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Sample records for arsenic rich iron

  1. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, M.A.; Mateo, R.; Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F.; Green, A.J.; Meharg, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg -1 , and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores

  2. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)], E-mail: mark.taggart@uclm.es; Mateo, R. [Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F. [Synchrotron Radiation Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Green, A.J. [Department of Wetland Ecology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, CSIC, Pabellon del Peru, Avenida Maria Luisa s/n, 41013 Seville (Spain); Meharg, A.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg{sup -1}, and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  3. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots--an ecotoxicological risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, M A; Mateo, R; Charnock, J M; Bahrami, F; Green, A J; Meharg, A A

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcóllar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root+plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg(-1), and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcóllar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque.

  4. ARSENIC ADSORPTION AND REDUCTION IN IRON-RICH SOILS NEARBY LANDFILLS IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqin Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Florida, soils are mainly composed of Myakka, an acid soil characterized by a subsurface accumulation of humus and Al(III and Fe(III oxides. Downgradient of the landfills in Northwest Florida, elevated levels of iron and arsenic observations had been made in the groundwater from monitoring wells, which was attributed to the geomicrobial iron and arsenic reduction. There is thus an immediate research need for a better understanding of the reduction reactions that are responsible for the mobilization of iron and arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills. Owing to the high Fe(III oxide content, As(V adsorption reactions with Fe(III oxide surfaces are particularly important, which may control As(V reduction. This research focused on the investigation of the biogeochemical processes of the subsurface soil nearby landfills of Northwest Florida. Arsenic and iron reduction was studied in batch reactors and quantified based on Monod-type microbial kinetic growth simulations. As(V adsorption in iron-rich Northwest Floridian soils was further investigated to explain the reduction observations. It was demonstrated in this research that solubilization of arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills in Northwest Florida would likely occur under conditions favoring Fe(III dissimilatory reduction.

  5. Energy sources for chemolithotrophs in an arsenic- and iron-rich shallow-sea hydrothermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, N H; Price, R E; Pichler, T; Amend, J P

    2011-09-01

    The hydrothermally influenced sediments of Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea, are ideal for investigating the chemolithotrophic activities of micro-organisms involved in arsenic cycling because hydrothermal vents there expel fluids with arsenite (As(III)) concentrations as high as 950 μg L(-1) . These hot (99 °C), slightly acidic (pH ~6), chemically reduced, shallow-sea vent fluids mix with colder, oxidized seawater to create steep gradients in temperature, pH, and concentrations of As, N, Fe, and S redox species. Near the vents, iron oxyhydroxides precipitate with up to 6.2 wt% arsenate (As(V)). Here, chemical analyses of sediment porewaters from 10 sites along a 300-m transect were combined with standard Gibbs energies to evaluate the energy yields (-ΔG(r)) from 19 potential chemolithotrophic metabolisms, including As(V) reduction, As(III) oxidation, Fe(III) reduction, and Fe(II) oxidation reactions. The 19 reactions yielded 2-94 kJ mol(-1) e(-) , with aerobic oxidation of sulphide and arsenite the two most exergonic reactions. Although anaerobic As(V) reduction and Fe(III) reduction were among the least exergonic reactions investigated, they are still potential net metabolisms. Gibbs energies of the arsenic redox reactions generally correlate linearly with pH, increasing with increasing pH for As(III) oxidation and decreasing with increasing pH for As(V) reduction. The calculated exergonic energy yields suggest that micro-organisms could exploit diverse energy sources in Tutum Bay, and examples of micro-organisms known to use these chemolithotrophic metabolic strategies are discussed. Energy modeling of redox reactions can help target sampling sites for future microbial collection and cultivation studies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Adsorption of arsenic by iron rich precipitates from two coal mine drainage sites on the West Coast of New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rait, R.; Trumm, D.; Pope, J.; Craw, D.; Newman, N.; MacKenzie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved As can be strongly adsorbed to fine grained Fe(III) minerals such as hydroxides, oxyhydroxides and hydroxysulphates. Therefore precipitates that form during neutralisation or treatment of acid mine drainage have potential to be useful for treatment of As-contaminated water because acid mine drainage is often Fe rich. We tested the adsorption properties of Fe(III) rich precipitates from two West Coast coal mines with As-contaminated water from an historic gold ore processing site near Reefton. Precipitates were collected from distinctly different settings, an active acid mine drainage treatment plant at Stockton mine and the neutralisation/oxidation zone of acid mine drainage discharge at the abandoned Blackball Coal Mine. The two mine sites produce precipitates with different compositions and mineralogy. Arsenic adsorption onto precipitates from each site was determined in batch and column tests under laboratory conditions. Batch experiments indicate As adsorption occurs rapidly during the first 5 h and reaches equilibrium after 24 h. At equilibrium, and for a dosing ratio of 50 g of precipitate per litre of water, As concentrations decreased from 99 mg/L to 0.0080 mg/L with precipitates from Stockton and to 0.0017 mg/L with precipitates from Blackball. Arsenic adsorption capacity is up to 12 mg/g on precipitates from Stockton sludge and 74 mg/g on precipitates from Blackball. The Blackball precipitate adsorbs more As than precipitates from Stockton which is probably due to the higher Fe oxide content but pH and surface structure could also play a role. The column experiment confirmed that adsorption of As from a continuous waste stream onto these precipitates is possible, and that passive remediation using this waste product mixed with gravel to enhance permeability could be a viable approach at As-contaminated mine sites. (author). 56 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using iron removal processes that include oxidation/filtration and the manganese greensand processes. Presentation includes results of U.S. EPA field studies conducted in Michigan and Ohio on existing iron remo...

  9. REDUCING ARSENIC LEVELS IN DRINKING WATER DURING IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides an overview of iron removal technology for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The presentation is divided into several topic topics: Arsenic Chemistry, Treatment Selection, Treatment Options, Case Studies and Iron Removal Processes. Each topic i...

  10. ARSENIC MOBILITY FROM IRON OXIDE SOLIDS PRODUCED DURING WATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arsenic Rule under the Safe Drinking Water Act will require certain drinking water suppliers to add to or modify their existing treatment in order to comply with the new 10 ppb arsenic standard. One of the treatment options is co-precipitation of arsenic with iron. This tre...

  11. Amendment of arsenic and chromium polluted soil from wood preservation by iron residues from water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Skov; Petersen, L. R.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An iron-rich water treatment residue (WTR) consisting mainly of ferrihydrite was used for immobilization of arsenic and chromium in a soil contaminated by wood preservatives. A leaching batch experiment was conducted using two soils, a highly contaminated soil (1033mgkg−1 As and 371mgkg−1 Cr....... Pore water was extracted during 3years from the amended soil and a control site. Pore water arsenic concentrations in the amended soil were more than two orders of magnitude lower than in the control for the upper samplers. An increased release of arsenic was observed during winter in both fields...

  12. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  13. Bioleaching of Arsenic-Rich Gold Concentrates by Bacterial Flora before and after Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the bioleaching efficiency of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, a mixed bacterial flora had been developed, and the mutation breeding method was adopted to conduct the research. The original mixed bacterial flora had been enrichedin acid mine drainage of Dexing copper mine, Jiangxi Province, China. It was induced by UV (ultraviolet, ultrasonic, and microwave, and their combination mutation. The most efficient bacterial flora after mutation was collected for further bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates. Results indicated that the bacterial flora after mutation by UV 60 s combined with ultrasonic 10 min had the best oxidation rate of ferrous, the biggest density of cells, and the most activity of total protein. During bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, the density of the mutant bacterial cells reached to 1.13×108 cells/mL at 15 days, more than 10 times compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of iron reached to 95.7% after 15 days, increased by 9.9% compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of arsenic reached to 92.6% after 12 days, which was increased by 46.1%. These results suggested that optimum combined mutation could improve leaching ability of the bacterial flora more significantly.

  14. Bioleaching of Arsenic-Rich Gold Concentrates by Bacterial Flora before and after Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuehui; Yuan, Xuewu; Liu, Na; Chen, Xiaoguang; Abdelgadir, Awad; Liu, Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the bioleaching efficiency of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, a mixed bacterial flora had been developed, and the mutation breeding method was adopted to conduct the research. The original mixed bacterial flora had been enrichedin acid mine drainage of Dexing copper mine, Jiangxi Province, China. It was induced by UV (ultraviolet), ultrasonic, and microwave, and their combination mutation. The most efficient bacterial flora after mutation was collected for further bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates. Results indicated that the bacterial flora after mutation by UV 60 s combined with ultrasonic 10 min had the best oxidation rate of ferrous, the biggest density of cells, and the most activity of total protein. During bioleaching of arsenic-rich gold concentrates, the density of the mutant bacterial cells reached to 1.13 × 108 cells/mL at 15 days, more than 10 times compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of iron reached to 95.7% after 15 days, increased by 9.9% compared with that of the original culture. The extraction of arsenic reached to 92.6% after 12 days, which was increased by 46.1%. These results suggested that optimum combined mutation could improve leaching ability of the bacterial flora more significantly. PMID:24381948

  15. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been

  16. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.; Van Halem, Doris; Verberk, J. Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  17. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.

    2012-06-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  18. Arsenic speciation in arsenic-rich Brazilian soils from gold mining sites under anaerobic incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, J. W. V.; Talbott, J.L.; Scott, J.; Roy, W.R.; Stucki, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Arsenic speciation in environmental samples is essential for studying toxicity, mobility and bio-transformation of As in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Although the inorganic species As(III) and As(V) have been considered dominant in soils and sediments, organisms are able to metabolize inorganic forms of arsenic into organo-arsenic compounds. Arsenosugars and methylated As compounds can be found in terrestrial organisms, but they generally occur only as minor constituents. We investigated the dynamics of arsenic species under anaerobic conditions in soils surrounding gold mining areas from Minas Gerais State, Brazil to elucidate the arsenic biogeochemical cycle and water contamination mechanisms. Methods. Surface soil samples were collected at those sites, namely Paracatu Formation, Banded Iron Formation and Riacho dos Machados Sequence, and incubated in CaCl2 2.5 mmol L-1 suspensions under anaerobic conditions for 1, 28, 56 and 112 days. After that, suspensions were centrifuged and supernatants analyzed for soluble As species by IC-ICPMS and HPLC-ICPMS. Results. Easily exchangeable As was mainly arsenite, except when reducible manganese was present. Arsenate was mainly responsible for the increase in soluble arsenic due to the reductive dissolution of either iron or manganese in samples from the Paracatu Formation and Riacho dos Machados Sequence. On the other hand, organic species of As dominated in samples from the Banded Iron Formation during anaerobic incubation. Discussion. Results are contrary to the expectation that, in anaerobic environments, As release due to the reductive dissolution of Fe is followed by As(V) reduction to As(III). The occurrence of organo-arsenic species was also found to be significant to the dynamics of soluble arsenic, mainly in soils from the Banded Iron Formation (BIF), under our experimental conditions. Conclusions. In general, As(V) and organic As were the dominant species in solution, which is surprising

  19. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not

  20. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the ... and sediment were collected and trace element concentrations were measured with an ICP-MS. ..... Clay minerals are known to have high sorption affinities ..... sediment/water quality interaction with particular reference to the.

  1. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents a long term performance study of two iron removal water treatment plants to remove arsenic from drinking water sources. Performance information was collected from one system located in midwest for one full year and at the second system located in the farwest...

  2. Moessbauer and EXAFS spectroscopy investigation of iron and arsenic adsorption to lettuce leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Silva, Gabriela C.; Carvalho, Regina P.; Dantas, Maria Sylvia S.; Ciminelli, Virginia S. T.

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of iron and arsenic from aqueous solution by lettuce leaves biomass was investigated using Moessbauer and EXAFS spectroscopic techniques. Moessbauer spectroscopy results show that iron is oxidized during sorption while EXAFS results indicate that iron is coordinated by approximately 6 oxygen and 2 carbon atoms while arsenic is coordinated by approximately 4 oxygen atoms with iron as a second neighbor.

  3. Moessbauer and EXAFS spectroscopy investigation of iron and arsenic adsorption to lettuce leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Igor F., E-mail: ifvasco@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Dep. Eng. Metalurgica e de Materiais (Brazil); Silva, Gabriela C.; Carvalho, Regina P.; Dantas, Maria Sylvia S.; Ciminelli, Virginia S. T. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Dep. Eng. Metalurgica e de Materiais (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The accumulation of iron and arsenic from aqueous solution by lettuce leaves biomass was investigated using Moessbauer and EXAFS spectroscopic techniques. Moessbauer spectroscopy results show that iron is oxidized during sorption while EXAFS results indicate that iron is coordinated by approximately 6 oxygen and 2 carbon atoms while arsenic is coordinated by approximately 4 oxygen atoms with iron as a second neighbor.

  4. Removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions using waste iron columns inoculated with iron bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhdarpoor, Abooalfazl; Nikmanesh, Roya; Samaei, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of water resources is one of the serious risks threatening natural ecosystems and human health. This study investigates arsenic removal using a waste iron column with and without iron bacteria in continuous and batch phases. In batch experiments, the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration of arsenic and adsorbent dose were investigated. Results indicated that the highest arsenate removal efficiency occurred at pH 7 (96.76%). On increasing the amount of waste iron from 0.25 to 1 g, the removal rate changed from about 42.37%-96.70%. The results of continuous experiments on the column containing waste iron showed that as the empty bed contact time increased from 5 to 60 min, the secondary arsenate concentration changed from 23 to 6 µg/l. In experiments involving a waste iron column with iron bacteria, an increase in residence time from 5 to 60 min decreased the secondary arsenate concentration from 14.97 to 4.86 µg/l. The results of this study showed that waste iron containing iron bacteria is a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  5. Diverse arsenic- and iron-cycling microbial communities in arsenic-contaminated aquifers used for drinking water in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zahid; Sultana, Munawar; van Breukelen, Boris M; Khan, Sirajul I; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface removal of arsenic by injection with oxygenated groundwater has been proposed as a viable technology for obtaining 'safe' drinking water in Bangladesh. While the oxidation of ferrous iron to solid ferric iron minerals, to which arsenic adsorbs, is assumed to be driven by abiotic reactions, metal-cycling microorganisms may potentially affect arsenic removal. A cultivation-independent survey covering 24 drinking water wells in several geographical regions in Bangladesh was conducted to obtain information on microbial community structure and diversity in general, and on specific functional groups capable of the oxidation or reduction of arsenic or iron. Each functional group, targeted by either group-specific 16S rRNA or functional gene amplification, occurred in at least 79% of investigated samples. Putative arsenate reducers and iron-oxidizing Gallionellaceae were present at low diversity, while more variation in potentially arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms and iron-reducing Desulfuromonadales was revealed within and between samples. Relations between community composition on the one hand and hydrochemistry on the other hand were in general not evident, apart from an impact of salinity on iron-cycling microorganisms. Our data suggest widespread potential for a positive contribution of arsenite and iron oxidizers to arsenic removal upon injection with oxygenated water, but also indicate a potential risk for arsenic re-mobilization by anaerobic arsenate and iron reducers once injection is halted. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower assisted removal of arsenic from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raul, Prasanta Kumar, E-mail: prasanta.drdo@gmail.com [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Devi, Rashmi Rekha; Umlong, Iohborlang M. [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Thakur, Ashim Jyoti [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Banerjee, Saumen; Veer, Vijay [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 μg L{sup −1} to less than 10 μg L{sup −1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. TEM image clearly reveals that the nanoparticle looks flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic at room temperature and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface. The material can be regenerated up to 70% using dilute hydrochloric acid and it would be utilized for de-arsenification purposes. - Highlights: • The work includes synthesis of iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower and its applicability for the removal of arsenic from water. • The nanoparticle was characterized using modern instrumental methods like FESEM, TEM, BET, XRD, etc. • The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic at room temperature. • The sorption is multilayered on the heterogeneous surface of the nano adsorbent. • The mechanism of arsenic removal of IOH nanoflower follows both adsorption and ion-exchange. - Abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 μg L{sup −1} to less than 10 μg L{sup −1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. The nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), BET surface area, FTIR, FESEM and TEM images. TEM image clearly reveals flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The nanoflower morphology is also supported by FESEM images. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 μg g{sup −1} for arsenic and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the

  7. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobilization of iron and arsenic from soil by construction and demolition debris landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Sikora, Saraya; Kim, Hwidong; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy

    2012-05-01

    Column experiments were performed to examine (a) the potential for leachate from construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills to mobilize naturally-occurring iron and arsenic from soils underlying such facilities and (b) the ability of crushed limestone to remove these aqueous phase pollutants. In duplicate columns, water was added to a 30-cm layer of synthetic C&D debris, with the resulting leachate serially passed through a 30-cm soil layer containing iron and arsenic and a 30-cm crushed limestone layer. This experiment was conducted for two different soil types (one high in iron (10,400mg/kg) and the second high in iron (5400mg/kg) and arsenic (70mg/kg)); also monitored were control columns for both soil types with water infiltration alone. Despite low iron concentrations in the simulated C&D debris leachate, elevated iron concentrations were observed when leachate passed through the soils; reductive dissolution was concluded to be the cause of iron mobilization. In the soil containing elevated arsenic, increased iron mobilization from the soil was accompanied by a similar but delayed arsenic mobilization. Since arsenic sorbs to oxidized iron soil minerals, reductive dissolution of these minerals results in arsenic mobilization. Crushed limestone significantly reduced iron (to values below the detection limit of 0.01mg/L in most cases); however, arsenic was not removed to any significant extent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of arsenic resistant bacteria from arsenic rich groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-03-01

    Sixty-four arsenic (As) resistant bacteria isolated from an arsenic rich groundwater sample of West Bengal were characterized to investigate their potential role in subsurface arsenic mobilization. Among the isolated strains predominance of genera Agrobacterium/Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum and Achromobacter which could grow chemolitrophically and utilize arsenic as electron donor were detected. Higher tolerance to As(3+) [maximum tolerable concentration (MTC): ≥10 mM], As(5+) (MTC: ≥100 mM) and other heavy metals like Cu(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+) etc. (MTC: ≥10 mM), presence of arsenate reductase and siderophore was frequently observed among the isolates. Ability to produce arsenite oxidase and phosphatase enzyme was detected in 50 and 34 % of the isolates, respectively. Although no direct correlation among taxonomic identity of bacterial strains and their metabolic abilities as mentioned above was apparent, several isolates affiliated to genera Ochrobactrum, Achromobacter and unclassified Rhizobiaceae members were found to be highly resistant to As(3+) and As(5+) and positive for all the test properties. Arsenate reductase activity was found to be conferred by arsC gene, which in many strains was coupled with arsenite efflux gene arsB as well. Phylogenetic incongruence between the 16S rRNA and ars genes lineages indicated possible incidence of horizontal gene transfer for ars genes. Based on the results we propose that under the prevailing low nutrient condition inhabitant bacteria capable of using inorganic electron donors play a synergistic role wherein siderophores and phosphatase activities facilitate the release of sediment bound As(5+), which is subsequently reduced by arsenate reductase resulting into the mobilization of As(3+) in groundwater.

  10. Iron Polymerization and Arsenic Removal During In-Situ Iron Electrocoagulation in Synthetic Bangladeshi Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, C. M.; Pena, J.; Addy, S.; Gadgil, A.

    2010-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contamination in groundwater drinking supplies. The majority of affected people live in rural Bangladesh. Electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes is a promising arsenic removal strategy that is based on the generation of iron precipitates with a high affinity for arsenic through the electrochemical dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Many studies of iron hydrolysis in the presence of co-occurring ions in groundwater such as PO43-, SiO44-, and AsO43- suggest that these ions influence the polymerization and formation of iron oxide phases. However, the combined impact of these ions on precipitates generated by EC is not well understood. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to examine EC precipitates generated in synthetic Bangladeshi groundwater (SBGW). The iron oxide structure and arsenic binding geometry were investigated as a function of EC operating conditions. As and Fe k-edge spectra were similar between samples regardless of the large range of current density (0.02, 1.1, 5.0, 100 mA/cm2) used during sample generation. This result suggests that current density does not play a large role in the formation EC precipitates in SBGW. Shell-by-shell fits of Fe K-edge data revealed the presence of a single Fe-Fe interatomic distance at approximately 3.06 Å. The absence of longer ranged Fe-Fe correlations suggests that EC precipitates consist of nano-scale chains (polymers) of FeO6 octahedra sharing equatorial edges. Shell-by-shell fits of As K-edge spectra show arsenic bound in primarily bidentate, binuclear corner sharing complexes. In this coordination geometry, arsenic prevents the formation of FeO6 corner-sharing linkages, which are necessary for 3-dimensional crystal growth. The individual and combined effects of other anions, such as PO43- and SiO44- present in SBGW are currently being investigated to determine the role of these ions in stunting crystal growth. The results provided by this

  11. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN. PROJECT SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is an eight page summary of the final report on arsenic demonstration project at Climax, MN (EPA/600/R-06/152). The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of the Kinetico iron removal system in removing arsenic to meet the new arsenic maximum co...

  13. Iron coated pottery granules for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liangjie; Zinin, Pavel V; Cowen, James P; Ming, Li Chung

    2009-09-15

    A new media, iron coated pottery granules (ICPG) has been developed for As removal from drinking water. ICPG is a solid phase media that produces a stable Fe-Si surface complex for arsenic adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to document the physical attributes (grain size, pore size and distribution, surface roughness) of the ICPG media. Several advantages of the ICPG media such as (a) its granular structure, (b) its ability to absorb As via the F(0) coating on the granules' surface; (c) the inexpensive preparation process for the media from clay material make ICPG media a highly effective media for removing arsenic at normal pH. A column filtration test demonstrated that within the stability region (flow rate lower than 15L/h, EBCT >3 min), the concentration of As in the influent was always lower than 50 microg/L. The 2-week system ability test showed that the media consistently removed arsenic from test water to below the 5 microg/L level. The average removal efficiencies for total arsenic, As(III), and As(V) for a 2-week test period were 98%, 97%, and 99%, respectively, at an average flow rate of 4.1L/h and normal pH. Measurements of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms at normal pH show that the Freundlich constants of the ICPG are very close to those of ferric hydroxide, nanoscale zero-valent iron and much higher than those of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide. The parameter 1/n is smaller than 0.55 indicating a favorable adsorption process [K. Hristovski, A. Baumgardner, P. Westerhoff, Selecting metal oxide nanomaterials for arsenic removal in fixed bed columns: from nanopowders to aggregated nanoparticle media, J. Hazard. Mater. 147 (2007) 265-274]. The maximum adsorption capacity (q(e)) of the ICPG from the Langmuir isotherm is very close to that of nanoscale zero-valent indicating that zero-valent iron is involved in the process of the As removal from the water. The results of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP

  14. Iron coated pottery granules for arsenic removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Liangjie; Zinin, Pavel V.; Cowen, James P.; Ming, Li Chung

    2009-01-01

    A new media, iron coated pottery granules (ICPG) has been developed for As removal from drinking water. ICPG is a solid phase media that produces a stable Fe-Si surface complex for arsenic adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to document the physical attributes (grain size, pore size and distribution, surface roughness) of the ICPG media. Several advantages of the ICPG media such as (a) its granular structure, (b) its ability to absorb As via the F(0) coating on the granules' surface; (c) the inexpensive preparation process for the media from clay material make ICPG media a highly effective media for removing arsenic at normal pH. A column filtration test demonstrated that within the stability region (flow rate lower than 15 L/h, EBCT >3 min), the concentration of As in the influent was always lower than 50 μg/L. The 2-week system ability test showed that the media consistently removed arsenic from test water to below the 5 μg/L level. The average removal efficiencies for total arsenic, As(III), and As(V) for a 2-week test period were 98%, 97%, and 99%, respectively, at an average flow rate of 4.1 L/h and normal pH. Measurements of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms at normal pH show that the Freundlich constants of the ICPG are very close to those of ferric hydroxide, nanoscale zero-valent iron and much higher than those of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide. The parameter 1/n is smaller than 0.55 indicating a favorable adsorption process [K. Hristovski, A. Baumgardner, P. Westerhoff, Selecting metal oxide nanomaterials for arsenic removal in fixed bed columns: from nanopowders to aggregated nanoparticle media, J. Hazard. Mater. 147 (2007) 265-274]. The maximum adsorption capacity (q e ) of the ICPG from the Langmuir isotherm is very close to that of nanoscale zero-valent indicating that zero-valent iron is involved in the process of the As removal from the water. The results of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) analysis

  15. Biological attenuation of arsenic and iron in a continuous flow bioreactor treating acid mine drainage (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rojo, L; Héry, M; Le Pape, P; Braungardt, C; Desoeuvre, A; Torres, E; Tardy, V; Resongles, E; Laroche, E; Delpoux, S; Joulian, C; Battaglia-Brunet, F; Boisson, J; Grapin, G; Morin, G; Casiot, C

    2017-10-15

    Passive water treatments based on biological attenuation can be effective for arsenic-rich acid mine drainage (AMD). However, the key factors driving the biological processes involved in this attenuation are not well-known. Here, the efficiency of arsenic (As) removal was investigated in a bench-scale continuous flow channel bioreactor treating As-rich AMD (∼30-40 mg L -1 ). In this bioreactor, As removal proceeds via the formation of biogenic precipitates consisting of iron- and arsenic-rich mineral phases encrusting a microbial biofilm. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) oxidation and iron (Fe) and arsenic removal rates were monitored at two different water heights (4 and 25 mm) and with/without forced aeration. A maximum of 80% As removal was achieved within 500 min at the lowest water height. This operating condition promoted intense Fe(II) microbial oxidation and subsequent precipitation of As-bearing schwertmannite and amorphous ferric arsenate. Higher water height slowed down Fe(II) oxidation, Fe precipitation and As removal, in relation with limited oxygen transfer through the water column. The lower oxygen transfer at higher water height could be partly counteracted by aeration. The presence of an iridescent floating film that developed at the water surface was found to limit oxygen transfer to the water column and delayed Fe(II) oxidation, but did not affect As removal. The bacterial community structure in the biogenic precipitates in the bottom of the bioreactor differed from that of the inlet water and was influenced to some extent by water height and aeration. Although potential for microbial mediated As oxidation was revealed by the detection of aioA genes, removal of Fe and As was mainly attributable to microbial Fe oxidation activity. Increasing the proportion of dissolved As(V) in the inlet water improved As removal and favoured the formation of amorphous ferric arsenate over As-sorbed schwertmannite. This study proved the ability of this bioreactor

  16. Effects of gamma-sterilization on DOC, uranium and arsenic remobilization from organic and microbial rich stream sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, Joerg; Weiske, Arndt; Dudel, E. Gert

    2011-01-01

    Organic-rich sediments are known to be effective accumulators for uranium and arsenic. Much is known about the capacity for metal or metalloid fixation by microbes and organic compounds as well as inorganic sediment particles. Experiments investigating the effect of microbes on the process of metal fixation in sediments require sterilized sediments as control treatment which is often realized by gamma-sterilization. Only few studies show that gamma-sterilization has an effect on the remobilization of metal and metalloids and on their physico-chemical properties. These studies deal with sediments with negligible organic content whereas almost nothing is known about organic-rich sediments including a probably high microbial activity. In view of this, we investigated the effect of gamma-sterilization of organic-rich sediments on uranium and arsenic fixation and release. After ten days within an exposure experiment we found a significant higher remobilization of uranium and arsenic in sterile compared to unsterile treatments. In line with these findings the content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), manganese, and iron increased to even significantly higher concentration in the sterile compared to unsterile treatment. Gamma-sterilization seems to change the physico-chemical properties of organic-rich sediments. Microbial activity is effectively eliminated. From increased DOC concentrations in overlaying water it is concluded that microbes are eventually killed with leaching of cellular compounds in the overlaying water. This decreases the adsorption capacity of the sediment and leads to enhanced uranium and arsenic remobilization. - Research highlight s : →Remobilization of uranium and arsenic is higher in gamma-sterile treatments. →DOC mobilization is also higher in sterilized treatment. →Adsorption capacity in sediments is reduced by release of DOC.

  17. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morin Guillaume

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V. X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II3(PO42.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1 As(V is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2 the

  18. Arsenic-Rich Polyarsenides Stabilized by Cp*Fe Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Monika; Konieczny, David; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Virovets, Alexander V; Balázs, Gabor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Riedlberger, Felix; Krauss, Hannes; Scheer, Manfred

    2017-06-12

    The redox chemistry of [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] (1, Cp*=η 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry, revealing a redox behavior similar to that of its lighter congener [Cp*Fe(η 5 -P 5 )]. However, the subsequent chemical reduction of 1 by KH led to the formation of a mixture of novel As n scaffolds with n up to 18 that are stabilized only by [Cp*Fe] fragments. These include the arsenic-poor triple-decker complex [K(dme) 2 ][{Cp*Fe(μ,η 2:2 -As 2 )} 2 ] (2) and the arsenic-rich complexes [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] (3), [K(dme) 2 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 2:2:2:2 -As 14 )] (4), and [K(dme) 3 ] 2 [(Cp*Fe) 4 (μ 4 ,η 4:3:3:2:2:1:1 -As 18 )] (5). Compound 4 and the polyarsenide complex 5 are the largest anionic As n ligand complexes reported thus far. Complexes 2-5 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, 1 H NMR spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy (2), and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, DFT calculations showed that the intermediate [Cp*Fe(η 5 -As 5 )] - , which is presumably formed first, undergoes fast dimerization to the dianion [(Cp*Fe) 2 (μ,η 4:4 -As 10 )] 2- . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  20. Preservation strategies for inorganic arsenic species in high iron, low-Ehgroundwater from West Bengal, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, Andrew G.; Polya, David A. [University of Manchester, Department of Earth Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jana, Joydeb; Chakraborty, Sudipto; Mukherjee, Partha; Sarkar, Mitali; Nath, Bibash; Chatterjee, Debashis [University of Kalyani, Department of Chemistry, Kalyani, (India)

    2005-01-01

    Despite the importance of accurately determining inorganic arsenic speciation in natural waters to predicting bioavailability and environmental and health impacts, there remains considerable debate about the most appropriate species preservation strategies to adopt. In particular, the high-iron, low-Eh(redox potential) shallow groundwaters in West Bengal, Bangladesh and SE Asia, the use of which for drinking and irrigation purposes has led to massive international concerns for human health, are particularly prone to changes in arsenic speciation after sampling. The effectiveness of HCl and EDTA preservation strategies has been compared and used on variably arsenic-rich West Bengali groundwater samples, analysed by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Immediate filtration and acidification with HCl followed by refrigerated storage was found to be the most effective strategy for minimizing the oxidation of inorganic As(III) during storage. The use of a PRP-X100 (Hamilton) column with a 20 mmol L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} as mobile phase enabled the separation of Cl{sup -} from As(III), monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid and As(V), thereby eliminating any isobaric interference between {sup 40}Ar{sup 35}Cl{sup +} and {sup 75}As{sup +}. The use of EDTA as a preservative, whose action is impaired by the high calcium concentrations typical of these types of groundwater, resulted in marked oxidation during storage. The use of HCl is therefore indicated for analytical methods in which chloride-rich matrices are not problematical. The groundwaters analysed by IC-ICP-MS were found to contain between 5 and 770 ng As mL{sup -1} exclusively as inorganic arsenic species. As(III)/total-As varied between 0 and 0.94. (orig.)

  1. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, Petr; Machovič, Vladimír; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L −1 . Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As

  2. Arsenic Removal Efficiency in Aqueous Solutions Using Reverse Osmosis and Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Saboori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is one of the most hazardous pollutants of water resources which threaten human health as well as animals. Therefore arsenic removal from water resources is the priority of health programs. There are several ways to remove arsenic. In this study, reverse osmosis and zero-valent iron nanoparticles methods have been used in a laboratory scale. To perform the test, the variables of temperature, arsenic concentration, pH, iron nanoparticle concentration and mixing time were considered. The results indicated that in both methods of reverse osmosis and iron nanoparticle, through increasing arsenic concentration, arsenic removal efficiency has been also increased. At concentration of 1.5 mg per litre in reverse osmosis method, the maximum efficiency was achieved by 98% and 95.2% removal of arsenic respectively. The effect of temperature and pH were similar in reverse osmosis; by increasing these two variables, arsenic removal percentage also increased. The highest removal rates of 95.98% and 95.56% were observed at pH 9 and Temperature 30oC respectively. The results indicated that in iron nanoparticles method the arsenic removal efficiency increases by increasing mixing time and temperature, while it decreases with increasing pH.

  3. Arsenic content in pteridophytes from the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros C.; Silva, Lucilene Guerra e; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos; Salino, Alexandre

    2005-01-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world and, in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities contributed to aggravate natural contamination of this area. The discovery that a fern, Pteris vitata, hyperaccumulates arsenic led to the search of other pteridophytes species with such capacity, due to their possible use for phytoremediation of contaminated areas. In the literature cited, arsenic amounts were measured by atomic absorption, using leaf and roots samples; and only one species (Pityrogramma calomelanos) had the arsenic content of its spores measured. In a preliminary study, ferns samples from the Iron Quadrangle region were collected, identified and had their leaves processed for measurement of their arsenic content through Neutron Activation Analysis - method k 0 ; also, spores of Pteris vitata had their arsenic content measured. The results showed that: spores of P. vitata present arsenic accumulation and another fern species was found to accumulate arsenic (Adiantum raddianum). Other species that were screened confirm that, among the families of ferns already studied, species from the family Pteridaceae seems the most promising for arsenic phytoremediation purposes. Considering that two species that showed arsenic accumulation in their leaves, also presented high arsenic content in their spores, it might fasten the selection if the spores of different fern species from contaminated sites are screened first, making the process of species selection for phytoremediation faster and more efficient. (author)

  4. Evaluating the cement stabilization of arsenic-bearing iron wastes from drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Tara M; Snyder, Kathryn V; Reddy, Raghav; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Amrose, Susan E; Raskin, Lutgarde; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-12-30

    Cement stabilization of arsenic-bearing wastes is recommended to limit arsenic release from wastes following disposal. Such stabilization has been demonstrated to reduce the arsenic concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), which regulates landfill disposal of arsenic waste. However, few studies have evaluated leaching from actual wastes under conditions similar to ultimate disposal environments. In this study, land disposal in areas where flooding is likely was simulated to test arsenic release from cement stabilized arsenic-bearing iron oxide wastes. After 406 days submersed in chemically simulated rainwater, wastes. Presenting the first characterization of cement stabilized waste using μXRF, these results revealed the majority of arsenic in cement stabilized waste remained associated with iron. This distribution of arsenic differed from previous observations of calcium-arsenic solid phases when arsenic salts were stabilized with cement, illustrating that the initial waste form influences the stabilized form. Overall, cement stabilization is effective for arsenic-bearing wastes when acidic conditions can be avoided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Arsenic content in pteridophytes from the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, George; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros C.; Silva, Lucilene Guerra e [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: george@cdtn.br; menezes@cdtn.br; leneguerra@bol.com.br; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos; Salino, Alexandre [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Botanica]. E-mail: rosy@icb.ufmg.br; salino@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world and, in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities contributed to aggravate natural contamination of this area. The discovery that a fern, Pteris vitata, hyperaccumulates arsenic led to the search of other pteridophytes species with such capacity, due to their possible use for phytoremediation of contaminated areas. In the literature cited, arsenic amounts were measured by atomic absorption, using leaf and roots samples; and only one species (Pityrogramma calomelanos) had the arsenic content of its spores measured. In a preliminary study, ferns samples from the Iron Quadrangle region were collected, identified and had their leaves processed for measurement of their arsenic content through Neutron Activation Analysis - method k{sub 0}; also, spores of Pteris vitata had their arsenic content measured. The results showed that: spores of P. vitata present arsenic accumulation and another fern species was found to accumulate arsenic (Adiantum raddianum). Other species that were screened confirm that, among the families of ferns already studied, species from the family Pteridaceae seems the most promising for arsenic phytoremediation purposes. Considering that two species that showed arsenic accumulation in their leaves, also presented high arsenic content in their spores, it might fasten the selection if the spores of different fern species from contaminated sites are screened first, making the process of species selection for phytoremediation faster and more efficient. (author)

  6. Multifunctional Silver Coated E-33/Iron Oxide Water Filters: Inhibition of Biofilm Growth and Arsenic Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoxide® E33 (E-33, Goethite) is a widely used commercial material for arsenic adsorption. It is a mixture of iron oxyhydroxide and oxides. E-33 is primarily used to remove arsenic from water and to a lesser extent, other anions, but generally lacks multifunctuality. It is a non...

