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Sample records for arsenic-enhanced uvr carcinogenesis

  1. UVR induction of TGFα: a possible autocrine mechanism for the epidermal melanocytic response and for promotion of epidermal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of the epidermal growth factor homologue, transforming growth factor α (TGFα), in embryonic and neoplastic tissues suggest that it may be an oncofetal version of epidermal growth factor. A strong case is developing for TGFα to have an autocrine mode of action in sustaining the autonomous growth of several types of tumour. We propose that TGFα normally has an autocrine role not only in stimulating the growth of some fetal tissues but also with postnatal epidermal cells in response to local stimuli-in particular ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We found that cultures of normal foreskin melanocytes do not produce detectable amounts of TGFα when grown under routine conditions, but, within 12 h of exposure to low doses of short-wavelength UVR, significant quantities of TGFα are produced. The UVR-induced TGFα is both cell associated and released into the medium of these cultures. Also, UVR has a promoting action on epidermal cells which have been initiated by carcinogenic activity. A significant part of the promoting activity may be due to autocrine stimulation of multiplication of partially transformed epidermal cells. In this regard we found that UVR induced TGFα in HeLa cells and all human melanoma lines so far tested. (author)

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on neutron carcinogenesis, time-dose relationships, the role of host factors in radiation carcinogenesis, and the dynamics of the carcinogenic process after exposure to radiation and chemicals are reported. Problems are being pursued with in vivo studies as well as in vitro and in vivo/in vitro approaches. A common theme among all of these studies is the examination of mechanisms and the establishment of general principles which may alow a better understanding of the risks to humans from radiation exposure. Data from all of these studies are also being used to examine more direct methods of extrapolation of animal data to human risks. The program in ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis (UVR) is concerned with development of model systems, methods and background information necessary for designing quantitative UVR carcinogenesis experiments, the role of interactions of UVR and chemicals, and interactions between ionizing and ultraviolet radiation in skin carcinogenesis

  3. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on studies at the molecular, biochemical, and immunological level of carcinogenesis induced in mice by viruses, radiation, or environmental chemicals alone or in combinations. Emphasis was placed on the identification and assessments of cocarcinogens and studies on their mechanisms of action. Data are included on mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the liver, thyroid, Harderian glands, skin, and lungs. The effects of the food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), phenobarbitol, DDT, uv irradiation, the herbicide 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole(AT), the pituitary hormone prolactin, topically applied 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and benzo(a) pyrene(BaP) on tumor induction or enhancement were studied

  4. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer

  5. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  6. Stimulation of UvrD helicase by UvrAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Guy, Colin P; Cadman, Chris J; Moolenaar, Geri F; Goosen, Nora; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Helicases play critical roles in all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism by catalyzing the remodeling of DNA and RNA structures. UvrD is an abundant helicase in Escherichia coli with well characterized functions in mismatch and nucleotide excision repair and a possible role in displacement of proteins such as RecA from single-stranded DNA. The mismatch repair protein MutL is known to stimulate UvrD. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair proteins UvrA and UvrB can together stimulate UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of a range of DNA substrates containing strand discontinuities, including forked DNA substrates. The stimulation is specific for UvrD, as UvrAB failed to stimulate Rep helicase, a UvrD homologue. Moreover, although UvrAB can promote limited strand displacement, stimulation of UvrD did not require the strand displacement function of UvrAB. We conclude that UvrAB, like MutL, modulate UvrD helicase activity. This stimulation likely plays a role in DNA strand and protein displacement by UvrD in nucleotide excision repair. Promotion of UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of nicked duplexes by UvrAB may also explain the need for UvrAB and UvrD in Okazaki fragment processing in cells lacking DNA polymerase I. More generally, these data support the idea that helicase activity is regulated in vivo, with helicases acting as part of multisubunit complexes rather than in isolation. PMID:19208629

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This general discussion is dealt with under the following headings: problems of collecting information (epidemiology, experimental animal studies), the temporal stages of radiation action (physical and chemical effects and cellular response), human cancer, radiation dose and risk, epidemiology and dose-response relationships, cellular and molecular processes (cell inactivation, chromosome damage and cell mutation, radiation transformation, virus and oncogene activation, free radical aspects of radiation carcinogenesis, interaction of radiation and chemical carcinogens. (U.K.)

  8. Chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that the multistage process of carcinogenesis can be affected by different environmental risk factors and that the type and temporal sequence of genetic or epigenetic changes varies from one cancer to another. Analytical epidemiological studies have contributed significantly to the identification of a number of major causes of human cancers, notably tobacco smoke, various occupational exposures, ionizing radiation, certain drugs and some viruses. At present, out of a total of 834 agents or exposure circumstances evaluated in the IARC Monographs, 75 have been concluded to be carcinogenic to humans, and the epidemiological evidence has played a critical role in these evaluations. Epidemiology and cancer statistics have also contributed to some basic understanding of the carcinogenic processes, showing that at least five or six sequential events are required in order to explain the development of cancer in humans

  9. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waalkes, Michael P

    2003-12-10

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis.

  10. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis

  11. Influence of uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations on the phenotypes of Escherichia coli K-12 dam mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Marinus, M G

    1980-01-01

    The recF143 allele did not alter the phenotypes of dam mutants of Escherichia coli. The uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations did alter some of the phenotypes of dam bacteria. It was concluded that the uvrD, uvrE, and recL gene products are involved in the same deoxyribonucleic acid repair pathway as the dam gene product.

  12. Stimulation of the UvrABC enzyme-catalyzed repair reactions by the UvrD protein (DNA helicase II).

    OpenAIRE

    Kumura, K; Sekiguchi, M.; Steinum, A L; Seeberg, E

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro assay system was constructed using highly purified preparations of UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, UvrD proteins and DNA polymerase I, the objective being to analyse the role of UvrD protein in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. UvrABC enzyme-initiated repair synthesis was greatly enhanced by the addition of UvrD protein to the reaction mixture. Further analysis revealed that UvrD protein stimulated introduction of strand breaks in irradiated DNA by UvrABC enzyme but had no effect on the...

  13. Dietary chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin of hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1 mice was investigated. The dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine were tested for prevention of chromium-enhanced skin carcinogenesis. The mice were exposed to UVR (1.0 kJ/m2 3x weekly) for 26 weeks either alone, or combined with 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate, or with 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride in drinking water. Vitamin E or selenomethionine was added to the lab chow for 29 weeks beginning 3 weeks before the start of UVR exposure. Both chromium and nickel significantly increased the UVR-induced skin cancer yield in mice. In male Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.9 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate added to drinking water increased the yields to 5.9 ± 0.8 and 8.6 ± 0.9 cancers/mouse, respectively. In female Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.7 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and the addition of 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride increased the yields to 2.8 ± 0.9, 5.6 ± 0.7 and 4.2 ± 1.0 cancers/mouse, respectively. Neither vitamin E nor selenomethionine reduced the cancer yield enhancement by chromium. These results confirm that chromium and nickel, while not good skin carcinogens per se, are enhancers of UVR-induced skin cancers in Skh1 mice. Data also suggest that the enhancement of UVR-induced skin cancers by chromate may not be oxidatively mediated since the antioxidant vitamin E as well as selenomethionine, found to prevent arsenite-enhanced skin carcinogenesis, failed to suppress enhancement by chromate

  14. Melatonin enhances antioxidative enzyme gene expression (CAT, GPx, SOD), prevents their UVR-induced depletion, and protects against the formation of DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine) in ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tobias W; Kleszczyński, Konrad; Hardkop, Lena H; Kruse, Nathalie; Zillikens, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    UV radiation (UVR) induces serious structural and functional alterations in human skin leading to skin aging and carcinogenesis. Reactive oxygen species are key players in UVR-mediated photodamage and induce the DNA-base-oxidized, intermediate 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Herein, we report the protective action of melatonin against UVR-induced 8-OHdG formation and depletion of antioxidative enzymes using ex vivo human full-thickness skin exposed to UVR in a dose (0, 100, 300 mJ/cm(2))- and time-dependent manner (0, 24, 48 hr post-UVR). Dynamics of depletion of antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), or 8-OHdG formation were studied by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence/immunohistochemical staining. UVR-treated skin revealed significant and immediate (0 hr 300 mJ/cm(2)) reduction of gene expression, and this effect intensified within 24 hr post-UVR. Simultaneous increase in 8-OHdG-positive keratinocytes occurred already after 0 hr post-UVR reaching 71% and 99% up-regulation at 100 and 300 mJ/cm(2), respectively (P DNA protectant against UVR-induced oxidative damage in human skin. PMID:23110400

  15. UV protection and mutagenesis in uvrD, uvrE and recL strains of Escherichia coli carrying the pKM101 plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the pKM101 plasmid on UV mutagenesis and survival was examined in DNA-repair-deficient strains of E. coli carrying the uvrD, uvrE and recL mutations. Although enhancement of UV mutagenesis by pKM101 was found in all 3 strains, UV protection was only observed in the uvrD strain. The authors conclude that the plasmid not only requires lexA+ rec A+ functions of the cell, but also those of uvrE+ recL+ for its UV-protective effect. (Auth.)

  16. Stimulation of UvrD Helicase by UvrAB*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, John; Guy, Colin P.; Cadman, Chris J.; Moolenaar, Geri F.; Goosen, Nora; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Helicases play critical roles in all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism by catalyzing the remodeling of DNA and RNA structures. UvrD is an abundant helicase in Escherichia coli with well characterized functions in mismatch and nucleotide excision repair and a possible role in displacement of proteins such as RecA from single-stranded DNA. The mismatch repair protein MutL is known to stimulate UvrD. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair proteins UvrA and UvrB...

  17. Carcinogenesis and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 2-voluem set discusses the problem of inter-relation between carcinogenesis and aging, and the phenomenon of age-related increase in cancer incidence in animals and humans. Covered topics include current concepts in mechanisms of carcinogenesis and aging; data on chemical, radiation, ultraviolet-light, hormonal and viral carcinogenesis in aging; data on the role of age-related shifts in the activity of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes; binding of carcinogens with macromolecules; DNA repair; tissue proliferation; and immunity and homono-metabolic patterns in realization of initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis

  18. Chronic subhepatotoxic exposure to arsenic enhances hepatic injury caused by high fat diet in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous contaminant in drinking water. Whereas arsenic can be directly hepatotoxic, the concentrations/doses required are generally higher than present in the US water supply. However, physiological/biochemical changes that are alone pathologically inert can enhance the hepatotoxic response to a subsequent stimulus. Such a ‘2-hit’ paradigm is best exemplified in chronic fatty liver diseases. Here, the hypothesis that low arsenic exposure sensitizes liver to hepatotoxicity in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was tested. Accordingly, male C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to low fat diet (LFD; 13% calories as fat) or high fat diet (HFD; 42% calories as fat) and tap water or arsenic (4.9 ppm as sodium arsenite) for ten weeks. Biochemical and histologic indices of liver damage were determined. High fat diet (± arsenic) significantly increased body weight gain in mice compared with low-fat controls. HFD significantly increased liver to body weight ratios; this variable was unaffected by arsenic exposure. HFD caused steatohepatitis, as indicated by histological assessment and by increases in plasma ALT and AST. Although arsenic exposure had no effect on indices of liver damage in LFD-fed animals, it significantly increased the liver damage caused by HFD. This effect of arsenic correlated with enhanced inflammation and fibrin extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. These data indicate that subhepatotoxic arsenic exposure enhances the toxicity of HFD. These results also suggest that arsenic exposure might be a risk factor for the development of fatty liver disease in human populations. -- Highlights: ► Characterizes a mouse model of arsenic enhanced NAFLD. ► Arsenic synergistically enhances experimental fatty liver disease at concentrations that cause no overt hepatotoxicity alone. ► This effect is associated with increased inflammation.

  19. Mexoryl SX protects against solar-simulated UVR-induced photocarcinogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine, for regulatory purposes, the potential of Mexoryl* SX, a broad UVA absorber that also absorbs to some extent in the UVB, to modify the UV radiation (UVR)-induced murine skin tumor development and growth. Skh-hr1 mice were exposed to solar-simulated UVR 5 days per week for 40 weeks. Two control groups were irradiated without topical application, three groups received a sunscreen preparation containing either the UVA absorber, Mexoryl* SX at 5 or 10% concentration, or a filter that absorbs principally in the UVB, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (2-EHMC) at 5% concentration, introduced as a comparator test article. Tumor prevalence and yield show the same efficacy differences between the two sunscreen ingredients. Tumor protection factors were calculated from these results and found to be equal to 2.4 for the two preparations containing Mexoryl* SX and to 1.3 for the 5% 2-EHMC preparation. These findings illustrate the efficacy of Mexoryl* SX in preventing UVR-induced carcinogenesis. (Author)

  20. Effect of uvrD and uvrE genes on DNA repair processes in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Known data on the effect of uvrD and uvrE genes on DNA repair processes show that they are active in diverse types of repairs even though the mechanism of their effect is not yet clear. The clarification of the properties of these genes do, however, help us draw a general idea of the DNA repair processes which take place in cells. (author)

  1. Much of spontaneous mutagenesis in Escherichia coli is due to error-prone DNA repair: implications for spontaneous carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargentini, N.J.; Smith, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    The role of DNA repair genes (uvrA, uvrB, uvrD, recA, recB, lexA, and umuC) in spontaneous mutation rate per bacterium per cell division (micro) was determined for the reversion of UAA (his-4 and trpE65), UAG (lacZ53), and frameshift (trpE9777) mutations, and for the occurrence of forward mutations to valine resistance. Rich growth medium enhanced micro in a wildtype strain but not in a uvrB5 strain. In minimal growth medium, the uvrA and uvrB strains had the largest micro (1.9-6.2-fold greater than that for isogenic wild-type strains, depending on the mutation assay). The uvrB strains carrying lexA, recA, umuC, or both the uvrD and rec B mutations (in combination), i.e., mutations that inhibit error-prone DNA repair, had the lowest micro values (approximately 10-fold less than the uvrB strain). Teh recA and lexA mutations also reduced micro (by approximately 2-fold) in uvr+ strains. The genetic control of the error prone repair-dependent sector of spontaneous mutagenesis was shown to be qualitatively similar to the genetic control for u.v. radiation mutagenesis. The umuC mutation, which drastically reduced spontaneous mutagensis, had no effect on genetic recombination. It is proposed that the low level of spontaneous mutagenesis observed in the recA, lexA, umuC, and the uvrD recB strains is due to errors made during DNA replication, while the enhanced level of spontaneous mutagenesis observed in the wild type, and especially in the uvrA and uvrB strains, is due to excisable lesions that are produced in the DNA by normal metabolic reactions, and that such unexcised lesions induce mutations via error-prone DNA repair. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to spontaneous carcinogenesis.

  2. Personal UVR exposure of farming families in four European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, M; Harrison, G I; Philipsen, P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main risk factor for skin cancer is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Farming families living in rural areas with easy outdoor access may experience excessive UVR exposure. Differences between countries in latitude, altitude and sun behaviour could result in different personal UVR...... exposures. However, no studies have examined this until now. OBJECTIVES: To determine personal UVR exposure in work and leisure situations among farming families in Europe. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of farmers, their partners (spouses) and children in Denmark (DK), Poland (PL), Austria (AT), and...... Spain (ES) from 2009 to 2011. Personal UVR exposure and sun behaviour were recorded by dosimetry and diaries. RESULTS: Farmers' average daily UVR exposure on working days ranged from 1.4 SED (DK, AT) to 2.7 SED (ES). Corresponding figures for partners were: 0.6 SED (DK) to 1.9 SED (PL), and for children...

  3. Effect of the uvrD mutation on excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pair of related Escherichia coli K-12 strains, one of which contains the uvrD101 mutation, were constructed and compared for ability to perform various steps in the excision repair of deoxyribonucleic acid damage inflicted by ultraviolet radiation. The results of this study indicated: (i) ultraviolet sensitivity in the uvrD101 mutant was greater than that of wild type but less than that measured in an incision-deficient uvrA mutant; (ii) host cell reactivation paralleled the survival data; (iii) postirradiation deoxyribonucleic acid degradation was virtually identical in the two strains; (iv) incision, presumably at the sites of pyrimidine dimers, proceeded normally in the uvrD101 strain; (v) excision of pyrimidine dimers was markedly reduced in both rate and extent in the uvrD101 mutant; (vi) the amount of repair resynthesis was the same in both strains, and there was no evidence of abnormally long repair patches in the uvrD mutant; and (vii) rejoining of incision breaks was slow and incomplete in the uvrD strain. These data suggest that the ultraviolet sensitivity conferred by the uvrD mutation arises from inefficient removal of pyrimidine dimers or from failure to close incision breaks. The data are compatible with the notion that the uvrD+ gene product affects the conformation of incised deoxyribonucleic acid molecules

  4. Effect of the uvrD mutation on excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuemmerle, N.B.; Masker, W.E.

    1980-05-01

    A pair of related Escherichia coli K-12 strains, one of which contains the uvrD101 mutation, were constructed and compared for ability to perform various steps in the excision repair of deoxyribonucleic acid damage inflicted by ultraviolet radiation. The results of this study indicated: (i) ultraviolet sensitivity in the uvrD101 mutant was greater than that of wild type but less than that measured in an incision-deficient uvrA mutant; (ii) host cell reactivation paralleled the survival data; (iii) postirradiation deoxyribonucleic acid degradation was virtually identical in the two strains; (iv) incision, presumably at the sites of pyrimidine dimers, proceeded normally in the uvrD101 strain; (v) excision of pyrimidine dimers was markedly reduced in both rate and extent in the uvrD101 mutant; (vi) the amount of repair resynthesis was the same in both strains, and there was no evidence of abnormally long repair patches in the uvrD mutant; and (vii) rejoining of incision breaks was slow and incomplete in the uvrD strain. These data suggest that the ultraviolet sensitivity conferred by the uvrD mutation arises from inefficient removal of pyrimidine dimers or from failure to close incision breaks. The data are compatible with the notion that the uvrD+ gene product affects the conformation of incised deoxyribonucleic acid molecules.

  5. uvrC gene function has no specific role in repair of N-2-aminofluorene adducts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bichara, M; Fuchs, R P

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, plasmid DNA modified with N-2-aminofluorene adducts survived equally well in wild-type, uvrA, or uvrB strains. Increased sensitivity was found in uvrC and uvrD strains. Moreover, N-2-aminofluorene-mediated toxicity in the uvrC background was reversed when an additional uvrA mutation was introduced into the strain.

  6. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  7. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancreatic cancer. It is hoped for the future that the understanding of genetic alterations will lead to the rapid discovery of an effective biomarker of pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this thesis we vis...

  8. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion

  9. Effect of the uvrD mutation on excision repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuemmerle, N B; Masker, W E

    1980-01-01

    A pair of related Escherichia coli K-12 strains, one of which contains the uvrD101 mutation, were constructed and compared for ability to perform various steps in the excision repair of deoxyribonucleic acid damage inflicted by ultraviolet radiation. The results of this study indicated: (i) ultraviolet sensitivity in the uvrD101 mutant was greater than that of wild type but less than that measured in an incision-deficient uvrA mutant; (ii) host cell reactivation paralleled the survival data; ...

  10. Involvement of genes uvrD and recB in separate mutagenic deoxyribonucleic acid repair pathways in Escherichia coli K-12 uvrB5 and B/r uvrA155.

    OpenAIRE

    Sargentini, N J; Smith, K C

    1980-01-01

    We compared the ultraviolet radiation-induced reversion of nonsense (lacZ53) and missense (leuB19) mutations in uvrB5, uvrB5 uvrD3, uvrB5 recB21, and uvrB5 uvrD3 recB21 strains of Escherichia coli K-12. Nonsense (trpE65) reversion was also compared in similar derivatives of E. coli B/r uvrA155. The uvrD mutation reduced mutagenesis in very case, but had its main effect in cells ultraviolet irradiated with low fluences (< 0.6 J m-2). The effect of the recB mutation varied; it decreased Leu and...

  11. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  12. Characterization of molecular mechanisms of in vivo UVR induced cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Söderberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world (1). The World Health Organization defines cataract as a clouding of the lens of the eye which impedes the transfer of light. Cataract is a multi-factorial disease associated with diabetes, smoking, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), alcohol, ionizing radiation, steroids and hypertension. There is strong experimental (2-4) and epidemiological evidence (5,6) that UVR causes cataract. We developed an animal model for UVR B induced cataract in both anesthetized (7) and non-anesthetized animals (8). The only cure for cataract is surgery but this treatment is not accessible to all. It has been estimated that a delay of onset of cataract for 10 years could reduce the need for cataract surgery by 50% (9). To delay the incidence of cataract, it is needed to understand the mechanisms of cataract formation and find effective prevention strategies. Among the mechanisms for cataract development, apoptosis plays a crucial role in initiation of cataract in humans and animals (10). Our focus has recently been apoptosis in the lens as the mechanism for cataract development (8,11,12). It is anticipated that a better understanding of the effect of UVR on the apoptosis pathway will provide possibilities for discovery of new pharmaceuticals to prevent cataract. In this article, we describe how cataract can be experimentally induced by in vivo exposure to UVR-B. Further RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry are presented as tools to study molecular mechanisms of UVR-B induced cataract. PMID:23222480

  13. Resolving Holliday junctions with Escherichia coli UvrD helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Annamarie S; Tahmaseb, Kambiz; Compton, Sarah A; Matson, Steven W

    2012-03-01

    The Escherichia coli UvrD helicase is known to function in the mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair pathways and has also been suggested to have roles in recombination and replication restart. The primary intermediate DNA structure in these two processes is the Holliday junction. UvrD has been shown to unwind a variety of substrates including partial duplex DNA, nicked DNA, forked DNA structures, blunt duplex DNA and RNA-DNA hybrids. Here, we demonstrate that UvrD also catalyzes the robust unwinding of Holliday junction substrates. To characterize this unwinding reaction we have employed steady-state helicase assays, pre-steady-state rapid quench helicase assays, DNaseI footprinting, and electron microscopy. We conclude that UvrD binds initially to the junction compared with binding one of the blunt ends of the four-way junction to initiate unwinding and resolves the synthetic substrate into two double-stranded fork structures. We suggest that UvrD, along with its mismatch repair partners, MutS and MutL, may utilize its ability to unwind Holliday junctions directly in the prevention of homeologous recombination. UvrD may also be involved in the resolution of stalled replication forks by unwinding the Holliday junction intermediate to allow bypass of the blockage. PMID:22267744

  14. The unstructured C-terminal extension of UvrD interacts with UvrB, but is dispensable for nucleotide excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Manelyte, Laura; Guy, Colin P.; Smith, Rachel M.; Dillingham, Mark S.; McGlynn, Peter; Savery, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    During nucleotide excision repair (NER) in bacteria the UvrC nuclease and the short oligonucleotide that contains the DNA lesion are removed from the post-incision complex by UvrD, a superfamily 1A helicase. Helicases are frequently regulated by interactions with partner proteins, and immunoprecipitation experiments have previously indicated that UvrD interacts with UvrB, a component of the post-incision complex. We examined this interaction using 2-hybrid analysis and surface plasmon resonan...

  15. Expression of Escherichia coli uvr genes in mammalian cells. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The E. coli uvrA, uvrB and uvrC gene products are required to carry out the incision step in excision repair of damaged DNA. The range of sensitivity to DNA damage in E. coli uvrA uvrB, and uvrC mutants is similar to that of cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Our goal is to introduce the E. coli uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes into SV40-transformed XP cells and to examine whether these genes are able to genetically complement the repair deficiency in XP cells. Ecogpt was used as a selection marker for uvr gene transfection into XP cells. The uvr genes were cloned into composite pBR322-SV40 and Ecogpt vectors in which each E. coli gene is flanked by individual SV40 regulatory elements. We have also constructed vectors in which the uvr gene and the gpt are in tandem and flanked by one set of SV40 regulatory elements. SV40-transformed XP cells of complementation group A (XP12BE) were transfected with pSV2uvrASV2gpt, a vector of the former configuration. Southern gel analysis of the resulting gpt+ cells has revealed one colony in which the uvrA gene with its SV40 elements has been integrated into the chromosomal DNA intact

  16. How to model radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems encountered in modelling radiation carcinogenesis are examined in the light of the available experimental information and discussed in view of existing attempts. The role of endogenous and exogenous factors is considered. (author)

  17. Carcinogenesis by internal radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation carcinogenesis is based on the same molecular mechanisms, while spatial and temporal dose distribution in target cells is differed between internal and external radiation exposures. Animal models on dose-carcinogenic response relationships are required to complement an uncertainties in human epidemiological studies and finally to estimate human risk of internal exposures to radionuclides. Several dose response models for experimental carcinogenesis by internally administered radionuclides in laboratory animals were reviewed and discussed in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  18. Involvement of genes uvrD and recB in separate mutagenic deoxyribonucleic acid repair pathways in Escherichia coli K-12 uvrB5 and B/r uvr A155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargentini, N.J.; Smith, K.C.

    1980-07-01

    The ultraviolet radiation-induced reversion of nonsense (lacZ53) and missense (leuB19) mutations in uvrB5, uvrB5 uvrD3, uvrB5 recB21, and uvrB5 uvrD3 recB21 strains of Escherichia coli K-12 was compared. Nonsense (trpE65) reversion was also compared in similar derivatives of E. coli B/r uvrA155. The uvrD mutation reduced mutagenesis in every case, but had its main effect in cells ultraviolet irradiated with low fluences (< 0.6 J m/sup -2/). The effect of the recB mutation varied; it decreased Leu and Trp reversion, but had little effect on Lac reversion. The effect of the uvrD recB combination was a gross reduction in mutagenesis. Only in the case of Lac reversion was appreciable mutagenesis detected (at fluences > 0.3 J m/sup -2/). These results indicate that separate uvrD- and recB-controlled pathways exist for ultraviolet radiation mutagenesis.

  19. Functional characterization of UvrD helicases from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruchika; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori are major bacterial pathogens that face high levels of genotoxic stress within their host. UvrD, a ubiquitous bacterial helicase that plays important roles in multiple DNA metabolic pathways, is essential for genome stability and might, therefore, be crucial in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. In this study, the functional characterization of UvrD helicase from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori is reported. UvrD from Haemophilus influenzae (HiUvrD) and Helicobacter pylori (HpUvrD) exhibit strong single-stranded DNA-specific ATPase and 3'-5' helicase activities. Mutation of highly conserved arginine (R288) in HiUvrD and glutamate (E206) in HpUvrD abrogated their activities. Both the proteins were able to bind and unwind a variety of DNA structures including duplexes with strand discontinuities and branches, three- and four-way junctions that underpin their role in DNA replication, repair and recombination. HiUvrD required a minimum of 12 nucleotides, whereas HpUvrD preferred 20 or more nucleotides of 3'-single-stranded DNA tail for efficient unwinding of duplex DNA. Interestingly, HpUvrD was able to hydrolyze and utilize GTP for its helicase activity although not as effectively as ATP, which has not been reported to date for UvrD characterized from other organisms. HiUvrD and HpUvrD were found to exist predominantly as monomers in solution together with multimeric forms. Noticeably, deletion of distal C-terminal 48 amino acid residues disrupted the oligomerization of HiUvrD, whereas deletion of 63 amino acids from C-terminus of HpUvrD had no effect on its oligomerization. This study presents the characteristic features and comparative analysis of Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori UvrD, and constitutes the basis for understanding the role of UvrD in the biology and virulence of these pathogens. PMID:22500516

  20. COP1 is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of the UVR8 photoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ruohe; Skvortsova, Mariya Y; Loubéry, Sylvain; Ulm, Roman

    2016-07-26

    The UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) promotes UV-B acclimation and tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8 localizes to both cytosol and nucleus, but its main activity is assumed to be nuclear. UV-B photoreception stimulates nuclear accumulation of UVR8 in a presently unknown manner. Here, we show that CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of UVR8, but bypassing the COP1 requirement for UVR8 nuclear accumulation did not rescue the cop1 mutant UV-B phenotype. Using a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-based fusion protein system to conditionally localize GR-UVR8 to the nucleus, we have demonstrated that both photoactivation and nuclear localization of UVR8 are required for UV-B-induced photomorphogenic responses. In contrast, there was no UV-B response when UV-B-activated UVR8 was artificially retained in the cytosol. In agreement with a predominantly nuclear activity, constitutively active UVR8(W285A) accumulated in the nucleus also in the absence of UV-B. Furthermore, GR-COP1 expression lines suggested that UV-B-activated UVR8 can be coimported into the nucleus by COP1. Our data strongly support localization of UVR8 signaling in the nucleus and a dual role for COP1 in the regulation of UV-B-induced UVR8 nuclear accumulation and in UVR8-mediated UV-B signaling. PMID:27407149

  1. UVR exposures in Australia are high: can they be reduced?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australians have high UVR exposures for a number of reasons, mainly because of their geographical location resulting in high levels of ambient solar UVR but also because of their lifestyle and time spent outdoors. Numerous Australian studies have made measurements of the UVR doses individuals in various high risk groups such as outdoor workers and children receive and these results, summarised in this presentation, indicate that the doses are high. Given skin cancer is preventable by reducing exposures to UVR, can these exposures be significantly reduced? Considerable effort has already gone into trying to reduce both the leisure time and occupational exposures of the population through multiple strategies including public education in media campaigns and establishment and monitoring of compliance to an occupational exposure standard N. More detailed information about which activities and behaviours contribute the major UV exposures in the population and the outdoor workforce would allow more accurately targeted campaigns to reduce those UV exposures. The availability and use of the new technology of time-stamped personal UV dosimeters outlined in this presentation in a number of projects working with at risk groups could provide the more detailed information of UVR exposures required and then facilitate the targeted campaigns and help reduce UVR exposures. One other avenue for Australians to get harmful UVR exposures is by using solaria, where recent work [2] has shown Australian solaria to have some of the highest UV emissions of in the world. Considerable effort has been made over the last few years to remove self regulation by the solarium industry and introduce government regulations independent of the industry. The introduction of a standard set of regulations in each State and Territory governing the procedures and practices in solaria will have improved the situation significantly. Specifically, some state surveys have shown increasing levels of compliance

  2. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Quantification of quantum dot murine skin penetration with UVR barrier impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Jatana, Samreen; Gelein, Robert; De Benedetto, Anna; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Beck, Lisa; Elder, Alison; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin exposure is a common exogenous insult that can alter skin barrier and immune functions. With the growing presence of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer goods and technological applications the potential for NPs to contact UVR exposed skin is increasing. Therefore it is important to understand the effect of UVR on NP skin penetration and potential for systemic translocation. Previous studies qualitatively showed that UVR skin exposure can increase the penetration ...

  4. UvrD facilitates DNA repair by pulling RNA polymerase backwards

    OpenAIRE

    Epshtein, Vitaly; Kamarthapu, Venu; McGary, Katelyn; Svetlov, Vladimir; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    UvrD helicase is required for nucleotide excision repair, although its role in this process is not well defined. Here we show that Escherichia coli UvrD binds RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and, using its helicase/translocase activity, forces RNA polymerase to slide backward along DNA. By inducing backtracking, UvrD exposes DNA lesions shielded by blocked RNA polymerase, allowing nucleotide excision repair enzymes to gain access to sites of damage. Our results establish UvrD a...

  5. The unstructured C-terminal extension of UvrD interacts with UvrB, but is dispensable for nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelyte, Laura; Guy, Colin P; Smith, Rachel M; Dillingham, Mark S; McGlynn, Peter; Savery, Nigel J

    2009-11-01

    During nucleotide excision repair (NER) in bacteria the UvrC nuclease and the short oligonucleotide that contains the DNA lesion are removed from the post-incision complex by UvrD, a superfamily 1A helicase. Helicases are frequently regulated by interactions with partner proteins, and immunoprecipitation experiments have previously indicated that UvrD interacts with UvrB, a component of the post-incision complex. We examined this interaction using 2-hybrid analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and found that the N-terminal domain and the unstructured region at the C-terminus of UvrD interact with UvrB. We analysed the properties of a truncated UvrD protein that lacked the unstructured C-terminal region and found that it showed a diminished affinity for single-stranded DNA, but retained the ability to displace both UvrC and the lesion-containing oligonucleotide from a post-incision nucleotide excision repair complex. The interaction of the C-terminal region of UvrD with UvrB is therefore not an essential feature of the mechanism by which UvrD disassembles the post-incision complex during NER. In further experiments we showed that PcrA helicase from Bacillus stearothermophilus can also displace UvrC and the excised oligonucleotide from a post-incision NER complex, which supports the idea that PcrA performs a UvrD-like function during NER in gram-positive organisms. PMID:19762288

  6. Epigenetic mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogenic action of radiations has long been thought to be due to its mutagenic activity. Since DNA damage is induced and distributes in a stochastic fashion, radiation induction of cancers was also assumed to follow a stochastic kinetics. However, recent progress in radiation research has revealed that some features of radiation carcinogenesis are not explainable by the simple action of radiation as a DNA damaging and mutagenic agent. Firstly, frequencies of radiation-induced transformation in vitro and radiation-induced mammary cancers in rats are too high to be accounted for by the frequency of radiation-induced mutation. Secondly, trans-generation carcinogenesis among F1 mice born to irradiated parents occurs also much more frequently than to be predicted by the frequency of radiation induced germline mutation. Thirdly, multistage carcinogenesis theory predicts that carcinogens give hits to the target cells so as to shorten the latency of cancers. However, latencies of radiation induced solid cancers among atomic bomb survivors are similar to those of the control population. Fourthly, although radiation elevates the frequency of cancers, the induced cancers seem to share the same spectrum of cancer types as in the unirradiated control populations. This suggests that radiation induces cancer by enhancement of the spontaneous carcinogenesis process. These data suggest that the first step of radiation carcinogenesis may not be the direct induction of mutation. Radiation may induce genetic instability which increases the spontaneous mutation rate in the cells to produce carcinogenic mutations. Growth stimulatory effect of radiation may also contribute to the process. Thus, epigenetic, but not genetic effect of radiation might better contribute in the process of carcinogenesis. (author)

  7. Epigenetic mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Ohtsura [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1995-12-01

    Carcinogenic action of radiations has long been thought to be due to its mutagenic activity. Since DNA damage is induced and distributes in a stochastic fashion, radiation induction of cancers was also assumed to follow a stochastic kinetics. However, recent progress in radiation research has revealed that some features of radiation carcinogenesis are not explainable by the simple action of radiation as a DNA damaging and mutagenic agent. Firstly, frequencies of radiation-induced transformation in vitro and radiation-induced mammary cancers in rats are too high to be accounted for by the frequency of radiation-induced mutation. Secondly, trans-generation carcinogenesis among F1 mice born to irradiated parents occurs also much more frequently than to be predicted by the frequency of radiation induced germline mutation. Thirdly, multistage carcinogenesis theory predicts that carcinogens give hits to the target cells so as to shorten the latency of cancers. However, latencies of radiation induced solid cancers among atomic bomb survivors are similar to those of the control population. Fourthly, although radiation elevates the frequency of cancers, the induced cancers seem to share the same spectrum of cancer types as in the unirradiated control populations. This suggests that radiation induces cancer by enhancement of the spontaneous carcinogenesis process. These data suggest that the first step of radiation carcinogenesis may not be the direct induction of mutation. Radiation may induce genetic instability which increases the spontaneous mutation rate in the cells to produce carcinogenic mutations. Growth stimulatory effect of radiation may also contribute to the process. Thus, epigenetic, but not genetic effect of radiation might better contribute in the process of carcinogenesis. (author)

  8. Epigenetic alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In-Seon CHOI; Tsung-Teh WU

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is believed to result in part from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to oncogene overexpression and tumor suppressor loss. Epigenetic alterations as a distinct and crucial mechanism to silence a variety of methylated tissue-specific and imprinted genes, have been extensively studied in gastric carcinoma and play important roles in gastric carcinogenesis. This review will briefly discuss the basic aspects of DNA methylation and CpG island methylation, in particular the epigenetic alterations of certain critical genes implicated in gastric carcinogenesis and its relevance of clinical implications.

  9. Ambient solar UVR measurement : evaluation of currently available detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) has maintained a solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) measurement network covering numerous sites around Australia and Antarctica since the late 1980's using a variety of radiometric detectors. Each datalogger system generally has a UVB (280-315 nm) detector, UVR (290-390 nm) detector and a detector which attempts to measure biologically effective UVR (either an International Light actinic detector or a Solar Light Model 501 UV-Biometer). The network, which covers all the capital cities is underpinned by a double monochromator spectroradiometer and calibrated standard lamps at ARL. This allows each radiometer to be individually calibrated against simultaneous spectral measurements of solar UVR. Concern over ozone depletion and the possibility of a concomitant increase in solar UVB at the earth's surface has lead to a rapid increase in the number of UW measurement systems deployed worldwide. The 501 UV- Biometer is now used extensively on a global basis and it is important that its performance characteristics are known. The ARL network covers a very wide latitude and longitude band, with conditions ranging from tropical to Antarctic. Prior to installation all detectors were intercompared at ARL although complete characterisation was not possible. Analysis of the data collected from the network has commenced and has begun to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the UVR detectors. Data from the network provides input for the daily UVB chart for television, for UVR personal exposure studies and for UVB climatology. Results for Melbourne and Brisbane will be presented and these show the importance of solar zenith angle, atmospheric ozone and cloud in determining levels of ambient UVB. Recently a 501 W-Biometer was used in separate short-term measurement campaigns in Finland and Townsville. Results were inconsistent with calibrations performed at ARL and subsequent laboratory characterisations revealed a significant

  10. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis is studies at NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental radiation carcinogenesis studies conducted during the past decade at NIRS are briefly reviewed. They include the following: 1) Age dependency of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. 2) Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. 3) Mechanism of fractionated X-irradiation (FX) induced thymic lymphomas. 4) Significance of radiation-induced immunosuppression in radiation carcinogenesis in vivo. 5) Other ongoing studies. (author)

  11. Expression of Escherichia coli uvr genes in mammalian cells. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal was to determine if Escherichia coli uvr genes could be expressed in repair deficient mammalian cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum). Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) ATPase activity was assessed in which the release of labelled orthophosphate from γ-[32P]-ATP is effected by damaged DNA and the uvrB protein; (2) the binding of the uvrA protein to damaged DNA was tested; and (3) a double uvrA and uvrC vector was engineered with gpt and the gpt+ clones isolated. 2 references, 2 figures

  12. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H.; Molzberger, Eileen T.; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with ...

  13. Identification of the uvrD gene product of Salmonella typhimurium LT2.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, P P; Walker, G C

    1983-01-01

    The product of the uvrD gene of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and Escherichia coli K-12 is thought to play a role in both the correction of mismatched bases and the repair of DNA damage, since insertion mutations in the uvrD gene increase the spontaneous mutation frequency and make the cells more sensitive to killing by UV irradiation. To clone the uvrD gene of S. typhimurium, we first generated a uvrD-specific probe by using DNA from an S. typhimurium uvrD421::Tn5 mutant. This probe was used to...

  14. DNA repair in Escherichia coli: identification of the uvrD gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1982-01-01

    A 2.9-kilobase (kb) Pvu II DNA fragment that contains the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli K-12 has been cloned in both low-copy and multiple-copy plasmid vehicles. The low-copy uvrD plasmid (pVMK49) complements a variety of uvrD, uvrE, and recL mutations. In contrast, the same strains carrying the 2.9-kb fragment in a multiple-copy plasmid (pVMK45) remain sensitive to ultraviolet light (UV). Additionally, pVMK45 transformants of wild-type E. coli are sensitive to UV and methyl methanesulfonate ...

  15. UvrD helicase, unlike Rep helicase, dismantles RecA nucleoprotein filaments in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Veaute, Xavier; Delmas, Stéphane; Selva, Marjorie; Jeusset, Josette; Le cam, Eric; Matic, Ivan; Fabre, Francis; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2004-01-01

    The roles of UvrD and Rep DNA helicases of Escherichia coli are not yet fully understood. In particular, the reason for rep uvrD double mutant lethality remains obscure. We reported earlier that mutations in recF, recO or recR genes suppress the lethality of uvrD rep, and proposed that an essential activity common to UvrD and Rep is either to participate in the removal of toxic recombination intermediates or to favour the proper progression of replication. Here, we show that UvrD, but not Rep...

  16. Genetically Engineered Synthetic Miniaturized Versions of Plasmodium falciparum UvrD Helicase Are Catalytically Active

    OpenAIRE

    Abulaish Ansari; Mohammed Tarique; Renu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Helicases catalyze unwinding of double stranded nucleic acids in an energy-dependent manner. We have reported characterization of UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. We reported that the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of PfUvrD contain characteristic ATPase and DNA helicase activities. Here we report the generation and characterization of a genetically engineered version of PfUvrD and its derivatives. This synthetic UvrD (sUD) contains all the conserved domains of PfUvrD but only t...

  17. Antipairing and strand transferase activities of E. coli helicase II (UvrD).

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, P; Hejna, J A; Ehrlich, S D; Cassuto, E

    1993-01-01

    The product of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli, UvrD (helicase II), is known to be involved in methyl-directed mismatch repair, transposon excision and uvrABC excision repair. In conjugational crosses, various uvrD mutants have been reported to result in higher, lower or unaffected recombination frequencies. In an attempt to clarify the role of UvrD in recombination, we have studied in vitro its effects on two key reactions driven by RecA, homologous pairing and strand exchange. We show her...

  18. Postreplication repair in uvrA and uvrB strains of Eschericia coli K-12 is inhibited by rich growth medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escherichia coli K-12 uvr A or uvrB strains grown in minimal medium showed higher survival after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) if plated on minimal medium (MM) instead of rich medium. This 'minimal medium recovery' (MMR) was largely blocked by additional recA56 (92% inhibition) or lexA101 (77%) mutations, was partially blocked by additional recB21 (54%), uvrD3 (31%) or recF143 (22%) mutations, but additional polA1 or polA5 mutations had no effect on MMR. When incubated in MM after UV irradiation, the uvrB5 and uvrB5 uvrD3 strains showed essentially complete repair of DNA daughter-strand gaps (DSG) produced after UV radiation fluences up to approximately 6 J/m2 and approximately 1 J/m2, respectively, and then they accumulated unrepaired DSG as a linear function of UV radiation fluence. However, when incubated in rich growth medium after UV irradiation, they did not show the complete repair of DSG and unrepaired DSG accumulated as a linear function of UV radiation fluence. The fluence-dependent correlation observed for the uvrB and uvrB uvrD cells between UV radiation-induced killing and the accumulation of unrepaired DSG, indicates that the molecular basis of MMR is the partial inhibition of postreplication repair by rich growth medium. (author)

  19. UvrD and UvrD252 Counteract RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR in a rep Mutant of Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-01-01

    Rep and UvrD are two related Escherichia coli helicases, and inactivating both is lethal. Based on the observation that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD inactivation is suppressed in the absence of the recombination presynaptic proteins RecF, RecO, or RecR, it was proposed that UvrD is essential in the rep mutant to counteract a deleterious RecFOR-dependent RecA binding. We show here that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD mutations is also suppressed by recQ and recJ inactivation...

  20. Postreplication repair in uvrA and uvrB strains of Eschericia coli K-12 is inhibited by rich growth medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.C.; Barfknecht, T.R.; Smith, K.C. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1982-09-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 uvr A or uvrB strains grown in minimal medium showed higher survival after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) if plated on minimal medium (MM) instead of rich medium. This 'minimal medium recovery' (MMR) was largely blocked by additional recA56 (92% inhibition) or lexA101 (77%) mutations, was partially blocked by additional recB21 (54%), uvrD3 (31%) or recF143 (22%) mutations, but additional polA1 or polA5 mutations had no effect on MMR. When incubated in MM after UV irradiation, the uvrB5 and uvrB5 uvrD3 strains showed essentially complete repair of DNA daughter-strand gaps (DSG) produced after UV radiation fluences up to approximately 6 J/m/sup 2/ and approximately 1 J/m/sup 2/, respectively, and then they accumulated unrepaired DSG as a linear function of UV radiation fluence. However, when incubated in rich growth medium after UV irradiation, they did not show the complete repair of DSG and unrepaired DSG accumulated as a linear function of UV radiation fluence. The fluence-dependent correlation observed for the uvrB and uvrB uvrD cells between UV radiation-induced killing and the accumulation of unrepaired DSG, indicates that the molecular basis of MMR is the partial inhibition of postreplication repair by rich growth medium.

