalytic mechanism is proposed to understand the enhancement mechanism over Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO{sub 2}.

  8. Enhanced hydrogen evolution from water splitting using Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2 synthesized by solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites displayed a higher hydrogen evolution rate. • TiO2 showed well optical property of light absorption by Fe, Ni and Ag modified. • More surface vacancies on TiO2 generated by the low cost metal introduced. • The separation rate of photoinduced electro-hole pairs was considerable improved. - Abstract: In this paper, the Fe-Ni co-doped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2 (Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by a simple one-pot solvothermal approach. The investigations indicated that all as-prepared TiO2 samples were single anatase phase, and the impurity level was generated due to the Fe3+ or Ni2+ being located in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, while the Ag+ ions could be transformed into metallic silver due to the reduction reaction and then loaded onto the surface of TiO2. Compared with pure TiO2, Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2 composites with the sizes of Ag nanoparticles from 1.0 to 3.0 nm displayed the well optical property including higher visible light absorption activity and lower electron-hole pair recombination rate, and its absorption wavelength edge moved remarkably with a red shift to 700 nm. The photocatalytic water splitting was performed to produce H2 over the samples, and the experimental results indicate that Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2 composites presented the highest H2 evolution rate, it can reach up to 793.86 μmol h−1 gcat−1 (λ > 400 nm for 6 h, energy efficiency is 0.25%), which was much higher than that of pure TiO2 for 9.57 μmol h−1 gcat−1. In addition, a tentative photocatalytic mechanism is proposed to understand the enhancement mechanism over Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2

  9. Formation and evolution of MnNi clusters in neutron irradiated dilute Fe alloys modelled by a first principle-based AKMC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomistic Monte Carlo model parameterised on electronic structure calculations data has been used to study the formation and evolution under irradiation of solute clusters in Fe–MnNi ternary and Fe–CuMnNi quaternary alloys. Two populations of solute rich clusters have been observed, which can be discriminated by whether or not the solute atoms are associated with self-interstitial clusters. Mn–Ni-rich clusters are observed at a very early stage of the irradiation in both modelled alloys, whereas the quaternary alloys contain also Cu-containing clusters. Mn–Ni-rich clusters nucleate very early via a self-interstitial-driven mechanism, earlier than Cu-rich clusters; the latter, however, which are likely to form via a vacancy-driven mechanism, grow in number much faster than the former, helped by the thermodynamic driving force to Cu precipitation in Fe, thereby becoming dominant in the low dose regime. The kinetics of the number density increase of the two populations is thus significantly different. Finally the main conclusion suggested by this work is that the so-called late blooming phases might as well be neither late, nor phases.

  10. The physics of evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Manfred

    1988-12-01

    likely candidate for early evolution2,3, and of the implications on natural selection have been given in Refs. 4 and 5. The quasi-species model has been constructed in Refs. 6 and 7 using the concept of sequence space. Subsequently various methods have been invented to elucidate this concept and to relate it to the theory of critical phenomena 8-19. The instability of the quasi-species at the error threshold is discussed in Ref. 10. Evolution experiments with RNA strands in test tubes are described in Refs. 21 and 22.

  11. Tensor Networks for Entanglement Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meznaric, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The intuitiveness of the tensor network graphical language is becoming well known through its use in numerical simulations using methods from tensor network algorithms. Recent times have also seen rapid progress in developing equations of motion to predict the time evolution of quantum entanglement [Nature Physics, 4(\\textbf{4}):99, 2008]. Here we cast these recent results into a tensor network framework and in doing so, construct a theory which exposes the topological equivalence of the evolution of a family of entanglement monotones in arbitrary dimensions. This unification was accomplished by tailoring a form of channel state duality through the interpretation of graphical tensor network rewrite rules. The introduction of tensor network methods to the theory of entanglement evolution opens the door to apply methods from the rapidly evolving area known as tensor network states.

  12. Frost evolution in tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review was carried out on the physical and thermal mechanisms of permafrost evaluation in soils and uranium tailings. The primary mechanism controlling permafrost evolution is conductive heat transfer with the latent heat of fusion of water being liberated as phase change occurs. Depending on the soil properties and freezing rate, pore water can be expelled from the frost front or pore water can migrate towards the frost front. Solute redistribution may occur as the frost front penetrates into the soil. The rate of frost penetration is a function of the thermal properties of the tailings and the climatic conditions. Computer modelling programmes capable of modelling permafrost evolution were reviewed. The GEOTHERM programme was selected as being the most appropriate for this study. The GEOTHERM programme uses the finite element method of thermal analysis. The ground surface temperature is determined by solving the energy balance equations a the ground surface. The GEOTHERM programme was used to simulate the permafrost evolution in the Key Lake Mine tailings located in north central Saskatchewan. The analyses indicated that the existing frozen zones in the tailing pond will eventually thaw if an average snow depth covers the tailings. Hundreds of years are required to thaw the tailings. If minimal snow cover is present the extent of the frozen zone in the tailings will increase

  13. Chemotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method as a field method for volatile arsenic in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroic, M Kalle; Krupp, Eva M; Johnson, Charlie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Volatile arsenic compounds in natural gas, existing in the form of trimethylarsine (TMAs), have been determined using gas cryo-trapping gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (CT-GC-ICP-MS). The results from a number of different gas wells revealed a huge concentration spread ranging from below the detection limit of 0.2 up to 1800 microg/m(3) TMAs (as As) in the gas. Due to the toxicity and corrosive nature of these arsines, they need near real time monitoring via a method that can easily be implemented on site, i.e. during gas exploitation. Here, we introduce a novel method which utilises silver nitrate impregnated silica gel tubes for quantitative chemotrapping of trimethylarsine (TMAs) from a natural gas matrix. Subsequent elution with hot nitric acid followed by online photo-oxidation hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) is used for the determination of TMAs gas standards in nitrogen and natural gas samples, respectively. The chemotrapping method was validated using CT-GC-ICP-MS as a reference method. The recovery of arsenic from nitrogen or natural gas matrix ranged from 85 to 113% for a range of 20 to 2000 ng As. Trapping efficiency was >98%, from the methods LOD of 20 ng to 4.8 microg (absolute amount As) with sample sizes of 0.02 and 2 L gas. Method performance was established by comparing the results obtained for eight natural gas samples containing between 1 and 140 microg As/m(3) with those achieved by the reference method (CT-GC-ICP-MS). PMID:20024020

  14. Generalization capabilities of co-evolution in learning robot behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Berlanga, Antonio; Sanchis, Araceli; Isasi, Pedro; José M. Molina

    2002-01-01

    In this article, a co-evolutive method is used to evolve neural controllers for general obstacle-avoidance of a Braitenberg vehicle. During a first evolutionary process, Evolution Strategies were applied to generate neural controllers; the generality of the obtained behaviors was quite poor. During a second evolutionary process, a new co-evolutive method, called Uniform Co-evolution, is introduced to co-evolve both the controllers and the environment. A comparison of both methods shows that t...

  15. Mechanism for the Evolution of Rural Consumption Methods of China and Their Action on Consumption Growth%农村消费方式变迁及其作用消费增长的机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡绍雨; 申曙光

    2014-01-01

    Since the reform and opening-up, China ’ s rural consumption methods gradually evolve from the traditional consumption methods such as decentralization, individualization, closure and low level which befit the traditional agriculture to modern consumption methods such as centralization, socialization and marketization which focus on the enjoyment and development, among which the consumption of rural durable products significantly shows the feature from“poverty to ample food and clothing”, then from“ample food and clothing to all-round well-being”, then from “all-round well-being to overall all-round well-being”, and the important factors affecting rural durable product consumption methods and their evolution direction are consumption habit, self-cognition of the consumers, social hierarchy attribution, regional location, consumption system, household life cycle and family income. Consumption method evolution can directly bring the increase of consumption quantity, however, the consumption method evolution comprehensively depends on the self-factor of the peasants, rural objective environment factors and the income of the peasants, and meanwhile, the promotion of the consumption method evolution and the peasant income increase can relatively use small social reform to realize the rapid increase of rural consumption. Thus, village reconstruction should pay the same attention to “improving rural environment”,“increasing the income of the peasants” and“raising the quality of the peasants” so that rural consumption can be effectively boosted.%改革开放以来,我国农村消费方式从与传统农业生产相适应的分散化、个体化、封闭性、低层次的传统消费方式,逐步向集中化、社会化、市场化、重视享受与发展的现代消费方式转变;其中,农村耐用消费品消费从“贫困-温饱”到“温饱-小康”再到“小康-全面小康”的三个阶段特征表现得尤为明显;消费

  16. Enhanced hydrogen evolution from water splitting using Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2 synthesized by solvothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Enzhou; Liang, Xuhua; Hu, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the Fe-Ni co-doped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2 (Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by a simple one-pot solvothermal approach. The investigations indicated that all as-prepared TiO2 samples were single anatase phase, and the impurity level was generated due to the Fe3+ or Ni2+ being located in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, while the Ag+ ions could be transformed into metallic silver due to the reduction reaction and then loaded onto the surface of TiO2. Compared with pure TiO2, Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2 composites with the sizes of Ag nanoparticles from 1.0 to 3.0 nm displayed the well optical property including higher visible light absorption activity and lower electron-hole pair recombination rate, and its absorption wavelength edge moved remarkably with a red shift to 700 nm. The photocatalytic water splitting was performed to produce H2 over the samples, and the experimental results indicate that Fe-Ni/Ag/TiO2 composites presented the highest H2 evolution rate, it can reach up to 793.86 μmol h-1 gcat-1 (λ > 400 nm for 6 h, energy efficiency is 0.25%), which was much higher than that of pure TiO2 for 9.57 μmol h-1 gcat-1. In addition, a tentative photocatalytic mechanism is proposed to understand the enhancement mechanism over Fe-Ni codoped and Ag deposited anatase TiO2.

  17. Gas evolution from spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas evolution from spherical solids or liquids where no convective processes are active is analyzed. Three problem classes are considered: (1) constant concentration boundary, (2) Henry's law (first order) boundary, and (3) Sieverts' law (second order) boundary. General expressions are derived for dimensionless times and transport parameters appropriate to each of the classes considered. However, in the second order case, the non-linearities of the problem require the presence of explicit dimensional variables in the solution. Sample problems are solved to illustrate the method. 5 refs., 4 figs

  18. Bibliometric Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2015-01-01

    Applying a recently developed method for measuring the level of specialization over time for a selection of library and information science (LIS)-core journals seems to reveal that Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) is slowly transforming into a specialty j...

  19. Hyperbolicity and Constrained Evolution in Linearized Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, R A

    2005-01-01

    Solving the 4-d Einstein equations as evolution in time requires solving equations of two types: the four elliptic initial data (constraint) equations, followed by the six second order evolution equations. Analytically the constraint equations remain solved under the action of the evolution, and one approach is to simply monitor them ({\\it unconstrained} evolution). Since computational solution of differential equations introduces almost inevitable errors, it is clearly "more correct" to introduce a scheme which actively maintains the constraints by solution ({\\it constrained} evolution). This has shown promise in computational settings, but the analysis of the resulting mixed elliptic hyperbolic method has not been completely carried out. We present such an analysis for one method of constrained evolution, applied to a simple vacuum system, linearized gravitational waves. We begin with a study of the hyperbolicity of the unconstrained Einstein equations. (Because the study of hyperbolicity deals only with th...

  20. Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project: Isotope and Chemical Methods in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy, 2003-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Robert O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Landis, Gary P.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Emsbo, Poul; Stricker, Craig A.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Rusk, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    Principal functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program are providing assessments of the location, quantity, and quality of undiscovered mineral deposits, and predicting the environmental impacts of exploration and mine development. The mineral and environmental assessments of domestic deposits are used by planners and decisionmakers to improve the stewardship of public lands and public resources. Assessments of undiscovered mineral deposits on a global scale reveal the potential availability of minerals to the United States and other countries that manufacture goods imported to the United States. These resources are of fundamental relevance to national and international economic and security policy in our globalized world economy. Performing mineral and environmental assessments requires that predictions be made of the likelihood of undiscovered deposits. The predictions are based on geologic and geoenvironmental models that are constructed for the diverse types of mineral deposits from detailed descriptions of actual deposits and detailed understanding of the processes that formed them. Over the past three decades the understanding of ore-forming processes has benefited greatly from the integration of laboratory-based geochemical tools with field observations and other data sources. Under the aegis of the Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project (referred to hereinafter as the Project), a 5-year effort that terminated in 2008, the Mineral Resources Program provided state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to support applications of several related geochemical tools to ore-deposit-related studies. The analytical capabilities and scientific approaches developed within the Project have wide applicability within Earth-system science. For this reason the Project Laboratories represent a valuable catalyst for interdisciplinary collaborations of the type that should be formed in the coming years for the United States to meet

  1. Tracking Group Evolution in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Easy access and vast amount of data, especially from long period of time, allows to divide social network into timeframes and create temporal social network. Such network enables to analyse its dynamics. One aspect of the dynamics is analysis of social communities evolution, i.e., how particular group changes over time. To do so, the complete group evolution history is needed. That is why in this paper the new method for group evolution extraction called GED is presented.

  2. On Technology and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Radovan, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Evolution creates structures of increasing order and power; in this process the stronger prevail over the weaker and carry the evolution further. Technology is an artificial creation that often threatens life and evolution conceived of as natural phenomena; but technology also supports life and it works together with evolution. However, there are claims that technology will do much more than that, and bring about an entirely new epoch of evolution. Technology will replace the fragile biologic...

  3. Stator current harmonics evolution by neural network method based on CFE/SS algorithm for ACEC generator of Rey Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One method for on-line fault diagnosis in synchronous generator is stator current harmonics analysis. Then artificial neural network is considered in this paper in order to evaluate stator current harmonics in different loads. Training set of artificial neural network is made ready by generator modeling, finite element method and state space model. Many points from generator capability curve are used in order to complete this set. Artificial neural network which is used in this paper is a percept ron network with a single hidden layer, Eight hidden neurons and back propagation algorithm. Results are indicated that the trained artificial neural network can identify stator current harmonics for arbitrary load from the capability curve. The error is less than 10% in comparison with values obtained directly from the CFE-SS algorithm. The rating parameters of modeled generator are 43950 (kV A), 11(KV), 3000 (rpm), 50 (H Z), (P F=0.8)

  4. Stellar Evolution Physics 2 Volume Hardback Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iben, Icko

    2012-12-01

    Volume 1: Part I. Introduction and Overview: 1. Qualitative description of single and binary star evolution; 2. Quantitative foundations of stellar evolution theory; Part II. Basic Physical Processes in Stellar Interiors: 3. Properties of and physical processes in the interiors of main sequence stars - order of magnitude estimates; 4. Statistical physics, thermodynamics, and equations of state; 5. Polytropes and single zone models: elementary tools for understanding some aspects of stellar structure and evolution; 6. Hydrogen-burning nuclear reactions and energy-generation rates; 7. Photon-matter interactions and opacity; 8. Equations of stellar evolution and methods of solution; Part III. Pre-Main Sequence, Main Sequence, and Shell Hydrogen Burning Evolution of Single Stars: 9. Star formation and evolution to the main-sequence; 10. Solar structure and neutrino physics; 11. Evolution during core hydrogen-burning phases up to the onset of helium burning; Volume 2: Part IV. Transport Processes, Weak Interaction Processes and Helium-Burning Reactions: 12. Diffusion and gravitational settling; 13. Heat conduction by electrons; 14. Beta decay and electron capture at high densities in stars; 15. The current-current weak interaction and the production of neutrino-antineutrino pairs; 16. Helium-burning nuclear reactions and energy-generation rates; Part V. Evolution during Helium-Burning Phases: 17. Evolution of a low mass model burning helium and hydrogen; 18. Evolution of an intermediate mass model burning helium and hydrogen; 19. Neutron production and neutron capture in a thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch star of intermediate mass; 20. Evolution of a massive population I model during helium- and carbon-burning stages; Part VI. Terminal Evolution of Low and Intermediate Mass Stars: 21. Wind mass loss on the AGB and formation of a circumstellar envelope, evolution of the remnant as the central star of a planetary nebula, and white dwarf evolution; Index.