  7. Arsenic removal from water using iron-coated seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Bárbara R C; Pintor, Ariana M A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Botelho, Cidália M S; Santos, Sílvia C R

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a semi-metal element that can enter in water bodies and drinking water supplies from natural deposits and from mining, industrial and agricultural practices. The aim of the present work was to propose an alternative process for removing As from water, based on adsorption on a brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum), after a simple and inexpensive treatment: coating with iron-oxy (hydroxides). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were studied and modeled in terms of As oxidation state (III and V), pH and initial adsorbate concentration. Maximum adsorption capacities of 4.2 mg/g and 7.3 mg/g were obtained at pH 7 and 20 °C for arsenite and arsenate, respectively. When arsenite was used as adsorbate, experimental evidences pointed to the occurrence of redox reactions involving As(III) oxidation to As(V) and Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II), with As(V) uptake by the adsorbent. The proposed adsorption mechanism was then based on the assumption that arsenate was the adsorbed arsenic species. The most relevant drawback found in the present work was the considerable leaching of iron to the solution. Arsenite removal from a mining-influenced water by adsorption plus precipitation was studied and compared to a traditional process of coagulation/flocculation. Both kinds of treatment provided practically 100% of arsenite removal from the contaminated water, leading at best in 12.9 μg/L As after the adsorption and precipitation assays and 14.2 μg/L after the coagulation/flocculation process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid arsenic(V)-reduction by fire in schwertmannite-rich soil enhances arsenic mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Bennett, William W.; Burton, Edward D.; Hockmann, Kerstin; Dawson, Nigel; Karimian, Niloofar

    2018-04-01

    Arsenic in acid sulfate soil (ASS) landscapes commonly associates with schwertmannite, a poorly crystalline Fe(III) mineral. Fires in ASS landscapes can thermally transform Fe(III) minerals to more crystalline phases, such as maghemite (γFe2O3). Although thermal genesis of maghemite requires electron transfer via organic matter pyrolysis, the possibility of fire causing concurrent transfer of electrons to schwertmannite-bound As(V) remains unexplored. Here, we subject an organic-rich soil with variable carbon content (∼9-44% organic C) mixed (4:1) with As(V)-bearing schwertmannite (total As of 4.7-5.4 μmol g-1), to various temperatures (200-800 °C) and heating durations (5-120 min). We explore the consequences for As and Fe via X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and selective extracts. Heating transforms schwertmannite to mainly maghemite and hematite at temperatures above 300-400 °C, with some transitory formation of magnetite, and electrons are readily transferred to both Fe(III) and As(V). As(V) reduction to As(III) is influenced by a combination of temperature, heating duration and carbon content and is significantly (P moderate fires in ASS landscapes, even of short duration, may generate considerable labile As(III) species and cause a pulse of As(III)aq mobilisation following initial re-wetting. Further research is warranted to examine if analogous As(III) formation occurs during combustion of organic-rich soil containing common As-bearing Fe(III) minerals such as ferrihydrite and goethite.

  9. Effects of sulfur in flooded paddy soils: Implications for iron chemistry and arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (amplified by erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Iron and sulfur both interact strongly with arsenic in paddy soils: iron oxides are strong adsorbents for arsenic in oxic conditions, and sulfur (in the form of sulfide) is a strong adsorbent under anoxic conditions. In the process of reductive dissolution of iron oxides, arsenic, which had been adsorbed to the iron oxides, is released. Therefore, higher levels of reduced iron (ferrous iron) will likely correlate with higher levels of mobilized arsenic. However, the mobilized arsenic may then co-precipitate with or adsorb to iron sulfides, which form under sulfate-reducing conditions and with the aid of certain microbes already present in the soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how these processes correlate and which has the greatest influence on arsenic mobilization and potential plant availability. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of sulfur (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, and gypsum) on the iron and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. The two types of rice straw were designed to introduce the same amount of organic sulfur (7.7 μg/g of soil), but different levels of available carbon, since carbon stimulates microbial activity in the soil. In comparison, two different levels of gypsum (calcium sulfate) were used, 7.7 and 34.65 μg/g of soil, to test the effect of directly available inorganic sulfate without carbon addition. The soil was flooded with a buffer solution at pH 7.07 in airtight serum vials and kept as a slurry on a shaker at 25 °C. We measured pH, alkalinity, ferrous iron, ferric iron, sulfide, sulfate, total iron, sulfur, and arsenic in the

  10. Significance of Iron(II,III) Hydroxycarbonate Green Rust in Arsenic Remediation Using Zerovalent Iron in Laboratory Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted three- to four-months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50 : 50 (w : w, Peerless iron : sand) in t...

  11. Iron interference in arsenic absorption by different plant species, analysed by neutron activation, k0-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia

    2009-01-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand, United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities have been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Among other elements, iron is capable to interfere with the arsenic absorption by plants; iron ore has been proposed to remediate areas contaminated by the mentioned metalloid. In order to verify if iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by different taxa of plants, specimens of Brassicacea and Equisetaceae were kept in a 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S), with 10 μgL -1 of arsenic acid. And varying concentrations of iron. The specimens were analysed by neutron activation analysis, k 0 -method, a routine technique in CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. The preliminary results were quite surprising, showing that iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by plants, but in different ways, according to the species studied. (author)

  12. Removal of arsenic and iron removal from drinking water using coagulation and biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC), biological aerated filter (BAF), alum coagulation and Moringa oleifera coagulation were investigated to remove iron and arsenic contaminants from drinking water. At an initial dose of 5 mg/L, the removal efficiency for arsenic and iron was 63% and 58% respectively using alum, and 47% and 41% respectively using Moringa oleifera. The removal of both contaminants increased with the increase in coagulant dose and decrease in pH. Biological processes were more effective in removing these contaminants than coagulation. Compared to BAF, BAC gave greater removal of both arsenic and iron, removing 85% and 74%, respectively. Longer contact time for both processes could reduce the greater concentration of arsenic and iron contaminants. The addition of coagulation (at 5 mg/L dosage) and a biological process (with 15 or 60 min contact time) could significantly increase removal efficiency, and the maximum removal was observed for the combination of alum and BAC treatment (60 min contact time), with 100% and 98.56% for arsenic and iron respectively. The reduction efficiency of arsenic and iron reduced with the increase in the concentration of dissolved organics in the feedwater due to the adsorption competition between organic molecules and heavy metals.

  13. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Qigang; Lin Wei; Ying Weichi

    2010-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  14. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal for shallow tube well drinking water supply in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; Olivero, S; de Vet, W W J M; Verberk, J Q J C; Amy, G L; van Dijk, J C

    2010-11-01

    Subsurface iron and arsenic removal has the potential to be a cost-effective technology to provide safe drinking water in rural decentralized applications, using existing shallow tube wells. A community-scale test facility in Bangladesh was constructed for injection of aerated water (∼1 m(3)) into an anoxic aquifer with elevated iron (0.27 mmolL(-1)) and arsenic (0.27μmolL(-1)) concentrations. The injection (oxidation) and abstraction (adsorption) cycles were monitored at the test facility and simultaneously simulated in the laboratory with anoxic column experiments. Dimensionless retardation factors (R) were determined to represent the delayed arrival of iron or arsenic in the well compared to the original groundwater. At the test facility the iron removal efficacies increased after every injection-abstraction cycle, with retardation factors (R(Fe)) up to 17. These high removal efficacies could not be explained by the theory of adsorptive-catalytic oxidation, and therefore other ((a)biotic or transport) processes have contributed to the system's efficacy. This finding was confirmed in the anoxic column experiments, since the mechanism of adsorptive-catalytic oxidation dominated in the columns and iron removal efficacies did not increase with every cycle (stable at R(Fe)=∼8). R(As) did not increase after multiple cycles, it remained stable around 2, illustrating that the process which is responsible for the effective iron removal did not promote the co-removal of arsenic. The columns showed that subsurface arsenic removal was an adsorptive process and only the freshly oxidized adsorbed iron was available for the co-adsorption of arsenic. This indicates that arsenic adsorption during subsurface treatment is controlled by the amount of adsorbed iron that is oxidized, and not by the amount of removed iron. For operational purposes this is an important finding, since apparently the oxygen concentration of the injection water does not control the subsurface arsenic

  15. Iron cycling potentials of arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Bangladesh as revealed by enrichment cultivation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Z.; Sultana, M.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Khan, S.I.; Roling, W.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The activities of iron-oxidizing and reducing microorganisms impact the fate of arsenic in groundwater. Phylogenetic information cannot exclusively be used to infer the potential for iron oxidation or reduction in aquifers. Therefore, we complemented a previous cultivation-independent microbial

  16. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  17. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. Copyright © 2015

  18. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-01-01

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO 4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na 2 HAsO 4 ) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights:

  19. Arsenic and trace metals in river water and sediments from the southeast portion of the Iron Quadrangle, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varejão, Eduardo V V; Bellato, Carlos R; Fontes, Maurício P F; Mello, Jaime W V

    2011-01-01

    The Iron Quadrangle has been one of the most important gold production regions in Brazil since the end of the seventeenth century. There, arsenic occurs in close association with sulfide-rich auriferous rocks. The most abundant sulfide minerals are pyrite and arsenopyrite, yet trace metal sulfides occur in subordinate phases as well. Historical mining activities have been responsible for the release of As and trace metals to both aquatic and terrestrial environments close to mining sites in the region. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the distribution and mobility of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in streams in the southeast portion of the Iron Quadrangle between the municipalities of Ouro Preto and Mariana, the oldest Brazilian Au mining province. Total concentrations of some trace metals and arsenic in water were determined. The four-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by the commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR) was used to investigate the distribution of these elements in stream sediments. Arsenic concentration in water was > 10 μg L⁻¹ (maximum limit permitted by Brazilian environmental regulations for water destined for human consumption) at all sampling sites, varying between 36.7 and 68.3 μg L⁻¹. Sequential extraction in sediments showed high concentrations of As and trace metals associated with easily mobilized fractions.

  20. THE EFFECT OF PH, PHOSPHATE AND OXIDANT TYPE ON THE REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER DURING IRON REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many regions of the United States, groundwaters that contain arsenic (primarily As[III]) also contain significant amounts of iron (Fe[II]). Arsenic removal will most likely be achieved by iron removal in many of those cases which will consist of oxidization followed by filtra...

  1. The role of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresintsi, S. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Simeonidis, K., E-mail: ksime@physics.auth.gr [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, 38334 Volos (Greece); Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Mitrakas, M. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO{sub 4} precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3–12). Physically sorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO{sub 4}. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer. - Graphical abstract: An analytical methodology for the accurate quantification of sulfate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the diffuse layer, the Stern layer and the structure of iron oxy-hydroxides used as arsenic removal agents. - Highlights: • Quantification of sulfate ions presence in FeOOH surface compartments. • Preparation pH defines the distribution of sulfates. • XPS and FTIR verify the presence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure, the Stern layer the diffuse layer of FeOOH. • Chemically adsorbed sulfates control the arsenic removal efficiency of iron oxyhydroxides.

  2. Arsenic-rich acid mine water with extreme arsenic concentration: mineralogy, geochemistry, microbiology, and environmental implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majzlan, J.; Plášil, Jakub; Škoda, R.; Gescher, J.; Kögler, F.; Rusznyak, A.; Küsel, K.; Neu, T.R.; Mangold, S.; Rothe, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 23 (2014), s. 13685-13693 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : extreme arsenic concentration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 5.330, year: 2014

  3. Adsorption and removal of arsenic from water by iron ore mining waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Nguyen, Thi Van Trang; Pham, Tuan Linh; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuth; Ngo, Huu Hao; Kandasamy, J; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Nguyen, Duc Tho

    2009-01-01

    There is a global need to develop low-cost technologies to remove arsenic from water for individual household water supply. In this study, a purified and enriched waste material (treated magnetite waste, TMW) from the Trai Cau's iron ore mine in the Thai Nguyen Province in Vietnam was examined for its capacity to remove arsenic. The treatment system was packed with TMW that consisted of 75% of ferrous-ferric oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) and had a large surface area of 89.7 m(2)/g. The experiments were conducted at a filtration rate of 0.05 m/h to treat groundwater with an arsenic concentration of 380 microg/L and iron, manganese and phosphate concentrations of 2.07 mg/L, 0.093 mg/L and 1.6 mg/L respectively. The batch experimental results show that this new material was able to absorb up to 0.74 mg arsenic/g. The results also indicated that the treatment system removed more than 90% arsenic giving an effluent with an arsenic concentration of less than 30 microg/L while achieving a removal efficiency of about 80% for Mn(2 + ) and PO(4) (3-). This could be a promising and cost-effective new material for capturing arsenic as well as other metals from groundwater.

  4. FIELD STUDY OF ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER BY ZEROVALENT IRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of ground-water resources by arsenic is a widespread environmental problem; consequently, there is a need for developments and improvements of remedial technologies to effectively manage arsenic contamination in ground water and soils. In June 2005, a 7 m long, 14 ...

  5. Dissimilatory Arsenate Reduction and In Situ Microbial Activities and Diversity in Arsenic-rich Groundwater of Chianan Plain, Southwestern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Tsunglin

    2016-02-01

    Although dissimilatory arsenic reduction (DAsR) has been recognized as an important process for groundwater arsenic (As) enrichment, its characterization and association with in situ microbial activities and diversity in As-rich groundwater is barely studied. In this work, we collected As-rich groundwater at depths of 23, 300, and 313 m, respectively, from Yenshui-3, Budai-Shinwen, and Budai-4 of Chianan plain, southwestern Taiwan, and conducted incubation experiments using different electron donors, acceptors, and sulfate-reducing bacterial inhibitor (tungstate) to characterize DAsR. Moreover, bacterial diversity was evaluated using 454-pyrosequencing targeting bacterial 16S rRNAs. MPN technique was used to enumerate microorganisms with different in situ metabolic functions. The results revealed that DAsR in groundwater of Chianan plain was a biotic phenomenon (as DAsR was totally inhibited by filter sterilization), enhanced by the type of electron donor (in this case, lactate enhanced DAsR but acetate and succinate did not), and limited by the availability of arsenate. In addition to oxidative recycling of As(III), dissolution of As(V)-saturated manganese and iron minerals by indigenous dissimilatory Mn(IV)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, and abiotic oxidation of As(III) with Mn(IV) regenerated As(V) in the groundwater. Sulfate-respiring bacteria contributed 7.4 and 28.2 % to the observed DAsR in groundwater of Yinshui-3 and Budai-Shinwen, respectively, whereas their contribution was negligible in groundwater of Budai-4. A noticeable variation in dominant genera Acinetobacter and Bacillus was observed within the groundwater. Firmicutes dominated in highly As-rich groundwater of Yenshui-3, whereas Proteobacteria dominated in comparatively less As-rich groundwater of Budai-Shinwen and Budai 4.

  6. Removing arsenic from groundwater in Cambodia using high performance iron adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y; Takeda, R; Nada, A; Thavarith, L; Tang, S; Nuki, K; Sakurai, K

    2014-09-01

    In Cambodia, groundwater has been contaminated with arsenic, and purification of the water is an urgent issue. From 2010 to 2012, an international collaborative project between Japan and Cambodia for developing arsenic-removing technology from well water was conducted and supported by the foundation of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Japan. Quality of well water was surveyed in Kandal, Prey Veng, and Kampong Cham Provinces, and a monitoring trial of the arsenic removal equipment using our patented amorphous iron (hydr)oxide adsorbent was performed. Of the 37 wells surveyed, arsenic concentration of 24 exceeded the Cambodian guideline value (50 μg L(-1)), and those of 27 exceeded the WHO guideline for drinking water (10 μg L(-1)). Levels of arsenic were extremely high in some wells (>1,000-6,000 μg L(-1)), suggesting that arsenic pollution of groundwater is serious in these areas. Based on the survey results, 16 arsenic removal equipments were installed in six schools, three temples, two health centers, four private houses, and one commune office. Over 10 months of monitoring, the average arsenic concentrations of the treated water were between 0 and 10 μg L(-1) at four locations, 10-50 μg L(-1) at eight locations, and >50 μg L(-1) at four locations. The arsenic removal rate ranged in 83.1-99.7%, with an average of 93.8%, indicating that the arsenic removal equipment greatly lower the risk of arsenic exposure to the residents. Results of the field trial showed that As concentration of the treated water could be reduced to condition. This is one of the succeeding As removal techniques that could reduce As concentration of water below the WHO guideline value for As in situ.

  7. The iron, aluminate and jarosite deposits in Riazas area as potential source of arsenic in groundwater; Los yacimientos de hierro, alunita y jarosita de la zona de Riaza como posible origen del arsenico en las aguas subterraneas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Meca, M.; Lilo Ramos, J.

    2009-07-01

    Arsenic in concentrations above the legal limit of 10 {mu}g/l has been detected in groundwaters of the Duero Cenozoic Basin. The origin of arsenic is related to sedimentary units with arsenic content above the background value of 28.5 mg/kg. Thus, iron-rich deposits located at the base of Cenozoic succession may constitute a potential source of arsenic in the groundwaters. Three outcrops of iron-rich conglomerates in the Riazas area of Segovia province (one in El Negredo and two in Madriguera) have been studied to determine the significance of these materials as a potential source of arsenic in groundwater. These outcrops occur above an unconformity separating them from strongly altered Paleozoic slates, rich in alunite and jarosite. The work is based in geochemical (trace elements detection by INAA) and mineralogical analyses (through XRD-EDAX and ESEM) of 18 samples of altered slates and materials of ferriferrous deposits. Besides, 3 water samples from springs have subjected to hydrochemical analysis to establish major ionic species and trace elements. Although mineralogical study reveals that arsenic occurs in iron oxides and high arsenic concentrations have been identified in rocks of El Negredo (up to 361 mg/kg, average 143.3 mg/kg), the arsenic concentrations in Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} - water type are always lower than 10 {mu}g/l. Therefore, it does not seem to be probable that these deposits act as arsenic source, at least at the present physic-chemical conditions.(Author) 37 refs.

  8. The role of orthophosphate and dissolved oxygen in the performance of arsenic-iron removal plants in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ryan T; McBean, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic iron removal plants (AIRPs) are used in some locations in Bangladesh to remove arsenic from groundwater to provide access to safer drinking water. In this study, the influence of orthophosphate in influent water on the performance of 21 (of 105) AIRPs installed in the Manikganj District was evaluated. The degree of aeration was also estimated, and the role of dissolved oxygen in AIRP performance is discussed. AIRP installations were done by a local non-governmental organization (The Society for People's Action in Change and Equity) with financial assistance from the Australian High Commission, Dhaka under the Direct Aid Program of the Australian Government. The presence of orthophosphate in the influent did not influence arsenic removal efficiency in the tested AIRPs, likely due to the high iron concentrations at all sites. The high iron provides adequate surface area for both orthophosphate and arsenic to be removed. Orthophosphate co-precipitated with iron oxides much more quickly than arsenic, in one cleaning cycle study, and is expected to play a more significant role in interfering with arsenic removal at sites with much lower iron concentrations. The aeration trays studied are estimated to introduce at least 2.4-3.7 mg/L of dissolved oxygen. In normal operation, sufficient oxygen is introduced through the aeration tray to fully oxidize all influent iron. The AIRPs studied show promise for use in areas of Bangladesh with high natural iron, where users are concerned with arsenic, iron, or both, in their drinking water.

  9. In field arsenic removal from natural water by zero-valent iron assisted by solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo, Lorena; Lienqueo, Hugo; Arenas, Maria; Acarapi, Jorge; Contreras, David; Yanez, Jorge; Mansilla, Hector D.

    2008-01-01

    An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated water is presented. The method is based in the use of steel wool, lemon juice and solar radiation. The method was evaluated using water from the Camarones River, Atacama Desert in northern Chile, in which the arsenic concentration ranges between 1000 and 1300 μg L -1 . Response surface method analysis was used to optimize the amount of zero-valent iron (steel wool) and the citrate concentration (lemon juice) to be used. The optimal conditions when using solar radiation to remove arsenic from natural water from the Camarones river are: 1.3 g L -1 of steel wool and one drop (ca. 0.04 mL) of lemon juice. Under these conditions, removal percentages are higher than 99.5% and the final arsenic concentration is below 10 μg L -1 . This highly effective arsenic removal method is easy to use and inexpensive to implement. - An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated waters by using zero-valent iron, citrate and solar radiation was developed

  10. In field arsenic removal from natural water by zero-valent iron assisted by solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, Lorena [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile)], E-mail: lorenacp@uta.cl; Lienqueo, Hugo; Arenas, Maria [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Acarapi, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile); Contreras, David; Yanez, Jorge; Mansilla, Hector D. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2008-12-15

    An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated water is presented. The method is based in the use of steel wool, lemon juice and solar radiation. The method was evaluated using water from the Camarones River, Atacama Desert in northern Chile, in which the arsenic concentration ranges between 1000 and 1300 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Response surface method analysis was used to optimize the amount of zero-valent iron (steel wool) and the citrate concentration (lemon juice) to be used. The optimal conditions when using solar radiation to remove arsenic from natural water from the Camarones river are: 1.3 g L{sup -1} of steel wool and one drop (ca. 0.04 mL) of lemon juice. Under these conditions, removal percentages are higher than 99.5% and the final arsenic concentration is below 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}. This highly effective arsenic removal method is easy to use and inexpensive to implement. - An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated waters by using zero-valent iron, citrate and solar radiation was developed.

  11. Regenerating an Arsenic Removal Iron-Based Adsorptive ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The replacement of exhausted, adsorptive media used to remove arsenic from drinking water accounts for approximately 80% of the total operational and maintenance (O/M) costs of this commonly used small system technology. The results of three, full scale system studies of an on-site media regeneration process (Part 1) showed it to be effective in stripping arsenic and other contaminants from the exhausted media. Part 2, of this two part paper, presents information on the performance of the regenerated media to remove arsenic through multiple regeneration cycles (3) and the approximate cost savings of regeneration over media replacement. The results of the studies indicate that regenerated media is very effective in removing arsenic and the regeneration cost is substantially less than the media replacement cost. On site regeneration, therefore, provides small systems with alternative to media replacement when removing arsenic from drinking water using adsorptive media technology. Part 2 of a two part paper on the performance of the regenerated media to remove arsenic through multiple regeneration cycles (3) and the approximate cost savings of regeneration over media replacement.

  12. Electron exchange between neutral and ionized impurity iron centers in vitreous arsenic selenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, A. V. [Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Egorova, A. Yu. [St.-Petersburg Mining University (Russian Federation); Kiselev, V. S.; Seregin, P. P., E-mail: ppseregin@mail.ru [Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Impurity iron atoms in vitreous arsenic-selenide As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films modified by iron form one-electron donor centers with an ionization energy of 0.24 (3) eV (the energy is counted from the conduction-band bottom). The Fermi level is shifted with an increase in the iron concentration from the mid-gap to the donorlevel position of iron due to the filling of one-electron states of the acceptor type lying below the Fermi level. At an iron concentration of ≥3 at %, the electron-exchange process is observed between neutral and ionized iron centers resulting in a change both in the electron density and in the tensor of the electric-field gradient at iron-atom nuclei with increasing temperature above 350 K.

  13. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES BY IRON REMOVAL PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This design manual is an in-depth presentation of the steps required to design and operate a water treatment plant for removal of arsenic in the As (V) form from drinking water using an iron removal process. The manual also discusses the capital and operating costs including many...

  14. AN INVESTIGATION OF ARSENIC MOBILITY FROM IRON OXIDE SOLIDS PRODUCED DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arsenic Rule under the Safe Drinking Water Act will require certain drinking water suppliers to add to or modify their existing treatment in order to comply with the regulations. One of the treatment options is iron co-precipitation. This treatment is attractive because ars...

  15. Enhanced carcinogenicity by coexposure to arsenic and iron and a novel remediation system for the elements in well drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Shimizu, Shingo; Ohnuma, Shoko; Furuta, Akio; Yajima, Ichiro; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    Various carcinomas including skin cancer are explosively increasing in arsenicosis patients who drink arsenic-polluted well water, especially in Bangladesh. Although well drinking water in the cancer-prone areas contains various elements, very little is known about the effects of elements except arsenic on carcinogenicity. In order to clarify the carcinogenic effects of coexposure to arsenic and iron, anchorage-independent growth and invasion in human untransformed HaCaT and transformed A431 keratinocytes were examined. Since the mean ratio of arsenic and iron in well water was 1:10 in cancer-prone areas of Bangladesh, effects of 1 μM arsenic and 10 μM iron were investigated. Iron synergistically promoted arsenic-mediated anchorage-independent growth in untransformed and transformed keratinocytes. Iron additionally increased invasion in both types of keratinocytes. Activities of c-SRC and ERK that regulate anchorage-independent growth and invasion were synergistically enhanced in both types of keratinocytes. Our results suggest that iron promotes arsenic-mediated transformation of untransformed keratinocytes and progression of transformed keratinocytes. We then developed a low-cost and high-performance adsorbent composed of a hydrotalcite-like compound for arsenic and iron. The adsorbent rapidly reduced concentrations of both elements from well drinking water in cancer-prone areas of Bangladesh to levels less than those in WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water. Thus, we not only demonstrated for the first time increased carcinogenicity by coexposure to arsenic and iron but also proposed a novel remediation system for well drinking water.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of iron nano particles for the arsenic removal in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez M, O. E.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of iron nanoparticles for the removal of metallic ions in polluted waters has been during the last years study topic for different world organizations. This work presents a synthesis method of conditioned coal with iron nanoparticles starting from the use of leaves of pineapple crown, with the purpose of using it in arsenic removal processes in aqueous phase. For the synthesis of this material, the leaves of the pineapple crown were used like supports structure of the iron nanoparticles. First, the pyrolysis appropriate temperature was determined. For the preparation of the support material, this had contact with a ferric nitrate and hexamine solution, because the preparation of the material and the coal synthesis were realized during the pyrolysis process, where the hexamine molecules and the ferric nitrate react, causing the reduction of the iron particles and their dispersion on the support material, obtaining as product a conditioned coal with iron nanoparticles. For the characterization of the materials were used techniques as: Scanning electron microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, X-Rays Diffraction), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy; moreover was determined the isoelectric point and the density of surface sites. The arsenic sorption capacity of the materials was evaluated by means of the methodology type lots where was determined the sorption kinetics and isotherms in terms of arsenic concentration and mass. (Author)

  17. Removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater with application of iron electrodissolution, aeration and sand filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Arturi, Kasia; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2014-01-01

    The results from a new water treatment system for arsenic removal are presented. The technology is based on the employment of an electrolytic iron dissolution and efficient aeration procedure prior to sand filtration. The treatment was introduced and investigated in a pilot scale plant and full......, there was a relationship where the higher applied current from the iron generator resulted in a better quality of the produced water. The long period of use also helped to determine a proper iron dosage (the Fe/As ratio 68 mg/mg) and identify carbonate scale formation in the electrochemical process. The electrolytic...

  18. Effects of iron on arsenic speciation and redox chemistry in acid mine water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Concern about arsenic is increasing throughout the world, including areas of the United States. Elevated levels of arsenic above current drinking-water regulations in ground and surface water can be the result of purely natural phenomena, but often are due to anthropogenic activities, such as mining and agriculture. The current study correlates arsenic speciation in acid mine drainage and mining-influenced water with the important water-chemistry properties Eh, pH, and iron(III) concentration. The results show that arsenic speciation is generally in equilibrium with iron chemistry in low pH AMD, which is often not the case in other natural-water matrices. High pH mine waters and groundwater do not always hold to the redox predictions as well as low pH AMD samples. The oxidation and precipitation of oxyhydroxides deplete iron from some systems, and also affect arsenite and arsenate concentrations through sorption processes. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to

  20. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this research, we investigated the accumulation of arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) in rice grain under different soil conditions in standard straighthead-resistant and straighthead-susceptible cultivars, Zhe 733 and Cocodrie, respectively. Results demonstrated that,...

  1. RATES OF IRON OXIDATION AND ARSENIC SORPTION DURING GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER MIXING AT A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a pond at a hazardous waste site is controlled, in part, by the rate of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption. Laboratory experiments were conducted using site-derived water to assess the impact...

  2. Rapid arsenic(V)-reduction by fire in schwertmannite-rich soil enhances arsenic mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Bennett, William W.; Burton, Edward D.

    2018-01-01

    (III) formation (∼90%) within 5–10 min at 400–600 °C, followed by partial re-oxidation to As(V) thereafter. In contrast, heating As(V)-schwertmannite in the absence of soil-organic matter did not cause reduction of As(V) or Fe(III), nor form maghemite; thus highlighting the critical role of organic matter......Arsenic in acid sulfate soil (ASS) landscapes commonly associates with schwertmannite, a poorly crystalline Fe(III) mineral. Fires in ASS landscapes can thermally transform Fe(III) minerals to more crystalline phases, such as maghemite (γFe2O3). Although thermal genesis of maghemite requires...... and hematite at temperatures above 300–400 °C, with some transitory formation of magnetite, and electrons are readily transferred to both Fe(III) and As(V). As(V) reduction to As(III) is influenced by a combination of temperature, heating duration and carbon content and is significantly (P

  3. Effect of some operational parameters on the arsenic removal by electrocoagulation using iron electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a global problem that will likely become more apparent in future years as scientists and engineers measure the true extent of the problem. Arsenic poisoning is preventable though as there are several methods for easily removing even trace amounts of arsenic from drinking water. In the present study, electrocoagulation was evaluated as a treatment technology for arsenic removal from aqueous solutions. The effects of parameters such as initial pH, current density, initial concentration, supporting electrolyte type and stirring speed on removal efficiency were investigated. It has been observed that initial pH was highly effective on the arsenic removal efficiency. The highest removal efficiency was observed at initial pH = 4. The obtained experimental results showed that the efficiency of arsenic removal increased with increasing current density and decreased with increasing arsenic concentration in the solution. Supporting electrolyte had not significant effects on removal, adding supporting electrolyte decreased energy consumption. The effect of stirring speed on removal efficiency was investigated and the best removal efficiency was at the 150 rpm. Under the optimum conditions of initial pH 4, current density of 0.54 mA/cm2, stirring speed of 150 rpm, electrolysis time of 30 minutes, removal was obtained as 99.50%. Energy consumption in the above conditions was calculated as 0.33 kWh/m3. Electrocoagulation with iron electrodes was able to bring down 50 mg/L arsenic concentration to less than 10 μg/L at the end of electrolysis time of 45 minutes with low electrical energy consumption as 0.52 kWh/m3. PMID:24991426

  4. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  5. [Effect of the interaction of microorganisms and iron oxides on arsenic releasing into groundwater in Chinese Loess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun-Yun; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Xie, Qiao-Qin

    2013-10-01

    A large part of groundwater in the Chinese Loess Plateau area is characterized by high arsenic concentration. Anaerobic bacteria have been considered to play key roles in promoting arsenic releasing from loess to groundwater. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed. Based on modeling experiments, this study investigated the speciation of arsenic in loess, and then determined the release rates and quantities of arsenic with the mediation of anaerobic bacteria. The results showed that arsenic contents in loess were between 23 mg.kg-1 and 30 mg.kg-1. No obvious arsenic content difference among loess samples was observed. The ratios for specific adsorbed, iron oxides co-precipitated and silicate co-precipitated arsenic were 37.76% , 36. 15% and 25. 69% , respectively. Indigenous microorganisms, dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) could all promote the release of arsenic from loess. Organic matters highly affected the release rates. More than 100 mg.L-1 sodium lactate was required for all bacterial experiments to facilitate obvious arsenic release. Considering the redox condition in loess, the contribution of SRB to arsenic release in loess area was less feasible than that of DIRB and indigenous microorganisms.

  6. Inorganic arsenic and iron(II) distributions in sediment porewaters investigated by a combined DGTcolourimetric DET technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William W.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Welsh, David T.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for investigating the biogeochemistry of inorganic arsenic and iron(II) in freshwater, estuarine and marine sediments is reported. The recently developed Metsorb diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for the measurement of total inorganic arsenic and the colourimetric d...... highly representative assessment of the biogeochemical status of arsenic and iron in a variety of natural sediments, including groundwater sediments where mobilised arsenic is responsible for significant human health risks.......A new approach for investigating the biogeochemistry of inorganic arsenic and iron(II) in freshwater, estuarine and marine sediments is reported. The recently developed Metsorb diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for the measurement of total inorganic arsenic and the colourimetric...... diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) technique for the measurement of iron(II), were utilised in combination to determine co-located depth profiles of both solutes in sediment porewaters. DGT-measured porewater arsenic concentrations were typically less than 40nM, whereas iron(II) concentrations...