  1. Structure of the gene complementing uvr-402 in Streptococcus pneumoniae: homology with Escherichia coli uvrB and the homologous gene in Micrococcus luteus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sicard, N.; Oreglia, J; Estevenon, A M

    1992-01-01

    The repair ability for UV-induced damage observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae proceeds through a system similar to the Uvr-dependent system in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence of a gene complementing uvr-402, a mutation conferring UV sensitivity, was determined. Alignments of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed an extensive sequence homology of 55% with the UvrB protein of E. coli and 59% with the UvrB-homologous protein of Micrococcus luteus. Nucleotide-binding site consensus was obs...

  2. Expression of the cloned uvr B gene of Escherichia coli: dependency on nonsense suppressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant plasmid pNP5, consisting of plasmid pMB9 on which the uvrB gene is cloned, fully complements for the defects due to chromosomal uvrB mutations in the presence of the amber suppressor sup-6 or supF. Correndonuclease II activity was also completely restored in UvrB strains containing both plasmid pNP5 and amber suppressor sup-6, as compared with the parental UvrB+ strain. It is shown that the amber mutation which interferes with the expression of the cloned uvrB gene is located outside this gene. Apparently, the amber mutation exerts a polar effect on uvrB expression that is relieved by sup-6 or supF. Introduction of a rho mutation into suppressor-free UvrB strains, harboring pNP5, did not relieve the polarity caused by the amber mutation

  3. Publication des œuvres de Jacques Tits

    OpenAIRE

    Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Jacques Tits, professeur honoraire au Collège de France, a occupé la chaire de « Théorie des groupes » de 1973 à 2000. D’origine belge, il a également enseigné à Bruxelles et à Bonn, avant de prendre la nationalité française en 1974, pour pouvoir être nommé professeur titulaire au Collège de France. Deux publications majeures mettent à l’honneur l’œuvre de Jacques Tits. En novembre 2013, quatre volumes de ses Œuvres ont été publiés par la European Mathematical Society. Ils reproduisent la to...

  4. Quantification of quantum dot murine skin penetration with UVR barrier impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Luke J; Jatana, Samreen; Gelein, Robert; De Benedetto, Anna; De Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Beck, Lisa A; Elder, Alison; Delouise, Lisa A

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin exposure is a common exogenous insult that can alter skin barrier and immune functions. With the growing presence of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer goods and technological applications the potential for NPs to contact UVR-exposed skin is increasing. Therefore it is important to understand the effect of UVR on NP skin penetration and the potential for systemic translocation. Previous studies qualitatively showed that UVR skin exposure can increase the penetration of NPs below the stratum corneum. In this work, an in vivo mouse model was used to quantitatively examine the skin penetration of carboxylated (CdSe/ZnS, core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) through intact and UVR barrier-disrupted murine skin by organ Cd mass analysis. Transepidermal water loss was used to measure the magnitude of the skin barrier defect as a function of UVR dose and time post-UVR exposure. QDs were applied to mice 3-4 days post-UVR exposure at the peak of the skin barrier disruption. Our results reveal unexpected trends that suggest these negative-charged QDs can penetrate barrier intact skin and that penetration and systemic transport depends on the QD application time post-UVR exposure. The effect of UVR on skin-resident dendritic cells and their role in the systemic translocation of these QDs are described. Our results suggest that NP skin penetration and translocation may depend on the specific barrier insult and the inflammatory status of the skin. PMID:23078247

  5. UvrD2 is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its helicase activity is not required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alan; Güthlein, Carolin; Beresford, Nicola; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O

    2011-09-01

    UvrD is an SF1 family helicase involved in DNA repair that is widely conserved in bacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has two annotated UvrD homologues; here we investigate the role of UvrD2. The uvrD2 gene at its native locus could be knocked out only in the presence of a second copy of the gene, demonstrating that uvrD2 is essential. Analysis of the putative protein domain structure of UvrD2 shows a distinctive domain architecture, with an extended C terminus containing an HRDC domain normally found in SF2 family helicases and a linking domain carrying a tetracysteine motif. Truncated constructs lacking the C-terminal domains of UvrD2 were able to compensate for the loss of the chromosomal copy, showing that these C-terminal domains are not essential. Although UvrD2 is a functional helicase, a mutant form of the protein lacking helicase activity was able to permit deletion of uvrD2 at its native locus. However, a mutant protein unable to hydrolyze ATP or translocate along DNA was not able to compensate for lack of the wild-type protein. Therefore, we concluded that the essential role played by UvrD2 is unlikely to involve its DNA unwinding activity and is more likely to involve DNA translocation and, possibly, protein displacement. PMID:21725019

  6. Health risks and benefits from UVR exposure: perceptions and evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selection pressures related to vitamin D and folate adequacy under varying ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels are thought to have driven the evolution of skin pigmentation in humans. Over recent history, ease of travel has facilitated migration, and humans now occupy regions where there is a mismatch between skin type and ambient UVR. Additionally, longer lifespans have resulted in diseases of chronic UVR exposure becoming increasingly common. The health risks of UVR exposure - primarily skin and eye diseases - became well-recognised during the 20th century, with research and public health action driven by rising skin cancer incidence and fears of ozone depletion. Skin cancers, primarily the non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), are the commonest malignancy in many developed countries, but are largely diseases of older age, but with childhood and adolescent sun exposure setting the scene for these diseases of later life. Malignant melanoma, often with inset at a younger age, is relatively uncommon, but has significant mortality. In the 21st century, there has been an explosion of interest in the health benefits of sun exposure, through production of vitamin D. Considerable media attention, a large amount of research of mixed quality and highly vocal advocates, have drawn attention to possible risks of vitamin D deficiency. This has resulted in public confusion about appropriate sun exposure. Nevertheless, there is considerable uncertainty - often ignored by media or vitamin D advocates - in our understanding of the links between sun exposure, vitamin D, and health. Understanding the population attributable fraction, that is, what proportion of the disease in the population can be explained by exposure (or lack of exposure) to the relevant factor, is key. Research indicating an increased disease risk associated with low vitamin D status, may not translate to an important disease risk at the population level, if the risk factor (low vitamin D status) is uncommon

  7. Sun behaviour and personal UVR exposure among Europeans on short term holidays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Maier, Bernhard; Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Heydenreich, Jakob; Dadvand, Payam; Maier, Harald; Grage, Mette Marie-Louise; Harrison, Graham I; Schmalwieser, Alois W; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Young, Antony R; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to be the main cause of skin cancer, the incidence of which is rising with national differences across Europe. With this observation study we aimed to determine the impact of nationality on sun behaviour and personal UVR exposure on sun and ski holidays....... 25 Danish and 20 Spanish sun-seekers were observed during a sun holiday in Spain, and 26 Danish and 27 Austrian skiers were observed during a ski holiday in Austria. The participants recorded their location and clothing in diaries. Personal time-logged UVR data were recorded as standard erythema...... than Austrian skiers, but the behaviour of the Danish skiers did not result in significantly greater accumulated UVR doses. Both Danish and Spanish sun-seekers and Danish and Austrian skiers received substantial UVR doses. The behaviour's influence on the UVR doses received by the Danish participants...

  8. In vitro complementation assay for the Escherichia coli uvrD gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuemmerle, N.B.; Masker, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    An in vitro assay for the product of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli has been developed. This assay, derived from properties of uvrD mutants revealed by in vivo experiments, is based on the necessity for a functional uvrD protein for complete rejoining of covalently closed circular DNA during the excision repair of UV-induced damage. Extracts prepared from gently lysed uvrD101 mutant cells are capable of restoring UV-damaged DNA to its covalently closed circular form when provided with a functional uvrD protein from other repair-deficient cell extracts or from partially purified protein fractions. This assay was employed to monitor the activity of the uvrD protein after several steps of fractionation.

  9. In Vivo Skin Penetration of Quantum Dot Nanoparticles in the Murine Model: the Effect of UVR

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, Luke; Oberdörster, Gunter; Pentland, Alice P.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has widespread effects on the biology and integrity of the skin barrier. Research on the mechanisms that drive these changes, as well as their effect on skin barrier function has been ongoing since the 1980s. However, no studies have examined the impact of UVR on nanoparticle skin penetration. Nanoparticles (NP) are commonly used in sunscreens and other cosmetics, and since consumer use of sunscreen is often applied to sun damaged skin, the effect of UVR on NP skin...

  10. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ossanna, N; Mount, D W

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that...

  11. Modulation of UvrD Helicase Activity by Covalent DNA-Protein Cross-links*

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Anuradha; Minko, Irina G.; Smith, Rebecca L.; Lloyd, R. Stephen; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2010-01-01

    UvrD (DNA helicase II) has been implicated in DNA replication, DNA recombination, nucleotide excision repair, and methyl-directed mismatch repair. The enzymatic function of UvrD is to translocate along a DNA strand in a 3′ to 5′ direction and unwind duplex DNA utilizing a DNA-dependent ATPase activity. In addition, UvrD interacts with many other proteins involved in the above processes and is hypothesized to facilitate protein turnover, thus promoting further DNA processing. Although UvrD int...

  12. An in vitro complementation assay for the Escherichia coli uvrD gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuemmerle, N B; Masker, W E

    1983-01-01

    An in vitro assay specific for the product of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli has been developed. This assay, derived from properties of uvrD mutants revealed by in vivo experiments, is based on the necessity for a functional UvrD protein for complete rejoining of covalently closed circular DNA during the excision repair of UV-induced damage. Extracts prepared from gently lysed uvrD101 mutant cells are capable of restoring UV-damaged DNA to its covalently closed circular form when provided ...

  13. Domain Requirements for DNA Unwinding by Mycobacterial UvrD2, an Essential DNA Helicase†

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Stephanou, Nicolas C.; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Glickman, Michael S.; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterial UvrD2 is a DNA-dependent ATPase with 3′ to 5′ helicase activity. UvrD2 is an atypical helicase, insofar as its N-terminal ATPase domain resembles the superfamily I helicases UvrD/PcrA, yet it has a C-terminal HRDC domain, which is a feature of RecQ-type superfamily II helicases. The ATPase and HRDC domains are connected by a CxxC-(14)-CxxC tetracysteine module that defines a new clade of UvrD2-like bacterial helicases found only in Actinomycetales. By characterizing truncated ve...

  14. Regulation of the Escherichia coli uvrD gene in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, H M; Cavanagh, D R; Finch, P W; Emmerson, P T

    1987-01-01

    The roles of two putative promoter sequences, P1 and P2, and a potential antiterminator sequence found in the uvrD control region were examined in vivo. Constitutive and SOS-induced levels of uvrD mRNA were determined by S1 mapping, and it was shown that the majority of uvrD transcripts are from P1, while P2 plays only a minor role. A series of increasing deletions from the 5' end of the uvrD gene was used to assay transcription in the promoterless vector pKO-1. Loss of just the -35 region of...

  15. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into DNA Unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD

    OpenAIRE

    Meike Stelter; Samira Acajjaoui; Sean McSweeney; Joanna Timmins

    2013-01-01

    International audience DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD) in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement ar...

  16. uvrD gene of E. coli: molecular cloning and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have cloned the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli in phage and plasmid vectors and identified the gene product. The uvrD protein whose molecular weight is 75,000 dalton has been purified to apparent physical homogeneity. The uvrD protein possessed DNA-dependent ATPase and DNA unwinding activities and may be identical to DNA-dependent ATPase I and DNA helicase II. Expression of the uvrD gene was stimulated by exposure of bacteria to DNA-damaging agents. 6 figures

  17. Impaired incision of ultraviolet-irradiated deoxyribonucleic acid in uvrC mutants of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of single-strand breaks in the deoxyribonucleic acid of irradiated uvrC mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 was studied both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, uvrC mutants displayed a slow accumulation of breaks after irradiation, and in this respect appeared different from uvrA mutants, in which very few breaks could be detected. The breakage observed in uvrC mutants differed from that observed in wild-type strains in both the slow rate of break accumulation and the very limited dose response. In toluene-treated cells, we studied the effect of the ligase inhibitor nicotinomide mononucleotide on strand incision. Whereas uvrC mutants displayed more strand breakage in the presence of this inhibitor, the same amount of breakage was seen in uvrA mutants. Experiments using a cell-free system comprising the partially purified uvr+ gene products demonstrated clearly that there is a requirement for the uvrC+ gene product for strand incision. We suggest that in vivo in the absence of the uvrC+ gene product, a partial analog of this protein may allow some abnormal incision

  18. W-reactivation of phage lambda in recF, recL, uvrA, and uvrB mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W-reactivation is reduced by recF143 and recF144 mutations and is undetectable if a second mutation at either the uvrA or uvrB locus is combined with recF143. The uvrA and uvrB mutations alone block W-reactivation partially. A recL152 mutation also partially blocks W-reactivation by itself. In combination with a uvrB5 mutation, recL125 blocks W-reactivation completely but in combination with recF143, significant residual W-reactivation ability remains. We suggest that the phenomenon of W-reactivation is the result of at least two modes or pathways. The observation that recF143 uvrB5 and recF143 uvrA6 strains permit normal levels of mutagenesis completely block all W-reactivation leads us to suggest further that the mechanism(s) of W-reactivation is at least partly different from that of UV mutagenesis. (orig.)

  19. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, P.R.; Kushner, S.R.; Grossman, L.

    1985-08-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration.

  20. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration

  1. UvrD2 Is Essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but Its Helicase Activity Is Not Required ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Alan; Güthlein, Carolin; Beresford, Nicola; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O.

    2011-01-01

    UvrD is an SF1 family helicase involved in DNA repair that is widely conserved in bacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosishas two annotated UvrD homologues; here we investigate the role of UvrD2. The uvrD2gene at its native locus could be knocked out only in the presence of a second copy of the gene, demonstrating that uvrD2is essential. Analysis of the putative protein domain structure of UvrD2 shows a distinctive domain architecture, with an extended C terminus containing an HRDC domain normall...

  2. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section contains summaries of research in the following areas: use of liver for mechanistic studies of multistage hepatocarcinogenesis and for screening of environmental contaminants for tumor initiating and promoting activity; molecular properties of rat liver ornithine aminotransferase; regulation of gene expression in rat liver; methods of tumor detection; mechanisms of radiation and viral oncogenesis; biphenyl metabolism by rat liver microsomes; and studies on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity

  3. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first section deals with the assessment of carcinogens and cocarcinogens and the underlying mechanisms of their actions. The second concerns cancer induction by bone-seeking radionuclides and seeks to provide a firm foundation for estimating cancer risks to human populations in the event of accidental incorporation of radionuclides. The third is aimed at defining the role of oncornavirus activation in tumor induction by radiation and other environmental pollutants. The other two sections describe the new studies, one dealing with the development of an in vitro cell system (murine teratocarcinoma cells) to screen chemicals rapidly for carcinogenic and mutagenic capacity, and the other investigating the potential use of plasma isozymes as indicators of mutagenesis in mammals. Accomplishments and projections for each of these studies follow

  4. Œuvre d'Adalbert de Beaumont

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Institution patrimoniale conservant l’œuvre Les Arts décoratifs. Musée des Arts décoratifs, département des Arts graphiques107, rue de Rivoli, 75001 PARISSite web : http://www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr Entretien avec Chantal Bouchon, conservateur au musée des Arts décoratifs, département des Arts graphiques, Paris, le 3 décembre 2009. Entretien avec Matthieu Lelièvre, assistant de conservation au musée des Arts décoratifs, département des Arts graphiques, Paris, le 8 novembre 2010. Description de ...

  5. Black light visualized solar lentigines on the shoulders and upper back are associated with objectively measured UVR exposure and cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Luise Winkel; Datta, Pameli; Heydenreich, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the association of solar lentigines with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure have been based on retrospective questionnaires about UVR exposure. We aimed to investigate the association between solar lentigines and UVR exposure in healthy individuals using objective measuremen...

  6. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  7. Molecular mechanism of cholangiocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2014-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly malignant cancer of the biliary tract with a poor prognosis, which often arises from conditions causing long-term inflammation, injury, and reparative biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Several conditions are known to be major risk factors for cancer in the biliary tract or gallbladder, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver fluke infection, pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and chemical exposure in proof-printing workers. Abnormalities in various signaling cascades, molecules, and genetic mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of CCA. CCA is characterized by a series of highly recurrent mutations in genes, including KRAS, BRF, TP53, Smad, and p16(INK4a) . Cytokines that are affected by inflammatory environmental conditions, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Prominent signaling pathways important in carcinogenesis include TGF-β/Smad, IL-6/STAT-3, PI3K/AKT, Wnt, RAF/MEK/MAPK, and Notch. Additionally, some microRNAs regulate targets in critical pathways of CCA development and progression. This review article provides the understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis in CCA, which leads to the development of new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating cancer. PMID:24895231

  8. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelter, Meike; Acajjaoui, Samira; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD) in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A) helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo. PMID:24143224

  9. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Stelter

    Full Text Available DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo.

  10. Mutiple simultaneous event model for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical Radiobiology and Risk Estimates includes reports on: Multiple Simultaneous Event Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis; Cancer Risk Estimates and Neutron RBE Based on Human Exposures; A Rationale for Nonlinear Dose Response Functions of Power Greater or Less Than One; and Rationale for One Double Event in Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis

  11. Skin infections in renal transplant recipients and the relation with solar UVR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen F; Hogewoning AA; Bouwes Bavinck JN; Goettsch WG; Fijter JW de; Loveren H van; UMC Leiden Afdeling; UMC Leiden Afdeling Nephrologie; LPI

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether exposure to solar UVR would influence the occurrence of skin infections in a cohort of renal transplant recipients. In various experimental studies, exposure to UVR was demonstrated to possibly cause immunosuppression and impaired resistance to infections. We expected that

  12. Vitamin D Level in Summer and Winter Related to Measured UVR Exposure and Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieden, E.; Philipsen, P.A.; Heydenreich, J.;

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the summer UVR exposure on serum-25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) in late summer and winter was investigated in an open study on 25 healthy, adult volunteers. The UVR exposure dose in standard erythema dose (SED) was monitored continuously during a summer season with personal, elec...

  13. Determination of the Action Spectrum of UVR-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage in Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Jennifer A; Lloyd, James J; Diffey, Brian L; Matts, Paul J; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Biological responses of human skin to UVR including cancer and aging are largely wavelength-dependent, as shown by the action spectra of UVR-induced erythema and nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage. A molecular dosimeter of UVR exposure is therefore required. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive biomarker of UVR exposure in human skin, its wavelength dependency is unknown. The current study solves this problem by determining the action spectrum of UVR-induced mtDNA damage in human skin. Human neonatal dermal fibroblasts and primary human adult keratinocyte cells were irradiated with increasing doses of UVR. Dose-response curves of mtDNA damage were produced for each of the UVR sources and cell types, and an action spectrum for each cell type was determined by mathematical induction. Similarities between these mtDNA damage action spectra and previously determined nDNA damage were observed, with the most detrimental effects occurring over the shorter UVR wavelengths. Notably, a statistically significant (P300 nm, possibly indicating a wider picture of depth dependence in sensitivity. This finding has implications for disease/photodamage mechanisms and interventions. PMID:26030182

  14. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H; Molzberger, Eileen T; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M; Cox, Michael M

    2015-04-30

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with enhanced DNA-binding properties. The ATPase rate of UvrD during RecA removal is much slower than the ATPase activity of UvrD when it is functioning either as a translocase or a helicase on DNA in the absence of RecA. Thus, in this context UvrD may operate in a specialized disassembly mode. PMID:25824953

  15. 5′-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase

    OpenAIRE

    Tomko, Eric J.; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K.; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule analyses of the dual DNA helicase/translocase enzyme UvrD reveal the particular substrate preferences of its monomeric, translocase form, with implications for understanding UvrD's translocase and anti-recombinase roles.

  16. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto;

    1991-01-01

    In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms....../l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium...... levels revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk....

  17. Time factors in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments using B6C3F1 female mice were made subject of analysis on the time factors in radiation carcinogenesis. In the experiment for examination of influence of age at irradiation on the lifetime risk and on distribution of ages at death, mice were irradiated at day 12, 14 or 17 of the prenatal period, or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 of the postnatal period with doses ranging from 0.48 to 5.7 Gy gamma-rays from 137Cs. In the experiment to examine the reduction factor for carcinogenic effect by multiple fractionation of gamma-rays dose 1.9 or 3.8 Gy was divided into 10 fractions, which were delivered once a week during period from 5 to 15 weeks of age. All mice were allowed to live out their life spans under a specific pathogen free condition. The cumulative relative risk for mortality from all causes except lymphoma and leukemia was shown to decrease with age when mice were irradiated at the fetal, neonatal, suckling, adolescent or young adult period, whereas, the decrease in the cumulative relative risk was very little when gamma-rays were given at the intermediate adult period. The lifetime risk for the increase in mortality and for the induction of solid tumors was highest in mice irradiated during neonatal, suckling or adolescent period. Age-dependence of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis was different for each type of neoplasm. However, the most susceptible period for induction of each type of neoplasm concentrated in the age from neonatal to adolescent period. Radiation-induced late effects were apparently reduced by multiple fractionation of radiation dose, but the reduction factor for the increase in the long-term mortality did not exceed 2.0. (author)

  18. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico De Marco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis

  19. Modulation of UvrD helicase activity by covalent DNA-protein cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anuradha; Minko, Irina G; Smith, Rebecca L; Lloyd, R Stephen; McCullough, Amanda K

    2010-07-01

    UvrD (DNA helicase II) has been implicated in DNA replication, DNA recombination, nucleotide excision repair, and methyl-directed mismatch repair. The enzymatic function of UvrD is to translocate along a DNA strand in a 3' to 5' direction and unwind duplex DNA utilizing a DNA-dependent ATPase activity. In addition, UvrD interacts with many other proteins involved in the above processes and is hypothesized to facilitate protein turnover, thus promoting further DNA processing. Although UvrD interactions with proteins bound to DNA have significant biological implications, the effects of covalent DNA-protein cross-links on UvrD helicase activity have not been characterized. Herein, we demonstrate that UvrD-catalyzed strand separation was inhibited on a DNA strand to which a 16-kDa protein was covalently bound. Our sequestration studies suggest that the inhibition of UvrD activity is most likely due to a translocation block and not helicase sequestration on the cross-link-containing DNA substrate. In contrast, no inhibition of UvrD-catalyzed strand separation was apparent when the protein was linked to the complementary strand. The latter result is surprising given the earlier observations that the DNA in this covalent complex is severely bent ( approximately 70 degrees ), with both DNA strands making multiple contacts with the cross-linked protein. In addition, UvrD was shown to be required for replication of plasmid DNAs containing covalent DNA-protein complexes. Combined, these data suggest a critical role for UvrD in the processing of DNA-protein cross-links. PMID:20444702

  20. Effect of recB21, uvrD3, lexA101 and recF143 mutations on ultraviolet radiation sensitivity and genetic recombination in ΔuvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of the recB21, uvrD3, lexA101, and recF143 mutations on UV radiation sensitization and genetic recombination was studied in isogenic strains containing all possible combinations of these mutations in a ΔuvrB genetic background. The relative UV radiation sensitivities of the multiply mutant strains in the ΔuvrB background were: recF recB lexA > recF recB uvrD lexA, recF recB uvrD > recA > recF uvrD lexA > recF recB, recF uvrD > recF lexA > recB uvrD lexA > recB uvrD > recB lexA, lexA uvrD > recB > lexA, uvrD > recF; three of these strains were more UV radiation sensitive than the uvrB recA strain. There was no correlation between the degree of radiation sensitivity and the degree of deficiency in genetic recombination. An analysis of the survival curves revealed that the recF mutation interacts synergistically with the recB, uvrD, and lexA mutations in UV radiation sensitization, while the recB, uvrD, and lexA mutations appear to interact additively with each other. We interpret these data to suggest that there are two major independent pathways for postreplication repair; one is dependent on the recF gene, and the other is dependent on the recB, uvrD, and lexA genes. (orig.)

  1. Effect of recB21, uvrD3, lexA101 and recF143 mutations on ultraviolet radiation sensitivity and genetic recombination in. delta. uvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.V.; Smith, K.C.

    1981-09-01

    The interaction of the recB21, uvrD3, lexA101, and recF143 mutations on UV radiation sensitization and genetic recombination was studied in isogenic strains containing all possible combinations of these mutations in a ..delta..uvrB genetic background. The relative UV radiation sensitivities of the multiply mutant strains in the ..delta..uvrB background were: recF recB lexA > recF recB uvrD lexA, recF recB uvrD > recA > recF uvrD lexA > recF recB, recF uvrD > recF lexA > recB uvrD lexA > recB uvrD > recB lexA, lexA uvrD > recB > lexA, uvrD > recF; three of these strains were more UV radiation sensitive than the uvrB recA strain. There was no correlation between the degree of radiation sensitivity and the degree of deficiency in genetic recombination. An analysis of the survival curves revealed that the recF mutation interacts synergistically with the recB, uvrD, and lexA mutations in UV radiation sensitization, while the recB, uvrD, and lexA mutations appear to interact additively with each other. We interpret these data to suggest that there are two major independent pathways for postreplication repair; one is dependent on the recF gene, and the other is dependent on the recB, uvrD, and lexA genes.

  2. Foucault, l’œuvre, l’auteur

    OpenAIRE

    Olivesi, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    À partir de l’expérience littéraire, Michel Foucault entreprit une critique des catégories d’œuvre et d’auteur. Celle-ci éclaire les présupposés qui président à nos propres conceptions de l’écriture, de l’écrivain, du texte, du corpus, de l’interprétation, etc. Dans l’ordre du discours, s’institue un lien entre un sujet de l’écriture et l’ensemble des traces écrites qui répèteraient sa présence en négatif, comme la garantie ultime d’un sens, gagé sur une intentionalité expressive. Dénouer ce ...

  3. Violences dans l’œuvre de Kara Walker

    OpenAIRE

    Géré, Vanina

    2012-01-01

    L’œuvre de l’artiste afro-américaine Kara Walker est saturée par la violence. Faisant appel à la représentation de l’esclavage aux États-Unis, elle propose une vision allégorique de l’histoire comme la répétition sans fin de la perpétration de la violence. Plasticienne virtuose, Walker utilise le médium obsolète de la silhouette sur papier découpé afin de montrer comment la violence raciste participe d’une logique de négation du corps d’autrui, et exploite une stratégie de piège visuel afin d...

  4. Mutational analysis of Mycobacterium UvrD1 identifies functional groups required for ATP hydrolysis, DNA unwinding, and chemomechanical coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Glickman, Michael S.; Shuman, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial UvrD1 is a DNA-dependent ATPase and a Ku-dependent 3’ to 5’ DNA helicase. The UvrD1 motor domain resembles that of the prototypal superfamily I helicases UvrD and PcrA. Here we performed a mutational analysis of UvrD1 guided by the crystal structure of a DNA-bound E. coli UvrD-ADP-MgF3 transition state mimetic. Alanine scanning and conservative substitutions identified five amino acids essential for both ATP hydrolysis and duplex unwinding, including those implicated in phosphoh...

  5. Solar PAR and UVR modify the community composition and photosynthetic activity of sea ice algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, Sara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Majaneva, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus

    2015-10-01

    The effects of increased photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on species diversity, biomass and photosynthetic activity were studied in fast ice algal communities. The experimental set-up consisted of nine 1.44 m(2) squares with three treatments: untreated with natural snow cover (UNT), snow-free (PAR + UVR) and snow-free ice covered with a UV screen (PAR). The total algal biomass, dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates, increased in all treatments during the experiment. However, the smaller biomass growth in the top 10-cm layer of the PAR + UVR treatment compared with the PAR treatment indicated the negative effect of UVR. Scrippsiella complex (mainly Scrippsiella hangoei, Biecheleria baltica and Gymnodinium corollarium) showed UV sensitivity in the top 5-cm layer, whereas Heterocapsa arctica ssp. frigida and green algae showed sensitivity to both PAR and UVR. The photosynthetic activity was highest in the top 5-cm layer of the PAR treatment, where the biomass of the pennate diatom Nitzschia frigida increased, indicating the UV sensitivity of this species. This study shows that UVR is one of the controlling factors of algal communities in Baltic Sea ice, and that increased availability of PAR together with UVR exclusion can cause changes in algal biomass, photosynthetic activity and community composition. PMID:26310455

  6. Expression of the cloned uvrB gene of Escherichia coli: mode of transcription and orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Escherichia coli uvrB gene, located on a 1.5-megadalton EcoRI fragment F, derived from transducing phage lambda b2att2 [lambda b2cI857intam6Δ(bioAB)bioFCD+uvrB+], has been cloned in the unique EcoRI site of several relaxed plasmids, i.e., pMB9, pBR322, and pBH20 (=pBR322, including the lac regulatory elements). Expression of the uvrB gene, both on pMB9 and on pBH20, occurs only when fragment F has one particular orientation. Cloning of this fragment on pBR322 in either orientation does not allow expression of the uvrB gene. Transcription of this gene on pNP5 (=pMB9 uvrB) is shown to be dependent on a pMB9 promotor that is located on a 0.22-megadalton EcoRI-HindIII fragment. Using plasmid pBH20 as a vector, we could demonstrate that expression of the uvrB gene is under control of the lac promotor-operator region. From deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization experiments with lambda pgal8 deoxyribonucleic acid and restriction fragments of pNP5 deoxyribonucleic acid it could be shown that the uvrB gene is transcribed clockwise on the chromosome

  7. Efficient processing of TFO-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks by the UvrABC nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Laura A; Wang, Hong; Van Houten, Bennett; Vasquez, Karen M

    2008-12-01

    Photoreactive psoralens can form interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in double-stranded DNA. In eubacteria, the endonuclease UvrABC plays a key role in processing psoralen ICLs. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can be used to direct ICLs to specific genomic sites. Previous studies of pyrimidine-rich methoxypsoralen-modified TFOs indicated that the TFO inhibits cleavage by UvrABC. Because different chemistries may alter the processing of TFO-directed ICLs, we investigated the effect of another type of triplex formed by purine-rich TFOs on the processing of 4'-(hydroxymethyl)-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) ICLs by the UvrABC nuclease. Using an HMT-modified TFO to direct ICLs to a specific site, we found that UvrABC made incisions on the purine-rich strand of the duplex approximately 3 bases from the 3'-side and approximately 9 bases from the 5'-side of the ICL, within the TFO-binding region. In contrast to previous reports, the UvrABC nuclease cleaved the TFO-directed psoralen ICL with a greater efficiency than that of the psoralen ICL alone. Furthermore, the TFO was dissociated from its duplex binding site by UvrA and UvrB. As mutagenesis by TFO-directed ICLs requires nucleotide excision repair, the efficient processing of these lesions supports the use of triplex technology to direct DNA damage for genome modification. PMID:18996898

  8. Statistical modeling and extrapolation of carcinogenesis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, including pharmacokinetic models for metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances. Maximum likelihood procedures for fitting these models to epidemiological data are discussed, including situations where the time to tumor occurrence is unobservable. The plausibility of different possible shapes of the dose response curve at low doses is examined, and a robust method for linear extrapolation to low doses is proposed and applied to epidemiological data on radiation carcinogenesis

  9. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Takuji Tanaka; Rikako Ishigamori

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for...

  10. Breast carcinogenesis: risk of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of radiation carcinogenesis in the opposite breast is a major concern for physicians and breast cancer patients who choose to preserve the involved breast through conservation treatment, i.e., conservation survey and radiation therapy. In analyzing the carcinogenic effect of irradiation on the breast, the radiobiologic risks assumed from the studies must be evaluated first in order to determine the accuracy of the epidemiologic data and radiation dosage. It is generally assumed from the carcinogenic studies that radiation is carcinogenic at any dose rate. However, it is well-known that low dose rates are less effective at producing cancer in animal species than high dose rates. However, in most epidemiologic studies no apparent account is taken of dose rate. Also, there are technical differences between the irradiation received by individuals involved in most epidemiologic studies and the therapeutic irradiation received by breast cancer patients. All of these factors make it difficult, if not impossible, to directly correlate the irradiation risk ascertained from the studies and modern radiotherapy. This paper examines what risk exists and how great it is

  11. The nucleotide sequence of the uvrD gene of E. coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Finch, P W; Emmerson, P T

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned section of the E. coli chromosome containing the uvrD gene has been determined. The coding region for the UvrD protein consists of 2,160 nucleotides which would direct the synthesis of a polypeptide 720 amino acids long with a calculated molecular weight of 82 kd. The predicted amino acid sequence of the UvrD protein has been compared with the amino acid sequences of other known adenine nucleotide binding proteins and a common sequence has been identified, ...

  12. UvrD controls the access of recombination proteins to blocked replication forks

    OpenAIRE

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Blocked replication forks often need to be processed by recombination proteins prior to replication restart. In Escherichia coli, the UvrD repair helicase was recently shown to act at inactivated replication forks, where it counteracts a deleterious action of RecA. Using two mutants affected for different subunits of the polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol IIIh), we show here that the anti-RecA action of UvrD at blocked forks reflects two different activities of this enzyme. A defective UvrD mutan...

  13. Characterization of the Helicase Activity and Substrate Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD▿

    OpenAIRE

    Curti, Elena; Smerdon, Stephen J; Davis, Elaine O.

    2006-01-01

    UvrD is a helicase that is widely conserved in gram-negative bacteria. A uvrD homologue was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the basis of the homology of its encoded protein with Escherichia coli UvrD, with which it shares 39% amino acid identity, distributed throughout the protein. The gene was cloned, and a histidine-tagged form of the protein was expressed and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein had in vitro ATPase activity that was dependent upon the presence of DNA. ...

  14. Characterization of DNA helicase II from a uvrD252 mutant of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Washburn, B K; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    The loss of DNA helicase II (UvrD) in Escherichia coli results in sensitivity to UV light and increased levels of spontaneous mutagenesis. While the effects of various uvrD alleles have been analyzed in vivo, the proteins produced by these alleles have not been examined in any detail. We have cloned one of these alleles, uvrD252, and determined the site of the mutation conferring the phenotype. In addition, the protein it encodes has been purified to homogeneity and characterized in vitro. Th...

  15. DNA sequence changes in mutation induced by ultraviolet light in the gpt gene on the chromosome of Escherichia coli uvr+ und uvrA cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequence changes in mutations induced by ultraviolet light are reported for the chromosomal Escherichia coli gpt gene in almost isogenic E. coli uvr+ and excision-deficient uvrA cells. Differences between the mutagenic spectra are ascribed to preferential removal of photoproducts in the transcribed strand by excision repair in uvr+ cells. This conclusion is confirmed by analysis of published results for genes in both uvr+ and uvr− cells, showing a similar selective removal of mutagenic products from the transcribed strand of the E. coli lacI gene and of the lambda phage cl repressor gene. Comparison of these data with published results for ultraviolet mutagenesis of gpt on a chromosome in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that a mutagenic hot spot in mammalian cells is not present in E. coli; the possibility is suggested that the hot spot might arise from localized lack of excision repair. Otherwise, mutagenesis in hamster cells appeared similar to that in E. coli uvr+ cells, except there appears to be a smaller fraction of single-base additions and deletions (frameshifts) in mammalian than in bacterial cells. Phenotypes of 6-thioguanine-resistant E. coli showed there is a gene (or genes) other than gpt involved in the utilization of thioguanine by bacteria

  16. Single-strand breaks in the DNA of the uvrA and uvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12 after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA single-strand breaks were produced in uvrA and uvrB strains of E.coli K-12 after UV (254 nm) irradiation. These breaks appeared to be produced both directly by photochemical events, and by a temperature-dependent process. Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers are probably not the photoproducts that lead to the temperature-dependent breaks, since photoreactivation had no detectable effect on the final yield of breaks. The DNA strand breaks appeared to be repairable by a process that requires DNA polymerase I and polynucleotide ligase, but not the recA, recB, recF, lexA101 or uvrD gene products. It is hypothesized that these temperature-dependent breaks occur either as a result of breakdown of a thermolabile photoproduct, or as the initial endonucleolytic event of a uvrA, uvrB-independent excision repair process that acts on a UV photoproduct other than the cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimer. (author)

  17. Chronic UVR Causes Increased Immunostaining of CD44 and Accumulation of Hyaluronan in Mouse Epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    Siiskonen, Hanna; Törrönen, Kari; Kumlin, Timo; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku I; Tammi, Raija H.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic intense UV radiation is the main cause of epidermal tumors. Because hyaluronan (HA), a large extracellular polysaccharide, is known to promote malignant growth, hyaluronan expression was studied in a model in which long-term UV radiation (UVR) induces epidermal tumors. Mouse back skin was exposed three times a week for 10.5 months to UVR corresponding to one minimal erythema dose, processed for histology, and stained for hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor CD44. This exposure proto...

  18. Efficient processing of TFO-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks by the UvrABC nuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Laura A.; Wang, Hong; van Houten, Bennett; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Photoreactive psoralens can form interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in double-stranded DNA. In eubacteria, the endonuclease UvrABC plays a key role in processing psoralen ICLs. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can be used to direct ICLs to specific genomic sites. Previous studies of pyrimidine-rich methoxypsoralen–modified TFOs indicated that the TFO inhibits cleavage by UvrABC. Because different chemistries may alter the processing of TFO-directed ICLs, we investigated th...

  19. UvrD Helicase Suppresses Recombination and DNA Damage-Induced Deletions†

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Josephine; Martin J Blaser

    2006-01-01

    UvrD, a highly conserved helicase involved in mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair (NER), and recombinational repair, plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability and facilitating DNA lesion repair in many prokaryotic species. In this report, we focus on the UvrD homolog in Helicobacter pylori, a genetically diverse organism that lacks many known DNA repair proteins, including those involved in mismatch repair and recombinational repair, and that is noted for high levels of i...

  20. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, P R; Kushner, S R; Grossman, L

    1985-01-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that r...

  1. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Indian men and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. It is considered as a multistep and multifactorial disease. Besides accumulation of genetic mutations, numerous other carcinogens are involved. In this category, viral and chemical carcinogens are well studied and documented. However, in the oral cavity, the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites, and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies, but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways, and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. This review presents possible carcinogenesis pathway involved in bacterial carcinogenesis, commonly implicated bacteria in oral carcinogenesis, and their role in cancer therapeutics as well.

  2. Cloning, nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the uvrA gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recombinant plasmid capable of restoring UV resistance to an Escherichia coli uvrA mutant was isolated from a genomic library of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence displayed significant similarity to those of the UvrA proteins of other bacterial species. A second open reading frame (ORF259) was identified upstream from, and in the opposite orientation to the gonococcal uvrA gene. Transcriptional fusions between portions of the gonococcal uvrA upstream region and a reporter gene were used to localise promoter activity in both E. coli and N. gonorrhoeae. The transcriptional starting points of uvrA and ORF259 were mapped in E. coli by primer extension analysis, and corresponding σ70 promoters were identified. The arrangement of the uvrA-ORF259 intergenic region is similar to that of the gonococcal recA-aroD intergenic region. Both contain inverted copies of the 10 bp neisserial DNA uptake sequence situated between divergently transcribed genes. However, there is no evidence that either the uptake sequence or the proximity of the promoters influences expression of these genes. (author)

  3. Genetically engineered synthetic miniaturized versions of Plasmodium falciparum UvrD helicase are catalytically active.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Abulaish; Tarique, Mohammed; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Helicases catalyze unwinding of double stranded nucleic acids in an energy-dependent manner. We have reported characterization of UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. We reported that the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of PfUvrD contain characteristic ATPase and DNA helicase activities. Here we report the generation and characterization of a genetically engineered version of PfUvrD and its derivatives. This synthetic UvrD (sUD) contains all the conserved domains of PfUvrD but only the intervening linker sequences are shortened. sUD (∼ 45 kDa) and one of its smallest derivative sUDN1N2 (∼ 22 kDa) contain ATPase and DNA helicase activities. sUD and sUDN1N2 can utilize hydrolysis of all the NTPs and dNTPs, can also unwind blunt end duplex DNA substrate and unwind DNA duplex in 3 to 5 direction only. Some of the properties of sUD are similar to the PfUvrD helicase. Mutagenesis in the conserved motif Ia indicate that the mutants sUDM and sUDN1N2M lose all the enzyme activities, which further confirms that these activities are intrinsic to the synthesized proteins. These studies show that for helicase activity only the conserved domains are essentially required and intervening sequences have almost no role. These observations will aid in understanding the unwinding mechanism by a helicase. PMID:24608129

  4. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of �what dose does?� in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of �what dose is?� Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  5. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When considering and analyzing experimental material concerning cellular aspects of the problem of radiation carcinogenesis, the following conclusions can be made: neoplastic transformation of cells in a culture is caused already by small radiation doses, under the effect of which the level of DNA injury is quite insignificant; the frequency of cell transformation depends on the type of radiation, it is particularly pronounced under the effect of radiations with a high linear energy transfer; a correlation between the processes of postradiation recovery and radiogenic transformation of cells is detected, nonrepairable injures of DNA playing the most important role in radiation carcinogenesis; tumour promoters and anticarcinogenic agens produce a modifying effect on the transformation of irradiated cells. Molecular mechanisms of oncogene activation are thoroughly studied using the model of virus carcinogenesis, the problem of the nature of chemical and, in particular, radiation cell transformation remains scantily investigated

  7. UVR exposure and vitamin D in a rural population. A study of outdoor working farmers, their spouses and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, M; Petersen, B; Thieden, E;

    2014-01-01

    outdoor working male farmers, their indoor working spouses and their children, expected to receive high UVR exposure. METHODS: Prospective, cohort study. During the summer 2009 daily, personal UVR exposure and sun behaviour were recorded by dosimetry and diaries (17 403 days). Vitamin D was measured at......BACKGROUND: Living and working in the countryside may result in excessive UVR exposure, with increased risk of skin cancer. Some sun exposure is, however, recommended, since vitamin D production is UVB-dependent. OBJECTIVES: To examine UVR exposure and vitamin D levels in a rural population of...... exposure was even higher (up to 2.0 SED per day). Farmers, girls and boys had a higher chronic UVR exposure than the spouses, who had more intermittent high UVR exposure. Vitamin D levels did not differ between family members. At the end of summer 16% of the participants were vitamin D insufficient, the...

  8. Molecular cloning of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli that controls ultraviolet sensitivity and spontaneous mutation frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, K.; Horiuchi, T.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uvrD gene of Escherichia coli that controls UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutation frequency has been cloned with phage lambda as vector. The increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV) of uvrD3, uvrE502, recL152, and pdeB41 mutants, high mutability of uvrD3 and pdeB41 mutants, and conditional lethality of strain TS41 that carried pdeB41, polA1, and sup126 mutations were all suppressed by lysogenization of the mutant cells with lambdavrD/sup +/. These results were consistent with the idea that the uvrD, uvrE, recL, and pdeB mutations are alleles of the uvrD gene. In addition to the uvrD gene, lambdavrD/sup +/ carried the corA gene that controls transport of Mg/sup + +/, Mn/sup + +/, and Co/sup + +/ through the cell membrane. Hybrid plasmids carrying both uvrD and corA genes were also constructed by using pKY2289 as a cloning vehicle. Orientational isomers that carried the same 12.0 kb fragment in the opposite direction were equally efficient in complementing the UvrD/sup -/ as well as CorA/sup -/ defects of the transformed host cells, suggesting that the DNA insert contains all the genetic signals needed to express the two gene products. Insertion of the ..gamma..delta sequence into recombinant plasmids was performed to generate appropriate restriction endonuclease target sites in the cloned DNA fragments.