  5. Co-evolution algorithm based on punctuated anytime learning and sampling method%基于间隔时间学习和抽样法的协同进化算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖喜丽

    2012-01-01

    When evaluating individuals, the selection of representation and the evaluation of the combination of the individuals and representations need lots of computation in co-evolution algorithm. For cooperative co-evolutionary genetic algorithm, calculated amount is small, but it can only obtain one greedy solution. Multi-pattern symbiotic evolutionary algorithm can overcome the shortcoming, but its calculated amount is too big. In this paper we proposed punctuated anytime learning co-evolution algorithm using punctuated anytime learning method, this approach interacts information every N generations. Based on this algorithm, the sampling method was used to co-evolutionary algorithms. The experimental results and mathematical analysis show that this algorithm is effective to reduce the calculated amount.%协同进化算法中,计算个体适应度时,代表个体的选择以及代表个体与个体的组合评估需要很大的计算量。协同进化遗传算法虽然计算量相对小一点,但是只能获得一个贪婪解。多模式共生进化算法虽能克服协同进化遗传算法的这个缺点,但是计算量太大。本文利用间隔时间学习方法提出间隔时间学习协同进化算法,该算法每隔N代交互一次信息。在此基础上,将抽样法应用到协同进化算法中。实验结果表明,这种方法能有效地减少计算量,且本文从数学方面进行了分析验证。

  6. Evolution of biological information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T D

    2000-07-15

    How do genetic systems gain information by evolutionary processes? Answering this question precisely requires a robust, quantitative measure of information. Fortunately, 50 years ago Claude Shannon defined information as a decrease in the uncertainty of a receiver. For molecular systems, uncertainty is closely related to entropy and hence has clear connections to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. These aspects of information theory have allowed the development of a straightforward and practical method of measuring information in genetic control systems. Here this method is used to observe information gain in the binding sites for an artificial 'protein' in a computer simulation of evolution. The simulation begins with zero information and, as in naturally occurring genetic systems, the information measured in the fully evolved binding sites is close to that needed to locate the sites in the genome. The transition is rapid, demonstrating that information gain can occur by punctuated equilibrium. PMID:10908337

  7. Simulation of phase diagram and transformation structure evolution by the use of Monte Carlo method; Monte Carlo ho wo katsuyoshita heiko jotaizu to hentai soshiki keisei no simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, T. [Nippon Steel Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-08-20

    The Monte Carlo method was used to simulate an equilibrium diagram, and structural formation of transformation and recrystallization. In simulating the Cu-A equilibrium diagram, the calculation was performed by laying 24 face centered cubic lattices including four lattice points in all of the three directions, and using a simulation cell consisting of lattice points of a total of 24{sup 3}{times}4 points. Although this method has a possibility to discover existence of an unknown phase as a result of the calculation, problems were found left in handling of lattice mitigation, and in simulation of phase diagrams over phases with different crystal structures. In simulation of the transformation and recrystallization, discussions were given on correspondence of 1MCS to time when the lattice point size is increased, and on handling of nucleus formation. As a result, it was estimated that in three-dimensional grain growth, the average grain size is proportional to 1/3 power of the MCS number, and the real time against 1MCS is proportional to three power of the lattice point size. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the evolution of photoluminescence characteristics in porous silicon nanowires prepared by Ag-assisted electroless etching method

    KAUST Repository

    Najar, Adel

    2012-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) fabricated using silver (Ag) ions assisted electroless etching method. Silicon nanocrystallites with sizes <5 nm embedded in amorphous silica have been observed from PSiNW samples etched using the optimum hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration. The strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal has been measured from samples etched with 4.8 M of HF, beyond which a significant decreasing in PL emission intensity has been observed. A qualitative model is proposed for the formation of PSiNWs in the presence of Ag catalyst. This model affirms our observations in PL enhancement for samples etched using HF <4.8 M and the eventual PL reduction for samples etched beyond 4.8 M of HF concentration. The enhancement in PL signals has been associated to the formation of PSiNWs and the quantum confinement effect in the Si nanocrystallites. Compared to PSiNWs without Si-O x, the HF treated samples exhibited significant blue PL peak shift of 100 nm. This effect has been correlated to the formation of defect states in the surface oxide. PSiNWs fabricated using the electroless etching method can find useful applications in optical sensors and as anti-reflection layer in silicon-based solar cells. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Evaluation of conventional therapeutic methods versus maggot therapy in the evolution of healing of tegumental injuries in Wistar rats with and without diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Franciéle Souza; Thyssen, Patricia Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Larval therapy consists on the application of sterilized carrion flies larvae, reared in laboratory, on acute, chronic, and/or infected wounds in order to promote healing. Conventional methods for treating injuries include mechanical debridement or silver-based dressings; however, they are not always effective for wound healing. Larval therapy is a feasible and safe treatment for therapeutic application and, in many cases, the only and the most recommended alternative for difficult healing injuries. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the competence of Cochliomyia macellaria F. (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as a suitable species for therapeutic application and evaluate time and effectiveness of the types of treatments most commonly used to treat integumental injuries. C. macellaria eggs were obtained from colonies established in laboratory and sterilized prior to application. Twenty-five larvae were applied for each centimeter squared of lesion. Lesions were induced in 24 Wistar rats; type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in 12 of them. Animals were divided in four groups with three individuals each, being denominated: larval therapy, larval therapy associated with foam dressing with silver release, mechanical debridement with foam dressing silver and control group, without treatment. All treatments were applied once and held for 24 h. Medical application of larvae was found to be safe, as only dead tissue was removed, and efficient to accelerate healing process when compared to other treatments. PMID:26976407

  10. The Evolution of Photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Review was written by Engelbert Broda, an Austrian Chemist and Physicist, on February the 10th 1976. The merits of the inductive and the deductive approach in tracing the pathways of evolution are discussed. Using the latter approach, it is concluded that photosynthesis followed fermentation as a method of obtaining energy-rich compounds, especially ATP. Photosynthesis probably arose by utilization of membranes for bioenergetic processes. Originally photosynthesis served photophosphorylation (ATP production), later reducing power was also made, either by open-ended, light-powered, electron flow or driven by ATP; ultimate electron donors were at first hydrogen or sulfur compounds, and later water, the last-named capability Was acquired by prokaryotic algae the earliest plants, similar to the recent blue-greens. When free oxygen entered the atmosphere for the first time, various forms of respiration (oxidative phosphorylation) became possible. Mechanistically, respiration evolved from photosynthesis (‘conversion hypotheses’). Prokaryotic algae are probably the ancestors of the chloroplasts in the eukaryotes, In the evolution of the eukaryotes, not much change in the basic processes of photosynthesis occurred.(author)

  11. Annealing-free synthesis of carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} microspheres by flame thermal method and enhanced photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Cui, Xiaoli, E-mail: xiaolicui@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} microspheres were firstly prepared by annealing-free flame thermal approach and its enhanced photocatalytic activity was demonstrated for hydrogen production. - Highlights: • Carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} microspheres were prepared by annealing-free flame thermal approach in the first time. • Hydrolysis and incomplete combustion gave rise to Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} incorporated with carbon. • Carbon species act as surface sensitizer to enhance photocatalytic activity. • It is possible to extend the strategy to develop various other metal oxides. - Abstract: An annealing-free synthesis of carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} photocatalyst via a one-step flame assisted pyrolysis approach was proposed for the first time. Nearly amorphous carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} microspheres were obtained directly through the facile and waste-free method. The presence of carbonate species was confirmed by means of EDS, XPS, BET and TEM. Both FT-IR and Raman analysis further revealed the existence form of carbon residuals for the resulted sample. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra showed the strong absorption of visible light and narrowed band gap for the carbon modified Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. On account of the vital role that carbon played in efficient electron-hole separation and light absorption, the hydrogen generation rate was 2.7 times that of the annealed and commercial Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} samples. Further calcination can foster the crystallinity and expand specific surface area but lower the photocatalytic performance of as-prepared Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} because of the elimination of carbon species. This work provides a new strategy for the preparation of carbonaceous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} candidates with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

  12. Annealing-free synthesis of carbonaceous Nb2O5 microspheres by flame thermal method and enhanced photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Carbonaceous Nb2O5 microspheres were firstly prepared by annealing-free flame thermal approach and its enhanced photocatalytic activity was demonstrated for hydrogen production. - Highlights: • Carbonaceous Nb2O5 microspheres were prepared by annealing-free flame thermal approach in the first time. • Hydrolysis and incomplete combustion gave rise to Nb2O5 incorporated with carbon. • Carbon species act as surface sensitizer to enhance photocatalytic activity. • It is possible to extend the strategy to develop various other metal oxides. - Abstract: An annealing-free synthesis of carbonaceous Nb2O5 photocatalyst via a one-step flame assisted pyrolysis approach was proposed for the first time. Nearly amorphous carbonaceous Nb2O5 microspheres were obtained directly through the facile and waste-free method. The presence of carbonate species was confirmed by means of EDS, XPS, BET and TEM. Both FT-IR and Raman analysis further revealed the existence form of carbon residuals for the resulted sample. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra showed the strong absorption of visible light and narrowed band gap for the carbon modified Nb2O5. On account of the vital role that carbon played in efficient electron-hole separation and light absorption, the hydrogen generation rate was 2.7 times that of the annealed and commercial Nb2O5 samples. Further calcination can foster the crystallinity and expand specific surface area but lower the photocatalytic performance of as-prepared Nb2O5 because of the elimination of carbon species. This work provides a new strategy for the preparation of carbonaceous Nb2O5 candidates with enhanced photocatalytic activity

  13. Phase and magnetic properties evolutions of Y3-x(CaZr)xFe5-xO12 by the sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Huiqin; Yu, Ruibing

    2015-12-01

    In this work, Y3-x(CaZr)xFe5-xO12 (CaZr)x:YIG) were prepared by the sol-gel method. High substituted (CaZr)x:YIG nanoparticles with x up to 0.7 were obtained at 1080 °C, below the melting point of Cu electrode. The average sizes calculated by Scherrer formula decreased from 92.4 nm to 70.0 nm when the substitution amount increased from 0 to 0.7, which was consistent with the results of TEM. The sintering temperature required to form pure garnet phase increased from 690 °C to 1065 °C as the substitution amount x increased from 0 to 0.7 for probable homogeneity destruction by Ca2+ and Zr4+. The maximum saturation magnetization (Ms) of 29.8 emu/g was achieved at x=0.3. The enhancement of Ms was attributed to the quantity reduction of Fe3+ in a-site and the increase of net magnetic moment. The observed decline in Ms for the samples with x>0.3 might be attributed to the weakness of super-exchange interaction by changing the angle and length of Fe-O-Fe bonds too much. The complex variations of the coecivities (Hc) indicated the crystal structure from single domain to multiple domains as the sintering temperature increased. Comparing the properties of the samples with x=0 and 0.3, it seemed that the substitution had the influence not only on the formation temperature, but also on the critical size of single domain and the temperature of the critical size emerging.

  14. Morphological Evolution of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Premadi, P.; Matzner, R. [Center for Relativity, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Premadi, P.; Matzner, R. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    1998-04-01

    We simulate the growth of large-scale structure for three different cosmological models, an Einstein{endash}de Sitter model (density parameter {Omega}{sub 0} = 1), an open model ({Omega}{sub 0} = 0.2), and a flat model with nonzero cosmological constant ({Omega}{sub 0} = 0.2, cosmological constant {lambda}{sub 0} = 0.8), using a cosmological {ital N}-body code (particle-particle/particle-mesh) with 64{sup 3} dark matter particles in a comoving cubic volume of present comoving size 128 Mpc. The calculations start at {ital z} = 24 and end at {ital z} = 0. We use the results of these simulations to generate distributions of galaxies at the present ({ital z} = 0), as follows: Using a Monte Carlo method based on the present distribution of dark matter, we located {approximately}40,000 galaxies in the computational volume. We then ascribe to each galaxy a morphological type based on the local number density of galaxies in order to reproduce the observed morphology-density relation. The resulting galaxy distributions are similar to the observed ones, with most ellipticals concentrated in the densest regions, and most spirals concentrated in low-density regions. By {open_quotes}tying{close_quotes} each galaxy to its nearest dark matter particle, we can trace the trajectory of that galaxy back in time by simply looking at the location of that dark matter particle at earlier time slices provided by the {ital N}-body code. This enables us to reconstruct the distribution of galaxies at high redshift and the trajectory of each galaxy from its formation epoch to the present. We use these galaxy distributions to investigate the problem of morphological evolution. Our goal is to determine whether the morphological type of galaxies is determined primarily by the initial conditions in which these galaxies form or by evolutionary processes (such as mergers or tidal stripping) occurring after the galaxies have formed and eventually altering their morphology, or a combination of both

  15. Models of Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized an...

  16. Chemical evolution and life

    OpenAIRE

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before na...

  17. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  18. Evolution in bouncing quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Mielczarek, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    We present the method of describing an evolution in quantum cosmology in the framework of the reduced phase space quantization of loop cosmology. We apply our method to the flat Friedman-Robertson-Walker model coupled to a massless scalar field. We identify the physical quantum Hamiltonian that is positive-definite and generates globally an unitary evolution of considered quantum system. We examine properties of expectation values of physical observables in the process of the quantum big bounce transition. The dispersion of evolved observables are studied for the Gaussian state. Calculated relative fluctuations enable an examination of the semi-classicality conditions and possible occurrence of the cosmic forgetfulness. Preliminary estimations based on the cosmological data suggest that there was no cosmic amnesia. Presented results are analytical, and numerical computations are only used for the visualization purposes. Our method may be generalized to sophisticated cosmological models including the Bianchi t...

  19. Evolution in bouncing quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the method of describing an evolution in quantum cosmology in the framework of the reduced phase space quantization of loop cosmology. We apply our method to the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model coupled to a massless scalar field. We identify the physical quantum Hamiltonian that is positive-definite and generates globally a unitary evolution of the considered quantum system. We examine the properties of expectation values of physical observables in the process of the quantum big bounce transition. The dispersion of evolved observables is studied for the Gaussian state. Calculated relative fluctuations enable an examination of the semi-classicality conditions and possible occurrence of the cosmic forgetfulness. Preliminary estimations based on the cosmological data suggest that there was no cosmic amnesia. Presented results are analytical, and numerical computations are only used for the visualization purposes. Our method may be generalized to sophisticated cosmological models including the Bianchi-type universes. (paper)

  20. Directed evolution strategies for improved enzymatic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dalby Paul A; Hibbert Edward G

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The engineering of enzymes with altered activity, specificity and stability, using directed evolution techniques that mimic evolution on a laboratory timescale, is now well established. However, the general acceptance of these methods as a route to new biocatalysts for organic synthesis requires further improvement of the methods for both ease-of-use and also for obtaining more significant changes in enzyme properties than is currently possible. Recent advances in library design, and...

  1. Differential evolution in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Qing, Anyong

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution has proven itself a very simple while very powerful stochastic global optimizer. It has been applied to solve problems in many scientific and engineering fields. This book focuses on applications of differential evolution in electromagnetics to showcase its achievement and capability in solving synthesis and design problems in electromagnetics.Topics covered in this book include:*A comprehensive up-to-date literature survey on differential evolution*A systematic description of differential evolution*A topical review on applications of differential evolution in electromag

  2. The triple-pole pomeron: Regge theory and DGLAP evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Soyez, G.

    2003-01-01

    We will explain how it is possible to link Regge theory with DGLAP evolution using a triple-pole pomeron model. We will first show that Regge theory can be used to constrain the initial condition for DGLAP evolution. We will then spell out a method to extract Regge couplings at high Q^2 using DGLAP evolution.

  3. The evolution of programs

    CERN Document Server

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    1983-01-01

    -Ecclesiastes 12:12 Programs are invariably subjected to many rorms or transrormation. After an initial version of a program has been designed and developed, it undergoes debugging and certification. In addition, most long-lived pro­ grams have a liCe-cycle that includes modifications to meet amended specifications and extensions for expanded capabilities. Such evolution­ ary aspects of programming are the topic of this monograph. We present rormal methods for manipulating programs and illustrate their applica­ tion with numerous examples. Such methods could be incorporated in semi-automated programming environments, where they would serve to ease the burden on the programmer. We begin by describing a method whereby a given program that achieves one goal can be modified to achieve a different goal or a pro­ gram that computes wrong results can be debugged to achieve the 2 Preface intended results. The abstraction of a set of cognate programs to obtain a program schema, and the instantiation of abstract sc...

  4. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  5. Cost Drivers. Evolution and Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary COKINS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to capture the evolution of applying cost drivers in calculating costs since their initial occurrence until the present times. There are different conceptual approaches of cost drivers, and new insights from applying cost modeling techniques from the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC. The article looks at the typology, criteria for selection of cost drivers and their benefits. The cost allocation method is also presented with specific steps corresponding to the ABC calculation method. In the end, the authors conclusions on the benefits of cost drivers are presented.

  6. 基于差分进化的六自由度并联机构运动学正解%Forward Kinematics Analysis of 6-DOF Parallel Mechanism Based on Differential Evolution Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲泉

    2016-01-01

    6自由度摇摆台因其具有刚度大、承载能力强、惯性小、位置误差不积累、易于力反馈控制等优点得到了越来越深入的研究与应用。通过分析6自由度并联机构的结构与运动学模型,提出了一种具有全局寻优的基于差分进化的位置正解方法。差分进化方法在充分借鉴遗传进化算法的思想基础上,采用了3个基因的相对信息,可以较好地提升算法的全局寻优能力,而且算法采用实数编码方式更容易在实践中应用。仿真表明了该算法对求解问题起到了很好的全局优化作用。%As an important aspect in the field of robotics, the six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) platform has more and more be-come a focus of recent application and research, which is characterized by the high rigidity, large load handling capability, small iner-tia non-accumulation of position error, easy force feedback control, and other advantages.Through analyzing the structure and kinetic model of the 6-DOF parallel platform, a global optimal forward displacement analysis method was presented based on Differential Evolu-tion ( DE) algorithm.The DE method could be achieved of good optimization performance by using the relative information of three genes, which was based on fully referenced to traditional generic algorithm (GA) method.The proposed method could be easily applied by employed the real number encoding strategy.The simulation results illustrate very good optimization function acted by the proposed method.

  7. Statistical questions in experimental evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the mathematical analysis of models describing evolutionary dynamics are rapidly increasing our ability to make precise quantitative predictions. These advances have created a growing need for corresponding improvements in our ability to observe evolutionary dynamics in laboratory evolution experiments. High-throughput experimental methods are particularly crucial, in order to maintain many replicate populations and measure statistical differences in evolutionary outcomes at both phenotypic and genomic levels. In this paper, I describe recent technical developments which have greatly increased the throughput of laboratory evolution experiments, and outline a few promising directions for further improvements. I then highlight a few ways in which these new experimental methods can help to answer simple statistical questions about evolutionary dynamics, and potentially guide future theoretical work

  8. Erratum to 'Comments on: The phase-shift method for determining Langmuir adsorption isotherms of over-potentially deposited hydrogen for the cathodic H{sub 2} evolution reaction at poly-Re/aqueous electrolyte interfaces [International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2005) 485-99]'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasia, Andrzej [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Que. (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Erratum to 'The phase-shift method for determining Langmuir adsorption isotherms of over-potentially deposited hydrogen for the cathodic H2 evolution reaction at poly-Re/aqueous electrolyte interfaces, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Volume 30, Issue 5, April 2005, Pages 485-499'. (author)

  9. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  10. An Evolution Model of Intelligence and Knowledge:The Influence of Learning Method on Species%具有智能生物种群的演化:学习方式对群体演化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘秋惠; 王震; 王恩鹏; 贺明峰

    2012-01-01

    We introduce intelligence gene into Penna model to describe an individual.Two kinds of leaning method based on intelligence,experience and environment are defined.We discuss the influence of learning method on the evolution of species.The results show that high utilization rate of external environment will increase the value of population size and knowledge.But the equilibrium value of intelligence decreases continuously with the increasing of environmental utilization rate.This will be a certain caution for human who contact more and more closely.%在Penna model基础上引入智能因素,建立了具有学习能力的生物演化模型,考虑智能、经验和环境因素定义了个体的学习方式,讨论了学习方式及学习的知识类型对种群演化的影响.从所得结果看出个体只有充分利用环境,才能使种群规模和群体平均知识有明显的增加.然而随着对外界环境利用程度的加强,种群的平均智能却是在下降,这一点对于联系越来越紧密的人类来说真是值得深思的一个问题.