  7. Arsenic mobilization and speciation during iron plaque decomposition in a paddy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Sun, Guoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences; Zhu, Yongguan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Yin, Xixiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences

    2012-03-15

    Little information is available concerning the mobilization and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils during iron plaque decomposition. It is important to investigate these processes since they affect As bioavailability and contaminate surface and ground water systems. A microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the reductive dissolution of iron plaque and subsequent As mobilization under NaN{sub 3} sterilized (abiotic treatments) and non-sterilized (biotic treatments) paddy soil conditions. In the biotic treatment, As and iron (Fe) were quickly released into the soil solution, with more than 76.1% of total arsenic (T{sub As}) on the roots lost in 27 days. In the abiotic treatment, both iron plaque decomposition and As release were significantly slower, with only 39.4% of T{sub As} on the roots lost in 85 days. A part of arsenate reduction reaction occurred before and may also occur after release from roots in both abiotic and biotic treatments. Bacterial abundance, quantified by real-time PCR, varied significantly between treatments. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that microbial community structures were also different between treatments. The changes in microbial factors (bacterial abundance and microbial diversity and activities) significantly affected iron plaque decomposition, As mobilization, and speciation processes. Iron plaque reductive dissolution was likely the major factor leading to As release. Most As released was trapped in the solid phase during the incubation period. (orig.)

  8. Arsenic pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  9. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of toxic levels of sodium, arsenic, iron and aluminum on the rice plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockard, R G; McWalter, A R

    1956-01-01

    The results of two sand culture experiments on rice plants are described. In one, the toxic effects of sodium, as sodium chloride, and of arsenic, as sodium arsenate, were tested; in the other, iron, chelated with the disodium salt of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid, and aluminium, as aluminium sulfate, were tried out. The former was undertaken because of the existence of these sub

  11. Groundwater arsenic remediation using zerovalent iron: Batch and column tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, increasing efforts have been made to explore the applicability and limitations of zerovalent iron (Fe0) for the treatment of arsenicbearing groundwater and wastewater. The experimental batch and column tests have demonstrated that arsenate and arsenite are removed effec...

  12. Synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles toward arsenic removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starbird Perez, Ricardo; Montero Campos, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    A high contact area material is supplied to be used in the treatment of water contaminated with arsenic. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles is reported with superparamagnetic properties, stabilized with stearic acid. The characterization is performed through spectrophotometric, thermogravimetric and electronic transmission techniques. The presence of an emulsifier is evidenced and determinant for the stabilization of the iron oxide phase (maghemite or magnetite) with magnetic properties. The material is obtained and shows suitable properties to be used in the treatment of water for human consumption. (author) [es

  13. Arsenic removal with iron(II) and iron(III) in waters with high silicate and phosphate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Ruettimann, Thomas; Billah, Morsaline; Khan, Abdul Wahab; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic removal by passive treatment, in which naturally present Fe(II) is oxidized by aeration and the forming iron(III) (hydr)oxides precipitate with adsorbed arsenic, is the simplest conceivable water treatment option. However, competing anions and low iron concentrations often require additional iron. Application of Fe(II) instead of the usually applied Fe(III) is shown to be advantageous, as oxidation of Fe(II) by dissolved oxygen causes partial oxidation of As(III) and iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed from Fe(II) have higher sorption capacities. In simulated groundwater (8.2 mM HCO3(-), 2.5 mM Ca2+, 1.6 mM Mg2+, 30 mg/L Si, 3 mg/L P, 500 ppb As(III), or As(V), pH 7.0 +/- 0.1), addition of Fe(II) clearly leads to better As removal than Fe(III). Multiple additions of Fe(II) further improved the removal of As(II). A competitive coprecipitation model that considers As(III) oxidation explains the observed results and allows the estimation of arsenic removal under different conditions. Lowering 500 microg/L As(III) to below 50 microg/L As(tot) in filtered water required > 80 mg/L Fe(III), 50-55 mg/L Fe(II) in one single addition, and 20-25 mg/L in multiple additions. With As(V), 10-12 mg/L Fe(II) and 15-18 mg/L Fe(III) was required. In the absence of Si and P, removal efficiencies for Fe(II) and Fe(III) were similar: 30-40 mg/L was required for As(II), and 2.0-2.5 mg/L was required for As(V). In a field study with 22 tubewells in Bangladesh, passive treatment efficiently removed phosphate, but iron contents were generally too low for efficient arsenic removal.

  14. The Arsenite Oxidation Potential of Native Microbial Communities from Arsenic-Rich Freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Crognale, Simona; Casentini, Barbara; Amalfitano, Stefano; Lotti, Francesca; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment, by mediating redox transformations of both inorganic and organic species. Since arsenite [As(III)] is more toxic than arsenate [As(V)] to the biota, the microbial driven processes of As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation may play a prominent role in mediating the environmental impact of arsenic contamination. However, little is known about the ecology and dynamics of As(III)-oxidizing populations within native microbial communities exposed to natural high levels of As. In this study, two techniques for single cell quantification (i.e., flow cytometry, CARD-FISH) were used to analyze the structure of aquatic microbial communities across a gradient of arsenic (As) contamination in different freshwater environments (i.e., groundwaters, surface and thermal waters). Moreover, we followed the structural evolution of these communities and their capacity to oxidize arsenite, when experimentally exposed to high As(III) concentrations in experimental microcosms. Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the main groups retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, while Beta and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the bacteria community in thermal waters. At the end of microcosm incubations, the communities were able to oxidize up to 95 % of arsenite, with an increase of Alphaproteobacteria in most of the experimental conditions. Finally, heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing strains (one Alphaproteobacteria and two Gammaproteobacteria) were isolated from As rich waters. Our findings underlined that native microbial communities from different arsenic-contaminated freshwaters can efficiently perform arsenite oxidation, thus contributing to reduce the overall As toxicity to the aquatic biota.

  15. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  16. Granulated Bog Iron Ores as Sorbents in Passive (BioRemediation Systems for Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Debiec

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main element of PbRS (passive (bioremediation systems are sorbents, which act as natural filters retaining heavy metals and carriers of microorganisms involved in water treatment. Thus, the effectiveness of PbRS is determined by the quality of the (adsorbents, which should be stable under various environmental conditions, have a wide range of applications and be non-toxic to (microorganisms used in these systems. Our previous studies showed that bog iron ores (BIOs meet these requirements. However, further investigation of the physical and chemical parameters of BIOs under environmental conditions is required before their large-scale application in PbRS. The aim of this study was (i to investigate the ability of granulated BIOs (gBIOs to remove arsenic from various types of contaminated waters, and (ii to estimate the application potential of gBIOs in technologies dedicated to water treatment. These studies were conducted on synthetic solutions of arsenic and environmental samples of arsenic contaminated water using a set of adsorption columns filled with gBIOs. The experiments performed in a static system revealed that gBIOs are appropriate arsenic and zinc adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption studies confirmed these results and showed, that the actual sorption efficiency of gBIOs depends on the adsorbate concentration and is directly proportional to them. Desorption analysis showed that As-loaded gBIOs are characterized by high chemical stability and they may be reused for the (adsorption of other elements, i.e., zinc. It was also shown that gBIOs may be used for remediation of both highly oxygenated waters and groundwater or settling ponds, where the oxygen level is low, as both forms of inorganic arsenic (arsenate and arsenite were effectively removed. Arsenic concentration after treatment was <100 μg/L, which is below the limit for industrial water.

  17. Granulated bog iron ores as sorbents in passive (bio)remediation systems for arsenic removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiec, Klaudia; Rzepa, Grzegorz; Bajda, Tomasz; Uhrynowski, Witold; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Krzysztoforski, Jan; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2018-03-01

    The main element of PbRS (passive (bio)remediation systems) are sorbents, which act as natural filters retaining heavy metals and carriers of microorganisms involved in water treatment. Thus, the effectiveness of PbRS is determined by the quality of the (ad)sorbents, which should be stable under various environmental conditions, have a wide range of applications and be non-toxic to (micro)organisms used in these systems. Our previous studies showed that bog iron ores (BIOs) meet these requirements. However, further investigation of the physical and chemical parameters of BIOs under environmental conditions is required before their large-scale application in PbRS. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the ability of granulated BIOs (gBIOs) to remove arsenic from various types of contaminated waters, and (ii) to estimate the application potential of gBIOs in technologies dedicated to water treatment. These studies were conducted on synthetic solutions of arsenic and environmental samples of arsenic contaminated water using a set of adsorption columns filled with gBIOs. The experiments performed in a static system revealed that gBIOs are appropriate arsenic and zinc adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption studies confirmed these results and showed that the actual sorption efficiency of gBIOs depends on the adsorbate concentration and is directly proportional to them. Desorption analysis showed that As-loaded gBIOs are characterized by high chemical stability and they may be reused for the (ad)sorption of other elements, i.e. zinc. It was also shown that gBIOs may be used for remediation of both highly oxygenated waters and groundwater or settling ponds, where the oxygen level is low, as both forms of inorganic arsenic (arsenate and arsenite) were effectively removed. Arsenic concentration after treatment was <100 µg/L, which is below the limit for industrial water.

  18. Novel chitosan/PVA/zerovalent iron biopolymeric nanofibers with enhanced arsenic removal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Divya; Dwivedi, Jaya; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced removal application of both forms of inorganic arsenic from arsenic-contaminated aquifers at near-neutral pH was studied using a novel electrospun chitosan/PVA/zerovalent iron (CPZ) nanofibrous mat. CPZ was carefully examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Application of the adsorbent towards the removal of total inorganic arsenic in batch mode has also been studied. A suitable mechanism for the adsorption has also been discussed. CPZ nanofibers mat was found capable to remove 200.0±10.0 mg g(-1) of As(V) and 142.9±7.2 mg g(-1) of As(III) from aqueous solution of pH 7.0 at ambient condition. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) enabled the stability of iron in zerovalent state (ZVI). Enhanced capacity of the fibrous mat could be attributed to the high surface area of the fibers, presence of ZVI, and presence of functional groups such as amino, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups of the chitosan and EDTA. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applicable to describe the removal process. The possible mechanism of adsorption has been explained in terms of electrostatic attraction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan/arsenate ions and oxidation of arsenite to arsenate by Fentons generated from ZVI and subsequent complexation of the arsenate with the oxidized iron. These CPZ nanofibrous mats has been prepared with environmentally benign naturally occurring biodegradable biopolymer chitosan, which offers unique advantage in the removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater.

  19. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  20. Performance of a Zerovalent Iron Reactive Barrier for the Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical Modeling and Solid Phase Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic plays a key role in directing arsenic...

  1. Accumulation of iron and arsenic in the Chandina alluvium of the lower delta plain, Southeastern Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, A.; Hassan, M.Q.; Breit, G.N.; Balke, K.-D.; Flegr, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulations of iron, manganese, and arsenic occur in the Chandina alluvium of southeastern Bangladesh within 2.5 m of the ground surface. These distinctive orange-brown horizons are subhorizontal and consistently occur within 1 m of the contact of the aerated (yellow-brown) and water-saturated (gray) sediment. Ferric oxyhydroxide precipitates that define the horizons form by oxidation of reduced iron in pore waters near the top of the saturated zone when exposed to air in the unsaturated sediment. Hydrous Fe-oxide has a high specific surface area and thus a high adsorption capacity that absorbs the bulk of arsenic also present in the reduced pore water, resulting in accumulations containing as much as 280 ppm arsenic. The steep redox gradient that characterizes the transition of saturated and unsaturated sediment also favors accumulation of manganese oxides in the oxidized sediment. Anomalous concentrations of phosphate and molybdenum also detected in the ferric oxyhydroxide-enriched sediment are attributed to sorption processes. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  2. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    ULVZ and show that a small amount of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O can greatly reduce the average sound velocity of an aggregate assemblage. When combined with a geodynamic model of a solid ULVZ (Bower et al., 2011), we can directly correlate inferred sound velocities to mineralogy and predicted ULVZ shapes. In this presentation, our combined geodynamic and mineral physics model of a solid ULVZ will be used to explore the relationship between the observed sound velocities and mineralogy of ULVZs with added insight into ULVZ morphology.

  3. Preliminary assessment of arsenic concentration in a spring water area, iron quadrangle, Minas Gerais Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Magalhaes, Camila Lucia M.R., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Reator e Tecnicas Analiticas. Laboratorio de Ativacao Neutronica; Uemura, George, E-mail: george@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Meio Ambiente; Jacimovic, Radojko, E-mail: radojko.jacimovic@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, Group for Radiochemistry and Radioecology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Deschamps, Maria Eleonora, E-mail: leonora.deschamps@meioambiente.mg.gov.br [FEAM, Fundacao Estadual do Meio Ambiente. Universidade FUMEC, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Isaias, Rosy Mary; Salino, Alexandre, E-mail: rosy@icb.ufmg.br, E-mail: salino@icb.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Botanica, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhaes, Fernando, E-mail: camila@bonsaimorrovelho.com.br [Instituto Superior de Ciencias da Saude, Curso Superior de Ciencias Biologicas, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The attention to environmental exposure to arsenic is increasing in the worldwide. In this scenario, a project is being developed in Santana do Morro, Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, region well known due to natural and anthropogenic occurrence of arsenic. This proposal has several objectives; one of them is to start a procedure of phyto remediation in laboratory aiming at future riparian forests restoration. The main concern is the preservation of water resource and consequently the health of the inhabitants. The study place is close to a water spring. One sampling was carried out, collecting plants, soil and sediment. The Neutron Activation Analysis, k{sub 0}-method, was applied to determine the elemental concentration, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor, located at CDTN/CNEN. In this paper, the results are discussed. (author)

  4. Preliminary assessment of arsenic concentration in a spring water area, iron quadrangle, Minas Gerais Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Magalhaes, Camila Lucia M.R.; Deschamps, Maria Eleonora; Isaias, Rosy Mary; Salino, Alexandre; Magalhaes, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The attention to environmental exposure to arsenic is increasing in the worldwide. In this scenario, a project is being developed in Santana do Morro, Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, region well known due to natural and anthropogenic occurrence of arsenic. This proposal has several objectives; one of them is to start a procedure of phyto remediation in laboratory aiming at future riparian forests restoration. The main concern is the preservation of water resource and consequently the health of the inhabitants. The study place is close to a water spring. One sampling was carried out, collecting plants, soil and sediment. The Neutron Activation Analysis, k 0 -method, was applied to determine the elemental concentration, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor, located at CDTN/CNEN. In this paper, the results are discussed. (author)

  5. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal for drinking water treatment in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Halem, D.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of shallow tube well drinking water is an urgent health problem in Bangladesh. Current arsenic mitigation solutions, including (household) arsenic removal options, do not always provide a sustainable alternative for safe drinking water. A novel technology, Subsurface Arsenic

  6. Biogeochemical interactions among the arsenic, iron, humic substances, and microbes in mud volcanoes in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chuan; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Sracek, Ondra; Kar, Sandeep; Li, Zhaohui; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chen, Chien-Yen; Lu, Hsueh-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fluid and mud samples collected from Hsiaokunshui (HKS), Wushanting (WST), Yenshuikeng (YSK), Kunshuiping (KSP), Liyushan (LYS), and Sinyangnyuhu (SYNH) mud volcanoes of southwestern Taiwan were characterized for major ions, humic substances (HS) and trace elements concentrations. The relationship between the release of arsenic (As) and activities of sulfate-reducing bacteria has been assessed to understand relevant geochemical processes in the mud volcanoes. Arsenic (0.02-0.06 mg/L) and humic substances (4.13 × 10(-4) to 1.64 × 10(-3) mM) in the fluids of mud volcanoes showed a positive correlation (r = 0.99, p volcano. Arsenic and iron in mud sediments formed two separate groups i) high As, but low Fe in HKS, WST, and SYNH; and ii) low As, but high Fe in the YSK, KSP, and LYS mud volcanoes. The Eh(S.H.E.) values of the mud volcano liquids were characterized by mild to strongly reducing conditions. The HKS, SYNH, and WST mud volcanoes (near the Chishan Fault) belongs to strong reducing environment (-33 to -116 mV), whereas the LYS, YSK, and KSP mud volcanoes located near the coastal plain are under mild reducing environment (-11 to 172 mV). At low Eh values mud volcanoes, saturation index (SI) values of poorly crystalline phases such as amorphous ferric hydroxide indicate understaturation, whereas saturation is reached in relatively high Eh(S.H.E.) values mud volcanoes. Arsenic contents in sediments are low, presumably due to its release to fluids (As/Fe ratio in YSK, KSP, and LYS sediment: 4.86 × 10(-4)-6.20 × 10(-4)). At low Eh(S.H.E.) values (mild to strong reducing environment), arsenic may co-precipitate with sulfides as a consequence of sulfate reduction (As/Fe ratios in WST, HKS, and SYNH sediments: 0.42-0.69).

  7. Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for drinking-water quality Chemical hazards in drinking-water: arsenic Evaluations of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee ... Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western ...

  8. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladesh

    KAUST Repository

    Van Halem, Doris; Heijman, Bas G J; Johnston, Richard Bart; Huq, Imamul M.; Ghosh, Sanchari K.; Verberk, Jasper Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.

    2010-01-01

    The principle of subsurface or in situ iron and arsenic removal is that aerated water is periodically injected into an anoxic aquifer through a tube well, displacing groundwater containing Fe(II). An oxidation zone is created around the tube well where Fe(II) is oxidised. The freshly formed iron hydroxide surfaces provide new sorption sites for soluble Fe(II) andarsenic. The system's efficiency is determined based on the ratio between abstracted volume with reduced iron/arsenic concentrations (V) and the injected volume (Vi). In the field studypresented in this paper, the small-scale application of this technology was investigated in rural Bangladesh. It was found that at small injection volumes (>1m3) iron removal was successful and became more effective with every successive cycle. For arsenic, however, the system did not prove to be very effective yet. Arsenic retardation was only limited and breakthrough of 10mg/L (WHO guideline) was observed before V/Vi = 1, which corresponds to arrival of groundwater at the well. Possible explanations for insufficient arsenic adsorption are the short contact times within the oxidation zone, and the presence of competing anions, like phosphate. © IWA Publishing 2010.

  9. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladesh

    KAUST Repository

    Van Halem, Doris

    2010-12-01

    The principle of subsurface or in situ iron and arsenic removal is that aerated water is periodically injected into an anoxic aquifer through a tube well, displacing groundwater containing Fe(II). An oxidation zone is created around the tube well where Fe(II) is oxidised. The freshly formed iron hydroxide surfaces provide new sorption sites for soluble Fe(II) andarsenic. The system\\'s efficiency is determined based on the ratio between abstracted volume with reduced iron/arsenic concentrations (V) and the injected volume (Vi). In the field studypresented in this paper, the small-scale application of this technology was investigated in rural Bangladesh. It was found that at small injection volumes (>1m3) iron removal was successful and became more effective with every successive cycle. For arsenic, however, the system did not prove to be very effective yet. Arsenic retardation was only limited and breakthrough of 10mg/L (WHO guideline) was observed before V/Vi = 1, which corresponds to arrival of groundwater at the well. Possible explanations for insufficient arsenic adsorption are the short contact times within the oxidation zone, and the presence of competing anions, like phosphate. © IWA Publishing 2010.

  10. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mobility and attenuation of arsenic in sulfide-rich mining wastes from the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, P.; Knappová, M.; Kindlová, H.; Culka, A.; Majzlan, J.; Mihaljevič, M.; Rohovec, Jan; Veselovský, F.; Fridrichová, Michaela; Jehlička, J.

    557/558, July 01 (2016), s. 192-203 ISSN 0048-9697 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : arsenic * mining waste * mobility * pore water * secondary arsenic minerals Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  12. Dietary Intake of Iron Rich Food and Awareness on Iron Deficiency Anaemia among Female Students in Rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F. R.; Usmani, A. Q.; Shahid, A.; Sadiq, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the awareness and intake of iron rich diet amongst college girls with a particular focus on the knowledge about the iron deficiency anaemia. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted in Government College for Women Rawalpindi, during September - December 2010. One hundred and thirty five students of intermediate level aged 17-19 years were selected through convenient sampling technique. The sample size was calculated by WHO-sample size calculator, keeping 95 percent Cl, p<0.05 statistically significant, anticipated population proportion of iron deficiency anaemia 35 percent and absolute precision at 0.08. Results: The awareness about iron rich diet and iron deficiency anaemia was satisfactory (86 percent), while poor intake of iron rich diet amongst adolescent college girls (52 percent) was found. About 65 percent of the participants had knowledge about the causes of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA); while 72 percent and 80 percent knew about the prevention and treatment of IDA respectively. Conclusions: Results indicate the gap between knowledge and practices about IDA; it highlights the need of an effective health promotional programme to raise awareness about the significance of iron in young female diet and to highlight the consequences when it is absent. (author)

  13. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego, E-mail: dcarriagada@gmail.com; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  14. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  15. Arsenic species in ecosystems affected by arsenic-rich spring water near an abandoned mine in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.T. [Department of Earth System Science, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Sudaemoon-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nano Environment Materials Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-600 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, H.O., E-mail: dunee@kbsi.re.k [Nano Environment Materials Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-600 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, C. [Nano Environment Materials Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-600 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, N.C., E-mail: ncwoo@yonsei.ac.k [Department of Earth System Science, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Sudaemoon-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantitatively estimate the distribution of arsenic with its speciation and to identify potential pathways for transformation of arsenic species from samples of water, sediments, and plants in the ecosystem affected by the Cheongog Spring, where As(V) concentration reached levels up to 0.270 mg L{sup -1}. After flowing about 100 m downstream, the arsenic level showed a marked reduction to 0.044 mg L{sup -1} (about 84% removal) without noticeable changes in major water chemistry. The field study and laboratory hydroponic experiments with the dominant emergent plants along the creek (water dropwort and thunbergian smartweed) indicated that arsenic distribution, reduction, and speciation appear to be controlled by, (i) sorption onto stream sediments in exchangeable fractions, (ii) bioaccumulation by and possible release from emergent plants, and (iii) transformation of As(V) to As(III) and organic species through biological activities. - Biogeochemical reactions with emergent plants and sediments control the fate of arsenic along creeks originating from a high-As Spring.

  16. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  17. Removal of arsenic from synthetic acid mine drainage by electrochemical pH adjustment and coprecipitation with iron hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny Weijun; Bejan, Dorin; Bunce, Nigel J

    2003-10-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), which is caused by the biological oxidation of sulfidic materials, frequently contains arsenic in the form of arsenite, As(III), and/or arsenate, As(V), along with much higher concentrations of dissolved iron. The present work is directed toward the removal of arsenic from synthetic AMD by raising the pH of the solution by electrochemical reduction of H+ to elemental hydrogen and coprecipitation of arsenic with iron(III) hydroxide, following aeration of the catholyte. Electrolysis was carried out at constant current using two-compartment cells separated with a cation exchange membrane. Four different AMD model systems were studied: Fe(III)/As(V), Fe(III)/As(III), Fe(II)/As(V), and Fe(II)/As(III) with the initial concentrations for Fe(III) 260 mg/L, Fe(II) 300 mg/L, As(V), and As(III) 8 mg/L. Essentially quantitative removal of arsenic and iron was achieved in all four systems, and the results were independent of whether the pH was adjusted electrochemically or by the addition of NaOH. Current efficiencies were approximately 85% when the pH of the effluent was 4-7. Residual concentrations of arsenic were close to the drinking water standard proposed by the World Health Organization (10 microg/L), far below the mine waste effluent standard (500 microg/L).

  18. Mobility and attenuation of arsenic in sulfide-rich mining wastes from the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drahota, Petr, E-mail: petr.drahota@natur.cuni.cz [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Knappová, Magdaléna; Kindlová, Helena; Culka, Adam [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Majzlan, Juraj [Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich-Schiller University, Burgweg 11, D-07749 Jena (Germany); Mihaljevič, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Rohovec, Jan [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Veselovský, František [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Fridrichová, Michaela [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jehlička, Jan [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-01

    The mineralogical composition of mining wastes deposited in countless dumps around the world is the key factor that controls retention and release of pollutants. Here we report a multi-method data set combining mineralogical (X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe and Raman microspectrometry) and geochemical (sequential extraction and pore water analysis) methods to resolve As mobility in two 50-years-old mining waste dumps. Originally, all of the As in the mining wastes selected for the study was present as arsenopyrite and with time it has been replaced by secondary As phases. At Jedová jáma mining area, the most of As precipitated as X-ray amorphous ferric arsenate (HFA). Arsenic is also accumulated in the scorodite and Fe (hydr)oxide (with up to 3.2 wt.% As{sub 2}O{sub 5}) that is particularly represented by hematite. Mining wastes at Dlouhá Ves contain only trace amount of scorodite. Arsenic is primarily bound to Pb-jarosite and Fe (hydr)oxides (especially goethite) with up to 1.6 and 1.8 wt.% As{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively. The pore water collected after rainfall events indicated high concentrations of As (~ 4600 μg·L{sup −1}) at Jedová jáma, whereas aqueous As at Dlouhá Ves was negligible (up to 1.5 μg·L{sup −1}). Highly mobile As at Jedová jáma is attributed to the dissolution of HFA and simultaneous precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides under mildly acidic conditions (pH ~ 4.4); immobile As at Dlouhá Ves is due to the efficient adsorption on the Fe (hydr)oxides and hydroxosulfates under acidic pH of ~ 2.8. Taken together, As mobility in the ferric arsenates-containing mining wastes may significantly vary. These wastes must be kept under acidic conditions or with high aqueous Fe(III) concentrations to prevent the release of As from incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates. - Highlights: • Two 50 years-old sulfide-rich mining waste dumps were studied. • Environmental stability of secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed.

  19. Mobility and attenuation of arsenic in sulfide-rich mining wastes from the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahota, Petr; Knappová, Magdaléna; Kindlová, Helena; Culka, Adam; Majzlan, Juraj; Mihaljevič, Martin; Rohovec, Jan; Veselovský, František; Fridrichová, Michaela; Jehlička, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The mineralogical composition of mining wastes deposited in countless dumps around the world is the key factor that controls retention and release of pollutants. Here we report a multi-method data set combining mineralogical (X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe and Raman microspectrometry) and geochemical (sequential extraction and pore water analysis) methods to resolve As mobility in two 50-years-old mining waste dumps. Originally, all of the As in the mining wastes selected for the study was present as arsenopyrite and with time it has been replaced by secondary As phases. At Jedová jáma mining area, the most of As precipitated as X-ray amorphous ferric arsenate (HFA). Arsenic is also accumulated in the scorodite and Fe (hydr)oxide (with up to 3.2 wt.% As_2O_5) that is particularly represented by hematite. Mining wastes at Dlouhá Ves contain only trace amount of scorodite. Arsenic is primarily bound to Pb-jarosite and Fe (hydr)oxides (especially goethite) with up to 1.6 and 1.8 wt.% As_2O_5, respectively. The pore water collected after rainfall events indicated high concentrations of As (~ 4600 μg·L"−"1) at Jedová jáma, whereas aqueous As at Dlouhá Ves was negligible (up to 1.5 μg·L"−"1). Highly mobile As at Jedová jáma is attributed to the dissolution of HFA and simultaneous precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides under mildly acidic conditions (pH ~ 4.4); immobile As at Dlouhá Ves is due to the efficient adsorption on the Fe (hydr)oxides and hydroxosulfates under acidic pH of ~ 2.8. Taken together, As mobility in the ferric arsenates-containing mining wastes may significantly vary. These wastes must be kept under acidic conditions or with high aqueous Fe(III) concentrations to prevent the release of As from incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates. - Highlights: • Two 50 years-old sulfide-rich mining waste dumps were studied. • Environmental stability of secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • Different modes of As binding are

  20. Simple and Efficient Synthesis of Iron Oxide-Coated Silica Gel Adsorbents for Arsenic Removal: Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arifin, Eric; Lee, Jiukyu [Interdisciplinary Program in Nanoscience and Technology, Virginia (United States); Cha, Jinmyung [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Iron oxide (ferrihydrite, hematite, and magnetite) coated silica gels were prepared using a low-cost, easily-scalable and straightforward method as the adsorbent material for arsenic removal application. Adsorption of the anionic form of arsenic oxyacids, arsenite (AsO{sup 2-}) and arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup -3}), onto hematite coated silica gel was fitted against non-linear 3-parameter-model Sips isotherm and 2-parameter-model Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption kinetics of arsenic could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model and value of adsorption energy derived from non-linear Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm suggests chemical adsorption. Although arsenic adsorption process was not affected by the presence of sulfate, chloride, and nitrate anions, as expected, bicarbonate and silicate gave moderate negative effects while the presence of phosphate anions significantly inhibited adsorption process of both arsenite and arsenate. When the actual efficiency to remove arsenic was tested against 1 L of artificial arsenic-contaminated groundwater (0.6 mg/L) in the presence competing anions, the reasonable amount (20 g) of hematite coated silica gel could reduce arsenic concentration to below the WHO permissible safety limit of drinking water of 10 μg/L without adjusting pH and temperature, which would be highly advantageous for practical field application.

  1. The Effect of Water Chemistry on the Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water During Iron Removal Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigates the effects of water chemistry, oxidant type and concentration on the removal of iron and arsenic from drinking water. The research will be conducted using one of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory’s Water Supply and Water Resources Divisi...

  2. Synthesis of magnetite from iron-rich mine water using sodium carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akinwekomi, V

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available is highly mineralised and technologies are required for the processing of the final sludge for possible industrial application. Conventionally, magnetite is synthesized using iron-rich, industrial grade chemical reagents making magnetite expensive to produce...

  3. Adsorption of arsenic(V) by iron-oxide-coated diatomite (IOCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Fong; Chiou, Cary T; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSES AND AIMS: Economically efficient methods for removing arsenic from the drinking water supply are urgently needed in many parts of the world. Iron oxides are known to have a strong affinity for arsenic in water. However, they are commonly present in the forms of fine powder or floc, which limits their utility in water treatment. In this study, a novel granular adsorbent, iron-oxide-coated diatomite (IOCD), was developed and examined for its adsorption of arsenic from water. An industrial-grade diatomite was used as the iron oxide support. The diatomite was first acidified and dried and then coated with iron oxide up to five times. The prepared IOCD samples were characterized for their morphology, composition, elemental content, and crystal properties by various instruments. Experiments of equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of As(V) on IOCD were conducted using 0.1- and 2-L polyethylene bottles, respectively, at different pH and temperatures. Iron oxide (alpha-Fe(2)O(3) hematite) coated onto diatomite greatly improves (by about 30 times) the adsorption of As(V) from water by IOCD as compared to using raw diatomite. This improvement was attributed to increases in both surface affinity and surface area of the IOCD. The surface area of IOCD increased to an optimal value. However, as the IOCD surface area (93 m(2)/g) was only 45% higher than that of raw diatomite (51 m(2)/g), the enhanced As(V) adsorption resulted primarily from the enhanced association of negatively charged As(V) ions with the partial positive surface charge of the iron oxide. The As(V) adsorption decreased when the solution pH was increased from 3.5 to 9.5, as expected from the partial charge interaction between As(V) and IOCD. The adsorption data at pH 5.5 and 7.5 could be well fitted to the Freundlich equation. A moderately high exothermic heat was observed for the As(V) adsorption, with the calculated molar isosteric heat ranging from -4 to -9 kcal/mol. The observed heats fall between those

  4. Arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with arsenic-rich groundwater in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Ju; Su, Yu-Chen; Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Chung-Min; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fi-John

    2011-04-01

    Drinking highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a likely cause of blackfoot disease in Taiwan, but microorganisms that potentially control arsenic mobility in the subsurface remain unstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relevant arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing microbial community that exists in highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Taiwan. We cultured and identified arsenic-transforming bacteria, analyzed arsenic resistance and transformation, and determined the presence of genetic markers for arsenic transformation. In total, 11 arsenic-transforming bacterial strains with different colony morphologies and varying arsenic transformation abilities were isolated, including 10 facultative anaerobic arsenate-reducing bacteria and one strictly aerobic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium. All of the isolates exhibited high levels of arsenic resistance with minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic ranging from 2 to 200 mM. Strain AR-11 was able to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations relevant to environmental groundwater samples without the addition of any electron donors or acceptors. We provide evidence that arsenic-reduction activity may be conferred by the ars operon(s) that were not amplified by the designed primers currently in use. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis grouped the isolates into the following genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Psychrobacter, Vibrio, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Bosea. Among these genera, we present the first report of the genus Psychrobacter being involved in arsenic reduction. Our results further support the hypothesis that bacteria capable of either oxidizing arsenite or reducing arsenate coexist and are ubiquitous in arsenic-contaminated groundwater.

  5. Arsenic species and chemistry in groundwater of southeast Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, Jerome; Haack, Sheridan

    2002-01-01

    Most of the arsenic detected was arsenite [As(III)]. - Groundwater samples, taken from 73 wells in 10 counties of southeast Michigan in 1997 had arsenic concentrations in the range of 0.5 to 278 μg/l, the average being 29 μg/l. About 12% of these wells had arsenic concentrations that exceeded the current USEPA's maximum contaminant level of 50 μg/l. Most (53-98%) of the arsenic detected was arsenite [As(III)] and other observations supported the arsenic species distribution (low redox potential and DO). In shallow groundwater ( 15 m), the concentration of arsenic is possibly controlled by reductive dissolution of arsenic-rich iron hydroxide/oxyhydroxide and dissolution of arsenic sulfide minerals

  6. Salivary proline-rich protein may reduce tannin-iron chelation: a systematic narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Delimont, Nicole M.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Haub, Mark D.; Lindshield, Brian L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Tannins are often cited for antinutritional effects, including chelation of non-heme iron. Despite this, studies exploring non-heme iron bioavailability inhibition with long-term consumption have reported mixed results. Salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) may mediate tannin-antinutritional effects on non-heme iron bioavailability. Aim To review evidence regarding biochemical binding mechanisms and affinity states between PRPs and tannins, as well as effects of PRPs on non-heme ir...

  7. Arsenic removal with composite iron matrix filters in Bangladesh: a field and laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Kaegi, Ralf; Voegelin, Andreas; Hussam, Abul; Munir, Abul K M; Hug, Stephan J

    2013-05-07

    The main arsenic mitigation measures in Bangladesh, well-switching and deep tube wells, have reduced As exposure, but water treatment is important where As-free water is not available. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) based SONO household filters, developed in Bangladesh, remove As by corrosion of locally available inexpensive surplus iron and sand filtration in two buckets. We investigated As removal in SONO filters in the field and laboratory, covering a range of typical groundwater concentrations (in mg/L) of As (0.14-0.96), Fe (0-17), P (0-4.4), Ca (45-162), and Mn (0-2.8). Depending on influent Fe(II) concentrations, 20-80% As was removed in the top sand layer, but As removal to safe levels occurred in the ZVI-layer of the first bucket. Residual As, Fe, and Mn were removed after re-aeration in the sand of the second bucket. New and over 8-year-old filters removed As to iron matrix (CIM) of newer filters and predominantly magnetite in older filters. As mass balances indicated that users filtered less than reported volumes of water, pointing to the need for more educational efforts. All tested SONO filters provided safe drinking water without replacement for up to over 8 years of use.