  9. Molecular cloning of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli that controls ultraviolet sensitivity and spontaneous mutation frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uvrD gene of Escherichia coli that controls UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutation frequency has been cloned with phage lambda as vector. The increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV) of uvrD3, uvrE502, recL152, and pdeB41 mutants, high mutability of uvrD3 and pdeB41 mutants, and conditional lethality of strain TS41 that carried pdeB41, polA1, and sup126 mutations were all suppressed by lysogenization of the mutant cells with lambdavrD+. These results were consistent with the idea that the uvrD, uvrE, recL, and pdeB mutations are alleles of the uvrD gene. In addition to the uvrD gene, lambdavrD+ carried the corA gene that controls transport of Mg++, Mn++, and Co++ through the cell membrane. Hybrid plasmids carrying both uvrD and corA genes were also constructed by using pKY2289 as a cloning vehicle. Orientational isomers that carried the same 12.0 kb fragment in the opposite direction were equally efficient in complementing the UvrD- as well as CorA- defects of the transformed host cells, suggesting that the DNA insert contains all the genetic signals needed to express the two gene products. Insertion of the γdelta sequence into recombinant plasmids was performed to generate appropriate restriction endonuclease target sites in the cloned DNA fragments. (orig.)

  10. Low concentration of arsenite exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies have associated arsenic exposure with many types of human cancers. Arsenic has also been shown to act as a co-carcinogen even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is unknown. Recent studies indicate that arsenic can interfere with DNA-repair processes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 is a zinc-finger DNA-repair protein, which can promptly sense DNA strand breaks and initiate DNA-repair pathways. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low concentrations of arsenic could inhibit PAPR-1 activity and so exacerbate levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA strand breaks. HaCat cells were treated with arsenite and/or UVR, and then DNA strand breaks were assessed by comet assay. Low concentrations of arsenite (≤ 2 μM) alone did not induce significant DNA strand breaks, but greatly enhanced the DNA strand breaks induced by UVR. Further studies showed that 2 μM arsenite effectively inhibited PARP-1 activity. Zinc supplementation of arsenite-treated cells restored PARP-1 activity and significantly diminished the exacerbating effect of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA strand breaks. Importantly, neither arsenite treatment, nor zinc supplementation changed UVR-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suggesting that their effects upon UVR-induced DNA strand breaks are not through a direct free radical mechanism. Combination treatments of arsenite with PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide or PARP-1 siRNA demonstrate that PARP-1 is the target of arsenite. Together, these findings show that arsenite at low concentration exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, which may represent an important mechanism underlying the co-carcinogenicity of arsenic

  11. Quality of UVR exposure for different biological systems along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Maria; Diaz, Susana B; Fuenzalida, Humberto A; Camilion, Carolina; Booth, Charles R; Cabrera, Sergio; Casiccia, Claudio; Deferrari, Guillermo; Lovengreen, Charlotte; Paladini, Alejandro; Pedroni, Jorge; Rosales, Alejandro; Zagarese, Horacio E

    2009-09-01

    The exposure of organisms to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is characterized by the climatology (annual cycle) and the variance (anomalies) of biologically-weighted irradiances at eight geographical locations in austral South America, from 1995-2002. The net effect of UVR on biological systems is a result of the balance of damage and repair which depends on intensity and duration of irradiance and is modulated by its variability. The emphasis in this study is on day-to-day variability, a time scale of importance to adaptive strategies that counteract UVR damage. The irradiances were weighted with DNA- and phytoplankton photosynthesis-action spectra. Low latitude sites show high average UVR. For all sites, the frequency of days with above average irradiances is higher than below average irradiances. Persistence in anomalies is generally low (coefficient), but higher for DNA- than phytoplankton photosynthesis-weighted irradiances due to their higher correspondence to stratospheric ozone. Cloudiness and other factors with small wavelength dependence (e.g. aerosols and albedo) are highly correlated with UVR anomalies at low latitudes (24-33 degrees S); ozone correlates higher at high latitudes (42-54.5 degrees S). Our results show that organisms in this region deal with several days of excess radiation and fewer, shorter and more intense periods of lower than average radiation. Relief from UVR stress (or higher frequency of days below the climatology) is more prevalent at high latitudes (54.5 degrees S). Thus, lower latitudes are more stressful to organisms not only because of higher average UVR irradiance but also for the higher frequency of days above the climatology. PMID:19707621

  12. 5'-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-11-17

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3'-5' superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3'-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5'-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5'-ss-duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3'-ss-duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5'-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  13. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  14. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides

  15. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  16. Analysis of DNA repair helicase UvrD from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-10-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) proteins play important roles in maintaining genome stability in all the organisms. Studies of MMR genes in plants have identified several homologs of the Escherichia coli genes. Crop yield is directly related to genome stability, which is crucially required for optimal plant growth and development. Numerous genotoxic stresses such as UV light, radiations, pollutants and heavy metals cause DNA damage leading to genome instability, which can interfere with the plant growth and crop productivity. But the efficient repair mechanisms can help to overcome the deleterious effects of the damage. Therefore it is important to study the genes involved in various repair pathways in the plants in greater detail. UvrD helicase is a component of MMR complex and plays an essential role in the DNA repair by providing the unwinding function. In the present manuscript we present an in silico analysis of UvrD helicase from two plant species (Arabidopsis and rice). The Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa UvrD are 1149 (~129 kDa) and 1165 amino-acids (~130 kDa) proteins, respectively. These proteins contain all the conserved domains and are larger than the E. coli UvrD because they contain a longer N-terminal extension. In order to decipher the role of plant UvrD in various stresses it will be important to study the biochemical and functional properties of this enzyme. PMID:23974358

  17. Damage recognition by UvrABC: A study of vectorial movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) in all organisms, as a major DNA repair mechanism, is able to accommodate to virtually any kind of DNA damage, unlike many repair systems whose specificity is limited to a single species of damage. As a consequence, NER has the advantage of being effective in responding to new types of environmental agents able to damage DNA, thereby eliminating the need for organisms to evolve new enzymes each time novel genotoxicants are introduced into the environment. The NER system under extensive study is the Escherichia coli uvr system, which consists of at least six structural genes (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, uvrD, polA, and lig) and two regulatory genes (recA and lexA). The genes that control damage-specific incision have been cloned, mapped, sequenced, and their gene products amplified and purified to homogeneity. The availability of reagent quantities of these proteins has been instrumental in the biochemical reconstitution of the partial and overall NER enzymatic reactions.

  18. The UvrD303 hyper-helicase exhibits increased processivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners, Matthew J; Tahmaseb, Kambiz; Matson, Steven W

    2014-06-13

    DNA helicases use energy derived from nucleoside 5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to catalyze the separation of double-stranded DNA into single-stranded intermediates for replication, recombination, and repair. Escherichia coli helicase II (UvrD) functions in methyl-directed mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. A previously discovered 2-amino acid substitution of residues 403 and 404 (both Asp → Ala) in the 2B subdomain of UvrD (uvrD303) confers an antimutator and UV-sensitive phenotype on cells expressing this allele. The purified protein exhibits a "hyper-helicase" unwinding activity in vitro. Using rapid quench, pre-steady state kinetic experiments we show the increased helicase activity of UvrD303 is due to an increase in the processivity of the unwinding reaction. We suggest that this mutation in the 2B subdomain results in a weakened interaction with the 1B subdomain, allowing the helicase to adopt a more open conformation. This is consistent with the idea that the 2B subdomain may have an autoregulatory role. The UvrD303 mutation may enable the helicase to unwind DNA via a "strand displacement" mechanism, which is similar to the mechanism used to processively translocate along single-stranded DNA, and the increased unwinding processivity may contribute directly to the antimutator phenotype. PMID:24798324

  19. UvrD facilitates DNA repair by pulling RNA polymerase backwards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, Vitaly; Kamarthapu, Venu; McGary, Katelyn; Svetlov, Vladimir; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-01-16

    UvrD helicase is required for nucleotide excision repair, although its role in this process is not well defined. Here we show that Escherichia coli UvrD binds RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and, using its helicase/translocase activity, forces RNA polymerase to slide backward along DNA. By inducing backtracking, UvrD exposes DNA lesions shielded by blocked RNA polymerase, allowing nucleotide excision repair enzymes to gain access to sites of damage. Our results establish UvrD as a bona fide transcription elongation factor that contributes to genomic integrity by resolving conflicts between transcription and DNA repair complexes. Furthermore, we show that the elongation factor NusA cooperates with UvrD in coupling transcription to DNA repair by promoting backtracking and recruiting nucleotide excision repair enzymes to exposed lesions. Because backtracking is a shared feature of all cellular RNA polymerases, we propose that this mechanism enables RNA polymerases to function as global DNA damage scanners in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:24402227

  20. Black tattoos protect against UVR-induced skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina M; Sepehri, Mitra; Serup, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black tattoos may involve risk of cancer owing to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in inks. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces skin cancer. The combination of UVR and black tattoo may therefore potentially be very problematic, but has not been previously...... studied. METHODS: Immunocompetent C3.Cg/TifBomTac mice (n = 99) were tattooed on the back with Starbrite Tribal Black(™) . This ink has a high content of the carcinogen BaP. Half of the mice were irradiated with three standard erythema doses UVR thrice weekly. Time to induction of first, second and third...... squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was measured. Controls were 'tattooed' without ink. RESULTS: All irradiated mice developed SCCs while no malignant tumours were found in the nonirradiated group. In the tattooed and irradiated group, the development of the first, second and third SCC was significantly delayed...

  1. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossanna, N.; Mount, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that the mutant proteins were functioning in some capacity. The viability of one of the mutants in combination with rep-5 suggests that the protein is functional in DNA replication. We suggest that these mutant proteins are deficient in DNA repair activities (since UV sensitivity is complemented) but are able to participate in DNA replication. We believe that defective DNA replication in these mutants increases SOS expression.

  2. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that the mutant proteins were functioning in some capacity. The viability of one of the mutants in combination with rep-5 suggests that the protein is functional in DNA replication. We suggest that these mutant proteins are deficient in DNA repair activities (since UV sensitivity is complemented) but are able to participate in DNA replication. We believe that defective DNA replication in these mutants increases SOS expression

  3. Personal solar UVR exposure studies using a new miniature electronic dosimeter/datalogger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) has been involved in a number of different collaborative studies around Australia using polysulphone (PS) film dosimeters in the measurement of personal exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) (Herlihy E et al, Photochem Photobiol 60:288-294, 1994; Gies HP et al, Photochem Photobiol 62:1015-1021, 1995). These PS dosimeters have proven useful in measuring cumulative exposures during different outdoor occupational and recreational activities. Recent advances in both UV photodiodes and miniature dataloggers have allowed the development of UV dosimeters which can log the incident UVR exposure with time (Diffey BL and Saunders PJ, Photochem Photobiol 61:615-618, 1995). This provides information on the variation of UVR exposure with time of day and also on the effect of variations in local environment, activity and possibly behaviour on exposure. A pilot study to examine the performance of the UV dosimeter/ datalogger and to refine a suitable questionnaire for a much larger follow up study was undertaken in 1995. Two of the new dosimeter/dataloggers were available and a third, less portable unit was used to monitor ambient solar UVR. The site chosen was a recreation park within 5 km of ARL where calibrated ambient UVR monitoring occurs. The UVR exposures of people undertaking outdoor activities were measured. The subjects wore the UV detector attached to clothing on their back, so that it was out of sight and therefore less likely to cause them to consciously modify their behaviour during their activity. On completion the subjects were asked a number of standard questions about their activities while wearing the UV dosimeters. Of particular interest was whether the data collected could be used to determine whether subjects have modified their behaviour when in the sun as a result of educational campaigns on sun exposure run by the Cancer Councils. Comparison of the subjects UV data record with the simultaneous

  4. Genetically engineered synthetic miniaturized versions of Plasmodium falciparum UvrD helicase are catalytically active.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abulaish Ansari

    Full Text Available Helicases catalyze unwinding of double stranded nucleic acids in an energy-dependent manner. We have reported characterization of UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. We reported that the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of PfUvrD contain characteristic ATPase and DNA helicase activities. Here we report the generation and characterization of a genetically engineered version of PfUvrD and its derivatives. This synthetic UvrD (sUD contains all the conserved domains of PfUvrD but only the intervening linker sequences are shortened. sUD (∼ 45 kDa and one of its smallest derivative sUDN1N2 (∼ 22 kDa contain ATPase and DNA helicase activities. sUD and sUDN1N2 can utilize hydrolysis of all the NTPs and dNTPs, can also unwind blunt end duplex DNA substrate and unwind DNA duplex in 3 to 5 direction only. Some of the properties of sUD are similar to the PfUvrD helicase. Mutagenesis in the conserved motif Ia indicate that the mutants sUDM and sUDN1N2M lose all the enzyme activities, which further confirms that these activities are intrinsic to the synthesized proteins. These studies show that for helicase activity only the conserved domains are essentially required and intervening sequences have almost no role. These observations will aid in understanding the unwinding mechanism by a helicase.

  5. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA Signal Transduction Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfalem R Zere

    Full Text Available The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  6. Des ingénieries didactiques de l’œuvre

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Henri-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Cette étude vise à apporter une contribution à la « théorie de l’action conjointe en didactique (TACD)  », en travaillant la question de l’enseignement des œuvres. L’article fait fond sur une réflexion anthropologique et philosophique : si les hommes édifient des œuvres, des institutions, des civilisations (Meyerson, 1973), les professeurs ont à se porter responsables d’un monde (Arendt, 1972), et c’est bien ce qui est en jeu dans toute transaction didactique digne de ce nom. Comment construi...

  7. Localization of UvrA and Effect of DNA Damage on the Chromosome of Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Bradley T.; Grossman, Alan D.; Walker, Graham C.

    2002-01-01

    We found that the nucleotide excision repair protein UvrA, which is involved in DNA damage recognition, localizes to the entire chromosome both before and after damage in living Bacillus subtilis cells. We suggest that the UvrA2B damage recognition complex is constantly scanning the genome, searching for lesions in the DNA. We also found that DNA damage induces a dramatic reconfiguration of the chromosome such that it no longer fills the entire cell as it does during normal growth. This recon...

  8. Escherichia coli helicase II (UvrD) protein initiates DNA unwinding at nicks and blunt ends.

    OpenAIRE

    Runyon, G T; Bear, D G; Lohman, T M

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli uvrD gene product, helicase II, is required for both methyl-directed mismatch and uvrABC excision repair and is believed to function by unwinding duplex DNA. Initiation of unwinding may occur specifically at either a mismatch or a nick, although no direct evidence for this has previously been reported. It has recently been shown that helicase II can unwind fully duplex linear and nicked circular DNA with lengths of at least approximately 2700 base pairs in vitro; hence, a...

  9. Specificity in suppression of SOS expression by recA4162 and uvrD303

    OpenAIRE

    Massoni, Shawn C.; Sandler, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and repair of DNA damage is essential in all organisms and depends on the ability of proteins recognizing and processing specific DNA substrates. In E. coli, the RecA protein forms a filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) produced by DNA damage and induces the SOS response. Previous work has shown that one type of recA mutation (e.g., recA4162 (I298V)) and one type of uvrD mutation (e.g., uvrD303 (D403A, D404A)) can differentially decrease SOS expression depending on the type of in...

  10. Characterization of the Mycobacterial NER System Reveals Novel Functions of the uvrD1 Helicase

    OpenAIRE

    Guthlein, C.; Wanner, R M; Sander, P; Davis, E O; Bosshard, M.; Jiricny, J; Bottger, E. C.; Springer, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in mycobacterial DNA repair. Mycobacterium smegmatis lacking the NER excinuclease component uvrB or the helicase uvrD1 gene and a double knockout lacking both genes were constructed, and their sensitivities to a series of DNA-damaging agents were analyzed. As anticipated, the mycobacterial NER system was shown to be involved in the processing of bulky DNA adducts and interstrand cross-links. In addition, i...

  11. Characterisation of the mycobacterial NER system reveals novel functions of uvrD1 helicase

    OpenAIRE

    Güthlein, C; Wanner, R M; Sander, P; Davis, E O; Bosshard, M.; Jiricny, J; Böttger, E C; Springer, B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in mycobacterial DNA repair. Mycobacterium smegmatis lacking the NER excinuclease component uvrB, the helicase uvrD1 and a double knock-out lacking both proteins were constructed and their sensitivity to a series of DNA damaging agents wa analysed. As anticipated, the mycobacterial NER system was shown to be involved in the processing of bulky DNA adducts and inter-strand cross-links. In addition, it coul...

  12. Repair of nonreplicating UV-irradiated DNA: cooperative dark repair by Escherichia coli uvr and phr functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system previously used to study recombination of nonreplicating UV-irradiated phage lambda DNA was adapted to study UV repair. Irradiated phages infected undamaged homoimmune lysogens. Pyrimidine dimer content (by treatment with Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease and alkaline sucrose sedimentation) and a biological activity endpoint (infectivity in transfection of uvrB recA recB spheroplasts) were followed. Unless room light was excluded during DNA extraction procedures, photoreactivation (Phr function) was significant. In uvr Δphr bacteria, repair, by both assays, was very low but not zero. Even when light was totally excluded, Phr function appeared to play a role in Uvr-mediated excision repair: both dimer removal and restoration of infectivity were two to five times as efficient in uvr+ phr+ bacteria as in uvr+ Δphr bacteria. Similarly, UV-irradiated phages plated with higher efficiencies on phr+ than Δphr bacteria even under totally dark conditions. In uvr phr+ repressed infections, removal of dimers from nonreplicating DNA did not increase infectivity as much as in uvr2= infections, suggesting a requirement for repair of nondimer photoproducts by the uvrABC system

  13. Heterogeneity in multistage carcinogenesis and mixture modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler Stephan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carcinogenesis is commonly described as a multistage process, in which stem cells are transformed into cancer cells via a series of mutations. In this article, we consider extensions of the multistage carcinogenesis model by mixture modeling. This approach allows us to describe population heterogeneity in a biologically meaningful way. We focus on finite mixture models, for which we prove identifiability. These models are applied to human lung cancer data from several birth cohorts. Maximum likelihood estimation does not perform well in this application due to the heavy censoring in our data. We thus use analytic graduation instead. Very good fits are achieved for models that combine a small high risk group with a large group that is quasi immune.

  14. Indirect stimulation of recombination in Escherichia coli K-12: dependence on recJ, uvrA, and uvrD.

    OpenAIRE

    Schellhorn, H E; Low, K B

    1991-01-01

    Direct and indirect UV-stimulated homologous genetic recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli strains blocked in several host-encoded functions. Genetic recombination was assayed by measuring beta-galactosidase produced after recombination between two noncomplementing lacZ ochre alleles. Both types of stimulation (direct and indirect) were found to be primarily RecF pathway-mediated. In a rec+ background, both direct and indirect stimulation were found to be dependent on uvrD (codin...

  15. Lymphotoxin prevention of diethylnitrosamine carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of intervention measures to control cancer would be facilitated by being able to monitor in vivo carcinogenesis by in vitro quantitation of early indices of neoplastic transformation to assess the in vivo effectiveness of preventive-therapeutic measures. Pregnant Syrian golden hamsters were used in an in vivo-in vitro transplacental model of carcinogenesis to determine the extent that in vivo administration of immunologic hormone preparations along with chemical carcinogen would prevent morphologic transformation assessed in vitro. Pregnant hamsters at 10-11 days of gestation were given injections ip of 3 mg diethylnitrosamine (DENA)/100 g body weight and were killed 2 days later when fetal cells were seeded for colony formation. The frequency of morphologically transformed colonies was assessed after 7 days of growth. Cloning efficiency and mean transformation frequency after DENA exposure were 3.6% and 1 X 10(-4) per cell seeded, respectively. The ip injection of an immunologic hormone preparation reduced the transformation frequency by 46%. The hormone preparation, containing 10,000 U of lymphotoxin but no detectable interferon, was the ultrafiltered lymphokines (greater than 10,000 mol wt) from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated hamster peritoneal leukocytes. The effect of lymphotoxin on cocarcinogenic exposure of fetal cells to DENA in vivo followed by X-irradiation in vitro was also determined. Cells exposed to 250 rad in vitro had a cloning efficiency of 0.5% and a transformation frequency of 0.4 X 10(-4) per cell seeded. After DENA injection and X-irradiation, the transformation frequency increased to 1 X 10(-4) and was inhibited 64% by lymphotoxin in vivo. Thus immunologic hormones (e.g., lymphotoxin) can prevent carcinogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro quantitation of transformation is a rapid means for evaluating therapeutic and autochthonous effector mechanisms for their ability to prevent or otherwise modulate carcinogenesis in vivo

  16. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  17. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev, R.; Kanaram Choudhary; Swagatika Panda; Neha Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Oral cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Indian men and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. It is considered as a multistep and multifactorial disease. Besides accumulation of genetic mutations, numerous other carcinogens are involved. In this category, viral and chemical carcinogens are well studied and documented. However, in the oral cavity, the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites, ...

  18. Genetic alterations in carcinogenesis and chemoprevention.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosin, M P

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory and clinical studies suggest that genetic change is intrinsically involved in the development of cancer and that this change occurs in humans throughout carcinogenesis, in both early and late stages. Therefore, the quantification of the level of genetic change in human epithelial tissues may serve as a marker for cancer risk. The micronucleus test has been used to quantify the level of site-specific chromosomal breakage occurring in epithelial tissues of individuals at elevated ris...

  19. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Putz Mihai V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development) regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters...

  20. Inhibition of carcinogenesis by retinoids. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in recent years in the search for retinoids with anticarcinogenic activity is reviewed. There are many studies to be found in the literature which show no substantial effect of retinoids on carcinogenesis or tumor growth. Some of these negative findings may be related to the carcinogen dose used, the type of retinoid used, the dose, dose schedule or mode of administration of the retinoid. Others may indicate that the particular type of tumor or tumor system is, indeed, refractory to retinoids in general or to those retinoids that were tested. A great gap still exists in our knowledge concerning the pharmake-kinetics of most retinoids their availability to various normal and cancerous tissues, and the role and existence of transport and binding proteins. There are studies which indicate that under certain conditions, particularly conditions of topical application, some retinoids may even enhance carcinogenesis. It seems, however, indisputable by now that some retinoids are effective inhibitors of carcinogenesis in some organ systems and can even inhibit the growth of some established tumors. While the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are presently not understood, it does seem clear that they are not mediated via the cytotoxic mechanisms typical of chemotherapeutic agents. The hope that retinoids might become an effective tool to halt the progression of some neoplastic diseases, seems to be justified.

  1. Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar M. Przybyszewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90�0of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  2. Combined effects of Cu and UVR on survival and melanin synthesis in Chironomus riparius larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. de Baat; M. van Gemert; R.A. Verweij; R.A. Loayza Muro; M.H.S. Kraak

    2012-01-01

    The tropical Andes encompass vast areas with altitudes above 4000 m, where the combination of high UV radiation and metal pollution creates environments that challenge the survival and persistence of aquatic life. Since the pigment melanin counteracts the negative effects of UVR, and has the additio

  3. In silico analysis of Plasmodium species specific UvrD helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Renu

    2013-03-01

    Malaria is still a devastating disease caused by the mosquito-transmitted parasite Plasmodium, particularly Plasmodium falciparum. During the last few years the situation has worsened in many ways, mainly due to malarial parasites becoming increasingly resistant to several anti-malarial drugs. Thus there is an urgent need to find alternate ways to control malaria and therefore it is necessary to identify new drug targets and new classes of anti-malarial drugs. A malaria vaccine would be the ultimate weapon to fight this deadly disease but unfortunately despite encouraging advances a vaccine is not likely soon. DNA helicases from the PcrA/UvrD/Rep (PUR) subfamily are important for the survival of the various organisms, mainly pathogenic bacteria. Members from this subfamily can be targeted and inhibited by a variety of synthetic compounds. Using bioinformatics analysis we have shown that UvrD from this subfamily is the only member present in the P. falciparum genome, while PcrA and Rep are absent in the genome. UvrD from the parasite shows no homology to any protein or enzyme from human and thus can be considered as a strong potential drug target. In the present study we report an in silico analysis of this important enzyme from a variety of Plasmodium species. The results suggest that among all the species of Plasmodium, P. falciparum contains the largest UvrD and this enzyme is variable at the sequence and structural level. PMID:23750298

  4. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helicase implicated in DNA repair. In this study, we also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares similarities with that of Vibrio phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also depend on UvrD for replication. A structural comparative analysis of the initiator proteins of most known filamentous phages described thus far suggested that UvrD, known as a nonreplicative helicase, is involved in rolling circle replication of filamentous phages in diverse bacteria genera. This report consolidates knowledge on the new role of UvrD in filamentous phage replication, a function previously thought to be exclusive of Rep helicase. IMPORTANCE Biofilm development is a key component of the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to evade host immune defenses and resist multiple drugs. Induction of the filamentous phage Pf, which usually is lysogenized in clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa, plays an important role in biofilm assembly, maturation, and dispersal. Despite the clinical relevance of Pf, the molecular biology of this phage is largely unknown. In this study, we found that rolling circle replication of Pf depends on UvrD, a DNA helicase normally involved in DNA repair. We also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares structural similarity with that of Vibrio cholerae phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also use UvrD for replication. Our results reveal that, in addition to DNA repair, UvrD plays an essential role in rolling circle replication of filamentous

  5. Specificity in suppression of SOS expression by recA4162 and uvrD303.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Shawn C; Sandler, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    Detection and repair of DNA damage is essential in all organisms and depends on the ability of proteins recognizing and processing specific DNA substrates. In E. coli, the RecA protein forms a filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) produced by DNA damage and induces the SOS response. Previous work has shown that one type of recA mutation (e.g., recA4162 (I298V)) and one type of uvrD mutation (e.g., uvrD303 (D403A, D404A)) can differentially decrease SOS expression depending on the type of inducing treatments (UV damage versus RecA mutants that constitutively express SOS). Here it is tested using other SOS inducing conditions if there is a general feature of ssDNA generated during these treatments that allows recA4162 and uvrD303 to decrease SOS expression. The SOS inducing conditions tested include growing cells containing temperature-sensitive DNA replication mutations (dnaE486, dnaG2903, dnaN159, dnaZ2016 (at 37°C)), a del(polA)501 mutation and induction of Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs). uvrD303 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions, while recA4162 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions except in the polA strain or when DSBs occur. It is hypothesized that recA4162 suppresses SOS expression best when the ssDNA occurs at a gap and that uvrD303 is able to decrease SOS expression when the ssDNA is either at a gap or when it is generated at a DSB (but does so better at a gap). PMID:24084169

  6. Important Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD1 in Pathogenesis and Persistence apart from Its Function in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Joanna; Townsend, Carolin; Williams, Alan R.; Rodgers, Angela; Rand, Lucinda; Walker, K. Barry; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives and replicates in macrophages, where it is exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that damage DNA. In this study, we investigated the roles of UvrA and UvrD1, thought to be parts of the nucleotide excision repair pathway of M. tuberculosis. Strains in which uvrD1 was inactivated either alone or in conjunction with uvrA were constructed. Inactivation of uvrD1 resulted in a small colony phenotype, although growth in liquid culture was not significant...

  7. Long repair replication patches are produced by the short-patch pathway in a uvrD252 (recL152) mutant of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, R H; Fried, B

    1984-01-01

    The uvrD252 mutation leads to increased UV sensitivity, diminished dimer excision and host cell reactivation capacity, and an increase in the average patch size after repair replication. A recA56 uvrD252 double mutant was far more resistant to UV than was a recA56 uvrB5 double mutant. Its host cell reactivation capacity was identical to that of uvrD252 single mutant and was far greater than that of the uvrB5 single mutant. The strain showed no Weigle reactivation. From these results, we concl...

  8. Xeroderma pigmentosum, DNA repair and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are reviewed: Symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum; xeroderma pigmentosum as a defect in the biochemistry of repair of radiation damage; major classes of DNA damage and repair mechanisms; excision repair in relation to biochemical steps and the XP defect; sensitivity of xeroderma pigmentosum cells; host-cell reactivation of UV-damaged viruses; excision of pyrimidine dimers from human cells; formation and sealing of single strand breaks during dimer excision; insertion of new bases to repair DNA; and DNA repair, carcinogens, and carcinogenesis

  9. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  10. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis prevention by flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Belitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of anticancerogenic effects of flavanoids and isocyanates from the plants widely consumed in the midland belt of Russia were reviewed. Data of studies both in vitro and in vivo were analyzed. Special attention was paid to inhibition of targets responsible for carcinogen metabolic activation, carcinogenesis promotion and tumor progression as well as neoangiogenesis. Besides that the antioxidant properties of flavonoids and their effects on cell cycle regulation, apoptosis initiation and cell mobility were considered.

  11. Deletion mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli UvrA protein localizes domains for DNA binding, damage recognition, and protein-protein interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UvrA protein is the DNA binding and damage recognition subunit of the damage-specific UvrABC endonuclease. In addition, it is an ATPase/GTPase, and the binding energy of ATP is linked to dimerization of the UvrA protein. Furthermore, the UvrA protein interacts with the UvrB protein to modulate its activities, both in solution and in association with DNA, where the UvrAB complex possesses a helicase activity. The domains of the UvrA protein that sponsor each of these activities were localized within the protein by studying the in vitro properties of a set of purified deletion mutants of the UvrA protein. A region located within the first 230 amino acids was found to contain the minimal region necessary for interactions with UvrB, the UvrA dimerization interface was localized to within the first 680 amino acids, and the DNA binding domain lies within the first 900 amino acids of the 940-amino acid UvrA protein. Two damage recognition domains were detected. The first domain, which coincides with the DNA binding region, is required to detect the damage. The second domain, located on or near the C-terminal 40 amino acids, stabilizes the protein-DNA complex when damage is encountered

  12. The Salmonella typhimurium LT2 uvrD gene is regulated by the lexA gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, P P; Walker, G C

    1983-01-01

    The uvrD gene product apparently plays a role in the repair of UV damage, in mismatch repair, and in genetic recombination. A lower level of expression of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 uvrD gene was observed in maxicells prepared from an Escherichia coli strain that contained a lexA+ plasmid than in maxicells prepared from an E. coli strain that lacked functional LexA protein. These results suggest that the uvrD+ gene is repressed by the LexA protein and is thus a member of the set of genes ...

  13. Construction and analysis of deletions in the structural gene (uvrD) for DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Washburn, B K; Kushner, S R

    1991-01-01

    DNA helicase II, the product of the uvrD gene, has been implicated in DNA repair, replication, and recombination. Because the phenotypes of individual uvrD alleles vary significantly, we constructed deletion-insertion mutations in the uvrD gene to determine the phenotype of cells lacking DNA helicase II. Deletion mutants completely lacking the protein, as well as one which contains a truncated protein retaining the ATP-binding site, remained viable. However, they were sensitive to UV light an...

  14. lon Incompatibility Associated with Mutations Causing SOS Induction: Null uvrD Alleles Induce an SOS Response in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    SaiSree, L.; Reddy, Manjula; Gowrishankar, J

    2000-01-01

    The uvrD gene in Escherichia coli encodes a 720-amino-acid 3′-5′ DNA helicase which, although nonessential for viability, is required for methyl-directed mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair and furthermore is believed to participate in recombination and DNA replication. We have shown in this study that null mutations in uvrD are incompatible with lon, the incompatibility being a consequence of the chronic induction of SOS in uvrD strains and the resultant accumulation of the cell s...

  15. Single stranded DNA translocation of E. coli UvrD monomer is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is an SF1A helicase/translocase that functions in several DNA repair pathways. A UvrD monomer is a rapid and processive single-stranded (ss) DNA translocase, but is unable to unwind DNA processively in vitro. Based on data at saturating ATP (500 μM) we proposed a non-uniform stepping mechanism in which a UvrD monomer translocates with biased (3′ to 5′) directionality while hydrolyzing 1 ATP per DNA base translocated, but with a kinetic step-size of 4–5 nucleotides/step, suggestin...

  16. Radiation carcinogenesis: Epidemiology and biological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies of populations exposed to radiation have led to the identification of a preventable cause of cancer, but in the long run perhaps the most important contribution of radiation studies will be to provide insights into the basic processes of human carcinogenesis. In this volume, key investigators of major epidemiologic projects summarize their observations to date, including information to help assess the effects of low-level exposures. Experimentalists and theorists emphasize the relevance of laboratory and epidemiologic data in elucidating carcinogenic risks and mechanisms in man. This volume was prepared with several objectives in mind: (a) organize and synthesize knowledge on radiation carcinogenesis through epidemiologic and experimental approaches; (b) illustrate and explore ways of utilizing this information to gain insights into the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development; (c) stimulate the formation of hypotheses suited to experimental or epidemiologic testing, theoretical modeling, and multidisciplinary approaches; and (d) identify recent advances that clarify dose-response relationships and the influence of low-dose exposures, provide leads to carcinogenic mechanisms and host-environmental interactions, and suggest strategies for future research and preventive action

  17. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats

  18. Aberrant DNA methylation in cervical carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Juan Yang

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus(HPV) is known to cause cervical cancer; however,additional genetic and epigenetic alterations are required for progression from precancerous disease to invasive cancer.DNA methylation is an early and frequent molecular alteration in cervical carcinogenesis.In this review,we summarize DNA methylation within the HPV genome and human genome and identify its clinical implications.Methylation of the HPV long control region (LCR) and L1 gene is common during cervical carcinogenesis and increases with the severity of the cervical neoplasm.The L1 gene of HPV16 and HPV18 is consistently hypermethylated in invasive cervical cancers and can potentially be used as a clinical marker of cancer progression.Moreover,promoters of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) involved in many cellular pathways are methylated in cervical precursors and invasive cancers.Some are associated with squamous cell carcinomas,and others are associated with adenocarcinomas.Identification of methylated TSGs in Pap smear could be an adjuvant test in cervical cancer screening for triage of women with high-risk HPV,atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance,or low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL).However,consistent panels must be validated for this approach to be translated to the clinic.Furthermore,reversion of methylated TSGs using demethylating drugs may be an alternative anticancer treatment,but demethylating drugs without toxic carcinogenic and mutagenic properties must be identified and validated.

  19. Transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper thoroughly reviews studies on transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis induced by radiation and summarizes currently available data from animal studies. The discussions focus on the incidence of tumors, malformations, and mutations in the offspring after parental exposure to radiation, as well as estimated relative risks of congenital malformations and stillbirths in the offspring after parental X-ray exposure. The data suggest that different types of tumors are induced in offspring, because of strain differences in the experimental animals. The results of epidemiological studies in human populations, such as the children of atomic bomb survivors, conflict with the findings in animal studies. The author points to the following reasons for the differences between the results in animals and humans: differences in radiation doses, timing of exposure, and genetic predisposition, etc. While pointing out issues that need to be investigated further, the author indicates that clear strain differences exist in types of tumors induced and in tumor incidences in the offspring of animals that were irradiated before the offspring were conceived, and that genetic predisposition is therefore important in transgenerational carcinogenesis. (K.H.)

  20. Noir, blanc, gris, l’infini, l’œuvre du graveur Richard Brunck de Freundeck

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Ce catalogue qui accompagne l’exposition consacrée à Richard Brunck de Freundeck qui s’est tenue à la Bibliothèque des Dominicains de Colmar entend redonner vie à l’intensité de l’œuvre de l’artiste. Bien documenté et richement illustré, l’ouvrage permet de faire le point sur l’état des connaissances actuelles concernant l’activité de cet artiste dont les créations restent encore trop peu connues du grand public. Une dizaine d’articles cherchent à explorer les différents aspects de l’œuvre de...

  1. Synergism between ultraviolet radiation and reductone in Escherichia coli UVR: quantitative analysis of produced injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between cell viability and DNA-single and double-strand breaks induced by UV-reductone treatment of E.coli AB1157 and AB1886 cells was studied. A molecular and quantitative analysis was done by sedimentation in sucrose gradients. Bacteriophage T4-DNA was submitted to similar conditions. The two bacterial strains showed the same kinetics of single strand-breaks induction by reductone, in agreement with the hypothesis that the repair of these lesion is independent of uvr A uvr B genes product. This paper suggests that the 'UV-sensibilization' to reductone action is linked to a synergistic process between reductone induced single breaks and the enzymatic incisions accumulated by modification in the excision repair, during the treatment. (author)

  2. Andy Warhol : l’œuvre ultime (1972‑1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakuta Alikavazovic

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Andy Warhol : l’oeuvre ultime se présente d’emblée comme un projet d’envergure. Y sont exposées plus de deux cents œuvres ; outre des toiles magistrales, on y découvre de nombreuses photos et planches de contact inédites, documents vidéo, interviews et films. Il s’agit bien d’une exposition majeure, couvrant la production des quinze dernières années de l’artiste, sans négliger ses facettes moins connues, du designer au « social observer » new yorkais. L’œuvre ultime ressemble presque à un pro...

  3. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) (290-400 nm) radiometry of solar simulation for experimental radiation in drug and chemical photosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A. R.; Magnus, I. A.; Gibbs, N. K.

    1982-02-01

    The ultraviolet radiation (UVR) radiometry of solar simulated radiation in a long-term photocarcinogenesis project is described. The methods used were (a) a phototherapy radiometer, (b) an electronic integrating dosimeter, (c) indirect spectroradiometry,and (d) polysulphone and naladixic film badge dosimeters for UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) radiation, respectively. The merits of the various methods are discussed. The importance of reliable and practical UVR radiometry is emphasised.

  4. The Conserved C-Terminus of the PcrA/UvrD Helicase Interacts Directly with RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Gwynn, Emma J.; Smith, Abigail J.; Guy, Colin P.; Savery, Nigel J; Peter McGlynn; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    UvrD-like helicases play diverse roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination pathways. An emerging body of evidence suggests that their different cellular functions are directed by interactions with partner proteins that target unwinding activity to appropriate substrates. Recent studies in E. coli have shown that UvrD can act as an accessory replicative helicase that resolves conflicts between the replisome and transcription complexes, but the mechanism is not understood. Here we show...

  5. Combined effects of Cu and UVR on survival and melanin synthesis in Chironomus riparius larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Baat, de, M.L.; Gemert, van, F.H.M.; Verweij, R.A.; Loayza Muro, R.A.; Kraak, M.H.S.

    2012-01-01

    The tropical Andes encompass vast areas with altitudes above 4000 m, where the combination of high UV radiation and metal pollution creates environments that challenge the survival and persistence of aquatic life. Since the pigment melanin counteracts the negative effects of UVR, and has the additional ability to sequester metal cations, it has been hypothesized that melanin plays an important role in the ability of benthic invertebrates to persist under these harsh conditions. The aim of the...

  6. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helica...

  7. Lessons Learned From UvrD Helicase : Mechanism For Directional Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    How do molecular motors convert chemical energy to mechanical work? Helicases and nucleic acids offer simple motor systems for extensive biochemical and biophysical analyses. Atomic resolution structures of UvrD-like helicases complexed with DNA in the presence of AMPPNP, ADP·Pi, and Pi reveal several salient points that aid understanding mechano-chemical coupling. Each ATPase cycle causes two motor-domains to rotationally close and open. At a minimum, two motor-track contact points of altern...

  8. Direct imaging of single UvrD helicase dynamics on long single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Balci, Hamza; Jia, Haifeng; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of single-protein dynamics on DNA has been largely limited to double-stranded DNA or short single-stranded DNA. We have developed a hybrid approach for observing single proteins moving on laterally stretched kilobase-sized ssDNA. Here we probed the single-stranded DNA translocase activity of Escherichia coli UvrD by single fluorophore tracking, while monitoring DNA unwinding activity with optical tweezers to capture the entire sequence of protein binding, single-stranded ...

  9. Understanding Engineered Nanomaterial Skin Interactions and the Modulatory Effects of UVR Skin Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Jatana, Samreen; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of engineered nanomaterials for the development of technological applications, nanomedicine, and nano-enabled consumer products is an ever expanding discipline as is the concern over the impact of nanotechnology on human environmental health and safety. In this review we discuss the current state of understanding of nanomaterial skin interactions with a specific emphasis on the effects of ultra-violet radiation (UVR) skin exposure. Skin is the largest organ of the body and is typica...

  10. Impact of oral green tea catechins on UVR-induced skin inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Darby, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure of human skin to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) results in oxidative stress and an acute inflammatory response (sunburn), manifest clinically as erythema, histologically by a dermal leukocytic infiltrate and biochemically by upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Green tea catechins (GTC) are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents with potential to offer systemic photoprotection. We hypothesised that oral GTC are bioavailable in human skin and through cyclooxygenase...

  11. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  12. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Kelley N; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-01-01

    UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:23056919

  13. UVR induce optical changes and phosphorous release of lake water and macrophyte leachates in shallow Andean lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz MODENUTTI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We carried out laboratory experiments in order to study the effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR on optical features and phosphorous release of Dissolved Organic Mater (DOM from lake water and macrophyte leachates. Lake water samples were obtained from lakes Escondido and El Trébol, and macrophytes (Potamogeton linguatus and Schoenoplectus californicus from their littoral zones. After UVR exposure, DOM from lake El Trébol seemed to react more quickly than that from Lake Escondido and this seems to be related with the degree of lability or aromaticity in the DOM bulk of each lake. Leachates from both macrophytes showed different absorbance spectra with differences in photochemical transformations after UVR exposure: S. californicus leachates exhibited the highest photodegradation. A significant Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP release was observed in lake water after UVR exposure. Lake El Trébol showed the highest SRP concentrations, suggesting that the release of orthophosphate was favored by low molecular weight DOM. P. linguatus leachates have more dissolved phosphorus content than S. californicus ones and after UVR exposure, P. linguatus leachate did not react to UVR while S. californicus exhibited a decrease in SRP. However both macrophyte leachates showed the higher P release in darkness. The obtained results indicated that macrophyte leachates could contribute significantly to changes in the optical characteristics and in the nutrient content in shallow Andean lakes. An increasing input of P. linguatus leachates would produce DOM of high molecular size and a higher P release than S. californicus.

  14. Low concentration of arsenite exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xu-Jun; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Wenlan; Timmins, Graham S; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated arsenic exposure with many types of human cancers. Arsenic has also been shown to act as a co-carcinogen even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is unknown. Recent studies indicate that arsenic can interfere with DNA-repair processes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 is a zinc-finger DNA-repair protein, which can promptly sense DNA strand breaks and initiate DNA-repair pathways. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low concentrations of arsenic could inhibit PAPR-1 activity and so exacerbate levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA strand breaks. HaCat cells were treated with arsenite and/or UVR, and then DNA strand breaks were assessed by comet assay. Low concentrations of arsenite (mechanism. Combination treatments of arsenite with PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide or PARP-1 siRNA demonstrate that PARP-1 is the target of arsenite. Together, these findings show that arsenite at low concentration exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, which may represent an important mechanism underlying the co-carcinogenicity of arsenic. PMID:18619636

  15. Investigation of absorption spectra of Gafchromic EBT2 film's components and their impact on UVR dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    2016-05-01

    The absorption spectra of the EBT2 film's components were investigated in conjunction with its use for UVA dosimetry. The polyester (topside) and adhesive layers of the EBT2 film have been gently removed. Gafchromic™ EBT2 films with and without the protected layers (polyester and adhesive) were exposed to UVR of 365 nm for different durations. Thereafter, the UV-visible spectra were measured using a UV-visible spectrophotometer (Model Spectro Dual Split Beam, UVS-2700). Films were digitized using a Nikon CanoScan 9000F Mark II flatbed scanner. The dosimetric characteristics including film's uniformity, reproducibility and post-irradiation development were investigated. The color development of EBT2 and new modified EBT2 (EBT2-M) films irradiated with UVA was relatively stable (less than 1%) immediately after exposure. Based on this study, the sensitivity of EBT2 to UVR with wavelength between ~350 nm and ~390 nm can significantly be enhanced if the adhesive layer (~25 μm) is removed. The polyester layer plays almost no part on absorbing UVR with wavelength between ~320 nm and ~390 nm. Furthermore, various sensitivities for the EBT2-M film has been established depending on the wavelength of analysis.