  11. The Evolution of GIM Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Meadows

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the origins and evolution of the music programs central to the Bonny Method (also called GIM or BMGIM). These programmed, sequenced western art music selections shape the core experience of GIM, eliciting intra-, inter-, and trans-personal phenomena through a range of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic feelings, images, memories, and metaphoric fantasies. Bonny’s original programs will be described and discussed in relation to GIM, and developments in programming will demon...

  12. The Evolution of Perforator Flaps

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Farah N.; Spiegel, Aldona J.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps have recently become ubiquitous in the field of plastic surgery. To understand and appreciate their unique nature, it is necessary to compare and contrast them with the development of other types of flaps. A complete yet abridged version of the history of flap surgery is presented in this article. Beginning with Sushruta's Indian cheek flap method for nasal reconstruction, a trip through time and space is taken to highlight the milestones leading to the evolution of the perfo...

  13. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Petroni, N. Cufaro; Martino, S; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or nonstationary quantum states. In particular we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows to realize arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations, to account for controlled quantum transitions. The method is illustrated by presenting the detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-depend...

  14. The evolution of emergent computation.

    OpenAIRE

    Crutchfield, J. P.; Mitchell, M.

    1995-01-01

    A simple evolutionary process can discover sophisticated methods for emergent information processing in decentralized spatially extended systems. The mechanisms underlying the resulting emergent computation are explicated by a technique for analyzing particle-based logic embedded in pattern-forming systems. Understanding how globally coordinated computation can emerge in evolution is relevant both for the scientific understanding of natural information processing and for engineering new forms...

  15. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications and on software architecture and design. Usually, the focus is when the software is under development. Little is known about how requirements evolve when software is put into use. Groupware is an ...

  16. Learning and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Nolfi, S.; Floreano, D.

    1999-01-01

    In the last few years several researchers have resorted to artificial evolution (e.g. genetic algorithms) and learning techniques (e.g. neural networks) for studying the interaction between learning and evolution. These studies have been conducted for two different purposes: (a) looking at the performance advantages obtained by combining these two adaptive techniques; (b) understanding the role of the interaction between learning and evolution in biological organisms. In this paper we describ...

  17. Seevolution: visualizing chromosome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban-Marcos, Andrés; Darling, Aaron E.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Genome evolution underpins all of biology, yet its principles can be difficult to communicate to the non-specialist. To facilitate broader understanding of genome evolution, we have designed an interactive 3D environment that enables visualization of diverse genome evolution processes. The system can intuitively and interactively animate mutation histories involving genome rearrangement, point mutation, recombination, insertion and deletion. Multiple organisms related by a phylogeny ...

  18. Evolution of biological complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Christoph; Ofria, Charles; Collier, Travis C.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its environment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of digital organisms and monitor in detail the evolutionary transitions that increase complexit...

  19. Evolution des Geistes

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Evolution des Geistes Vortrag am 9. Februar 2003 im Rahmen der Reihe "Evolution – Entstehung der Erde bis zur Entfaltung des Geistes" des Zoologischen Museums Nach traditioneller Auffassung besitzt nur der Mensch Geist und Bewusstsein, und hierin besteht seine Einzigartigkeit. Aus Sicht der Hirnforschung und der Verhaltensbiologie haben sich jedoch während der tierischen Evolution Geist und Bewusstsein über viele Stufen entwickelt. Eine Reihe nichtmenschlicher Tiere, vor allem Säugetiere und ...

  20. Creationism and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Quintelier, Katinka; Blancke, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    In Tower of Babel, Robert Pennock wrote that “defenders of evolution would help their case immeasurably if they would reassure their audience that morality, purpose, and meaning are not lost by accepting the truth of evolution.” We first consider the thesis that the creationists’ movement exploits moral concerns to spread its ideas against the theory of evolution. We analyze their arguments and possible reasons why they are easily accepted. Creationists usually empl...

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Evolution in Stage-Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Michael; Holt, Robert D.; Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    For many organisms, stage is a better predictor of demographic rates than age. Yet no general theoretical framework exists for understanding or predicting evolution in stage-structured populations. Here, we provide a general modeling approach that can be used to predict evolution and demography of stage-structured populations. This advances our ability to understand evolution in stage-structured populations to a level previously available only for populations structured by age. We use this framework to provide the first rigorous proof that Lande’s theorem, which relates adaptive evolution to population growth, applies to stage-classified populations, assuming only normality and that evolution is slow relative to population dynamics. We extend this theorem to allow for different means or variances among stages. Our next major result is the formulation of Price’s theorem, a fundamental law of evolution, for stage-structured populations. In addition, we use data from Trillium grandiflorum to demonstrate how our models can be applied to a real-world population and thereby show their practical potential to generate accurate projections of evolutionary and population dynamics. Finally, we use our framework to compare rates of evolution in age- versus stage-structured populations, which shows how our methods can yield biological insights about evolution in stage-structured populations. PMID:21460563

  3. Predicting Community Evolution in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Saganowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, sustained development of different social media can be observed worldwide. One of the relevant research domains intensively explored recently is analysis of social communities existing in social media as well as prediction of their future evolution taking into account collected historical evolution chains. These evolution chains proposed in the paper contain group states in the previous time frames and its historical transitions that were identified using one out of two methods: Stable Group Changes Identification (SGCI and Group Evolution Discovery (GED. Based on the observed evolution chains of various length, structural network features are extracted, validated and selected as well as used to learn classification models. The experimental studies were performed on three real datasets with different profile: DBLP, Facebook and Polish blogosphere. The process of group prediction was analysed with respect to different classifiers as well as various descriptive feature sets extracted from evolution chains of different length. The results revealed that, in general, the longer evolution chains the better predictive abilities of the classification models. However, chains of length 3 to 7 enabled the GED-based method to almost reach its maximum possible prediction quality. For SGCI, this value was at the level of 3–5 last periods.

  4. Bringing molecules back into molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus O Wilke

    Full Text Available Much molecular-evolution research is concerned with sequence analysis. Yet these sequences represent real, three-dimensional molecules with complex structure and function. Here I highlight a growing trend in the field to incorporate molecular structure and function into computational molecular-evolution work. I consider three focus areas: reconstruction and analysis of past evolutionary events, such as phylogenetic inference or methods to infer selection pressures; development of toy models and simulations to identify fundamental principles of molecular evolution; and atom-level, highly realistic computational modeling of molecular structure and function aimed at making predictions about possible future evolutionary events.

  5. Application of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method to Late Miocene-Pliocene sequences in the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System): Confirmation of heterochronous evolution of sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šujan, Michal; Braucher, Régis; Kováč, Michal; Bourlès, Didier L.; Rybár, Samuel; Guillou, Valéry; Hudáčková, Natália

    2016-02-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method was applied to lacustrine, deltaic and alluvial sequences of the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System), to bridge the insufficiency of geochronological data for the Late Miocene to Pliocene period. The measurements of 51 samples (both lacustrine and floodplain), ranging from 11.6 to 0.95 Ma are consistent with the existing magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data standing mainly on the evolution degree of endemic mollusk fauna, mammals and dinocysts. This agreement confirms our assumption that the incoming beryllium fluxes remained constant over the studied time period and thus that the two initial 10Be/9Be ratios determined in actual Holocene/Late Pleistocene sediments (lacustrine and floodplain) are valid for these environments. The obtained ages indicate gradual progradation of the deltaic depositional systems across the Danube Basin with a clear time-transgressional character, replacing basin floor and shelfal environments. Deltaic sedimentation occurred firstly in the north at foothills of the Western Carpathians from 11.0 Ma, and changed to the alluvial environment after 10.5 Ma. At the same time (~ 10.5 Ma), the paleo-Danube deltaic system draining the Eastern Alps entered the study area from the Vienna Basin situated on the West. Later, the deltaic systems were merged in the central part of the basin and reached its southeastern margin at ~ 9.4 Ma. Regression of the Lake Pannon from the southernmost part of the study area is evidenced after 8.7 Ma. Alluvial deposition of meandering rivers lasting until 6.0-5.0 Ma followed and was interrupted by the early Pliocene basin inversion. Sedimentation of braided streams took place during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene, reflecting uplift of mountains surrounding the basin margins. This study documents the powerful potential of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method and its reliability in a basin with complicated tectonic and sedimentary history. It demonstrates that

  6. CO-EVOLUTION: ROAD TO REAL FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    E. K. Bulygo

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes co-evolution as method for harmonization of the social medium. This phenomenon is based on instability and non-linearity principles that express main peculiarities of the systems investigated by post-non-classsical natural science but they are also applied as a theoretical background of a social methodology. The author tries to prove that the co-evolution strategy has a long pre-history in the oriental philosophy and also manifests itself in modern forms of culture.

  7. Security issues for the software evolution model

    OpenAIRE

    Rambidis, Anastasios X.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis examines the security requirements of the software evolution model and identifies possible security mechanisms called "control classes" that are applicable to the model. Then, based on combinations of "control lasses," proposes a suitable security level for each of the model's databases. Furthermore this thesis deals with the possibility of using Pretty Good Privacy as a method for protection of software data stored in databases. The software evolution model captures all the neces...

  8. Bringing Molecules Back into Molecular Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke, Claus O.

    2012-01-01

    Much molecular-evolution research is concerned with sequence analysis. Yet these sequences represent real, three-dimensional molecules with complex structure and function. Here I highlight a growing trend in the field to incorporate molecular structure and function into computational molecular-evolution work. I consider three focus areas: reconstruction and analysis of past evolutionary events, such as phylogenetic inference or methods to infer selection pressures; development of toy models a...

  9. Modelling Software Evolution using Algebraic Graph Rewriting

    OpenAIRE

    Ciraci, Selim; Broek, van den, PR Peter; Avgeriou, P.; Zdun, U.; Borne, I

    2006-01-01

    We show how evolution requests can be formalized using algebraic graph rewriting. In particular, we present a way to convert the UML class diagrams to colored graphs. Since changes in software may effect the relation between the methods of classes, our colored graph representation also employs the relations in UML interaction diagrams. Then, we provide a set of algebraic graph rewrite rules that formalizes the changes that may be caused by an evolution request, using the pushout construction ...

  10. Evolution of Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu Chih; Chen, I Ju

    2010-01-01

    The contrast between social constructivism and cognitive constructivism are depicted in different ways in many studies. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the evolution of constructivism and put a focus on social constructivism from the perception of Vygotsky. This study provides a general idea of the evolution of constructivism for people…

  11. Evolution: Theory or Dogma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.

    In this paper the author examines the question of whether evolution is a theory or a dogma. He refutes the contention that there is a monolithic scientific conspiracy to present evolution as dogma and suggests that his own presentation might be more appropriately entitled "Creationism: Theory or Dogma." (PEB)

  12. Inhomogeneous inflation: Numerical evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurki-Suonio, H. (Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland) University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Laguna, P. (Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)); Matzner, R.A. (Center for Relativity, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States))

    1993-10-15

    We describe our three-dimensional numerical relativity code for the evolution of inhomogeneous cosmologies. During the evolution, the constraint equations are monitored but not solved. The code has been tested against perturbation theory with good results. We present some runs of inhomogeneous inflation with strongly inhomogeneous initial data.

  13. Characteristic Evolution and Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winicour Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the development of numerical evolution codes for general relativity based upon the characteristic initial value problem. Progress is traced from the early stage of 1D feasibility studies to current 3D codes that simulate binary black holes. A prime application of characteristic evolution is Cauchy-characteristic matching, which is also reviewed.

  14. Evolution and Earth's Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Klauber, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy decreases on the Earth due to day/night temperature differences. This decrease exceeds the decrease in entropy on the Earth related to evolution by many orders of magnitude. Claims by creationists that science is somehow inconsistent with regard to evolution are thus show to be baseless.

  15. Introduction: Understanding Legal Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Heine (Klaus)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In recent years, the study of legal evolution has become more systematic, and there have emerged various approaches to the study of legal evolution. However, until now, there has been no consensus as to which of these approaches is the most appropriate for the purposes

  16. Entanglement of Quantum Evolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Zanardi, Paolo

    2000-01-01

    The notion of entanglement can be naturally extended from quantum-states to the level of general quantum evolutions. This is achieved by considering multi-partite unitary transformations as elements of a multi-partite Hilbert space and then extended to general quantum operations. We show some connection between this entanglement and the entangling capabilities of the quantum evolution.

  17. Kognition, evolution og Bibel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Lundager

    2012-01-01

    En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)......En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)...

  18. Evolution for Young Victorians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Evolution was a difficult topic to tackle when writing books for the young in the wake of the controversies over Darwin's "Origin of Species." Authors who wrote about evolution for the young experimented with different ways of making the complex concepts of evolutionary theory accessible and less controversial. Many authors depicted presented…

  19. Software evolution with XVCL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Jarzabek, Stan; Zhang, Hongyu;

    2004-01-01

    This chapter introduces software evolution with XVCL (XML-based Variant Configuration Language), which is an XML-based metaprogramming technique. As the software evolves, a large number of variants may arise, especially whtn such kinds of evolutions are related to multiple platforms as shown in our...

  20. Framing Evolution Discussion Intellectually

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Cook, Kristin; Buck, Gayle A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how a first-year biology teacher facilitates a series of whole-class discussions about evolution during the implementation of a problem-based unit. A communicative theoretical perspective is adopted wherein evolution discussions are viewed as social events that the teacher can frame intellectually (i.e., present or organize as…

  1. Effects of annealing temperature variation on the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by starch-assisted sol-gel auto-combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Yadav, Raghvendra; Havlica, Jaromir; Masilko, Jiri; Kalina, Lukas; Wasserbauer, Jaromir; Hajdúchová, Miroslava; Enev, Vojtěch; Kuřitka, Ivo; Kožáková, Zuzana

    2015-11-01

    Evolution of the structural and magnetic properties of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by starch-assisted sol-gel auto-combustion method, and exposed to further annealing at 200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C and 1000 °C, was evaluated in detail and correlation of these properties explored. The ferrite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer. The X-ray diffraction patterns demonstrated single phase formation of NiFe2O4 spinel ferrite nanoparticles at different annealing temperature 200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C and 1000 °C. The change in crystallite size with increase of annealing temperature is observed. The FE-SEM analysis also indicated an increase of particle size with increase of higher annealing temperature. The change in Raman modes and infrared absorption bands were noticed with change of particle size. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ni2+ and Fe3+ at octahedral and tetrahedral sites in NiFe2O4 nanoparticles. The representative sample NiFe2O4 nanoparticles annealed at 400 °C, have mixed cation distribution (Ni0.23+2 Fe0.52+3)[ Ni0.77+2 Fe1.48+3 ]O4. The highest value of coercivity 62.35 Oe and saturation magnetization 34.10 erg/g were obtained at annealing temperature 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively.

  2. How Can Evolution Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-02-01

    The theory of evolution links random variation and selection to incremental adaptation. In a different intellectual domain, learning theory links incremental adaptation (e.g., from positive and/or negative reinforcement) to intelligent behaviour. Specifically, learning theory explains how incremental adaptation can acquire knowledge from past experience and use it to direct future behaviours toward favourable outcomes. Until recently such cognitive learning seemed irrelevant to the 'uninformed' process of evolution. In our opinion, however, new results formally linking evolutionary processes to the principles of learning might provide solutions to several evolutionary puzzles - the evolution of evolvability, the evolution of ecological organisation, and evolutionary transitions in individuality. If so, the ability for evolution to learn might explain how it produces such apparently intelligent designs. PMID:26705684

  3. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  4. Machine learning for evolution strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces numerous algorithmic hybridizations between both worlds that show how machine learning can improve and support evolution strategies. The set of methods comprises covariance matrix estimation, meta-modeling of fitness and constraint functions, dimensionality reduction for search and visualization of high-dimensional optimization processes, and clustering-based niching. After giving an introduction to evolution strategies and machine learning, the book builds the bridge between both worlds with an algorithmic and experimental perspective. Experiments mostly employ a (1+1)-ES and are implemented in Python using the machine learning library scikit-learn. The examples are conducted on typical benchmark problems illustrating algorithmic concepts and their experimental behavior. The book closes with a discussion of related lines of research.