  8. Background species effect on aqueous arsenic removal by nano zero-valent iron using fractional factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanboonchuy, Visanu; Grisdanurak, Nurak; Liao, Chih-Hsiang

    2012-02-29

    This study describes the removal of arsenic species in groundwater by nano zero-valent iron process, including As(III) and As(V). Since the background species may inhibit or promote arsenic removal. The influence of several common ions such as phosphate (PO4(3-)), bicarbonate (HCO3-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), calcium (Ca2+), chloride (Cl-), and humic acid (HA) were selected to evaluate their effects on arsenic removal. In particular, a 2(6-2) fractional factorial design (FFD) was employed to identify major or interacting factors, which affect arsenic removal in a significant way. As a result of FFD evaluation, PO4(3-) and HA play the role of inhibiting arsenic removal, while Ca2+ was observed to play the promoting one. As for HCO3- and Cl-, the former one inhibits As(III) removal, whereas the later one enhances its removal; on the other hand, As(V) removal was affected only slightly in the presence of HCO3- or Cl-. Hence, it was suggested that the arsenic removal by the nanoiron process can be improved through pretreatment of PO4(3-) and HA. In addition, for the groundwater with high hardness, the nanoiron process can be an advantageous option because of enhancing characteristics of Ca2+. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancing arsenic removal from groundwater at household level with naturally occurring iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Kumari Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A supply of drinking water low in Arsenic (As prevents arsenic poisoning. The presence of high concentrations of iron (Fe in groundwater under the alluvial plains of the large rivers in Southeast Asia is a prerequisite for the simple removal of As. This study investigated the mechanisms and possibilities for enhancing As removal with naturally occurring Fe in a reliable, low cost and sustainable way. The results of the study show that As removal with Fe is greatly enhanced by the addition of an oxidizing agent (preferably KMnO4 immediately after the pumping of groundwater. Further enhancement of As removal in the presence of Fe can be achieved by adding a small volume of a concentrated basic solution of MnO4- and AlO2-, which has a combined oxidation, coagulation and buffering capacity. Best results were obtained when this solution was mixed with the groundwater immediately after its pumping until a pale pink color appeared. Maximum required reaction time was 10 minutes and subsequent filtration of the water was able to reduce the As concentration to near zero. Concentrations of MnO4- and AlO2- can be varied in the solution to achieve sufficient As removal to suit different Fe/As ratios and the presence of interfering co-occurring anions.

  10. Arsenic removal from groundwater using iron electrocoagulation: effect of charge dosage rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrose, Susan; Gadgil, Ashok; Srinivasan, Venkat; Kowolik, Kristin; Muller, Marc; Huang, Jessica; Kostecki, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia, while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance over a larger range of current density than in any other single previous EC study (5000-fold: 0.02 - 100 mA/cm(2)) and over a wide range of charge dosage rates (0.060 - 18 Coulombs/L/min). We find that charge dosage rate has significant effects on both removal capacity (μg-As removed/Coulomb) and treatment time and is the appropriate parameter to maintain performance when scaling to different active areas and volumes. We estimate the operating costs of EC treatment in Bangladesh groundwater to be $0.22/m(3). Waste sludge (~80 - 120 mg/L), when tested with the Toxic Characteristic Leachate Protocol (TCLP), is characterized as non-hazardous. Although our focus is on developing a practical device, our results suggest that As[III] is mostly oxidized via a chemical pathway and does not rely on processes occurring at the anode. Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the free supplemental file.

  11. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacquart, Thomas [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Frisbie, Seth [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Mitchell, Erika [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Grigg, Laurie [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Cole, Christopher [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Small, Colleen [Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, Burlington, VT (United States); Sarkar, Bibudhendra, E-mail: bsarkar@sickkids.ca [Department of Molecular Structure and Function, The Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  12. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-01-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  13. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  14. Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-09-20

    Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

  15. Arsenic in drinking water wells on the Bolivian high plain: field monitoring and effect of salinity on removal efficiency of iron-oxides-containing filters

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bergh, Kenneth; Du Laing, Gijs; Montoya, Juan; De Deckere, E; Tack, Filip

    2010-01-01

    In the rural areas around Oruro (Bolivia), untreated groundwater is used directly as drinking water. This research aimed to evaluate the general drinking water quality, with focus on arsenic (As) concentrations, based on analysis of 67 samples from about 16 communities of the Oruro district. Subsequently a filter using Iron Oxide Coated Sand (IOCS) and a filter using a Composite Iron Matrix (CIM) were tested for their arsenic removal capacity using synthetic water mimicking real groundwater. ...

  16. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the

  17. Impact of Redox Condition on Fractionation and Bioaccessibility of Arsenic in Arsenic-Contaminated Soils Remediated by Iron Amendments: A Long-Term Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-bearing amendments, such as iron grit, are proved to be effective amendments for the remediation of arsenic- (As- contaminated soils. In present study, the effect of redox condition on As fractions in As-contaminated soils remediated by iron grit was investigated, and the bioaccessibility of As in soils under anoxic condition was evaluated. Results showed that the labile fractions of As in soils decreased significantly after the addition of iron grit, while the unlabile fractions of As increased rapidly, and the bioaccessibility of As was negligible after 180 d incubation. More labile fractions of As in iron-amended soils were transformed into less mobilizable or unlabile fractions with the contact time. Correspondingly, the bioaccessibility of As in iron-amended soils under the aerobic condition was lower than that under the anoxic condition after 180 d incubation. The redistribution of loosely adsorbed fraction of As in soils occurred under the anoxic condition, which is likely ascribed to the reduction of As(V to As(III and the reductive dissolution of Fe-(hydroxides. The stabilization processes of As in iron-amended soils under the anoxic and aerobic conditions were characterized by two stages. The increase of crystallization of Fe oxides, decomposition of organic matter, molecular diffusion, and the occlusion within Fe-(hydroxides cocontrolled the transformation of As fractions and the stabilization process of As in iron-amended soils under different redox conditions. In terms of As bioaccessibility, the stabilization process of As in iron-amended soils was shortened under the aerobic condition in comparison with the anoxic condition.

  18. Health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dusts from arsenic-rich sediment at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, Jamie; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Hu, Qing; Chow, Rebecca; David, Winnie; Young, Sharon; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham-Spencer, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; Keil, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Geogenic dust from arid environments is a possible inhalation hazard for humans, especially when using off-road vehicles that generate significant dust. This study focused on immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust generated from sediments in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area near Las Vegas, Nevada that are particularly high in arsenic; the naturally-occurring arsenic concentrations in these surficial sediments ranged from 4.8 to 346 μg/g. Dust samples from sediments used in this study had a median diameter of 4.5 μm and also were a complex mixture of naturally-occurring metals, including aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, strontium, cesium, lead, uranium, and arsenic. Adult female B6C3F1 mice exposed via oropharyngeal aspiration to 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight, four times, a week apart, for 28 days, were evaluated 24 h after the last exposure. Peripheral eosinophils were increased at all concentrations, serum creatinine was dose responsively increased beginning at 1.0 mg/kg/day, and blood urea nitrogen was decreased at 10 and 100 mg/kg/day. Antigen-specific IgM responses and natural killer cell activity were dose-responsively suppressed at 0.1 mg/kg/day and above. Splenic CD4 + CD25 + T cells were decreased at 0.01, 0.1, 10, and 100 mg/kg/day. Antibodies against MBP, NF-68, and GFAP were selectively reduced. A no observed adverse effect level of 0.01 mg/kg/day and a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.1 mg/kg/day were determined from IgM responses and natural killer cell activity, indicating that exposure to this dust, under conditions similar to our design, could affect these responses. - Highlights: • Toxicity of geogenic dust from arsenic-rich sediment in Nevada was characterized. • The geogenic dust is a mixture of many metals and crystalline silica. • Geogenic dust exposure decreased IgM antibodies and natural killer cell activity.

  19. Health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dusts from arsenic-rich sediment at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, Jamie, E-mail: dewittj@ecu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834 (United States); Buck, Brenda [Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Goossens, Dirk [Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, KU Leuven (Belgium); Hu, Qing [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834 (United States); Chow, Rebecca; David, Winnie; Young, Sharon; Teng, Yuanxin [Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Leetham-Spencer, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Pollard, James [Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); McLaurin, Brett [Department of Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, Bloomsburg, PA,17815 (United States); Gerads, Russell [Brooks Rand Labs, LLC, Bothell, WA 98011 (United States); Keil, Deborah [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Geogenic dust from arid environments is a possible inhalation hazard for humans, especially when using off-road vehicles that generate significant dust. This study focused on immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust generated from sediments in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area near Las Vegas, Nevada that are particularly high in arsenic; the naturally-occurring arsenic concentrations in these surficial sediments ranged from 4.8 to 346 μg/g. Dust samples from sediments used in this study had a median diameter of 4.5 μm and also were a complex mixture of naturally-occurring metals, including aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, strontium, cesium, lead, uranium, and arsenic. Adult female B6C3F1 mice exposed via oropharyngeal aspiration to 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight, four times, a week apart, for 28 days, were evaluated 24 h after the last exposure. Peripheral eosinophils were increased at all concentrations, serum creatinine was dose responsively increased beginning at 1.0 mg/kg/day, and blood urea nitrogen was decreased at 10 and 100 mg/kg/day. Antigen-specific IgM responses and natural killer cell activity were dose-responsively suppressed at 0.1 mg/kg/day and above. Splenic CD4 + CD25 + T cells were decreased at 0.01, 0.1, 10, and 100 mg/kg/day. Antibodies against MBP, NF-68, and GFAP were selectively reduced. A no observed adverse effect level of 0.01 mg/kg/day and a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.1 mg/kg/day were determined from IgM responses and natural killer cell activity, indicating that exposure to this dust, under conditions similar to our design, could affect these responses. - Highlights: • Toxicity of geogenic dust from arsenic-rich sediment in Nevada was characterized. • The geogenic dust is a mixture of many metals and crystalline silica. • Geogenic dust exposure decreased IgM antibodies and natural killer cell activity.

  20. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  1. A cross sectional study of anemia and iron deficiency as risk factors for arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly L. Kile

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Ganges Delta, chronic arsenic poisoning is a health concern affecting millions of people who rely on groundwater as their potable water source. The prevalence of anemia is also high in this region, particularly among women. Moreover, arsenic is known to affect heme synthesis and erythrocytes and the risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions appears to differ by sex. Methods We conducted a case-control study in 147 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi women to assess the association between anemia and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Results We observed that the odds of arsenic-related skin lesions were approximately three times higher among women who were anemic (hemoglobin < 120 g/L compared to women with normal hemoglobin levels [Odds Ratio (OR = 3.32, 95 % Confidence Intervals (CI: 1.29, 8.52] after adjusting for arsenic levels in drinking water and other covariates. Furthermore, 75 % of the women with anemia had adequate iron stores (serum ferritin ≥12 μg/L, suggesting that the majority of anemia detected in this population was unrelated to iron depletion. Conclusions Considering the magnitude of arsenic exposure and prevalence of anemia in Bangladeshi women, additional research is warranted that identifies the causes of anemia so that effective interventions can be implemented while arsenic remediation efforts continue.

  2. The sorption of inorganic arsenic on modified sepiolite: Effect of hydrated iron(III-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic arsenic species, As(III and As(V, from water by sepiolite modified with hydrated iron(III oxide was investigated at 25 °C through batch studies. The influence of the initial pH value, the initial As concentrations, the contact time and types of water on the sorption capacity was investigated. Two types of water were used, deionized and groundwater. The maximal sorption capacity for As(III from deionized water was observed at initial and final pH value 7.0, while the bonding of As(V was observed to be almost pH independent for pH value in the range from 2.0 to 7.0, and the significant decrease in the sorption capacity was observed at pH values above 7.0. The sorption capacity at initial pH 7.0 was about 10 mg gˉ1 for As(III and 4.2 mg gˉ1 for As(V in deionized water. The capacity in groundwater was decreased by 40 % for As(III and by 20 % for As(V. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetic model revealed good agreement with the experimental results. The results show that Fe(III-modified sepiolite exhibits significant affinity for arsenic removal and it has a potential for the application in water purification processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, III 43009 i TR 37010

  3. Control of arsenic mobilization in paddy soils by manganese and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Peng; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2017-12-01

    Reductive mobilization of arsenic (As) in paddy soils under flooded conditions is an important reason for the relatively high accumulation of As in rice, posing a risk to food safety and human health. The extent of As mobilization varies widely among paddy soils, but the reasons are not well understood. In this study, we investigated As mobilization in six As-contaminated paddy soils (total As ranging from 73 to 122 mg kg -1 ) in flooded incubation and pot experiments. Arsenic speciation in the solution and solid phases were determined. The magnitude of As mobilization into the porewater varied by > 100 times among the six soils. Porewater As concentration correlated closely with the concentration of oxalate-extractable As, suggesting that As associated with amorphous iron (oxyhydr)oxides represents the potentially mobilizable pool of As under flooded conditions. Soil containing a high level of manganese oxides showed the lowest As mobilization, likely because Mn oxides retard As mobilization by slowing down the drop of redox potential upon soil flooding and maintaining a higher arsenate to arsenite ratio in the solid and solution phases. Additions of a synthetic Mn oxide (hausmannite) to two paddy soils increased arsenite oxidation, decreased As mobilization into the porewater and decreased As concentrations in rice grain and straw. Consistent with previous studies using simplified model systems or pure mineral phases, the present study shows that Mn oxides and amorphous Fe (oxyhydr)oxides are important factors controlling reductive As mobilization in As-contaminated paddy soils. In addition, this study also suggests a potential mitigation strategy using exogenous Mn oxides to decrease As uptake by rice in paddy soils containing low levels of indigenous Mn oxides, although further work is needed to verify its efficacy and possible secondary effects under field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ treatment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by air sparging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major problem in some areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh where it is caused by reducing conditions in the aquifer. In situ treatment, if it can be proven as operationally feasible, has the potential to capture some advantages over other treatment methods by being fairly simple, not using chemicals, and not necessitating disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. In this study, the potential for in situ treatment by injection of compressed air directly into the aquifer (i.e. air sparging) is assessed. An experimental apparatus was constructed to simulate conditions of arsenic-rich groundwater under anaerobic conditions, and in situ treatment by air sparging was employed. Arsenic (up to 200 μg/L) was removed to a maximum of 79% (at a local point in the apparatus) using a solution with dissolved iron and arsenic only. A static "jar" test revealed arsenic removal by co-precipitation with iron at a molar ratio of approximately 2 (iron/arsenic). This is encouraging since groundwater with relatively high amounts of dissolved iron (as compared to arsenic) therefore has a large theoretical treatment capacity for arsenic. Iron oxidation was significantly retarded at pH values below neutral. In terms of operation, analysis of experimental results shows that periodic air sparging may be feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of Zero Valent Iron Nanoparticles (nZVI and its Efficiency in Arsenic Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Rahmani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study to synthesize nanoparticle zero valent iron and to determine its efficiency in arsenic removal from aqueous solutions. Nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of ferric chloride using sodium borohydrid. The experiments were conducted in a batch system and the effects of pH, contact time, and the concentrations of arsenit, arsenat, and nano zero valent iron were investigated. SEM and XRD were applied for the determination of particle size and characterization of the nanoparticles synthesized. SEM results revealed that synthesized particles were of nano size (1-100 nanometers. At pH=7.0, 99% of arsenit and arsenat was removed when nano zero valent iron concentration was 1 (g L-1  over a retention time of  10 min. Based on the results obtained, the removal efficiency was enhanced with increasing nano zero valent iron dosage and reaction time, but decreased with increasing initial concentration and initial solution pH. The significant removal efficiency, high rate of process and short reaction time showed that iron nano particles are of a significant potential for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions.

  6. Removal of arsenic from Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil with soil washing using magnetic iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaemaro; Zhao, Xin; Lee, Jong Keun; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic compounds are considered carcinogen and easily enter drinking water supplies with their natural abundance. US Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a regulation to reduce the public health risks from arsenic in drinking water by revising the current drinking water standard for arsenic from 50 ppb to 10 ppb in 2001 (USEPA, 2001). Therefore, soil remediation is also growing field to prevent contamination of groundwater as well as crop cultivation. Soil washing is adjusted as ex-situ soil remediation technique which reduces volume of the contaminated soil. The technique is composed of physical separation and chemical extraction to extract target metal contamination in the soil. Chemical extraction methods have been developed solubilizing contaminants containing reagents such as acids or chelating agents. And acid extraction is proven as the most commonly used technology to treat heavy metals in soil, sediment, and sludge (FRTR, 2007). Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic iron oxide have been used in diverse areas including information technology and biomedicine. Magnetic iron oxides also can be used as adsorbent to heavy metal enhancing removal efficiency of arsenic concentration. In this study, magnetite is used as the washing agent with acid extraction condition so that the injected oxide can be separated by magnetic field. Soil samples were collected from three separate areas in the Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil to have synergy effect with phytoremediation. Each sample was air-dried and sieved (2mm). Soil washing condition was adjusted on pH in the range of 0-12 with hydrogen chloride and sodium hydroxide. After performing soil washing procedure, arsenic-extracted samples were analyzed for arsenic concentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). All the soils have exceeded worrisome level of soil contamination for region 1 (25mg/kg) so the soil remediation techniques are

  7. Insights into the Structure and Metabolic Function of Microbes That Shape Pelagic Iron-Rich Aggregates ( Iron Snow )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; REICHE, M [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Nietzsche, S [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Kusel, K [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany

    2013-01-01

    Metaproteomics combined with total nucleic acid-based methods aided in deciphering the roles of microorganisms in the formation and transformation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates (iron snow) formed in the redoxcline of an acidic lignite mine lake. Iron snow had high total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies, with 2 x 109 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the acidic (pH 3.5) central lake basin and 4 x 1010 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the less acidic (pH 5.5) northern lake basin. Active microbial communities in the central basin were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (36.6%) and Actinobacteria (21.4%), and by Betaproteobacteria (36.2%) in the northern basin. Microbial Fe-cycling appeared to be the dominant metabolism in the schwertmannite-rich iron snow, because cloning and qPCR assigned up to 61% of active bacteria as Fe-cycling bacteria (FeB). Metaproteomics revealed 70 unique proteins from central basin iron snow and 283 unique proteins from 43 genera from northern basin. Protein identification provided a glimpse into in situ processes, such as primary production, motility, metabolism of acidophilic FeB, and survival strategies of neutrophilic FeB. Expression of carboxysome shell proteins and RubisCO indicated active CO2 fixation by Fe(II) oxidizers. Flagellar proteins from heterotrophs indicated their activity to reach and attach surfaces. Gas vesicle proteins related to CO2-fixing Chlorobium suggested that microbes could influence iron snow sinking. We suggest that iron snow formed by autotrophs in the redoxcline acts as a microbial parachute, since it is colonized by motile heterotrophs during sinking which start to dissolve schwertmannite.

  8. Effect of some operational parameters on the arsenic removal by electrocoagulation using iron electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Can, Berrin Zeliha; Boncukcuoglu, Recep; Yilmaz, Alper Erdem; Fil, Baybars Ali

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a global problem that will likely become more apparent in future years as scientists and engineers measure the true extent of the problem. Arsenic poisoning is preventable though as there are several methods for easily removing even trace amounts of arsenic from drinking water. In the present study, electrocoagulation was evaluated as a treatment technology for arsenic removal from aqueous solutions. The effects of parameters such as initial pH, curr...

  9. Iron single crystal growth from a lithium-rich melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, M.; Schumann, H.; Jantz, S. G.; Breitner, F. A.; Leineweber, A.; Jesche, A.

    2018-03-01

    α -Fe single crystals of rhombic dodecahedral habit were grown from a Li84N12Fe∼3 melt. Crystals of several millimeter along a side form at temperatures around T ≈ 800 ° C. Upon further cooling the growth competes with the formation of Fe-doped Li3N. The b.c.c. structure and good sample quality of α -Fe single crystals were confirmed by X-ray and electron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. A nitrogen concentration of 90 ppm was detected by means of carrier gas hot extraction. Scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any sign of iron nitride precipitates.

  10. Resource Recovery and Reuse: Recycled Magnetically Separable Iron-based Catalysts for Phosphate Recovery and Arsenic Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmentally friendly processes that aid human and environmental health include recovering, recycling, and reusing limited natural resources and waste materials. In this study, we re-used Iron-rich solid waste materials from water treatment plants to synthesize magnetic iron-o...

  11. Pathways of coupled arsenic and iron cycling in high arsenic groundwater of the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia, China: an iron isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaming; Liu, Chen; Lu, Hai; Wanty, Richard B.; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Yinzhu

    2013-01-01

    High As groundwater is widely distributed all over the world, which has posed a significant health impact on millions of people. Iron isotopes have recently been used to characterize Fe cycling in aqueous environments, but there is no information on Fe isotope characteristics in the groundwater. Since groundwater As behavior is closely associated with Fe cycling in the aquifers, Fe isotope signatures may help to characterize geochemical processes controlling As concentrations of shallow groundwaters. This study provides the first observation of Fe isotope fractionation in high As groundwater and evaluation of Fe cycling and As behaviors in shallow aquifers in terms of Fe isotope signatures. Thirty groundwater samples were taken for chemical and isotopic analysis in the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia. Thirty-two sediments were sampled as well from shallow aquifers for Fe isotope analysis. Results showed that groundwater was normally enriched in isotopically light Fe with δ56Fe values between −3.40‰ and 0.58‰ and median of −1.14‰, while heavier δ56Fe values were observed in the sediments (between −1.10‰ and 0.75‰, median +0.36‰). In reducing conditions, groundwaters generally had higher δ56Fe values, in comparison with oxic conditions. High As groundwaters, generally occurring in reducing conditions, had high δ56Fe values, while low As groundwaters normally had low δ56Fe values. Although sediment δ56Fe values were generally independent of lithological conditions, a large variation in sediment δ56Fe values was observed in the oxidation–reduction transition zone. Three pathways were identified for Fe cycling in shallow groundwater, including dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides, re-adsorption of Fe(II), and precipitation of pyrite and siderite. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides resulted in light δ56Fe values (around −1.0‰) and high As concentration (>50 μg/L) in groundwater in anoxic conditions. Re-adsorption of isotopically

  12. Synthesis and characterization of conditioned carbon with iron nanoparticles for the arsenic removal in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores C, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Using pineapple husks conditioned with carboxymethylcellulose, hexamine and ferric nitrate, a carbonaceous material was obtained with nanoparticles of Fe (C Fe), which was characterized and tested for arsenic removal in the aqueous phase. The microscopic study showed spheres 4 microns and filaments 100 nm wide, so as iron particles whose diameter decreases to an average of 38.81 nm, when pyrolysis time was increased to 180 min. their distribution in the carbonaceous matrix is homogeneous. According to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, C Fe contains C (82.29%), O (7.23%), K (0.68%), Ca (3.77%) and Fe (6.25%) and its diffraction pattern shows the characteristic peak of Fe (0), which is not observed in the coal without iron. By neutron activation analysis were quantified Al, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn, they can be involved in the process of sorption of As (v) forming surface active sites. For C Fe and C B characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, groups C-H, C=O, C=C, -Nh, NH 2 , isocyanate and isonitrile were found, the last two were formed by the present hexamine. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed energy states of C 1 and O 1 in pineapple shell washed, shell conditioned with iron, C Fe at different times and the pyrolysis coal without iron (C B). The material C Fe 180 presented a specific area of 167 m 2 /g and 7.12 ± 1 sites/nm 2 isoelectric point while pH i = 11.1 C B is 98.80 m 2 /g specific area and 1.5 ± 1 sites/nm 2 and pH i = 10.6, being favorable to the sorption process. The highest removal of As(v) for both materials was at ph = 2, fitting the kinetic data to pseudo-second order model. The isotherms as a function of concentration were adjusted to Freundlich model indicating multilayer chemisorption at specific sites of a heterogeneous medium. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy after the sample sorption Fe nanoparticles remain in the carbonaceous matrix being not affected by the

  13. Arsenic and iron removal from groundwater by oxidation–coagulation at optimized pH: Laboratory and field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoloi, Shreemoyee; Nath, Suresh K.; Gogoi, Sweety; Dutta, Robin K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Arsenic and iron removed by a systematic oxidation–coagulation at optimized pH. • Used KMnO 4 as oxidant and FeCl 3 as coagulant in presence of NaHCO 3 . • Field trial results are highly encouraging. • The method is efficient, safe, simple and low-cost. • The method is suitable for rural application in developing countries. -- Abstract: A three-step treatment process involving (i) mild alkaline pH-conditioning by NaHCO 3 ; (ii) oxidation of arsenite and ferrous ions by KMnO 4 , itself precipitating as insoluble MnO 2 under the pH condition; and (iii) coagulation by FeCl 3 has been used for simultaneous removal of arsenic and iron ions from water. The treated water is filtered after a residence time of 1–2 h. Laboratory batch experiments were performed to optimize the doses. A field trial was performed with an optimized recipe at 30 households and 5 schools at some highly arsenic affected villages in Assam, India. Simultaneous removals of arsenic from initial 0.1–0.5 mg/L to about 5 μg/L and iron from initial 0.3–5.0 mg/L to less than 0.1 mg/L have been achieved along with final pH between 7.0 and 7.5 after residence time of 1 h. The process also removes other heavy elements, if present, without leaving any additional toxic residue. The small quantity of solid sludge containing mainly ferrihydrite with adsorbed arsenate passes the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The estimated recurring cost is approximately USD 0.16 per/m 3 of purified water. A high efficiency, an extremely low cost, safety, non-requirement of power and simplicity of operation make the technique potential for rural application

  14. Spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes of nickel and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, M.; Dessagne, P.; Bernas, M.; Langevin, M.; Pougheon, F.; Roussel, P.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of neutron rich isotopes of 67 Ni, 68 Ni and 62 Fe is studied using the quasi-elastic transfer reactions ( 14 C, 16 O) and ( 14 C, 17 O) on mass separated targets of 70 Zn and of 64 Ni. The structure of these new nuclei is investigated through the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations, using the D1SA interaction. Inertial parameters are calculated in the cranking approximation. Collective excited states are obtained consistently by solving the Bohr Hamiltonian. Based on these results, quantum numbers are tentatively assigned to the observed states and angular distributions, measured and calculated from the DWBA, are used to check this assignment. The spectroscopy of more neutron rich nuclei, yet unknown, is anticipated. A sharper test of wave functions is provided by the monopole operator of the O 2 + → O 1 + transition in 68 Ni, which have been deduced from the halflife measurement performed in delayed coincidence experiments. An impressive agreement is obtained between the measured halflife and its value calculated using complete HFB wave functions

  15. Colour, compressive strength and workability of mortars with an iron rich sewage sludge ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the colour, compressive strength and workability of mortar when cement is partly replaced by sewage sludge ash (SSA). In the study, an iron rich SSA was dry milled into six different fractions. The results showed that the colour, compressive strength and workability...

  16. Traditional Practicing with Arsenic Rich Water in Fish Industries Leads to Health Hazards in West Bengal and North-Eastern States of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The supply of good quality food is main necessity for economic and social health of urban and rural population throughout the globe. This study comes to know the severity of As in the west Bengal and north-eastern states of the India. Over the 75% large population of India lives in villages and associated with farming and its related work. West Bengal is the densest populated area of India, fish and rice is the staple food as well as in north-eastern states. For the fulfil demand of fish large population the area are used fisheries as the business. Arsenic contamination in ground water is major growing threat to worldwide drinking water resources. High As contamination in water have been reported in many parts of the world Chandrasekharam et al., 2001; Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002; Farooq et al., 2010). In context to West Bengal and north-east states of India arsenic is main problem in the food chain. These areas are very rich in arsenic many fold higher concentrations of Arsenic than their respective WHO permissible limits have been reported in the water. Over the 36 million people in Bengal delta are at risk due to drinking of As contaminated water (Nordstrom, 2002). The highest concentration of arsenic (535 μg/L Chandrashekhar et al. 2012) was registered from Ngangkha Lawai Mamang Leikai area of Bishnupur district which is fifty fold of the WHO limit for arsenic and tenfold of Indian permissible limit. With the continuous traditional practicing (As rich water pond) and untreated arsenic rich water in fish industries leads to health hazards. A sustainable development in aquaculture should comprise of various fields including environmental, social, cultural and economic aspects. A scientific study has to be needed for the overcome on this problem and rain harvested water may be used for reduce the arsenic problems in fisheries.

  17. Geochemical characterization of arsenic-rich coal-combustion ashes buried under agricultural soils and the release of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselská, Veronika; Majzlan, Juraj; Hiller, Edgar; Peťková, Katarína; Jurkovič, Ľubomír; Ďurža, Ondrej; Voleková-Lalinská, Bronislava

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sources, mineralogy and mobility of As in coal-combustion ashes were investigated. ► After a dam failure in 1965, the spilled ashes were buried under agricultural soils. ► Primary carriers of As within coal-combustion ashes are aluminosilicate glasses. ► The most probable secondary carriers of labile As are oxyhydroxides of Si, Al, and Fe. ► Arsenic stored in ashes is a long-term contamination source for the environment. - Abstract: A combination of geochemical and mineralogical methods was used to determine the concentrations, mobility, and sources of As in coal-combustion ashes and soils in the vicinity of a thermal power plant at Nováky, central Slovakia. Fresh lagooned ash, ashes buried under agricultural soils for 45 a, and the overlying soils, contain high concentrations of As ranging from 61 to 1535 mg/kg. There is no differences in the water extractable percentages of As between the fresh lagooned ash and buried ashes, which range from 3.80% to 6.70% of the total As. This small amount of As may perhaps reside on the surfaces of the ash particles, as postulated in the earlier literature, but no evidence was found to support this claim. Electron microprobe analyses show that the dominant primary As carriers are the aluminosilicate glasses enriched in Ca and Fe. The acid NH 4 + -oxalate extraction hints that the oxyhydroxides of Si, Al, and Fe are the most probable secondary carriers of labile As. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses show that As in the lagooned and buried ashes occurs mostly as As(V). The long-term burial of the coal-combustion ash under agricultural soil did not cause any major change of its chemical composition or As lability compared to the fresh lagooned ash

  18. Litterfall dynamics in a iron-rich rock outcrop complex in the southeastern portion of the Iron Quadrangle of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo André Ribeiro Valim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems on cangas (duricrust present considerable heterogeneity of habitats due to microtopographic variations, soil accumulation and a variety of plant functional groups. Therefore, spatial and temporal ecosystem processes such as litterfall are to be expected to be large, and the absence of a level of productivity represents all the facets of iron-rich landscapes. We investigated litterfall in a iron-rich rock complex in the Iron Quadrangle of Brazil, with habitats formed on different evolutionary stages of the soil, resulting in a gradient of biomass, canopy cover and community structure. The measurements were made in open field areas, dominated by herb-shrub vegetation and interspersed with islands of dense vegetation in which there were individual trees, as well as in areas of semideciduous forest. The litterfall, especially that of leaf litter, followed the gradient of woody cover and was approximately two times greater in the forest formation. However, the spatial and temporal variations in deposition were greatest in the herb-shrub areas and least in the semideciduous forest area, intermediate values being obtained for the tree island areas. The peaks in litterfall also varied among habitats, occurring in some periods of the rainy season and during the transition from rainy to dry in the herb-shrub and tree island areas, whereas they occurred at the end of the dry season in the semideciduous forest area. The results show significant differences in the patterns of litterfall among different physiognomies within the same iron-rich rock complex, indicating the need for expanded studies, focusing on the flow of matter and energy in such environments.

  19. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Demands for a better drinking water quality, especially concerning arsenic, a compound with many adverse health effects, put a pressure on the utilities to ensure the best treatment technologies that meet nowadays and possible future quality standards. The aim of this paper is to introduce...... an improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence...

  20. Sustainability of the effects of medicinal iron and iron rich food supplementation on haemoglobin, intelligence quotient and growth of school aged girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia in school aged girls is an important but neglected issue. Since iron supplementation programmes have had little reported success in reducing anaemia, interest is turning to food based approaches that have higher potential for achieving far reaching benefits. The purpose of the study was to observe sustainability of the effect of iron and food supplementation on haemoglobin (Hb, intelligence quotient (IQ and growth of the subjects. At baseline, estimation of haemoglobin (Hb, red cell indices, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, serum transferrin saturation and serum ferritin was done. IQ, weight and height were measured using standard procedures. Anaemic subjectswere divided into three groups, viz., (i twice weekly supplementation of iron folic acid syrup (53 mg iron/week; (ii daily supplementation of 4 niger seed and defatted soyaflour biscuits plus 2 lemons (45 mg iron/week and (iii control. Non anaemic group(NAC was not intervened. Endline data was collected after 120 days. Follow up for Hb, IQ, weight and height was done 4 months after cessation of supplementation. The prevalence of anaemia was 77% in the study population; 46% subjects had mild anaemia and 32% had moderate anaemia. Iron status was lower in anaemic subjects (p<0.001.Iron supplementation was more effective in raising Hb and building iron stores than iron rich food supplementation. Iron supplementation improved IQ but did not bring about catch up of anaemics to non anaemics. Iron rich food supplementation was better than medicinal iron in promoting growth in anaemic girls. The impact of iron rich food supplementation on Hb, IQ and growth sustained for 4 months while that of medicinal iron did not. Effects of food supplementation are sustainable for 4 months, therefore, this strategy holds more potential to control anaemia, in school aged girls.