  16. Direct imaging of single UvrD helicase dynamics on long single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Balci, Hamza; Jia, Haifeng; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of single-protein dynamics on DNA has been largely limited to double-stranded DNA or short single-stranded DNA. We have developed a hybrid approach for observing single proteins moving on laterally stretched kilobase-sized ssDNA. Here we probed the single-stranded DNA translocase activity of Escherichia coli UvrD by single fluorophore tracking, while monitoring DNA unwinding activity with optical tweezers to capture the entire sequence of protein binding, single-stranded DNA translocation and multiple pathways of unwinding initiation. The results directly demonstrate that the UvrD monomer is a highly processive single-stranded DNA translocase that is stopped by a double-stranded DNA, whereas two monomers are required to unwind DNA to a detectable degree. The single-stranded DNA translocation rate does not depend on the force applied and displays a remarkable homogeneity, whereas the unwinding rate shows significant heterogeneity. These findings demonstrate that UvrD assembly state regulates its DNA helicase activity with functional implications for its stepping mechanism, and also reveal a previously unappreciated complexity in the active species during unwinding. PMID:23695672

  17. Postreplication repair of deoxyribonucleic acid and daughter strand exchange in Uvr- mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of pyrimidine dimers in deoxyribonuclei acid (DNA) newly synthesized by Bacillus subtilis after ultraviolet irradiation was monitored by use of a damage-specific endonuclease that introduces single-strand breaks adjacent to nearly all of the dimer sites. Two Uvr- strains, one defective in the initiation of dimer excision and the other defective in a function required for efficient dimer excision, were found to be similar to their wild-type parent in the kinetics and extent of converting low-molecular-weight DNA newly synthesized after ultraviolet irradiation to high molecular weight. In the Uvr- strains large molecules of newly synthesized DNA remained susceptible to nicking by the damage-specific endonuclease even after extended incubation in growth medium, whereas the enzyme-sensitive sites were rapidly removed from both preexisting and newly synthesized DNA in Uvr+ cells. Our results support the hypothesis that postreplication repair in bacteria includes recombination between dimer-containing parental DNA strands and newly synthesized strands

  18. Ionizing radiation, human carcinogenesis and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H2O2 and free radicals are correlated with inflammatory diseases, cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Experiments studying their direct or indirect influence in vivo, and/or, in cell cultures were still positive. In the contrary, reactions or products, which decrease level(s) of free radicals/H2O2 (i) directly, (ii) indirectly by an increase of SOD, catalase and peroxydase activities zeroed the above described phenomena. It is the case of the domain number 2 (that contains copper) of the Scorpion's blood pigment (hemocyanin), (i) which possesses SOD-, catalase-and peroxyde-like properties, resistant, at least, at 4000Gy, furthermore explaining the especially high radioresistance of scorpions. (author)

  19. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  20. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  1. Radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rodent models. What's different from chemical carcinogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is one of a few well-characterized etiologic factors of human breast cancer. Laboratory rodents serve as useful experimental models for investigating dose responses and mechanisms of cancer development. Using these models, a lot of information has been accumulated about mammary gland cancer, which can be induced by both chemical carcinogens and radiation. In this review, we first list some experimental rodent models of breast cancer induction. We then focus on several topics that are important in understanding the mechanisms and risk modification of breast cancer development, and compare radiation and chemical carcinogenesis models. We will focus on the pathology and natural history of cancer development in these models, genetic changes observed in induced cancers, indirect effects of carcinogens, and finally risk modification by reproductive factors and age at exposure to the carcinogens. In addition, we summarize the knowledge available on mammary stem/progenitor cells as a potential target of carcinogens. Comparison of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis models on these topics indicates certain similarities, but it also indicates clear differences in several important aspects, such as genetic alterations of induced cancers and modification of susceptibility by age and reproductive factors. Identification of the target cell type and relevant translational research for human risk management may be among the important issues that are addressed by radiation carcinogenesis models. (author)

  2. Mechanism of carcinogenesis in familial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kazuo; Utsunomiya, Joji; Iwama, Takeo; Furuyama, Jun-ichi; Takagawa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naohisa; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Nishigami, Takashi; Kusuhara, Kiyoshi; Sagayama, Ken; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamura, Takehira

    2004-08-01

    It is thought that malignant tumors occur through interactions of multiple environmental factors and a personal genetic factor. A normal somatic cell having an intrinsic function is able to acquire the characteristics of a malignant cell under the influence of many factors. A small percentage of all tumors have obvious familial aggregation. These entities are called familial cancer. The familial cancer syndrome is well defined for colorectal cancer, breast cancer, endocrine neoplasia, and so on. Traits of familial tumors are sequentially inherited by offspring through gametes in a Mendelian fashion, most commonly in an autosomal-dominant manner. Carcinogenesis requires multiple genetic events. A patient with a familial tumor is ahead of an individual without any germline mutation in the carcinogenesis process. In such a situation, patients frequently suffer from multiple malignant tumors at a young age. It is well known that three major genes are closely related to the cell cycle and tumorigenesis. These gene types are protooncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and DNA mismatch repair genes. Proto-oncogenes function to accelerate cells during the G1 or growth phase of the cell cycle. Tumor suppressor genes act as blocks against cell growth and proliferation. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires alterations in both alleles. These phenomena are known as Knudson's two-hits theory. However, DNA mismatch repair genes are known as caretaker genes and correct mismatch pair generation during DNA replication. Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair genes causes hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The tumor phenotype from patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is demonstrated to be microsatellite instability positive. PMID:15375699

  3. 重组E.coli解旋酶Ⅱ(UvrD)的DNA结合及解螺旋功能分析%DNA Binding and Unwinding Functional Analyses of Recombinant E.coli HelicaseⅡ (UvrD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张泓泰; 陈媛媛; 侯剑; 马涛; 毕利军

    2007-01-01

    E.coli解旋酶Ⅱ(UvrD)是一种在甲基定向错配修复(methyl-directed mismatch repair,MMR)和核苷酸切除修复(nucleotide excision repair,NER)中起重要作用的3'→5'解旋酶.本研究对大肠杆菌的UvrD进行了重组表达和纯化,并检测其ATP酶比活性(87 U/mg).利用表面等离子共振(surface plasmon resonance,SPR)方法实时检测了UvrD与同源双链DNA分子(homoduplex DNA)和异源双链DNA分子(heteroduplex DNA)结合的动态过程以及镁离子对此过程的影响.结果显示,UvrD与DNA的平衡解离常数在10-7mol/L水平.DNA分子中错配碱基的存在,在一定程度上影响了二者的结合,而镁离子不是两者结合的必要因素.本研究还利用原子力显微镜(atomic force microscopy,AFM)方法在单分子水平上观察到UvrD将双链DNA解链形成单链DNA的中间体.此研究得到的UvrD与DNA结合的动力学信息数据以及解螺旋中间体的单分子可视化,为进一步深入研究UvrD在修复过程中的作用机制奠定了基础.

  4. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Kelley N.; Courcelle, Charmain T; Justin Courcelle

    2012-01-01

    UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the...

  5. Plasticity of protective mechanisms only partially explains interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Pippa; Cramp, Rebecca L; Seebacher, Frank; Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E

    2015-12-01

    Temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are key environmental drivers that are linked in their effects on cellular damage. Exposure to both high temperatures and UVR can cause cellular damage that result in the up-regulation of common protective mechanisms, such as the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and antioxidants. As such, the interactive effects of these stressors at the cellular level may determine physiological limits, such as thermal tolerance. Furthermore, antioxidant activity is often thermally sensitive, which may lead to temperature dependent effects of UVR exposure. Here we examined the interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits, Hsp70 abundance, oxidative damage and antioxidant (catalase) activity. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to one of three temperature treatments (constant 18°C, constant 28°C and daily fluctuations between 18 and 28°C) in the presence or absence of UVR. Tadpoles were tested for upper thermal limits (CTmax), induction of Hsp70, oxidative damage and catalase activity. Our results show that CTmax was influenced by an interactive effect between temperature and UVR treatment. For tadpoles kept in cold temperatures, exposure to UVR led to cross-tolerance to high temperatures, increasing CTmax. Plasticity in this trait was not fully explained by changes in the lower level mechanistic traits examined. These results highlight the difficulty in predicting the mechanistic basis for the interactive effects of multiple stressors on whole animal traits. Multifactorial studies may therefore be required to understand how complex mechanistic processes shape physiological tolerances, and determine responses to environmental variation. PMID:26408107

  6. Mutational analysis of Mycobacterium UvrD1 identifies functional groups required for ATP hydrolysis, DNA unwinding, and chemomechanical coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Glickman, Michael S; Shuman, Stewart

    2009-05-19

    Mycobacterial UvrD1 is a DNA-dependent ATPase and a Ku-dependent 3' to 5' DNA helicase. The UvrD1 motor domain resembles that of the prototypal superfamily I helicases UvrD and PcrA. Here we performed a mutational analysis of UvrD1 guided by the crystal structure of a DNA-bound Escherichia coli UvrD-ADP-MgF(3) transition state mimetic. Alanine scanning and conservative substitutions identified amino acids essential for both ATP hydrolysis and duplex unwinding, including those implicated in phosphohydrolase chemistry via transition state stabilization (Arg308, Arg648, Gln275), divalent cation coordination (Glu236), or activation of the nucleophilic water (Glu236, Gln275). Other residues important for ATPase/helicase activity include Phe280 and Phe72, which interact with the DNA 3' single strand tail. ATP hydrolysis was uncoupled from duplex unwinding by mutations at Glu609 (in helicase motif V), which contacts the ATP ribose sugar. Introducing alanine in lieu of the adenine-binding "Q motif" glutamine (Gln24) relaxed the substrate specificity in NTP hydrolysis, e.g., eliciting a gain of function as a UTPase/TTPase, although the Q24A mutant still relied on ATP/dATP for duplex unwinding. Our studies highlight the role of the Q motif as a substrate filter and the contributions of adenosine-binding residues as couplers of NTP hydrolysis to motor activity. The Ku-binding function of UvrD1 lies within its C-terminal 270 amino acid segment. Here we found that deleting the 90 amino acid C-terminal domain, which is structurally uncharacterized, diminished DNA unwinding, without affecting ATP hydrolysis or binding to the DNA helicase substrate, apparently by affecting the strength of the UvrD1-Ku interaction. PMID:19317511

  7. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putz Mihai V

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((QSAR studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters to describe genotoxicity by a general mechanism. Residual-QSAR Method The double or looping multiple linear correlation was examined by comparing the direct and residual structural information against the observed activity. A self-consistent equation of observed-computed activity was assumed to give maximum correlation efficiency for those situations in which the direct correlations gave non-significant statistical information. Alternatively, it was also suited to describe slow and apparently non-noticeable cancer phenomenology, with special application to non-congeneric molecules involved in genotoxic carcinogenesis. Application and Discussions The QSAR principles were systematically applied to a given pool of molecules with genotoxic activity in rats to elucidate their carcinogenic mechanisms. Once defined, the endpoint associated with ligand-DNA interaction was used to select variables that retained the main Hansch physicochemical parameters of hydrophobicity, polarizability and stericity, computed by the custom PM3 semiempirical quantum method. The trial and test sets of working molecules were established by implementing the normal Gaussian principle of activities that applies when the applicability domain is not restrained to the congeneric compounds, as in the present study. The application of the residual, self-consistent QSAR method and the factor (or average method yielded results characterized by extremely high and low correlations, respectively

  8. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 (SF1) DNA helicase and single stranded (ss) DNA translocase that functions in DNA repair, plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and translocate along ssDNA with 3′ to 5′ directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Pre...

  9. UvrD Limits the Number and Intensities of RecA-Green Fluorescent Protein Structures in Escherichia coli K-12▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Centore, Richard C.; Sandler, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    RecA is important for recombination, DNA repair, and SOS induction. In Escherichia coli, RecBCD, RecFOR, and RecJQ prepare DNA substrates onto which RecA binds. UvrD is a 3′-to-5′ helicase that participates in methyl-directed mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair. uvrD deletion mutants are sensitive to UV irradiation, hypermutable, and hyper-rec. In vitro, UvrD can dissociate RecA from single-stranded DNA. Other experiments suggest that UvrD removes RecA from DNA where it promotes un...

  10. In vivo cell kinetics in breast carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disruption of the balance between apoptosis and proliferation is considered to be an important factor in the development and progression of tumours. In the present study we determined the in vivo cell kinetics along the spectrum of apparently normal epithelium, hyperplasia, preinvasive lesions and invasive carcinoma, in breast tissues affected by fibrocystic changes in which preinvasive and/or invasive lesions developed, as a model of breast carcinogenesis. A total of 32 areas of apparently normal epithelium and 135 ductal proliferative and neoplastic lesions were studied. More than one epithelial lesion per case were analyzed. The apoptotic index (AI) and the proliferative index (PI) were expressed as the percentage of TdT-mediated dUTP-nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively. The PI/AI (P/A index) was calculated for each case. The AIs and PIs were significantly higher in hyperplasia than in apparently normal epithelium (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0005, respectively), in atypical hyperplasia than in hyperplasia (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively) and in invasive carcinoma than in in situ carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The two indices were similar in atypical hyperplasia and in in situ carcinoma. The P/A index increased significantly from normal epithelium to hyperplasia (P = 0.01) and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma (P = 0.04) whereas it was decreased (non-significantly) from hyperplasia to preinvasive lesions. A strong positive correlation between the AIs and the PIs was found (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). These findings suggest accelerating cell turnover along the continuum of breast carcinogenesis. Atypical hyperplasias and in situ carcinomas might be kinetically similar lesions. In the transition from normal epithelium to hyperplasia and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma the net growth of epithelial cells results from a growth imbalance in favour of proliferation. In the transition from hyperplasia

  11. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    SLIVA, DANIEL; Loganathan, Jagadish; JIANG, JIAHUA; Jedinak, Andrej; Lamb, John G.; TERRY, COLIN; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Adamec, Jiri; Sandusky, George E.; DUDHGAONKAR, SHAILESH

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-...

  12. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Adamec, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-...

  13. β-Catenin—A Linchpin in Colorectal Carcinogenesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Newton Alexander Chiang Shuek; Pignatelli, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    An important role for β-catenin pathways in colorectal carcinogenesis was first suggested by the protein’s association with adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein, and by evidence of dysregulation of β-catenin protein expression at all stages of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Recent studies have, however, shown that yet more components of colorectal carcinogenesis are linked to β-catenin pathways. Pro-oncogenic factors that also release β-catenin from the adherens complex and/or encourage ...

  14. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Tanaka; Mayu Tanaka; Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  15. Regulation of UVR8 photoreceptor dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in Arabidopsis plants grown under photoperiodic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Kirsten M W; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2016-08-01

    The UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptor specifically mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B. Photoreception induces dissociation of dimeric UVR8 into monomers to initiate responses. However, the regulation of dimer/monomer status in plants growing under photoperiodic conditions has not been examined. Here we show that UVR8 establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in plants growing in diurnal photoperiods in both controlled environments and natural daylight. The photo-equilibrium is determined by the relative rates of photoreception and dark-reversion to the dimer. Experiments with mutants in REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (RUP1) and RUP2 show that these proteins are crucial in regulating the photo-equilibrium because they promote reversion to the dimer. In plants growing in daylight, the UVR8 photo-equilibrium is most strongly correlated with low ambient fluence rates of UV-B (up to 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), rather than higher fluence rates or the amount of photosynthetically active radiation. In addition, the rate of reversion of monomer to dimer is reduced at lower temperatures, promoting an increase in the relative level of monomer at approximately 8-10 °C. Thus, UVR8 does not behave like a simple UV-B switch under photoperiodic growth conditions but establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium that is regulated by UV-B and also influenced by temperature. PMID:26864532

  16. Catalytic sites for 3' and 5' incision of Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair are both located in UvrC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, E E; van Kesteren, M; Moolenaar, G F; Visse, R; Goosen, N

    2000-02-18

    Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli is a multistep process in which DNA damage is removed by incision of the DNA on both sides of the damage, followed by removal of the oligonucleotide containing the lesion. The two incision reactions take place in a complex of damaged DNA with UvrB and UvrC. It has been shown (Lin, J. -J., and Sancar, A. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 17688-17692) that the catalytic site for incision on the 5' side of the damage is located in the UvrC protein. Here we show that the catalytic site for incision on the 3' side is in this protein as well, because substitution R42A abolishes 3' incision, whereas formation of the UvrBC-DNA complex and the 5' incision reaction are unaffected. Arg(42) is part of a region that is homologous to the catalytic domain of the homing endonuclease I-TevI. We propose that the UvrC protein consists of two functional parts, with the N-terminal half for the 3' incision reaction and the C-terminal half containing all the determinants for the 5' incision reaction. PMID:10671556

  17. Genetic control of multiple pathways of post-replicational repair in uvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the recA, uvrD, exrA, and recB mutations and of post-irradiation treatment with chloramphenicol on the survival and post-replicational repair after ultraviolet irradiation of uvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12 was examined. Each of these mutations or treatments was found to decrease survival and the extent of repair. The interactions of the inhibitory effects of the uvrD, exrA, and recB mutations and chloramphenicol treatment were determined by examining the survival and repair characteristics of the several multiple mutants. The survival results suggest that the post-replication repair process in uvrB strains may be subdivided into at least five different branches. These include three branches that are blocked by the exrA, recB, or uvrD mutation, a fourth branch that is blocked by any one of these mutations and is also sensitive to chloramphenicol treatment, and at least one additional branch that is not sensitive to either of these mutations or to chloramphenicol treatment. The extent of post-replicational repair observed with each of the strains is in general agreement with the pathways postulated on the basis of the survival data, although there are several apparent exceptions to this correlation

  18. The helicases DinG, Rep and UvrD cooperate to promote replication across transcription units in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubakri, Hasna; de Septenville, Anne Langlois; Viguera, Enrique; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    How living cells deal with head-on collisions of the replication and transcription complexes has been debated for a long time. Even in the widely studied model bacteria Escherichia coli, the enzymes that take care of such collisions are still unknown. We report here that in vivo, the DinG, Rep and UvrD helicases are essential for efficient replication across highly transcribed regions. We show that when rRNA operons (rrn) are inverted to face replication, the viability of the dinG mutant is affected and over-expression of RNase H rescues the growth defect, showing that DinG acts in vivo to remove R-loops. In addition, DinG, Rep and UvrD exert a common function, which requires the presence of two of these three helicases. After replication blockage by an inverted rrn, Rep in conjunction with DinG or UvrD removes RNA polymerase, a task that is fulfilled in its absence by the SOS-induced DinG and UvrD helicases. Finally, Rep and UvrD also act at inverted sequences other than rrn, and promote replication through highly transcribed regions in wild-type E. coli. PMID:19851282

  19. The conserved C-terminus of the PcrA/UvrD helicase interacts directly with RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynn, Emma J; Smith, Abigail J; Guy, Colin P; Savery, Nigel J; McGlynn, Peter; Dillingham, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    UvrD-like helicases play diverse roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination pathways. An emerging body of evidence suggests that their different cellular functions are directed by interactions with partner proteins that target unwinding activity to appropriate substrates. Recent studies in E. coli have shown that UvrD can act as an accessory replicative helicase that resolves conflicts between the replisome and transcription complexes, but the mechanism is not understood. Here we show that the UvrD homologue PcrA interacts physically with B. subtilis RNA polymerase, and that an equivalent interaction is conserved in E. coli where UvrD, but not the closely related helicase Rep, also interacts with RNA polymerase. The PcrA-RNAP interaction is direct and independent of nucleic acids or additional mediator proteins. A disordered but highly conserved C-terminal region of PcrA, which distinguishes PcrA/UvrD from otherwise related enzymes such as Rep, is both necessary and sufficient for interaction with RNA polymerase. PMID:24147116

  20. The conserved C-terminus of the PcrA/UvrD helicase interacts directly with RNA polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Gwynn

    Full Text Available UvrD-like helicases play diverse roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination pathways. An emerging body of evidence suggests that their different cellular functions are directed by interactions with partner proteins that target unwinding activity to appropriate substrates. Recent studies in E. coli have shown that UvrD can act as an accessory replicative helicase that resolves conflicts between the replisome and transcription complexes, but the mechanism is not understood. Here we show that the UvrD homologue PcrA interacts physically with B. subtilis RNA polymerase, and that an equivalent interaction is conserved in E. coli where UvrD, but not the closely related helicase Rep, also interacts with RNA polymerase. The PcrA-RNAP interaction is direct and independent of nucleic acids or additional mediator proteins. A disordered but highly conserved C-terminal region of PcrA, which distinguishes PcrA/UvrD from otherwise related enzymes such as Rep, is both necessary and sufficient for interaction with RNA polymerase.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ionizing radiation in carcinogenesis is discussed. Every cell contains proto-oncogenes, which if damaged may lead to cell transformation. Every cell also contains tumor suppressor genes, which guard against transformation. Thus, transformation would seem to require a double injury to the DNA in a cell. Ionizing radiation is known to be a relatively weak mutagen, but a good clastogen (inducer of chromosome breaks, deletions and rearrangements). Ionizing radiation may therefore be a 'promoter' of cancer, i.e. a stimulant of the clonal expansion of transformed cells, if it kills enough cells to induce compensatory hyperplasia - i.e. rapid growth of cells. Ionizing radiation may be a 'progressor', if it deactivates tumor suppressor genes tending to suppress the growth of existing clones of transformed cells resulting from any of numerous causes. It may therefore be an oversimplification to say that radiation causes cancer; rather, it seems to be a weak initiator, an indirect promoter, and a late-stage progressor. 2 figs

  2. Pulmonary carcinogenesis from plutonium-containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of lung tumors by various types of radiation is of paramount concern to the nuclear industry. The data presented were obtained by exposing the pulmonary system of Syrian hamsters to particles of zirconium oxide containing various amounts of either plutonium-238 or -239 as the alpha radiation source. These particles were injected intravenously and lodged permanently in the capillary bed of the lung. When less than 20% of the lung tissue was irradiated, simulating the ''hot particle'' mode, tumors were not evident with lung burdens up to 500 nCi plutonium. More diffuse irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence, with lung burdens of 50 to 150 nCi. When plutonium-laden microspheres were administered intratracheally, tumor production was considerably increased and the addition of 3 mg of iron oxide intratracheally further increased the incidence. Using the zirconium oxide matrix for the carrier of plutonium in aerosol particles produced tumor incidences of up to 50% in Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation. Initial pulmonary (alveolar) burdens reached 100 nCi of plutonium. Similar inhalation studies using plutonium dioxide alone (no matrix) failed to produce any increase in lung tumorigenesis. The results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms necessary for lung carcinogenesis. (H.K.)

  3. Wnt signaling and colon carcinogenesis: Beyond APC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Najdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway via mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC is a critical event in the development of colon cancer. For colon carcinogenesis, however, constitutive signaling through the canonical Wnt pathway is not a singular event. Here we review how canonical Wnt signaling is modulated by intracellular LEF/TCF composition and location, the action of different Wnt ligands, and the secretion of Wnt inhibitory molecules. We also review the contributions of non-canonical Wnt signaling and other distinct pathways in the tumor micro environment that cross-talk to the canonical Wnt pathway and thereby influence colon cancer progression. These ′non-APC′ aspects of Wnt signaling are considered in relation to the development of potential agents for the treatment of patients with colon cancer. Regulatory pathways that influence Wnt signaling highlight how it might be possible to design therapies that target a network of signals beyond that of APC and β-catenin.

  4. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Sumit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer.

  5. Multistage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Weeks, C.E.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Skin tumors in mice can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiation phase) followed by repetitive treatment with a noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. The initiation phase requires only a single application of either a direct acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen which has to be metabolized before being active and is essentially an irreversible step which probably involves a somatic cell mutation. There is a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activites of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their ability to bind covalently to epidermal DNA. Laboratory results suggest that bay region diol-epoxides are the ultimate carcinogenic form of PAH carcinogens. Potent inhibitors and stimulators of PAH tumor initiation appear to affect the level of the PAH diol-epoxide reacting with specific DNA bases. Reecent data suggests that the tumor promotion stage involves at least three important steps: (1) the induction of embryonic looking cells (dark cells) in adult epidermis; (2) an increased production of epidermal prostaglandins and polyamines; (3) sustained proliferation of dark cells. Retinoic acid specifically inhibits step two whereas the anti-inflammatory steriod fluocinolone acetonide is a potent inhibitor of steps one and three. The mechanism and the importance of a specific sequence for each step in chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin are detailed.

  6. Stress and radiation carcinogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present experiment irritation consisting of the combination of an optic signal followed by a mild electric shock administered at regular intervals was started in 2 groups of animals at the age of 3 months. At 4 months of age, one of the irritated and one of the non-irritated groups were exposed to whole-body gamma irradiation with 20 daily doses of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), 1.4 Gy/min (140 rad/min), while the other 2 groups were sham-irradiated. The animals were autopsied and the specimens were microscopically studied for the presence of malignant tumors. Malignant tumors particularly involving the testes and lungs, and leukosis were found in 29% of males, whereas in females the tumor incidence with mammary, pulmonary and ovarian involvement and leukosis was 39%. The irradiation decreased the minimum latency time in the irritated males and both female groups. In males, the irritation lowered the cumulative prevalence of malignant tumors, a significant decrease being noted at the age of 15 months. In females, it was increased, with a significant rise observed to occur at the end of the experiment. The opposite effects of irritation on the radiation carcinogenesis in males and females can be attributed to the radiation-induced specific alterations of the gonads in females and, in part, to a longer survival time observed in the irradiated females. (author)

  7. Stress and radiation carcinogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisnik, M.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Kham-Lindtner, T.; Logonder-Mlinsek, M.; Skrk, J.; Pajntar, M. (Ljubljana Univ. (Yugoslavia). Medicinski Fakultet)

    1981-01-01

    In the present experiment irritation consisting of the combination of an optic signal followed by a mild electric shock administered at regular intervals was started in 2 groups of animals at the age of 3 months. At 4 months of age, one of the irritated and one of the non-irritated groups were exposed to whole-body gamma irradiation with 20 daily doses of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), 1.4 Gy/min (140 rad/min), while the other 2 groups were sham-irradiated. The animals were autopsied and the specimens were microscopically studied for the presence of malignant tumors. Malignant tumors particularly involving the testes and lungs, and leukosis were found in 29% of males, whereas in females the tumor incidence with mammary, pulmonary and ovarian involvement and leukosis was 39%. The irradiation decreased the minimum latency time in the irritated males and both female groups. In males, the irritation lowered the cumulative prevalence of malignant tumors, a significant decrease being noted at the age of 15 months. In females, it was increased, with a significant rise observed to occur at the end of the experiment. The opposite effects of irritation on the radiation carcinogenesis in males and females can be attributed to the radiation-induced specific alterations of the gonads in females and, in part, to a longer survival time observed in the irradiated females.

  8. Pathways of resistance to thymineless death in Escherichia coli and the function of UvrD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Natalie C; Vaksman, Zalman; DeNapoli, Jessica; Hastings, P J; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2011-09-01

    Thymineless death (TLD) is the rapid loss of viability in bacterial, yeast, and human cells starved of thymine. TLD is the mode of action of common anticancer drugs and some antibiotics. TLD in Escherichia coli is accompanied by blocked replication and chromosomal DNA loss and recent work identified activities of recombination protein RecA and the SOS DNA-damage response as causes of TLD. Here, we examine the basis of hypersensitivity to thymine deprivation (hyper-TLD) in mutants that lack the UvrD helicase, which opposes RecA action and participates in some DNA repair mechanisms, RecBCD exonuclease, which degrades double-stranded linear DNA and works with RecA in double-strand-break repair and SOS induction, and RuvABC Holliday-junction resolvase. We report that hyper-TLD in uvrD cells is partly RecA dependent and cannot be attributed to accumulation of intermediates in mismatch repair or nucleotide-excision repair. These data imply that both its known role in opposing RecA and an additional as-yet-unknown function of UvrD promote TLD resistance. The hyper-TLD of ruvABC cells requires RecA but not RecQ or RecJ. The hyper-TLD of recB cells requires neither RecA nor RecQ, implying that neither recombination nor SOS induction causes hyper-TLD in recB cells, and RecQ is not the sole source of double-strand ends (DSEs) during TLD, as previously proposed; models are suggested. These results define pathways by which cells resist TLD and suggest strategies for combating TLD resistance during chemotherapies. PMID:21705756

  9. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA) Signal Transduction Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zere, Tesfalem R.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yuanyuan Leng; Archana Pannuri; Potts, Anastasia H.; Raquel Dias; Dongjie Tang; Bryan Kolaczkowski; Dimitris Georgellis; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Tony Romeo

    2015-01-01

    The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genom...

  10. The DNA repair helicase UvrD is essential for replication fork reversal in replication mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Maria Jose; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Michel, Bénédicte

    2004-01-01

    Replication forks arrested by inactivation of the main Escherichia coli DNA polymerase (polymerase III) are reversed by the annealing of newly synthesized leading- and lagging-strand ends. Reversed forks are reset by the action of RecBC on the DNA double-strand end, and in the absence of RecBC chromosomes are linearized by the Holliday junction resolvase RuvABC. We report here that the UvrD helicase is essential for RuvABC-dependent chromosome linearization in E. coli polymerase III mutants, ...

  11. Characterization of a thermostable UvrD helicase and its participation in helicase dependent amplification

    OpenAIRE

    AN, LIXIN; Tang, Wen; Ranalli, Tamara A.; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Wytiaz, Jamie; Kong, Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Helicase-Dependent Amplification (HDA) is an isothermal in vitro DNA amplification method based upon the coordinated actions of helicases to separate double-stranded DNA and DNA polymerases to synthesize DNA. Previously, a mesophilic form of HDA (mHDA) utilizing the E. coli UvrD helicase, DNA polymerase I Klenow Fragment, two accessory proteins, MutL and single stranded DNA binding protein (SSB), was developed (1). In an effort to improve the specificity and performance of HDA, we have cloned...

  12. The UvrD helicase and its modulation by the mismatch repair protein MutL

    OpenAIRE

    Matson, Steven W.; Robertson, Adam B.

    2006-01-01

    UvrD is a superfamily I DNA helicase with well documented roles in excision repair and methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) in addition to poorly understood roles in replication and recombination. The MutL protein is a homodimeric DNA-stimulated ATPase that plays a central role in MMR in Escherichia coli. This protein has been characterized as the master regulator of mismatch repair since it interacts with and modulates the activity of several other proteins involved in the mismatch repair p...

  13. Single-molecule assay reveals strand switching and enhanced processivity of UvrD

    OpenAIRE

    Dessinges, Marie-Noëlle; Lionnet, Timothée; Xi, Xu Guang; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes capable of unwinding double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to provide the single-stranded DNA template required in many biological processes. Among these, UvrD, an essential DNA repair enzyme, has been shown to unwind dsDNA while moving 3′-5′ on one strand. Here, we use a single-molecule manipulation technique to monitor real-time changes in extension of a single, stretched, nicked dsDNA substrate as it is unwound by a single enzyme. This technique offers a means for measuring...

  14. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of a UV-B photoreceptor gene, MdUVR8 (UV Resistance Locus 8), from apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cheng; Mao, Ke; You, Chun-Xiang; Zhao, Xian-Yan; Wang, Shu-Hui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-06-01

    UVR8 (UV Resistance Locus 8) is an ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315nm) light receptor that is involved in regulating many aspects of plant growth and development. UV-B irradiation can increase the development of flower and fruit coloration in many fruit trees, such as grape, pear and apple. Previous investigations of the structure and functions of UVR8 in plants have largely focused on Arabidopsis. Here, we isolated the UVR8 gene from apple (Malus domestica) and analyzed its function in transgenic Arabidopsis. Genomic and protein sequence analysis showed that MdUVR8 shares high similarity with the AtUVR8 protein from Arabidopsis, including the conserved seven-bladed β-propeller, the C27 region, the 3 "GWRHT" motifs and crucial amino-acid residues (14 Trps, 2 Args). A point mutation prediction and three-dimensional structural analysis of MdUVR8 indicated that it has a similar structure to AtUVR8 and that the crucial residues are also important in MdUVR8. In terms of transcript levels, MdUVR8 expression was up-regulated by UV-B light, which suggests that its expression follows a 24-h circadian rhythm. Using heterologous expression of MdUVR8 in both uvr8-1 mutant and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, we found that MdUVR8 regulates hypocotyl elongation and gene expression under UV-B light. These data provide functional evidence for a role of MdUVR8 in controlling photomorphogenesis under UV-B light and indicate that the function of UVR8 is conserved between Arabidopsis and apple. Furthermore, we examined the interaction between MdUVR8 and MdCOP1 (constitutive photomorphogenic1) using a yeast two-hybrid assay and a co-immunoprecipitation assay. This interaction provides a direction for investigating the regulatory mechanisms of the UV-B-light pathway in apple. PMID:27095405

  15. Effects of the global regulator CsrA on the BarA/UvrY two-component signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Martha I; Alvarez, Adrian F; Chavez, Ricardo Gonzalez; Romeo, Tony; Merino, Enrique; Georgellis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid sensor kinase BarA and its cognate response regulator UvrY, members of the two-component signal transduction family, activate transcription of CsrB and CsrC noncoding RNAs. These two small RNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA, which posttranscriptionally regulates translation and/or stability of its target mRNAs. Here, we provide evidence that CsrA positively affects, although indirectly, uvrY expression, at both the transcriptional and translational levels. We also demonstrate that CsrA is required for properly switching BarA from its phosphatase to its kinase activity. Thus, the existence of a feedback loop mechanism that involves the Csr and BarA/UvrY global regulatory systems is exposed. PMID:25535275

  16. Insights into endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadare, Oluwole; Zheng, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial serous carcinomas (ESC) constitute only approximately 10% of endometrial cancers, but have a substantially higher case-fatality rate than their more common endometrioid counterparts. The precise composite of factors driving endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression remain largely unknown, but we attempt to review the current state of knowledge in this report. ESC probably do not evolve through a single pathway, and their underlying molecular events probably occur early in their evolution. TP53 gene mutations occur in 22.7 to 96% of cases, and p53 protein overexpression is seen in approximately 76%. By gene expression profiling, p16 is upregulated in ESC significantly above both normal endometrial cells and endometrioid carcinomas, and 92-100% of cases display diffuse expression of the p16 protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Together, these findings suggest dysregulation of both the p16(INKA)/Cyclin D-CDK/pRb-E2F and the ARF-MDM2-p53 cell cycle pathways in ESC. By IHC, HER2/neu is overexpressed (2+ or 3+) in approximately 32.1% of ESC, and approximately 54.5% of cases scored as 2+ or 3+ by IHC display c-erbB2 gene amplification as assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Genetic instability, typically manifested as loss of heterozygosity in multiple chromosomes, is a common feature of ESC, and one study found loss of heterozygosity at 1p32-33 in 63% of cases. A subset of ESC display protein expression patterns that are characteristic of high grade endometrial carcinomas, including loss of the metastasis suppressor CD82 (KAI-1) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, the latter manifested as E-cadherin downregulation, P-cadherin upregulation, and expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation-related molecules such as zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and focal adhesion kinase. Preliminary data suggests differential patterns of expression in ESC of some isoforms of claudins, proteases, the tumor invasiveness and

  17. Single-stranded DNA translocation of E. coli UvrD monomer is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Eric J; Fischer, Christopher J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2012-04-20

    Escherichia coli UvrD is an SF1A (superfamily 1 type A) helicase/translocase that functions in several DNA repair pathways. A UvrD monomer is a rapid and processive single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase but is unable to unwind DNA processively in vitro. Based on data at saturating ATP (500 μM), we proposed a nonuniform stepping mechanism in which a UvrD monomer translocates with biased (3' to 5') directionality while hydrolyzing 1 ATP per DNA base translocated, but with a kinetic step size of 4-5 nt/step, suggesting that a pause occurs every 4-5 nt translocated. To further test this mechanism, we examined UvrD translocation over a range of lower ATP concentrations (10-500 μM ATP), using transient kinetic approaches. We find a constant ATP coupling stoichiometry of ∼1 ATP/DNA base translocated even at the lowest ATP concentration examined (10 μM), indicating that ATP hydrolysis is tightly coupled to forward translocation of a UvrD monomer along ssDNA with little slippage or futile ATP hydrolysis during translocation. The translocation kinetic step size remains constant at 4-5 nt/step down to 50 μM ATP but increases to ∼7 nt/step at 10 μM ATP. These results suggest that UvrD pauses more frequently during translocation at low ATP but with little futile ATP hydrolysis. PMID:22342931

  18. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Excision repair of UVR-induced pyrimidine dimers in corneal DNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured excision repair of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA of the corneal epithelium of the marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, using damage-specific nucleases from Micrococcus luteus in conjunction with agarose gel electrophoresis. We observed that 100 J m-2 of UVR from a FS-40 sunlamp (280-400 nm) induced an average of 2.2 +- 0.2x 10-2 endonuclease-sensitive sites per kilobase (ESS/kb) (pyrimidine dimers) and that ∼ 50% of the dimers were repaired within 12 h after exposure. We also determined that an exposure of 400 J m-2 was needed to induce comparable numbers of pyrimidine dimers (2.5 x 10-2) in the DNA of skin of M. domestica in vivo. In addition, we found that 50% of the dimers were also removed from the epidermal cells of M. domestica within 12 h after exposure. A dose of 100 J m-2 was necessary to induce similar levels of pyrimidine dimers (2.0 +- 0.2 x 10-2) in the DNA of the cultured marsupial cell line Pt K2 (Potorous tridactylus). (author)

  20. Excision repair of UVR-induced pyrimidine dimers in corneal DNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.E.; Applegate, L.A.; Ley, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    We measured excision repair of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA of the corneal epithelium of the marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, using damage-specific nucleases from Micrococcus luteus in conjunction with agarose gel electrophoresis. We observed that 100 J m/sup -2/ of UVR from a FS-40 sunlamp (280-400 nm) induced an average of 2.2 +- 0.2x 10/sup -2/ endonuclease-sensitive sites per kilobase (ESS/kb) (pyrimidine dimers) and that approx. 50% of the dimers were repaired within 12 h after exposure. We also determined that an exposure of 400 J m/sup -2/ was needed to induce comparable numbers of pyrimidine dimers (2.5 x 10/sup -2/) in the DNA of skin of M. domestica in vivo. In addition, we found that 50% of the dimers were also removed from the epidermal cells of M. domestica within 12 h after exposure. A dose of 100 J m/sup -2/ was necessary to induce similar levels of pyrimidine dimers (2.0 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -2/) in the DNA of the cultured marsupial cell line Pt K2 (Potorous tridactylus).

  1. CTXφ Replication Depends on the Histone-Like HU Protein and the UvrD Helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eriel; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, François-Xavier

    2015-05-01

    The Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the agent of cholera. The capacity to produce the cholera toxin, which is responsible for the deadly diarrhea associated with cholera epidemics, is encoded in the genome of a filamentous phage, CTXφ. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is central to the life cycle of CTXφ because amplification of the phage genome permits its efficient integration into the genome and its packaging into new viral particles. A single phage-encoded HUH endonuclease initiates RCR of the proto-typical filamentous phages of enterobacteriaceae by introducing a nick at a specific position of the double stranded DNA form of the phage genome. The rest of the process is driven by host factors that are either essential or crucial for the replication of the host genome, such as the Rep SF1 helicase. In contrast, we show here that the histone-like HU protein of V. cholerae is necessary for the introduction of a nick by the HUH endonuclease of CTXφ. We further show that CTXφ RCR depends on a SF1 helicase normally implicated in DNA repair, UvrD, rather than Rep. In addition to CTXφ, we show that VGJφ, a representative member of a second family of vibrio integrative filamentous phages, requires UvrD and HU for RCR while TLCφ, a satellite phage, depends on Rep and is independent from HU. PMID:25992634

  2. Single-molecule assay reveals strand switching and enhanced processivity of UvrD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessinges, Marie-Noëlle; Lionnet, Timothée; Xi, Xu Guang; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2004-04-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes capable of unwinding double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to provide the single-stranded DNA template required in many biological processes. Among these, UvrD, an essential DNA repair enzyme, has been shown to unwind dsDNA while moving 3'-5' on one strand. Here, we use a single-molecule manipulation technique to monitor real-time changes in extension of a single, stretched, nicked dsDNA substrate as it is unwound by a single enzyme. This technique offers a means for measuring the rate, lifetime, and processivity of the enzymatic complex as a function of ATP, and for estimating the helicase step size. Strikingly, we observe a feature not seen in bulk assays: unwinding is preferentially followed by a slow, enzyme-translocation-limited rezipping of the separated strands rather than by dissociation of the enzymatic complex followed by quick rehybridization of the DNA strands. We address the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and propose a fully characterized model in which UvrD switches strands and translocates backwards on the other strand, allowing the DNA to reanneal in its wake. helicase | DNA replication | DNA repair | magnetic tweezers

  3. CTXφ Replication Depends on the Histone-Like HU Protein and the UvrD Helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriel Martínez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the agent of cholera. The capacity to produce the cholera toxin, which is responsible for the deadly diarrhea associated with cholera epidemics, is encoded in the genome of a filamentous phage, CTXφ. Rolling-circle replication (RCR is central to the life cycle of CTXφ because amplification of the phage genome permits its efficient integration into the genome and its packaging into new viral particles. A single phage-encoded HUH endonuclease initiates RCR of the proto-typical filamentous phages of enterobacteriaceae by introducing a nick at a specific position of the double stranded DNA form of the phage genome. The rest of the process is driven by host factors that are either essential or crucial for the replication of the host genome, such as the Rep SF1 helicase. In contrast, we show here that the histone-like HU protein of V. cholerae is necessary for the introduction of a nick by the HUH endonuclease of CTXφ. We further show that CTXφ RCR depends on a SF1 helicase normally implicated in DNA repair, UvrD, rather than Rep. In addition to CTXφ, we show that VGJφ, a representative member of a second family of vibrio integrative filamentous phages, requires UvrD and HU for RCR while TLCφ, a satellite phage, depends on Rep and is independent from HU.

  4. UVR emissions from solaria in Australia and implications for the regulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Peter; Javorniczky, John; Henderson, Stuart; McLennan, Alan; Roy, Colin; Lock, Jordan; Lynga, Claire; Melbourne, Alan; Gordon, Louisa

    2011-01-01

    To assist in the development of the 2008 Australian/New Zealand standard on solaria and related regulations, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency scientists visited a number of tanning establishments during 2008 to measure the intensity and spectral distribution of the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emissions from a range of solaria. The 2002 Australian/New Zealand Standard "Solaria for cosmetic purposes" (AS/NZS 2635) allowed a maximum UVR output from solaria of UV Index 60, a compromise between the solarium industry who wanted no upper limit and the health agencies who wanted to limit intensity. Of the 20 solaria examined in detail, only one had emissions of intensity less than UV Index 12, typical of mid-latitude summer sunlight, 15 units emitted more than UV Index 20, while three units emitted at intensities above UV Index 36, the maximum allowed by the new standard, AS/NZS 2635 (2008) and would thus not comply. UVA emissions ranged from 98W·m(-2) up to a maximum of 438W·m(-2) , more than six times the UVA content of mid-latitude summer sunshine. The results indicate that solaria users in Australia have access to solaria that are high intensity units with both significantly higher UVB and UVA emissions than sunlight, with implications for resultant adverse health effects. PMID:21091485

  5. A Non-uniform Stepping Mechanism for E. coli UvrD Monomer Translocation along Single Stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3′ to 5′ directionality along single stranded DNA and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with novel analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupl...