  5. 基于概率密度演化的渡槽结构抗震分析%Seismic Analysis of Large-scale Aqueduct Structures Based on the Probability Density Evolution Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾波; 邢彦富; 刘章军

    2014-01-01

    Using the orthogonal expansion method of random processes,the non-stationary seismic acceleration process is represented as a linear combination of the standard orthogonal basis func-tions and the standard orthogonal random variables.Then,using the random function,these stand-ard orthogonal random variables in the orthogonal expansion are expressed as an orthogonal func-tion form of the basic random variable.Therefore,this method can use a basic random variable to express the original earthquake ground processes.The orthogonal expansion-random function ap-proach was used to generate 126 representative earthquake samples,and each representative sam-ple was assigned a given probability.The 126 representative earthquake samples were combined with the probability density evolution method of stochastic dynamical systems and random seis-mic responses of large-scale aqueduct structures was investigated.In this study,four cases were considered;aqueduct without water,aqueduct with water in the central trough,aqueduct with wa-ter in a two-side trough,and aqueduct with water in three troughs,and probability information of seismic responses for these cases were obtained.Moreover,using the proposed method,the seis-mic reliability of the aqueduct structures was efficiently calculated.This method provides a new and effective means for precise seismic analysis of large-scale aqueduct structures.%应用随机过程的正交展开方法,将地震动加速度过程展开为标准正交基函数与标准正交随机变量的线性组合形式。在此基础上采用随机函数的思想,将正交展开式中的标准正交随机变量表达为基本随机变量的函数形式,从而实现用一个基本随机变量来表达原地震动过程的目的。结合地震动过程的正交展开-随机函数模型与概率密度演化方法,对某大型渡槽结构进行随机地震反应分析与抗震可靠度计算;重点研究空槽和三槽有水等四种工况下渡槽结构

  6. Cauchy-characteristic evolution and waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates a new method for computing waveforms generated by independent sources. A global spacetime evolution algorithms based on the Cauchy initial-value approach is used for the bounded interior area and the same algorithm based on the characteristic hypersurfaces is used for the exterior region. Both methods are equated at the common interface

  7. Cauchy-characteristic evolution and waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, N.T. [Univ. of South Africa, Pretoria (South Africa); Holvorcem, P.R.; Matzner, R.A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)]|[Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    This paper investigates a new method for computing waveforms generated by independent sources. A global spacetime evolution algorithms based on the Cauchy initial-value approach is used for the bounded interior area and the same algorithm based on the characteristic hypersurfaces is used for the exterior region. Both methods are equated at the common interface.

  8. Evolution of the Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, David; Engel, Michael S.

    2005-05-01

    This book chronicles the complete evolutionary history of insects--their living diversity and relationships as well as 400 million years of fossils. Introductory sections cover the living species diversity of insects, methods of reconstructing evolutionary relationships, basic insect structure, and the diverse modes of insect fossilization and major fossil deposits. Major sections then explore the relationships and evolution of each order of hexapods. The volume also chronicles major episodes in the evolutionary history of insects from their modest beginnings in the Devonian and the origin of wings hundreds of millions of years before pterosaurs and birds to the impact of mass extinctions and the explosive radiation of angiosperms on insects, and how they evolved into the most complex societies in nature. Whereas other volumes focus on either living species or fossils, this is the first comprehensive synthesis of all aspects of insect evolution. Illustrated with 955 photo- and electron- micrographs, drawings, diagrams, and field photos, many in full color and virtually all of them original, this reference will appeal to anyone engaged with insect diversity--professional entomologists and students, insect and fossil collectors, and naturalists. David Grimaldi and Michael S. Engel have collectively published over 200 scientific articles and monographs on the relationships and fossil record of insects, including 10 articles in the journals Science, Nature, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. David Grimaldi is curator in the Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History and adjunct professor at Cornell University, Columbia University, and the City University of New York. David Grimaldi has traveled in 40 countries on 6 continents, collecting and studying recent species of insects and conducting fossil excavations. He is the author of Amber: Window to the Past (Abrams, 2003). Michael S. Engel is an assistant professor in the

  9. Cultural Evolution and SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Drake Equation for the number of radio communicative technological civilizations in the Galaxy encompasses three components of cosmic evolution: astronomical, biological and cultural. Of these three, cultural evolution totally dominates in terms of the rapidity of its effects. Yet, SETI scientists do not take cultural evolution into account, perhaps for understandable reasons, since cultural evolution is not well-understood even on Earth and is unpredictable in its outcome. But the one certainty for technical civilizations billions, millions, or even thousands of years older than ours is that they will have undergone cultural evolution. Cultural evolution potentially takes place in many directions, but this paper argues that its central driving force is the maintenance, improvement and perpetuation of knowledge and intelligence, and that to the extent intelligence can be improved, it will be improved. Applying this principle to life in the universe, extraterrestrials will have sought the best way to improve their intelligence. One possibility is that they may have long ago advanced beyond flesh-and-blood to artificial intelligence, constituting a postbiological universe. Although this subject has been broached, it has not been given the attention it is due from its foundation in cultural evolution. Nor has the idea of a postbiological universe been carried to its logical conclusion, including a careful analysis of the implications for SETI. SETI scientists, social scientists, and experts in AI should consider the strengths and weaknesses of this new paradigm.

  10. The evolution of airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  11. Is genetic evolution predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David L; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2009-02-01

    Ever since the integration of Mendelian genetics into evolutionary biology in the early 20th century, evolutionary geneticists have for the most part treated genes and mutations as generic entities. However, recent observations indicate that all genes are not equal in the eyes of evolution. Evolutionarily relevant mutations tend to accumulate in hotspot genes and at specific positions within genes. Genetic evolution is constrained by gene function, the structure of genetic networks, and population biology. The genetic basis of evolution may be predictable to some extent, and further understanding of this predictability requires incorporation of the specific functions and characteristics of genes into evolutionary theory. PMID:19197055

  12. Evolution of science I: Evolution of Mind

    CERN Document Server

    Vahia, M N

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system and particularly the brain was designed to control the life cycle of a living being. With increasing size and sophistication, in mammals, the brain became capable of exercising significant control over life. In Homo Sapiens the brain became significantly powerful and capable of comprehension beyond survival needs with visualisation, formal thought and long term memory. Here we trace the rise of the powers of the brains of the Homo Sapiens and its capability of three comprehending the three spatial dimensions as well as time. By tracing the evolution of technology over the last millennium and particularly the late arrival of astronomy to discuss the evolution of the formal thinking process in humans. In a follow up paper we will trace the extensive use of this new faculty by humans to comprehend the working of the universe.

  13. Heredity in Evolution & Evolution of Heredity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoire, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The inheritance of characteristics induced by the environment has often been opposed to the theory of evolution by natural selection. However, although evolution by natural selection requires new heritable traits to be produced and transmitted, it does not prescribe, per se, the mechanisms by which this is operated. The mechanisms of inheritance are not, however, unconstrained, because they are themselves subject to natural selection. We introduce a schematic, analytically solvable mathematical model to compare the adaptive value of different schemes of inheritance. Our model allows for variations to be inherited, randomly produced, or environmentally induced, and, irrespectively, to be either transmitted or not during reproduction. The adaptation of the different schemes for processing variations is quantified for a range of fluctuating environments, following an approach that links quantitative genetics with stochastic control theory.

  14. Simulated Versus Observed Cluster Eccentricity Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Floor, S; Motl, P M; Floor, Stephen; Melott, Adrian; Motl, and Patrick

    2003-01-01

    The rate of galaxy cluster eccentricity evolution is useful in understanding large scale structure. Rapid evolution for $z < $ 0.13 has been found in observed clusters. We present an analysis of projections of 41 clusters produced in hydrodynamic simulations augmented with radiative cooling and 43 clusters from adiabatic simulations. This new, larger set of simulated clusters strengthens the claims of previous eccentricity studies. We find very slow evolution in simulated clusters, significantly different from the reported rates of observational eccentricity evolution. We estimate the rate of change of eccentricity with redshift and compare the rates between simulated and observed clusters. We also use a variable aperture radius to compute the eccentricity, r$_{200}$. This method is much more robust than the fixed aperture radius used in previous studies. Apparently, radiative cooling does not change cluster morphology on scales large enough to alter eccentricity. The discrepancy between simulated and obse...

  15. Co-Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of techniques of DNA analysis in assessing the genetic relationships between various species. Focuses on wolf-dog evolution using DNA evidence and historical data about human/wolf-dog relationships. (DDR)

  16. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bateson

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  17. Chemical evolution and life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before natural selection took place, the latter being the birthmark of living systems. In this contribution, I review the arguments defended by each side and show how both views presuppose a dichotomous definition of “life”.

  18. Divergent Cumulative Cultural Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, Chris; Chebib, Jobran

    2016-01-01

    Divergent cumulative cultural evolution occurs when the cultural evolutionary trajectory diverges from the biological evolutionary trajectory. We consider the conditions under which divergent cumulative cultural evolution can occur. We hypothesize that two conditions are necessary. First that genetic and cultural information are stored separately in the agent. Second cultural information must be transferred horizontally between agents of different generations. We implement a model with these ...

  19. Microfluidic Landscapes for Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Brian M Paegel

    2010-01-01

    Evolution at its heart is an iterative algorithm composed of three steps: selection, amplification and mutagenesis. This algorithm can be applied to complex inputs such as populations of whole organisms and viruses, or mixtures of bare nucleic acids and proteins. The output is the same: evolutionary adaptation of new and improved function subject to selection. Recent breakthroughs in microfluidic technology have introduced automation and process monitoring to in vitro evolution, and reproduci...

  20. Controlled quantum evolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respec...

  1. Evolution of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of stars with masses larger than 15 sun masses is reviewed. These stars have large convective cores and lose a substantial fraction of their matter by stellar wind. The treatment of convection and the parameterisation of the stellar wind mass loss are analysed within the context of existing disagreements between theory and observation. The evolution of massive close binaries and the origin of Wolf-Rayet Stars and X-ray binaries is also sketched. (author)

  2. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  3. Introduction: why people do not accept evolution: using protistan diversity to promote evolution literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2012-01-01

    The controversy evolution vs. creationism is inherent to the incompatibility between scientific rationalism/empiricism and the belief in supernatural causation. To test this hypothesis, we conceptualized a Cartesian landscape where the dependent variable acceptance of evolution was plotted as function of three factors, each represented by an index (value range 0 to 3): Religiosity Index (RI), Science Index (SI), and Evolution Index (EI). The indexes summarized an individual's personal religious convictions, familiarity with the processes and forces of change in organisms (= concept of evolution), and understanding the essence of science (= method to explore reality). We compared and contrasted acceptance of evolution among four populations of variable educational attainment: 244 professors of New England, United States (93% Ph.D./doctorate holders), 50 protistologists from 25 countries (70% Ph.D./doctorate holders), 62 educators of prospective teachers (83% Ph.D./doctorate holders), and 827 college students. The New England faculty held the highest acceptance of evolution position (RI = 0.49; SI = 2.49; EI = 2.49), followed by the protistologists (RI = 0.46; SI = 2.30; EI = 2.48), the educators of prospective teachers (RI = 0.83; SI = 1.96; EI = 1.96), and the students (RI = 0.89; SI = 1.80; EI = 1.60); therefore, the data supported our hypothesis. Proper science education, public outreach and robust debate over the controversy "evolution versus creationism" should suffice to improve society's evolution literacy, and qualified scholars ought to lead this mission. PMID:22273365

  4. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or nonstationary quantum states. In particular we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows to realize arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations, to account for controlled quantum transitions. The method is illustrated by presenting the detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-dependent potentials associated to the transitions between the stationary, the coherent, and the squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. Possible extensions to anharmonic systems and mixed states are briefly discussed and assessed.

  5. The Improved Evolution Paths to Speedup Quantum Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Deng, Yun; Luo, Ming-Xing

    2016-04-01

    The quantum adiabatic evolution is very important for quantum mechanics and applied in quantum information processing to solve the difficult problem. The traditional quantum adiabatic algorithms use the linear interpolating to construct quantum evolution paths. We construct special evolution paths to speedup quantum evolutions. By choosing state-dependent correlations some constant time evolution paths may be generated. This result is very useful quantum adiabatic simulations.

  6. Directed evolution strategies for improved enzymatic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalby Paul A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The engineering of enzymes with altered activity, specificity and stability, using directed evolution techniques that mimic evolution on a laboratory timescale, is now well established. However, the general acceptance of these methods as a route to new biocatalysts for organic synthesis requires further improvement of the methods for both ease-of-use and also for obtaining more significant changes in enzyme properties than is currently possible. Recent advances in library design, and methods of random mutagenesis, combined with new screening and selection tools, continue to push forward the potential of directed evolution. For example, protein engineers are now beginning to apply the vast body of knowledge and understanding of protein structure and function, to the design of focussed directed evolution libraries, with striking results compared to the previously favoured random mutagenesis and recombination of entire genes. Significant progress in computational design techniques which mimic the experimental process of library screening is also now enabling searches of much greater regions of sequence-space for those catalytic reactions that are broadly understood and, therefore, possible to model. Biocatalysis for organic synthesis frequently makes use of whole-cells, in addition to isolated enzymes, either for a single reaction or for transformations via entire metabolic pathways. As many new whole-cell biocatalysts are being developed by metabolic engineering, the potential of directed evolution to improve these initial designs is also beginning to be realised.

  7. THE NUMERICAL METHODS OF THE RESEARCH IN THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF THE ASTEROIDS%小行星轨道演化研究中的数值方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘林; 季江徽; 廖新浩

    2001-01-01

    小行星是太阳系最重要的一类小天体,主要分布在两个区域;火星和木星轨道之间的一条主带和近地空间.近地小行星轨道的最大特点是其轨道半长径与地球轨道半长径相近,或近日距离接近甚至小于日地平均距离,其运动可深入到地球轨道的内部,这将导致该类小行星与地球(还有金星、火星等)十分靠近甚至发生碰撞.这一特征给其轨道演化数值研究带来一些困难,包括天体力学方法中一般消除碰撞奇点的正规化处理以及对定性研究十分成功的辛算法都将在不同程度上失效.通过对几种常用数值方法(包括辛算法)计算效果的比较,根据小天体运动自身的特性,给出了相应处理措施,从而可提高计算结果的可靠性.%The asteroids are the most important small bodies in the solarsystem,and they mainly lies in the two locations-a main belt between the Mars's orbit and the Jupiter's and the near-Earth space.The most feature of the orbits of Near-Earth Asteroids(NEAs) is that the semi-major axes of the orbits are nearly equal to that of the Earth or the perihelia distances are approximate to or even less than the mean distance between the Sun and the Earth,thus they could move into inside of the Earth's orbit,so that they might close approach or even colliside with the Earth (or other planets,such as the Venus,the Mars,etc.).The characteristic brings about some difficulties in the numerical research during their orbital evolution,which leads to the failure of the normalization technique in the general removal impact singularities of celestial mechanics methods and the Symplectic Algorithm which is successfully applied to the investigation in quality.By comparing the computation effects of several common numerical methods(including Symplectic Algorithm),and considering the nature of the movement of the small bodies,the corresponding treatments are provided here to improve the

  8. Evolution: from cosmogenesis to biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains the material of an interdisciplinary evolution symposium. The purpose was to shed some light on possible connections between steps of evolution of matter on different levels of organisation. The topics involved are as follow: cosmogenesis; galactic and stellar evolution; formation and evolution of the solar system; global atmospheric and tectonic changes of Earth; viral evolution; phylogeny and evolution of terrestrial life; evolution of neural system; hominization. The material also includes some discussions of the underlying phenomena and laws of nature. (author)

  9. Continuous Directed Evolution of Enzymes with Novel Substrate Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Jacob Charles

    2013-01-01

    Methodological advances in directed evolution have already made it possible to discover useful biomolecules within months to years. A further acceleration of this process might make it possible to address outstanding challenges, or needs for which the current timescale is a fundamental barrier. To realize these goals would require transformative methodological advances in directed evolution. In Chapter One, current methods in directed evolution are briefly reviewed. In Chapter Two, a general ...

  10. THE EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Donald

    2011-01-01

    This paper asserts that while culture does change, it does not evolve. In anthropology the explanation for the evolution of the non-biological aspects of the human condition has relied on the paradigm of cultural evolution. This paper argues that non-biological evolution is better explained in terms of the evolution of social organization. It also rejects the materialist bias that dominates the explanations for why and how evolution takes place. Instead it argues that human agents play a larg...

  11. Evolution Properties of Modules in Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; GAO Zi-You

    2008-01-01

    In complex networks, network modules play a center role, which carry out a key function. In this paper, we introduce the spatial correlation function to describe the relationships among the network modules. Our focus is to investigate how the network modules evolve, and what the evolution properties of the modules are. In order to test the proposed method, as the examples, we use our method to analyze and discuss the ER random network and scale-free network. Rigorous analysis of the existing data shows that the introduced correlation function is suitable for describing the evolution properties of network modules. Remarkably, the numerical simulations indicate that the ER random network and scale-free network have different evolution properties.

  12. Evolution of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, Lucie May

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of active regions (AR) from their emergence through their long decay process is of fundamental importance in solar physics. Since large-scale flux is generated by the deep-seated dynamo, the observed characteristics of flux emergence and that of the subsequent decay provide vital clues as well as boundary conditions for dynamo models. Throughout their evolution, ARs are centres of magnetic activity, with the level and type of activity phenomena being dependent on the evolutionary stage of the AR. As new flux emerges into a pre-existing magnetic environment, its evolution leads to re-configuration of small-and large-scale magnetic connectivities. The decay process of ARs spreads the once-concentrated magnetic flux over an ever-increasing area. Though most of the flux disappears through small-scale cancellation processes, it is the remnant of large-scale AR fields that is able to reverse the polarity of the poles and build up new polar fields. In this Living Review the emphasis is put on what we have learned from observations, which is put in the context of modelling and simulation efforts when interpreting them. For another, modelling-focused Living Review on the sub-surface evolution and emergence of magnetic flux see Fan (2009). In this first version we focus on the evolution of dominantly bipolar ARs.

  13. AGN evolution from a galaxy evolution viewpoint

    CERN Document Server

    Caplar, Neven; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2014-01-01

    We explore the connections between the evolving galaxy and AGN populations. We present a simple phenomenological model that links the evolving galaxy mass function and the evolving quasar luminosity function, motivated by similarities between the two, which makes specific and testable predictions for the distribution of host galaxy masses for AGN of different luminosities. We show that the phi$^{*}$ normalisations of the galaxy mass function and the AGN luminosity function closely track each other over a wide range of redshifts, implying a constant "duty cycle" of AGN activity. The strong redshift evolution in the AGN break luminosity $L^*$ is produced by either an evolution in the distribution of Eddington rations, or in the $m_{bh}/m_{*}$ mass ratio, or both. An evolving $m_{bh}/m_{*}$ ratio, such that it is ten times higher at $z \\sim 2$ (i.e. roughly following $(1+z)^{2}$), reproduces the observed distribution of SDSS quasars in the ($m_{bh},L$) plane and accounts for the apparent "sub-Eddington boundary"...