  1. Iron-based subsurface arsenic removal technologies by aeration: A review of the current state and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Vu T; Cañas Kurz, Edgardo E; Hellriegel, Ulrich; Luu, Tran L; Hoinkis, Jan; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2018-04-15

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater is a critical issue and one that raises great concern around the world as the cause of many negative health impacts on the human body, including internal and external cancers. There are many ways to remove or immobilize arsenic, including membrane technologies, adsorption, sand filtration, ion exchange, and capacitive deionization. These exhibit many different advantages and disadvantages. Among these methods, in-situ subsurface arsenic immobilization by aeration and the subsequent removal of arsenic from the aqueous phase has shown to be very a promising, convenient technology with high treatment efficiency. In contrast to most of other As remediation technologies, in-situ subsurface immobilization offers the advantage of negligible waste production and hence has the potential of being a sustainable treatment option. This paper reviews the application of subsurface arsenic removal (SAR) technologies as well as current modeling approaches. Unlike subsurface iron removal (SIR), which has proven to be technically feasible in a variety of hydrogeochemical settings for many years, SAR is not yet an established solution since it shows vulnerability to diverse geochemical conditions such as pH, Fe:As ratio, and the presence of co-ions. In some situations, this makes it difficult to comply with the stringent guideline value for drinking water recommended by the WHO (10 μg L -1 ). In order to overcome its limitations, more theoretical and experimental studies are needed to show long-term application achievements and help the development of SAR processes into state-of-the-art technology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arsenic adsorption and plant availability in an agricultural soil irrigated with As-rich water: Effects of Fe-rich amendments and organic and inorganic fertilisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco-Lázaro, Elena; Pardo, Tania; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, Ma Pilar

    2018-03-01

    The use of As-rich water for irrigation in agricultural soils may result in As accumulation in soil and crops, with the consequent risk of its entry into the food chain. The effectiveness of three different Fe-based materials (a commercial iron oxide (Bayoxide ® ), lamination slag (a by-product of the hot rolling of steel) and a commercial red mud derivative (ViroBind™)) used as soil amendments to minimise the impact of irrigation with As-rich water in an agricultural soil-plant system was evaluated in a pot experiment. Simultaneously, the influence of organic and inorganic fertilisation (olive oil mill waste compost versus NPK fertiliser) on the effectiveness of iron oxide in As adsorption processes was also assessed. The As adsorption capacity of the amendments was determined in a preliminary batch experiment using sorption isotherms. Then, a pot experiment was carried out in a growth chamber using an agricultural soil (arenosol) from Segovia province (central Spain), amended with the different materials, in which Lactuca sativa (lettuce) was grown for two months. The As adsorption capacity was higher in the commercial iron oxide and in the red mud derivative, which fitted the Freundlich model (no saturation), than in the lamination slag, which fitted the Langmuir model (limited adsorption). All the materials decreased the pore water As concentration compared to the control (by 29-80%), but only iron oxide reduced As availability in the soil, and none of the amendments decreased the As concentration in plant leaves. The combination of iron oxide and compost did not significantly improve plant growth, but increased nutrients (N, K, Ca, Na and Mg) concentrations and availability in the soil and their concentration in the plants, relative to the other treatments and the control. Therefore, this seems to be a viable option to prevent As leaching and improve the plant nutritional status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Regenerating an Arsenic Removal Iron-Based Adsorptive Media System, Part 1: The Regeneration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorptive media technology is a frequently used method of removing arsenic by small water systems because of its simplicity and efficiency. Current practice is to replace the media when it no longer reduces arsenic below the USEPA drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) ...

  4. HPLC inorganic arsenic speciation analysis of samples containing high sulfuric acid and iron levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Contreras, P.A.; Gerrits, I.P.A.M.; Weijma, J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in oxidizing and bioleaching reactors, speciation analysis of the inorganic arsenic compounds is required. Existing arsenic speciation analysis techniques are based on the use of liquid chromatography columns coupled to detector equipment such as

  5. Mineralogical characterization of arsenic, iron, and nickel in uranium mine tailings using XAS and EMPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essilfie-Dughan, J.; Hendry, M.J.; Warner, J.; Kotzer, T.

    2010-01-01

    In northern Saskatchewan, Canada, high-grade uranium ores and the resulting tailings can contain high levels of arsenic (As), iron (Fe), and nickel (Ni). An environmental concern in the uranium mining industry is the long-term stabilization of these elements of concern (EOCs) within tailings management facilities thereby mitigating their transfer to the surrounding groundwater. Characterization of these As-, Fe- and Ni-bearing minerals and complexes must be carried out to evaluate their solubility and long-term stability within the tailings mass. Synchrotron-based bulk x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the speciation of these EOCs in mine tailing samples obtained from the Deilmann Tailings Management Facility (DTMF) at Key Lake, Saskatchewan. Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and synchrotron-based micro-focussing x-ray fluorescence mapping and absorption spectroscopy (μXRF; μXAS ) have also been employed to study spatial distribution and speciation at the micron scale. Comparisons of K-edge absorption spectra of tailings samples and reference compounds indicate the dominant oxidation states of As, Fe, and Ni in the mine tailings samples are +5, +3, and +2, respectively, largely reflecting their deposition in an oxidized environment and complexation within stable oxic phases. Backscattered electron (BSE) images of the tailings from the electron microprobe indicate the presence of gypsum/lime nodules surrounded by metallic rims mainly consisting of As, Fe, and Ni. μXRF elemental mapping confirms these EPMA results. μXAS collected within the metal-bearing rims indicates As and Fe is present mainly in the +5 and +3 oxidation state, respectively. (author)

  6. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake. II. Isolation of Arsenic-Metabolizing Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Stolz, J. F.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Kulp, T. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation for isolating arsenic-metabolizing prokaryotes from Searles Lake was to characterize the physiology of microbes that can cope simultaneously with at least 3 environmental extremes: saturating salt concentration, high pH, and high dissolved inorganic arsenic. A secondary motivation was to find extremely halophilc Archaea that could respire As(V), as this has only been reported for the Crenarchaea. Enrichment cultures of arsenate [As(V)]-respirers were established by inoculating Searles Lake mud into an anaerobic, alkaline (pH = 9.8) artificial medium containing 346 g/L dissolved salts, with lactate as the electron donor and As(V) as the electron acceptor. After about 6 months of bi-weekly transfers, the enrichment was purified by serial dilution, with the highest growth-positive dilution tube exhibiting motile cells having uniform morphology (curved rods). This culture, strain SLAS-1, grew by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide while reducing As(V) to arsenite [As(III)]. The doubling time was 48 hours at 346 g/L salinity, and nearly equivalent growth rates were observed over a salinity range of 200 to 346 g/l, with no growth evident below 200 g/L. The pH range was 8.5 to 10, with an optimum at 9.5. Strain SLAS-1 has an unusual motility that can be characterized as a "fish-like" swimming motion. Thin section electron micrographs revealed the presence of an internal cytoplasmic filament that runs the full length of the microorganism. We suggest that this filament may be involved in cellular motility. However, taxonomic classification of SLAS-1 made by 16S rRNA gene sequences aligned it in the order Haloanaerobacteriales of the Domain Bacteria. In a further effort to isolate haloalkaliphilic Archaea, a similar enrichment strategy was employed as above, but cell-wall antibiotics were added to the medium to discourage the growth of Bacteria. An enrichment culture, designated Serl-Ab, was established that oxidized lactate to acetate plus carbon

  7. Concurrent arsenic and microbe removal from groundwater using iron electro-coagulation: Mechanisms of E.coli attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaire, C.; Van Genuchten, C. M.; Amrose, S. E.; Gadgil, A.

    2013-12-01

    Around 60 million people in South Asia drink groundwater from arsenic contaminated shallow aquifers. Research over the last two decades has focused on arsenic removal alone to mitigate this problem, largely ignoring possible microbial contamination of shallow groundwater. However, diarrheal diseases are still prevalent in the region and recently, fecal indicators and pathogens were detected in shallow tubewells in Bangladesh. Comprehensive treatment technologies addressing both microbial and arsenic contamination are needed and may have a higher social acceptability, contributing to their sustainability in resource poor areas. Iron electro-coagulation (EC) is a low-cost and low-waste process using small amounts of electricity to produce Fe(III)-oxides that serve as an adsorbent for arsenic and a coagulant for microbes. Iron EC relies on the oxidative dissolution of a Fe(0) anode to produce Fe(II) ions that rapidly oxidize and precipitate in the presence of oxygen. In the process, strong oxidants generated by Fenton-like reactions convert As(III) into As(V), which is more amenable to adsorption. In this work, we demonstrate that iron EC can simultaneously remove arsenic and the model organism E.coli in South Asian synthetic groundwater. We find that E.coli is attenuated because it adheres to iron precipitates and is trapped in aggregates that settle out. Some inactivation (~20%, as probed by membrane permeability stains) also takes place, likely due to oxidative stress caused by strong oxidants produced in Fenton-like reactions. We find that pH has a significant effect on E.coli removal from South Asian synthetic groundwater. The iron dosages required to achieve 4-log attenuation (from an initial concentration of 10^6.4 CFU/mL) at pH 6.6. and 7.5 are 25 and 140 mg-Fe/L respectively, other parameters being equal. In this pH range, iron precipitates generated in synthetic groundwater have a negative surface charge, whose variation cannot entirely explain the

  8. Assessment of biochar and iron filing amendments for the remediation of a metal, arsenic and phenanthrene co-contaminated spoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneath, Helen E.; Hutchings, Tony R.; Leij, Frans A.A.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Sites contaminated with mixtures of metals, metalloids and organics are difficult to remediate as each contaminant type may require a different treatment. Biochar, with high metal sorption capacity, used singly and in combination with iron filings, is investigated in microcosm trials to immobilise metal(loid)s within a contaminated spoil, thereby enabling revegetation and degradation of organic pollutants. A mine spoil, contaminated with heavy metals, arsenic and spiked with phenanthrene was treated with either 1%w/w biochar, 5%w/w iron or their combination, enhancing phenanthrene degradation by 44–65%. Biochar treatment reduced Cu leaching and enabled sunflower growth, but had no significant effect on As mobility. Iron treatment reduced Cu and As leaching but negatively impacted soil structure and released high levels of Fe causing sunflower plant mortality. The combined treatment reduced both Cu and As leaching and enabled sunflower growth suggesting this could be a useful approach for treating co-contaminated sites. -- Highlights: ► 56 day microcosm trials examine biochar for remediation of co-contaminated sites. ► Biochar reduces leachable Cu concentrations but phytotoxicity remains. ► Iron filings are investigated as a co-amendment with biochar to reduce As leaching. ► Removal of metal toxicity stimulates phenanthrene degradation. ► Biochar could enable revegetation of contaminated sites. -- Biochar and iron filings incorporated into contaminated spoils reduce Cu and As leaching and stimulate phenanthrene degradation, but do not prevent phytotoxicity to sunflowers

  9. Bioremediation of an iron-rich mine effluent by Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, S; Vieira, M N; Espinha Marques, J; Pereira, R

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of water resources by mine effluents is a serious environmental problem. In a old coal mine, in the north of Portugal (São Pedro da Cova, Gondoma),forty years after the activity has ended, a neutral mine drainage, rich in iron (FE) it stills being produced and it is continuously released in local streams (Ribeiro de Murta e Rio Ferreira) and in surrounding lands. The species Lemna minor has been shown to be a good model for ecotoxicological studies and it also has the capacity to bioaccumulate metals. The work aimed test the potential of the species L. minor to remediate this mine effluent, through the bioaccumulation of Fe, under greenhouse experiments and, at the same time, evaluate the time required to the maximum removal of Fe. The results have shown that L. minor was able to grow and develop in the Fe-rich effluent and bioaccumulating this element. Throughout the 21 days of testing it was found that there was a meaningful increase in the biomass of L. minor both in the contaminated and in the non-contaminated waters. It was also found that bioaccumulation of Fe (iron) occurred mainly during the first 7 days of testing. It was found that L. minor has potential for the bioremediation of effluents rich in iron.

  10. The Paleo-environmental significance of the iron-formations and iron-rich mudstones of the Mesoarchean Witwatersrand-Mozaan Basin, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.Sc. The Mesoarchean Witwatersrand and Pongola Supergroups of South Africa are the oldest, well preserved supracratonic successions worldwide. Various banded iron formation (BIF) and iron-rich mudstone units occur within the West Rand Group of the Witwatersrand Supergroup and the Mozaan Group of the Pongola Supergroup. A granular iron formation (GIF) occurs in a single unit in the Nconga Formation of the Mozaan Group. The Witwatersrand Supergroup and Mozaan Group have been lithostratigrap...

  11. Spatial variability of arsenic concentration in soils and plants, and its relationship with iron, manganese and phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.B.; Jahiruddin, M.; Panaullah, G.M.; Loeppert, R.H.; Islam, M.R.; Duxbury, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial distribution of arsenic (As) concentrations of irrigation water, soil and plant (rice) in a shallow tube-well (STW) command area (8 ha), and their relationship with Fe, Mn and P were studied. Arsenic concentrations of water in the 110 m long irrigation channel clearly decreased with distance from the STW point, the range being 68-136 μg L -1 . Such decreasing trend was also noticed with Fe and P concentrations, but the trend for Mn concentrations was not remarkable. Concerning soil As, the concentration showed a decreasing tendency with distance from the pump. The NH 4 -oxalate extractable As contributed 36% of total As and this amount of As was associated with poorly crystalline Fe-oxides. Furthermore only 22% of total As was phosphate extractable so that most of the As was tightly retained by soil constituents and was not readily exchangeable by phosphate. Soil As (both total and extractable As) was significantly and positively correlated with rice grain As (0.296 ± 0.063 μg g -1 , n = 56). Next to drinking water, rice could be a potential source of As exposure of the people living in the As affected areas of Bangladesh. - Arsenic concentrations of irrigation water, soil and rice decreased with distance from STW point and it was related with iron and phosphorus concentrations

  12. Sulfidization of Organic Freshwater Flocs from a Minerotrophic Peatland: Speciation Changes of Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Lohmayer, Regina; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-04-05

    Iron-rich organic flocs are frequently observed in surface waters of wetlands and show a high affinity for trace metal(loid)s. Under low-flow stream conditions, flocs may settle, become buried, and eventually be subjected to reducing conditions facilitating trace metal(loid) release. In this study, we reacted freshwater flocs (704-1280 mg As/kg) from a minerotrophic peatland (Gola di Lago, Switzerland) with sulfide (5.2 mM, S(-II)spike/Fe = 0.75-1.62 mol/mol) at neutral pH and studied the speciation changes of Fe, S, and As at 25 ± 1 °C over 1 week through a combination of synchrotron X-ray techniques and wet-chemical analyses. Sulfidization of floc ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite caused the rapid formation of mackinawite (52-81% of Fesolid at day 7) as well as solid-phase associated S(0) and polysulfides. Ferrihydrite was preferentially reduced over lepidocrocite, although neoformation of lepidocrocite from ferrihydrite could not be excluded. Sulfide-reacted flocs contained primarily arsenate (47-72%) which preferentially adsorbed to Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, despite abundant mackinawite precipitation. At higher S(-II)spike/Fe molar ratios (≥1.0), the formation of an orpiment-like phase accounted for up to 35% of solid-phase As. Despite Fe and As sulfide precipitation and the presence of residual Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, mobilization of As was recorded in all samples (Asaq = 0.45-7.0 μM at 7 days). Aqueous As speciation analyses documented the formation of thioarsenates contributing up to 33% of Asaq. Our findings show that freshwater flocs from the Gola di Lago peatland may become a source of As under sulfate-reducing conditions and emphasize the pivotal role Fe-rich organic freshwater flocs play in trace metal(loid) cycling in S-rich wetlands characterized by oscillating redox conditions.

  13. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized

  14. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and arsenic-induced changes in biological responses of model aquatic organisms exposed to iron-based nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llaneza, Verónica [University of Florida, Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences (United States); Rodea-Palomares, Ismael [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Zhou, Zuo [University of Florida, Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences (United States); Rosal, Roberto [Univ. de Alcalá, Dept. de Ingeniería Química (Spain); Fernández-Pina, Francisca [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J., E-mail: bonzongo@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The efficiency of zero-valent iron particles used in the remediation of contaminated groundwater has, with the emergence of nanotechnology, stimulated interest on the use of nano-size particles to take advantage of high-specific surface area and reactivity characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs). Accordingly, engineered iron-NPs are among the most widely used nanomaterials for in situ remediation. However, while several ecotoxicity studies have been conducted to investigate the adverse impacts of these NPs on aquatic organisms, research on the implications of spent iron-based NPs is lacking. In this study, a comparative approach is used, in which the biological effects of three iron-based NPs (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs with particle sizes ranging from 20 to 50 nm, and Fe{sup 0}-NPs with an average particle size of 40 nm) on Raphidocelis subcapitata (formely known as Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and Daphnia magna were investigated using both as-prepared and pollutant-doped Fe-based NPs. For the latter, arsenic (As) was used as example sorbed pollutant. The results show that improved degree of NP dispersion by use of polyvinylpyrrolidone overlapped with both increased arsenic adsorption capacity and toxicity to the tested organisms. For R. subcapitata, Fe-oxide NPs were more toxic than Fe{sup 0}-NPs, due primarily to differences in the degree of NPs aggregation and ability to produce reactive oxygen species. For the invertebrate D. magna, a similar trend of biological responses was observed, except that sorption of As to Fe{sup 0}-NPs significantly increased the toxic response when compared to R. subcapitata. Overall, these findings point to the need for research on downstream implications of NP-pollutant complexes generated during water treatment by injection of NPs into aquatic systems.

  15. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and arsenic-induced changes in biological responses of model aquatic organisms exposed to iron-based nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llaneza, Verónica; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Zhou, Zuo; Rosal, Roberto; Fernández-Pina, Francisca; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J.

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of zero-valent iron particles used in the remediation of contaminated groundwater has, with the emergence of nanotechnology, stimulated interest on the use of nano-size particles to take advantage of high-specific surface area and reactivity characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs). Accordingly, engineered iron-NPs are among the most widely used nanomaterials for in situ remediation. However, while several ecotoxicity studies have been conducted to investigate the adverse impacts of these NPs on aquatic organisms, research on the implications of spent iron-based NPs is lacking. In this study, a comparative approach is used, in which the biological effects of three iron-based NPs (Fe_3O_4 and γ-Fe_2O_3 NPs with particle sizes ranging from 20 to 50 nm, and Fe"0-NPs with an average particle size of 40 nm) on Raphidocelis subcapitata (formely known as Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and Daphnia magna were investigated using both as-prepared and pollutant-doped Fe-based NPs. For the latter, arsenic (As) was used as example sorbed pollutant. The results show that improved degree of NP dispersion by use of polyvinylpyrrolidone overlapped with both increased arsenic adsorption capacity and toxicity to the tested organisms. For R. subcapitata, Fe-oxide NPs were more toxic than Fe"0-NPs, due primarily to differences in the degree of NPs aggregation and ability to produce reactive oxygen species. For the invertebrate D. magna, a similar trend of biological responses was observed, except that sorption of As to Fe"0-NPs significantly increased the toxic response when compared to R. subcapitata. Overall, these findings point to the need for research on downstream implications of NP-pollutant complexes generated during water treatment by injection of NPs into aquatic systems.

  16. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and arsenic-induced changes in biological responses of model aquatic organisms exposed to iron-based nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaneza, Verónica; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Zhou, Zuo; Rosal, Roberto; Fernández-Pina, Francisca; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J.

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of zero-valent iron particles used in the remediation of contaminated groundwater has, with the emergence of nanotechnology, stimulated interest on the use of nano-size particles to take advantage of high-specific surface area and reactivity characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs). Accordingly, engineered iron-NPs are among the most widely used nanomaterials for in situ remediation. However, while several ecotoxicity studies have been conducted to investigate the adverse impacts of these NPs on aquatic organisms, research on the implications of spent iron-based NPs is lacking. In this study, a comparative approach is used, in which the biological effects of three iron-based NPs (Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 NPs with particle sizes ranging from 20 to 50 nm, and Fe0-NPs with an average particle size of 40 nm) on Raphidocelis subcapitata (formely known as Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and Daphnia magna were investigated using both as-prepared and pollutant-doped Fe-based NPs. For the latter, arsenic (As) was used as example sorbed pollutant. The results show that improved degree of NP dispersion by use of polyvinylpyrrolidone overlapped with both increased arsenic adsorption capacity and toxicity to the tested organisms. For R. subcapitata, Fe-oxide NPs were more toxic than Fe0-NPs, due primarily to differences in the degree of NPs aggregation and ability to produce reactive oxygen species. For the invertebrate D. magna, a similar trend of biological responses was observed, except that sorption of As to Fe0-NPs significantly increased the toxic response when compared to R. subcapitata. Overall, these findings point to the need for research on downstream implications of NP-pollutant complexes generated during water treatment by injection of NPs into aquatic systems.

  17. Arsenic and iron removal from groundwater by oxidation–coagulation at optimized pH: Laboratory and field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordoloi, Shreemoyee; Nath, Suresh K.; Gogoi, Sweety; Dutta, Robin K., E-mail: robind@tezu.ernet.in

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Arsenic and iron removed by a systematic oxidation–coagulation at optimized pH. • Used KMnO{sub 4} as oxidant and FeCl{sub 3} as coagulant in presence of NaHCO{sub 3}. • Field trial results are highly encouraging. • The method is efficient, safe, simple and low-cost. • The method is suitable for rural application in developing countries. -- Abstract: A three-step treatment process involving (i) mild alkaline pH-conditioning by NaHCO{sub 3}; (ii) oxidation of arsenite and ferrous ions by KMnO{sub 4}, itself precipitating as insoluble MnO{sub 2} under the pH condition; and (iii) coagulation by FeCl{sub 3} has been used for simultaneous removal of arsenic and iron ions from water. The treated water is filtered after a residence time of 1–2 h. Laboratory batch experiments were performed to optimize the doses. A field trial was performed with an optimized recipe at 30 households and 5 schools at some highly arsenic affected villages in Assam, India. Simultaneous removals of arsenic from initial 0.1–0.5 mg/L to about 5 μg/L and iron from initial 0.3–5.0 mg/L to less than 0.1 mg/L have been achieved along with final pH between 7.0 and 7.5 after residence time of 1 h. The process also removes other heavy elements, if present, without leaving any additional toxic residue. The small quantity of solid sludge containing mainly ferrihydrite with adsorbed arsenate passes the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The estimated recurring cost is approximately USD 0.16 per/m{sup 3} of purified water. A high efficiency, an extremely low cost, safety, non-requirement of power and simplicity of operation make the technique potential for rural application.

  18. Arsenic and iron removal from groundwater by oxidation-coagulation at optimized pH: laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Shreemoyee; Nath, Suresh K; Gogoi, Sweety; Dutta, Robin K

    2013-09-15

    A three-step treatment process involving (i) mild alkaline pH-conditioning by NaHCO₃; (ii) oxidation of arsenite and ferrous ions by KMnO₄, itself precipitating as insoluble MnO₂ under the pH condition; and (iii) coagulation by FeCl₃ has been used for simultaneous removal of arsenic and iron ions from water. The treated water is filtered after a residence time of 1-2 h. Laboratory batch experiments were performed to optimize the doses. A field trial was performed with an optimized recipe at 30 households and 5 schools at some highly arsenic affected villages in Assam, India. Simultaneous removals of arsenic from initial 0.1-0.5 mg/L to about 5 μg/L and iron from initial 0.3-5.0 mg/L to less than 0.1 mg/L have been achieved along with final pH between 7.0 and 7.5 after residence time of 1h. The process also removes other heavy elements, if present, without leaving any additional toxic residue. The small quantity of solid sludge containing mainly ferrihydrite with adsorbed arsenate passes the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The estimated recurring cost is approximately USD 0.16 per/m(3) of purified water. A high efficiency, an extremely low cost, safety, non-requirement of power and simplicity of operation make the technique potential for rural application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic Studies of the Arsenic Adsorption on Iron Species Generated by Electrocoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Parga, J. R.; Vazquez, V.; Moreno, H.

    2009-01-01

    Protection of global environment and sustainable sources of clean water are a necessity for human survival. The wide use of heavy metals by modern industries has generated heavy metals containing wastes and by-products. Specifically, large quantities of arsenic compounds are being discharged into the environment. The full potential of Electrocoagulation (EC) with air injection as an alternative wastewater treatment technique to remove arsenic from water showed more than 99 percent of removal ...

  20. Diel changes in water chemistry in an arsenic-rich stream and treatment-pond system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammons, C.H.; Grant, T.M.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; DeGrandpre, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations are elevated in surface waters of the Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit (WSPOU), located at the head of the upper Clark Fork River Superfund site, Montana, USA. Arsenic is derived from historical deposition of smelter emissions (Mill and Willow Creeks) and historical mining and milling wastes (Silver Bow Creek). Although long-term monitoring has characterized the general seasonal and flow-related trends in As concentrations in these streams and the pond system used to treat Silver Bow Creek water, little is known about solubility controls and sorption processes that influence diel cycles in As concentrations. Diel (24-h) sampling was conducted in July 2004 and August 2005 at the outlet of the treatment ponds, at two locations along a nearby reconstructed stream channel that diverts tributary water around the ponds, and at Silver Bow Creek 2??km below the ponds. Dissolved As concentration increased up to 51% during the day at most of the stream sites, whereas little or no diel change was displayed at the treatment-pond outlet. The strong cycle in streams is explained by pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of As onto hydrous metal oxides or biofilms on the streambed. Concentrations of dissolved Ca2+ and HCO3- at the stream sites showed a diel temporal pattern opposite to that of As, and geochemical modeling supports the hypothesis that the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- were controlled by precipitation of calcite during the warm afternoon hours when pH rose above 9.0. Nightly increases in dissolved Mn and Fe(II) concentrations were out of phase with concentrations of other divalent cations and are more likely explained by redox phenomena. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Pressure-Volume-Temperature Equation of State of Iron-Rich (Mg,Fe)O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic observations near the base of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have detected 5-20 km thick patches in which the seismic wave velocities are reduced by up to 30%. These ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been interpreted as aggregates of partially molten material (e.g. Williams and Garnero 1996, Hernlund and Jellinek, 2010) or as solid, iron-enriched residues (e.g. Knittle and Jeanloz, 1991; Mao et al., 2006; Wicks et al., 2010), typically based on proposed sources of velocity reduction. The stabilities of these structure types have been explored through dynamic models that have assembled a relationship between ULVZ stability and density (Hernlund and Tackley, 2007; Bower et al., 2010). Now, to constrain the chemistry of ULVZs, more information is needed on the relationship between density and sound velocity of candidate phases. Recently, we have shown that the characteristically low sound speeds of ULVZs can be produced by small amounts of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O, which is likely to be found in iron-rich assemblages based on current partitioning studies (eg. Sakai et al., 2010; Tange et al., 2009). We determined the Debye velocity (VD) of (Mg.1657Fe.84)O using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS), and calculated the seismically relevant compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities up to 120 GPa using an equation of state of a similar composition (Wicks et al., 2010). These densities and sound velocities, in turn, are consistent with reasonable morphologies of modeled solid ULVZs (Bower et al., 2011). To increase the accuracy of density and sound velocity predictions, measurements must be made at elevated temperatures to correctly predict the properties of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O at mantle conditions. In this study, we present the pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of (Mg.0657Fe.94)O measured up to pressures of 120 GPa and temperatures of 2000 K. Volume was measured with x-ray diffraction at beamline 13-ID-D of the Advanced Photon

  2. Assessment of in situ immobilization of Lead (Pb) and Arsenic (As) in contaminated soils with phosphate and iron: solubility and bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Y.S.; Du, X.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of in situ immobilization of lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) in soil with respectively phosphate and iron is well recognized. However, studies on combined Pb and As-contaminated soil are fewer, and assessment of the effectiveness of the immobilization on mobility and bioaccessibility is also

  3. Iron isotope constraints on arsenic release from Mekong Delta sediments, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Hirata, T.; Yamagata, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Abe, G.

    2017-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a world-wide environmental problem and threatens more than 100 million people living in delta areas of South, SE and East Asia. It is typically associated with reducing aquifers with organic-rich alluvial sediments, little thermal gradients, low sulfate concentrations, and slow flushing rates. Such conditions are typical for low-lying countries in Asian deltas; however, compared to Bangladesh, Cambodia has received far less attention. Upon reductive dissolution of Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides that adsorbed As, Fe and As are released into solution as dissolved Fe2+ and arsenate, respectively. Following the oxidation of dissolved Fe2+, newly-formed Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides adsorb As again. Thus, in anoxic waters, concentrations of As correlate with those of dissolved Fe2+. Fluctuating redox conditions in the aquifer are control As release, although inhibition of adsorption of arsenate and arsenite onto the Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides occurs when the concentrations of phosphate, bicarbonate, silicate, and/or organic matter become sufficiently high. Biogeochemical redox reactions of Fe result in significant isotope fractionation (e.g., Johnson et al., 2008). We hypothesized that magnitude of isotope fractionation of Fe in the aquifer sediments, reflecting repeated (incomplete) redox reactions of Fe, may be proportional to the amount of total As release. We aim to calibrate the As release from aquifer sediment by Fe isotope analysis. As a preliminary study, series of sediment samples were collected from the Mekong Delta, Cambodia, in September 2016. Based on measurements by XRF, ICP-AES and ICP-MS, concentrations of As varied significantly covering the range from 4.5 to 15.5 µg/g with a median value of 11 µg/g (higher than the average crustal value of 5 µg/g), and those of Fe is from 2.6 to 9.7 wt.% with a median value of 7.1 wt.%. Concentrations of As and Fe show positive correlation (R2 = 0.72), indicating an effective redox cycling of Fe and As as

  4. Compositional and structural variabilities of Mg-rich iron oxide spinels from tuffite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Mussel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Maghemite (γFe2O3 from tuffite is exceptionally rich in Mg, relatively to most of those reportedly found in other mafic lithosystems. To investigate in detail the compositional and structural variabilities of this natural magnetic iron oxide, sets of crystals were isolated from samples collected at different positions in a tuffite weathering mantle. These sets of crystal were individually powdered and studied by X-ray diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. Lattice parameter of the cubic cell (a0 was found to vary from 0.834(1 to 0.8412(1 nm. Lower a0-values are characteristic of maghemite whereas higher ones are related to a magnetite precursor. FeO content ranges up to 17 mass % and spontaneous magnetization ranges from 8 to 32 J T-1 kg-1. Zero-field room temperature Mössbauer spectra are rather complex, indicating that the hyperfine field distributions due to Fe3+ and mixed valence Fe3+/2+ overlap. The structural variabilities of the (Mg, Ti-rich iron oxide spinels is essentially related to the range of chemical composition of its precursor (Mg, Ti-rich magnetite, and probably to the extent to which it has been oxidized during transformation in soil.

  5. STABILITY: AN INVESTIGATION OF AS(III)/AS(V) STABILITY IN IRON RICH DRINKING WATER MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic in drinking water is predominantly inorganic arsenic. The two oxidation states of inorganic arsenic are As(III)(pKa=9.3) and As(V)(pKa2=6.9). The distribution of As(III) and AS(V) in a water is dependent on the redox potential of the water. The actual distribution can ...

  6. Vertical variability of arsenic concentrations under the control of iron-sulfur-arsenic interactions in reducing aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Postma, Dieke; Ma, Teng; Su, Chunli; Xie, Xianjun

    2018-06-01

    High spatial variability of arsenic (As) concentration in geogenic As-contaminated groundwater has been commonly observed worldwide, but the underlying reasons remain not well understood. Selecting a sulfate-containing, As-affected aquifer at the Datong Basin, northern China as the study area and combining hydrogeochemical investigation and sediment extraction with reactive transport modeling, this work elucidated the roles of Fe-S-As interactions in regulating the vertical variation of As concentration in the groundwater. Dissolved As concentration varied between 0.05 and 18 μmol/L, but generally increased in the depth of 20-25 m and then decreased in 25-30 m. The high-As groundwater contained low Fe(II) (groundwater devoid of sulfate reduction. The reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe(III) oxides coupled to the degradation of organic matter with an estimated maximum rate of 0.22 mmol C/L/yr, mainly accounted for the depth-dependent increase of As concentration in the upper part of the shallow aquifer (groundwater but also probably co-precipitated As to prompt As decrease in the depth of 25-30 m. Arsenite adsorbed on remaining Fe(III) oxides and newly-formed Fe(II) sulfides is another important pool of As in the aquifer, which varies in response to the extents of Fe(III)-oxide and sulfate reduction and consequently alters As distribution coefficient between the solid and the aqueous phases. This study highlights the importance of coupled geochemical cycling of Fe, S and As for As mobilization and reveals how it regulates As partitioning between groundwater and sediments.

  7. Corrigendum to "Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump" [Sci. Total Environ. 536 (2015) 713-728

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, P.; Machovič, V.; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 541, January 15 (2016), s. 1639 ISSN 0048-9697 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : corrigendum * erratum * arsenic mineralogy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  8. Speciation-dependent studies on removal of arsenic by iron-doped calcium alginate beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to study the differential attitude of Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads towards As(III) and As(V) compounds so that speciation-dependent environmentally sustainable methodologies can be developed for removal of arsenic from contaminated water. Throughout the experiment, 76 As has been used as precursor of stable arsenic. The affinity of As(V) towards the Fe-CA beads is greater than that of As(III). Removal efficiency of Fe-CA beads for As(V) increases with increasing number of beads and longer shaking times. At pH 3, 30 Fe-CA beads remove As(V) completely from a solution containing 20 mg kg -1 As(V). The technique has been successfully applied to the ground water collected from an arsenic-contaminated area

  9. Regeneration of Iron-based Adsorptive Media Used for Removing Arsenic from Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The journal article will describe batch and column regeneration tests and results that were conducted on six exhausted iron media products to determine whether an iron based media can be successfully regenerated and reused.

  10. Molecular analysis of microbial community in arsenic-rich groundwater of Kolsor, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial community composition within the highly arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater from Kolsur, West Bengal was analyzed over a period of 3 years using 16S rRNA gene clone library and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Molecular phylogenetic study revealed abundance of α-Proteobacteria (56%) and Firmicutes (29%) along with members of β-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria as relatively minor groups. Along with consistent physicochemical environment, a stable microbial community structure comprising of bacterial genera Agrobacterium-Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Anoxybacillus and Penibacillus was recorded over the three years study period. Presence of cytosolic arsenate reductase (arsC) gene was observed within the microbial community. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all the arsC sequences were closely related to the same gene from γ-proteobacterial members while the community was consisted of mainly α-proteobacterial groups. Such phylogenetic incongruence between 16S rRNA and arsC genes possibly indicated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the ars genes within the groundwater community. Overall, the study reported a nearly stable geomicrobial environment and genetic determinant related to As homeostasis gene, and provided a better insight on biogeochemistry of As contaminated aquifer of West Bengal.

  11. Arsenic Transfer from As-Rich Sediments to River Water in the Presence of Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Martiñá Prieto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of epipsammic biofilms on As release from river sediments was evaluated in a microcosm experiment where biofilms were grown on sediments containing 106 mg kg−1 As, collected in the Anllóns River, and compared with control systems without biofilms. The As transfer to the water column was low (<0.11% of total As in the sediment and was further reduced by 64% in the presence of biofilms. AsV was the predominant species in the overlying water in both systems. AsIII concentration was higher (up to 12% of total dissolved As in the control systems than in the systems with biofilms, where this species was almost absent. This fact is of toxicological relevance due to the usually higher mobility and toxicity of the reduced AsIII species. Control systems exhibited higher As mobility in water, in sulphate solution, and in weak acid medium and higher bioavailability in diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT devices. Arsenic retained by the biofilm was equally distributed between extracellular and intracellular compartments. Inside the cells, significant concentrations of AsIII, monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV were detected, suggesting that active methylation (detoxification processes are occurring in the intracellular compartment.