  6. UvrD303, a hyperhelicase mutant that antagonizes RecA-dependent SOS expression by a mechanism that depends on its C terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centore, Richard C; Leeson, Michael C; Sandler, Steven J

    2009-03-01

    Genomic integrity is critical for an organism's survival and ability to reproduce. In Escherichia coli, the UvrD helicase has roles in nucleotide excision repair and methyl-directed mismatch repair and can limit reactions by RecA under certain circumstances. UvrD303 (D403A D404A) is a hyperhelicase mutant, and when expressed from a multicopy plasmid, it results in UV sensitivity (UV(s)), recombination deficiency, and antimutability. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the UV(s) phenotype of uvrD303 cells, this mutation was transferred to the E. coli chromosome and studied in single copy. It is shown here that uvrD303 mutants are UV sensitive, recombination deficient, and antimutable and additionally have a moderate defect in inducing the SOS response after UV treatment. The UV-sensitive phenotype is epistatic with recA and additive with uvrA and is partially suppressed by removing the LexA repressor. Furthermore, uvrD303 is able to inhibit constitutive SOS expression caused by the recA730 mutation. The ability of UvrD303 to antagonize SOS expression was dependent on its 40 C-terminal amino acids. It is proposed that UvrD303, via its C terminus, can decrease the levels of RecA activity in the cell. PMID:19074381

  7. Involvement of uvrD, exrA, and recB genes in the control of the postreplicational repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet radiation survival studies support the hypothesis that the uvrD, exrA and recB mutations inhibit separate branches of the postreplicational repair process. Results suggest that each of the mutations uvrD, exrA, and recB acts on a branch of the postreplicational repair process which is at least partially independent of those inhibited by the other mutations. Since the uvrB and uvrD exrA recB strain was not as uv sensitive as the uvrB recA strain, at least one additional branch of postreplicational repair, possibly dependent on recF, must be postulated

  8. Ultraviolet radiation-induced mutability of uvrD3 strains of Escherichia coli B/r and K-12: a problem in analyzing mutagenesis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The involvement of the uvrD gene product in UV-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli was studied by comparing wild-type and uvrA or uvrB strains with their uvrD derivatives in B/r and K-12(W3110) backgrounds. Mutations per survivor (reversions to prototrophy) were compared as a function of surviving fraction and of UV fluence. While recognizing that both methods are not without problems, arguments are presented for favoring the former rather than the latter method of presenting the data when survival is less than 100%. When UV-induced mutation frequencies were plotted as a function of surviving fraction, the uvrD derivatives were less mutable than the corresponding parent strains. The B/r strains exhibited higher mutation frequencies than did the K-12(W3110) strains. A uvrB mutation increased the mutation frequency of its parental K-12 strain, but a uvrA mutation only increased the mutation frequency of its parental B/r strain at UV survivals greater than approximately 80%. Both the uvrA and uvrB mutations increased the mutation frequencies of the uvrD strains in the B/r and K-12 backgrounds, respectively. Rather different conclusions would be drawn if mutagenesis were considered as a function of UV fluence rather than of survival, a situation that calls for further work and discussion. Ideally mutation efficiencies should be compared as a function of the number of repair events per survivor, a number that is currently unobtainable. (author)

  9. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  10. Experimental, statistical and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared with domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research programme that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models) and the relationship of radon to smoking and other co-pollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. (author)

  11. Solution structure, hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the UvrB C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrovich, A; Czisch, M; Frenkiel, T A; Kelly, G P; Goosen, N; Moolenaar, G F; Chowdhry, B Z; Sanderson, M R; Lane, A N

    2001-10-01

    The solution structure, thermodynamic stability and hydrodynamic properties of the 55-residue C-terminal domain of UvrB that interacts with UvrC during excision repair in E. coli have been determined using a combination of high resolution NMR, ultracentrifugation, 15N NMR relaxation, gel permeation, NMR diffusion, circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. The subunit molecular weight is 7,438 kDa., compared with 14.5+/-1.0 kDa. determined by equilibrium sedimentation, indicating a dimeric structure. The structure determined from NMR showed a stable dimer of anti-parallel helical hairpins that associate in an unusual manner, with a small and hydrophobic interface. The Stokes radius of the protein decreases from a high plateau value (ca. 22 A) at protein concentrations greater than 4 microM to about 18 A at concentrations less than 0.1 microM. The concentration and temperature-dependence of the far UV circular dichroism show that the protein is thermally stable (Tm ca. 71.5 degrees C at 36 microM). The simplest model consistent with these data was a dimer dissociating into folded monomers that then unfolds co-operatively. The van't Hoff enthalpy and dissociation constant for both transition was derived by fitting, with deltaH1=23 kJ mol(-1). K1(298)=0.4 microM and deltaH2= 184 kJ mol(-1). This is in good agreement with direct calorimetric analysis of the thermal unfolding of the protein, which gave a calorimetric enthalpy change of 181 kJ mol(-1) and a van't Hoff enthalpy change of 354 kJ mol(-1), confirming the dimer to monomer unfolding. The thermodynamic data can be reconciled with the observed mode of dimerisation. 15N NMR relaxation measurements at 14.1 T and 11.75 T confirmed that the protein behaves as an asymmetric dimer at mM concentrations, with a flexible N-terminal linker for attachment to the remainder of the UvrB protein. The role of dimerisation of this domain in the excision repair mechanism is discussed. PMID:11697728

  12. Latitudinal UVR-PAR measurements in Argentina. Extent of the `ozone hole`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orce, V. Luis [Instituto de Genetica y Biologia Molecular INGEBI-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Helbling, E. Walter [Estacion de Fotobiologia Playa Union y Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas CONICET, Chubut (Argentina)

    1997-10-30

    The UVR-PAR Argentinean Monitoring Network started its operation in September 1994 recording ultraviolet (UVR) and Photosynthetic Available Radiation (PAR) at a frequency of once per minute, at four sites, throughout the entire year. Four spectroradiometers (GUV-511, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.) were installed at research centers separated by about 8-12 degrees of latitude, extending from the Subantarctic-Fueguian region to the Tropic of Capricorn. The instruments are located in populated areas ranging from 30,000 to 11 million people and with extremely different climate regimes and conditions of tropospheric pollution. Our ground-based data indicated that the irradiance increased steadily from south to north. This increase was also observed in the calculated daily doses of UV-B (280-320 nm); however, daily integrated values for UV-A (320-400 nm) and PAR (400-700 nm) were higher at mid-latitudes (Puerto Madryn, 4247`S). A similar south-to-north increase was evident in the ratio of the energy at 305 nm and 340 nm wavelengths (with low 305/340 ratios indicating high total ozone column concentration), with low values at Ushuaia (5501`S) and high values at Jujuy (2410`S). However, the 305/340 ratios increased significantly over their normal spring values at two sites, Ushuaia and Puerto Madryn, for variable time periods during October-December. Our data suggest that the ozone hole was over South America extending to about 38S for at least a week during October and about two weeks during November-December of the years of 1994 and 1995. However, it should be noted that the erythemal irradiance, in the area influenced by the ozone hole, was at all times lower than that in Buenos Aires and well below the value at Jujuy (tropical station). This study also indicates that when assessing the impact of solar UVR upon organisms, other variables such as cloud cover, solar zenith angle, day length, latitude, and atmospheric pollution should be considered in addition to total

  13. Latitudinal UVR-PAR measurements in Argentina: extent of the 'ozone hole'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis Orce, V.; Walter Helbling, E.

    1997-10-01

    The UVR-PAR Argentinean Monitoring Network started its operation in September 1994 recording ultraviolet (UVR) and Photosynthetic Available Radiation (PAR) at a frequency of once per minute, at four sites, throughout the entire year. Four spectroradiometers (GUV-511, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.) were installed at research centers separated by about 8-12 degrees of latitude, extending from the Subantarctic-Fueguian region to the Tropic of Capricorn. The instruments are located in populated areas ranging from 30,000 to 11 million people and with extremely different climate regimes and conditions of tropospheric pollution. Our ground-based data indicated that the irradiance increased steadily from south to north. This increase was also observed in the calculated daily doses of UV-B (280-320 nm); however, daily integrated values for UV-A (320-400 nm) and PAR (400-700 nm) were higher at mid-latitudes (Puerto Madryn, 42°47'S). A similar south-to-north increase was evident in the ratio of the energy at 305 nm and 340 nm wavelengths (with low 305/340 ratios indicating high total ozone column concentration), with low values at Ushuaia (55°01'S) and high values at Jujuy (24°10'S). However, the 305/340 ratios increased significantly over their normal spring values at two sites, Ushuaia and Puerto Madryn, for variable time periods during October-December. Our data suggest that the ozone hole was over South America extending to about 38°S for at least a week during October and about two weeks during November-December of the years of 1994 and 1995. However, it should be noted that the erythemal irradiance, in the area influenced by the ozone hole, was at all times lower than that in Buenos Aires and well below the value at Jujuy (tropical station). This study also indicates that when assessing the impact of solar UVR upon organisms, other variables such as cloud cover, solar zenith angle, day length, latitude, and atmospheric pollution should be considered in addition to

  14. Fibre optic spectrophotometry for the in vitro evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) spectral transmittance of rabbit corneas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fibre optic spectrophotometer front-end system for measuring corneas to overcome shortcomings associated with existing instruments was tested. The system allowed prompt measurement postmortem, minimizing beam pathlength to reduce the effects of scatter and unwanted refraction and eliminated optical interfaces and cuvette media. Rabbit corneas were excised immediately postmortem and placed on a detecting fibre optic coupled to an Ocean Optics spectrophotometer and illuminated by a deuterium–halogen source. The compact instrument with its small beam size allowed tissue profiling at test points across the corneal surface and efficient interchange for comparison of different tissues. This simplified system operation allowed rapid tissue altering to study induced changes on transmittance. The corneal transmittance data showed a consistent sharp cut-off at 320 nm in the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) spectrum, which decayed rapidly from postmortem swelling. Inter- and intra-corneal consistency was demonstrated by comparing data from different regions of the same cornea and those from opposite eyes. Changes to the spectra, particularly in the UVB below 300 nm, were evident when the corneal epithelium was removed, indicating that this layer is not the only corneal UVR filter. The new system reduced much of the variability associated with previous methods, as it rapidly measured corneal transmittance postmortem. Data are in broad agreement with published transmittance curves. The removal of the corneal epithelium revealed a substantial stromal contribution to the overall corneal UVR absorption, suggesting that corneas with pathologically or iatrogenically thinned stromas are less effective UVR blockers

  15. MutS and UvrD proteins stimulate exonuclease action: insights into exonuclease-mediated strand repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noothi, Sunil K; Minda, Renu; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2009-08-25

    MutS and UvrD proteins individually stimulate Escherichia coli exonuclease VII activity on blunt-ended short duplex DNA substrates. Stimulation by both proteins is ATP-dependent but not mismatch-specific and is not accompanied by apparent strand separation. Under similar conditions, MutS and UvrD proteins in fact confer resistance to exonuclease VII action on ssDNA targets, thereby implying that a novel state of a double-stranded DNA intermediate, which we term a "destabilized duplex", is involved in exonuclease-mediated strand degradation. We find that DNA strands in such a destabilized duplex can be displaced by the challenge of a molar excess of homologous single- and double-stranded DNA targets, in trans. Such an action of the UvrD protein is ATP-dependent. We discuss these results in relation to the (i) directional excision repair of E. coli MMR, (ii) downregulation of repeat deletions by exonucleases during replication slippage, and (iii) the fork reversal function of UvrD at stalled replication forks. PMID:19618961

  16. Influence of a uvrD mutation on survival and repair of X-irradiated Escherichia coli K-12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a uvrD mutation increased the X-ray sensitivities of E.coli wild-type and polA strains, but had no effect on the sensitivities of recA and recB strains, and little effect on a lexA strain. Incubation of irradiated cells in medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol or chloramphenicol decreased the survival of wild-type and uvrD cells, but had no effect on the survival of recA, recB and lexA strains. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation studies indicated that the uvrD strain is deficient in the growth-medium-dependent (Type III) repair of DNA single-strand breaks. These results indicate that the uvrD mutation inhibits certain rec+lex+-dependent repair processes, including the growth-medium-dependent (Type III) repair of X-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks, but does not inhibit other rec+lex+-dependent processes that are sensitive to 2,4-dinitrophenol and chloramphenicol. (author)

  17. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Regina Pereira Silva; Luis Fernando Barbisan; Maria Lúcia Zaidan Dagli; Paulo Hilário Nascimento Saldiva

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4- liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine ...

  18. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  19. The role of free radicals in radiation and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since sunlight, ionising radiation and toxic chemicals can serve as the initiators of free radical damage and as a means of enhancing the effectiveness of any existing potentially damaging free radical, they may act independently, additively or synergistically in a multi-step free radical process leading to biological damage. Having examined methods of studying the fast reactions involved, comparisons are made of the mechanism of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis and the role of synergism is considered. Different approaches to cancer protection are examined and the development of a redox model for carcinogenesis is discussed. 317 references. (U.K.)

  20. Meurtres et meurtriers dans l’œuvre d’Alfred Hitchcock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Palfroy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Le premier plan de The Lodger, - film considéré par Hitchcock comme son véritable premier film (chronologiquement son 3e, le premier « Hitchcock picture » comme il le dit à François Truffaut  - montre en gros plan le visage d’une femme hurlant. Ce plan condense en lui une grande partie des éléments qui vont constituer la matière de l’œuvre : la femme, le sexe, le meurtre. Ce qui retient l’attention dans ce plan au-delà du cri - qui renvoie comme bien des cris cadrés par le cinéaste au célèbr...

  1. Deux aspects de la correction fraternelle dans l’œuvre de Blaise Pascal

    OpenAIRE

    Plainemaison, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    En usage sous la Loi ancienne, la correction fraternelle n’était pas inconnue des païens, chez qui elle était dépourvue de signification proprement spirituelle. Pascal, qui l’a pratiquée dans sa vie, en mentionne l’usage dans son œuvre en la présentant comme susceptible, par l’humiliation qu’elle procure, de débarrasser l’homme d’une partie de ses fautes : « On a bien de l’obligation à ceux qui avertissent des défauts, car ils mortifient ; ils apprennent qu’on a été méprisé, ils n’empêchent p...

  2. El Laberinto de Fortuna, strophes 63-84 : l’œuvre au blanc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis BEZLER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Le Laberinto de Fortuna de Juan de Mena renvoie au labyrinthe du Grand Œuvre. La preuve de cette thèse est fournie dans le présent article, où l’on essaie de déchiffrer le symbolisme alchimique du Cercle de la Lune (strophes 63-84.El sentido alegórico de El Laberinto de Fortuna de Juan de Mena remite al mundo de la alquimia. La prueba de ello se facilita en este artículo en el que se intenta descifrar el simbolismo alquímico del Círculo de la Luna (estrofas 63-84.

  3. Colloque international « L’œuvre de Brian Evenson »

    OpenAIRE

    Bougerol, Maud

    2016-01-01

    Organisé par Sylvie Bauer, Nawelle Lechevalier-Bekadar et Florian Tréguer de l’Université Rennes 2 (ACE, EA1796), ce colloque a permis de réunir des chercheurs français, américains, canadiens et sud-africains autour d’une réflexion sur l’œuvre de Brian Evenson, en présence de l’auteur. Les communications présentées ont permis aux participants d’interroger la fonction du langage dans la poétique evensonienne qui associe un traitement à la fois clinique et violent du corps à une réflexion sur l...

  4. LA PSYCHOPATHOLOGIE DANS L’ŒUVRE RUSSE DE VLADIMIR NABOKOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Gassin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available L’écrivain Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977 est connu pour ses propos méprisants à l’égard de la psychanalyse. L’étude de ses œuvres souligne pourtant son intérêt accru pour la psychopathologie. C’est cet aspect de son écriture que nous analyserons dans quelques-uns de ses romans russes, en particulier La méprise. Nous essaierons ainsi de définir les traits de sa poétique psychopathologique, qui tend à copier certaines maladies psychiques tout en créant un univers irréel, et montrerons ce que ces procédés impliquent dans les rapports de Nabokov avec la psychanalyse.

  5. Les romans du kibbutz dans l’œuvre d’Amos Oz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Claparéde-Albernhe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available À la question : « La littérature ou le discours engagé ? », Amos Oz répond volontiers qu’il souhaite être non seulement citoyen de l’œuvre mais citoyen du monde réel, et que ces deux appartenances ne sont pas contradictoires. Cette réponse trahit un certain nombre de références intellectuelles liées à la conception moderne, héritée des Lumières, de la croyance en une transformation de la réalité dans et par l’histoire. Il est certain qu’Oz croit aux pouvoirs de la langue littéraire pour décri...

  6. Temperature benefits the photosynthetic performance of the diatoms Chaetoceros gracilis and Thalassiosira weissflogii when exposed to UVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halac, S R; Villafañe, V E; Helbling, E W

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined effects of temperature and UVR on the photosynthesis performance of two diatoms -Chaetoceros gracilis and Thalassiosira weissflogii. In particular, we evaluated the role of UVR in inducing photoinhibition and the potential mitigation of this negative effect by an increase in temperature. Cultures were pre-acclimated at two temperatures - 18°C and 23°C - and exposed to different radiation treatments - UVR+PAR (280-700nm); UV-A+PAR (315-700nm) and PAR only (400-700nm) under two temperatures: 18°C (local surface summer water temperature) and 23°C (simulating a potential increase estimated by the year 2100). Exposure to natural solar radiation resulted in UVR-induced photoinhibition that was significantly higher in T. weissflogii than in C. gracilis. Both species benefited from the higher temperature (23°C) resulting in a lower photoinhibition as compared to samples exposed at 18°C. Inter-specific differences were determined in regard to the heat dissipation processes (NPQ) which were higher at high temperatures, and much more evident in C. gracilis than in T. weissflogii. The analyses of inhibition and recovery rates under different irradiances indicate that the balance between negative (inhibition) and positive (repair-dissipation) effects shifted towards a more positive balance with increasing temperature. Our results highlight for a beneficial effect of temperature on photosynthesis performance during exposure to UVR, although important inter-specific differences are found, probably due to differences in cell size as well as in their distribution within the oceanic realm (i.e., coastal versus oceanic species). PMID:20692849

  7. Development of a High Efficiency UVR/IRR Coverglass for Triple Junction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John; Jones, Glenn; Hall, James

    2007-01-01

    Cover glasses have been a necessary and integral part of space solar arrays since their inception. The main function of the cover glass is to protect the underlying solar cell from the harsh radiation environment of space. They are formed either from fused silica or specially formulated ceria doped glass types that are resistant to radiation damage, for example Pilkington's CMX, CMG, CMO. Solar cells have steadily increased in performance over the past years, from Silicon cells through textured Silicon cells to GaAs cells and the multijunction cells of today. The optimum coverglass solution for each of these cells has been different. The glass itself has also evolved. In some cases it has had its expansion coefficient matched to the cell substrate material, and in addition, added value has been derived from the application of thin film optical coatings to the coverglass. In the majority of cases this has taken the form of a single layer of MgF2 which acts as an antireflection coating. There are also conductive coatings to address electrostatic discharge issues (ESD) and Ultra Violet Reflective (UVR) and Infrared Reflective (IRR) coatings designed for thermal enhancement. Each type of coating can be applied singly or in combination. This paper describes a new type of UVR/IRR (or blue red reflector BRR) specifically designed for triple junction solar cells. For space applications, where radiation is the principal mechanism for removing heat from the satellite, it is the emittance and solar absorptance that primarily determine the temperature of the array. It is therefore essential that any coatings designed to have an effect on the temperature by reducing the solar absorption have a minimal effect on the overall emittance.

  8. UvrD in Deinococcus radiodurans is optimized for processing G-quadruplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is a radiation resistant Gram-positive bacterium capable of tolerating very high doses of DNA-damaging agents such as gamma radiation (D10 ∼ 12kGy) desiccation (∼ 5% relative humidity), UVC radiation (D10 ∼ 800J/m2) and hydrogen peroxide (40 mM). It achieves this by using a complex regulatory mechanism and novel proteins. Recently bioinformatic analysis showed several stretches of guanine runs in D.radiodurans genome, which could form G-quartets. The role of G-quartets in regulatory processes is well documented in various organisms. The presence of G -quartets in D. radiodurans means that there are regulatory or structural proteins which would bind to these elements. Several proteins are known to bind G-quartets. Finding the proteins which would bind to G4 DNA is difficult as no specific motifs are available for binding these elements. Also most of the known proteins that are shown to bind to G-quadruplex DNA are of eukaryotic nature. To overcome these challenges we defined a set of known G-quadruplex binding proteins and used a smith-waterman algorithm with our own scoring matrix to homologs of G-quadruplex binding proteins in D.radiodurans. Using bioinformatics analysis, we showed that UvrD (DR 1775) of D. radiodurans has ability to bind/translocate along G-quadruplex DNA, a novel feature in prokaryotes. The translocase activity of DR1775 is ATP specific and this ATPase activity is attenuated by ssDNA. Data supporting UvrD of D. radiodurans as a G-quadruplex DNA metabolizing proteins would be presented. (author)

  9. Hypoxia and cell cycle deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrée, N.

    2007-01-01

    Because uterine endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and 1 of every 5 patients dies of this disease, understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma is important. In general, this thesis can be summarized as a study o

  10. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  11. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the oxidation of nucleic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Animals;chemistry;deficiency;DNA Damage;DNA Glycosylases;DNA Repair;DNA Repair Enzymes;Enzymes;genetics;Genomics;Guanine;Hydrolases;Intestinal Neoplasms;Japan;Liver Neoplasms;metabolism;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Mice;Mutagenesis;Mutation;Neoplasms;Nucleic Acids;Oxidation-Reduction;Oxidative Stress;Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases;Skin Neoplasms;Ultraviolet Rays.

  12. Role of colonic microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Borges-Canha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The human colonic mucosa is populated by a wide range of microorganisms, usually in a symbiotic relation with the host. Sometimes this balance is lost and a state of dysbiosis arises, exposing the colon to different metabolic and inflammatory stimuli (according to the microbiota's changing profile. Recent findings lead to hypothesize that this unbalance may create a subclinical pro-inflammatory state that increases DNA mutations and, therefore, colorectal carcinogenesis. In this article we aim to systematically review the scientific evidence regarding colonic microbiota and its role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: Systematic review of PubMed searching results for original articles studying microbiota and colorectal cancer until November 2014. Results: Thirty-one original articles studied the role of colon microbiota in colorectal carcinoma including both human and animal studies. Different and heterogeneous methods were used and different bacteria were considered. Nevertheless, some bacteria are consistently augmented (such as Fusobacteria, Alistipes, Porphyromonadaceae, Coriobacteridae, Staphylococcaceae, Akkermansia spp. and Methanobacteriales, while other are constantly diminished in colorectal cancer (such as Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, Faecalibacterium spp., Roseburia, and Treponema. Moreover, bacteria metabolites amino acids are increased and butyrate is decreased throughout colonic carcinogenesis. Conclusion: Conclusive evidence shows that colorectal carcinogenesis is associated with microbial dysbiosis. This information may be used to create new prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for colorectal cancer.

  13. Placebo controlled, crossover validation study of oral ibuprofen and topical hydrocortisone-21-acetate for a model of ultraviolet B radiation (UVR)-induced pain and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rother M; Rother I

    2011-01-01

    Matthias Rother, Ilka RotherDepartment of Clinical Operations, X-pert Med GmbH, Graefelfing, GermanyBackground: Pain related to ultraviolet B radiation (UVR) induced sunburn is an established, simple, acute pain model. One of the major criticisms is related to the potential dermal adverse events caused by the UVR exposure. This study tried to validate the model for oral and topical drugs and to define the minimum required UVR exposure.Methods: This subject- and observer-blinded, placebo-contr...

  14. Impediment of E. coli UvrD by DNA-destabilizing force reveals a strained-inchworm mechanism of DNA unwinding

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo; Wei, Kong-Ji; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Li, Ming; Xi, Xu Guang

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a non-ring-shaped model helicase, displaying a 3′–5′ polarity in DNA unwinding. Using a transverse magnetic tweezer and DNA hairpins, we measured the unwinding kinetics of UvrD at various DNA-destabilizing forces. The multiform patterns of unwinding bursts and the distributions of the off-times favour the mechanism that UvrD unwinds DNA as a dimer. The two subunits of the dimer coordinate to unwind DNA processively. They can jointly switch strands and translocate back...

  15. Evidence for a physical interaction between the Escherichia coli methyl-directed mismatch repair proteins MutL and UvrD.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, M C; Jordan, J R; Matson, S W

    1998-01-01

    UvrD (DNA helicase II) is an essential component of two major DNA repair pathways in Escherichia coli: methyl-directed mismatch repair and UvrABC-mediated nucleotide excision repair. In addition, it has an undefined role in the RecF recombination pathway and possibly in replication. In an effort to better understand the role of UvrD in these various aspects of DNA metabolism, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used to search for interacting protein partners. Screening of an E.coli genomic library ...

  16. Transcription of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli is controlled by the lexA repressor and by attenuation.

    OpenAIRE

    Easton, A M; Kushner, S R

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and the presumptive N-terminal portion of the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli K-12 has been determined. The 1190 base pairs of DNA examined include the likely coding sequence for the first 258 amino acids of the uvrD protein. The transcription promoter for the uvrD gene was identified upstream of the protein coding region. Synthesis of messenger RNA in vitro from this promoter was inhibited by purified lexA protein. The lexA protein was found to bin...

  17. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    series of transcription factors. Moreover, in addition to direct production of ROS by these pathogens, liver infiltration by activated phagocytic cells provides an additional source of ROS production that promotes oxidative stress via interleukin or NO production that can damage proteins, lipids and DNA.

    Nuclear MSI was demonstrated first in familial hereditary colorectal cancer (HNPCC and then in sporadic cancers, primarily digestive tract cancers such as colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers.In HCC, although nuclear MSI has been shown in some studies (15,18, there is as yet no direct evidence of alteration of the MMR genes and the biological and the clinicopathological significance of the lowlevel MSI seen in HCC is unclear. MSI has also been shown to occur in inflammatory tissues such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis as well as in ulcerative colitis, chronic pancreatitis and in non digestive inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

    Recently, the role of mitochondria in carcinogenesis has been under numerous investigation, in part because their prominent role in apoptosis, ROS production and other aspects of tumour biology. The mitochondrial genome is particularly susceptible to mutations because of the high level of ROS generation in this organelle, coupled with a relatively low level of DNA repair. Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been shown in HCC as was also observed MSI. These findings suggest a potential role for mitochondrial genome instability in the early steps of tumorigenesis.

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury can occur in several situations and is a major cause of cell damage during surgery. Cells and tissues subjected to hypoxia by prolonged ischemia become acidic

  18. Signes et traces dans l’œuvre poétique de Günter Eich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandie Attia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cette thèse porte sur les catégories « signe » (Zeichen et « trace » (Spur dans l’œuvre poétique et les déclarations poétologiques de Günter Eich (1907-1972. Signes naturels, linguistiques, traces biographiques et intertextuelles, relevé de stigmates historiques (Spurensicherung imprègnent l’œuvre de Eich tant sous la forme d’images poétiques que de concepts poétologiques. Complémentaires ou opposés, ils éclairent le parcours complexe du poète, du déchiffrement des signes naturels au souh...

  19. Signes et traces dans l’œuvre poétique de Günter Eich

    OpenAIRE

    Sandie Attia

    2010-01-01

    Cette thèse porte sur les catégories « signe » (Zeichen) et « trace » (Spur) dans l’œuvre poétique et les déclarations poétologiques de Günter Eich (1907-1972). Signes naturels, linguistiques, traces biographiques et intertextuelles, relevé de stigmates historiques (Spurensicherung) imprègnent l’œuvre de Eich tant sous la forme d’images poétiques que de concepts poétologiques. Complémentaires ou opposés, ils éclairent le parcours complexe du poète, du déchiffrement des signes naturels au souh...

  20. UvrD303, a Hyperhelicase Mutant That Antagonizes RecA-Dependent SOS Expression by a Mechanism That Depends on Its C Terminus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Centore, Richard C.; Leeson, Michael C.; Sandler, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic integrity is critical for an organism's survival and ability to reproduce. In Escherichia coli, the UvrD helicase has roles in nucleotide excision repair and methyl-directed mismatch repair and can limit reactions by RecA under certain circumstances. UvrD303 (D403A D404A) is a hyperhelicase mutant, and when expressed from a multicopy plasmid, it results in UV sensitivity (UVs), recombination deficiency, and antimutability. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the ...

  1. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M. (UIUC); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED); (UCL)

    2011-11-02

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a 'closed' state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an 'open' state that differs by an {approx} 160{sup o} rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme.

  2. Rotations of the 2B sub-domain of E. coli UvrD helicase/translocase coupled to nucleotide and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K; Gauss, George H; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M

    2011-08-19

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a "closed" state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an "open" state that differs by an ∼160° rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme. PMID:21704638

  3. Increased UV-inducibility of SOS functions in a dam-3 mutant of Escherichia coli K12 uvrA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dam-3 mutation caused a 2-4 fold increase in the susceptibility of E. coli K-12 uvrA to UV induction of prophage lambda, induced reactivation and mutagenesis of lambda, and mutation to histidine prototrophy. The increased inducibility exceeded the level expected by UV and dam-3 acting additively and independently, and suggests that the effects of UV and dam-3 interact in some way to potentiate induction of SOS functions. (Auth.)

  4. Monsoon variability of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) attenuation and bio-optical factors in the Asian tropical coral-reef waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizubayashi, Keiko; Kuwahara, Victor S.; Segaran, Thirukanthan C.; Zaleha, Kassim; Effendy, A. W. M.; Kushairi, M. R. M.; Toda, Tatsuki

    2013-07-01

    The East coast of Peninsular Malaysia is strongly influenced by the North-East (NE) monsoon, and may significantly influence the optical environment of coral-reef ecosystems. However, our knowledge of temporal variability, including episodic events, of environmental factors in Asian tropical regions is still limited. The objectives of this study were to (1) observe temporal variability in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) attenuation and (2) determine the bio-optical factors regulating the optical environment in shallow coral-reef waters. Downwelling UVR and PAR irradiance and in situ bio-optical factors were measured monthly near Bidong Island on the East coast of Peninsular Malaysia from June 2010 to June 2011. The NE monsoon was recognized between November 2010 and January 2011. The highest diffuse attenuation coefficient at 305 nm was 2.05 ± 0.03 m-1 in a coral-reef area on December 2010. The most significant bio-optical factor at 305, 380, 440 nm during the NE monsoon season was CDOM (89 ± 8% at 305 nm, 84 ± 9% at 380 nm and 49 ± 17% at 440 nm). All UVR attenuation coefficients showed significant correlations with the CDOM absorption coefficients (aCDOM). CDOM with relatively low S275-295 during the NE monsoon season (0.0177 ± 0.0020 nm-1) suggests terrestrial sources, which is also supported by the correlation between salinity and aCDOM(305). A significant correlation between S275-295 and the carbon specific absorbance coefficient (a*(305)) suggest the potential to measure DOC optically in these waters. The high CDOM during the NE monsoon season may have an important role to reduce harmful UVR exposure reaching benthic communities.

  5. UvrD Helicase Unwinds DNA One Base Pair At A Time By A Two-Part Power Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Young; Yang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Helicases use the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to unwind double helices in essentially every metabolic pathway involving nucleic acids. Earlier crystal structures have suggested that DNA helicases translocate along a single-stranded DNA in an inchworm fashion. We report here a series of crystal structures of the UvrD helicase complexed with DNA and ATP hydrolysis intermediates. These structures reveal that ATP binding alone leads to unwinding of 1 base pair by direct...

  6. Single-molecule imaging of the oligomer formation of the nonhexameric Escherichia coli UvrD helicase

    OpenAIRE

    Yokota, Hiroaki; Chujo, Yuko Ayabe; Harada, Yoshie

    2013-01-01

    Superfamily I helicases are nonhexameric helicases responsible for the unwinding of nucleic acids. However, whether they unwind DNA in the form of monomers or oligomers remains a controversy. In this study, we addressed this question using direct single-molecule fluorescence visualization of Escherichia coli UvrD, a superfamily I DNA helicase. We performed a photobleaching-step analysis of dye-labeled helicases and determined that the helicase is bound to 18-basepair (bp) double-stranded DNA ...

  7. Emerging importance of mismatch repair components including UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with the development of drug resistance in malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Human malaria is an important parasitic infection responsible for a significant number of deaths worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The recent scenario has worsened mainly because of the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites having the potential to spread across the world. Drug-resistant parasites possess a defective mismatch repair (MMR); therefore, it is essential to explore its mechanism in detail to determine the underlying cause. Recently, artemisinin-resistant parasites have been reported to exhibit nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in MMR pathways such as MutL homolog (MLH) and UvrD. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is an endonuclease required to restore the defective MMR in drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. Although the role of helicases in eukaryotic MMR has been questioned, the identification and characterization of the UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with MLH in P. falciparum suggests the possible involvement of UvrD in MMR. A comparative genome-wide analysis revealed the presence of the UvrD helicase in Plasmodium species, while it is absent in human host. Therefore, PfUvrD may emerge as a suitable drug target to control malaria. This review study is focused on recent developments in MMR biochemistry, emerging importance of the UvrD helicase, possibility of its involvement in MMR and the emerging cross-talk between MMR components and drug resistance in malaria parasite. PMID:25771870

  8. Phototoxic effect of UVR on wild type, ebony and yellow mutants of Drosophila melanogaster: Life Span, fertility, courtship and biochemical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhePeng; LIU RuiFang; WANG AnRu; DU LiLi; DENG XueMei

    2008-01-01

    Melanin plays an important role in protecting organisms from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Therefore, it is possible that differently colored strains can show different sensitivities to UVR. In the present work, life span, fertility and courtship behavior of wild type (w), ebony (e) and yellow (y) strains of Drosophila melanogaster were studied to evaluate their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV). Because a range of photo-toxic effects of UVR are mediated through generation of free radicals, levels of free radicals, lipid per-oxide (malondialdehyde, MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of three strains were examined to indicate their antioxidant defending ability and oxidative status. It was shown that w always had the highest lifespan and fertility not only in the control but also in UV-exposed groups. Moreover, lifespan and fertility of e were significantly higher (P0.05). MDA levels were increased in the UV dose-dependent manner (P=0.0495). In con-clusion, our results suggested that UVB can decrease life span and fertility of flies and do harm to courtship, which may be due to oxidative damage to flies tissues (e.g. central nervous system) induced by free radicals, w had the highest tolerance to UVR, which may be ascribed to its advantage of survival under the natural condition and at high level of SOD activity. Then differences of pigment between e and y in absorbing UV, shielding against UV and scavenging free radicals produced by UVR should be responsible for their different sensitivity to UVR.

  9. Molecular analysis of plasmid DNA repair within ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli. II. UvrABC-initiated excision repair and photolyase-catalyzed dimer monomerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a novel approach to the analysis of DNA repair in Escherichia coli was employed which allowed the first direct determination of the mechanisms by which endogenous DNA repair enzymes encounter target sites in vivo. An in vivo plasmid DNA repair analysis was employed to discriminate between two possible mechanisms of target site location: a processive DNA scanning mechanism or a distributive random diffusion mechanism. The results demonstrate that photolyase acts by a distributive mechanism within E. coli. In contrast, UvrABC-initiated excision repair occurs by a limited processive DNA scanning mechanism. A majority of the dimer sites on a given plasmid molecule were repaired prior to the dissociation of the UvrABC complex. Furthermore, plasmid DNA repair catalyzed by the UvrABC complex occurs without a detectable accumulation of nicked plasmid intermediates despite the fact that the UvrABC complex generates dual incisions in the DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. Therefore, the binding or assembly of the UvrABC complex on DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer represents the rate-limiting step in the overall process of UvrABC-initiated excision repair in vivo

  10. Lifespan animal studies on carcinogenesis following plutonium-exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A constituent of nuclear compound, 239Pu, is an important radionuclide for radiological protection of workers in nuclear reactors and facilities as the carcinogen related to the highest predictive cancer risks due to high LET alpha-emitter with longer half life and retention in the body. The cancer risks estimated by some epidemiological studies, however, remain unclear or uncertain, and even experimental studies have not fully elucidated the dose and cancer relationships with or without threshold doses, modulating factors, and mechanisms specific for metabolic behaviors and dose distribution dependent on physicochemical states and exposure modes. As considering these matters, we here present our own animal experiments on the carcinogenicity of 239Pu, as focused on both pulmonary carcinogenesis following inhalation exposures to insoluble dioxide aerosols and carcinogenic spectra following injection of soluble citrate, referring to specificity and mechanisms of 239Pu-induced carcinogenesis. (author)

  11. The Role of Ubiquitine Proteasome Pathway in Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Ceren Sumer Turanligil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin works as a marker protein which targets misfolded or injured proteins to cellular degradation. It brings the abnormal proteins to a subcellular organelle named proteasome and it maintains the degradation of proteins in limited lenghts of peptides by leaving the process withuout being changed. Mistakes in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in various steps of carcinogenesis is known. In this review, we dealed with the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP on carcinogenesis via intercellular signaling molecules like Ras, transcription factors like NF-kB, cytokines like TNF-alfa Tumor necrosis factor, protooncogenes like p53 and MDM2(murine double minute 2, components of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins like BRCA1. We also focused on the relationship of UPP on antigen presentation which is active in immune response and its place in the aetiology of colon cancer to provide a specific example. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(1.000: 36-55

  12. Inflammation-driven carcinogenesis is mediated through STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeonghyun; Xia, Tianli; Konno, Hiroyasu; Konno, Keiko; Ruiz, Phillip; Barber, Glen N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stimulation of innate immune pathways by microbial agents or damaged tissue is known to promote inflammation-driven tumorigenesis by mechanisms that are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that mutagenic 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), cisplatin and etoposide induce nuclear DNA leakage into the cytosol that intrinsically activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent cytokine production. Inflammatory cytokine levels are subsequently augmented in a STING-dependent extrinsic manner by infiltrating phagocytes purging dying cells. Consequently, STING−/− mice, or wild-type mice adoptively transferred with STING−/− bone marrow, are almost completely resistant to DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis compared with their wild-type counterparts. Our data establish a role for STING in the control of cancer, shed significant insight into the causes of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and may provide a basis for therapeutic strategies to help prevent malignant disease. PMID:25300616

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Carcinogenesis Based on Chromosome Aberration Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bo Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The progression of human cancer is characterized by the accumulation of genetic instability. An increasing number of experimental genetic molecular techniques have been used to detect chromosome aberrations. Previous studies on chromosome abnormalities often focused on identifying the frequent loci of chromosome alterations, but rarely addressed the issue of interrelationship of chromosomal abnormalities. In the last few years, several mathematical models have been employed to construct models of carcinogenesis, in an attempt to identify the time order and cause-and-effect relationship of chromosome aberrations. The principles and applications of these models are reviewed and compared in this paper. Mathematical modeling of carcinogenesis can contribute to our understanding of the molecular genetics of tumor development, and identification of cancer related genes, thus leading to improved clinical practice of cancer.

  14. Use of cell proliferation data in modeling urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, S M; Ellwein, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    A multistage, probabilistic, biologically based model of carcinogenesis has been developed involving qualitative and quantitative aspects of the process. A chemical can affect the risk of cancer by directly damaging DNA and/or increasing the number of cell divisions during which errors in DNA replication can occur. Based on this model, carcinogens are classified as genotoxic versus nongenotoxic; nongenotoxic chemicals are further divided on the basis of whether or not they act through a speci...

  15. Heterochromatinization as a Potential Mechanism of Nickel-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, Thomas P.; Kluz, Thomas; Harder, Mark E.; Xiong, Judy; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to heritable patterns of gene expression that do not depend on alterations of the genomic DNA sequence. Nickel compounds have demonstrated carcinogenicity without any associated mutagenesis, suggesting that its mechanism of carcinogenesis is epigenetic in nature. One such potential mechanism is the heterochromatinization of chromatin within a region of the genome containing a gene sequence, inhibiting any further molecular interactions with that underlying gene sequence and...

  16. A Review of Molecular Events of Cadmium-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic, heavy industrial metal that poses serious environmental health hazards to both humans and wildlife. Lately, Cd and Cd containing compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens and epidemiological data show causal associations with prostate, breast and lung cancer. The molecular mechanisms involved in Cd-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood and are only now beginning to be elucidated. The effects of chronic exposure to Cd have recently become of grea...

  17. Transgenic cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression sensitizes mouse skin for carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Müller-Decker, Karin; Neufang, Gitta; Berger, Irina; Neumann, Melanie; Marks, Friedrich; Fürstenberger, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    Genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is critical for epithelial carcinogenesis and provides a major target for cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Transgenic mouse lines with keratin 5 promoter-driven COX-2 overexpression in basal epidermal cells exhibit a preneoplastic skin phenotype. As shown here, this phenotype depends on the level of COX-2 expression and COX-2-mediated prostaglandin accumulation. The tran...

  18. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  19. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Chen; Vonetta Williams; Maria Filippova; Valery Filippov; Penelope Duerksen-Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play a...

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Human Papillomavirus-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehoux, Michaël; D’Abramo, Claudia M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all cancers are associated with infectious agents. Among them, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are very common and are now recognized as the etiological agent of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, and they are increasingly linked with other forms of dysplasia. Carcinogenesis is a complex and multistep process requiring the acquisition of several genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. HPV-induced neoplasia, however, is in part mediated by the ...

  1. Host Species Barriers to Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Replication and Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Caporale, Marco; Martineau, Henny; De Las Heras, Marcelo; Murgia, Claudio; Huang, Robert; Centorame, Patrizia; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Spencer, Thomas E.; Griffiths, David J.; Palmarini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors governing host species barriers to virus transmission has added significantly to our appreciation of virus pathogenesis. Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA), a transmissible lung cancer of sheep that has rarely been found in goats. In this study, in order to further clarify the pathogenesis of OPA, we investigated whether goats are resistant to JSRV replication and carcinogenesis. We found that JSRV induce...

  2. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  3. Hromonal regulation of sex differentiated liver carcinogenesis in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Dezhong

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine factors influence cancer development in a variety of reproductive and non-reproductive tissues and organs. The incidence of liver cancer is higher in men than in women and long temm administration of androgens and estrogens has been reported to increase the risk for liver cancer formation, supporting the importance of hormonal factors in the etiology of this tumor. Hormonal effects on liver carcinogenesis have been demonstrated also in experimental animals. In the resistant hepatocy...

  4. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  5. Heel spur radiotherapy and radiation carcinogenesis risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical alternative therapy of painful heel spur patients. Nonetheless, cancer induction is the most important somatic effect of ionizing radiation. This study was designed to evaluate the carcinogenesis risk factor in benign painful heel spur patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 1974 and 1999, a total of 20 patients received mean 8.16 Gy total irradiation dose in two fractions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD100) were placed on multiple phantom sites in vivo within the irradiated volume to verify irradiation accuracy and carcinogenesis risk factor calculation. The 20 still-alive patients, who had a minimum 5-year and maximum 29-year follow-up (mean 11.9 years), have been evaluated by carcinogenic radiation risk factor on the basis of tissue weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Reasonable pain relief has been obtained in all 20 patients. The calculated mean carcinogenesis risk factor is 1.3% for radiation portals in the whole group, and no secondary cancer has been clinically observed. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment modality for relieving pain in calcaneal spur patients. The estimated secondary cancer risk factor for irradiation of this benign lesion is not as high as was feared. (author)

  6. The relevance of cell transformation to carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the caveats concerning rodent as opposed to human cell transformation systems, the author concludes there are several areas in which cell transformation studies with rodent cells have shown clear relevance to carcinogenesis in vivo, especially studies of carcinogenic effects of high LET radiation, particularly dependence on dose rate. In vitro studies firmly established the generality of promotion by phorbol esters tumour promotors. Initial studies on suppression of transformation, notably by protease inhibitors, has led to the confirmation of this phenomenon in in vivo carcinogenesis; development of inhibitor preparations from natural sources suitable for long-term supplementation in human diet, is under investigation. The potential importance of these modifiers is further emphasized by mechanistic studies suggesting that radiation may initiate a large fraction of exposed cell population, and expression of transformation may be controlled to a large extent by environmental conditions including the presence of promoting or suppressing agents. Finally, cell transformation systems offer the opportunity for mechanistic studies of the initial stages of carcinogenesis. Provocative results have arisen in several areas consistent with findings in experimental animals. (author)

  7. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  8. Midkine translocated to nucleoli and involved in carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai

    2009-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a heparin-binding growth factor with its gene first identified in embryonal carcinoma cells at early stages of retinoic acid-induced differentiation.MK is frequently and highly expressed in a variety of human carcinomas. Furthermore, the blood MK level is frequently elevated with advance of human carcinomas, decreased after surgical removal of the tumors. Thus, it is expected to become a promising marker for evaluating the progress of carcinomas.There is mounting evidence that MK plays a significant role in carcinogenesis-related activities, such as proliferation, migration, anti-apoptosis, mitogenesis,transforming, and angiogenesis. In addition, siRNA and anti-sense oligonucleotides for MK have yielded great effects in anti-tumor activities. Therefore, MK appears to be a potential candidate molecular target of therapy for human carcinomas. In this paper, we review MK targeting at nucleoli in different tumor cells and its role in carcinogenesis to deepen our understanding of the mechanism of MK involved in carcinogenesis.