  14. Dynamics of secular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2012-01-01

    The text of lectures to the 2011 Tenerife Winter School. The School's theme was "Secular Evolution of Galaxies" and my task was to present the underlying stellar-dynamical theory. Other lecturers were speaking on the role of bars and chemical evolution, so these topics are avoided here. We start with an account of the connections between isolating integrals, quasiperiodicity and angle-action variables - these variables played a unifying role throughout the lectures. This leads on to the phenomenon of resonant trapping and how this can lead to chaos in cuspy potentials and phase-space mixing in slowly evolving potentials. Surfaces of section and frequency analysis are introduced as diagnostics of phase-space structure. Real galactic potentials include a fluctuating part that drives the system towards unattainable thermal equilibrium. Two-body encounters are only one source of fluctuations, and all fluctuations will drive similar evolution. We derive the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation and relations that ...

  15. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  16. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence;

    2008-01-01

    Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution....... The software architect must modify multiple elements of the architecture manually, which risks introducing inconsistencies. This chapter provides an overview, comparison and detailed treatment of the various state-of-the-art approaches to describing and evolving software architectures. Furthermore, we...... discuss one particular framework named Tran SAT, which addresses the above problems of software architecture evolution. Tran SAT provides a new element in the software architecture descriptions language, called an architectural aspect, for describing new concerns and their integration into an existing...

  17. Evolution and Christian Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughgarden, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    My recent book, Evolution and Christian Faith explores how evolutionary biology can be portrayed from the religious perspective of Christianity. The principal metaphors for evolutionary biology---differential success at breeding and random mutation, probably originate with the dawn of agriculture and clearly occur in the Bible. The central narrative of evolutionary biology can be presented using Biblical passages, providing an account of evolution that is inherently friendly to a Christian perspective. Still, evolutionary biology is far from complete, and problematic areas pertain to species in which the concept of an individual is poorly defined, and to species in which the expression of gender and sexuality depart from Darwin's sexual-selection templates. The present- day controversy in the US about teaching evolution in the schools provides an opportunity to engage the public about science education.

  18. Computational evolution: taking liberties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Luís

    2010-09-01

    Evolution has, for a long time, inspired computer scientists to produce computer models mimicking its behavior. Evolutionary algorithm (EA) is one of the areas where this approach has flourished. EAs have been used to model and study evolution, but they have been especially developed for their aptitude as optimization tools for engineering. Developed models are quite simple in comparison with their natural sources of inspiration. However, since EAs run on computers, we have the freedom, especially in optimization models, to test approaches both realistic and outright speculative, from the biological point of view. In this article, we discuss different common evolutionary algorithm models, and then present some alternatives of interest. These include biologically inspired models, such as co-evolution and, in particular, symbiogenetics and outright artificial operators and representations. In each case, the advantages of the modifications to the standard model are identified. The other area of computational evolution, which has allowed us to study basic principles of evolution and ecology dynamics, is the development of artificial life platforms for open-ended evolution of artificial organisms. With these platforms, biologists can test theories by directly manipulating individuals and operators, observing the resulting effects in a realistic way. An overview of the most prominent of such environments is also presented. If instead of artificial platforms we use the real world for evolving artificial life, then we are dealing with evolutionary robotics (ERs). A brief description of this area is presented, analyzing its relations to biology. Finally, we present the conclusions and identify future research avenues in the frontier of computation and biology. Hopefully, this will help to draw the attention of more biologists and computer scientists to the benefits of such interdisciplinary research. PMID:20532997

  19. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Alesio Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The factorization theorem for qT spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and Z-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final χ2/points ≲ 1. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  20. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    The factorization theorem for $q_T$ spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and $Z$-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final $\\chi^2/{\\rm points}\\lesssim 1$. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  1. Evolution of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  2. Controlled quantum evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respect to both possible models for quantum measurements and applications to the control of particle beams in accelerators.

  3. Evolution 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper; Bek-Thomsen, Jakob; Clasen, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    Studies in the history of science and education have documented that the reception and understanding of evolutionary theory is highly contingent on local factors such as school systems, cultural traditions, religious beliefs, and language. This has important implications for teaching evolution...... audiences readily available. As more and more schools require teachers to use low cost or free web-based materials, in the research community we need to take seriously how to facilitate that demand in communication strategies on evolution. This article addresses this challenge by presenting the learning...

  4. Lossless Conditional Schema Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers conditional schema evolution, where schema changes change the schema of the tuples that satisfy the change condition. When the schema of a relation change some tuples may no longer fit the current schema. Handling the mismatch between the intended schema of tuples and the...... recorded schema of tuples is at the core of a DBMS that supports schema evolution. We propose to keep track of schema mismatches at the level of individual tuples, and prove that conditionally evolving schemas, in contrast to current commercial database systems, are lossless when the schema evolves. The...

  5. Emergence and Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ancestor and as such they provide insights into the evolution and development of the extant genetic code. Although the aaRSs have long been viewed as a highly conserved group of enzymes, findings within the last couple of decades have started to demonstrate how diverse and versatile these enzymes really...... are. Beyond their central role in translation, aaRSs and their numerous homologs have evolved a wide array of alternative functions both inside and outside translation. Current understanding of the emergence of the aaRSs, and their subsequent evolution into a functionally diverse enzyme family, are...

  6. Lectures on random evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, Mark A

    1991-01-01

    Random evolution denotes a class of stochastic processes which evolve according to a rule which varies in time according to jumps. This is in contrast to diffusion processes, which assume that the rule changes continuously with time. Random evolutions provide a very flexible language, having the advantage that they permit direct numerical simulation-which is not possible for a diffusion process. Furthermore, they allow connections with hyperbolic partial differential equations and the kinetic theory of gases, which is impossible within the domain of diffusion proceses. They also posses great g

  7. Overview of TMD Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Daniël

    2016-02-01

    Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) appear in many scattering processes at high energy, from the semi-inclusive DIS experiments at a few GeV to the Higgs transverse momentum distribution at the LHC. Predictions for TMD observables crucially depend on TMD factorization, which in turn determines the TMD evolution of the observables with energy. In this contribution to SPIN2014 TMD factorization is outlined, including a discussion of the treatment of the nonperturbative region, followed by a summary of results on TMD evolution, mostly applied to azimuthal asymmetries.

  8. Overview of TMD evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) appear in many scattering processes at high energy, from the semi-inclusive DIS experiments at a few GeV to the Higgs transverse momentum distribution at the LHC. Predictions for TMD observables crucially depend on TMD factorization, which in turn determines the TMD evolution of the observables with energy. In this contribution to SPIN2014 TMD factorization is outlined, including a discussion of the treatment of the nonperturbative region, followed by a summary of results on TMD evolution, mostly applied to azimuthal asymmetries.

  9. Blind Equalization Based on Evolution Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongYu; ZhangXianda; 等

    1997-01-01

    Conventional blind equalization algorithms suffer from ill convergence to local minima and slow convergence speed.This paper proposes a novel blind equalization algorithm.using random search methods-evolution strategies and existing cost functions,Simulation results verify the fast and global convergence of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Teaching Evolution: From SMART Objectives to Threshold Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alexander; Akkaraju, Shylaja

    2014-01-01

    Despite the centrality of evolution to the study of biology, the pedagogical methods employed to teach the subject are often instructor-centered and rarely embedded in every topic throughout the curriculum. In addition, students' prior beliefs about evolution are often dismissed rather than incorporated into the classroom. In this article we…

  11. Evolution of Clinical Enzymology

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, J

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of clinical enzymology is discussed in relation to the history of general enzymology and clinical chemistry. The discussion is limited to the period from 1835 (definition of catalysis by Berzelius) to 1935 (description of the optical test by Warburg). In conclusion, a general account is given of the introduction of the concept of quantitative enzyme activity determination into clinical medicine.

  12. Evolution of market heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Anufriev; C.H. Hommes

    2012-01-01

    The time evolution of aggregate economic variables, such as stock prices, is affected by market expectations of individual investors. Neoclassical economic theory assumes that individuals form expectations rationally, thus forcing prices to track economic fundamentals and leading to an efficient all

  13. Evolution of housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, C.; Mohammadi, S.; Geraedts, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Perfection means something is complete and stands still and what stands still doesn’t change or evolve and is automatically dead. Everything in the universe changes, evolution implies that the creation is not complete hence the possibility of evolving’ (Osho, 1985). Our society and economy are cons

  14. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  15. Evolution of lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, David

    2014-10-01

    Present-day evolutionary theory, modern synthesis and evo-devo, appear to explain evolution. There remain however several points of contention. These include: biological time, direction, macroevolution verses microevolution, ageing and the extent of internal as opposed to external mediation. A new theoretical model for the control of biological time in vertebrates/bilaterians is introduced. Rather than biological time being controlled solely by a molecular cascade domino effect, it is suggested there is also an intracellular oscillatory clock. This clock (life's timekeeper) is synchronised across all cells in an organism and runs at a constant frequency throughout life. Slower frequencies extend lifespan, increase body/brain size and advance behaviour. They also create a time void which could aid additional evolutionary change. Faster frequencies shorten lifespan, reduce body/brain size and diminish behaviour. They are therefore less likely to mediate evolution in vertebrates/mammals. It is concluded that in vertebrates, especially mammals, there is a direction in evolution towards longer lifespan/advanced behaviour. Lifespan extension could equate with macroevolution and subsequent modifications with microevolution. As life's timekeeper controls the rate of ageing it constitutes a new genetic theory of ageing. Finally, as lifespan extension is internally mediated, this suggests a major role for internal mediation in evolution. PMID:24992233

  16. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, E; Elettreby, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here we will introduce random version of BS model. Also we generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  17. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, E.; Elettreby, M. F.

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here, we will introduce random version of BS model. We also generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  18. Evolution of rhizobium symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of rhizobium symbiosis is studied from several points of view in this thesis. The ultimate goal of the combined approaches is to unravel the genetic constrains of the symbiotic interaction. To this end the legume rhizobium symbiosis is studied in model plant species from the Papilionoi

  19. Directed Evolution of Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Doucet, Nicolas; Pelletier, Joelle,

    2004-01-01

    This brief technological report presents an overview of techniques and applications in the field of directed evolution of enzyme catalysts. These techniques allow for the creation of modified enzymes that are better adapted to many industrial contexts. Recent applications in organic synthesis as well as commercial, biomedical, and environmental usage of these modified catalysts will be presented.

  20. Evolution of an operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumacker, H B

    1981-01-01

    The story of the origin of Matas' endoaneurysmorrhaphy with suggestions for maintaining or restoring arterial continuity and their gradual evolution into the technique of intrasaccular interpolation of grafts in managing aneurysms provides another example of the increased utility of an operative procedure by its modification and expansion. PMID:7217191

  1. Evolution and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.

    1973-01-01

    Some court cases and legislative bills have been filed in states to legalize the use of the creationist view (of life forms on earth) in biology textbooks superseding the organic theory of evolution. The law has not yet accepted the religious viewpoint. (PS)

  2. Evolution in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Mike; Duggan, Adrienne; McGregor, Deb

    2014-01-01

    Evolution and inheritance appear in the new National Science Curriculum for England, which comes into effect from September 2014. In the curriculum documents, it is expected that pupils in year 6 (ages 10-11) should be taught to: (1) recognise that living things have changed over time; (2) recognise that living things produce offspring of the same…

  3. Lossless conditional schema evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Böhlen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    DBMS that supports schema evolution. We propose to keep track of schema mismatches at the level of individual tuples, and prove that evolving schemas with conditional schema changes, in contrast to database systems relying on data migration, are lossless when the schema evolves. The lossless property...

  4. Evolution Perception with Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to find out how the teacher candidates who graduated from the Faculty of Theology and study in pedagogical formation program perceive the theory of evolution. Having a descriptive characteristic, this research is conducted with 63 Faculty of Theology graduate teacher candidates of which 36 is women and 27 is…

  5. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobaloximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jillian L; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2009-12-21

    Natural photosynthesis uses sunlight to drive the conversion of energy-poor molecules (H(2)O, CO(2)) to energy-rich ones (O(2), (CH(2)O)(n)). Scientists are working hard to develop efficient artificial photosynthetic systems toward the "Holy Grail" of solar-driven water splitting. High on the list of challenges is the discovery of molecules that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons to H(2). In this Account, we report on one promising class of molecules: cobalt complexes with diglyoxime ligands (cobaloximes). Chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical methods all have been utilized to explore proton reduction catalysis by cobaloxime complexes. Reduction of a Co(II)-diglyoxime generates a Co(I) species that reacts with a proton source to produce a Co(III)-hydride. Then, in a homolytic pathway, two Co(III)-hydrides react in a bimolecular step to eliminate H(2). Alternatively, in a heterolytic pathway, protonation of the Co(III)-hydride produces H(2) and Co(III). A thermodynamic analysis of H(2) evolution pathways sheds new light on the barriers and driving forces of the elementary reaction steps involved in proton reduction by Co(I)-diglyoximes. In combination with experimental results, this analysis shows that the barriers to H(2) evolution along the heterolytic pathway are, in most cases, substantially greater than those of the homolytic route. In particular, a formidable barrier is associated with Co(III)-diglyoxime formation along the heterolytic pathway. Our investigations of cobaloxime-catalyzed H(2) evolution, coupled with the thermodynamic preference for a homolytic route, suggest that the rate-limiting step is associated with formation of the hydride. An efficient water splitting device may require the tethering of catalysts to an electrode surface in a fashion that does not inhibit association of Co(III)-hydrides. PMID:19928840

  6. CO-EVOLUTION: ROAD TO REAL FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Bulygo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes co-evolution as method for harmonization of the social medium. This phenomenon is based on instability and non-linearity principles that express main peculiarities of the systems investigated by post-non-classsical natural science but they are also applied as a theoretical background of a social methodology. The author tries to prove that the co-evolution strategy has a long pre-history in the oriental philosophy and also manifests itself in modern forms of culture.

  7. Dislocation evolution with rheological forming of metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    It is known that some internal defects exist in metal materials. Preliminary attempt to relate dislo cation evolution with metal rheological forming was done. By the attempt, it is learned that the evolution of dislocation density p( x, y, t ) is essentially the change of n independent internal variables qα (α = 1, 2, …n ) with material. The preliminary research in theory and experiments showed that dislocations piling-up could be avoided. One can improve the internal microstructure and mechanical properties of products by rheological forming method.

  8. Dynamical evolution of two associated galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamical interactions of mass systems in equilibrium under their own gravity that mutually exert and experience gravitational forces. The method we employ is to model the dynamical evolution of two isolated bars, hosted within the same galactic system, under their mutual gravitational interaction. In this study we present an analytical treatment of the secular evolution of two bars that oscillate with respect one another. Two cases of interaction, with and without geometrical deformation, are discussed. In the latter case, the bars are described as modified Jacobi ellipsoids. These triaxial systems are formed by a rotating fluid mass in gravitational equilibrium with its own rotational velocity and the gravitational field of the other bar. The governing equation for the variation of their relative angular separation is then numerically integrated, which also provides the time evolution of the geometrical parameters of the bodies. The case of rigid, non-deformable, bars produces in some cases an ...

  9. Unpolarized coupled DGLAP evolution equation at small-

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurav Bhattacharjee; Ranjit Baishya; Jayanata Kumar Sarma

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have obtained the solution of the unpolarized coupled Dokshitzer–Gribove–Lipatov–Alterelli–Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equation in leading order at the small- limit. Here, we have used a Taylor series expansion, separation of functions and then the method of characteristics to solve the evolution equations. We have also calculated -evolution of singlet and gluon distribution functions and the results are compared with E665 and NNPDF data for singlet structure function and GRV1998 and MRST2004 gluon parametrizations. It is shown that our results are in good agreement with the parametrizations especially at small-x and high-2 region. From global parametrizations and our results, we have seen that the singlet and gluon distribution functions increase when 2 increases for fixed values of .

  10. Directed Evolution of Enzymes for Industrial Biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne L; Rusli, Rukhairul A; Ollis, David L

    2016-02-01

    Enzymes have the potential to catalyse a wide variety of chemical reactions. They are increasingly being sought as environmentally friendly and cost-effective alternatives to conventional catalysts used in industries ranging from bioremediation to applications in medicine and pharmaceutics. Despite the benefits, they are not without their limitations. Many naturally occurring enzymes are not suitable for use outside of their native cellular environments. However, protein engineering can be used to generate enzymes tailored for specific industrial applications. Directed evolution is particularly useful and can be employed even when lack of structural information impedes the use of rational design. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of current industrial applications of enzyme technology and to show how directed evolution can be used to modify and to enhance enzyme properties. This includes a brief discussion on library generation and a more detailed focus on library screening methods, which are critical to any directed evolution experiment. PMID:26661585

  11. "New" Persuasive Evidence for Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Edward E.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses some new evidence for evolution that might be useful in persuading students who question the scientific basis for evolution. Draws on findings from the fields of molecular biology and genetics. (DDR)

  12. Animal evolution: trilobites on speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    A new study quantifies rates of morphological and molecular evolution for arthropods during the critical Cambrian explosion. Both morphological and molecular evolution are accelerated--but not so much to break any speed limits. PMID:24112983

  13. Controlling Tensegrity Robots Through Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscen, Atil; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2013-01-01

    Tensegrity structures (built from interconnected rods and cables) have the potential to offer a revolutionary new robotic design that is light-weight, energy-efficient, robust to failures, capable of unique modes of locomotion, impact tolerant, and compliant (reducing damage between the robot and its environment). Unfortunately robots built from tensegrity structures are difficult to control with traditional methods due to their oscillatory nature, nonlinear coupling between components and overall complexity. Fortunately this formidable control challenge can be overcome through the use of evolutionary algorithms. In this paper we show that evolutionary algorithms can be used to efficiently control a ball-shaped tensegrity robot. Experimental results performed with a variety of evolutionary algorithms in a detailed soft-body physics simulator show that a centralized evolutionary algorithm performs 400 percent better than a hand-coded solution, while the multi-agent evolution performs 800 percent better. In addition, evolution is able to discover diverse control solutions (both crawling and rolling) that are robust against structural failures and can be adapted to a wide range of energy and actuation constraints. These successful controls will form the basis for building high-performance tensegrity robots in the near future.