  12. The microbial community of a passive biochemical reactor treating arsenic, zinc and sulfate-rich seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Anne Baldwin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfidogenic biochemical reactors for metal removal that use complex organic carbon have been shown to be effective in laboratory studies, but their performance in the field is highly variable. Successful operation depends on the types of microorganisms supported by the organic matrix, and factors affecting the community composition are unknown. A molecular survey of a field-based biochemical reactor that had been removing zinc and arsenic for over six years revealed that the microbial community was dominated by methanogens related to Methanocorpusculum sp. and Methanosarcina sp., which co-occurred with Bacteroidetes environmental groups, such as Vadin HA17, in places where the organic matter was more degraded. The metabolic potential for organic matter decomposition by Ruminococcaceae was prevalent in samples with more pyrolysable carbon. Rhodobium- and Hyphomicrobium-related genera within the Rhizobiales Order that have the metabolic potential for dark hydrogen fermentation and methylotrophy, and unclassified Comamonadaceae were the dominant Proteobacteria. The unclassified environmental group Sh765B-TzT-29 was an important Delta-Proteobacteria group in this BCR, that co-occurred with the dominant Rhizobiales OTUs. Organic matter degradation is one driver for shifting the microbial community composition and therefore possibly the performance of these bioreactors over time.

  13. Arsenic enrichment in estuarine sediments-impact of iron and manganese mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, K.K.C.; Paimpillii, J.S.

    River Mandovi and Zuari, Goa (west coast of India) are flowing through iron and manganese mining areas and are heavily used for iron and manganese ore transport. This region generates 25-30 million tons of mining rejects per year. The iron ore...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of iron nano particles for the arsenic removal in water; Sintesis y caracterizacion de nanoparticulas de hierro para la remocion de arsenico en agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez M, O. E.

    2011-07-01

    The synthesis of iron nanoparticles for the removal of metallic ions in polluted waters has been during the last years study topic for different world organizations. This work presents a synthesis method of conditioned coal with iron nanoparticles starting from the use of leaves of pineapple crown, with the purpose of using it in arsenic removal processes in aqueous phase. For the synthesis of this material, the leaves of the pineapple crown were used like supports structure of the iron nanoparticles. First, the pyrolysis appropriate temperature was determined. For the preparation of the support material, this had contact with a ferric nitrate and hexamine solution, because the preparation of the material and the coal synthesis were realized during the pyrolysis process, where the hexamine molecules and the ferric nitrate react, causing the reduction of the iron particles and their dispersion on the support material, obtaining as product a conditioned coal with iron nanoparticles. For the characterization of the materials were used techniques as: Scanning electron microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, X-Rays Diffraction), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy; moreover was determined the isoelectric point and the density of surface sites. The arsenic sorption capacity of the materials was evaluated by means of the methodology type lots where was determined the sorption kinetics and isotherms in terms of arsenic concentration and mass. (Author)

  15. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  16. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles from tea waste for arsenic removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunge, Sneha, E-mail: jagtapsneha@yahoo.co.in [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Nagpur Unit-II, 17/C, Telenkhedi Area, Nagpur 440001 (India); Singh, Shripal, E-mail: Shripal_singh@yahoo.co.uk [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Nagpur Unit-II, 17/C, Telenkhedi Area, Nagpur 440001 (India); Sinha, Amalendu, E-mail: director@cmri.nic.in [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Barwa Road, Dhanbad, Jharkhand, 826001 (India)

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION-Tea) successfully synthesized using tea waste template. MION-Tea exhibit super magnetic properties under external magnetic field with saturation magnetization value of 6.9 emu/g at room temperature. SEM of MION-Tea shows cuboid/pyramid shaped crystals structure of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite). TEM of MION-Tea shows the particle size in the range of 5–25 nm. XRD pattern of MION-Tea is identical to magnetite. Magnetic nanoparticles are tested for removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution. The adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with high adsorption capacity of 188.69 mg/g for arsenic (III), and 153.8 mg/g for arsenic (V). The mean sorption energy (E) calculated from D–R model, indicated physico-chemical sorption process. A pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted best for As(III) adsorption on MION-Tea and the derived activation energy was 64.27 kJ/mol. Thermodynamics revealed the endothermic nature of adsorption. The effects of solution pH, interfering anions and initial As(III) concentration have been investigated. MION-Tea was very low cost (Rs. 136 per kg). MION-Tea can be reused up to 5 adsorption cycles and regenerated using NaOH. Cost of As(III) removal from water of was estimated to be Rs. 14 for 100 L. Comparison with reported adsorbents proved MION-Tea a potential adsorbent for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. - Highlights: • Used tea has been used to prepare magnetic nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles have particle size of 2-25nm and cuboid/pyramid structure. • Magnetic nanoparticles show high adsorption capacity for arsenic.

  17. Petrology and geochemistry of REE-rich Mafé banded iron formations (Bafia group, Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoumbou, Charles; Gentry, Fuh Calistus; Tchakounte Numbem, Jacqueline; Belle Ekwe Lobé, Yolande Vanessa; Nwagoum Keyamfé, Christin Steve

    2017-07-01

    Archaean-Paleoproterozoic foliated amphibole-gneisses and migmatites interstratified with amphibolites, pyroxeno-amphibolites and REE-rich banded-iron formations outcrop at Mafé, Ndikinimeki area. The foliation is nearly vertical due to tight folds. Flat-lying quartz-rich mica schists and quartzites, likely of Pan-African age, partly cover the formations. Among the Mafé BIFs, the oxide BIF facies shows white layers of quartz and black layers of magnetite and accessory hematite, whereas the silicate BIF facies is made up of thin discontinuous quartz layers alternating with larger garnet (almandine-spessartine) + chamosite + ilmenite ± Fe-talc layers. REE-rich oxide BIFs compositions are close to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) hydrothermal deposit; silicate BIFs plot midway between EPR and the associated amphibolite, accounting for a contamination by volcanic materials, in addition to the hydrothermal influence during their oceanic deposition. The association of an oceanic setting with alkaline and tholeiitic magmatism is typical of the Algoma-type BIF deposit. The REE-rich BIFs indices recorded at Mafé are interpreted as resulting from an Archaean-Paleoproterozoic mineralization.

  18. Fe-FeS2 adsorbent prepared with iron powder and pyrite by facile ball milling and its application for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xiaobo; Li, Yangwenjun; Ke, Yong; Shi, Meiqing; Chai, Liyuan; Xue, Ke

    2017-07-01

    Arsenic is one of the major pollutants and a worldwide concern because of its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. An adsorbent of Fe-FeS 2 mixture for effective arsenic removal was successfully prepared by mechanical ball milling. The products before and after arsenic adsorption were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorbent shows high arsenic removal efficiency when molar ratio of iron to pyrite is 5:5. The experimental data of As(III) adsorption are fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model with a maximal adsorption capacity of 101.123 mg/g. And As(V) data were described perfectly by the Freundlich model with a maximal adsorption capacity of 58.341 L/mg. As(III) is partial oxidized to As(V) during the adsorption process. High arsenic uptake capability and cost-effectiveness of waste make it potentially attractive for arsenic removal.

  19. In situ co-adsorption of arsenic and iron/manganese ions on raw clays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doušová, B.; Lhotka, M.; Grygar, Tomáš; Machovič, V.; Herzogová, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2011), s. 166-171 ISSN 0169-1317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Arsenic * Groundwater * Co-adsorption * Raw clays * Pre-modified clays * Fe/Mn Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.474, year: 2011

  20. Regenerating an Arsenic Removal Iron-Based Adsorptive Media System, Part 2: Performance and Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    The replacement of exhausted, adsorptive media used to remove arsenic from drinking water accounts for approximately 80% of the total operational and maintenance (O/M) costs of this commonly used small system technology. The results of three, full scale system studies of an on-s...

  1. Doping properties of cadmium-rich arsenic-doped CdTe single crystals: Evidence of metastable AX behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Akira; Kuciauskas, Darius; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2017-12-01

    Cd-rich composition and group-V element doping are of interest for simultaneously maximizing the hole concentration and minority carrier lifetime in CdTe, but the critical details concerning point defects are not yet fully established. Herein, we report on the properties of arsenic doped CdTe single crystals grown from Cd solvent by the travelling heater method. The photoluminescence spectra and activation energy of 74 ± 2 meV derived from the temperature-dependent Hall effect are consistent with AsTe as the dominant acceptor. Doping in the 1016 to 1017/cm3 range is achieved for measured As concentrations between 1016 and 1020/cm3 with the highest doping efficiency of 40% occurring near 1017 As/cm3. We observe persistent photoconductivity, a hallmark of light-induced metastable configuration changes consistent with AX behavior. Additionally, quenching experiments reveal at least two mechanisms of increased p-type doping in the dark, one decaying over 2-3 weeks and the other persisting for at least 2 months. These results provide essential insights for the application of As-doped CdTe in thin film solar cells.

  2. Crystallization characteristics of iron-rich glass ceramics prepared from nickel slag and blast furnace slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Jie; Ni, Wen; Li, Ke-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Li-Ping

    2011-08-01

    The crystallization process of iron-rich glass-ceramics prepared from the mixture of nickel slag (NS) and blast furnace slag (BFS) with a small amount of quartz sand was investigated. A modified melting method which was more energy-saving than the traditional methods was used to control the crystallization process. The results show that the iron-rich system has much lower melting temperature, glass transition temperature ( T g), and glass crystallization temperature ( T c), which can result in a further energy-saving process. The results also show that the system has a quick but controllable crystallization process with its peak crystallization temperature at 918°C. The crystallization of augite crystals begins from the edge of the sample and invades into the whole sample. The crystallization process can be completed in a few minutes. A distinct boundary between the crystallized part and the non-crystallized part exists during the process. In the non-crystallized part showing a black colour, some sphere-shaped augite crystals already exist in the glass matrix before samples are heated to T c. In the crystallized part showing a khaki colour, a compact structure is formed by augite crystals.

  3. Microstructural characterization of the geopolymer obtained from iron-rich metakaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassalo, Erica Antunes de S.; Aguilar, Maria Teresa P.; Gumieri, Adriana Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Geopolymer is a material derived from precursors rich in SiO_2 and Al_2O_3, activated in an alkaline solution by means of a polymerization process. In this process, units of tetrahedral aluminosilicate structures are organized in repetitions that share oxygen. One of the precursors most commonly used to obtain geopolymer is metakaolin. Recent studies have reported iron enhancement in a partial replacement of the aluminium present in metakaolin. This paper presents the microstructural characterization and analysis of a geopolymer obtained by means of the activation of iron-rich metakaolin with sodium hydroxide at 12, 15 and 18 mol, both at room temperature and in an oven at 85±3°C. The geopolymers obtained were classified and analysed using X-ray fluorescence testing (EDX-720), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results enabled an assessment of their physical-chemical and microstructural characteristics, as well as their reactive potential. (author)

  4. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Archaeal and Bacterial Variation Across Geochemical Gradients in an Arsenic-Rich, Shallow Submarine Vent, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Osburn, M. R.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Near the Feni Islands of Papua New Guinea, reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with seawater, establishing redox disequilibria that may serve as energy sources for chemotrophic Archaea and Bacteria. Of particular interest are elevated arsenite concentrations (1000 μg/L) in the vent water and arsenate-rich ferrihydrite deposits (up to 7 wt.%) that envelope the sediment and coral. In sediment pore waters out to > 200m from the vents, a steeply decreasing arsenic gradient is observed. To establish a baseline of microbial community composition at the vent fluid-seawater interface, bulk DNA was extracted from ferrihydrite coatings, then amplified (16S rRNA, targeting both Archaea and Bacteria), cloned, and sequenced. Red and green biofilms associated with the coatings revealed archaeal communities exclusively composed of deeply-branching, uncultured Crenarchaea. The bacterial members of the community differed in the two biofilms; the red biofilm is primarily composed of gamma Proteobacteria, Chloroflexis, and Planctomycetes, but 60% of clones from the green biofilm community affiliates with the alpha Proteobacteria and candidate group OP11. The remaining portion of the bacterial community in the red coating is made of Thermotogales, Aquificales, Thermales phylotypes and uncultured Bacteria, while OP10, Chloroflexis and Plantomycetales complete the community in the green coatings. No clones associating with thermophilic bacterial groups were found in the green coatings. To provide a comparison to the vent source communities, a sediment core was taken 2.5m from the vent and two depths (10 and 40cm) were analyzed by similar molecular analysis. In both core horizons, the archaeal community is composed of > 75% uncultured Crenarchaea, similar to phylotypes found in deep-sea and terrestrial hydrothermal locations, with the remainder of the communities from known crenarchaeal phylotypes. The bacterial communities are primarily Chloroflexis and gamma Proteobacteria-like phylotypes

  6. Iron and cell death in Parkinson's disease: a nuclear microscopic study into iron-rich granules in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of primate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thong, P.S.P.; Watt, F. E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg; Ponraj, D.; Leong, S.K.; He, Y.; Lee, T.K.Y

    1999-09-02

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative brain disease characterised by a loss of cells in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain and accompanying biochemical changes such as inhibition of mitochondrial function, increased iron concentrations and decreased glutathione levels in the parkinsonian SN. Though the aetiology of the disease is still unknown, the observed biochemical changes point to the involvement of oxidative stress. In particular, iron is suspected to play a role by promoting free radical production, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. The increase in iron in the parkinsonian SN has been confirmed by several research groups, both in human post-mortem brains and in brain tissue from parkinsonian animal models. However, the question remains as to whether the observed increase in iron is a cause or a consequence of the SN cell death process. Our previous study using unilaterally 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys in a time sequence experiment has shown that the increase in bulk iron concentrations follow rather than precede dopaminergic cell death. However, changes in the localised iron concentrations, which may play a more direct role in SN cell death, may not be reflected at the bulk level. Indeed, we have observed iron-rich granules in parkinsonian SNs. From this time sequence study into the iron content of iron-rich granules in the SNs of an untreated control and unilaterally MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian models, we present the following observations: (1) Iron-rich granules are found in both control and parkinsonian SNs and are variable in size and iron content in any one model. (2) These iron-rich granules may be associated with neuromelanin granules found in the SN and are known to accumulate transition metal ions such as iron. (3) The early onset of bulk SN cell loss (35%) was accompanied by a significant elevation of iron in granules found in the MPTP-injected SN compared to the contra-lateral SN

  7. How Effective are Existing Arsenic Removal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will summarize the system performance results of the technologies demonstrated in the arsenic demonstration program. The technologies include adsorptive media, iron removal, iron removal with iron additions, iron removal followed by adsorptive media, coagulatio...

  8. Iron crosslinked alginate as novel nanosorbents for removal of arsenic ions and bacteriological contamination from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of Fe (III crosslinked alginate nanoparticles for the removal of pentavalent arsenic ions [As (V] from aqueous environments. The study involved observing the influences of column bed depth, influent As (V concentration and influent flow rates on the removal of arsenic ions. The total adsorbed quantity, equilibrium uptake and total percentage removal of arsenic were determined from the breakthrough curves obtained at different flow rates, initial metal ion concentration and bed heights. The results showed that column demonstrate fairly well performance at the lowest flow rate. Also, column bed capacity and exhaustion time were found to increase with increasing bed height. When initial metal ion concentration was increased from 0.5 mg/L to 1.5 mg/L, the corresponding adsorption bed capacity decreases from 0.066 to 0.022 mg/g. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST model was used to analyze the experimental data and the model parameters were evaluated. Good agreement of the experimental breakthrough curves with the model predictions was observed.

  9. Pathways for arsenic from sediments to groundwater to streams: Biogeochemical processes in the Inner Coastal Plain, New Jersey, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Julia L.; Mumford, Adam; Young, Lily Y.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Bonin, Jennifer L.; Rosman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments that underlie the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey contain the arsenic-rich mineral glauconite. Streambed sediments in two Inner Coastal Plain streams (Crosswicks and Raccoon Creeks) that traverse these glauconitic deposits are enriched in arsenic (15–25 mg/kg), and groundwater discharging to the streams contains elevated levels of arsenic (>80 μg/L at a site on Crosswicks Creek) with arsenite generally the dominant species. Low dissolved oxygen, low or undetectable levels of nitrate and sulfate, detectable sulfide concentrations, and high concentrations of iron and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the groundwater indicate that reducing environments are present beneath the streambeds and that microbial activity, fueled by the DOC, is involved in releasing arsenic and iron from the geologic materials. In groundwater with the highest arsenic concentrations at Crosswicks Creek, arsenic respiratory reductase gene (arrA) indicated the presence of arsenic-reducing microbes. From extracted DNA, 16s rRNA gene sequences indicate the microbial community may include arsenic-reducing bacteria that have not yet been described. Once in the stream, iron is oxidized and precipitates as hydroxide coatings on the sediments. Arsenite also is oxidized and co-precipitates with or is sorbed to the iron hydroxides. Consequently, dissolved arsenic concentrations are lower in streamwater than in the groundwater, but the arsenic contributed by groundwater becomes part of the arsenic load in the stream when sediments are suspended during high flow. A strong positive relation between concentrations of arsenic and DOC in the groundwater samples indicates that any process—natural or anthropogenic—that increases the organic carbon concentration in the groundwater could stimulate microbial activity and thus increase the amount of arsenic that is released from the geologic materials.

  10. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  11. The effect of silicon on iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation in rice genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Zou, Qi; Xue, Sheng-Guo; Pan, Wei-Song; Huang, Liu; Hartley, William; Mo, Jing-Yu; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Rice is one of the major pathways of arsenic (As) exposure in human food chain, threatening over half of the global population. Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to examine the effects of Si application on iron (Fe) plaque formation, As uptake and rice grain As speciation in indica and hybrid rice genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL) ability. The results demonstrated that Si significantly increased root and grain biomass. Indica genotypes with higher ROL induced greater Fe plaque formation, compared to hybrid genotypes and sequestered more As in Fe plaque. Silicon applications significantly increased Fe concentrations in iron plaque of different genotypes, but it decreased As concentrations in the roots, straws and husks by 28-35%, 15-35% and 32-57% respectively. In addition, it significantly reduced DMA accumulation in rice grains but not inorganic As accumulation. Rice of indica genotypes with higher ROL accumulated lower concentrations of inorganic As in grains than hybrid genotypes with lower ROL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Arsenic Removal from Water by Adsorption on Iron-Contaminated Cryptocrystalline Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Yang, Lang; Song, Shaoxian; Xia, Ling

    This work aimed to study the feasibility of using iron-contaminated graphite as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was prepared by grinding graphite concentrate with steel ball. The study was performed through the measurements of adsorption capacity, BET surface area and XPS analysis. The experimental results showed that the iron-contaminated graphite exhibited significantly high adsorption capacity of As(V). The higher the iron contaminated on the graphite surface, the higher the adsorption capacity of As(V) on the material obtained. It was suggested that the ion-contaminated graphite was a good adsorbent for As(V) removal.

  13. Geochemistry of aquifer sediments and arsenic-rich groundwaters from Kandal Province, Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, Helen A.L.; Gault, Andrew G.; Lythgoe, Paul; Polya, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Elevated As is well known to be present in aquifers utilised for drinking water and irrigation in West Bengal and Bangladesh. This problem has also more recently been discovered in other parts of Asia, including Vietnam, Cambodia, Inner Mongolia and the Middle Ganges Plain. Analysis of groundwaters in Kandal Province of Cambodia found waters with comparable geochemistry to the As-rich groundwaters of the West Bengali Delta. Similarities included high but heterogeneous As distributions, predominantly in the form As(III), high Fe, moderate to high HCO 3 - , circumneutral pH, low SO 4 2- and geochemical components indicative of reducing conditions. Good positive correlations between As, Fe, HCO 3 - and NH 4 + , and dissolved organic C is consistent with As release predominantly via microbially mediated reductive dissolution of As bearing Fe(III) oxides. Further evidence for such a process is found from correlations between As, Fe and organic matter from analysis of aquifer sediments, by the presence of goethite in the finer fractions and from the association of As with amorphous, poorly crystalline and well crystallised hydrous Fe oxides. The presence of several high As, but low Fe, wells implies that microbes could have a more direct role in mediating As release via the direct utilisation of Fe(III) or As(V) as electron acceptors. The presence of elevated As in waters with short aquifer residence times (as indicated by their geochemical signature) highlights the possible vulnerability of these aquifers to the influx of surface derived waters, providing an additional source of labile organic C that could exacerbate As release by stimulating microbial activity

  14. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich melt in basalt petrogenesis documented in the Skaergaard intrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kløve; Veksler, Ilya; Tegner, Christian

    2005-01-01

    colored type contains 30.9 6 4.2 wt% FeOt and 40.7 6 3.6 wt% SiO2, whereas the light colored type contains 8.6 6 5.9 wt% FeOt and 65.6 6 7.3 wt% SiO2. Similar light colored melt inclusions in olivine and fine grained dark and light colored interstitial pockets also give evidence of crystallization from......Silicate liquid immiscibility in basalt petrogenesis is a contentious issue. Immiscible iron and silica-rich liquids were reported in melt inclusions of lunar basalt and in groundmass glasses of terrestrial volcanics. In fully crystallized plutonic rocks, however, silicate liquid immiscibility has...

  15. Copper-substituted, lithium rich iron phosphate as cathode material for lithium secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.B.; Cho, S.H.; Heo, J.B.; Aravindan, V.; Kim, H.S.; Lee, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-free, copper-doped, lithium rich iron phosphates, Li 1+x Fe 1-y Cu y PO 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15, 0 ≤ y ≤ 0.005), have been synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the optimization, the Li 1.05 Fe 0.997 Cu 0.003 PO 4 phase showed superior performances in terms of phase purity and high discharge capacity. The structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties were studied and compared to LiFePO 4 , Li 1.05 FePO 4 , LiFe 0.997 Cu 0.003 PO 4 , and materials. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted to ensure copper doping. Only smooth surface morphologies were observed for lithium rich iron phosphates, namely Li 1.05 FePO 4 and Li 1.05 Fe 0.997 Cu 0.003 PO 4 . The Li/Li 1.05 Fe 0.997 Cu 0.003 PO 4 cell delivered an initial discharge capacity of 145 mAh/g and was 18 mAh/g higher than the Li/LiFePO 4 cell without any carbon coating effect. Cyclic voltammetry revealed excellent reversibility of the Li 1.05 Fe 0.997 Cu 0.003 PO 4 material. High rate capability studies were also performed and showed a capacity retention over 95% during the cycling. We concluded that substituted Li and Cu ions play an important role in enhancing battery performance of the LiFePO 4 material through improving the kinetics of the lithium insertion/extraction reaction on the electrode.

  16. Diatoms in acid mine drainage and their role in the formation of iron-rich stromatolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Adverse conditions in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley mine, Indiana, limit diatom diversity to one species, Nitzschia tubicola. It is present in three distinct microbial consortia: Euglena mutabilis-dominated biofilm, diatom-dominated biofilm, and diatom-exclusive biofilm. E. mutabilis dominates the most extensive biofilm, with lesser numbers of N. tubicola, other eukaryotes, and bacteria. Diatom-dominated biofilm occurs as isolated patches containing N. tubicola with minor fungal hyphae, filamentous algae, E. mutabilis, and bacteria. Diatom-exclusive biofilm is rare, composed entirely of N. tubicola. Diatom distribution is influenced by seasonal and intraseasonal changes in water temperature and chemistry. Diatoms are absent in winter due to cool water temperatures. In summer, isolated patchy communities are present due to warmer water temperatures. In 2001, the diatom community expanded its distribution following a major rainfall that temporarily diluted the effluent, creating hospitable conditions for diatom growth. After several weeks when effluent returned to preexisting conditions, the diatom biofilm retreated to isolated patches, and E. mutabilis biofilm flourished. Iron-rich stromatolites underlie the biofilms and consist of distinct laminae, recording spatial and temporal oscillations in physicochemical conditions and microbial activity. The stromatolites are composed of thin, wavy laminae with partially decayed E. mutabilis biofilm, representing microbial activity and iron precipitation under normal AMD conditions. Alternating with the wavy layers are thicker, porous, spongelike laminae composed of iron precipitated on and incorporated into radiating colonies of diatoms. These layers indicate episodic changes in water chemistry, allowing diatoms to temporarily dominate the system.

  17. Transformation of arsenic-rich copper smelter flue dust in contrasting soils: A 2-year field experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarošíková, A.; Ettler, V.; Mihaljevič, M.; Penížek, V.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Culka, A.; Drahota, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 237, JUN (2018), s. 83-92 ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic * smelter dust * soil Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  18. THE ACCUMULATION AND RELEASE OF ARSENIC FROM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Iron based treatment technologies including iron removal and iron coagulation are effective at reducing arsenic in water because iron surfaces have a stron...

  19. Vacancy enhanced formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α - iron under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, G. C. [Basic Experimental Center of Natural Science, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Zhang, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, T6G2V4 (Canada); He, X. F.; Yang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413 (China); Su, Y. J., E-mail: yjsu@ustb.edu.cn [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we employed both molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulation methods to investigate the role of vacancies in the formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α-iron. The results indicated that vacancies promoted the diffusion of Cu atoms to form Cu-rich precipitates. After Cu-rich precipitates formed, they further trapped vacancies. The supersaturated vacancy concentration in the Cu-rich precipitate induced a shear strain, which triggered the phase transition from bcc to fcc structure by transforming the initial bcc (110) plane into fcc (111) plane. In addition, the formation of the fcc-twin structure and the stacking fault structure in the Cu-rich precipitates was observed in dynamics simulations.

  20. An arsenate-reducing and alkane-metabolizing novel bacterium, Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov., isolated from arsenic-rich groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Balaram; Sarkar, Angana; Joshi, Swati; Chatterjee, Atrayee; Kazy, Sufia Khannam; Maiti, Mrinal Kumar; Satyanarayana, Tulasi; Sar, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    A novel arsenic (As)-resistant, arsenate-respiring, alkane-metabolizing bacterium KAs 5-22 T , isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal was characterized by physiological and genomic properties. Cells of strain KAs 5-22 T were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile, and facultative anaerobic. Growth occurred at optimum of pH 6.0-7.0, temperature 30 °C. 16S rRNA gene affiliated the strain KAs 5-22 T to the genus Rhizobium showing maximum similarity (98.4 %) with the type strain of Rhizobium naphthalenivorans TSY03b T followed by (98.0 % similarity) Rhizobium selenitireducens B1 T . The genomic G + C content was 59.4 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness with its closest phylogenetic neighbors was 50.2 %. Chemotaxonomy indicated UQ-10 as the major quinone; phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol as major polar lipids; C 16:0 , C 17:0 , 2-OH C 10:0 , 3-OH C 16:0 , and unresolved C 18:1 ɷ7C/ɷ9C as predominant fatty acids. The cells were found to reduce O 2 , As 5+ , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- and Fe 3+ as alternate electron acceptors. The strain's ability to metabolize dodecane or other alkanes as sole carbon source using As 5+ as terminal electron acceptor was supported by the presence of genes encoding benzyl succinate synthase (bssA like) and molybdopterin-binding site (mopB) of As 5+ respiratory reductase (arrA). Differential phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic as well as physiological properties revealed that the strain KAs 5-22 T is separated from its nearest recognized Rhizobium species. On the basis of the data presented, strain KAs 5-22 T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov. is proposed as type strain (=LMG 28795 T =MTCC 12115 T ).

  1. Transformation of arsenic-rich copper smelter flue dust in contrasting soils: A 2-year field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošíková, Alice; Ettler, Vojtěch; Mihaljevič, Martin; Penížek, Vít; Matoušek, Tomáš; Culka, Adam; Drahota, Petr

    2018-06-01

    Dust emissions from copper smelters processing arsenic-bearing ores represent a risk to soil environments due to the high levels of As and other inorganic contaminants. Using an in situ experiment in four different forest and grassland soils (pH 3.2-8.0) we studied the transformation of As-rich (>50 wt% As) copper smelter dust over 24 months. Double polyamide bags with 1 g of flue dust were buried at different depths in soil pits and in 6-month intervals; then those bags, surrounding soil columns, and soil pore waters were collected and analysed. Dust dissolution was relatively fast during the first 6 months (5-34%), and mass losses attained 52% after 24 months. The key driving forces affecting dust dissolution were not only pH, but also the water percolation/retention in individual soils. Primary arsenolite (As 2 O 3 ) dissolution was responsible for high As release from the dust (to 72%) and substantial increase of As in the soil (to a 56 × increase; to 1500 mg kg -1 ). Despite high arsenolite solubility, this phase persisted in the dust after 2 years of exposure. Mineralogical investigation indicated that mimetite [Pb 5 (AsO 4 ) 3 (Cl,OH)], unidentified complex Ca-Pb-Fe-Zn arsenates, and Fe oxyhydroxides partly controlled the mobility of As and other metal(loid)s. Compared to As, other less abundant contaminants (Bi, Cu, Pb, Sb, Zn) were released into the soil to a lesser extent (8-40% of total). The relatively high mobility of As in the soil can be seen from decreases of bulk As concentrations after spring snowmelt, high water-extractable fractions with up to ∼50% of As(III) in extracts, and high As concentrations in soil pore waters. Results indicate that efficient controls of emissions from copper smelters and flue dust disposal sites are needed to prevent extensive contamination of nearby soils by persistent As. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-15

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO(3))(2) was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0-24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO(3))(2). Anglesite (PbSO(4)) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9-17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO(3))(2) added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO(3))(2) addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0-48 mM KNO(3) demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO(3))(2) addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Water management impacts on arsenic speciation and iron-reducing bacteria in contrasting rice-rhizosphere compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Hollister, Emily B; Yan, Wengui; Gentry, Terry J; Loeppert, Richard H

    2011-10-01

    Rice cultivated on arsenic (As) contaminated-soils will accumulate variable grain-As concentrations, as impacted by varietal differences, soil variables, and crop management. A field-scale experiment was conducted to study the impact of intermittent and continuous flooding on As speciation and microbial populations in rice rhizosphere compartments of soils that were either historically amended with As pesticide or unamended with As. Rhizosphere-soil, root-plaque, pore-water and grain As were quantified and speciated, and microbial populations in rhizosphere soil and root-plaque were characterized. Total-As concentrations in rhizosphere and grain were significantly lower in intermittently flooded compared to the continuously flooded plots (86% lower in pore-water, 55% lower in root-plaque and 41% lower in grain samples). iAs(V), iAs(III), and DMAs(V) were the predominant As species detected in rhizosphere-soil and root-plaque, pore-water and grain samples, respectively. Relative proportions of Archaea and iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) were higher in rhizosphere soil compared to root-plaque. In rhizosphere soil, the relative abundance of FeRB was lower in intermittently flooded compared to continuously flooded plots, but there were no differences between root-plaque samples. This study has demonstrated that reductions in dissolved As concentrations in the rhizosphere and subsequent decreases in grain-As concentration can be attained through water management.

  4. Assessment of zerovalent iron for stabilization of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Ore, Solvita; Renella, Giancarlo; Mench, Michel; Lagerkvist, Anders; Maurice, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Stabilization of soil contaminated with trace elements is a remediation practice that does not reduce the total content of contaminants, but lowers the amounts of mobile and bioavailable fractions. This study evaluated the efficiency of Fe to reduce the mobility and bioavailability of Cr, Cu, As and Zn in a chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-contaminated soil using chemical, biochemical and biotoxicity tests. Contaminated soil was stabilized with 1% iron grit. This treatment decreased As and Cr concentrations in leachates (by 98% and 45%, respectively), in soil pore water (by 99% and 94%, respectively) and in plant shoots (by 84% and 95%, respectively). The stabilization technique also restored most of analyzed soil enzyme activities and reduced microbial toxicity, as evaluated by the BioTox TM test. After stabilization, exchangeable and bioaccessible fractions of Cu remained high, causing some residual toxicity in the treated soil. - Zerovalent iron effectively reduces mobility and bioavailability of As and Cr, but does not adequately stabilize Cu

  5. Very low sound velocities in iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O: Implications for the core-mantle boundary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, J.K.; Jackson, J.M.; Sturhahn, W.

    2010-01-01

    The sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O have been measured to 121 GPa at ambient temperature using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The effect of electronic environment of the iron sites on the sound velocities were tracked in situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. We found the sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O to be much lower than those in other presumed mantle phases at similar conditions, most notably at very high pressures. Conservative estimates of the effect of temperature and dilution on aggregate sound velocities show that only a small amount of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O can greatly reduce the average sound velocity of an assemblage. We propose that iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O be a source of ultra-low velocity zones. Other properties of this phase, such as enhanced density and dynamic stability, strongly support the presence of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O in localized patches above the core-mantle boundary.

  6. Arsenic contamination of groundwater and drinking water in Vietnam: a human health threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M; Tran, H C; Nguyen, T C; Pham, H V; Schertenleib, R; Giger, W

    2001-07-01

    This is the first publication on arsenic contamination of the Red River alluvial tract in the city of Hanoi and in the surrounding rural districts. Due to naturally occurring organic matter in the sediments, the groundwaters are anoxic and rich in iron. With an average arsenic concentration of 159 micrograms/L, the contamination levels varied from 1 to 3050 micrograms/L in rural groundwater samples from private small-scale tubewells. In a highly affected rural area, the groundwater used directly as drinking water had an average concentration of 430 micrograms/L. Analysis of raw groundwater pumped from the lower aquifer for the Hanoi water supply yielded arsenic levels of 240-320 micrograms/L in three of eight treatment plants and 37-82 micrograms/L in another five plants. Aeration and sand filtration that are applied in the treatment plants for iron removal lowered the arsenic concentrations to levels of 25-91 micrograms/L, but 50% remained above the Vietnamese Standard of 50 micrograms/L. Extracts of sediment samples from five bore cores showed a correlation of arsenic and iron contents (r2 = 0.700, n = 64). The arsenic in the sediments may be associated with iron oxyhydroxides and released to the groundwater by reductive dissolution of iron. Oxidation of sulfide phases could also release arsenic to the groundwater, but sulfur concentrations in sediments were below 1 mg/g. The high arsenic concentrations found in the tubewells (48% above 50 micrograms/L and 20% above 150 micrograms/L) indicate that several million people consuming untreated groundwater might be at a considerable risk of chronic arsenic poisoning.

  7. Interaction of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbionts with arsenic and other potentially toxic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2000-01-01

    The response of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbionts to arsenic, and arsenic interactions with phosphorus and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soils from a former arsenic mine, the Devon Great Consols, were investigated. The objective was to determine whether AM associations ameliorate arsenic toxicity in Plantago lanceolata and Agrostis capillaris, plants commonly found at abandoned mines. An exploratory investigation indicated the richness in biodiversity of AMF that colonised plants growing at the site. Arsenic was found at high concentrations and was strongly associated with copper and iron. P. lanceolata was always colonised by AMF, while colonisation of A. capillaris was variable. There was no evidence in the field of soil pH or PTEs influencing AMF colonisation and spore density. There was no strong correlation between arsenic content in plant and available arsenic, obtained through various extraction methods. Spore germination and infectivity in the mine soils were strongly influenced by the AMF genotype and to a lesser extent by the soil environment. P. lanceolata and A. capillaris root growth was inhibited at arsenic concentrations of ≥50 μg g -1 in agar. Bioavailability experiments using mine soils and Terra-Green TM (calcined attapulgite) spiked with sodium arsenate gave no evidence that AMF-colonised plants translocated less arsenic to the shoots. Plants accumulated more arsenic in their roots than in their shoots, whether they were colonised by AMF or not. The A. capillaris genotype used in the present study translocated less of both arsenic and phosphorus to its shoots than P. lanceolata. High available phosphorus in Terra-Green TM protected plants against arsenic toxicity, at -1 As. There was evidence for inhibition by arsenic in AMF colonisation of roots. For quantifying AMF extra radical hyphae contribution to arsenic transportation from growth medium to plant using a compartmented pot system, the use of low phosphorus medium and a longer

  8. Phase composition of iron-rich R-Fe-Si (R=Dy, Ho, Er) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, G.V.; Makarova, G.M.; Shcherbakova, E.V.; Belozerov, E.V.