  9. Lessons learned from UvrD helicase: mechanism for directional movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    How do molecular motors convert chemical energy to mechanical work? Helicases and nucleic acids offer simple motor systems for extensive biochemical and biophysical analyses. Atomic resolution structures of UvrD-like helicases complexed with DNA in the presence of AMPPNP, ADP.Pi, and Pi reveal several salient points that aid our understanding of mechanochemical coupling. Each ATPase cycle causes two motor domains to rotationally close and open. At a minimum, two motor-track contact points of alternating tight and loose attachment convert domain rotations to unidirectional movement. A motor is poised for action only when fully in contact with its track and, if applicable, working against a load. The orientation of domain rotation relative to the track determines whether the movement is linear, spiral, or circular. Motors powered by ATPases likely deliver each power stroke in two parts, before and after ATP hydrolysis. Implications of these findings for analyzing hexameric helicase, F(1)F(0) ATPase, and kinesin are discussed. PMID:20192763

  10. Influence of temperature and UVR on photosynthesis and morphology of four species of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanino, M Valeria Fiorda; Strauch, Sebastian M; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2011-04-01

    During the late austral spring of 2009 we carried out experiments (4days of duration) with four cyanobacteria species, Anabaena sp., Nostoc sp., Arthrospira platensis and Microcystis sp., to assess the combined effects of temperature and solar radiation on photosynthesis performance and morphology. Two experimental temperatures (18°C and 23°C, simulating a 5°C increase under a scenario of climate change) and three radiation treatments (by using different filters/materials) were implemented: (i) P (PAR, 400-700nm), (ii) PA (PAR+UV-A, 320-700nm) and, (iii) PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B, 280-700nm). In general, samples under the P treatment had less decrease/higher recovery rates of effective photochemical quantum yield (Y) than those receiving UV-A or UV-A+UV-B. The effects of increased temperature were species-specific: At the end of the experiments, it was seen that increased temperature benefited photosynthetic performance of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc sp. but not of Microcystis sp. and A. platensis. Higher temperature was also associated to an increase in the chain area of Anabaena sp., and to bigger trichomes in A. platensis; however, no morphological effects were observed in Microcystis sp. In addition, in Nostoc sp. the increase in temperature counteracted the UVR impact on the reduction of the chain area. How these effects and mechanisms will affect the trophodynamics and production of aquatic ecosystems is still uncertain, but the specificity of the responses suggests that not all cyanobacteria would be equally benefited by temperature increases therefore affecting the balance and interaction among species in the water column. PMID:21296589

  11. Statistical properties of a two-stage model of carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Portier, C J

    1987-01-01

    Some of the statistical properties of a simple two-stage model of carcinogenesis are explored. The implications of additive treatment effects versus independent treatment effects on the shape of the dose-response curve are considered. Response that is low-dose linear results in the cases where the mutation rates are affected by dose or in the cases where treatment changes the birth rate/death rate of initiated cells in an additive fashion. Independent treatment effects lead to non-low-dose li...

  12. : beta-carotene, alpha-linolenate and carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Maillard, Virginie; Hoinard, Claude; Arab, Khelifa; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Bougnoux, Philippe; Chajès, Véronique

    2006-01-01

    To investigate whether dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content alters the effect of beta-carotene on mammary carcinogenesis, we conducted a chemically induced mammary tumorigenesis experiment in rats randomly assigned to four nutritional groups (15 rats per group) varying in beta-carotene supplementation and ALA content. Two oil formula-enriched diets (15 %) were used: one with 6 g ALA/kg diet in an essential fatty acids (EFA) ratio of linoleic acid:ALA of 5:1 w/w (EFA 5 diet), the other w...

  13. Interactive Effect of UVR and Phosphorus on the Coastal Phytoplankton Community of the Western Mediterranean Sea: Unravelling Eco-Physiological Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presentación Carrillo

    Full Text Available Some of the most important effects of global change on coastal marine systems include increasing nutrient inputs and higher levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm, which could affect primary producers, a key trophic link to the functioning of marine food webs. However, interactive effects of both factors on the phytoplankton community have not been assessed for the Mediterranean Sea. An in situ factorial experiment, with two levels of ultraviolet solar radiation (UVR+PAR vs. PAR and nutrients (control vs. P-enriched, was performed to evaluate single and UVR×P effects on metabolic, enzymatic, stoichiometric and structural phytoplanktonic variables. While most phytoplankton variables were not affected by UVR, dissolved phosphatase (APAEX and algal P content increased in the presence of UVR, which was interpreted as an acclimation mechanism of algae to oligotrophic marine waters. Synergistic UVR×P interactive effects were positive on photosynthetic variables (i.e., maximal electron transport rate, ETRmax, but negative on primary production and phytoplankton biomass because the pulse of P unmasked the inhibitory effect of UVR. This unmasking effect might be related to greater photodamage caused by an excess of electron flux after a P pulse (higher ETRmax without an efficient release of carbon as the mechanism to dissipate the reducing power of photosynthetic electron transport.

  14. UVR8 Mediates UV-B-Induced Arabidopsis Defense Responses against Botrytis cinerea by Controlling Sinapate Accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V. Demkura; Carlos L. Ballaré

    2012-01-01

    Light is emerging as a central regulator of plant immune responses against herbivores and pathogens.Solar UV-B radiation plays an important role as a positive modulator of plant defense.However,since UV-B photons can interact with a wide spectrum of molecular targets in plant tissues,the mechanisms that mediate their effects on plant defense have remained elusive.Here,we show that ecologically meaningful doses of UV-B radiation increase Arabidopsis resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and that this effect is mediated by the photoreceptor UVR8.The UV-B effect on plant resistance was conserved in mutants impaired in jasmonate (JA) signaling (jar1-1 and P35S:JAZ10.4) or metabolism of tryptophan-derived defense compounds (pen2-1,pad3-1,pen2 pad3),suggesting that neither regulation of the JA pathway nor changes in levels of indolic glucosinolates (iGS) or camalexin are involved in this response.UV-B radiation,acting through UVR8,increased the levels of flavonoids and sinapates in leaf tissue.The UV-B effect on pathogen resistance was still detectable in tt4-f,a mutant deficient in chalcone synthase and therefore impaired in the synthesis of flavonoids,but was absent in fah1-7,a mutant deficient in ferulic acid 5-hydroxylase,which is essential for sinapate biosynthesis.Collectively,these results indicate that UVR8 plays an important role in mediating the effects of UV-B radiation on pathogen resistance by controlling the expression of the sinapate biosynthetic pathway.

  15. UVR8 mediates UV-B-induced Arabidopsis defense responses against Botrytis cinerea by controlling sinapate accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkura, Patricia V; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2012-05-01

    Light is emerging as a central regulator of plant immune responses against herbivores and pathogens. Solar UV-B radiation plays an important role as a positive modulator of plant defense. However, since UV-B photons can interact with a wide spectrum of molecular targets in plant tissues, the mechanisms that mediate their effects on plant defense have remained elusive. Here, we show that ecologically meaningful doses of UV-B radiation increase Arabidopsis resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and that this effect is mediated by the photoreceptor UVR8. The UV-B effect on plant resistance was conserved in mutants impaired in jasmonate (JA) signaling (jar1-1 and P35S:JAZ10.4) or metabolism of tryptophan-derived defense compounds (pen2-1, pad3-1, pen2 pad3), suggesting that neither regulation of the JA pathway nor changes in levels of indolic glucosinolates (iGS) or camalexin are involved in this response. UV-B radiation, acting through UVR8, increased the levels of flavonoids and sinapates in leaf tissue. The UV-B effect on pathogen resistance was still detectable in tt4-1, a mutant deficient in chalcone synthase and therefore impaired in the synthesis of flavonoids, but was absent in fah1-7, a mutant deficient in ferulic acid 5-hydroxylase, which is essential for sinapate biosynthesis. Collectively, these results indicate that UVR8 plays an important role in mediating the effects of UV-B radiation on pathogen resistance by controlling the expression of the sinapate biosynthetic pathway. PMID:22447155

  16. Benzene-derived N2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-deoxyguanosine adduct: UvrABC incision and its conformation in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Bo; Rodriguez, Ben; Yang, Yanu; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed

    2010-06-14

    Benzene, a ubiquitous human carcinogen, forms DNA adducts through its metabolites such as p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ). N(2)-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-4-HOPh-dG) is the principal adduct identified in vivo by (32)P-postlabeling in cells or animals treated with p-BQ or HQ. To study its effect on repair specificity and replication fidelity, we recently synthesized defined oligonucleotides containing a site-specific adduct using phosphoramidite chemistry. We here report the repair of this adduct by Escherichia coli UvrABC complex, which performs the initial damage recognition and incision steps in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. We first showed that the p-BQ-treated plasmid was efficiently cleaved by the complex, indicating the formation of DNA lesions that are substrates for NER. Using a 40-mer substrate, we found that UvrABC incises the DNA strand containing N(2)-4-HOPh-dG in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The specificity of such repair was also compared with that of DNA glycosylases and damage-specific endonucleases of E. coli, both of which were found to have no detectable activity toward N(2)-4-HOPh-dG. To understand why this adduct is specifically recognized and processed by UvrABC, molecular modeling studies were performed. Analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories showed that stable G:C-like hydrogen bonding patterns of all three Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds are present within the N(2)-4-HOPh-G:C base pair, with the hydroxyphenyl ring at an almost planar position. In addition, N(2)-4-HOPh-dG has a tendency to form more stable stacking interactions than a normal G in B-type DNA. These conformational properties may be critical in differential recognition of this adduct by specific repair enzymes.

  17. La correspondance d'Elizabeth Gaskell et son œuvre : engagement et discrétion

    OpenAIRE

    Camus, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Les liens entre la correspondance de Gaskell et son œuvre sont assez lâches. Les lettres indiquent clairement les motivations de l'auteur et éclairent les principes qui guident ses choix narratifs (ainsi que la difficulté de les respecter). Elles parlent aussi clairement de la fatigue de l'écrivain et de ses causes. Mais elles sont beaucoup moins explicites en ce qui concerne l'écriture même. Si nous arrivons à nous faire une idée du processus de composition, les choses deviennent plus diffic...

  18. Marguerite Yourcenar et ses alter-egos stylistiques: une lecture psychocritique de l’œuvre yourcenarienne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiel van Woerkum

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, nous tentons, dans la tradition psychocritique de Leo Spitzer, de découvrir des anomalies stylistiques à l’intérieur de l’œuvre de Marguerite Yourcenar. C’est que, de manière à peine perceptible, l’auteur recourt à un style impersonnel dès qu’elle se heurte à de fortes émotions d’angoisse, de colère ou de honte. Ces « variantes stylistiques » se produisent de façon souvent inattendu à plusieurs endroits et indépendamment du genre utilisé.

  19. Referenced Publication Year Spectroscopy (RPYS) and Algorithmic Historiography: The Bibliometric Reconstruction of Andr\\'as Schubert's {\\OE}uvre

    OpenAIRE

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz; Comins, Jordan; Marx, Werner; Thor, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Referenced Publication Year Spectroscopy (RPYS) was recently introduced as a method to analyze the historical roots of research fields and groups or institutions. RPYS maps the distribution of the publication years of the cited references in a document set. In this study, we apply this methodology to the {\\oe}uvre of an individual researcher on the occasion of a Festschrift for Andr\\'as Schubert's 70th birthday. We discuss the different options of RPYS in relation to one another (e.g. Multi-R...

  20. Les représentations esthétiques de la violence dans l’œuvre de Fernando Botero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Lassus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available En 2005, le peintre colombien Fernando Botero expose à Rome une cinquantaine d'œuvres (triptyques, tableaux et dessins sur les tortures commises par des soldats américains dans la prison d'Abou Ghraib, conséquences de la guerre en Irak et des attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Après avoir traité de la violence en Colombie, Botero élargit la portée de son témoignage esthétique, humain et politique sur un thème qui a aussi à voir avec la question des prisonniers de Guantánamo. Dans des sociétés de plus en plus mondialisées, ces œuvres permettent de s’interroger sur la nécessité de la représentation d’une « méta-mémoire » et sur les conséquences de l’impunité et de la violence d’Etat. Elles révèlent aussi l’interaction des discours sur l’art et les sociétés dans l’opération de mémoire : les références explicites à Goya et Picasso des commentateurs de ces œuvres, les relations entre les textes, les photos et les œuvres picturales, mais aussi les conditions de la représentation esthétique dans le cadre de l’histoire immédiate.In 2005, the Colombian painter Fernando Botero exhibited at Rome fifty works (triptychs, paintings and drawings on torture committed by American soldiers in Abou Ghraib prison, the consequences of the war in Iraq and the attacks of September 11 2001. After dealing with the violence in Colombia, Botero expanded the scope of his testimony aesthetic, human and politic, on a theme that also concerns Guantanamo prisoners. In societies more and more globalized these works raise questions about the need to represent a « meta-memory » and the consequences of impunity and government violence. They also reveal the interaction of speaches on art and societies in the operation of memory: explicit references to Goya and Picasso review of these works, the relation between those texts, photographs and pictorial works but also terms of aesthetic representation in the immediate

  1. The helicases DinG, Rep and UvrD cooperate to promote replication across transcription units in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Boubakri, Hasna; de Septenville, Anne Langlois; Viguera, Enrique; Michel, Bénédicte

    2009-01-01

    How living cells deal with head-on collisions of the replication and transcription complexes has been debated for a long time. Even in the widely studied model bacteria Escherichia coli, the enzymes that take care of such collisions are still unknown. We report here that in vivo, the DinG, Rep and UvrD helicases are essential for efficient replication across highly transcribed regions. We show that when rRNA operons (rrn) are inverted to face replication, the viability of the dinG mutant is a...

  2. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  3. Radiation sensitivity as a genetic factor in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that some association exists between cancer-prone hereditary diseases and radiation sensitivity. In the case of ataxia telagiectasia (AT), frequencies of ionizing radiation-induced mutations are believed to be lower in AT fibroblast cells than in normal cells. When employing lymphoblastoid cells, the AT cells exhibited the same gamma-ray-induced mutation rates in proportion to doses as the normal cells. Nevertheless, it is concluded that the AT cells do not exhibit induced mutations so readily as the normal cells, taking high sensitivity of AT cells to gamma-rays into account. This conclusion has led to concern about the relationship between carcinogenesis and mutation. To elucidate this, quantitative studies on mutation of oncogenes are required. It is also pointed out that the mechanism of cancer-prone hereditary diseases is uncertain. High sensitivity of the cells to certain mutagens does not necessarily reflect deficiency in damage repair, suggesting the possibility that there might be no association between carcinogenesis and high sensitivity to ionizing radiation. It remains to be elucidated whether DNA repair is involved in radiation sensitivity in the case of cancer-prone hereditary diseases including AT, except for the case of xeroderma pigmentosum. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  5. Expression of survivin protein in human colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Jie Lin; Chang-Qing Zheng; Yu Jin; Ying Ma; Wei-Guo Jiang; Tie Ma

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify the role of survivin in colorectal carcinogenesis and the relationship between Survivin and histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of survivin by using the monoclonal antibody was performed by the standard streptavidin-peroxidase (SP) technique for the 188paraffin sections which included 30 normal colorectal mucosas, 41 adenomas with low grade dysplasia, 30adenomas with high grade dysplasia, and 87 colorectal carcinomas which were classified as high, middle and low differentiated subgroups which included 33, 28, 26 cases respectively.RESULTS: Expression of survivin was observed in the cytoplasm of adenoma with dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma cells. No immunoreactivity of survivin was seen in normal mucosas. The positive rate of survivin increased in the transition from normal mucosas to adenomas with low grade dysplasia to high grade dysplasia/carcinomas (0.0 %, 31.7 %, 56.7 % and 63.2% respectively). But the difference between high grade dyspiasia and carcinomas had no statistical significance. Positive rate was not related to histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma.Moreover, there was no correlation between histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma and immunoreactive intensity of survivin.CONCLUSION: The expression of survivin is the essential event in the early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis and plays an important role in the transition sequence and it is not related to histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma. It thus may provide a new diagnostic and therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  6. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Regina Pereira Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.; Group 3 and G4- liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF. Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  7. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  8. A Review of Molecular Events of Cadmium-Induced Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic, heavy industrial metal that poses serious environmental health hazards to both humans and wildlife. Lately, Cd and Cd containing compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens and epidemiological data show causal associations with prostate, breast and lung cancer. The molecular mechanisms involved in Cd-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood and are only now beginning to be elucidated. The effects of chronic exposure to Cd have recently become of great interest due to the development of malignancies in Cd-induced tumorigenesis in animal. Briefly, various in vitro studies demonstrate that Cd can act as a mitogen, stimulate cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and DNA repair, and induce carcinogenesis in several mammalian tissues and organs. Thus, the various mechanisms involved in chronic Cd exposure and malignant transformations warrant further investigation. In this review, we will focus on recent evidence of various leading general and tissue specific molecular mechanisms that follow chronic exposure to Cd in prostate, breast and lung transformed malignancies. In addition, this review considers less defined mechanisms such as epigenetic modification and autophagy, which are thought to play a role in the development of Cd-induced malignant transformation. PMID:25272057

  9. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer.

  10. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection.3H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  11. Carcinogenesis response modulation induced by gelonin encapsulated in liposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Anis; Nakhuru, K S; Singha, L I

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of gelonin to arrest protein synthesis, thereby limiting the growth of cancer cells was studied by encapsulating it into liposomes. The protein was extracted from the seeds of Indian plant Gelonium multiflorum by ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified using cation-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Biological activity of purified gelonin was determined using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate assay in the cell-free translational experiments. Gelonin was encapsulated in conventional liposomes prepared by the dry film method in order to retain biological activity of the entrapped protein. Carcinogenesis was induced in Swiss albino mice by intravenous administration of DBN (10 mg kg(-1) body weight) at weekly intervals. Marker enzyme assays (GGT, AChE, and GST), GSH levels, cell proliferation assay, hepatocyte DNA analysis, histological examination of micro sections of liver tissues were parameters used to monitor carcinogenesis induction, and regression in mice. From the in vitro experiments conducted, it was observed that gelonin upon its encapsulation into liposome, resulted in significant destruction of the transformed liver cells by its cytotoxic effects that arrest protein synthesis. Various parameters studied to monitor regression also suggested mass cell destruction to liver upon administration of liposomal gelonin in mice exposed to DBN. PMID:18500656

  12. Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunpeng; Zhu, Changjun; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Linwei; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih Hsin

    2010-09-01

    Microtubule (MT) kinesin motor proteins orchestrate various cellular processes (e.g. mitosis, motility and organelle transportation) and have been implicated in human carcinogenesis. Kif18A, a plus-end directed MT depolymerase kinesin, regulates MT dynamics, chromosome congression and cell division. In this study, we report that Kif18A is overexpressed in human breast cancers and Kif18A overexpression is associated with tumor grade, metastasis and poor survival. Functional analyses reveal that ectopic overexpression of Kif18A results in cell multinucleation, whereas ablation of Kif18A expression significantly inhibits the proliferative capability of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Kif18A not only affects the critical mitotic function of Kif18A but also decreases cancer cell migration by stabilizing MTs at leading edges and ultimately induces anoikis of cells with inactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway. Together, our results indicate that Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human breast cancer. PMID:20595236

  13. Arsenic-induced enhancement of ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis in mouse skin: a dose-response study.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Fredric J.; Uddin, Ahmed N.; Wu, Feng; Nádas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to establish the form of the dose-response relationship for dietary sodium arsenite as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in a mouse skin model. Hairless mice (strain Skh1) were fed sodium arsenite continuously in drinking water starting at 21 days of age at concentrations of 0.0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/L. At 42 days of age, solar spectrum UVR exposures were applied three times weekly to the dorsal skin at 1.0 kJ/m2 per exposure until the experi...

  14. Effect of luteolin on glycoproteins metabolism in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced experimental colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Vaiyapuri

    2008-12-01

    carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study indicates that luteolin has protected the cell surface and maintained the structural integrity of the cell membranes during DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. Keywords: Colon cancer, 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine, luteolin, glycoproteins Received: 23 January 2009 / Received in revised form: 17 February 2009, Accepted: 28 February 2009, Published online: 3 March 2009

  15. RNA polymerase mutations that facilitate replication progression in the rep uvrD recF mutant lacking two accessory replicative helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Lestini, Roxane; Duigou, Stéphane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-07-01

    We observed that cells lacking Rep and UvrD, two replication accessory helicases, and the recombination protein RecF are cryo-sensitive on rich medium. We isolated five mutations that suppress this Luria-Bertani (LB)-cryo-sensitivity and show that they map in the genes encoding the RNA polymerase subunits RpoB and RpoC. These rpoB (D444G, H447R and N518D) and rpoC mutants (H113R and P451L) were characterized. rpoB(H447R) and rpoB(D444G) prevent activation of the Prrn core promoter in rich medium, but only rpoB(H447R) also suppresses the auxotrophy of a relA spoT mutant (stringent-like phenotype). rpoC(H113R) suppresses the thermo-sensitivity of a greA greB mutant, suggesting that it destabilizes stalled elongation complexes. All mutations but rpoC(P451L) prevent R-loop formation. We propose that these rpo mutations allow replication in the absence of Rep and UvrD by destabilizing RNA Pol upon replication-transcription collisions. In a RecF(+) context, they improve growth of rep uvrD cells only if DinG is present, supporting the hypothesis that Rep, UvrD and DinG facilitate progression of the replication fork across transcribed sequences. They rescue rep uvrD dinG recF cells, indicating that in a recF mutant replication forks arrested by unstable transcription complexes can restart without any of the three known replication accessory helicases Rep, UvrD and DinG. PMID:20497334

  16. Cloning and characterization of a gene (UVR3) required for photorepair of 6-4 photoproducts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV radiation induces two major classes of pyrimidine dimers: the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product) and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, that specifically bind to these damage products and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. A gene that expresses a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity in vitro was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene, cloned on the basis of sequence similarity, from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This cloned gene produces a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. We also find that a previously described mutant of Arabidopsis (uvr3) that is defective in photoreactivation of 6-4 products carries a nonsense mutation in this 6-4 photolyase homolog. We have therefore termed this gene UVR3. Although homologs of this gene have previously been shown to produce a functional 6-4 photolyase when expressed in heterologous systems, this is the first demonstration of a requirement for this gene for photoreactivation of 6-4 products in vivo

  17. Phototoxic effect of UVR on wild type, ebony and yellow mutants of Drosophila melanogaster: Life Span, fertility, courtship and biochemical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Melanin plays an important role in protecting organisms from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Therefore, it is possible that differently colored strains can show different sensitivities to UVR. In the present work, life span, fertility and courtship behavior of wild type (w), ebony (e) and yellow (y) strains of Drosophila melanogaster were studied to evaluate their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV). Because a range of photo- toxic effects of UVR are mediated through generation of free radicals, levels of free radicals, lipid per- oxide (malondialdehyde, MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of three strains were examined to indicate their antioxidant defending ability and oxidative status. It was shown that w always had the highest lifespan and fertility not only in the control but also in UV-exposed groups. Moreover, lifespan and fertility of e were significantly higher (P<0.0001) than those of y in the UV-exposed groups, but not for the control. On the other hand, UV exposure had an adverse effect on courtship of flies. Stronger electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals could be detected in w, e and y exposed to 5 min UV. And there were more significant changes of EPR signals in y than in w and e. UVR had no significant (P=0.1782) effect on the SOD activities. After pooling data from the control and UV-exposed groups, we found that w had a significantly (P<0.05) higher level of SOD activity, but e and y were nearly at the same levels (P>0.05). MDA levels were increased in the UV dose-dependent manner (P=0.0495). In con- clusion, our results suggested that UVR can decrease life span and fertility of flies and do harm to courtship, which may be due to oxidative damage to flies tissues (e.g. central nervous system) induced by free radicals. w had the highest tolerance to UVR, which may be ascribed to its advantage of survival under the natural condition and at high level of SOD activity. Then differences of pigment between e and y in absorbing UV, shielding

  18. Plasmodium falciparum UvrD Helicase Translocates in 3′ to 5′ Direction, Colocalizes with MLH and Modulates Its Activity through Physical Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Moaz Ahmad; Abulaish Ansari; Mohammed Tarique; Akash Tripathi Satsangi; Renu Tuteja

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a global disease and a major health problem. The control of malaria is a daunting task due to the increasing drug resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify and characterize novel parasite specific drug targets. In the present study we report the biochemical characterization of parasite specific UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal fragment (PfUDN) containing UvrD helicase domain, which consists of helicase motifs Q, Ia-Id, II, III and most of mo...

  19. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans

  20. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, Gary M. [Dermatology Research Laboratories, Division of Medicine, Melanoma and Skin Cancer Research Institute, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital at the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: garyh@med.usyd.edu.au

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  1. Bioenergetic disturbances in mitochondrial membranes under fast neutrons induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breedless male mice have been used to study the effect of exogenous DNA on breathing, exogenous phosphorylation and free-radical oxidation of liver mitochondrion membrane in the case of carcinogenesis induced by fast neutrops. It is established that while-body irradiation of rats with fast neutrons in the sublethal dose bring about increase of free-radical oxidation and decrease of oxidation phosphorylation in membranes of liver mitachondria in delayed terms after irradiation. Free-radical reactions in membranes of liver mitochondria are inhibited in the case of tumour formation of different localization. Systematic introduction of DNA into irradiated animals is accompanied by the decrease of the frequency of tumoUr development

  2. Mechanistic modelling of genetic and epigenetic events in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodological problems arise on the way of radiation carcinogenesis modelling with the incorporation of radiobiological and cancer biology mechanistic data. The results of biophysical modelling of different endpoints [DNA DSB induction, repair, chromosome aberrations (CA) and cell proliferation] are presented and applied to the analysis of RBE-LET relationships for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation (RINT) of C3H/10T1/2 cells in culture. Predicted values for some endpoints correlate well with the data. It is concluded that slowly repaired DSB clusters, as well as some kind of CA, may be initiating events for RINT. As an alternative interpretation, it is possible that DNA damage can induce RINT indirectly via epigenetic process. A hypothetical epigenetic pathway for RINT is discussed. (authors)

  3. Carcinogenesis of gallbladder mucosa with occult pancreatobiliary reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of gallbladder cancer (GC) with occult pancreatobiliary reflux (OPBR) were retrospectively examined with images by US (ultrasonography), endoscopic US (EUS), ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) and multi-row CT, and with pathological specimens of the mucosa to consider its carcinogenesis. Subjects were 51-77 years old, 7 female patients with GC in whom OPBR was suggested mainly by mucosal hypertrophy in those images. Pathological observation was performed on specimens stained by HE and Ki-67 (for detecting cell proliferation). Imaging and pathological findings of the mucosa in the present GC were found analogous to known characteristics of GC with abnormal pancreatbiliary confluence, suggesting a similar carcinogenetic process to each other, where biliary phospholipids (PL) were degraded to toxic lyso-PL and free fatty acids. The subject with OPBR could thus be classified in the high risk group. More cases in number were thought necessary to define the surgical treatment, its timing and procedure in GC. (R.T.)

  4. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique O. Duarte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients’ response to therapy.

  5. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  6. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in man and experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now well established that some cancer in man results from exposures to certain chemicals and radiations, both ultraviolet and ionizing radiations. These chemical and physical agents are also carcinogenic in experimental animals and, where adequately tested, in mammalian cell cultures. However, only very limited data are available on the relative roles of and the interrelationships, if any, between these various environmental agents in the causation of the majority of the cancers in man. Nothing is known of the relationship between these agents and possible carcinogenic viral information in the etiology of cancer in man. Furthermore, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which chemicals and radiations induce cancers in either man or experimental animals. The objective of this brief review is to present certain aspects of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in man and experimental animals and some of the problems in the elucidation of their roles in carinogenesis in the human

  7. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C;

    2006-01-01

    preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent......This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...... IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month...

  8. Recent advances in the study of HPV-associated carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyan; Jin; Zhi-Xiang; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses(HPVs) cause virtually all cervical cancers, the second leading cause of death by cancer among women, as well as other anogenital cancers and a subset of head and neck cancers. Approximately half of women, who develop cervical cancer die from it. Despite the optimism that has accompanied the introduction of prophylactic vaccines to prevent some HPV infections, the relatively modest uptake of the vaccine, especially in the developing world, and the very high fraction of men and women who are already infected, means that HPV-associated disease will remain as a significant public health problem for decades. In this review, we summarize some recent findings on HPV-associated carcinogenesis, such as mi RNAs in HPV-associated cancers, implication of stem cells in the biology and therapy of HPV-positive cancers, HPV vaccines, targeted therapy of cervical cancer, and drug treatment for HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasias.

  9. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  10. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane...... zone of stratified epithelia. Immunohistochemical studies have previously reported changes in steady-state levels of different alpha(IV) chains in several epithelial cancer types. In the present study we aimed to quantitatively determine the mRNA levels of type IV collagen (alpha1/alpha 4/alpha 6) and...... type VII collagen (alpha1) during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for alpha1(IV), alpha 4(IV), alpha 6(IV), and alpha1(VII) in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 33), adenomas (n = 29) and in normal tissue from the same individuals. In...

  11. The Anticancer Role of Capsaicin in Experimentallyinduced Lung Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandi Anandakumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Capsaicin (CAP is the chief pungent principle found in the hot red peppers and the chili peppers that have long been used as spices, food additives and drugs. This study investigated the anticancer potential of CAP through its ability to modify extracellular matrix components and proteases during mice lung carcinogenesis. Methods: Swiss albino mice were treated with benzo(a pyrene (50 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil orally twice a week for four successive weeks to induce lung cancer at the end of 14th week. CAP was administrated (10 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil intraperitoneally. Extracellular matrix components were assayed; Masson’s trichome staining of lung tissues was performed. Western blot analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 were also carried out. Results: In comparison with the control animals, animals in which benzo(apyrene had induced lung cancer showed significant increases in extracellular matrix components such as collagen (hydroxy proline, elastin, uronic acid and hexosamine and in glycosaminoglycans such as hyaluronate, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. The above alterations in extracellular matrix components were effectively counteracted in benzo(apyrene along with CAP supplemented animals when compared to benzo(a pyrene alone supplemented animals. The results of Masson’s trichome staining for collagen and of, immunoblotting analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 further supported the biochemical findings. Conclusion: The apparent potential of CAP in modulating extracellular matrix components and proteases suggests that CAP plays a chemomodulatory and anti- cancer role working against experimentally induced lung carcinogenesis.

  12. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sliva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP] and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS] in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

  13. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  14. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  15. Role of Fapy glycosylase and UvrABC excinuclease in the repair of UVA (320-400 nm)-mediated DNA damage in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the damage caused by far-UV, the damage caused by UVA (320-400 nm) is largely oxygen dependent, suggesting near-UV-mediated DNA damage involves reactive oxygen species. The DNA repair enzymes that recognize oxidized bases may, therefore, be an important part of the cell's near-UV defense repertoire. To evaluate the relative importance of Fpg (Fapy) glycosy-lase (an enzyme known to remove oxidized bases) and the DNA damage-inducible UvrABC excinuclease in recovery from near-UV-induced stress, we have constructed fpg- and uvrA-derivatives of Escherichia coli and tested the response (survival) of these strains to both UVA and far-UV radiation. Relative to control strains, the fpg- derivatives were found to be consistently more sensitive to the lethal effects of UVA, but not far-UV radiation. In contrast, uvrA- mutants were more sensitive than control strains to both UVA and far-UV radiation. Thymine dimers, known to be produced by far-UV and corrected by UvrABC, were not generated by the UVA fluences used in this study, suggesting that some other UVA-induced lesion(s) is recognized and repaired by this excinuclease. (Author)

  16. Culture méditerranéenne: l'espace localisé dans l'œuvre de Georges Brassens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno CANINI

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available L'œuvre de G. Brassens prend en compte l'espace méditerranéen à trois échelles: le Bassin méditerranéen, le Golfe du Lion et la Ville de Sète. Un modèle est proposé pour chacune des trois.

  17. Deux extraits commentés des Basses Œuvres1 de ‘Abduh Khāl

    OpenAIRE

    Lagrange, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Le romancier saoudien ‘Abduh Khāl, dans son roman Tarmī bi‑sharar (Les Basses Œuvres) paru en 2009 et couronné par l’International Prize for Arab Fiction en 2010, tend un miroir peu flatteur au Royaume wahhabite : ce monologue d’un tortionnaire violeur au service d’un mystérieux Maître du Palais dans une Djedda déformée par l’affairisme figurant allégoriquement le régime présente un pays corrompu par sa soumission à l’absolutisme. Deux extraits sont ici commentés, en soulignant les rapports i...

  18. Mise en œuvre d’un dispositif d’apprentissage hybride en collège

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bonnassies

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available En poste dans un collège, j’ai constaté que la compétence de compréhension de l’oral en anglais y est difficilement acquise en raison, entre autres, d’une exposition insuffisante à la langue et d’un manque de temps pour développer des stratégies appropriées. J’ai alors postulé qu’un environnement d’apprentissage hybride s’appuyant sur le développement d’habiletés cognitives et métacognitives ainsi que sur la mise en œuvre de comportements d’entraide permettraient de rendre les apprenants plus...

  19. Quelques notes sur l’Orient dans l’œuvre poétique de Victor Hugo

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel, Achira

    2012-01-01

    L’Orient a toujours suscité l’intérêt des voyageurs et des écrivains ; il a fait l’objet de plusieurs ouvrages, depuis les relations de voyages jusqu’aux œuvres les plus fascinantes où le réel et l’imaginaire vont de pair. Nombre d’écrivains ont parlé de l’Orient sans l’avoir vu ; Victor Hugo en fait partie ; aussi ses recueils montrent-ils une perception particulière de l’Orient : c’est un rêve et un désir. Si le poète se tourne vers lui, c’est pour rechercher l’exotisme qu’il tâche ensuite ...

  20. UvrD helicase: an old dog with a new trick: how one step backward leads to many steps forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a phenomenon that exists in a wide variety of organisms from bacteria to humans. This mechanism allows cells to repair the actively transcribed DNA strand much faster than the non-transcribed one. At the sites of bulky DNA damage RNA polymerase stalls, initiating recruitment of the repair machinery. It is a commonly accepted paradigm that bacterial cells utilize a sole coupling factor, called Mfd to initiate TCR. According to that model, Mfd removes transcription complexes stalled at the lesion site and simultaneously recruits repair machinery. However, this model was recently put in doubt by various discrepancies between the proposed universal role of Mfd in the TCR and its biochemical and phenotypical properties. Here, I present a second pathway of bacterial TCR recently discovered in my laboratory, which does not involve Mfd but implicates a common repair factor, UvrD, in a central position in the process. PMID:25345862

  1. Error-free uvr+-dependent inducible DNA repair in Escherichia coli B/r Hcr+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of suppressor (tryptophan reversions) and of true (streptomycin-resistant and dependent) mutations has been followed in E. coli cells irradiated with a single dose or two separate doses of ultraviolet (U.V.) radiation. Under these conditions dimers were efficiently excised after a single dose, while about 40 per cent of the dimers remained unexcised after two doses. Although the level of unexcised dimers in the latter case increased proportionally with the second U.V. dose, the mutation frequency increased by 1.5-2-fold, but did not continue to increase with the level of unexcised dimers. A comparison of excision-proficient and excision-deficient cells containing similar amounts of persisting dimers has shown that proficient cells can tolerate a high level of dimers without an adequate increase in mutation frequency. Results suggest the existence of an error-free uvr+-dependent inducible repair in E. coli B/r Hcr+ cells. (author)

  2. Les représentations esthétiques de la violence dans l’œuvre de Fernando Botero

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Marie Lassus

    2010-01-01

    En 2005, le peintre colombien Fernando Botero expose à Rome une cinquantaine d'œuvres (triptyques, tableaux et dessins) sur les tortures commises par des soldats américains dans la prison d'Abou Ghraib, conséquences de la guerre en Irak et des attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Après avoir traité de la violence en Colombie, Botero élargit la portée de son témoignage esthétique, humain et politique sur un thème qui a aussi à voir avec la question des prisonniers de Guantánamo. Dans des sociétés d...

  3. Plasmodium falciparum UvrD helicase translocates in 3' to 5' direction, colocalizes with MLH and modulates its activity through physical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moaz; Ansari, Abulaish; Tarique, Mohammed; Satsangi, Akash Tripathi; Tuteja, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a global disease and a major health problem. The control of malaria is a daunting task due to the increasing drug resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify and characterize novel parasite specific drug targets. In the present study we report the biochemical characterization of parasite specific UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal fragment (PfUDN) containing UvrD helicase domain, which consists of helicase motifs Q, Ia-Id, II, III and most of motif IV, and the C-terminal fragment (PfUDC1) containing UvrD helicase C terminal domain, consisting of remaining part of motif IV and motifs IVa-IVc and 161 amino acids of intervening sequence between motif IV and V, possess ssDNA-dependent ATPase and DNA helicase activities in vitro. Using immunodepletion assays we show that the ATPase and helicase activities are attributable to PfUDN and PfUDC1 proteins. The helicase activity can utilize the hydrolysis of all the nucleotide and deoxynucleotide triphosphates and the direction of unwinding is 3' to 5'. The endogenous P. falciparum UvrD contains the characteristic DNA helicase activity. PfUDN interacts with PfMLH (P. falciparum MutL homologue) and modulates the endonuclease activity of PfMLH and PfMLH positively regulates the unwinding activity of PfUDN. We show that PfUvrD is expressed in the nucleus distinctly in the schizont stages of the intraerythrocytic development of the parasite and it colocalizes with PfMLH. These studies will make an important contribution in understanding the nucleic acid transaction in the malaria parasite. PMID:23185322

  4. Plasmodium falciparum UvrD helicase translocates in 3' to 5' direction, colocalizes with MLH and modulates its activity through physical interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Malaria is a global disease and a major health problem. The control of malaria is a daunting task due to the increasing drug resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify and characterize novel parasite specific drug targets. In the present study we report the biochemical characterization of parasite specific UvrD helicase from Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal fragment (PfUDN containing UvrD helicase domain, which consists of helicase motifs Q, Ia-Id, II, III and most of motif IV, and the C-terminal fragment (PfUDC1 containing UvrD helicase C terminal domain, consisting of remaining part of motif IV and motifs IVa-IVc and 161 amino acids of intervening sequence between motif IV and V, possess ssDNA-dependent ATPase and DNA helicase activities in vitro. Using immunodepletion assays we show that the ATPase and helicase activities are attributable to PfUDN and PfUDC1 proteins. The helicase activity can utilize the hydrolysis of all the nucleotide and deoxynucleotide triphosphates and the direction of unwinding is 3' to 5'. The endogenous P. falciparum UvrD contains the characteristic DNA helicase activity. PfUDN interacts with PfMLH (P. falciparum MutL homologue and modulates the endonuclease activity of PfMLH and PfMLH positively regulates the unwinding activity of PfUDN. We show that PfUvrD is expressed in the nucleus distinctly in the schizont stages of the intraerythrocytic development of the parasite and it colocalizes with PfMLH. These studies will make an important contribution in understanding the nucleic acid transaction in the malaria parasite.

  5. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described

  6. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC. Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  7. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  8. Apoptotic cell death and its relationship to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferda Bir; Nese Calli-Demirkan; A Cevik Tufan; Metin Akbulut; N Lale Satiroglu-Tufan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the apoptotic process of cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas co-localizing with chronic gastritis and gastric carcinomas and to analyze the involvement of proteins regulating apoptosis in the process of intestinal metaplasia related gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: Forty-two gastric carcinoma and seventeen chronic gastritis cases were included in this study. All cases were examined for the existence of intestinal metaplasia. Ten cases randomly selected from each group were processed for TUNEL assay. TUNEL positive cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas, colocalizing either to gastric carcinoma or chronic gastritis,were counted and converted to apoptotic indices.In addition, p53, bcl-2 and bax expression patterns within these tissues were analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Twenty-eight of the cases were intestinal and 14 of the cases were diffuse type adenocarcinomas.64% (27/42) of the gastric carcinoma cases had intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia co-localized more with intestinal type carcinomas compared with diffuse type carcinomas [75% (21/28) vs 42% (6/14),respectively; P≤0.05]. The mean apoptotic index in tumor cells was 0.70±0.08. The mean apoptotic index in intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to tumors was significantly higher than that of intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to chronic gastritis (0.70±0.03 vs 0.09±0.01, respectively; P≤0.05). P53 positivity was not observed in areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to tumors or chronic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed lower cytoplasmic bcl-2 positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [55.5% (15/27) vs 70.5%(12/17), respectively]. On the other hand, intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed significantly higher cytoplasmic bax positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [44.4%(12/27) vs 11.7% (2/17), respectively; P≤0

  9. Multistage epidermal carcinogenesis in transgenic mice: cooperativity and paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, D A; Wang, X J; Roop, D R

    1996-04-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most prevalent forms of human neoplasia with a frequency approaching that of all other neoplasms combined. Given this alarming statistic, which may be further exacerbated by increased ultraviolet B irradiation from ozone depletion, it is vital that realistic, relevant model systems are developed to increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis that result in or evaluate new treatment modalities. Toward this goal, the ability to stably introduce genes into the germline of mice has greatly enhanced prospects for generation of transgenic animal models of multistage molecular carcinogenesis. Moreover, when genes are combined with regulatory sequences that target their expression to specific tissues, investigators are able to study neoplasia both in the context of living organisms and in the tissues suspected of being the targets of these genes. The epidermis is an attractive tissue for targeted gene expression; not only is it a model for epithelial diseases in general, but the accessibility of the epidermis allows easy detection of progressive pathological changes that result from transgene expression and facilitates assessment of the potential role played by environmental factors. We have developed a targeting vector based on the human keratin gene (HK1), which is expressed exclusively in the epidermis of transgenic mice, at a late stage in development and in both basal and differentiated cells. Through the use of this targeting ability, rasHa, fos, and TGF alpha transgenic mice have been developed that exhibit preneoplastic epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, and later benign, regression prone papillomas. Together, coexpression of two oncogenes cooperated to give autonomous papillomas, which possessed the phenotypic stability to allow assessment of a third genetic event, namely loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, via mating with p53 knockout mice. Loss of p53 expression, however, identified a

  10. Modifier-concept of colorectal carcinogenesis: Lipidomics as a technical tool in pathway analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolaus; Gassler; Christina; Klaus; Elke; Kaemmerer; Andrea; Reinartz

    2010-01-01

    In the modifier concept of intestinal carcinogenesis, lipids have been established as important variables and one focus is given to long-chain fatty acids. Increased consumption of long-chain fatty acids is in discussion to modify the development of colorectal carcinoma in humans. Saturated long-chain fatty acids, in particular, are assumed to promote carcinogenesis, whereas poly-unsaturated forms are likely to act in the opposite way. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind these effects are not well u...

  11. Chronic estrogen-induced cervical and vaginal squamous carcinogenesis in human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeit, J M; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1996-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including type 16, have been identified as factors in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the presence and expression of the virus per se appear to be insufficient for carcinogenesis. Rather, cofactors most likely are necessary in addition to viral gene expression to initiate neoplasia. One candidate cofactor is prolonged exposure to sex hormones. To examine the possible effects of estrogen on HPV-associated neoplasia, we treated transgenic mice expressi...

  12. American ginseng attenuates azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced colon carcinogenesis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunhao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wu, Xiao-hui; Martin, Adiba; Du, Wei; He, Tong-Chuan; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for this malignancy. We previously reported colon cancer chemoprevention potential using American ginseng (AG) in a xenograft mice model. However, the nude mouse model is not a gut-specific colon carcinogenesis animal model. Methods In this study, an experimental colitis and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, chemically induced by azoxymethane/dextran...

  13. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rehman, Muneeb U.; Mir Tahir, Farrah Ali; Wajhul Qamar; Rehan Khan; Abdul Quaiyoom Khan; Abdul Lateef; Oday-O-Hamiza; Sarwat Sultana

    2012-01-01

    In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine) initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen ...

  14. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Payne CM; Crowley-Skillicorn C; Bernstein C; Holubec H; Bernstein H

    2011-01-01

    Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated w...