  14. Jet quenching from QCD evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Emerman, Alexander; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in soft-collinear effective theory with Glauber gluons have led to the development of a new method that gives a unified description of inclusive hadron production in reactions with nucleons and heavy nuclei. We show how this approach, based on the generalization of the DGLAP evolution equations to include final-state medium-induced parton shower corrections for large Q2 processes, can be combined with initial-state effects for applications to jet quenching phenomenology. We demonstrate that the traditional parton energy loss calculations can be regarded as a special soft-gluon emission limit of the general QCD evolution framework. We present phenomenological comparison of the SCETG -based results on the suppression of inclusive charged hadron and neutral pion production in √{sNN }=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider to experimental data. We also show theoretical predictions for the upcoming √{sNN }≃5.1 TeV Pb +Pb run at the LHC.

  15. Mulla Sadra and Evolution Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI ARSHAD RIAHI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In their observations, contemporary scientists have believed in transformism which claims whole natural world is always in evolvement. This paper investigates whether Mulla Sadra’s philosophical opinions are consistent with this theory or not. The method of this research is analytical-descriptive. The conclusion is that four fundamentals: the principality of existence, the analogical unity of existence, the substantial movement and gradual increase in intensity of existence, are the main foundations of Mulla Sadra’s philosophy. The first three principles justify the forth one which is ‘the evolutional movement of the natural creatures’. According to Mulla Sadra, nature is in-itself a movement and movement is not limited to accident, but he believes that movement is the mood of the nature. He believes that nature is, therefore, a continuous whole that moves from its inferiority to its superiority, in the same way as a child grows. In this paper it is also proved that the evolution of the creatures does not contradict the existence of God and religious texts.

  16. Mapping the evolution of scientific ideas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Mark [UNIV OF MARYLAND; Gulbahce, Natali [UNIV OF BOSTON

    2009-01-01

    Despite the apparent conceptual boundaries of scientific fields, a formal description for their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific fields using a network-based analysis. We build an idea network consisting of American Physical Society PACS numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two PACS numbers are linked if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using Cfinder, an overlapping community finding algorithm, and describe the time evolution of these fields using a community evolution method over the course of 1985-2006. The communities we identify map to known scientific fields, and their age strongly depends on t.heir size, impact and activity. Our analysis further suggests that communities that redefine themselves by merging and creating new groups of ideas tend to have more fitness as measured by the impact per paper, and hence communities with a higher fitness tend to be short-lived. The described approach to quantify the evolution of ideas may be relevant in making predictions about the future of science and how to guide its development.

  17. Information-theoretic metamodel of organizational evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Alfredo

    2011-12-01

    Social organizations are abstractly modeled by holarchies---self-similar connected networks---and intelligent complex adaptive multiagent systems---large networks of autonomous reasoning agents interacting via scaled processes. However, little is known of how information shapes evolution in such organizations, a gap that can lead to misleading analytics. The research problem addressed in this study was the ineffective manner in which classical model-predict-control methods used in business analytics attempt to define organization evolution. The purpose of the study was to construct an effective metamodel for organization evolution based on a proposed complex adaptive structure---the info-holarchy. Theoretical foundations of this study were holarchies, complex adaptive systems, evolutionary theory, and quantum mechanics, among other recently developed physical and information theories. Research questions addressed how information evolution patterns gleamed from the study's inductive metamodel more aptly explained volatility in organization. In this study, a hybrid grounded theory based on abstract inductive extensions of information theories was utilized as the research methodology. An overarching heuristic metamodel was framed from the theoretical analysis of the properties of these extension theories and applied to business, neural, and computational entities. This metamodel resulted in the synthesis of a metaphor for, and generalization of organization evolution, serving as the recommended and appropriate analytical tool to view business dynamics for future applications. This study may manifest positive social change through a fundamental understanding of complexity in business from general information theories, resulting in more effective management.

  18. Mapping the evolution of scientific ideas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Mark [UNIV OF MARYLAND; Gulbahce, Natali [NORTHEASTERN UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The importance of interdisciplinary research is ever increasing as challenging world problems require expertise across diverse fields. Despite the apparent conceptual boundaries of scientific fields, a formal description for their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific ideas and fields using a network-based analysis. We build a idea network consisting of American Physical Society Pacs numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two Pacs numbers are linked in the network if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using an overlapping community finding algorithm and describe the time evolution of these fields using a community evolution method over the course of 1985-2006. We find that the communities we find map to scientific fields, the lifetime of these fields strongly depends on their size, impact and activity, and longest living communities are least volatile. The described approach to quantify the evolution of ideas is expected to be relevant in making predictions about the future of science and how to guide its development.

  19. Darwinian Evolution on a Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Paegel, Brian M.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary The principles of Darwinian evolution are fundamental to understanding biological organization and have been applied to the development of functional molecules in the test tube. Laboratory evolution is greatly accelerated compared with natural evolution, but it usually requires substantial manipulation by the experimenter. Here we describe a system that relies on computer control and microfluidic chip technology to automate the directed evolution of functional molecules, subjec...

  20. Phenotypic Evolution With and Beyond Genome Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, M-A

    2016-01-01

    DNA does not make phenotypes on its own. In this volume entitled "Genes and Phenotypic Evolution," the present review draws the attention on the process of phenotype construction-including development of multicellular organisms-and the multiple interactions and feedbacks between DNA, organism, and environment at various levels and timescales in the evolutionary process. First, during the construction of an individual's phenotype, DNA is recruited as a template for building blocks within the cellular context and may in addition be involved in dynamical feedback loops that depend on the environmental and organismal context. Second, in the production of phenotypic variation among individuals, stochastic, environmental, genetic, and parental sources of variation act jointly. While in controlled laboratory settings, various genetic and environmental factors can be tested one at a time or in various combinations, they cannot be separated in natural populations because the environment is not controlled and the genotype can rarely be replicated. Third, along generations, genotype and environment each have specific properties concerning the origin of their variation, the hereditary transmission of this variation, and the evolutionary feedbacks. Natural selection acts as a feedback from phenotype and environment to genotype. This review integrates recent results and concrete examples that illustrate these three points. Although some themes are shared with recent calls and claims to a new conceptual framework in evolutionary biology, the viewpoint presented here only means to add flesh to the standard evolutionary synthesis. PMID:27282029

  1. Fla. Panel's Evolution Vote Hailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on how the compromise hammered out in Florida recently over the treatment of evolution in the state's science classrooms is winning praise from scientists and educators. The new science standards will refer to evolution as the "scientific theory of evolution." These changes will replace more-general language in the previous…

  2. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  3. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals remarkable predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society,...

  4. Evolution of mycorrhiza systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, J. W. G.

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. Fossil records and molecular clock dating suggest that all extant land plants have arisen from an ancestral arbuscular mycorrhizal condition. Arbuscular mycorrhizas evolved concurrently with the first colonisation of land by plants some 450-500 million years ago and persist in most extant plant taxa. Ectomycorrhizas (about 200million years ago) and ericoid mycorrhizas (about 100million years ago) evolved subsequently as the organic matter content of some ancient soils increased and sclerophyllous vegetation arose as a response to nutrient-poor soils respectively. Mycorrhizal associations appear to be the result of relatively diffuse coevolutionary processes. While early events in the evolution of mycorrhizal symbioses may have involved reciprocal genetic changes in ancestral plants and free-living fungi, available evidence points largely to ongoing parallel evolution of the partners in response to environmental change.

  5. Evolution with Drifting Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kanade, Varun; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2010-01-01

    We consider the question of the stability of evolutionary algorithms to gradual changes, or drift, in the target concept. We define an algorithm to be resistant to drift if, for some inverse polynomial drift rate in the target function, it converges to accuracy 1 -- \\epsilon , with polynomial resources, and then stays within that accuracy indefinitely, except with probability \\epsilon , at any one time. We show that every evolution algorithm, in the sense of Valiant (2007; 2009), can be converted using the Correlational Query technique of Feldman (2008), into such a drift resistant algorithm. For certain evolutionary algorithms, such as for Boolean conjunctions, we give bounds on the rates of drift that they can resist. We develop some new evolution algorithms that are resistant to significant drift. In particular, we give an algorithm for evolving linear separators over the spherically symmetric distribution that is resistant to a drift rate of O(\\epsilon /n), and another algorithm over the more general prod...

  6. Spectral evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth workshop organised by the Advanced School of Astronomy addresses the specific problems of galaxy and star formation processes, topics of uncertainty and controversy to which IRAS observations may give novel perspectives. The properties of stellar populations in the local group of galaxies are discussed. Several lectures deal with the fundamentals of the theory of spectral and photometrical evolution of stellar populations, and with recent developments in the theory of stellar structure, a necessary step to model and understand galactic evolution. Other lectures are concerned with empirical population syntheses and problems related to the UV spectra of elliptical and SO galaxies. The properties of galaxies at large lookback times and the search of primeval objects are also considered. (Auth.)

  7. Evolution of energy structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  8. Evolution of Protoneutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, J A; Prakash, M; Lattimer, J M; Miralles, J A

    1999-01-01

    We study the thermal and chemical evolution during the Kelvin-Helmholtz phase of the birth of a neutron star, employing neutrino opacities that are consistently calculated with the underlying equation of state (EOS). Expressions for the diffusion coefficients appropriate for general relativistic neutrino transport in the equilibrium diffusion approximation are derived. The diffusion coefficients are evaluated using a field-theoretical finite temperature EOS that includes the possible presence of hyperons. The variation of the diffusion coefficients is studied as a function of EOS and compositional parameters. We present results from numerical simulations of protoneutron star cooling for internal stellar properties as well as emitted neutrino energies and luminosities. We discuss the influence of the initial stellar model, the total mass, the underlying EOS, and the addition of hyperons on the evolution of the protoneutron star and upon the expected signal in terrestrial detectors.

  9. The evolution of helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Wen, C. Y.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we show that during their half-century history, helicopters have been evolving into geometrically similar architectures with surprisingly sharp correlations between dimensions, performance, and body size. For example, proportionalities emerge between body size, engine size, and the fuel load. Furthermore, the engine efficiency increases with the engine size, and the propeller radius is roughly the same as the length scale of the whole body. These trends are in accord with the constructal law, which accounts for the engine efficiency trend and the proportionality between "motor" size and body size in animals and vehicles. These body-size effects are qualitatively the same as those uncovered earlier for the evolution of aircraft. The present study adds to this theoretical body of research the evolutionary design of all technologies [A. Bejan, The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything (St. Martin's Press, New York, 2016)].

  10. QCD Evolution Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the QCD Evolution 2015 Workshop which was held 26–30 May, 2015 at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA. The workshop is a continuation of a series of workshops held during four consecutive years 2011, 2012, 2013 at Jefferson Lab, and in 2014 in Santa Fe, NM. With the rapid developments in our understanding of the evolution of parton distributions including low-x, TMDs, GPDs, higher-twist correlation functions, and the associated progress in perturbative QCD, lattice QCD and effective field theory techniques we look forward with great enthusiasm to the 2015 meeting. A special attention was also paid to participation of experimentalists as the topics discussed are of immediate importance for the JLab 12 experimental program and a future Electron Ion Collider.

  11. Cosmological Evolution of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shlosman, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    I review the subject of the cosmological evolution of galaxies, including different aspects of growth in disk galaxies, by focussing on the angular momentum problem, mergers, and their by-products. I discuss the alternative to merger-driven growth -- cold accretion and related issues. In the follow-up, I review possible feedback mechanisms and their role in galaxy evolution. Special attention is paid to high-redshift galaxies and their properties. In the next step, I discuss a number of processes, gas- and stellar-dynamical, within the central kiloparsec of disk galaxies, and their effect on the larger spatial scales, as well as on the formation and fuelling of the seed black holes in galactic centres at high redshifts.

  12. Evolution of clustered storage

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Vyvre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The session actually featured two presentations: * Evolution of clustered storage by Lance Hukill, Quantum Corporation * ALICE DAQ - Usage of a Cluster-File System: Quantum StorNext by Pierre Vande Vyvre, CERN-PH the second one prepared at short notice by Pierre (thanks!) to present how the Quantum technologies are being used in the ALICE experiment. The abstract to Mr Hukill's follows. Clustered Storage is a technology that is driven by business and mission applications. The evolution of Clustered Storage solutions starts first at the alignment between End-users needs and Industry trends: * Push-and-Pull between managing for today versus planning for tomorrow * Breaking down the real business problems to the core applications * Commoditization of clients, servers, and target devices * Interchangeability, Interoperability, Remote Access, Centralized control * Oh, and yes, there is a budget and the "real world" to deal with This presentation will talk through these needs and trends, and then ask the question, ...

  13. Eruptive stratigraphy of the Tatara-San Pedro complex, 36°S, sourthern volcanic zone, Chilean Andes: reconstruction method and implications for magma evolution at long-lived arc volcanic centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, M.A.; Wulff, A.; Thompson, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Quaternary Tatara-San Pedro volcanic complex (36°S, Chilean Andes) comprises eight or more unconformity-bound volcanic sequences, representing variably preserved erosional remnants of volcanic centers generated during 930 ky of activity. The internal eruptive histories of several dominantly mafic to intermediate sequences have been reconstructed, on the basis of correlations of whole-rock major and trace element chemistry of flows between multiple sampled sections, but with critical contributions from photogrammetric, geochronologic, and paleomagnetic data. Many groups of flows representing discrete eruptive events define internal variation trends that reflect extrusion of heterogeneous or rapidly evolving magna batches from conduit-reservoir systems in which open-system processes typically played a large role. Long-term progressive evolution trends are extremely rare and the magma compositions of successive eruptive events rarely lie on precisely the same differentiation trend, even where they have evolved from similar parent magmas by similar processes. These observations are not consistent with magma differentiation in large long-lived reservoirs, but they may be accommodated by diverse interactions between newly arrived magma inputs and multiple resident pockets of evolved magma and / or crystal mush residing in conduit-dominated subvolcanic reservoirs. Without constraints provided by the reconstructed stratigraphic relations, the framework for petrologic modeling would be far different. A well-established eruptive stratigraphy may provide independent constraints on the petrologic processes involved in magma evolution-simply on the basis of the specific order in which diverse, broadly cogenetic magmas have been erupted. The Tatara-San Pedro complex includes lavas ranging from primitive basalt to high-SiO2 rhyolite, and although the dominant erupted magma type was basaltic andesite ( 52-55 wt % SiO2) each sequence is characterized by unique proportions of

  14. 我国海洋产业结构演化的过程研究%Analysis of Chinese Marine Industrial Structure Evolution and Optimization Based on the"Three Axis Diagram"Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秋艳

    2014-01-01

    海洋产业结构的优化升级是海洋经济健康持续发展的重要保障,并直接影响着人类未来的发展。在有关学者对海洋产业结构演化的研究基础之上,运用三轴图分析法,构建了海洋产业结构演进模式图,可直观清晰地看出我国海洋三次产业结构的动态演变过程,显示我国海洋产业结构已实现第三产业占据主导地位的三、二、一产业结构模式,并在此基础上对海洋产业结构的演化阶段进行分析。从加强国家宏观调控、优化产业布局、加强科技创新、建立人才队伍等方面提出优化海洋产业结构的对策。%Optimization and upgrading of industrial structure of the ocean is an important guarantee for develping marine economy healthly and sustainly which directly affecting the future development of mankind. Based on the research scholars of the evolution of the marine industry structure above, marine industrial structure evolution model diagram was constructed by using three-axis chart analysis.c The dynamic evolution of the industrial structure of China's three oceans can be revealed as following:The third industry has become the largest industrial sector in marine industry structure . The evolutionary stages of marine industrial structure were analyzed based on the above analysis. Finally, the marine industrial structure optimization strategies were put forward as the following:strengthening the national macro-control, optimizing the industrial layout, strengthening scientific and technological innovation, and establishing personnel.

  15. The chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study has been made between various arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of uranium tetrahalides both in acetone solution and in the solid state. Conductimetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric methods have been used in solution, spectroscopic and structural methods on solids. The significantly greater ionising power of arsine oxide ligands is indicated and is discussed together with the structural differences between arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of the type UCl4.2L and UX4.6L[X = Cl and Br; L = AsR3O, PR3O, or P(NMe2)3O; R = Me, Et, or Ph]. (author)

  16. Algorithms, games, and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chastain, Erick; Livnat, Adi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Vazirani, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical biology was founded on the mathematical tools of statistics and physics. We believe there are productive connections to be made with the younger field of theoretical computer science, which shares with it an interest in complexity and functionality. In this paper, we find that the mathematical description of evolution in the presence of sexual recombination and weak selection is equivalent to a repeated game between genes played according to the multiplicative weight updates algor...

  17. How evolution guides complexity

    OpenAIRE

    LARRY S. YAEGER

    2009-01-01

    Long-standing debates about the role of natural selection in the growth of biological complexity over geological time scales are difficult to resolve from the paleobiological record. Using an evolutionary model—a computational ecosystem subjected to natural selection—we investigate evolutionary trends in an information-theoretic measure of the complexity of the neural dynamics of artificial agents inhabiting the model. Our results suggest that evolution always guides complexity change, just n...

  18. Memory Evolutive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ehresmann, Andree; Vanbremeersch, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Natural autonomous systems, such as biological, neural, social or cultural systems, are open, self-organized systems with a more or less large hierarchy of interacting complexity levels; they are able to memorize their experiences and to adapt to various conditions through a change of behavior. These last fifteen years, the Authors have developed a mathematical model for these systems, based on Category Theory. The aim of the paper is to give an overview of this model, called Memory Evolutive...