    2005-01-01

    Phase composition is studied in iron-rich alloys of R-Fe-Si (R=Dy, Ho, Er). In the as-cast state R 2 (Fe, Si) 17 of type Th 2 Ni 17 and R(Fe, Si) 12 compounds are observed; in the alloys of rated composition of R(Fe 0.85 Si 0.15 ) 8.5 (R=Dy, Er) a compound R 2 (Fe, Si) 17 of Th 2 Zn 17 -type is revealed as well. The annealing at 1273 K results in formation of Dy 3 (Fe, Si) 29 and also the compounds with the presumed composition of Dy 4 (Fe, Si) 41 and Ho 4 (Fe, Si) 41 . As this takes place the alloys contain a transition structure as well that represents a set of small-sized areas with various type short-range order in mutual displacement of Fe-Fe(Si) dumpbell chains. The process of phase formation at 1273 K is faced with difficulties. Even the annealing for 1000 h does not result in the state of equilibrium [ru

  9. Removal of groundwater arsenic using a household filter with iron spikes and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, M; Garrido, S E; Esteller, M V; De la Paz, J S; Najera, C; Cortés, J

    2013-12-15

    Arsenic (As) in groundwater for domestic use poses a worldwide threat to public health, most notably in rural areas. The aims of this study were: first, determine groundwater composition in a mining area in central Mexico (Huautla); second, assess As exposure through human groundwater consumption and; third, develop and test a household filter to obtain drinking water for these rural communities. From the 17th century through the 1990s, mines in the area produced Ag-galena and sphalerite from volcanic rock. Groundwater flooded the mines when they were abandoned due to low silver prices. Local households now use the water to meet domestic needs. Water from the mines was found to have high As content (0.04-0.26 mg L(-1)) and Fe, Mn, Pb and Cd were also above Mexican drinking water standards and WHO guidelines. All the population in the Huautla community was exposed to the metalloid through water used in food preparation. The best As removal was obtained with a filter using oxidized commercial fiber (HCl 2N as oxidant). Concentrations in the effluent were below Mexican drinking water standards (0.025 mg As L(-1) water) during the 105-day (2520 h) filter operation, with a maximum As removal efficiency of 95.4%. The household filter was simple, low-cost and may be very attractive for As removal in rural areas in developing countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport of surface-modified iron nanoparticle in porous media and application to arsenic(III) remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, Sushil Raj; Nepal, Dhriti; Manning, Bruce; Choi, Heechul

    2007-01-01

    The surface-modified iron nanoparticles (S-INP) were synthesized, characterized and tested for the remediation of arsenite (As(III)), a well known toxic groundwater contaminant of concern. The S-INP material was fully dispersed in the aqueous phase with a particle size distribution of 2-10 nm estimated from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that an Fe(III) oxide surface film was present on S-INP in addition to the bulk zero-valent Fe 0 oxidation state. Transport of S-INP through porous media packed in 10 cm length column showed particle breakthroughs of 22.1, 47.4 and 60 pore volumes in glass beads, unbaked sand, and baked sand, respectively. Un-modified INP was immobile and aggregated on porous media surfaces in the column inlet area. Results using S-INP pretreated 10 cm sand-packed columns containing ∼2 g of S-INP showed that 100 % of As(III) was removed from influent solutions (flow rate 1.8 mL min -1 ) containing 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mg L -1 As(III) for 9, 7 and 4 days providing 23.3, 20.7 and 10.4 L of arsenic free water, respectively. In addition, it was found that 100% of As(III) in 0.5 mg/L solution (flow rate 1.8 mL min -1 ) was removed by S-INP pretreated 50 cm sand packed column containing 12 g of S-INP for more than 2.5 months providing 194.4 L of arsenic free water. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed S-INP had transformed to elongated, rod-like shaped corrosion product particles after reaction with As(III) in the presence of sand. These results suggest that S-INP has great potential to be used as a mobile, injectable reactive material for in-situ sandy groundwater aquifer treatment of As(III)

  11. Determination of trace amounts of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after iron matrix removal with extractant-contained resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuyu; Zhou Jianfeng; Wang Guoxin; Zhou Jinfan; Tao Guanhong

    2007-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was applied to the determination of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment. Samples were dissolved with hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The digest was passed through a column, which was packed with a polymer resin containing a neutral organophosphorus extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate. Iron was sorbed selectively on the resin and the analytes of interest passed through the column, allowing the effective separation of them from the iron matrix. Conditions of separation were optimized. The detection limits (3σ) in solution were 10, 40, 7 and 5 μg L -1 , and in pigment were 0.2, 0.8, 0.14 and 0.1 mg kg -1 for lead, arsenic, cobalt and nickel, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 95% to 107% when sample digests were spiked with 5 μg of the analytes of interest, and relative standard deviations (n = 6) were 1.5-17.6% for the determination of the spiked samples. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of these elements in high-purity iron oxide pigment samples

  12. Adsorptive removal of arsenic by novel iron/olivine composite: Insights into preparation and adsorption process by response surface methodology and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Partha S; Kattil, Krishna V; Yadav, Manoj K; Gupta, Ashok K

    2018-03-01

    Olivine, a low-cost natural material, impregnated with iron is introduced in the adsorptive removal of arsenic. A wet impregnation method and subsequent calcination were employed for the preparation of iron/olivine composite. The major preparation process parameter, viz., iron loading and calcination temperature were optimized through the response surface methodology coupled with a factorial design. A significant variation of adsorption capacity of arsenic (measured as total arsenic), i.e., 63.15 to 310.85 mg/kg for arsenite [As(III) T ] and 76.46 to 329.72 mg/kg for arsenate [As(V) T ] was observed, which exhibited the significant effect of the preparation process parameters on the adsorption potential. The iron loading delineated the optima at central points, whereas a monotonous decreasing trend of adsorption capacity for both the As(III) T and As(V) T was observed with the increasing calcination temperature. The variation of adsorption capacity with the increased iron loading is more at lower calcination temperature showing the interactive effect between the factors. The adsorbent prepared at the optimized condition of iron loading and calcination temperature, i.e., 10% and 200 °C, effectively removed the As(III) T and As(V) T by more than 96 and 99%, respectively. The material characterization of the adsorbent showed the formation of the iron compound in the olivine and increase in specific surface area to the tune of 10 multifold compared to the base material, which is conducive to the enhancement of the adsorption capacity. An artificial neural network was applied for the multivariate optimization of the adsorption process from the experimental data of the univariate optimization study and the optimized model showed low values of error functions and high R 2 values of more than 0.99 for As(III) T and As(V) T . The adsorption isotherm and kinetics followed Langmuir model and pseudo second order model, respectively demonstrating the chemisorption in this

  13. Iron(II)-Catalyzed Iron Atom Exchange and Mineralogical Changes in Iron-rich Organic Freshwater Flocs: An Iron Isotope Tracer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Byrne, James; Kappler, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-06-20

    In freshwater wetlands, organic flocs are often found enriched in trace metal(loid)s associated with poorly crystalline Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. Under reducing conditions, flocs may become exposed to aqueous Fe(II), triggering Fe(II)-catalyzed mineral transformations and trace metal(loid) release. In this study, pure ferrihydrite, a synthetic ferrihydrite-polygalacturonic acid coprecipitate (16.7 wt % C), and As- (1280 and 1230 mg/kg) and organic matter (OM)-rich (18.1 and 21.8 wt % C) freshwater flocs dominated by ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite were reacted with an isotopically enriched 57 Fe(II) solution (0.1 or 1.0 mM Fe(II)) at pH 5.5 and 7. Using a combination of wet chemistry, Fe isotope analysis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we followed the Fe atom exchange kinetics and secondary mineral formation over 1 week. When reacted with Fe(II) at pH 7, pure ferrihydrite exhibited rapid Fe atom exchange at both Fe(II) concentrations, reaching 76 and 89% atom exchange in experiments with 0.1 and 1 mM Fe(II), respectively. XAS data revealed that it transformed into goethite (21%) at the lower Fe(II) concentration and into lepidocrocite (73%) and goethite (27%) at the higher Fe(II) concentration. Despite smaller Fe mineral particles in the coprecipitate and flocs as compared to pure ferrihydrite (inferred from Mössbauer-derived blocking temperatures), these samples showed reduced Fe atom exchange (9-30% at pH 7) and inhibited secondary mineral formation. No release of As was recorded for Fe(II)-reacted flocs. Our findings indicate that carbohydrate-rich OM in flocs stabilizes poorly crystalline Fe minerals against Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation by surface-site blockage and/or organic Fe(II) complexation. This hinders the extent of Fe atom exchange at mineral surfaces and secondary mineral formation, which may consequently impair Fe(II)-activated trace metal(loid) release. Thus, under short

  14. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, G.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Furdin, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, G.; Ballinas, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH ZC , and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl 3 or FeCl 2 at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  15. Stability of iron-rich magnesiowüstite in Earth's lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, K.; Fujino, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Shimizu, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    At ambient conditions, MgO periclase and FeO wüstite form a solid solution (Mg1-xFex)O, named ferropericlase (x ≤ 0.5) and magnesiowüstite (x > 0.5). (Mg1-xFex)O ferropericlase is considered to be a major component of Earth's lower mantle, and may play an important role for its structure and dynamics. Iron-rich magnesiowüstite also needs to be considered because of possible iron enrichment at the core-mantle boundary region [e.g., Nomura et al., 2011]. Recent laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments on FeO revealed that NaCl-type (B1) structured FeO underwent an insulator-metal transition at about 70 GPa and 1800 K without any structural transformation [Fischer et al., 2011; Ohta et al., 2012]. These results imply that the metallic B1 FeO would require a two-phase field for the MgO-FeO binary system due to different chemical bonding between insulating MgO and metallic FeO. We performed simultaneous electrical conductivity and x-ray diffraction measurements on (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O and (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O magnesiowüstite up to 140 GPa and 2100 K, and then examined recovered samples by using analytical transmission electron microprobe. We obtained some evidences for the dissociation of (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O into lighter and heavier phases than starting material occurring above 70 GPa and 1900 K, which is most likely due to the metallization of FeO component. On the other hand, we did not observe such dissociation and metallization in (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O. Observed dissociation in (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O might contribute to the heterogeneity in seismic wave and electrical conductivity at the Earth's core-mantle boundary region.

  16. THE EFFECT OF PH, PHOSPHATE AND OXIDANT ON THE REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER DURING IRON REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring drinking water contaminant that has known adverse human health effects. The recent compilation of new health effects data prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to recently reduce the previous arsenic maximum contaminant level ...

  17. Iron, Sulfur, Arsenic and Water: Geochemical Implications of Facultative Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Cyanobacteria and the Slow Rise of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Over geologic time, the global rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) is attributed to the evolution and wide spread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. Specifically, cyanobacteria can use a variety of alternative electron donors, rather than water, that are also readily oxidized. These may include sulfur, iron, and arsenic. Cyanobacteria are thus not uniquely constrained towards O2 production. Changes in the bioavailability of these key elements may have had dramatic consequences for and resulted in the slow accumulation of O2 in the atmosphere. In particular, by using facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis the cells maintain advantageous anaerobic conditions for N2-fixation. Although other types of bacteria are capable of N2-fixation, cyanobacteria singularly possess the dynamic capability of generating and surviving O2. These two processes "pull" the cells in opposite directions, metabolically speaking, around an aerobic-anaerobic continuum. Such a strategy also confers a distinct competitive advantage for cyanobacteria over photosynthetic eukaryotes, as they can endure widespread euxinia and maintain their cellular N quota. In an anoxic and/or sulfidic ocean, cyanobacteria would be expected to dominate over eukaryotic algae. Here we present Bayesian constructed phylogenetic distribution of specific genes and the metabolic role of key enzymes that form the basis of this hypothesis. We further suggest that the consequences of this proposed ecosystem structure altered the redox balance of the fluid Earth (atmosphere and oceans) and can help explain the observed long-term geochemical stasis and slow rates of eukaryotic diversification. We suggest that the underlying control for global oxygenation was a synergistic interplay between the evolution and elastic physiology of cyanobacteria as they impacted the redox state of early Earth.

  18. Manganese associated nanoparticles agglomerate of iron(III) oxide: synthesis, characterization and arsenic(III) sorption behavior with mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kaushik; Maity, Arjun; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2010-12-15

    Three samples of manganese associated hydrous iron(III) oxide (MNHFO), prepared by incinerating metal hydroxide precipitate at T (± 5)=90, 300 and 600°C, showed increase of crystalline nature in XRD patterns with decreasing As(III) removal percentages. TEM images showed the increase of crystallinity from sample-1 (MNHFO-1) to sample-3 (MNHFO-3). Dimensions (nm) of particles estimated were 5.0, 7.0 and 97.5. Optimization of pH indicated that MNHFO-1 could remove aqueous As(III) efficiently at pH between 3.0 and 7.0. Kinetic and equilibrium data of reactions under the experimental conditions described the pseudo-second order and the Langmuir isotherm equations very well, respectively. The Langmuir capacity (q(m)) estimated was 691.04 mmol kg(-1). The values of enthalpy, Gibb's free energy and entropy changes (ΔH(0)=+23.23 kJ mol(-1), ΔG(0)=-3.43 to -7.20 kJ mol(-1) at T=283-323K, ΔS(0)=+0.094 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)) suggested that the reaction was endothermic, spontaneous and took place with increasing entropy. The As(III) sorbed by MNHFO-1 underwent surface oxidation to As(V), and evidences appeared from the XPS and FTIR investigations. MNHFO-1 packed column (internal diameter: 1.0 cm, height: 3.7 cm) filtered 11.5 dm(3) groundwater (105 μg As dm(-3)) with reducing arsenic concentration to ≤ 10 μg dm(-3). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors influencing As(V) stabilization in the mine soils amended with iron-rich materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Juhee; Kim, Minhee; Kim, Yong-Seong; Nam, Seung Mo; Moon, Deok Hyun; Hyun, Seunghun

    2017-09-04

    Chemical stability of As(V) in amended mine-impacted soils was assessed according to functions of incubation period (0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 months), amendment dose (2.5 and 5%), and application timing (0 and 3rd month). Six soils contaminated with 26-209 mg kg -1 of As(V) were collected from two abandoned mine sites and were treated with two alkaline iron-rich materials (mine discharge sludge (MS) and steel-making slag (SS)). Seventeen to 23% of As(V) in soils was labile. After each designated time, As(V) stability was assessed by the labile fractions determined with sequential extraction procedures (F1-F5). Over 6 months, a reduction (26.9-70.4%) of the two labile fractions (F1 and F2) and a quantitative increase (7.4-29.9%) of As(V) in F3 were observed (r 2  = 0.956). Two recalcitrant fractions (F4 and F5) remained unchanged. Temporal change of As(V) stability in a sample was well described by the two-domain model (k fast , k slow , and F fast ). The stabilization (%) correlated well with the fast-stabilizing domain (F fast ), clay content (%), and Fe oxide content (mg kg -1 ), but correlated poorly with kinetic rate constants (k fast and k slow ). Until the 3rd month, the 2.5%-MS amended sample resulted in lower As(V) stabilization (25-40%) compared to the 5% sample (50-60%). However, the second 2.5% MS addition on the 2.5% sample upon the lapse of the 3rd month led to a substantial reduction (up to 38%) of labile As(V) fraction in the following 4th and 6th months. As a result, an additional 15-25% of As(V) stability was obtained when splitting the amendment dose into 3-month intervals. In conclusion, the As(V) stabilization by Fe-rich amendment is time-dependent and its efficacy can be improved by optimizing the amendment dose and its timing.

  20. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by in-situ stimulating biogenic precipitation of iron sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Ma, Teng; Liu, Yaqing; Su, Chunli; Zhu, Yapeng; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Severe health problems due to elevated arsenic (As) in groundwater have made it urgent to develop cost-effective technologies for As removal. This field experimental study tested the feasibility of in-situ As immobilization via As incorporation into newly formed biogenic Fe(II) sulfides in a typical As-affected strongly reducing aquifer at the central part of Datong Basin, China. After periodic supply of FeSO 4 into the aquifer for 25 d to stimulate microbial sulfate reduction, dissolved sulfide concentrations increased during the experiment, but the supplied Fe(II) reacted quickly with sulfide to form Fe(II)-sulfides existing majorly as mackinawite as well as a small amount of pyrite-like minerals in sediments, thereby restricting sulfide build-up in groundwater. After the completion of field experiment, groundwater As concentration decreased from an initial average value of 593 μg/L to 159 μg/L, with an overall As removal rate of 73%, and it further declined to 136 μg/L adding the removal rate up to 77% in 30 d after the experiment. The arsenite/As total ratio gradually increased over time, making arsenite to be the predominant species in groundwater residual As. The good correlations between dissolved Fe(II), sulfide and As concentrations, the increased abundance of As in newly-formed Fe sulfides as well as the reactive-transport modeling results all indicate that As could have been adsorbed onto and co-precipitated with Fe(II)-sulfide coatings once microbial sulfate reduction was stimulated after FeSO 4 supply. Under the strongly reducing conditions, sulfide may facilitate arsenate reduction into arsenite and promote As incorporation into pyrite or arsenopyrite. Therefore, the major mechanisms for the in-situ As-contaminated groundwater remediation can be As surface-adsorption on and co-precipitation with Fe(II) sulfides produced during the experimental period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  2. Moessbauer and XRD Comparative Study of Host Rock and Iron Rich Mineral Samples from Paz del Rio Iron Ore Mineral Mine in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Perez Alcazar, G. A.; Moreira, A. M.; Speziali, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study between the host rock and the iron rich mineral samples from the Paz del Rio iron ore mineral mine in Colombia was performed using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Diffraction results of the iron rich mineral sample show that goethite, hematite, quartz, kaolinite and siderite are the main phases, and that a small amount of illite is also present. By Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) the presence of all the above mentioned phases was detected except quartz as well as an additional presence of small amount of biotite. The goethite, which appears as four sextets with hyperfine fields of 33.5, 30.5, 27.5 and 18.5 T, respectively, is the majority phase. This result shows the different grades of formation of this oxyhydroxide. The Moessbauer spectrum of this sample at 80 K presents the same phases obtained at RT without any superparamagnetic effect. In this case the goethite appears as two sextets. Diffraction results of the host rock sample show a large amount of quartz and kaolinite and small amounts of illite and biotite, whereas by Moessbauer spectroscopy illite, kaolinite and biotite were detected.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T) isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats of a Himalayan hot water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Charu; Mahato, Nitish K; Rani, Pooja; Singh, Yogendra; Kamra, Komal; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T), a non-motile, aerobic and coccoid strain was isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats (temperature ~45 °C) of a hot water spring located atop the Himalayan ranges at Manikaran, India. The present study reports the first genome sequence of type strain CT6(T) of genus Lampropedia cohaerens. Sequencing data was generated using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and assembled with ABySS v 1.3.5. The 3,158,922 bp genome was assembled into 41 contigs with a mean GC content of 63.5 % and 2823 coding sequences. Strain CT6(T) was found to harbour genes involved in both the Entner-Duodoroff pathway and non-phosphorylated ED pathway. Strain CT6(T) also contained genes responsible for imparting resistance to arsenic, copper, cobalt, zinc, cadmium and magnesium, providing survival advantages at a thermal location. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with biofilm formation, pyrroloquinoline-quinone production, isoquinoline degradation and mineral phosphate solubilisation in the genome demonstrate the diverse genetic potential for survival at stressed niches.

  4. Fate of As(V)-treated nano zero-valent iron: determination of arsenic desorption potential under varying environmental conditions by phosphate extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Guan, Xiaohong; Lo, Irene M C

    2012-09-01

    Nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) offers a promising approach for arsenic remediation, but the spent NZVI with elevated arsenic content could arouse safety concerns. This study investigated the fate of As(V)-treated NZVI (As-NZVI), by examining the desorption potential of As under varying conditions. The desorption kinetics of As from As-NZVI as induced by phosphate was well described by a biphasic rate model. The effects of As(V)/NZVI mass ratio, pH, and aging time on arsenic desorption from As-NZVI by phosphate were investigated. Less arsenic desorption was observed at lower pH or higher As(V)/NZVI mass ratio, where stronger complexes (bidentate) formed between As(V) and NZVI corrosion products as indicated by FTIR analysis. Compared with the fresh As-NZVI, the amount of phosphate-extractable As significantly decreased in As-NZVI aged for 30 or 60 days. The results of the sequential extraction experiments demonstrated that a larger fraction of As was sorbed in the crystalline phases after aging, making it less susceptible to phosphate displacement. However, at pH 9, a slightly higher proportion of phosphate-extractable As was observed in the 60-day sample than in the 30-day sample. XPS results revealed the transformation of As(V) to more easily desorbed As(III) during aging and a higher As(III)/As(V) ratio in the 60-day sample at pH 9, which might have resulted in the higher desorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Anne Marie, E-mail: Anne.M.Cooper@asu.edu [Environmental Technology, College of Technology and Innovation. Arizona State University - Polytechnic Campus, 6075 South Williams Campus Loop West, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Hristovski, Kiril D., E-mail: Kiril.Hristovski@asu.edu [Environmental Technology, College of Technology and Innovation, Arizona State University - Polytechnic Campus, 6073 South Backus Mall, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Moeller, Teresia, E-mail: tmoller@solmetex.com [SolmeteX - Division of Layne Christiansen, 50 Bearfoot Road, Northborough, MA 01532 (United States); Westerhoff, Paul, E-mail: p.westerhoff@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Box 5306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 (United States); Sylvester, Paul, E-mail: psylvester@solmetex.com [SolmeteX - Division of Layne Christiansen, 50 Bearfoot Road, Northborough, MA 01532 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove {approx}6.3 L g{sup -1} dry media and {approx}4 L g{sup -1} dry media of water contaminated with 30 {mu}g L{sup -1} TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only {approx}0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and {approx}2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant.

  6. Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of Arsenic(III) at Platinum-Iron(III) Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Nanotube on Glassy Carbon Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Hyun; Hong, Hun Gi

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical detection of As(III) was investigated on a platinum-iron(III) nanoparticles modified multiwalled carbon nanotube on glassy carbon electrode(nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE) in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 . The nanoPt-Fe(III)/ MWCNT/GCE was prepared via continuous potential cycling in the range from .0.8 to 0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), in 0.1 M KCl solution containing 0.9 mM K 2 PtCl 6 and 0.6 mM FeCl 3 . The Pt nanoparticles and iron oxide were co-electrodeposited into the MWCNT-Nafion composite film on GCE. The resulting electrode was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). For the detection of As(III), the nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE showed low detection limit of 10 nM (0.75 ppb) and high sensitivity of 4.76 μAμM -1 , while the World Health Organization's guideline value of arsenic for drinking water is 10 ppb. It is worth to note that the electrode presents no interference from copper ion, which is the most serious interfering species in arsenic detection

  7. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Anne Marie; Hristovski, Kiril D.; Moeller, Teresia; Westerhoff, Paul; Sylvester, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g -1 dry media and ∼4 L g -1 dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L -1 TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant.

  8. Arsenic mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under iron compound amendments at different growth stages of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Wang, Xiangqin; Li, Fangbai; Li, Bin; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe)-based solids can reduce arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability in soils, which has been well recognized. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies on As uptake at different growth stages of rice under Fe compound amendments. In addition, the formation of Fe plaques at different growth stages of rice has also been rarely reported. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate As mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under Fe compound amendments throughout the whole growth stage of rice plants. Amendments of poorly crystalline Fe oxides (PC-Fe), FeCl 2 +NaNO 3 and FeCl 2 reduced grain As by 54% ± 3.0%, 52% ± 3.0% and 46% ± 17%, respectively, compared with that of the non-amended control. The filling stage was suggested to be the key stage to take measures to reduce As uptake. At this stage, all soil amendments significantly reduced As accumulation in rice plants. At the maturation stage, PC-Fe amendment significantly reduced mobile pools and increased immobile pools of soil As. Besides, PC-Fe treatment promoted the transformation of Fe fractions from dissolved Fe to adsorbed, poorly crystalline and free Fe oxides. Moreover, significant positive correlations between soil Fe fractions and As fractions were found. Accordingly, we hypothesized that Fe compound amendments might affect the concentration distribution of Fe fractions first and then affect As fractionation in soil and its bioavailability to rice plants indirectly. The formation of Fe plaques varied with growth stages and different treatments. Significantly negative correlations between mobile pools of As and Fe or As in Fe plaques indicated that Fe plaques could immobilize mobile As in soils and thus affect As bioavailability. Overall, the effect of the soil amendments on reduction of As uptake varied with growth stages and different treatments, and further research on the key stage for reducing As uptake is still required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Arsenic levels in the soils and macrophytes of the 'Entremuros' after the Aznalcollar mine spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, M.A.; Carlisle, M.; Pain, D.J.; Williams, R.; Green, D.; Osborn, D.; Meharg, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    In April 1998, a holding lagoon containing pyrite ore processing waste rich in arsenic, failed and released 5-6 million m 3 of highly polluting sludge and acidic water. Over 2700 ha of the internationally important Don-tilde ana National and Natural Parks were contaminated. The area of Natural Park to sustain the greatest impact was known as the Entremuros. This paper presents 0-5 cm soil monitoring data from the Entremuros, from sampling campaigns 6 and 18 months after the disaster; as well as macrophyte root, rhizome and stem data from samples taken 18 months after the spill. Results show a clear, decreasing, north-south arsenic soil pollution trend, both 6 and 18 months after the spill, and suggest a small reduction in total soil arsenic levels occurred over time; although a significant increase in extractable arsenic is also noted. The two macrophytes (Typha dominguensis and Scirpus maritimus) studied herein are not accumulating arsenic in stem parts, however, accumulation of arsenic on iron plaque on the roots of these plants may be occurring. Further work is recommended in order to determine the ecotoxicological significance of this process in relation to the avian food-chains of Don-tilde ana, and elsewhere. - Capsule: Arsenic associated with iron plaque on macrophyte roots may pose an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores

  10. Groundwater arsenic contamination affecting different geologic domains in India--a review: influence of geological setting, fluvial geomorphology and Quaternary stratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Subhrangsu K; Shah, Babar A

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater is pervasive within lowland organic-rich Bengal Delta and narrow entrenched channels in the Middle Ganga floodplains. Local areas of Damodar fan-delta and isolated areas within the Dongargarh Proterozoic rift-zone in central India are also contaminated. In this rift-zone, arsenic is enriched in felsic magmatic rocks and weathered rocks and soils from local areas are enriched further in arsenic and iron. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, geomorphology and sedimentation have influenced groundwater arsenic contamination in alluvium that aggraded during the Holocene sea-level rise. No specific source of arsenic could be identified, although Himalaya is the main provenance for the Ganga floodplain and the Bengal Delta. Gondwana coal seams and other Peninsular Indian rocks might be sources for arsenic in the Damodar fan-delta. As-bearing pyrite or any As-mineral is nearly absent in the aquifer sediments. Arsenic mainly occurs adsorbed on hydrated-iron-oxide (HFO), which coat sediment grains and minerals. Arsenic and iron are released to groundwater by bio-mediated reductive dissolution of HFO with corresponding oxidation of organic matter.

  11. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  12. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  13. Enhanced Column Filtration for Arsenic Removal from Water: Polymer-Templated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Immobilized on Sand via Layer-by-Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Calvin Chia-Hung

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in water sources around the world and is highly toxic. While precipitation and membrane filtration techniques are successfully implemented in developed cities, they are unsuitable for rural and low-resource settings lacking centralized facilities. This thesis presents the use of ultra-small iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles functionalized on sand granules for use as a house-hold scale adsorption filter. Water-stable alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanoparticles (arsenic adsorption, with 147 +/- 2 mg As(III) per g Fe2O3 and 91 +/- 10 mg As(V) per g Fe2O3. The platform was also used to synthesize iron-based composites, including magnetite (Fe 3O4) and Fe-Cu oxide nanoparticles. For use as a column filter, Fe2O3-PAA nanoparticles were functionalized on sand granules using a layer-by-layer deposition method, with the nanoparticles embedded in the negative layer. The removal of As(III) by the Fe2O 3-PAA functionalized column was described by reversible 1st order kinetics where the forward and reverse rate constants were 0.31 hr -1 and 0.097 hr-1, respectively. Implemented as a passive water filter with 30 x 30 x 50 cm3 dimensions, the filter has an expected lifetime in the order of many years. By controlling the flow rate of the column depending on contamination levels, the filter effectively removes arsenic down to the safety limit of 0.01 mg/L. In a parallel project, the layer-by-layer deposition of Poly(diallydimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 5-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) was exploited for a highly practical synthesis of discrete gradient surfaces. By independently controlling the concentration of NaCl in PDDA and PSS deposition solutions, a 2-dimensional matrix of surfaces was created in 96-well microtiter plates. Distinct non-monotonic dye adsorption patterns on the gradient surfaces was observed. Practical knowledge from this project was also used to enhance the nanoparticle surface functionalization described above. In all, a practical

  14. Biogeochemistry of an iron-rich hypersaline microbial mat (Camargue, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, A; Zopfi, J; Benthien, M; Kühl, M

    2005-01-01

    In situ microsensor measurements were combined with biogeochemical methods to determine oxygen, sulfur, and carbon cycling in microbial mats growing in a solar saltern (Salin-de-Giraud, France). Sulfate reduction rates closely followed the daily temperature changes and were highest during the day at 25 degrees C and lowest during the night at 11 degrees C, most probably fueled by direct substrate interactions between cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate reduction was the major mineralization process during the night and the contribution of aerobic respiration to nighttime DIC production decreased. This decrease of aerobic respiration led to an increasing contribution of sulfide (and iron) oxidation to nighttime O2 consumption. A peak of elemental sulfur in a layer of high sulfate reduction at low sulfide concentration underneath the oxic zone indicated anoxygenic photosynthesis and/or sulfide oxidation by iron, which strongly contributed to sulfide consumption. We found a significant internal carbon cycling in the mat, and sulfate reduction directly supplied DIC for photosynthesis. The mats were characterized by a high iron content of 56 micromol Fe cm(-3), and iron cycling strongly controlled the sulfur cycle in the mat. This included sulfide precipitation resulting in high FeS contents with depth, and reactions of iron oxides with sulfide, especially after sunset, leading to a pronounced gap between oxygen and sulfide gradients and an unusual persistence of a pH peak in the uppermost mat layer until midnight.

  15. The extent of arsenic and of metal uptake by aboveground tissues of Pteris vittata and Cyperus involucratus growing in copper- and cobalt-rich tailings of the Zambian copperbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kříbek, Bohdan; Mihaljevič, Martin; Sracek, Ondra; Knésl, Ilja; Ettler, Vojtěch; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2011-08-01

    The extent of arsenic (As) and metal accumulation in fronds of the As hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) and in leaves of Cyperus involucratus, which grow on the surface of an old flotation tailings pond in the Zambian Copperbelt province, was studied. The tailings consist of two types of material with distinct chemical composition: (1) reddish-brown tailings rich in As, iron (Fe), and other metals, and (2) grey-green tailings with a lower content of As, Fe, and other metals, apart from manganese (Mn). P. vittata accumulates from 2350 to 5018 μg g(-1) As (total dry weight [dw]) in its fronds regardless of different total and plant-available As concentrations in both types of tailings. Concentrations of As in C. involucratus leaves are much lower (0.24-30.3 μg g(-1) dw). Contents of copper (Cu) and cobalt (Co) in fronds of P. vittata (151-237 and 18-38 μg g(-1) dw, respectively) and in leaves of C. involucratus (96-151 and 9-14 μg g(-1) dw, respectively) are high, whereas concentrations of other metals (Fe, Mn, and zinc [Zn]) are low and comparable with contents of the given metals in common plants. Despite great differences in metal concentrations in the two types of deposited materials, concentrations of most metals in plant tissues are very similar. This indicates an exclusion or avoidance mechanism operating when concentrations of the metals in substrate are particularly high. The results of the investigation show that Chinese brake fern is not only a hyperaccumulator of As but has adapted itself to high concentrations of Cu and Co in flotation tailings of the Zambian Copperbelt.

  16. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in Two Arsenic-Impacted Aquifers in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin T. Gnanaprakasam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-term exposure to trace levels of arsenic (As in shallow groundwater used for drinking and irrigation puts millions of people at risk of chronic disease. Although microbial processes are implicated in mobilizing arsenic from aquifer sediments into groundwater, the precise mechanism remains ambiguous. The goal of this work was to target, for the first time, a comprehensive suite of state-of-the-art molecular techniques in order to better constrain the relationship between indigenous microbial communities and the iron and arsenic mineral phases present in sediments at two well-characterized arsenic-impacted aquifers in Bangladesh. At both sites, arsenate [As(V] was the major species of As present in sediments at depths with low aqueous As concentrations, while most sediment As was arsenite [As(III] at depths with elevated aqueous As concentrations. This is consistent with a role for the microbial As(V reduction in mobilizing arsenic. 16S rRNA gene analysis indicates that the arsenic-rich sediments were colonized by diverse bacterial communities implicated in both dissimilatory Fe(III and As(V reduction, while the correlation analyses involved phylogenetic groups not normally associated with As mobilization. Findings suggest that direct As redox transformations are central to arsenic fate and transport and that there is a residual reactive pool of both As(V and Fe(III in deeper sediments that could be released by microbial respiration in response to hydrologic perturbation, such as increased groundwater pumping that introduces reactive organic carbon to depth.

  17. Four-branched compounds coupled Si and iron-rich intermetallics in near eutectic Al-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuying; Liu, Xiangfa; Jiang, Binggang; Bian, Xiufang

    2007-01-01

    Many four-branched compounds coupled Si and iron-rich intermetallics were observed in near eutectic Al-Si alloy modified with Al-P master alloy. Such four-branched compounds have never been reported before, but in our case it seems to be commonly observed. In this work the growth characterization of the four-branched compounds are scrutinized with a JXA-8800 electron microprobe (EPMA). More deep study of the formation of four-branched compounds is performed by SEM and TEM analysis. The characterization of the four-branched compounds is that of a primary silicon in the center with four iron-rich intermetallics around. Experimental results also show that the precipitation of primary silicon is the key factor for the formation of four-branched compounds. And WHS-theory explains the growth mechanism of the four-branched compounds. In detail, subsequent twinning within the primary silicon provides four-fold coordination sites on the surface, and then the α-Al(Fe,Mn)-Si phase nucleates on the surface of the primary silicon

  18. Search for trans-iron elements in hot, helium-rich white dwarfs with the HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, D.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.