  15. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor system and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Kopchick, John J

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In terms of cell cycle regulation, the GH-IGF system induces signalling pathways for cell growth that compete with other signalling systems that result in cell death; thus the final effect of these opposed forces is critical for normal and abnormal cell growth. The association of the GH-IGF system with carcinogenesis has long been hypothesised, mainly based on in vitro studies and the use of a variety of animal models of human cancer, and also on epidemiological and clinical evidence in humans. While ample experimental evidence supports a role of the GH-IGF system in tumour promotion and progression, with several of its components being currently tested as central targets for cancer therapy, the strength of evidence from patients with acromegaly, GH deficiency, or treated with GH is much weaker. In this review, we will attempt to consolidate this data. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 414-426). PMID:27387246

  16. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis. PMID:22223508

  17. Experimental pulmonary carcinogenesis by radon and its daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on experimental pulmonary carcinogenesis by radon and its daughters has come mostly from experiments carried out in France and United States of America. In rats a dose response relation was estimated to be linear with dose at low dose region. Studies of rats exposed daily to radon and radon daughters indicated that the frequency of pulmonary cancer at total exposure greater than 3000 WLM was greater when the exposure rates were low. At low total exposures the dose-rate effect was less apparent. Cigarette smoke increased the pulmonary cancer in rats but decreased in dogs. The decrease may be due to a decrease of absorbed doses with increased secretion of mucus and to an enhancement of mucociliary clearance. After inhalation of 222Ru at equilibrium with radon daughters, rats were inoculated intrapleurally with asbestos fibres or glass fibres. The additive co-carcinogenic effects of this type of insult were demonstrated by the increased incidence of malignant thoracic tumours. As for species differences, dogs and hamsters are relatively resistant to cancer induction and rats are sensitive. While bronchogenic carcinomas are the most frequently observed radiation-induced pulmonary cancer in humans, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas are the most frequent type in most animal species. (author)

  18. Role of S100 Proteins in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moravkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The family of S100 proteins represents 25 relatively small (9–13 kD calcium binding proteins. These proteins possess a broad spectrum of important intracellular and extracellular functions. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men (after lung and prostate cancer and the second most frequent cancer in women (after breast cancer worldwide. S100 proteins are involved in the colorectal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms: they enable proliferation, invasion, and migration of the tumour cells; furthermore, S100 proteins increase angiogenesis and activate NF-κβ signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis especially of colitis-associated carcinoma. The expression of S100 proteins in the cancerous tissue and serum levels of S100 proteins might be used as a precise diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with suspected or already diagnosed colorectal neoplasia. Possibly, in the future, S100 proteins will be a therapeutic target for tailored anticancer therapy.

  19. Mechanisms of liver carcinogenesis in patients injected with Thorotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorotrast, a previously used radiological contrast medium, is known to induce liver tumors consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), and angiosarcoma (AS) at nearly the same instance. Pathological specimens from thorotrast patients are valuable for assessing the relevance of long-term exposure to low dose α-particles to radiation carcinogenesis. We analyzed mutations of the p53 and the K-ras genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in pathological specimens from thorotrast-induced ICC. The major p53 mutation observed in thorotrast ICC was the transition type, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are not likely involved in gene mutations of thorotrast cancers. MSI frequency in thorotrast ICC was significantly higher than that in non-thorotrast ICC. MSI was partly attributed to the inactivation of the hMLH1 mismatch repair gene via methylation of its promoter region. Thorotrast ICC shared LOH pattern with non-thorotrast HCC and ICC. Furthermore, we could assess the distribution and the quantity of deposited thorium using an imaging plate and a BAS image analyzer. Thorotrast was always phagocytosed by macrophages and the distribution of thorium deposits was not always consistent with that of apoptotic cells. We conclude that thorotrast ICC is developed through complex carcinogenic steps including genomic instability and mutations of crucial genes occurred during remodeling of the liver architecture. (orig.)

  20. Use of human epidermal cells in the study of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the importance of human cells, particularly human epithelial cells, in cancer research, we have studied certain phases or events of carcinogenesis using human epidermal cells in primary culture. (1) We found that human epidermal cells are capable of metabolizing benzo[a]pyrene. Large inter-individual variations are found in the basal and induced arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase activities. (2) UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was demonstrated in human epidermal cells on autoradiographs. We also found that DNA repair is defective in epidermal cells isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum by a new explant-outgrowth culture. (3) Human epidermal cells are unique in that there is a large number of binding sites to phorbol esters compared with mouse epidermal cells, but there is no down-regulation. Further, human epidermal cells show essentially negative responses to tumor promoters, i.e., no stimulation of DNA synthesis, sugar uptake, and no induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity. (4) Human epidermal cells contain 1.5 x 10(5) binding sites per cell for epidermal growth factor (EGF), whereas squamous cell carcinomas of skin and oral cavity have larger amounts of EGF receptors in the order of 10(6) per cell. (5) Based on the above results, we attempted to transform human epidermal cells by the treatment with chemical carcinogens, but until now no transformation was obtained. 16 references

  1. Interpretation by modelling of observations in radon radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biophysical models for radon-related induction of lung cancer are developed with the aim of reducing the uncertainties in current risk estimates at low doses by a better understanding of the relevant mechanisms. These models can make use of the full dosimetric information when extracting information on, say, age-at-exposure, protraction or fractionation effects. It is found that irradiation by radon and its progeny does act on the initiating event of carcinogenesis (e.g. mutation), but its dominating effect is via promoting the division of already initiated cells. Data show that the concept of a unit of exposure giving, in an additive way, a unit of lung cancer risk is too limited, while relatively simple mechanistic assumptions described in this article do yield an adequate description of observations. Exposures in epidemiological data sets are measured with error. For various error models it has been shown that likelihood-based techniques of correction work reliably; likewise for biologically based cancer models. When several parameters are allowed to be exposure dependent, for example, initiation and promotion, then their relative importance is influenced. (authors)

  2. Effect of Withania somnifera on DMBA induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L; Kuttan, G

    2001-05-01

    Administration of an extract of Withania somnifera was found to reduce two stage skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA (dimethyl benzanthracene) and croton oil. Withania somnifera was administered at a concentration of (20 mg/dose/animal i.p.) consecutively on 5 days prior to DMBA administration and continued twice weekly for 10 weeks. After the 180th day of carcinogen administration, all of the animals developed papilloma in the control group whereas only six out of 12 animals developed papilloma in the treated group. A total of 11 papillomas were found in the control group while only six developed them in the Withania somnifera treated group. Enzyme analysis of skin and liver showed significant enhancement in antioxidant enzymes such as GSH, GST, Glutathione peroxides and Catalases in Withania somnifera treated group when compared with the control. The elevated level of lipid peroxide in the control group was significantly inhibited by Withania somnifera administration. These studies indicate that Withania somnifera could reduce the papilloma induced alterations to the antioxidant defense systems. PMID:11297845

  3. Skin carcinogenesis in man and in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents an updated overview of the current state of the art in scientific, experimental and clinical investigations on the generation and the prevention of cancer of the skin. From the achievements presented, marked refinements in the assessment of the risk of cancer, by environmental and endogenous factors, including tumor virus, will be stimulated. They include the problem of the stratospheric 'ozone holes' above both poles of the earth causing much public concern as expressed by current headlines in the media and by the United Nations Environmental Program. Moreover, new ideas will merge for developing specific approaches to explore the mechanistic, i.e. ultimately the molecular-biological, causes of skin cancer and others. In addition, the experimental utilization of oncogens and of other techniques of molecular biology at all levels of the biology of tissues and cells, may open up entirely new facets in the research on skin cancer. Detailed knowledge of the mechanistic aspects of skin carcinogenesis may give important hints with respect to 'tailor-make' and utilize new anti-tumor agents in the therapy of skin cancer for the benefit of the cancer patient. (orig.). 67 figs., 44 tabs

  4. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis. PMID:27273788

  5. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  6. Unique database study linking gingival inflammation and smoking in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, Birgitta; Andersson, Leif C; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-02-01

    We investigated statistical association between gingival inflammation and cancer in a group of patients followed up for 26 years with the hypothesis that gingival inflammation affects carcinogenesis. Altogether, 1676 30- to 40-year-old subjects from Stockholm were clinically examined in 1985. In 2011, we compared the baseline oral examination and follow-up data with cancer diagnoses sourced from the Swedish national hospital register databases. Of 1676 individuals, 89 (55 women, 34 men) had got cancer by the year 2011. Women were found to be at higher risk for cancer than men. Smoking (expressed in pack-years) had been more prevalent in the cancer group than in those with no cancer diagnosis. Gingival index, marker of gingival inflammation, was higher in the cancer group than in subjects with no cancer. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, education, dental plaque and calculus index scores, or in the number of missing teeth. In multiple logistic regression analysis with cancer as the dependent variable and several independent variables, pack-years of smoking appeared to be a principal independent predictor with odds ratio (OR) 1.32 while gingival inflammation showed OR 1.29. Hence, our present findings showed that together with smoking, gingival inflammation indeed associated with the incidence of cancer in this cohort. PMID:25533098

  7. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  8. An UVB-carcinogenesis model with KSN nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nikaido, Osamu [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Suzuki, Fumio; Hayakawa, Jun-ichiro; Hiai, Hiroshi

    1998-03-01

    We established and characterized a systematic ultraviolet light-induced carcinogenesis model using KSN nude mice. We prepared five groups of KSN mice and exposed them six times a week to five levels of daily ultraviolet B (UVB) doses; 1340, 670, 320, 160 and 0 J/m{sup 2}/day. In 670, 320 and 160 J/m{sup 2}/day, the latency period tended to become shorter in proportion to the daily doses and prevalence data fitted well to log-normal distribution. In the log-log plot of days till 50% prevalence versus daily dose, we saw a linear relationship for 1 mm tumor diameter. From this analysis, we determined that days necessary to reach 50% prevalence is in proportion to the -0.49 power of daily dose. The average number of tumors per survivor correlated with prevalence data. Direct measured rates of tumor growth were independent of daily UVB-dose. Therefore we speculated that UV-irradiation did not affect tumor growth after its appearance. Most UVB-induced tumors were squamous cell carcinoma, the rest were spindle cell carcinoma, papilloma and mixed type. We concluded that our experimental data with nude mice was in accordance with data with hairless mice in nature. (author)

  9. The identification of Smad7 gene in lung carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhanKT; HuoYY

    2002-01-01

    Previous study showed that Smad7 inhibited the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signal transfuction physiologically in vitro.This study was carried out to investigate this feedback inhibitory effect in the carcinogenesis of lung.Smad7 expression was measured at transription and translation level in immortalized and malignant transformed cell line.Without stimulation of TGF-β1,Smad7 abundance in the malignant transformed cells was higher than thatin immortalized cells.Stimulated with TGF-β1,Smad7 expression level was up-regulated evidently in immortalized cells,but there was not a significant change in malignant transformed cells.With the overexpression of Smad7 in cells,the proliferation of malignant transformed cells was enhanced much higher than that in immortalized cells.Meanwhile,the inhibitory effect of exogenous TGF-β1 on malignant transformed cells was weaker than that on immortalized cells.It is suggested Smad7 feedback inhibition in malignant transformation stage be a mechanism to promote cell proliferation.

  10. Placebo controlled, crossover validation study of oral ibuprofen and topical hydrocortisone-21-acetate for a model of ultraviolet B radiation (UVR-induced pain and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rother M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Rother, Ilka RotherDepartment of Clinical Operations, X-pert Med GmbH, Graefelfing, GermanyBackground: Pain related to ultraviolet B radiation (UVR induced sunburn is an established, simple, acute pain model. One of the major criticisms is related to the potential dermal adverse events caused by the UVR exposure. This study tried to validate the model for oral and topical drugs and to define the minimum required UVR exposure.Methods: This subject- and observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluated 600 mg oral ibuprofen (IB and topical hydrocortisone-21-acetate (HC twice daily (bid in 24 healthy volunteers. Treatment started immediately after irradiation and again at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours post-UVR. Assessment of hyperalgesia to heat and signs of inflammation (erythema, skin temperature for all areas was performed after UVR and again at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours. Subjects returned within 4–11 days to the study site for the second period of the study. As in the first period, subjects received HC at one side and topical placebo on the other side, but oral treatment was crossed-over.Results: The primary analysis failed to show the expected superiority of the IB-group vs the placebo group in period 1 of the study. Evaluating period 2 alone clearly showed the expected treatment effects of IB for erythema and heat pain threshold. The results were less pronounced for skin temperature. In contrast to IB vs oral placebo, there were no differences in treatment response between HC and topical placebo. UVR at all dosages induced profound erythema and reduction of heat pain threshold without causing blisters or other unexpected discomfort to the subjects. The changes were almost linear between 1 and 2 minimal erythema doses (MED, whereas the change from 2 to 3 MED was less pronounced.Conclusion: Use of 2 MED in upcoming studies seems to be reasonable to limit subjects' UVB exposure. The following procedural changes are

  11. Role of gastrin-peptides in Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo Chueca; Angel Lanas; Elena Piazuelo

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone responsible for the stimulation of gastric acid secretion; in addition,gastrin and its derivatives exert proliferative and antiapoptotic effects on several cell types.Gastrin synthesis and secretion are increased in certain situations,for example,when proton pump inhibitors are used.The impact of sustained hypergastrinemia is currently being investigated.In vitro experiments and animal models have shown that prolonged hypergastrinemia may be related with higher cancer rates; although,this relationship is less clear in human beings.Higher gastrin levels have been shown to cause hyperplasia of several cell types; yet,the risk for developing cancer seems to be the same in normo-and hypergastrinemic patients.Some tumors also produce their own gastrin,which can act in an autocrine manner promoting tumor growth.Certain cancers are extremely dependent on gastrin to proliferate.Initial research focused only on the effects of amidated gastrins,but there has been an interest in intermediates of gastrin in the last few decades.These intermediates aren't biologically inactive;in fact,they may exert greater effects on proliferation and apoptosis than the completely processed forms.In certain gastrin overproduction states,they are the most abundant gastrin peptides secreted.The purpose of this review is to examine the gastrin biosynthesis process and to summarize the results from different studies evaluating the production,levels,and effects of the main forms of gastrin in different overexpression states and their possible relationship with Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  12. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  13. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  14. Carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an alternate hypothetical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Sharon Shuxian; Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Wee, Joseph T S

    2016-01-01

    Current proposed mechanisms implicate both early and latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the carcinogenic cascade, whereas epidemiological studies have always associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with early childhood EBV infection and with chronic ear, nose, and sinus conditions. Moreover, most patients with NPC present with IgA antibody titers to EBV capsid antigen (VCA-IgA), which can precede actual tumor presentation by several years. If early childhood EBV infection indeed constitutes a key event in NPC carcinogenesis, one would have to explain the inability to detect the virus in normal nasopharyngeal epithelium of patients at a high risk for EBV infection. It is perhaps possible that EBV resides within the salivary glands, instead of the epithelium, during latency. This claim is indirectly supported by observations that the East Asian phenotype shares the characteristics of an increased susceptibility to NPC and immature salivary gland morphogenesis, the latter of which is influenced by the association of salivary gland morphogenesis with an evolutionary variant of the human ectodysplasin receptor gene (EDAR), EDARV370A. Whether the immature salivary gland represents a more favorable nidus for EBV is uncertain, but in patients with infectious mononucleosis, EBV has been isolated in this anatomical organ. The presence of EBV-induced lymphoepitheliomas in the salivary glands and lungs further addresses the possibility of submucosal spread of the virus. Adding to the fact that the fossa of Rosen Müller contains a transformative zone active only in the first decade of life, one might be tempted to speculate the possibility of an alternative carcinogenic cascade for NPC that is perhaps not dissimilar to the model of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. PMID:26738743

  15. Interaction between APC and Fen1 during breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Law, Brian K; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant DNA base excision repair (BER) contributes to malignant transformation. However, inter-individual variations in DNA repair capacity plays a key role in modifying breast cancer risk. We review here emerging evidence that two proteins involved in BER - adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) - promote the development of breast cancer through novel mechanisms. APC and Fen1 expression and interaction is increased in breast tumors versus normal cells, APC interacts with and blocks Fen1 activity in Pol-β-directed LP-BER, and abrogation of LP-BER is linked with cigarette smoke condensate-induced transformation of normal breast epithelial cells. Carcinogens increase expression of APC and Fen1 in spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cells, human colon cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Since APC and Fen1 are tumor suppressors, an increase in their levels could protect against carcinogenesis; however, this does not seem to be the case. Elevated Fen1 levels in breast and lung cancer cells may reflect the enhanced proliferation of cancer cells or increased DNA damage in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor functions of APC and Fen1 is due to their interaction, which may act as a susceptibility factor for breast cancer. The increased interaction of APC and Fen1 may occur due to polypmorphic and/or mutational variation in these genes. Screening of APC and Fen1 polymorphic and/or mutational variations and APC/Fen1 interaction may permit assessment of individual DNA repair capability and the risk for breast cancer development. Such individuals might lower their breast cancer risk by reducing exposure to carcinogens. Stratifying individuals according to susceptibility would greatly assist epidemiologic studies of the impact of suspected environmental carcinogens. Additionally, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of APC and Fen1 may provide the basis for developing new and

  16. Involvement of genetic and epigenetic steps in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation carcinogenic risk prediction requires fundamental mechanistic assumptions about relationships between dose, DNA damage in certain regions leukemogenesis in the mouse may be viewed as specific chromosome aberration. Model of transformation by radiation induced chromosome aberrations is analyzed. Model is able to fit dose-response data for cell neoplastic transformation and cancer incidence in rodents. Alternative model is studied in which an induction of neoplastic phenotype is considered as delayed indirect effects of radiation. Initiating event is triggered by an epigenetic genomic modifications and represents a change in the program of cell senescence due to in part functional inactivation of senescence gene(s). The following possibilities are modeled. Radiation induces an unstable cell phenotype which reverses to normal one after many cell generations. Induction of highly unstable phenotype. Altered cells are assumed to acquire ability to generate new phenotype. Induction of stable alterations of cell phenotype following irradiation. Model suggests an essential role for selection of cells resistant to growth inhibition signals during promotion in vivo or sub culturing in vitro for development of cancer cell clones. Appearance the damage at specific sequences during the oncogenic transformation are predicted. The model fits data on dynamics of X-ray transformation of rodent cells in culture. Results are in qualitative agreement with data on radiation induced mouse mammary cancer and delayed expression of p53 mutations. The changes in hetero-chromating may cause significant changes in the control of gene expression during oncogeny. Chromatin structural alterations which are observed for chemical and viral transformation are expected to be an earliest and general phenomenon for radiation carcinogenesis. (authors)

  17. Carcinogenesis ofnasopharyngeal carcinoma:an alternate hypothetical mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Shuxian Poh; Melvin Lee Kiang Chua; Joseph TS Wee

    2016-01-01

    Current proposed mechanisms implicate both early and latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection in the carcinogenic cascade, whereas epidemiological studies have always associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with early child-hood EBV infection and with chronic ear, nose, and sinus conditions. Moreover, most patients with NPC present with IgA antibody titers to EBV capsid antigen (VCA-IgA), which can precede actual tumor presentation by several years. If early childhood EBV infection indeed constitutes a key event in NPC carcinogenesis, one would have to explain the inability to detect the virus in normal nasopharyngeal epithelium of patients at a high risk for EBV infection. It is perhaps possible that EBV resides within the salivary glands, instead of the epithelium, during latency. This claim is indirectly supported by observations that the East Asian phenotype shares the characteristics of an increased sus-ceptibility to NPC and immature salivary gland morphogenesis, the latter of which is inlfuenced by the association of salivary gland morphogenesis with an evolutionary variant of the human ectodysplasin receptor gene (EDAR), EDARV370A. Whether the immature salivary gland represents a more favorable nidus for EBV is uncertain, but in patients with infectious mononucleosis, EBV has been isolated in this anatomical organ. The presence of EBV-induced lymphoepitheliomas in the salivary glands and lungs further addresses the possibility of submucosal spread of the virus. Adding to the fact that the fossa of Rosen Müller contains a transformative zone active only in the ifrst decade of life, one might be tempted to speculate the possibility of an alternative carcinogenic cascade for NPC that is perhaps not dissimilar to the model of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

  18. Progressive telomere shortening and telomerase reactivation during hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, N; Horikawa, I; Nishimoto, A; Ohmura, H; Ito, H; Hirohashi, S; Shay, J W; Oshimura, M

    1997-01-01

    Telomeres shorten progressively with age in normal somatic cells in culture and in vivo. The maintenance of telomere length is assumed to be an obligatory step in the progression and immortalization of most human tumor cells. To understand the role of telomere dynamics in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we examined the length of terminal restriction fragment (TRF), as an indicator for telomere length, in HCC and surrounding tissues with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) or liver cirrhosis (LC). The study was performed in 12 hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody-positive, 12 hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigen-positive tissues, and 4 tissue samples from virus-negative patients with HCC. The peak TRFs in all 3 types of HCC were significantly shorter than those of the surrounding tissues (i.e., LC or CAH). TRFs examined in one patient with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) also was shortened. Thus, progressive TRF shortening occurs from normal to CAH to LC to HCC(AAH). Telomerase, an enzyme that adds repeated telomere sequences onto the chromosome ends and stabilizes telomere length in immortal cells, also was examined in tissues and detected in high levels almost exclusively in HCCs. Interestingly, the intensity of telomerase activity in the AAH case was similar to that of HCC. In addition, the telomerase activity of biopsy samples with a fine 21-gauge needle also was examined in 10 HCCs, 2 adenomatous hyperplasias (AHs), 2 LCs, and 2 CAHs. We found strong telomerase activity in all the HCCs and surprisingly in the 2 cases that were pathologically diagnosed as AH. Thus, the findings strongly suggest that persistent cell proliferation or rapid cell turnover through damage of hepatic cells result in a process of multistep hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Thus, progressive shortening of telomeres and the activation of telomerase may be a useful marker for the early detection of malignant progression in liver disease. PMID:9062581

  19. Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Nikhil N Mutyal; Azarin, Samira Michelle; Horcher, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Hemant K. Roy; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Field carcinogenesis is the initial stage of cancer progression. Understanding field carcinogenesis is valuable for both cancer biology and clinical medicine. Here, we used inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to study colorectal cancer (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) field carcinogenesis. Depth-resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of the mucosa were quantified from histologically normal rectal biopsies from patients with and without colon adenomas ( n = 85...

  20. RecQ-dependent death-by-recombination in cells lacking RecG and UvrD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Natalie C; Blankschien, Matthew D; Magner, Daniel B; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is critical for all cells. Homologous recombination (HR) pathways promote genome stability using evolutionarily conserved proteins such as RecA, SSB, and RecQ, the Escherichia coli homologue of five human proteins at least three of which suppress genome instability and cancer. A previous report indicated that RecQ promotes the net accumulation in cells of intermolecular HR intermediates (IRIs), a net effect opposite that of the yeast and two human RecQ homologues. Here we extend those conclusions. We demonstrate that cells that lack both UvrD, an inhibitor of RecA-mediated strand exchange, and RecG, a DNA helicase implicated in IRI resolution, are inviable. We show that the uvrD recG cells die a "death-by-recombination" in which IRIs accumulate blocking chromosome segregation. First, their death requires RecA HR protein. Second, the death is accompanied by cytogenetically visible failure to segregate chromosomes. Third, FISH analyses show that the unsegregated chromosomes have completed replication, supporting the hypothesis that unresolved IRIs prevented the segregation. Fourth, we show that RecQ and induction of the SOS response are required for the accumulation of replicated, unsegregated chromosomes and death, as are RecF, RecO, and RecJ. ExoI exonuclease and MutL mismatch-repair protein are partially required. This set of genes is similar but not identical to those that promote death-by-recombination of DeltauvrD Deltaruv cells. The data support models in which RecQ promotes the net accumulation in cells of IRIs and RecG promotes resolution of IRIs that form via pathways not wholly identical to those that produce the IRIs resolved by RuvABC. This implies that RecG resolves intermediates other than or in addition to standard Holliday junctions resolved by RuvABC. The role of RecQ in net accumulation of IRIs may be shared by one or more of its human homologues. PMID:20138014

  1. Émile Kappler, Bibliographie critique de l’œuvre imprimée de Pierre Jurieu (1637-1713)

    OpenAIRE

    Le Brun, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Qui travaillait sur les œuvres de Pierre Jurieu disposait jusqu’ici, comme point de départ obligé, d’un bon article de 1935 dans le Bulletin de l’histoire du Protestantisme français, « Bibliographie chronologique des œuvres de Pierre Jurieu », par Émile Kappler, et de la considérable thèse néerlandaise, malheureusement non traduite en français, de F. R. J. Knecht, Pierre Jurieu, Theoloog en Politikus der Refuge (Kampen, 1967) ; il devait ensuite chercher, au hasard des bibliothèques et des pu...

  2. L’institution des Œuvres-complètes-de-Blaise-Pascal ; à propos des éditions de Léon Brunschvicg (1897-1914)

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Cantillon

    2009-01-01

    Dans les pages qui suivent, nous voudrions donner un rapide aperçu des conditions historiques de l’institution des Œuvres complètes d’un auteur, et de la complexité d’une telle opération éditoriale en faisant quelques remarques sur l’édition des Œuvres-complètes-de-Blaise-Pascal en France dans les premières années du vingtième siècle.Le nom de Léon Brunschvicg est associé à la plus importante entreprise éditoriale pascalienne jamais, encore à ce jour, menée à son terme. Elle comporte trois en...

  3. Effecf the o Collb-P9 lasmid on UV survival and mutagenesis in umuC, uvm, recL, uvrE and tif1 sfi lex A spr mutants of Eschericia Coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the mechanism of plasmid Colib-P9 effect on the processes, connected with DNA repair, its effect in cells Escherihia coli K-12 with mutations, affecting mutagenesis apd DNA repair has been strudied. It is shown that plasmid Colib-P9 produced a protective effect after UV-irradiation on cells with mutations umuC, uvm, recL and uvr E. The frequency of UV-induced his++ revertants increased in the presence of plasmid in cells umuC-, uvm- and recL-mutants. Plasmid Colib-P9 restored completely UV-mutability and survival of cells which are mutants by umuC gene. The data permit to make a supposition that Colib-P9 plasmid encodes the product similar to the product of chromosome gene umuC. In mutant cells tif1, sfiA spr, in which constitutive expression of SOS-functions takes place, in the presence of Colib-P9 plasmid the number of his+-revertants increased several times. It shows that the effect of Colib-P9 is probably realized not on the level of recA-gene derepression, but on subsequent stages of recA+ lexA+-dependent process of DNA repair, which is prone to errors

  4. Relative roles of uvrA and recA genes in the recovery of Escherichia coli and phage lambda after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of the host-cell repair system on recovery from uv damage to bacterial and phage DNA was studied. lambda cI857 ind red lysogens were used. These lysogens, although noninducible by uv light, can be induced by raising the temperature from 30 to 420C. Sensitivity of the phage in relation to its host was analyzed in various bacterial backgrounds. Relative sensitivity of the phage and its host is the same if the uv survival curve for colonies is 80 times steeper than for plaques. This same relative sensitivity is observed if the host cell does not possess any mechanism for DNA repair (uvrA recA background). In the uvrA recA+ background, the plaque survival is not significantly increased above the level observed in the uvrA recA double mutant. recA-dependent recombinational postreplication repair does not operate on the phage DNA in the cytoplasm; relative sensitivity of the phage is therefore much higher than that of the host. If the lysogenic induction is delayed, a marked increase in the plaque count is seen so the phage shows the same relative sensitivity as the bacterial cell. Short-patch excision repair operates on both phage and bacterial DNA but less efficiently on phage DNA. In the wild-type (uvrA+ recA+) host, the highest survival of plaques and colonies is obtained. Relative sensitivity of the phage is nevertheless 50 times higher then that of the bacterial cell. This may mean the recA gene product is involved in copy-choice excision and/or long-patch excision and/or incision-promoted recombination repair of the phage DNA but it remains unable to mediate its recombinational postreplication repair

  5. Rational design of a photo-responsive UVR8-derived protein and a self-assembling peptide-protein conjugate for responsive hydrogel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Dong, Chunming; Huang, Weiyun; Wang, Huaimin; Wang, Ling; Ding, Dan; Zhou, Hao; Long, Jiafu; Wang, Tingliang; Yang, Zhimou

    2015-10-01

    Responsive hydrogels hold great potential in controllable drug delivery, regenerative medicine, sensing, etc. We introduced in this study the first example of a photo-responsive protein for hydrogel formation. Based on the first example of the crystal structure of a photo-responsive protein, Arabidopsis thaliana protein UVR8, we designed and expressed its derived protein UVR8-1 with a hexa-peptide WRESAI. We also prepared supramolecular nanofibers with a TIP-1 protein at their surface. The simple mixing of these two components resulted in rapid hydrogel formation through the specific interactions between the protein TIP-1 and the peptide WRESAI. Since the protein could show a reversible dimer-monomer transformation, the resulting gels also showed a reversible gel-sol phase transition which was controlled by photo-irradiation. The photo-controllable gel-sol phase transition could be applied for protein delivery and cell separation.Responsive hydrogels hold great potential in controllable drug delivery, regenerative medicine, sensing, etc. We introduced in this study the first example of a photo-responsive protein for hydrogel formation. Based on the first example of the crystal structure of a photo-responsive protein, Arabidopsis thaliana protein UVR8, we designed and expressed its derived protein UVR8-1 with a hexa-peptide WRESAI. We also prepared supramolecular nanofibers with a TIP-1 protein at their surface. The simple mixing of these two components resulted in rapid hydrogel formation through the specific interactions between the protein TIP-1 and the peptide WRESAI. Since the protein could show a reversible dimer-monomer transformation, the resulting gels also showed a reversible gel-sol phase transition which was controlled by photo-irradiation. The photo-controllable gel-sol phase transition could be applied for protein delivery and cell separation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05213k

  6. Inhibitory effect of UvrD and DinG on the replication of ColE1-derived plasmids in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nalae; Choi, Eunsil; Kim, Sung-Gun; Hwang, Jihwan

    2015-09-01

    CspA has been identified as a major cold-shock protein in Escherichia coli. CspA binds to RNAs which are abnormally folded at low temperature and then acts as an RNA chaperone unfolding those RNAs. The dramatic expression of cspA at low temperature is contributed by posttranscriptional stability and robust translatability. Interestingly, when cspA mRNA encoding a premature nonsense codon was overexpressed at low temperature, cell growth was completely inhibited. This phenotype was termed LACE (the low temperature-dependent antibiotic effect of truncated cspA expression), and this lethality resulted from exclusive stalling of most ribosomes on mutant cspA mRNAs. In a previous study, we demonstrated that overexpression of the ATP-dependent DNA helicases, UvrD and DinG, suppressed the lethality and ribosome stalling caused by mutant cspA mRNA. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate how these two DNA helicases help recover normal growth under LACE condition. Interestingly, we found that UvrD and DinG appeared to have an ability to down-regulate the replication of pUC-based high copy plasmid. In plasmid copy number tests, the amount of pUC-based plasmid encoding mutant cspA was reduced by 3-10-fold when either UvrD or DinG was expressed. Through a β-galactosidase activity assay, we also confirmed that expression of the lacZα gene inserted into the pUC-based plasmid was significantly reduced due to down-regulation of plasmid replication. Our findings imply that UvrD and DinG, known as non-replicative helicases, play a novel role in the regulation of ColE1-like plasmid replication. PMID:26143370

  7. DNA helicases in recombination and repair: construction of a delta uvrD delta helD delta recQ mutant deficient in recombination and repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonca, V M; Klepin, H D; Matson, S W

    1995-01-01

    DNA helicases play pivotal roles in homologous recombination and recombinational DNA repair. They are involved in both the generation of recombinogenic single-stranded DNA ends and branch migration of synapsed Holliday junctions. Escherichia coli helicases II (uvrD), IV (helD), and RecQ (recQ) have all been implicated in the presynaptic stage of recombination in the RecF pathway. To probe for functional redundancy among these helicases, mutant strains containing single, double, and triple del...

  8. RecF recombination pathway in Escherichia coli cells lacking RecQ, UvrD and HelD helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljubašić, Maja; Repar, Jelena; Zahradka, Ksenija; Dermić, Damir; Zahradka, Davor

    2012-04-01

    In recBCD sbcB sbcC(D) mutants of Escherichia coli homologous recombination proceeds via RecF pathway, which is thought to require RecQ, UvrD and HelD helicases at its initial stage. It was previously suggested that depletion of all three helicases totally abolishes the RecF pathway. The present study (re)examines the roles of these helicases in transductional recombination, and in recombinational repair of UV-induced DNA damage in the RecF pathway. The study has employed the ΔrecBCD ΔsbcB sbcC201 and ΔrecBCD sbcB15 sbcC201 strains, carrying combinations of mutations in recQ, uvrD, and helD genes. We show that in ΔrecBCD ΔsbcB sbcC201 strains, recombination requires exclusively the RecQ helicase. In ΔrecBCD sbcB15 sbcC201 strains, RecQ may be partially substituted by UvrD helicase. The HelD helicase is dispensable for recombination in both backgrounds. Our results also suggest that significant portion of recombination events in the RecF pathway is independent of RecQ, UvrD and HelD. These events are initiated either by RecJ nuclease alone or by RecJ nuclease associated with an unknown helicase. Inactivation of exonuclease VII by a xseA mutation further decreases the requirement for helicase activity in the RecF pathway. We suggest that elimination of nucleases acting on 3' single-strand DNA ends reduces the necessity for helicases in initiation of recombination. PMID:22342069

  9. Double helicase II (uvrD)-helicase IV (helD) deletion mutants are defective in the recombination pathways of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonca, V M; Kaiser-Rogers, K; Matson, S W

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli helD (encoding helicase IV) and uvrD (encoding helicase II) genes have been deleted, independently and in combination, from the chromosome and replaced with genes encoding antibiotic resistance. Each deletion was verified by Southern blots, and the location of each deletion was confirmed by P1-mediated transduction. Cell strains containing the single and double deletions were viable, indicating that helicases II and IV are not essential for viability. Cell strains lacking...

  10. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p. and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented.

  11. Breast carcinogenesis: Transition from hyperplasia to invasive lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the balance loss between proliferation and apoptosis that play a role in breast cancer development, and to explore the places of various genes and molecules within this process in this supposed multistep process. We obtained the specimens from 40 patients between 2002 and 2004 at the Department of Pathology, Medical Faculty, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey. We categorized the lesions ductal hyperplasia (DH), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), in situ ductal carcinoma (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). We determined the tumor size, histological grade and lymph node status of invasive cases and we used nottingham prognostic index (NPI). We applied ER, PR, c-erbB2, p53, Ki-67, bcl-2, dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), breast cancer gene-1, matrix metalloproteinases-1 and tissue inhibitor matrix metalloproteinases-1 stains to each lesion using the immunohistochemical method. We observed that ER and PR decreased in ADH when compared with DH (p=0.0001 and p=0.019). However, we determined that in DCIS as c-erbB2 (p=0,005) and Ki-67 (p=0.004) increase, TUNEL (p=0.04) and bcl-2 (p=0.005) decrease, when compared with ADH. When compared with DCIS lesions, we observed the existence of a higher c-erbB2 (p=0,003) and a lower TUNEL (p=0,012) in invasive tumors. Furthermore, we found that there is a higher MMP-1 (p=0,04) in invasive lesions, when compared with non-invasive lesions. We detected higher PR (p=0,049), lower TUNEL and c-erbB2 (p=0,017) in low grade group of NPI, when compared with high grade group of NPI. As a result, it has been shown that together with increase in proliferation, decrease in apoptosis, too, contributes to the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance that occurs in breast carcinogenesis. Increase in proliferation and decrease in apoptosis are parallel with the progression of lesions. We also showed that the changes, beginning with loss of ER and PR in ADH step, can cause malign transformation, which is especially notable both in

  12. Early pancreatic carcinogenesis - risk factors, early symptoms, and the impact of antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frič, Přemysl; Škrha, Jan; Šedo, Aleksi; Bušek, Petr; Kmochová, Klára; Laclav, Martin; Solař, Svatopluk; Bunganič, Bohuš; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    Risk factors (long-term diabetes, obesity) and early symptoms (new-onset diabetes, loss of weight, or persistent low body mass) are the initial symptoms of pancreatic carcinogenesis. They may be influenced by antidiabetic drugs and their correct evaluation is a prerequisite for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). We review the risk factors, early symptoms, and the impact of antidiabetic drugs on early pancreatic carcinogenesis. The main source of data was the database Medline/PubMed and abstracts of international congresses (DDW, UEGW). The risk factors and early symptoms are integral components of the familial PC surveillance and sporadic PC screening. Preventive programs should always be include multistep and multidisciplinary procedures. The correct evaluation of antidiabetic drugs and their interactions with other components of pancreatic carcinogenesis may influence the early diagnosis of PC. PMID:27120389

  13. From exposure to effect: a comparison of modeling approaches to chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, I M; Zonneveld, C

    2001-10-01

    Standardized long-term carcinogenicity tests aim to reveal the relationship between exposure to a chemical and occurrence of a carcinogenic response. The analysis of such tests may be facilitated by the use of mathematical models. To what extent current models actually achieve this purpose is difficult to evaluate. Various aspects of chemically induced carcinogenesis are treated by different modeling approaches, which proceed very much in isolation of each other. With this paper we aim to provide for the non-mathematician a comprehensive and critical overview of models dealing with processes involved in chemical carcinogenesis. We cover the entire process of carcinogenesis, from exposure to effect. We succinctly summarize the biology underlying the models and emphasize the relationship between model assumptions and model formulations. The use of mathematics is restricted as far as possible with some additional information relegated to boxes. PMID:11673088

  14. Role of Interleukin 17 in Lung Carcinogenesis and Lung Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong MEI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 17 (IL-17 is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. It plays a critical role in mediating pathogen defense reactions, and the pathological inflammation of autoimmune diseases. IL-17 is also involved in various inflammation-related carcinogenesis. Cigarette smoking is one of the most important risk factors of lung cancer. Chronic inflammation caused by smoking and other factors is accompanied with overexpression of IL-17 within the airway, which reveals a potential relationship between IL-17 and lung carcinogenesis. Furthermore, IL-17 also plays a role in lung cancer progression via different mechanisms. In this paper, we summarized the results of current studies on IL-17 and lung carcinogenesis, as well as lung cancer progression.

  15. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, M. J.; Meijers, M.; Van Garderen-Hoetmer, A.; Lamers, C. B.; Rovati, L. C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J. B.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturated fat, increased pancreatic weight. Rats treated with cholecystokinin developed more acidophilic atypical acinar cell nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas than control animals. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet developed significantly more adenomas and adenocarcinomas than controls given a diet low in unsaturated fat. Lorglumide largely inhibited the enhancing effect of cholecystokinin, but not of dietary fat, on pancreatic carcinogenesis indicating that it is unlikely that the promoting effect of dietary unsaturated fat on pancreatic carcinogenesis is mediated via cholecystokinin. PMID:1637675

  16. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  17. Application of DNA chip and nuclear technology to study on molecular mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One major challenge facing todays cancer researchers is the development of new approaches for the identification of carcinogens and other environmental hazards. Here, the authors describe the potential impact of emerging technologies for measuring gene expression profiles on carcinogen identification and on the general field of radiation carcinogenesis. An example of one of these technologies is the use of DNA chips. The authors provide an overview the mechanism and applications of DNA chip, and the application to study on molecular mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

  18. Cancer chemoprevention by phytochemicals. Expectation for phytochemicals as preventive agents against radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing evidence from the studies using animal models that phytochemicals in plants have preventive effect on cancer induction, which is mediated by polyphenol anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory functions. Some phytochemicals such as curcumin and epigallocatechin gallate have been moved onto clinical trials. These phytochemicals are also expected to reduce the deleterious effect of radiation, and to be a powerful tool for the prevention of radiation carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarized the general concept of cancer chemoprevention and usefulness of phytochemicals as cancer preventive agents, and pointed out their possibilities for prevention of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. (author)

  19. Complex Systems Analysis of Arrested Neural Cell Differentiation during Development and Analogous Cell Cycling Models in Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Baianu, Professor I.C.; Prisecaru, M.S. V

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to the modular, complex systems analysis of nonlinear dynamics of arrested neural cell Differentiation--induced cell proliferation during organismic development and the analogous cell cycling network transformations involved in carcinogenesis is proposed. Neural tissue arrested differentiation that induces cell proliferation during perturbed development and Carcinogenesis are complex processes that involve dynamically inter-connected biomolecules in the intercellular, membrane...

  20. Des enjeux éthiques et politiques dans l’œuvre d’Hermann Broch (1886-1951

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djéhanne Gani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available L’œuvre de Hermann Broch (1886-1951 est polymorphe, comportant romans, essais, correspondances, mêlant philosophie, histoire, psychanalyse et littérature. Cette diversité n’est pas, cependant, synonyme de dispersion puisque tous les écrits revêtent des enjeux éthiques et politiques. Broch, auteur engagé, concentre sa pensée sur l’homme, sa situation dans le monde moderne. L’absence d’ « un » sens et le sentiment de solitude forment la toile de fond de ses romans et de sa pensée. Son concept d’ « état crépusculaire » est à la fois symptôme et révélateur de la crise de l’homme et il montre le lien étroit entre théorie et création littéraire dans son œuvre. Dans un contexte marqué par l’expérience de l’antisémitisme et du totalitarisme, Broch développe une anthropologie de la responsabilité qui dénonce l’individualisme et l’indifférence. L’écriture relève pour lui de la « responsabilité sociale » et engage des enjeux éthiques et politiques. Hermann Broch croit à la « conversion » de ceux qui sont dans l’ « état crépusculaire » et qui somnolent. Il décrit la crise du monde moderne qu’il met en valeur, mais au-delà de l’analyse, sa réflexion a peut-être avant tout une visée pratique, comme son idée de la « conversion » en atteste. La dimension politique va de pair avec son engagement éthique. Il propose une éthique de l’humanité.Hermann Brochs (1886-1951 Werk ist äußerst vielseitig, es umfasst Romane, Essays, einen umfangreichen Briefwechsel und vermischt Philosophie, Geschichte, Psychoanalyse und Literatur. Diese Vielseitigkeit ist jedoch nicht gleichbedeutend mit Zerstreuung – Brochs Schriften vereint, dass sie sich alle mit Fragen von Politik und Ethik beschäftigen. Die Gedanken des engagierten Autors Broch sind auf den Menschen gerichtet, auf dessen Platz in der modernen Welt. Das Fehlen „eines“ Sinnes und das Gefühl der Einsamkeit bilden

  1. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures

  2. Chemopreventive properties of indole-3-carbinol, diindolylmethane and other constituents of cardamom against carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Asha; Das, Ila; Singh, Sushmita; Saha, Tapas

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell's own antioxidant defenses that in part lead to numerous carcinogenesis. Several phytochemicals, derived from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices, have demonstrated excellent chemopreventive properties against carcinogenesis by regulating the redox status of the cells during oxidative stress. I3C (indole-3-carbinol) and DIM (diindolylmethane) are the phytochemicals that are found in all types of cruciferous vegetables and demonstrated exceptional anti-cancer effects against hormone responsive cancers like breast, prostate and ovarian cancers. Novel analogs of I3C were designed to enhance the overall efficacy, particularly with respect to the therapeutic activity and oral bioavailability and that results in several patent applications on symptoms associated with endometriosis, vaginal neoplasia, cervical dysplasia and mastalgia. Likewise, DIM and its derivatives are patented for treatment and prevention of leiomyomas, HPV infection, respiratory syncytial virus, angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and anti-proliferative actions. On the other hand, phytochemicals in cardamom have not been explored in great details but limonene and cineole demonstrate promising effects against carcinogenesis. Thus studies with selected phytochemicals of cardamom and bioavailability research might lead to many patent applications. This review is focused on the patents generated on the effects of I3C, DIM and selected phytochemicals of cardamom on carcinogenesis. PMID:20653562

  3. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  4. Transformation of human mesenchymal stem cells in radiation carcinogenesis: long-term effect of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rikke; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence on cancer stem cells suggest that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and consequently can be the origin of many cancers. We have recently established a telomerase-transduced human mesenchymal stem cell line and subsequently irradiated this in order to achieve malignant...