  19. Die Evolution der Nierenfunktion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Aufgaben der Nieren in der Entgiftung, der Elektrolyt- und Säure-Basen- Haushaltshomöostase sowie der Regulation des Wasserhaushalts werden durch ein extrem komplexes Zusammenspiel von glomerulären und tubulären Funktionen sicher gestellt. Das Studium der Anpassung der einzelnen Strukturen und Stoffwechselabläufe an sich verändernde Umgebungsbedingungen im Laufe der Evolution erlaubt es, unser Verständnis der Physiologie, aber auch der Pathophysiologie zu vertiefen.

  20. Requirements Evolution for Dwellings

    OpenAIRE

    Răzvan Giuşcă

    2008-01-01

    At a certain point of society evolution appears, due to an aberrant culture, more actually due to a subculture, one point occurred during the development of society, due to an aberrant culture, an exacerbated resources consumption, exaggerated, extravagant, that generates waste. Were produced objects without value having a small using importance, it appears whim, unnecessary, kitsch or groundless products. There was an exaggerated consumption even for fundamental or existential needs fulfilme...

  1. The evolution of neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of neurodegenerative diseases that principally affect humans as they age, characterized by the loss of specific groups of neurons in different brain regions. Although these are in general sporadic disorders, it is know clear that many of these diseases have a substantial genetic component. As genes are the raw material with which evolution works, we might benefit from understanding these genes in an evolutionary framework. Here, I will discuss how we can understand whether ...

  2. Entrepreneurship, Evolution and Geography

    OpenAIRE

    STAM, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is a fundamental driver of economic evolution. It is also a distinctly spatially uneven process, and thus an important explanation of the uneven economic development of regions and nations. Not surprisingly, entrepreneurship is a key element of evolutionary economics (Schumpeter 1934; Witt 1998; Grebel et al. 2003; Metcalfe 2004; Grebel 2007) and has been recognized as an important element in explaining (regional) economic development (Acs and Armington 2004; Audretsch et al....

  3. Evolution and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, S. Moss; Alves, Domingos; Martins, J. S. Sa

    2000-01-01

    The idea of this review is to connect the different models of evolution to those of biological ageing through Darwin's theory. We start with the Eigen model of quasispecies for microevolution, then introduce the Bak-Sneppen model for macroevolution and, finally, present the Penna model for biological ageing and some of its most important results. We also explore the concept of coevolution using this model.

  4. Evolution of microbial pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Morschhäuser, J; Köhler, G; Ziebuhr, W; Blum-Oehler, G; Dobrindt, U; Hacker, J

    2000-01-01

    Various genetic mechanisms including point mutations, genetic rearrangements and lateral gene transfer processes contribute to the evolution of microbes. Long-term processes leading to the development of new species or subspecies are termed macroevolution, and short-term developments, which occur during days or weeks, are considered as microevolution. Both processes, macro- and microevolution need horizontal gene transfer, which is particularly important for the development of pathogenic micr...

  5. Deciphering orogenic evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Yan; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc; Jolivet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering orogenic evolution requires the integration of a growing number of geological and geophysical techniques on various spatial and temporal scales. Contrasting visions of mountain building and lithospheric deformation have been proposed in recent years. These models depend on the respective roles assigned to the mantle, the crust or the sediments. This article summarizes the contents of the Special Issue dedicated to 'Geodynamics and Orogenesis' following the 'Réunion previous termde...

  6. CATV Network Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Hottmar; Ladislav Schwartz; Jan Hlubik

    2006-01-01

    Cable television (CATV) distributions are transmissions systems assigned for received and distribution televisions (TV) and radios (R) signals. This paragraph is about individual stages of evolution of this distribution. It begins by classic CATV network by using coaxial cable then it continues by modernization of optical fibre. It describes structure and two-way communication of interactive TV cable distribution frame and it describes intelligence of this network. By implementation ...

  7. Evolution and public health

    OpenAIRE

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2009-01-01

    Evolution and its elements of natural selection, population migration, genetic drift, and founder effects have shaped the world in which we practice public health. Human cultures and technologies have modified life on this planet and have coevolved with myriad other species, including microorganisms; plant and animal sources of food; invertebrate vectors of disease; and intermediate hosts among birds, mammals, and nonhuman primates. Molecular mechanisms of differential resistance or susceptib...

  8. Evolution of neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Uršič, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is construction of an artificial life model and simulation of organisms in an environment with food. Organisms survive if they find food successfuly. With evolution and learning organisms develop a neural network which enables that. First neural networks and their history are introduced with the basic concepts like a neuron model, a network, transfer functions, topologies and learning. I describe the backpropagation learning on multilayer feed forward network and dem...

  9. New unified evolution equation

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jyh-Liong; Li, Hsiang-nan

    1998-01-01

    We propose a new unified evolution equation for parton distribution functions appropriate for both large and small Bjorken variables $x$, which is an improved version of the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini equation. In this new equation the cancellation of soft divergences between virtual and real gluon emissions is explicit without introducing infrared cutoffs, next-to-leading contributions to the Sudakov resummation can be included systematically. It is shown that the new equation reduc...

  10. Evolution of Business Models

    OpenAIRE

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e.g., develop new offerings, engage in partnerships, and the utilize new sales channels). This paper draws from strategy process perspective to develop an evolutionary business model (EBM...

  11. Software evolution and maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathy, Priyadarshi

    2014-01-01

    Software Evolution and Maintenance: A Practitioner's Approach is an accessible textbook for students and professionals, which collates the advances in software development and provides the most current models and techniques in maintenance.Explains two maintenance standards: IEEE/EIA 1219 and ISO/IEC14764Discusses several commercial reverse and domain engineering toolkitsSlides for instructors are available onlineInformation is based on the IEEE SWEBOK (Software Engineering Body of Knowledge)

  12. The Evolution of Cyberinsurance

    OpenAIRE

    Ruperto P. Majuca; Yurcik, William; Jay P. Kesan

    2006-01-01

    Cyberinsurance is a powerful tool to align market incentives toward improving Internet security. We trace the evolution of cyberinsurance from traditional insurance policies to early cyber-risk insurance policies to current comprehensive cyberinsurance products. We find that increasing Internet security risk in combination with the need for compliance with recent corporate legislation has contributed significantly to the demand for cyberinsurance. Cyberinsurance policies have become more comp...

  13. Photon track evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track. (authors)

  14. Reconstructing human evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalli-Sforza, M

    1999-01-01

    One can reconstruct human evolution using modern genetic data and models based on the mathematical theory of evolution and its four major factors : mutation, natural selection, statistical fluctuations in finite populations (random genetic drift), and migration. Archaeology gives some help on the major dates and events of the process. Chances of studying ancient DNA are very limited but there have been a few successful results. Studying DNA instead of proteins, as was done until a few years ago, and in particular the DNA of mitochondria and of the Y chromosome which are transmitted, respectively, by the maternal line and the paternal line, has greatly simplified the analysis. It is now possible to carry the analysis on individuals, while earlier studies were of necessity based on populations. Also the evolution of ÒcultureÓ (i.e. what we learn from others), in particular that of languages, gives some help and can be greatly enlightened by genetic studies. Even though it is largely based on mechanisms of mut...

  15. Redshift evolution of clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Matarrese, S; Lucchin, F; Moscardini, L; Matarrese, Sabino; Coles, Peter; Lucchin, Francesco; Moscardini, Lauro

    1996-01-01

    We discuss how the redshift dependence of the observed two-point correlation function of various classes of objects can be related to theoretical predictions. This relation involves first a calculation of the redshift evolution of the underlying matter correlations. The next step is to relate fluctuations in mass to those of any particular class of cosmic objects; in general terms, this means a model for the bias and how it evolves with cosmic epoch. Only after these two effects have been quantified can one perform an appropriate convolution of the non-linearly evolved two-point correlation function of the objects with their redshift distribution to obtain the `observed' correlation function for a given sample. This convolution in itself tends to mask the effect of evolution by mixing amplitudes at different redshifts. We develop a formalism which incorporates these requirements and, in particular, a set of plausible models for the evolution of the bias factor. We apply this formalism to the spatial, angular ...

  16. Evolution of segmented strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S

    2016-01-01

    I explain how to evolve segmented strings in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spaces of any dimension in terms of forward-directed null displacements. The evolution is described entirely in terms of discrete hops which do not require a continuum spacetime. Moreover, the evolution rule is purely algebraic, so it can be defined not only on ordinary real de Sitter and anti-de Sitter, but also on the rational points of the quadratic equations that define these spaces. For three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space, a simpler evolution rule is possible that descends from the Wess-Zumino-Witten equations of motion. In this case, one may replace three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space by a non-compact discrete subgroup of SL(2,R) whose structure is related to the Pell equation. A discrete version of the BTZ black hole can be constructed as a quotient of this subgroup. This discrete black hole avoids the firewall paradox by a curious mechanism: even for large black holes, there are no points inside the horizon until one reach...

  17. Darwinian Evolution and Fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Paul H.

    2009-05-01

    Did nature's beauty emerge by chance or was it intelligently designed? Richard Dawkins asserts that evolution is blind aimless chance. Michael Behe believes, on the contrary, that the first cell was intelligently designed. The scientific evidence is that nature's creativity arises from the interplay between chance AND design (laws). Darwin's ``Origin of the Species,'' published 150 years ago in 1859, characterized evolution as the interplay between variations (symbolized by dice) and the natural selection law (design). This is evident in recent discoveries in DNA, Madelbrot's Fractal Geometry of Nature, and the success of the genetic design algorithm. Algorithms for generating fractals have the same interplay between randomness and law as evolution. Fractal statistics, which are not completely random, characterize such phenomena such as fluctuations in the stock market, the Nile River, rainfall, and tree rings. As chaos theorist Joseph Ford put it: God plays dice, but the dice are loaded. Thus Darwin, in discovering the evolutionary interplay between variations and natural selection, was throwing God's dice!

  18. Observing and Simulating Galaxy Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Pardos

    It remains a quest for modern astronomy to answer what main mechanisms set the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies. Massive galaxies present a good starting point for such a quest due to their relatively easy detection at every redshift. Since stars form out of cold and dense gas, a comprehensive...... formation. This thesis consists of models and observations of gas and AGNs in massive galaxies at z _ 2, and how they may affect the overall SFR and the subsequent evolutionary trajectory of massive galaxies to z = 0. For an improved understanding of how observed gas emission lines link to the underlying...... sheds light on the AGN-host co-evolution by connecting the fraction and luminosity of AGNs with galaxy properties. By analyzing a large survey in X-ray, AGNs of high and low X-ray luminosity are extracted among massive galaxies at z _ 2 via AGN classification methods, and stacking techniques of non...

  19. Conceptual situation: evolution and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the work on the French nuclear power plants lifetime, the behavior of the PWR principal primary circuit is studied. The list of actions and the stresses, to which the device can be submitted, are specified by the manufacturer. The power plant complexity and the operating conditions lead the French Company of Electricity to establish a set of procedures to a status evaluation. The past and future main evolutions, concerning the collection of informations on the status evaluation, are analyzed as a function of the management and the exploitation modes. A new method, which takes into account the influence of new management and exploitation modes, is developed. The analysis show that the lifetime evaluation depends on the past and future operating and management modes. Moreover, the status estimation, and the fatigue measuring instruments allow the evaluation of the steam generator fatigue (conditions)

  20. The Evolution of Cluster Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, T E; Bautz, M W; Buote, D A; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Canizares, Claude R.; Bautz, Mark W.; Buote, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Using Chandra archival data, we have begun a study to quantify the evolution of cluster morphology with redshift. To quantify cluster morphology, we use the power ratio method developed by Buote and Tsai (1995). Power ratios are constructed from moments of the two-dimensional gravitational potential and are, therefore, related to a cluster's dynamical state. Our sample will include around 50 clusters from the Chandra archive with redshifts between 0.11 and 1.1. These clusters were selected from two fairly complete flux-limited X-ray surveys (the ROSAT Bright Cluster Sample and the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey), and additional high-redshift clusters were selected from recent ROSAT flux-limited surveys. Here we present preliminary results from the first 15 clusters in this sample. Of these, eight have redshifts below 0.5, and seven have redshifts above 0.5.

  1. Development of an analytic method for arsenic's determination in lime and tortilla; Desarrollo de un metodo analitico para determinacion de arsenico en cal y tortilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huato Soberanis, Julio; Ogura, Tetsuya [Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    1995-02-01

    A spectrophotometric method to determine As in tortilla and lime has been optimized, modifying the AsH{sub 3} generator. The reaction between arsin (AsH{sub 3}){sub 4} and diethyldithiocarbamate of Ag (AgDDC); was followed spectrophotometrically. The conditions under which the As remains in the ash during the calcination of the tortillas were studied. It was found that when they were heated in a quartz tube with a careful control of the air flow and oxygen, as well as the heating temperature, the arsenic loss in minimized. [Spanish] Se ha optimizado el metodo para determinar As en la tortilla y cal mediante espectrometria en el visible del color producido en la reaccion entre Arsina (AsH{sub 3}){sub 4} y dietilditiocarbamato de plata (AgDDC); modificando el generador de AsH{sub 3}. Se han buscado las condiciones en las que el arsenico permanece en las cenizas de la calcinacion de las tortillas; encontrandose que las tortillas deben calentarse en un tubo de cuarzo con control del flujo de aire y oxigeno asi como de la temperatura de calentamiento.

  2. Anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    Diskussion af basisproblemer i evolutionær fiktionsteori med udgangspunkt i en anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film......Diskussion af basisproblemer i evolutionær fiktionsteori med udgangspunkt i en anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film...

  3. Solitons and periodic solutions to a couple of fractional nonlinear evolution equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mirzazadeh; M Eslami; Anjan Biswas

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies a couple of fractional nonlinear evolution equations using first integral method. These evolution equations are foam drainage equation and Klein–Gordon equation (KGE), the latter of which is considered in (2 + 1) dimensions. For the fractional evolution, the Jumarie’s modified Riemann–Liouville derivative is considered. Exact solutions to these equations are obtained.

  4. Genomic tumor evolution of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumiaki; Saji, Shigehira; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Owing to recent technical development of comprehensive genome-wide analysis such as next generation sequencing, deep biological insights of breast cancer have been revealed. Information of genomic mutations and rearrangements in patients' tumors is indispensable to understand the mechanism in carcinogenesis, progression, metastasis, and resistance to systemic treatment of breast cancer. To date, comprehensive genomic analyses illustrate not only base substitution patterns and lists of driver mutations and key rearrangements, but also a manner of tumor evolution. Breast cancer genome is dynamically changing and evolving during cancer development course from non-invasive disease via invasive primary tumor to metastatic tumor, and during treatment exposure. The accumulation pattern of base substitution and genomic rearrangement looks gradual and punctuated, respectively, in analogy with contrasting theories for evolution manner of species, Darwin's phyletic gradualism, and Eldredge and Gould's "punctuated equilibrium". Liquid biopsy is a non-invasive method to detect the genomic evolution of breast cancer. Genomic mutation patterns in circulating tumor cells and circulating cell-free tumor DNA represent those of tumors existing in patient body. Liquid biopsy methods are now under development for future application to clinical practice of cancer treatment. In this article, latest knowledge regarding breast cancer genome, especially in terms of 'tumor evolution', is summarized. PMID:25998191

  5. Toward Documentation of Program Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestdam, Thomas; Nørmark, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The documentation of a program often falls behind the evolution of the program source files. When this happens it may be attractive to shift the documentation mode from updating the documentation to documenting the evolution of the program. This paper describes tools that support the documentation...... documentation files. The paper introduces a set of fine grained program evolution steps, which are supported directly by the documentation tools. The automatic discovery of the fine grained program evolution steps makes up a platform for documenting coarse grained and more high-level program evolution steps. It...... is concluded that our approach can help revitalize older documentation, and that discovery of the fine grained program evolution steps help the programmer in documenting the evolution of the program....

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis of Gene Expression Evolution Between Humans and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yupeng Wang; Romdhane Rekaya

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in gene expression account for most phenotypic differences between species. Advances in microarray technology have made the systematic study of gene expression evolution possible. In this study, gene expression patterns were compared between human and mouse genomes using two published methods. Specifically, we studied how gene expression evolution was related to GO terms and tried to decode the relationship between promoter evolution and gene expression evolution. The res...

  7. Co-evolution between the South African venture capital industry and the South [African] government

    OpenAIRE

    Aluko, Olumide Mayowa

    2011-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the current discourse around co-evolution, this study investigates co-evolution between the South African venture capital industry and the South African government. Using a qualitative method which involved gathering data from archival sources and contemporary interviews, this study extends the growing literature on the co-evolution of organizations and their institutional environment in three ways. First, the study shows that the co-evolution that occurs between or...

  8. Evolution of 3D tectonic stress field and fault movement in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈连旺; 陆远忠; 郭若眉; 许桂林; 张杰

    2001-01-01

    Based on data of fault movement surveying, we simulate the evolution process of three dimensional stress field in North China by three dimensional finite element method. Evolutional patterns in one-year time scale from 1986 to 1997 have been illustrated and the evolution characteristics of stress field have been analyzed. In comparison with the seismic activity among that time interval in North China, we have primarily discussed the relationship between the evolution of stress field and seismic activity.

  9. A population-based experimental model for protein evolution: Effects of mutation rate and selection stringency on evolutionary outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Leconte, Aaron M; Dickinson, Bryan; Yang, David D.; Chen, Irene; Allen, Benjamin; Liu, David Ruchien

    2013-01-01

    Protein evolution is a critical component of organismal evolution and a valuable method for the generation of useful molecules in the laboratory. Few studies, however, have experimentally characterized how fundamental parameters influence protein evolution outcomes over long evolutionary trajectories or multiple replicates. In this work, we applied phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE) as an experimental platform to study evolving protein populations over hundreds of rounds of evolution....