  5. Prevention of mammary carcinogenesis by short-term estrogen and progestin treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who have undergone a full-term pregnancy before the age of 20 have one-half the risk of developing breast cancer compared with women who have never gone through a full-term pregnancy. This protective effect is observed universally among women of all ethnic groups. Parity in rats and mice also protects them against chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. Seven-week-old virgin Lewis rats were given N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Two weeks later the rats were treated with natural or synthetic estrogens and progestins for 7–21 days by subcutaneous implantation of silastic capsules. In our current experiment, we demonstrate that short-term sustained exposure to natural or synthetic estrogens along with progestins is effective in preventing mammary carcinogenesis in rats. Treatment with 30 mg estriol plus 30 mg progesterone for 3 weeks significantly reduced the incidence of mammary cancer. Short-term exposure to ethynyl estradiol plus megesterol acetate or norethindrone was effective in decreasing the incidence of mammary cancers. Tamoxifen plus progesterone treatment for 3 weeks was able to confer only a transient protection from mammary carcinogenesis, while 2-methoxy estradiol plus progesterone was effective in conferring protection against mammary cancers. The data obtained in the present study demonstrate that, in nulliparous rats, long-term protection against mammary carcinogenesis can be achieved by short-term treatments with natural or synthetic estrogen and progesterone combinations

  6. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  7. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated

  8. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1476-1483, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26297835

  9. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne CM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss.Keywords: chromosome 1p, colon carcinogenesis, molecular pathways, cellular pathways

  10. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina;

    2013-01-01

    SILAC technology in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) can be successfully used to measure phosphoproteomes in vivo. Here, Zanivan, Mann, and colleagues have applied SILAC-based MS to investigate phosphoproteomic changes during skin carcinogenesis, using the DMBA/TPA two-stag...

  11. The effects of lexA101, recB21, recF143 and uvrD3 mutations on liquid-holding recovery in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli K12 recA56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an Escherichia coli K12 recA strain, we have tested the effects of incorporating additional mutations affecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair on ultraviolet-radiation sensitivity and in the expression of liquid-holding recovery (LHR). (This laboratory had previously shown that a mutation at uvrA, uvrB or uvrC blocked LHR in a recA strain). In the recA56 background, an additional lexA101 mutation had no effect on UV-radiation sensitivity or LHR. The addition of a recB21 mutation to recA56 did not alter UV-radiation sensitivity, but greatly increased the rate of LHR. The recB gene product (exonuclease V) appears to act as a competitive inhibitor both of excision repair and of photoreactivation under liquid-holding (LH) conditions. The uvrD3 mutation increased the radiation sensitivity of a recA strain, and almost completely blocked LHR. The recA uvrD strain showed more DNA degradation and DNA double-strand breaks during LH than did the recA strain. Rhe recF143 mutation increased both UV-radiation sensitivity and LHR in a recA strain, suggesting that the recF gene product may also function in recA-independent pathways of DNA repair. (orig.)

  12. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  13. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  14. Apocryphie, tautologie et vertige de la multiplication. Se una notte d’inverno un viaggiatore et l’œuvre de Giulio Paolini

    OpenAIRE

    Splendorini, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Dans Un quadro (1970) – quatorze toiles photographiques qui reproduisent à l’identique Disegno geometrico (le premier tableau peint par Paolini dix ans auparavant) mais avec des titres tour à tour différents et des noms d’auteurs fictifs – l’artiste se livre à une mise en scène du “plagiat” (un plagiat de toiles apocryphes en l’occurrence) et de l’autocitation. À la lumière des analyses et des réflexions que l’œuvre de Giulio Paolini inspire à Calvino dans La squadratura, nous nous sommes pro...

  15. Clairvoyance et vacuité : l’utopie de la communication dans trois œuvres de fiction américaine (Asimov, Pynchon, Allen)

    OpenAIRE

    Grundy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Dans L’utopie de la communication (1997) Philippe Breton explique la nouvelle envergure de la communication. Il puise dans la cybernétique et la littérature. Afin de poursuivre son travail de réflexion, cet article se penche sur les œuvres prophétiques d’artistes comme T. Pynchon, I. Asimov et W. Allen. L’objectif  : mettre en avant le rapport critique que ces auteurs entretiennent à l’utopie de la communication en s’interrogeant sur le sens paradoxal de leur dénonciation. En offrant si peu d...

  16. Mutagenesis, by methylating and ethylating agents, in mutH, mutL, mutS, and uvrD mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2.

    OpenAIRE

    Shanabruch, W G; Rein, R P; Behlau, I; Walker, G C

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium LT2 mutH, mutL, mutS, and uvrD mutants were especially sensitive to mutagenesis by both the recA+-dependent mutagen methyl methane sulfonate and the recA+-independent mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate, but not to mutagenesis by agents such as 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and UV irradiation. Similarly, these mutator strains were very sensitive to mutagenesis by the methylating agents N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The increased susceptibility ...

  17. RNA polymerase mutations that facilitate replication progression in the rep uvrD recF mutant lacking two accessory replicative helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Lestini, Roxane; Duigou, Stéphane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We observed that cells lacking Rep and UvrD, two replication accessory helicases, and the recombination protein RecF are cryo-sensitive on rich medium. We isolated five mutations that suppress this LB-cryo-sensitivity and show that they map in the genes encoding the RNA polymerase subunits RpoB and RpoC. These rpoB (D444G, H447R and N518D) and rpoC mutants (H113R and P451L) were characterized. rpoBH447R and rpoBD444G prevent activation of the Prrn core promoter in rich med...

  18. Effects of recB21, recF143, and uvrD152 on recombination in lambda bacteriophage-prophage and Hfr by F- crosses.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard-Flanders, P; Bardwell, E

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the mutation pairs recB21 recF143 and recB21 uvrD152 on the frequency of genetic recombination were investigated in lambda phage-prophage crosses under homoimmune conditions. To prevent recombinants from being formed by the phage red system, these experiments were performed with phages and prophages carrying red and gam mutations. Both spontaneous and damage-induced recombination was measured, the phages being either undamaged or treated with trimethylpsoralen and 360-nm light ...

  19. The Response of microRNAs to Solar UVR in Skin-Resident Melanocytes Differs between Melanoma Patients and Healthy Persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfeng Sha

    Full Text Available The conversion of melanocytes into cutaneous melanoma is largely dictated by the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR. Yet to be described, however, is exactly how these cells are affected by intense solar UVR while residing in their natural microenvironment, and whether their response differs in persons with a history of melanoma when compared to that of healthy individuals. By using laser capture microdissection (LCM to isolate a pure population of melanocytes from a small area of skin that had been intermittingly exposed or un-exposed to physiological doses of solar UVR, we can now report for the first time that the majority of UV-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs in the melanocytes of a group of women with a history of melanoma are down-regulated when compared to those in the melanocytes of healthy controls. Among the miRNAs that were commonly and significantly down-regulated in each of these women were miR-193b (P<0.003, miR-342-3p (P<0.003, miR186 (P<0.007, miR-130a (P<0.007, and miR-146a (P<0.007. To identify genes potentially released from inhibition by these repressed UV-miRNAs, we analyzed databases (e.g., DIANA-TarBase containing experimentally validated microRNA-gene interactions. In the end, this enabled us to construct UV-miRNA-gene regulatory networks consisting of individual genes with a probable gain-of-function being intersected not by one, but by several down-regulated UV-miRNAs. Most striking, however, was that these networks typified well-known regulatory modules involved in controlling the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and processes associated with the regulation of immune-evasion. We speculate that these pathways become activated by UVR resulting in miRNA down regulation only in melanocytes susceptible to melanoma, and that these changes could be partially responsible for empowering these cells toward tumor progression.

  20. The Response of microRNAs to Solar UVR in Skin-Resident Melanocytes Differs between Melanoma Patients and Healthy Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jingfeng; Gastman, Brian R; Morris, Nathan; Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas; Arbesman, Joshua; Harter, Marian L

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of melanocytes into cutaneous melanoma is largely dictated by the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Yet to be described, however, is exactly how these cells are affected by intense solar UVR while residing in their natural microenvironment, and whether their response differs in persons with a history of melanoma when compared to that of healthy individuals. By using laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate a pure population of melanocytes from a small area of skin that had been intermittingly exposed or un-exposed to physiological doses of solar UVR, we can now report for the first time that the majority of UV-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs) in the melanocytes of a group of women with a history of melanoma are down-regulated when compared to those in the melanocytes of healthy controls. Among the miRNAs that were commonly and significantly down-regulated in each of these women were miR-193b (P<0.003), miR-342-3p (P<0.003), miR186 (P<0.007), miR-130a (P<0.007), and miR-146a (P<0.007). To identify genes potentially released from inhibition by these repressed UV-miRNAs, we analyzed databases (e.g., DIANA-TarBase) containing experimentally validated microRNA-gene interactions. In the end, this enabled us to construct UV-miRNA-gene regulatory networks consisting of individual genes with a probable gain-of-function being intersected not by one, but by several down-regulated UV-miRNAs. Most striking, however, was that these networks typified well-known regulatory modules involved in controlling the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and processes associated with the regulation of immune-evasion. We speculate that these pathways become activated by UVR resulting in miRNA down regulation only in melanocytes susceptible to melanoma, and that these changes could be partially responsible for empowering these cells toward tumor progression. PMID:27149382

  1. Impact of intercellular induction of apoptosis on low-dose radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro data indicate that selective removal of oncogenic transformed cells by apoptosis induced via signalling by neighbouring cells may represent an important anti-carcinogenic process. Mechanistic modelling supports this concept and predicts that the phenomenon can stop the growth of a transformed cell population, forming a dormant pre-neoplastic lesion, or even remove the transformed clone completely. Radiation has been shown to enhance the underpinning signalling and increase the extent and rate of apoptosis induction in precancerous cells. Implications for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis are discussed based on in vitro data and mechanistic modelling. The possibility is outlined for radiation to act in a pro-carcinogenic manner, i.e. to reduce rather than enhance the removal of transformed cells by apoptosis. The effects of radiation exposure during early or late carcinogenesis are discussed. (authors)

  2. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  3. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Links Ovulation-Induced Inflammation and Serous Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stav Sapoznik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the notion that ovarian carcinoma results from ovulation-induced inflammation of the fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs has gained evidence. However, the mechanistic pathway for this process has not been revealed yet. In the current study, we propose the mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID as a link between ovulation-induced inflammation in FTECs and genotoxic damage leading to ovarian carcinogenesis. We show that AID, previously shown to be functional only in B lymphocytes, is expressed in FTECs under physiological conditions, and is induced in vitro upon ovulatory-like stimulation and in vivo in carcinoma-associated FTECs. We also report that AID activity results in epigenetic, genetic and genomic damage in FTECs. Overall, our data provides new insights into the etiology of ovarian carcinogenesis and may set the ground for innovative approaches aimed at prevention and early detection.

  4. Chemomodulatory Potential of Flaxseed Oil Against DMBA/Croton Oil-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Ritu; Goyal, P K

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of flaxseed oil to prevent chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Cancer was induced on 2-stage skin carcinogenesis model by single topical application of 7,12 dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA), as, initiator, and two weeks later it was promoted by croton oil treatment thrice a week on the dorsal surface of mice for 16 weeks. Flaxseed oil (FSO; 100µL/animal/d) was orally administered 1 week before and 1 week after DMBA application (Peri-initiation stage). The animals of the FSO-administered group showed a significant reduction in tumor incidence (76.67%), cumulative number of tumors (37), tumor yield (3.7), and tumor burden (4.81) when compared with the carcinogen-treated control animals. Biochemical parameters in skin and liver tissue such as LPO and phase I enzymes were significantly (P croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:26437861

  5. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  6. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  7. Tamoxifen may prevent both ER+ and ER- breast cancers and select for ER- carcinogenesis: an alternative hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Esserman, Laura J.; Dowsett, Mitch; Slingerland, Joyce M.; Elissa M. Ozanne

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene (MORE) data have been interpreted to indicate that tamoxifen reduces the risk of ER+ but not ER- breast carcinogenesis. We explored whether these data also support an alternative hypothesis, that tamoxifen influences the natural history of both ER+ and ER- cancers, that it may be equally effective in abrogating or delaying ER- and ER+ carcinogenesis, and place selection pressure, in some cases, for the out...

  8. Helicobacter pylori-Induced Signaling Pathways Contribute to Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Soichiro Sue; Wataru Shibata; Shin Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces chronic gastric inflammation, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and cancer. Although the risk of gastric cancer increases exponentially with the extent of atrophic gastritis, the precise mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated. H. pylori induces genetic and epigenetic changes in gastric epithelial cells through activating intracellular signaling pathways in a cagPAI-dependent manner. H. pylori eventually induces gast...

  9. Expression of SRSF3 is Correlated with Carcinogenesis and Progression of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Peiqi, Liu; Zhaozhong, Guo; Yaotian, Yin; Jun, Jia; Jihua, Guo; Rong, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of head and neck with high mortality rates. The mechanisms of initiation and development of OSCC remain largely unknown. Dysregulated alternative splicing of pre-mRNA has been associated with OSCC. Splicing factor SRSF3 is a proto-oncogene and overexpressed in multiple cancers. The aim of this study was to uncover the relationship between SRSF3 and carcinogenesis and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Desig...

  10. Tissue damage and nutritional factors in experimental respiratory tract (Co-)carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Reuzel, P G; Feron, V.J.; Spit, B J; Beems, R. B.; Kroes, R.

    1983-01-01

    Cofactors involved in respiratory tract carcinogenesis were studied in Syrian golden hamsters or in rats using benzo(a)pyrene as the carcinogenic agent. These factors included severe tissue damage induced by electro-coagulation, glass fibers administered by intratracheal instillation, acetaldehyde as irritant vapor, food restriction, and nutrients such as vitamin A and saturated and unsaturated fats. In addition, the effects of a combined exposure to four different major gaseous cigarette smo...

  11. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: Possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; YAMASHITA, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at ...

  12. Dietary Crocin Inhibits Colitis and Colitis-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kunihiro Kawabata; Nguyen Huu Tung; Yukihiro Shoyama; Shigeyuki Sugie; Takayuki Mori; Takuji Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    A natural carotenoid crocin is contained in saffron and gardenia flowers (crocuses and gardenias) and is used as a food colorant. This study reports the potential inhibitory effects of crocin against inflammation-associated mouse colon carcinogenesis and chemically induced colitis in male ICR mice. In the first experiment, dietary crocin significantly inhibited the development of colonic adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in mice by week 18. Crocin ...

  13. Increased visceral fat mass and insulin signaling in colitis-related colon carcinogenesis model mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Takuji; Murakami, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and metabolism, plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and immunity. We previously demonstrated that serum leptin levels are profoundly increased in mice which received azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) as tumor-initiator and -promoter, respectively, in a colon carcinogenesis model. In this study, we attempted to address underlying mechanism whereby leptin is up-regulated in this rodent model. Five-week-...

  14. Neutrophils Are Required for 3-Methylcholanthrene-Initiated, Butylated Hydroxytoluene-Promoted Lung Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Franklin, Andrew; Stein, Lauren; Rymaszewski, Amy; Zhu, Jihong; Liu, Pengyuan; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; You, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown a link between chronic inflammation and lung tumorigenesis. Inbred mouse strains vary in their susceptibility to methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether neutrophils play a role in strain dependent differences in susceptibility to lung tumor promotion. We observed a significant elevation in homeostatic levels of neutrophils in the lungs of tumor-susceptible BALB/cByJ...

  15. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  16. Melatonin attenuates lipid peroxidation and enhances circulatory antioxidants during mammary carcinogenesis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran Mirunalini; Kandhan Karthishwaran; Ganesan Dhamodharan; Shalini Mohan

    2010-01-01

    The possible protective effect of Melatonin was investigated for its antioxidant and lipid peroxidation activity against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced mammary carcinogenesis in female albino Wistar rats. Mammary tumor was developed to the animals by administering 5mg/kg body weight of DMBA orally at weekly intervals for one month. Intraperitoneal administration of melatonin 5mg/ml per animals for 15 days prior to the first oral administration of DMBA was continued for a month....

  17. Nano-architectural Alterations in Mucus Layer Fecal Colonocytes in Field Carcinogenesis: Potential for Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant K. Roy; Damania, Dhwanil P.; DelaCruz, Mart; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Crawford, Susan E.; Tiwari, Ashish K.; Wali, Ramesh K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Current fecal tests (occult blood, methylation, DNA mutations) target minute amounts of tumor products among a large amount of fecal material and thus have suboptimal performance. Our group has focused on exploiting field carcinogenesis as a modality to amplify the neoplastic signal. Specifically, we have demonstrated that endoscopically normal rectal brushings have striking nano-architectural alterations which are detectable utilizing a novel optical technique, partial wave spectroscopic mic...

  18. Influence of Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction and Exercise on Inflammation and Carcinogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Davis, J. Mark; Fadel, James R.; YOUNGSTEDT, SHAWN D.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise training on carcinogenesis were examined in adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasma (APC Min+/-) mice, a genetic strain which is predisposed to developing adenomatous polyposis. The mice were randomized to one of four 11 week treatments in a 2×2 design involving sleep restriction (by 4 h/day) vs. normal sleep and exercise training (1 h/day) vs. sedentary control. Wild-type control mice underwent identical experime...

  19. Suppression of colitis-related mouse colon carcinogenesis by a COX-2 inhibitor and PPAR ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally assumed that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related carcinogenesis occurs as a result of chronic inflammation. We previously developed a novel colitis-related mouse colon carcinogenesis model initiated with azoxymethane (AOM) and followed by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). In the present study we investigated whether a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor nimesulide and ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), troglitazone (a PPARγ ligand) and bezafibrate (a PPARα ligand) inhibit colitis-related colon carcinogenesis using our model to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs in prevention of IBD-related colon carcinogenesis. Female CD-1 (ICR) mice were given a single intraperitoneal administration of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight) and followed by one-week oral exposure of 2% (w/v) DSS in drinking water, and then maintained on the basal diets mixed with or without nimesulide (0.04%, w/w), troglitazone (0.05%, w/w), and bezafibrate (0.05%, w/w) for 14 weeks. The inhibitory effects of dietary administration of these compounds were determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. Feeding with nimesulide and troglitazone significantly inhibited both the incidence and multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma induced by AOM/DSS in mice. Bezafibrate feeding significantly reduced the incidence of colonic adenocarcinoma, but did not significantly lower the multiplicity. Feeding with nimesulide and troglitazone decreased the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-labeling index and expression of β-catenin, COX-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine. The treatments increased the apoptosis index in the colonic adenocarcinoma. Feeding with bezafibrate also affected these parameters except for β-catenin expression in the colonic malignancy. Dietary administration of nimesulide, troglitazone and bezafibrate effectively suppressed the development of colonic epithelial malignancy induced by AOM/DSS in female ICR

  20. Differentiation and carcinogenesis: an integrated multilevel study of mechanisms from molecules to man. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study sought to identify and characterize mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in vitro, to identify the in vivo equivalent of the in vitro MPCs, and to determine the relationship between the presence or response of these cells both in vitro and eventually in vivo to altered proliferative capacity (in vitro cellular senescence, in vivo organismal aging) and altered susceptibility to carcinogenesis (frequency of in vitro neoplastic transformation and age-related frequency of in vivo cancer incidence). 16 refs

  1. The LEC rat: a useful model for studying liver carcinogenesis related to oxidative stress and inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez Quinones, Adriana; Villa-Treviño, Saul; Gueraud, Francoise

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates oxidative stress as a mechanism of several diseases including cancer. Oxidative stress can be defined as the imbalance between cellular oxidant species production and antioxidant capability shifted towards the former. Lipid peroxidation is one of the processes that takes place during oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), are closely related to carcinogenesis as they are potent mutagens and they ha...

  2. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  3. Role of Interleukin 17 in Lung Carcinogenesis and Lung Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Jiandong; Liu, Lunxu

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. It plays a critical role in mediating pathogen defense reactions, and the pathological inflammation of autoimmune diseases. IL-17 is also involved in various inflammation-related carcinogenesis. Cigarette smoking is one of the most important risk factors of lung cancer. Chronic inflammation caused by smoking and other factors is accompanied with overexpression of IL-17 within the airway, which reveals a potential relationship b...

  4. Protective Effect of Withaferin-A on Micronucleus Frequency and Detoxication Agents During Experimental Oral Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Panjamurthy, Kuppusamy; Manoharan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Subramanian; Suresh, Kathiresan; Nirmal, Madhavan R; Senthil, Namasivayam; Alias, Linsa Marry

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effect of Withaferin-A on bone marrow micronucleus frequency and buccal mucosa detoxication agents during 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Oral squamous cell carcinoma was developed in hamsters' buccal pouches by painting 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin, three times per week for 14 weeks. We observed 100% tumor formation in DMBA painted hamsters. Elevated frequency of bone marrow micronucleated polychromatic erythr...

  5. Helicobacter pylori-infected animal models are extremely suitable for the investigation of gastric carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Sato, Ryugo; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Nishizono, Akira; Fujioka, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    Although various animal models have been developed to clarify gastric carcinogenesis, apparent mechanism of gastric cancer was not clarified in recent years. Since the recognition of the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), several animal models with H pylori infection have been developed to confirm the association between H pylori and gastric cancer. Nonhuman primate and rodent models were suitable for this study. Japanese monkey model revealed atrophic gastritis and p53 mutation...

  6. Transforming growth factor alpha dramatically enhances oncogene-induced carcinogenesis in transgenic mouse pancreas and liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandgren, E P; Luetteke, N C; Qiu, T H; Palmiter, R D; Brinster, R L; Lee, D C

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the effect(s) of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) during multistage carcinogenesis, we examined tumor development in pancreas and liver of transgenic mice that coexpressed TGF alpha with either viral (simian virus 40 T antigens [TAg]) or cellular (c-myc) oncogenes. In pancreas, TGF alpha itself was not oncogenic, but it nevertheless dramatically accelerated growth of tumors induced by either oncogene alone, thereby reducing the host life span up to 60%. Coexpressio...

  7. Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Alibek Kenneth; Kakpenova Ainur; Baiken Yeldar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with s...

  8. Transcriptionally Active Regions Are the Preferred Targets for Chromosomal HPV Integration in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Schmitz, Martina; Dürst, Matthias; Hovig, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is regarded as a determining event in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanism for integration, and the role of integration in stimulating cancer progression, is not fully characterized. Although integration sites are reported to appear randomly distributed over all chromosomes, fragile sites, translocation break points and transcriptionally active regions have all been suggested as being preferred sites for integrati...

  9. Functional Regulatory Role of STAT3 in HPV16-Mediated Cervical Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Shirish; Mahata, Sutapa; Shishodia, Gauri; Pandey, Arvind; Tyagi, Abhishek; Vishnoi, Kanchan; Basir, Seemi F; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharti, Alok C

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic transcription factor constitutively active and aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer. However, the functional role of STAT3 in regulation of HPV's viral oncogene expression and downstream events associated with cervical carcinogenesis is not known. Our present study performed on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines (SiHa and CaSki) and primary tumor tissues revealed a strong positive correlation of constitutivel...

  10. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, M J; Meijers, M.; Van Garderen-Hoetmer, A.; Lamers, C B; Rovati, L. C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J B; Woutersen, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturated fat, increased pancreatic weight. Rats treated with cholecystokinin developed more acidophilic atypical acinar cell nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas than control animals. Rats maintained on...

  11. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    OpenAIRE

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements ...

  12. Effects of Porcine Pancreatic Enzymes on the Pancreas of Hamsters. Part 2: Carcinogenesis Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fumiaki Nozawa; Mehmet Yalniz; Murat Saruc; Jens Standop; Hiroshi Egami; Pour, Parviz M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Our previous study suggested that porcine pancreatic extract in hamsters with peripheral insulin resistance, normalizes insulin output, islet size and pancreatic DNA synthetic rate. It also inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in nude mice. Objective To examine the potential value of the porcine pancreatic extract in controlling pancreatic carcinogenesis in this model, the present experiment was performed. Design Hamsters were fed a high fat diet and four wee...

  13. The Balance Between Initiation and Promotion in Radiation-Induced Murine Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Ullrich, Robert L.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of radiation carcinogenesis in animals allow detailed investigation of how the risk depends on age at exposure and time since exposure and of the mechanisms that determine this risk, e.g., induction of new pre-malignant cells (initiation) and enhanced proliferation of already existing pre-malignant cells (promotion). To assist the interpretation of these patterns, we apply a newly developed biologically based mathematical model to data on several types of solid tumors induced by acute...

  14. Adiponectin suppresses colorectal carcinogenesis under the high-fat diet condition

    OpenAIRE

    Fujisawa, T.; Endo, H; Tomimoto, A; Sugiyama, M; Takahashi, H; Saito, S.; Inamori, M.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, M.(Niigata University, 950-2181, Niigata, Japan); Kubota, N; Yamauchi, T.; Kadowaki, T; Wada, K.; Nakagama, H; Nakajima, A

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims: The effect of adiponectin on colorectal carcinogenesis has been proposed but not fully investigated. We investigated the effect of adiponectin deficiency on the development of colorectal cancer. Methods: We generated three types of gene-deficient mice (adiponectin-deficient, adiponectin receptor 1-deficient, and adiponectin receptor 2-deficient) and investigated chemical-induced colon polyp formation and cell proliferation in colon epithelium. Western blot analysis was pe...

  15. Polyamines as mediators of APC-dependent intestinal carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Nathaniel S; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2009-01-01

    Combination chemoprevention for cancer was proposed a quarter of a century ago, but has not been implemented in standard medical practice owing to limited efficacy and toxicity. Recent trials have targeted inflammation and polyamine biosynthesis, both of which are increased in carcinogenesis. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that DFMO (difluoromethylornithine), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC (ornithine decarboxylase) which is the first enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, combined with NS...

  16. DNA Damage in Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Ohnishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection and chronic inflammation have been recognized as important factors for carcinogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS are generated from inflammatory and epithelial cells and result in oxidative and nitrative DNA damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG and 8-nitroguanine. The DNA damage can cause mutations and has been implicated in the initiation and/or promotion of inflammation-mediated carcinogenesis. It has been estimated that various infectious agents are carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 1, including parasites (Schistosoma haematobium (SH and Opisthorchis viverrini (OV, viruses (hepatitis C virus (HCV, human papillomavirus (HPV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and bacterium Helicobacter pylori (HP. SH, OV, HCV, HPV, EBV, and HP are important risk factors for bladder cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and gastric cancer, respectively. We demonstrated that 8-nitroguanine was strongly formed via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression at these cancer sites of patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in SH-associated bladder cancer tissues and in Oct3/4- and CD133-positive stem cells in OV-associated cholangiocarcinoma tissues. Therefore, it is considered that oxidative and nitrative DNA damage in stem cells may play a key role in inflammation-related carcinogenesis.

  17. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis

  18. Carcinogenesis associated with parasites other than Schistosoma, Opisthorchis and Clonorchis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A

    2016-06-15

    Only three helminths (Schistosoma haematobium, Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis) are directly associated with carcinogenesis in humans whereas the role of other parasites in cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to perform a systematic review to identify recent insights in the role of other parasite infections in carcinogenesis. We conducted systematic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE on July 2015. Our primary outcome was the association between parasitic infections and carcinogenesis. Out of 1,266 studies, 19 were selected for detailed evaluation (eight for helminths and 11 for protozoa). The mechanisms of helminth-induced cancer included chronic inflammation, sustained proliferation, modulation of the host immune system, reprogramming of glucose metabolism and redox signaling, induction of genomic instability and destabilization of suppressor tumor proteins, stimulation of angiogenesis, resisting cell death, and activation of invasion and metastasis. In addition to the current knowledge, the following parasites were found in cancers or tumors: Echinococcus, Strongyloides, Fasciola, Heterakis, Platynosomum and Trichuris. Additional parasites were found in this systematic review that could potentially be associated with cancers or tumors but further evidence is needed to elaborate a cause-effect relationship. PMID:26840624

  19. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Association with the Risk of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biadgo, Belete; Abebe, Molla

    2016-04-25

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated diseases such as cancers are substantially increasing worldwide. About 80% of the patients with pancreatic cancer have glucose metabolism alterations. This suggests an association between type 2 DM and pancreatic cancer risk and progression. There are hypotheses that show metabolic links between the diseases, due to insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, low grade chronic inflammation, and alteration in the insulin-insulin-like growth factor axis. The use of diabetes medications can influence the extent of carcinogenesis of the pancreas. This study briefly reviews recent literature on investigation of metabolic link of type 2 DM, risk of carcinogenesis of the pancreas and their association, as well as the current understanding of metabolic pathways implicated in metabolism and cellular growth. The main finding of this review, although there are discrepancies, is that according to most research long-term DM does not raise the risk of pancreatic cancer. The longest duration of DM may reflect hypoinsulinemia due to treatment for hyperglycemia, but recent onset diabetes was associated with increased risk for pancreatic cancer due to hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. In conclusion, the review demonstrates that type 2 DM and the duration of diabetes pose a risk for pancreatic carcinogenesis, and that there is biological link between the diseases. PMID:27112242

  20. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of zinc utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. The rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and DMH treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30mg/Kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body 65Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb1 representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb2, the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb1 and Tb2 components of 65Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of 65Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in 65Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. The present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of zinc during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of zinc in colon tumorigenesis, a paradigm which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer. (author)

  1. Anti-tumour promoting activity of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate against two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rajat Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence collectively suggests that Se in different inorganic and organic forms provides a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, active against several types of cancer. It can exert preventive activity in all the three stages of cancer: initiation, promotion and progression. Literature reports revealed that organoselenocyanates have more potential as chemopreventive agents than inorganic forms due to their lower toxicity. In our previous report we showed chemopreventive efficacy of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate during the initiation and pre- plus post-initiation phases of skin and colon carcinogenesis process. The present study was undertaken to explore the anti-tumour promoting activity of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate in a 7,12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene (DMBA)-croton oil two-stage skin carcinogenesis model. The results obtained showed significant (pliver and skin. Thus, the present data strongly suggest that diphenylmethyl selenocyanate also has the potential to act as anti-tumour promoter agent in a two-stage skin carcinogenesis mouse model, pointing to possible general efficacy. PMID:16101330

  2. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed

  3. Dual preventive benefits of iron elimination by desferal in asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Chew, Shan-Hwu; Nakamura, Kosuke; Ohara, Yuuki; Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis is currently a profound social issue due to its extremely long incubation period and high mortality rate. Therefore, procedures to prevent malignant mesothelioma in people already exposed to asbestos are important. In previous experiments, we established an asbestos-induced rat peritoneal mesothelioma model, which revealed that local iron overload is a major cause of pathogenesis and that the induced genetic alterations are similar to human counterparts. Furthermore, we showed that oral administration of deferasirox modified the histology from sarcomatoid to the more favorable epithelioid subtype. Here, we used i.p. administration of desferal to evaluate its effects on asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation and iron deposition, as well as oxidative stress. Nitrilotriacetate was used to promote an iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction as a positive control. Desferal significantly decreased peritoneal fibrosis, iron deposition, and nuclear 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in mesothelial cells, whereas nitrilotriacetate significantly increased all of them. Desferal was more effective in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells to counteract asbestos-induced cytotoxicity than in murine macrophages (RAW264.7). Furthermore, rat sarcomatoid mesothelioma cells were more dependent on iron for proliferation than rat peritoneal mesothelial cells. Because inflammogenicity of a fiber is proportionally associated with subsequent mesothelial carcinogenesis, iron elimination from the mesothelial environment can confer dual merits for preventing asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis by suppressing inflammation and mesothelial proliferation simultaneously. PMID:27088640

  4. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanori Ito; Shinji Tanaka; Tomoari Kamada; Ken Haruma; Kazuaki Chayama

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiological reports indicate that Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.H pyloriis known to induce chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. Its products, including superoxides,participate in the DNA damage followed by initiation, and the inflammation-derived cytokines and growth factors contribute to the promotion of gastric carcinogenesis.By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophyl intestinal metaplasia in part. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without precancerous conditions. In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a nonrandomized manner. However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis. We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.

  6. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneeb U Rehman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen peroxide generation with reduction in renal glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phase-II metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase. It also enhances blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Fe-NTA also lead to increase in levels of some inflammatory markers viz NO and MPO and some proinflammatory cytokines viz PGE-2 and TNF-1. The chemopreventive efficacy of Quercus infectoria was studied in terms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities, LPO, redox status, serum toxicity markers, inflammatory and proinflammatory markers and cell proliferation in the kidney tissue. Oral administration of Quercus infectoria at doses of 75 and 150 mg/kg b wt effectively suppressed renal oxidative stress, inflammation and tumor incidence. Chemopreventive effects of Quercus infectoria were associated with up-regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities and down regulation of serum toxicity markers. Present study supports Quercus infectoria as a potent chemopreventive agent and suppresses Fe-NTA-induced renal carcinogenesis and oxidative and inflammatory response in Wistar rat.

  7. ATP-Dependent Lon Protease Contributes to Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Wang, Minggang; Hou, Nengyi; Hu, Xiao; Jia, Guiqing; Qin, Xianpeng; Zuo, Xiaofei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Kun; Song, Wei; Wang, Kang; Pang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Host cellular stress responses, including inflammatory and immune responses, have been reported highly linked to H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. However, whether mitochondrial regulation and metabolic reprogramming, which are potently associated with various cancers, play a role in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Here we revealed that Lon protease (Lonp1), which is a key inductive of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and is required to maintain the mitochondrial quality, was greatly induced in H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, we uncovered that knockdown of Lonp1 expression significantly diminished the metabolic switch to glycolysis and gastric cell proliferation associated with low multiplicity of H. pylori infection. In addition, Lonp1 overexpression in gastric epithelial cells also promoted glycolytic switch and cell overgrowth, suggesting H. pylori effect is Lonp1 dependent. We further demonstrated that H. pylori induced Lonp1 expression and cell overgrowth, at least partially, via HIF-1α regulation. Collectively, our results concluded the relevance of Lonp1 for cell proliferation and identified Lonp1 as a key regulator of metabolic reprogramming in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27108387

  8. A comparison of UVB-carcinogenesis between nude mice and nude beige mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Noriyoshi; Hayakawa, Jun-ichiro; Nikaido, Osamu [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Hiai, Hiroshi

    1998-06-01

    To gain an insight into the relationship between UVB-carcinogenesis and natural killer activity, we examined ultraviolet light-induced carcinogenesis in mice with high natural killer activity (KSN) and mice with natural killer deficiency (KSN-bg). We exposed mice six times a week to three levels of daily ultraviolet B (UVB) doses; 320, 160 and 0 J/m{sup 2}/day. During the latency period of skin tumor development in KSN mice, we detected no suppression of the natural killer activity at both 320 and 160 J/m{sup 2}/day. Even at 1340 J/m{sup 2}/day, we could not detect any significant suppression of NK activity in KSN mice. When we irradiated spleen cells in vitro, we observed NK activity suppression. Next, we compared the carcinogenic effects of UVB-irradiation on KSN and KSN-bg mice. At 320 J/m{sup 2}/day, we detected no significant differences between them. In contrast, at 160 J/m{sup 2}/day, KSN-bg mice showed a significantly higher rate of skin tumor induction than KSN mice (p<0.05). Most UVB-induced tumors were squamous cell carcinoma, the rest were spindle cell carcinoma, papilloma and mixed type. Our results suggest that NK activity plays a protective role against UVB-carcinogenesis from low daily-doses of UVB-irradiation. (author)

  9. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. L’œuvre de Jaime Bayly : littérature ou paralittérature ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Defoix

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Les ouvrages de Jaime Bayly (Lima, 1965 posent le problème de ce que sont réellement la littérature (associée à la culture savante et la paralittérature (culture populaire. Après avoir exposé ce que regroupe le genre paralittéraire, une définition de la paralittérature est donnée en la confrontant au concept de « littérarité ». Les principales caractéristiques de l’œuvre bayléenne sont alors proposées : traitement des mêmes thématiques, personnages stéréotypés, récurrence des mêmes anecdotes... L’étude de la structure même des écrits, la langue utilisée, le type de narration constituent autant d’éléments qui nous invitent à ranger la production de Jaime Bayly dans le domaine paralittéraire. Mais certaines nuances doivent être apportées : l’héritage et le contexte littéraires, la portée politique, historique et sociale, ainsi qu’une certaine cohérence des thématiques traitées et le lien étroit entre les ouvrages et leur auteur réfutent la vision plutôt simpliste volontiers accordée à la paralittérature. En outre, l’absence de réelle unité, l’évolution constatée tout au long des quinze écrits renforcent le caractère relativement inclassable de la production bayléenne, située entre ces deux domaines aux frontières poreuses et souvent subjectives que sont littérature et paralittérature.The works of Jaime Bayly (born in Lima in 1965 highlight the issue of the genuine nature of literature (associated to academic knowledge, and paraliterature (related to popular culture. After describing the main manifestations of paraliterature as a genre, a definition of paraliterature is given by comparing and contrasting it with the concept of « literarity ». The core aspects of Bayly’s work are listed : his resorting to repeated themes, stereotypical characters, the recurring aspect of some of the scenes… The study of the very structure of his writings, the language used, the

  12. Enhancement of DNA repair using topical T4 endonuclease V does not inhibit melanoma formation in Cdk4(R24C/R24C)/Tyr-Nras(Q61K) mice following neonatal UVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elke; Muller, H Konrad; Hayward, Nicholas; Fahey, Paul; Walker, Graeme

    2010-02-01

    To further investigate the use of DNA repair-enhancing agents for skin cancer prevention, we treated Cdk4(R24C/R24C)/Nras(Q61K) mice topically with the T4 endonuclease V DNA repair enzyme (known as Dimericine) immediately prior to neonatal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, which has a powerful effect in exacerbating melanoma development in the mouse model. Dimericine has been shown to reduce the incidence of basal-cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Unexpectedly, we saw no difference in penetrance or age of onset of melanoma after neonatal UVR between Dimericine-treated and control animals, although the drug reduced DNA damage and cellular proliferation in the skin. Interestingly, epidermal melanocytes removed cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) more efficiently than surrounding keratinocytes. Our study indicates that neonatal UVR-initiated melanomas may be driven by mechanisms other than solely that of a large CPD load and/or their inefficient repair. This is further suggestive of different mechanisms by which UVR may enhance the transformation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. PMID:19788533

  13. 腾冲嗜热厌氧菌耐热解旋酶Tte-uvrD的克隆表达及粗酶的初步应用%Clone of Tte-uvrD from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis and activity of crude enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章丽; 余以刚; 黄秀丽; 肖性龙

    2014-01-01

    以腾冲嗜热厌氧菌(Thermoanaerobacter tengconge ns is)基因组DNA为模版,通过PCR克隆编码解旋酶Tte-uvrD的基因tte-uvrd,将该基因插入原核表达载体pET-32a(+),构建重组表达载体pET-32a(+)-tte-uvrd,转入E.coli BL21中,经蓝白斑筛选和双酶切法筛选阳性重组转化子,挑取测序正确的单个阳性菌落,在IPTG诱导下表达出重组蛋白Tte-uvrD.诱导后的菌体经超声破碎和离心,上清液用硫酸铵沉淀法初步纯化,透析除盐,冻干复溶后得到粗酶液.用tHDA反应来验证Tte-uvrD粗酶液的活性,比较不同储存温度下粗酶液酶活保持的时间,并比较-20℃下储存两个月的粗酶液与商品化纯酶的tHDA反应灵敏度.结果表明,用本研究建立的克隆方法可成功克隆出耐热解旋酶Tte-uvrD,其粗酶液能用于tHDA反应,说明粗酶液具有解旋活性;粗酶液在-20℃下第80d酶活仍能保持稳定,4℃下则只能保持酶活约一周;-20℃下储存两个月的粗酶液能达到与商品化纯酶相当的灵敏度.

  14. Annexe 2. Recommandation du conseil de l’OCDE sur la mise en œuvre du principe pollueur-payeur

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    LE CONSEIL, Vu l’article 5b) de la Convention relative à l’Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques, en date du 14 décembre 1960 ; Vu les dispositions de l’Accord Général sur les Tarifs Douaniers et le Commerce ; Vu la Recommandation du Conseil, en date du 26 mai 1972, sur les principes directeurs relatifs aux aspects économiques des politiques de l’environnement sur le plan international [C(72)128] ; Vu la note du Comité de l’environnement sur la mise en œuvre du principe ...

  15. Les relations texte / image dans l’édition numérique enrichie d’une œuvre littéraire

    OpenAIRE

    Laborderie, Arnaud; Juhel, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    La Bibliothèque nationale de France s’est associée à Orange et à la Voltaire Foundation pour concevoir une édition enrichie de Candide, sous la forme d’une application iPad et d’un site web. Cette réédition d’un classique sous un mode renouvelé interroge la forme habituellement close et linéaire du livre pour la confronter à d’autres approches du texte. Au « Livre » s’ajoutent deux représentations de l’œuvre : le « Monde » et le « Jardin ». Dans ce processus de remédiatisation du conte de Vol...

  16. Relativisme cognitif et indétermination sémiotique : abduction et méta-abduction dans l’œuvre romanesque d’Umberto Eco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Yocaris

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : le problème de la compréhension L’œuvre romanesque d’Umberto Eco peut être considérée à plusieurs égards comme un traité de sémiotique « fictionnalisé » en plusieurs volumes, qui vient compléter les ouvrages théoriques de l’auteur (on pense surtout à trois livres : Opera aperta, Trattato di semiotica generale et I Limiti dell’interpretazione. Or, la question principale posée par ce « traité » sui generis porte justement sur le problème de la compréhension : pour Eco comme pour...

  17. Study of Measurement of luminescence life time of the Nd3+ ions in the 6-FDA/UVR and Al2o3 hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sunil Kumar,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence life time measurements of the Nd3+ ions in the 6-FDA/UVR and Al2o3 hosts were performed using a Laser diode emitting at 800nm as the excitation source. Optical losses in both materials have been studied and compared absorption bands of Nd3+ have been observed at 580nm ,745nm, 800nm and 870nm . Based on which Judd- ofelt analysis has been applied to study the transition properties of Nd3+ ions in the two hosts. Photoluminescence spectra of Nd3+ have been experimentally studied and emission around 880nm, 1060nm and 1330nm is observed, which indicates that Nd3+ ions are active in these two hosts.

  18. Réflexion et révolution. Notes sur le travail de l’histoire dans l’œuvre de Heine

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    L’œuvre de Heine peut être comprise comme une réaction à l’historisation générale du champ de savoir inaugurée par l’expérience de la Révolution. Face aux historicistes qui mettent l’accent sur l’autonomie du passé et aux philosophes de l’idéalisme qui analysent le processus historique en fonction de la seule perspective de l’avenir, Heine insiste sur le droit et la logique du présent. Dans ses articles pour la Gazette d’Augsbourg, il se fait historiographe du présent, tout en précisant les c...

  19. Vers la mise en œuvre d’une action collective pour gérer les risques naturels littoraux en France métropolitaine

    OpenAIRE

    Deboudt, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, la vulnérabilité des enjeux rassemblés dans la frange côtière a été principalement gérée par une maîtrise de l’aléa, coordonnée par l’État, avec la mise en œuvre de pratiques de défense côtière. Au début des années 1980, la politique de prévention des risques naturels privilégie la gestion des conséquences des catastrophes naturelles avec la création d’un dispositif d’indemnisation des victimes de catastrophes naturelles, le régime catnat. Au milieu des années ...

  20. Mise en œuvre opérationnelle d’un projet de compensation carbone de foyers améliorés au Niger

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Fanny; Begovic, Milena

    2013-01-01

    L’utilisation de foyers « ouverts » traditionnels utilisés au Niger a de lourdes conséquences au niveau environnemental, sanitaire et économique. Le projet de compensation carbone de foyers améliorés présenté ici consiste à remplacer ces foyers traditionnels par des foyers améliorés plus performants (appelés Kiva-Hybride) permettant de réduire la consommation de bois d'origine non renouvelable. La mise en œuvre d’un tel projet nécessite un travail préalable conséquent afin d’assurer sa pérenn...