  10. Evolution before genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasas Vera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our current understanding of evolution is so tightly linked to template-dependent replication of DNA and RNA molecules that the old idea from Oparin of a self-reproducing 'garbage bag' ('coacervate' of chemicals that predated fully-fledged cell-like entities seems to be farfetched to most scientists today. However, this is exactly the kind of scheme we propose for how Darwinian evolution could have occurred prior to template replication. Results We cannot confirm previous claims that autocatalytic sets of organic polymer molecules could undergo evolution in any interesting sense by themselves. While we and others have previously imagined inhibition would result in selectability, we found that it produced multiple attractors in an autocatalytic set that cannot be selected for. Instead, we discovered that if general conditions are satisfied, the accumulation of adaptations in chemical reaction networks can occur. These conditions are the existence of rare reactions producing viable cores (analogous to a genotype, that sustains a molecular periphery (analogous to a phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that only when a chemical reaction network consists of many such viable cores, can it be evolvable. When many cores are enclosed in a compartment there is competition between cores within the same compartment, and when there are many compartments, there is between-compartment competition due to the phenotypic effects of cores and their periphery at the compartment level. Acquisition of cores by rare chemical events, and loss of cores at division, allows macromutation, limited heredity and selectability, thus explaining how a poor man's natural selection could have operated prior to genetic templates. This is the only demonstration to date of a mechanism by which pre-template accumulation of adaptation could occur. Reviewers This article was reviewed by William Martin and Eugene Koonin.

  11. Evolution in the Multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Standish, R K

    2000-01-01

    In the {\\em Many Worlds Interpretation} of quantum mechanics, the range of possible worlds (or histories) provides variation, and the Anthropic Principle is a selective principle analogous to natural selection. When looked on in this way, the ``process'' by which the laws and constants of physics is determined not too different from the process that gave rise to our current biodiversity, i.e. Darwinian evolution. This has implications for the fields of SETI and Artificial Life, which are based on a philosophy of the inevitability of life.

  12. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial conditions are probably set by results of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBNS) without intervening complications affecting the composition of visible matter so that extrapolation of observed abundances to BBNS products seems fairly secure. Primordial helium and deuterium abundances deduced in this way place upper and lower limits on baryonic density implying that both baryonic and non-baryonic dark matter exist and predicting no more than 3 neutrino flavours as recently confirmed in accelerator experiments. The validity of simple galactic chemical evolution models assumed in extrapolating back to the Big Bang is examined in the light of the frequency distribution of iron or oxygen abundances in the Galactic halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  13. Evolution of housing

    OpenAIRE

    Slob, C.; Mohammadi, S; Geraedts, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Perfection means something is complete and stands still and what stands still doesn’t change or evolve and is automatically dead. Everything in the universe changes, evolution implies that the creation is not complete hence the possibility of evolving’ (Osho, 1985). Our society and economy are constantly changing. Hence the demands and wishes of users changes all the time. As now in China, the Netherlands had a quantitative demand in housing after the Second World War with a lot of booming d...

  14. Microphysics evolution and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few general features of microscopics evolution and their relationship with microscopics methodology are briefly surveyed. Several pluri-disciplinary and interdisciplinary aspects of microscopics research are also discussed in the present scientific context. The need for an equilibrium between individual tendencies and collective constraints required by team work, already formulated thirty years ago by Frederic Joliot, is particularly stressed in the present conjuncture of Nuclear Research favouring very large team projects and discouraging individual initiatives. The increasing importance of the science of science (due to their multiple social, economical, ecological aspects) and the stronger competition between national and international tendencies of scientific (and technical) cooperation are also discussed. (author)

  15. Evolution of Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e...... of SAP to explain how its success in a technology-intensive industry hinges on its ability to reconfigure its business model. The paper contributes to the extant literature on business models in two ways: first, by identifying and explaining the need for an evolutionary perspective; and second...

  16. Requirements Evolution for Dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Giuşcă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At a certain point of society evolution appears, due to an aberrant culture, more actually due to a subculture, one point occurred during the development of society, due to an aberrant culture, an exacerbated resources consumption, exaggerated, extravagant, that generates waste. Were produced objects without value having a small using importance, it appears whim, unnecessary, kitsch or groundless products. There was an exaggerated consumption even for fundamental or existential needs fulfilment. In our days in superstores the market basket is fill out and that goes to indigestion, obesity, diabetes, excess medicines, cardiac crisis and finally nothingness.

  17. A new evolution equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new evolution equation is proposed for the gluon density relevant (GLR) for the region of small xB. It generalizes the GLR equation and allows deeper penetration in dense parton systems than the GLR equation does. This generalization consists of taking shadowing effects more comprehensively into account by including multi gluon correlations, and allowing for an arbitrary initial gluon distribution in a hadron. We solve the new equation for fixed αs. It is found that the effects of multi gluon correlations on the deep-inelastic structure function are small. (author) 15 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  18. CATV Network Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hlubik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cable television (CATV distributions are transmissions systems assigned for received and distribution televisions(TV and radios (R signals. This paragraph is about individual stages of evolution of this distribution. It begins by classic CATVnetwork by using coaxial cable then it continues by modernization of optical fibre. It describes structure and two-waycommunication of interactive TV cable distribution frame and it describes intelligence of this network. By implementationinteractivity we can not understand it as the CATV network as only distributions system which transfers only TV and R signalsbut like multifunctional system which can transfer information by both directions.

  19. String Evolution with Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, C.J.A.P.(Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, Porto, 4150-762, Portugal); Shellard, E. P. S.

    1995-01-01

    We study the effects of friction on the scaling evolution of string networks in condensed matter and cosmological contexts. We derive a generalized `one-scale' model with the string correlation length $L$ and velocity $v$ as dynamical variables. In non-relativistic systems, we obtain a well-known $L\\propto t^{1/2}$ law, showing that loop production is important. For electroweak cosmic strings, we show transient damped epoch scaling with $L\\propto t^{5/4}$ (or, in the matter era, $L\\propto t^{...

  20. Evolution of Law

    OpenAIRE

    Pflimpfel, Stepan

    2011-01-01

    In this Bachelor thesis I would like to present to the reader a comprehensive and adequately in-depth review of what chronological development modern world’s legal systems have undergone up to current time being. The aim is to take the evolution of law step by step and project it on the most significant eras in the history of human civilization. The first - theoretical part is a historical revision of what I consider the crucial points in civilization time line valuable in respect to the...

  1. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A.B.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, F.;

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment....... The curve visually shows students that the best HER catalysts are characterized by an optimal hydrogen binding energy (reactivity), as stated by the Sabatier principle. In addition, students may use this volcano curve to predict the activity of an untested catalyst solely from the catalyst reactivity...

  2. Evolution of Protoplanetary Discs with Magnetically Driven Disc Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takeru K; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs hereafter) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We consider an initially massive disc with ~0.1 Msun to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solve the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of the mass and the angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard alpha model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass loss, and disc wind torque, which are adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux remaining, surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combinatio...

  3. Microbes Drive Evolution of Animals and Plants: the Hologenome Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilber-Rosenberg, Ilana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hologenome concept of evolution postulates that the holobiont (host plus symbionts) with its hologenome (host genome plus microbiome) is a level of selection in evolution. Multicellular organisms can no longer be considered individuals by the classical definitions of the term. Every natural animal and plant is a holobiont consisting of the host and diverse symbiotic microbes and viruses. Microbial symbionts can be transmitted from parent to offspring by a variety of methods, including via cytoplasmic inheritance, coprophagy, direct contact during and after birth, and the environment. A large number of studies have demonstrated that these symbionts contribute to the anatomy, physiology, development, innate and adaptive immunity, and behavior and finally also to genetic variation and to the origin and evolution of species. Acquisition of microbes and microbial genes is a powerful mechanism for driving the evolution of complexity. Evolution proceeds both via cooperation and competition, working in parallel. PMID:27034283

  4. Evolution and classification of cosmological perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of perturbations in a Friedmann universe is investigated by using a new method. In a first step fluctuations of the density, the pressure, and the four-velocity are removed by performing a gauge transformation. Subsequently the problem can be solved and that solution is finally transformed into some important gauges. With the help of this method the evolutions of all possible perturbations are classified; this leads to a physical interpretation of the obtained solutions. The complete solution of the density fluctuation in the de Donder gauge is given here for the first time; the result obtained by Rose, Rahmstorf, and Dehnen is not valid in the case of a really perturbed universe

  5. Concrete Chemical Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this analysis are to discuss and evaluate testing results that were performed for the M andO by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) to evaluate the potential long-term evolution of organic admixtures in cementitious materials at elevated temperatures. The testing was designed to help provide a basis for a determination by the Performance Assessment group (PA) of the long-term acceptability and longevity of cementitious materials for repository use. The main purpose of the testing was to assess the evolution of gases (especially CO2) from hydrated cement paste at elevated temperatures and to determine the impact on alkalinity, i.e., the pH value of cement paste pore solution. This information in turn can be used as scoping information to determine if further tests of this nature are needed to support PA. As part of this discussion and evaluation of the PSU results, an assessment of alkalinity in a ''cementitious repository'' and an evaluation of organic materials are presented

  6. Concrete Chemical Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.H. Tang

    1998-07-31

    The objectives of this analysis are to discuss and evaluate testing results that were performed for the M&O by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) to evaluate the potential long-term evolution of organic admixtures in cementitious materials at elevated temperatures. The testing was designed to help provide a basis for a determination by the Performance Assessment group (PA) of the long-term acceptability and longevity of cementitious materials for repository use. The main purpose of the testing was to assess the evolution of gases (especially CO{sub 2}) from hydrated cement paste at elevated temperatures and to determine the impact on alkalinity, i.e., the pH value of cement paste pore solution. This information in turn can be used as scoping information to determine if further tests of this nature are needed to support PA. As part of this discussion and evaluation of the PSU results, an assessment of alkalinity in a ''cementitious repository'' and an evaluation of organic materials are presented.

  7. Evolution of stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stellar systems of which the evolution will be considered in this thesis, are either galaxies, which contain about 1011 stars, or binary systems, which consist of only two stars. It is seen that binary systems can give us some insight into the relative age of the nucleus of M31. The positive correlation between the metal content of a galaxy and its mass, first noted for elliptical galaxies, seems to be a general property of galaxies of all types. The observed increase of metallicity with galaxy mass is too large to be accounted for by differences in the evolutionary stage of galaxies. To explain the observed correlation it is proposed that a relatively larger proportion of massive stars is formed in more massive galaxies. The physical basis is that the formation of massive stars seems to be tied to the enhanced gas-dynamical activity in more massive galaxies. A specific aspect of the production of heavy elements by massive stars is investigated in some detail. In 1979 a cluster of 18 point X-ray sources within 400 pc of the centre of M31 was detected with the Einstein satellite. This is a remarkable result since no equivalent of this cluster has been observed in the nucleus of our own Galaxy, which otherwise is very similar to that of M31. An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed, suggesting that X-ray binaries are the products of the long-term evolution of nova systems. (Auth.)

  8. Modeling Protein Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Richard; Pollock, David

    The study of biology is fundamentally different from many other scientific pursuits, such as geology or astrophysics. This difference stems from the ubiquitous questions that arise about function and purpose. These are questions concerning why biological objects operate the way they do: what is the function of a polymerase? What is the role of the immune system? No one, aside from the most dedicated anthropist or interventionist theist, would attempt to determine the purpose of the earth's mantle or the function of a binary star. Among the sciences, it is only biology in which the details of what an object does can be said to be part of the reason for its existence. This is because the process of evolution is capable of improving an object to better carry out a function; that is, it adapts an object within the constraints of mechanics and history (i.e., what has come before). Thus, the ultimate basis of these biological questions is the process of evolution; generally, the function of an enzyme, cell type, organ, system, or trait is the thing that it does that contributes to the fitness (i.e., reproductive success) of the organism of which it is a part or characteristic. Our investigations cannot escape the simple fact that all things in biology (including ourselves) are, ultimately, the result of an evolutionary process.

  9. Evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 87 papers divided into 8 chapters. The chapter Bipolar outflows and star formations contains papers on optical and infrared observations of young bipolar outflow objects and the theory thereof, and on observations of cometary nebulae. The chapter Masers and early stellar evolution discusses molecular masers and star forming regions. The following chapter contains papers on initial mass function and star formation rates in galaxies. The chapter Clusters and star formation contains data on OB associations and open star clusters, their development and observations, CO and H2 in our galaxy, the four vector model of radio emission and an atlas of the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet extinction in the Galaxy. The most voluminous is the chapter Evolution of galaxies. It contains papers on the theories of the physical and chemodynamic development of galaxies of different types, rotation research and rotation velocities of galaxies and their arms, and on mathematical and laboratory models of morphological development. Chapter seven contains papers dealing with active extragalactic objects, quasars and active galactic nuclei. The last chapter discusses cosmological models, the theory of the inflationary universe, and presents an interpretation of the central void and X-ray background. (M.D.). 299 figs., 48 tabs., 1651 refs

  10. Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important metabolic innovation in Earth history. It allowed life to generate energy and reducing power directly from sunlight and water, freeing it from the limited resources of geochemically derived reductants. This greatly increased global primary productivity and restructured ecosystems. The release of O2 as an end product of water oxidation led to the rise of oxygen, which dramatically altered the redox state of Earth's atmosphere and oceans and permanently changed all major biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, the biological availability of O2 allowed for the evolution of aerobic respiration and novel biosynthetic pathways, facilitating much of the richness we associate with modern biology, including complex multicellularity. Here we critically review and synthesize information from the geological and biological records for the origin and evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Data from both of these archives illustrate that this metabolism first appeared in early Paleoproterozoic time and, despite its biogeochemical prominence, is a relatively late invention in the context of our planet's history.

  11. Ultrastructure, macromolecules, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Lawrence S

    1981-01-01

    Thus far in the history of biology, two, and only two, fundamental principles have come to light that pervade and unify the entire science-the cell theory and the concept of evolution. While it is true that recently opened fields of inves­ tigation have given rise to several generalizations of wide impact, such as the universality of DNA and the energetic dynamics of ecology, closer inspection reveals them to be part and parcel of either of the first two mentioned. Because in the final analysis energy can act upon an organism solely at the cellular level, its effects may be perceived basically to represent one facet of cell me­ tabolism. Similarly, because the DNA theory centers upon the means by which cells build proteins and reproduce themselves, it too proves to be only one more, even though an exciting, aspect of the cell theory. In fact, if the matter is given closer scrutiny, evolution itself can be viewed as being a fundamental portion of the cell concept, for its effects arise only as a consequence ...

  12. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  13. Client Update: A Solution for Service Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ouederni, Meriem; Salaün, Gwen; Pimentel, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    International audience In service-based systems, service evolution might raise critical communication issues since the client cannot be aware of the changes that have occurred on the black-box services side. In this paper, we propose an automated process to adapt the client to the changes that have occurred. Our approach relies on a compatibility measuring method, and changes the client interface to ensure the system compatibility. This solution is fully automated inside a prototype tool w...

  14. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduncin, Gonzalo, E-mail: alduncin@geofisica.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Departamento de Recursos Naturales, Instituto de Geofísica (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  15. Evolution of hemostatic agents in surgical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sundaram, Chandru P.; Keenan, Alison C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Topical hemostatic agents are used in a wide variety of surgical settings, and the evolution of this class of surgical tools is an interesting topic. We reviewed and outlined the historical progress of topical hemostats into present day surgery and urology, and highlight opportunities for future research. Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE search of all available literature concerning several classes of topical hemostatic agents was performed. Fibrins sealants, Gelatin sponge hemosta...

  16. Optimal Elevator Group Control by Evolution Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Beielstein, Thomas; Ewald, Claus-Peter; MARKON, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Efficient elevator group control is important for the operation of large buildings. Recent developments in this field include the use of fuzzy logic and neural networks. This paper summarizes the development of an evolution strategy (ES) that is capable of optimizing the neuro-controller of an elevator group controller. It extends the results that were based on a simplified elevator group controller simulator. A threshold selection technique is presented as a method to cope with noisy fitness...

  17. Pollen Evolution in Yams (Dioscorea: Dioscoreaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Schols, P.; Wilkin, P.; Furness, C; Huysmans, S.; Smets, E.

    2005-01-01

    Pollen character evolution in yams (Dioscorea: Dioscoreaceae) was investigated in relation to the phylogeny obtained from a recent combined analysis of rbcL and matK gene sequences. The following characters were evaluated: pollen size, aperture number, sexine ornamentation, perforation density, and orbicule presence or absence. Continuous characters were coded using the gap weighting method. Each character was optimized using MacClade onto a tree selected at random from analyses based on mole...

  18. FAME: Face Association through Model Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Golge, Eren; Duygulu, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    We attack the problem of learning face models for public faces from weakly-labelled images collected from web through querying a name. The data is very noisy even after face detection, with several irrelevant faces corresponding to other people. We propose a novel method, Face Association through Model Evolution (FAME), that is able to prune the data in an iterative way, for the face models associated to a name to evolve. The idea is based on capturing discriminativeness and representativenes...

  19. Adaptive Strategy Selection in Differential Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Wenyin; Fialho, Álvaro; Cai, Zhihua

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet powerful evolutionary algorithm for global numerical optimization. Different strategies have been proposed for the offspring generation; but the selection of which of them should be applied is critical for the DE performance, besides being problem-dependent. In this paper, the probability matching technique is employed in DE to autonomously select the most suitable strategy while solving the problem. Four credit assignment methods, that update the k...

  20. Dynamic Neighborhood Structures in Parallel Evolution Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Mehnen, Jörn; Rudolph, Günter; Weinert, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Parallelizing is a straightforward approach to reduce the total computation time of evolutionary algorithms. Finding an appropriate communication network within spatially structured populations for improving convergence speed and convergence probability is a difficult task. A new method that uses a dynamic communication scheme in an evolution strategy will be compared with conventional static and dynamic approaches. The communication structure is based on a socalled diffusion model approach. ...