    2018-04-01

    The metal abundances in the atmospheres of hot white dwarfs (WDs) entering the cooling sequence are determined by the preceding Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolutionary phase and, subsequently, by the onset of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. In this paper, we investigate three hot He-rich WDs, which are believed to result from a late He-shell flash. During such a flash, the He-rich intershell matter is dredged up and dominates the surface chemistry. Hence, in contrast to the usual H-rich WDs, their spectra allow direct access to s-process element abundances in the intershell that were synthesized during the AGB stage. In order to look for trans-iron group elements (atomic number Z > 29), we performed a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmosphere analysis of new ultraviolet spectra taken with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. One of our program stars is of PG 1159 spectral type; this star, PG 1707+427, has effective temperature Teff = 85 000 K, and surface gravity logg = 7.5. The two other stars are DO white dwarfs: WD 0111+002 has Teff = 58 000 K and log g = 7.7, and PG 0109+111 has Teff = 70 000 K and log g = 8.0. These stars trace the onset of element diffusion during early WD evolution. While zinc is the only trans-iron element we could detect in the PG 1159 star, both DOs exhibit lines from Zn, Ga, Ge, Se; one additionally exhibits lines from Sr, Sn, Te, and I and the other from As. Generally, the trans-iron elements are very abundant in the DOs, meaning that radiative levitation must be acting. Most extreme is the almost six orders of magnitude oversolar abundance of tellurium in PG 0109+111. In terms of mass fraction, it is the most abundant metal in the atmosphere. The two DOs join the hitherto unique hot DO RE 0503-289, in which 14 trans-iron elements had even been identified. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which

  19. Matrix effects for calcium and potassium K-X-rays, in fenugreek plants grown in iron rich soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep, Kanan; Rao, Preeti; Bansal, Himani; Mittal, Raj

    2014-01-01

    The present work comprises the matrix effects study of the plant system (plant and soil) for macronutrients Ca and K with elevated levels of iron in the soil. The earlier derived matrix effect terms from fundamental relations of intensities of analyte and substrate elements with basic atomic and experimental setup parameters had led to iterative determination of enhanced elements rather than avoiding their enhancement. The relations also facilitated the evaluations of absorption for close Z interfering constituents (like Ca and K) in samples of a lot of particular category with interpolation of matrix terms with elemental amounts. The process has already been employed successfully for potato, radish, rice and maize plants. On similar lines, the observed prominent change in interpolation parameters for the plants in the present experiment serves as a tool to check the toxicity/contamination of the growing medium. - Highlights: • Matrix effects for Ca and K in Fenugreek plant and its soil with elevated iron level. • Fenugreek plants grown in iron rich soil and treated with K/Ca fertilizers. • The matrix terms correlated to analyte and enhancer element amounts. • Interpolation of matrix terms with elemental amounts points to Fe toxicity of soil

  20. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  2. Performance of a Zerovalent Iron Reactive Barrier for the Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater: Part 1. Hydrogeochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developments and improvements of remedial technologies are needed to effectively manage arsenic contamination in groundwater at hazardous waste sites. In June 2005, a 9.1 m long, 14 m deep, and 1.8 to 2.4 m wide (in the direction of groundwater flow) pilot-scale permeable reacti...

  3. Biogenic Fe(III) minerals lower the efficiency of iron-mineral based commercial filter systems for arsenic removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Susanne; Muehe, Eva M.; Posth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are affected by As (arsenic) contaminated groundwater. Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides sorb As efficiently and are therefore used in water purification filters. Commercial filters containing abiogenic Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides (GEH) showed varying As removal, and it was unclear...

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Climax, MN site. The objectives of the project are to evaluate (1) the effectiveness of Kinetico’s Macrolite®...

  5. Beneficial use of industrial by-products for phytoremediation of an arsenic-rich soil from a gold mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, G; Ferreira, P A A; Pereira, F G; Curi, N; Rangel, W M; Guilherme, L R G

    2016-08-02

    This study investigated two industrial by-products - red mud (RM) and its mixture with phosphogypsum (RMG), as amendments in an As((5+))-contaminated soil from a gold mining area in Brazil in order to grow three plant species: Brachiaria decumbens, Crotalaria spectabilis, and Stylosanthes cv. Campo Grande. These amendments were applied to reach a soil pH of 6.0. Using RM and RMG increased shoot dry matter (SDM) and root dry matter (RDM) of most plants, with RMG being more effective. Adding RMG increased the SDM of Brachiaria and Crotalaria by 18 and 25% and the RDM by 25 and 12%, respectively. Stylosanthes was sensitive to As toxicity and grew poorly in all treatments. Arsenic concentration in shoots of Brachiaria and Crotalaria decreased by 26% with the use of RMG while As in roots reduced by 11 and 30%, respectively. Also, the activities of the plant oxidative stress enzymes varied following treatments with the by-products. The plants grew in the As-contaminated soil from the gold mining area. Thus, they might be employed for phytoremediation purposes, especially with the use of RMG due to its potential advantage in terms of nutrient supply (Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) from phosphogypsum).

  6. Arsenic in groundwater of Licking County, Ohio, 2012—Occurrence and relation to hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-02-23

    (2) deeper open intervals, relative to the water level.The spatial distribution of arsenic concentrations was compared to hydrogeologic characteristics of Licking County. Elevated concentrations of arsenic (and iron) were associated with areas of flat topography and thick (greater than 100 feet),clay-rich glacial deposits. These characteristics are conducive to development of strongly reducing redox conditions, which can cause arsenic associated with iron oxyhydroxides in the aquifer matrix to be released to the groundwater.Hydrogeologic characteristics conducive to the development of strongly reducing groundwater are relatively wide-spread in the western part of Licking County, which is part of the Central Lowland physiographic province. In this area, a thick layer of clay-rich glacial deposits obscures the bedrock surface and creates flat to gently rolling landscape with poorly developed drainage networks. In the eastern part of the county, which is part of the Appalachian Plateaus physiographic province, the landscape includes steep-sided valleys and bedrock uplands. In this area, elevated arsenic concentrations were detected in buried valleys but not in the bedrock uplands, where glacial deposits are thin or absent. The observation that elevated concentrations of arsenic (and iron) were more prevalent in the western part of Licking County is true for both glacial and bedrock aquifers.In Licking County, thick, clay-rich glacial deposits (and elevated concentrations of arsenic) are associated with two hydrogeologic settings—buried valley and complex thick drift. Most wells in the buried-valley setting had low arsenic concentrations, but a few samples had very high concentrations (30–44 µg/L) and very reducing redox conditions (methanogenic and near-methanogenic). For wells in the complex-thick-drift setting, elevated arsenic concentrations are more prevalent, but the maximum concentration was lower (about 21 µg/L). Similar observations were made about arsenic

  7. Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic bacterium isolated from an arsenic-rich shallow marine hydrothermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Antje; Islam, Shaer; Savalia, Pratixa; Amend, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment cultures inoculated with hydrothermally influenced nearshore sediment from Papua New Guinea led to the isolation of an arsenic-tolerant, acidophilic, facultatively aerobic bacterial strain designated PNG-April(T). Cells of this strain were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile and did not form spores. Strain PNG-April(T) grew at temperatures between 4 °C and 40 °C (optimum 30-37 °C), at pH 3.5 to 8.3 (optimum pH 5-6) and in the presence of up to 2.7% NaCl (optimum 0-1.0%). Both arsenate and arsenite were tolerated up to concentrations of at least 0.5 mM. Metabolism in strain PNG-April(T) was strictly respiratory. Heterotrophic growth occurred with O2 or nitrate as electron acceptors, and aerobic lithoautotrophic growth was observed with thiosulfate or nitrite as electron donors. The novel isolate was capable of N2-fixation. The respiratory quinones were Q-8 and Q-7. Phylogenetically, strain PNG-April(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia and shares the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of Burkholderia fungorum (99.8%), Burkholderia phytofirmans (98.8%), Burkholderia caledonica (98.4%) and Burkholderia sediminicola (98.4%). Differences from these related species in several physiological characteristics (lipid composition, carbohydrate utilization, enzyme profiles) and DNA-DNA hybridization suggested the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which we propose the name Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov. The type strain is PNG-April(T) ( = DSM 28142(T) = LMG 28183(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  8. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  9. Arsenic levels in the soils and macrophytes of the 'Entremuros' after the Aznalcollar mine spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mark.taggart@abdn.ac.uk; Carlisle, M. [Department of Geography and Environment, University of Aberdeen, Elphinstone Road, Aberdeen AB24 3UF (United Kingdom); Pain, D.J. [RSPB, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL (United Kingdom); Williams, R. [RSPB, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL (United Kingdom); Green, D. [Department of Geography and Environment, University of Aberdeen, Elphinstone Road, Aberdeen AB24 3UF (United Kingdom); Osborn, D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom); Meharg, A.A. [Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    In April 1998, a holding lagoon containing pyrite ore processing waste rich in arsenic, failed and released 5-6 million m{sup 3} of highly polluting sludge and acidic water. Over 2700 ha of the internationally important Don-tilde ana National and Natural Parks were contaminated. The area of Natural Park to sustain the greatest impact was known as the Entremuros. This paper presents 0-5 cm soil monitoring data from the Entremuros, from sampling campaigns 6 and 18 months after the disaster; as well as macrophyte root, rhizome and stem data from samples taken 18 months after the spill. Results show a clear, decreasing, north-south arsenic soil pollution trend, both 6 and 18 months after the spill, and suggest a small reduction in total soil arsenic levels occurred over time; although a significant increase in extractable arsenic is also noted. The two macrophytes (Typha dominguensis and Scirpus maritimus) studied herein are not accumulating arsenic in stem parts, however, accumulation of arsenic on iron plaque on the roots of these plants may be occurring. Further work is recommended in order to determine the ecotoxicological significance of this process in relation to the avian food-chains of Don-tilde ana, and elsewhere. - Capsule: Arsenic associated with iron plaque on macrophyte roots may pose an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  10. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, Beth, E-mail: bethoshea@sandiego.edu [Department of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110 (United States); Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Stransky, Megan; Leitheiser, Sara [Department of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110 (United States); Brock, Patrick [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Marvinney, Robert G. [Maine Geological Survey, 93 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333 (United States); Zheng, Yan [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg{sup −1} for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg{sup −1}, median 12.1 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 38) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg{sup −1}, median 6.0 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 38). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.05) in the low grade phyllite rocks, and arsenic is detected up to 1944 mg kg{sup −1} in pyrite measured by electron microprobe. In contrast, statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlations between concentrations of As and S are absent in the calcareous meta-sediments of the Vassalboro Group, consistent with the absence of arsenic-rich pyrite in the protolith. Metamorphism converts the arsenic-rich pyrite to arsenic-poor pyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg{sup −1} As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water–rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. - Highlights: • Arsenic is enriched up to 138 mg kg

  11. Groundwater mixing at fracture intersections triggers massive iron-rich microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochet, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Bethencourt, L.; Aquilina, L.; Dufresne, A.; Pédrot, M.; Farasin, J.; Abbott, B. W.; Labasque, T.; Chatton, E.; Lavenant, N.; Petton, C.

    2017-12-01

    While most freshwater on Earth resides and flows in groundwater systems, these deep subsurface environments are often assumed to have little biogeochemical activity compared to surface environments. Here we report a massive microbial mat of iron-oxidizing bacteria, flourishing 60 meters below the surface, far below the mixing zone where most microbial activity is believed to occur. The abundance of microtubular structures in the mat hinted at the prevalence of of Leptothrix ochracea, but metagenomic analysis revealed a diverse consortium of iron-oxidizing bacteria dominated by unknown members of the Gallionellaceae family. This deep biogeochemical hot spot formed at the intersection of bedrock fractures, which maintain redox gradients by mixing water with different residence times and chemical compositions. Using measured fracture properties and hydrological conditions we developed a quantitative model to simulate the reactive zone where such deep hot spots could occur. While seasonal fluctuations are generally thought to decrease with depth, we found that meter-scale changes in water table level moved the depth of the reactive zone hundreds of meters because the microaerophilic threshold for ironoxidizers is highly sensitive to changes in mixing rates at fracture intersections. These results demonstrate that dynamic microbial communities can be sustained deep below the surface in bedrock fractures. Given the ubiquity of fractures at multiple scales in Earth's subsurface, such deep hot spots may strongly influence global biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Possible Links Among Iron Reduction, Silicate Weathering, and Arsenic Mobility in the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, D. M.; Lenz, R. M.; Jennings, J. E.; Gentry, M. L.; Vinson, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer (LMRAA) is a critical groundwater resource for Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Part of the aquifer in Louisiana contains waters rich in Na, HCO3, Fe, and As. We hypothesize that CO2 generated from dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) within the aquifer acts to weather Na-bearing silicates, contributing Na and HCO3, which may influence the mobility of As. We examined the geochemistry of the aquifer using historical and new data collected from the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ). Major and trace element data were collected from about 25 wells in the LMRAA in Louisiana every three years from 2001-2016. Samples collected in 2016 were additionally analyzed for water isotopes and the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Results suggest that groundwater in the LMRAA can be broken into two broad categories, (1) water with a molar Na/Cl ratio near 1 and/or high salinity, and (2) water with excess Na (i.e., the molar concentration of Na is greater than that of Cl) that is often higher in alkalinity (up to 616 mg/L as CaCO3), Fe (up to 21 mg/L), and sometimes As (up to 67 µg/L). Concentrations of dissolved Fe were found to correlate, at least weakly, with alkalinity and Na excess. Six of the approximately 25 wells historically sampled consistently had concentrations of As >10 µg/L. These locations generally correspond with groundwater characterized by higher Fe, alkalinity, and Na-excess. Initial results for δD and δ18O suggest that more isotopically depleted waters are sourced from the Mississippi River, whereas local precipitation recharges the aquifer farther from the river (δ18O ranged from -7.5‰ to -3.5‰). Part of the δ13C-DIC variation (-17.4‰ to -10.6‰) is consistent with pH modification (6.5-7.7) along differing horizontal and vertical flow paths in the aquifer. This geochemistry appears to be controlled in part by geology. Areas nearer to the current Mississippi River where

  13. Arsenic mobility in groundwater/surface water systems in carbonate-rich Pleistocene glacial drift aquifers (Michigan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szramek, Kathryn; Walter, Lynn M.; McCall, Patti

    2004-01-01

    Within the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, groundwaters from the Marshall Formation (Mississippian) contain As derived from As-rich pyrites, often exceeding the World Heath Organization drinking water limit of 10 μg/L. Many Michigan watersheds, established on top of Pleistocene glacial drift derived from erosion of the underlying Marshall Formation, also have waters with elevated As. The Huron River watershed in southeastern Lower Michigan is a well characterized hydrogeochemical system of glacial drift deposits, proximate to the Marshall Fm. subcrop, which hosts carbonate-rich groundwaters, streams, and wetlands (fens), and well-developed soil profiles. Aqueous and solid phase geochemistry was determined for soils, soil waters, surface waters (streams and fens) and groundwaters from glacial drift aquifers to better understand the hydrogeologic and chemical controls on As mobility. Soil profiles established on the glacial drift exhibit enrichment in both Fe and As in the oxyhydroxide-rich zone of accumulation. The amounts of Fe and As present as oxyhydroxides are comparable to those reported from bulk Marshall Fm. core samples by previous workers. However, the As host in core samples is largely unaltered pyrite and arsenopyrite. This suggests that the transformation of Fe sulfides to Fe oxyhydroxides largely retains As and Fe at the oxidative weathering site. Groundwaters have the highest As values of all the waters sampled, and many were at or above the World Health limit. Most groundwaters are anaerobic, within the zones of Fe 3+ and As(V) reduction. Although reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides is the probable source of As, there is no correlation between As and Fe concentrations. The As/Fe mole ratios in drift groundwaters are about an order of magnitude greater than those in soil profiles, suggesting that As is more mobile than Fe. This is consistent with the dominance of As(III) in these groundwaters and with the partitioning of Fe 2+ into carbonate cements. Soil

  14. Application of colloidal gas aphron suspensions produced from Sapindus mukorossi for arsenic removal from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Mukherjee, Sumona; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal gas aphron dispersions (CGAs) can be described as a system of microbubbles suspended homogenously in a liquid matrix. This work examines the performance of CGAs in comparison to surfactant solutions for washing low levels of arsenic from an iron rich soil. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and saponin, a biodegradable surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi or soapnut fruit were used for generating CGAs and solutions for soil washing. Column washing experiments were performed in down-flow and up flow modes at a soil pH of 5 and 6 using varying concentration of SDS and soapnut solutions as well as CGAs. Soapnut CGAs removed more than 70% arsenic while SDS CGAs removed up to 55% arsenic from the soil columns in the soil pH range of 5-6. CGAs and solutions showed comparable performances in all the cases. CGAs were more economical since it contains 35% of air by volume, thereby requiring less surfactant. Micellar solubilization and low pH of soapnut facilitated arsenic desorption from soil column. FT-IR analysis of effluent suggested that soapnut solution did not interact chemically with arsenic thereby facilitating the recovery of soapnut solution by precipitating the arsenic. Damage to soil was minimal arsenic confirmed by metal dissolution from soil surface and SEM micrograph. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Composition, structure, and properties of iron-rich nontronites of different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palchik, N. A., E-mail: nadezhda@igm.nsc.ru; Grigorieva, T. N.; Moroz, T. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    The composition, structure, and properties of smectites of different origins have been studied by X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microprobe analysis. The results showed that nontronites of different origins differ in composition, properties, morphology, and IR spectroscopic characteristics. Depending on the degree of structural order and the negative charge of iron-silicate layers in nontronites, the shift of the 001 reflection to smaller angles as a result of impregnation with ethylene glycol (this shift is characteristic of the smectite group) occurs differently. The calculated values of the parameter b (from 9.11 to 9.14A) are valid for the extreme terms of dioctahedral smectite representatives: nontronites.

  16. Reactivity of iron-rich phyllosilicates with uranium and chromium through redox transition zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, William D.

    2016-01-01

    This project performed thermodynamic, kinetic, and mineral structural studies on the reactivity of phyllosilicate Fe(II/III) with metal-reducing bacteria, and with two important poly-valent DOE contaminants (chromium and uranium) that show high mobility in their oxidized state. We focused on Fe-bearing phyllosilicates because these are important components of the reactive, fines fraction of Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho National Laboratory sediments. Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of Cr and U because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. This was a collaborative project between Penn State (W.D. Burgos - PI), Miami University (H. Dong - Co-PI), and Argonne National Laboratory (K. Kemner and M. Boyanov - Co-PIs). Penn State and Miami University were funded together but separately from ANL. This report summarizes research findings and publications produced by Penn State and Miami University.

  17. Reactivity of iron-rich phyllosilicates with uranium and chromium through redox transition zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, William D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This project performed thermodynamic, kinetic, and mineral structural studies on the reactivity of phyllosilicate Fe(II/III) with metal-reducing bacteria, and with two important poly-valent DOE contaminants (chromium and uranium) that show high mobility in their oxidized state. We focused on Fe-bearing phyllosilicates because these are important components of the reactive, fines fraction of Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho National Laboratory sediments. Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of Cr and U because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. This was a collaborative project between Penn State (W.D. Burgos – PI), Miami University (H. Dong – Co-PI), and Argonne National Laboratory (K. Kemner and M. Boyanov – Co-PIs). Penn State and Miami University were funded together but separately from ANL. This report summarizes research findings and publications produced by Penn State and Miami University.

  18. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Search for Hesperian Organic Matter on Mars: Pyrolysis Studies of Sediments Rich in Sulfur and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James M T; Najorka, Jens; Watson, Jonathan S; Sephton, Mark A

    2018-04-01

    Jarosite on Mars is of significant geological and astrobiological interest, as it forms in acidic aqueous conditions that are potentially habitable for acidophilic organisms. Jarosite can provide environmental context and may host organic matter. The most common extraction technique used to search for organic compounds on the surface of Mars is pyrolysis. However, thermal decomposition of jarosite releases oxygen into pyrolysis ovens, which degrades organic signals. Jarosite has a close association with the iron oxyhydroxide goethite in many depositional/diagenetic environments. Hematite can form by dehydration of goethite or directly from jarosite under certain aqueous conditions. Goethite and hematite are significantly more amenable than jarosite for pyrolysis experiments employed to search for organic matter. Analysis of the mineralogy and organic chemistry of samples from a natural acidic stream revealed a diverse response for organic compounds during pyrolysis of goethite-rich layers but a poor response for jarosite-rich or mixed jarosite-goethite samples. Goethite units that are associated with jarosite, but do not contain jarosite themselves, should be targeted for organic detection pyrolysis experiments on Mars. These findings are extremely timely, as exploration targets for Mars Science Laboratory include Vera Rubin Ridge (formerly known as "Hematite Ridge"), which may have formed from goethite precursors. Key Words: Mars-Pyrolysis-Jarosite-Goethite-Hematite-Biosignatures. Astrobiology 18, 454-464.

  20. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  1. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils

  2. Nanostructured iron(III)-copper(II) binary oxide: a novel adsorbent for enhanced arsenic removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaosheng; Ren, Zongming; Zhang, Xiwang; Chen, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To obtain a highly efficient and low-cost adsorbent for arsenic removal from water, a novel nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxide was synthesized via a facile co-precipitation method. Various techniques including BET surface area measurement, powder XRD, SEM, and XPS were used to characterize the synthetic Fe-Cu binary oxide. It showed that the oxide was poorly crystalline, 2-line ferrihydrite-like and was aggregated with many nanosized particles. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms, pH adsorption edge and regeneration of spent adsorbent. The results indicated that the Fe-Cu binary oxide with a Cu: Fe molar ratio of 1:2 had excellent performance in removing both As(V) and As(III) from water, and the maximal adsorption capacities for As(V) and As(III) were 82.7 and 122.3 mg/g at pH 7.0, respectively. The values are favorable, compared to those reported in the literature using other adsorbents. The coexisting sulfate and carbonate had no significant effect on arsenic removal. However, the presence of phosphate obviously inhibited the arsenic removal, especially at high concentrations. Moreover, the Fe-Cu binary oxide could be readily regenerated using NaOH solution and be repeatedly used. The Fe-Cu binary oxide could be a promising adsorbent for both As(V) and As(III) removal because of its excellent performance, facile and low-cost synthesis process, and easy regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphenol-rich apple (Malus domestica L.) peel extract attenuates arsenic trioxide induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 cells via its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineetha, Vadavanath Prabhakaran; Girija, Seetharaman; Soumya, Rema Sreenivasan; Raghu, Kozhiparambil Gopalan

    2014-03-01

    Evidences suggest that apple peel has a wide range of polyphenols having antioxidant activity and its consumption has been linked with improved health benefits. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a very effective drug for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) but it leads to cardiotoxicity mediated through alterations in various cardiac ion channels and by increasing the intracellular calcium level and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of methanolic extract of apple peel (APME) and aqueous extract of apple peel (APAE) on ATO (5 μM) induced toxicity in the H9c2 cardiac myoblast cell line. We estimated the cellular status of innate antioxidant enzymes, level of ROS, mitochondrial superoxide, glutathione and intracellular calcium with ATO and apple peel extracts. Prior to the cell line based study, we had evaluated the antioxidant potential of apple peel extract by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total reducing power (TRP), superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, in addition to quantifying total phenolic and flavonoid content. Both the extracts showed considerable antioxidant activity in cell-free chemical assays. In addition, both APME and APAE prevented the alteration in antioxidant status induced by ATO in H9c2 cells. Significant differential alterations had been observed in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase, xanthine oxidase, calcium overload and caspase 3 activity with ATO. The overall result revealed the protective property of polyphenol-rich apple peel extract against ATO induced cardiac toxicity via its antioxidant activity.

  4. Microcosm studies on iron and arsenic mobilization from aquifer sediments under different conditions of microbial activity and carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2009-05-01

    Microcosm experiments were conducted to understand the mechanism of microbially mediated mobilization of Fe and As from high arsenic aquifer sediments. Arsenic-resistant strains isolated from aquifer sediments of a borehole specifically drilled for this study at Datong basin were used as inoculated strains, and glucose and sodium acetate as carbon sources for the experiments. In abiotic control experiments, the maximum concentrations of Fe and As were only 0.47 mg/L and 0.9 μg/L, respectively. By contrast, the maximum contents of Fe and As in anaerobic microcosm experiments were much higher (up to 1.82 mg/L and 12.91 μg/L, respectively), indicating the crucial roles of microbial activities in Fe and As mobilization. The observed difference in Fe and As release with different carbon sources may be related to the difference in growth pattern and composition of microbial communities that develop in response to the type of carbon sources.

  5. Ferrous iron- and ammonium-rich diffuse vents support habitat-specific communities in a shallow hydrothermal field off the Basiluzzo Islet (Aeolian Volcanic Archipelago).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, G; Romeo, T; La Cono, V; La Spada, G; Smedile, F; Esposito, V; Sabatino, G; Di Bella, M; Canese, S; Scotti, G; Bo, M; Giuliano, L; Jones, D; Golyshin, P N; Yakimov, M M; Andaloro, F

    2017-09-01

    Ammonium- and Fe(II)-rich fluid flows, known from deep-sea hydrothermal systems, have been extensively studied in the last decades and are considered as sites with high microbial diversity and activity. Their shallow-submarine counterparts, despite their easier accessibility, have so far been under-investigated, and as a consequence, much less is known about microbial communities inhabiting these ecosystems. A field of shallow expulsion of hydrothermal fluids has been discovered at depths of 170-400 meters off the base of the Basiluzzo Islet (Aeolian Volcanic Archipelago, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea). This area consists predominantly of both actively diffusing and inactive 1-3 meters-high structures in the form of vertical pinnacles, steeples and mounds covered by a thick orange to brown crust deposits hosting rich benthic fauna. Integrated morphological, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses revealed that, above all, these crusts are formed by ferrihydrite-type Fe 3+ oxyhydroxides. Two cruises in 2013 allowed us to monitor and sampled this novel ecosystem, certainly interesting in terms of shallow-water iron-rich site. The main objective of this work was to characterize the composition of extant communities of iron microbial mats in relation to the environmental setting and the observed patterns of macrofaunal colonization. We demonstrated that iron-rich deposits contain complex and stratified microbial communities with a high proportion of prokaryotes akin to ammonium- and iron-oxidizing chemoautotrophs, belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, and Zetaproteobacteria. Colonizers of iron-rich mounds, while composed of the common macrobenthic grazers, predators, filter-feeders, and tube-dwellers with no representatives of vent endemic fauna, differed from the surrounding populations. Thus, it is very likely that reduced electron donors (Fe 2+ and NH 4 + ) are important energy sources in supporting primary production in microbial mats, which form a habitat

  6. Phosphate interference during in situ treatment for arsenic in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic is a problem in many areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh, where reducing conditions in groundwater are the cause. In situ treatment is a novel approach wherein, by introduction of dissolved oxygen (DO), advantages over other treatment methods can be achieved through simplicity, not using chemicals, and not requiring disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. A lab-scale test of in situ treatment by air sparging, using a solution with approximately 5.3 mg L(-1) ferrous iron and 200 μg L(-1) arsenate, showed removal of arsenate in the range of 59%. A significant obstacle exists, however, due to the interference of phosphate since phosphate competes for adsorption sites on oxidized iron precipitates. A lab-scale test including 0.5 mg L(-1) phosphate showed negligible removal of arsenate. In situ treatment by air sparging demonstrates considerable promise for removal of arsenic from groundwater where iron is present in considerable quantities and phosphates are low.

  7. Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavat François

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs are extreme environments characterized by very acid conditions and heavy metal contaminations. In these ecosystems, the bacterial diversity is considered to be low. Previous culture-independent approaches performed in the AMD of Carnoulès (France confirmed this low species richness. However, very little is known about the cultured bacteria in this ecosystem. The aims of the study were firstly to apply novel culture methods in order to access to the largest cultured bacterial diversity, and secondly to better define the robustness of the community for 3 important functions: As(III oxidation, cellulose degradation and cobalamine biosynthesis. Results Despite the oligotrophic and acidic conditions found in AMDs, the newly designed media covered a large range of nutrient concentrations and a pH range from 3.5 to 9.8, in order to target also non-acidophilic bacteria. These approaches generated 49 isolates representing 19 genera belonging to 4 different phyla. Importantly, overall diversity gained 16 extra genera never detected in Carnoulès. Among the 19 genera, 3 were previously uncultured, one of them being novel in databases. This strategy increased the overall diversity in the Carnoulès sediment by 70% when compared with previous culture-independent approaches, as specific phylogenetic groups (e.g. the subclass Actinobacteridae or the order Rhizobiales were only detected by culture. Cobalamin auxotrophy, cellulose degradation and As(III-oxidation are 3 crucial functions in this ecosystem, and a previous meta- and proteo-genomic work attributed each function to only one taxon. Here, we demonstrate that other members of this community can also assume these functions, thus increasing the overall community robustness. Conclusions This work highlights that bacterial diversity in AMDs is much higher than previously envisaged, thus pointing out that the AMD system is functionally more robust than expected

  8. Intermetallic phases in the iron-rich region of the Zr-Fe phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, M.S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales; Arias, D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    1996-04-01

    Intermetallic phases in the Fe-rich region of the Zr-Fe system are studied by X-ray diffraction and optical and electron microscopy. The chemical composition of each phase has been quantitatively measured in a electron microprobe. The stable phases found in this region are ZrFe{sub 2}, Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} and ({alpha}Fe). ZrFe{sub 2} is identified as a cubic Laves type phase (C15) and the ZrFe{sub 2}/ZrFe{sub 2}+Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} boundary composition is 73{+-}1 at.% Fe. Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} is a cubic phase of the Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type and its composition is 80.0{+-}1.5 at.% Fe. The eutectic L{r_reversible}Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23}+{tau}-Fe transformation temperature and composition are 1325 C and 91{+-}1 at.% Fe, respectively. The solubility of Zr in {tau}-Fe at 1012 C is 500{+-}50 appm and 1000{+-}100 appm close to the eutectic temperature. (orig.).

  9. Intermetallic phases in the iron-rich region of the Zr-Fe phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, M.S.; Arias, D.

    1996-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in the Fe-rich region of the Zr-Fe system are studied by X-ray diffraction and optical and electron microscopy. The chemical composition of each phase has been quantitatively measured in a electron microprobe. The stable phases found in this region are ZrFe 2 , Zr 6 Fe 23 and (αFe). ZrFe 2 is identified as a cubic Laves type phase (C15) and the ZrFe 2 /ZrFe 2 +Zr 6 Fe 23 boundary composition is 73±1 at.% Fe. Zr 6 Fe 23 is a cubic phase of the Th 6 Mn 23 type and its composition is 80.0±1.5 at.% Fe. The eutectic L↔Zr 6 Fe 23 +τ-Fe transformation temperature and composition are 1325 C and 91±1 at.% Fe, respectively. The solubility of Zr in τ-Fe at 1012 C is 500±50 appm and 1000±100 appm close to the eutectic temperature. (orig.)

  10. Crystal structure of modular sodium-rich and low-iron eudialyte from Lovozero alkaline massif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenberg, K. A.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru; Aksenov, S. M. [Federal Scientific Research Center “Crystallography and Photonics”, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The structure of the sodium-rich representative of the eudialyte group found by A.P. Khomyakov at the Lovozero massif (Kola Peninsula) is studied by X-ray diffraction. The trigonal cell parameters are: a = 14.2032(1) and c = 60.612(1) Å, V = 10589.13 Å3, space group R3m. The structure is refined to the final R = 5.0% in the anisotropic approximation of atomic displacement parameters using 3742|F| > 3σ(F). The idealized formula (Z = 3) is Na{sub 37}Ca{sub 10}Mn{sub 2}FeZr{sub 6}Si{sub 50}(Ti, Nb){sub 2}O{sub 144}(OH){sub 5}Cl{sub 3} · H{sub 2}O. Like other 24-layer minerals of the eudialyte group, this mineral has a modular structure. Its structure contains two modules, namely, “alluaivite” (with an admixture of “eudialyte”) and “kentbrooksite,” called according to the main structural fragments of alluaivite, eudialyte, and kentbrooksite. The mineral found at the Lovozero alkaline massif shows some chemical and symmetry-structural distinctions from the close-in-composition labyrinthite modular mineral from the Khibiny massif. The difference between the minerals stems from different geochemical conditions of mineral formation in the two regions.

  11. Extracting phosphorous from incinerated sewage sludge ash rich in iron or aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Kirkelund, Gunvor M.; Jensen, Pernille E.

    2013-01-01

    Ashes from mono-incineration of sewage sludge (ISSA) generally contain high concentrations of phosphorous (P) and can be regarded as secondary P resources. ISSA has no direct value as fertilizer as P is not plant available. The present paper experimentally compares P extraction in acid from two...... different ISSAs; one rich in Al (67g/kg) and the other in Fe (58g/kg). The difference related to P precipitation at the waste water treatment facilities. Another major difference between the ashes was that flue gas purification products were mixed into the first ash and it contained about 5% activated.......Formation of a high amount of gypsum crystals in both ashes after extraction in H2SO4 was seen by SEM–EDX. H2SO4 is the cheapest mineral ash, but the gypsum formation must be taken into account when either finding possibility for using the remaining ash in e.g. construction materials or if the choice is deposition...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  14. Effect of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction on arsenic dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Zhang, Z.; Moon, H. S.; Myneni, S.

    2015-12-01

    The mobility of arsenic in soils is linked to biogeochemical redox processes. The presence of wetland plants in riparian wetlands has a significant impact on the biogeochemical dynamics of the soil/sediment-redoxcline due to the release of root exudates and root turnover and oxygen transfer from the roots into the surrounding sediment. Micro-environmental redox conditions in the rhizosphere affect As, Fe, and S speciation as well as Fe(III) plaque deposition, which affects arsenic transport and uptake by plants. To investigate the dynamics of As coupled to S and Fe cycling in wetlands, mesocosms were operated in a greenhouse under various conditions (high and low Fe, high and low sulfate, with plant and without plants) for four months. Results show that the presence of plants, high Fe, and high SO42- levels enhanced As sequestration in these soils. We hypothesize that this compounding effect is because plants release biodegradable organic carbon, which is used by microorganism to reduce ferrihydrite and SO42- to generate FeS, FeS2, and/or orpiment (As2S3). Over the concentration range studied, As immobilization in soil and uptake by Scirpus actus was mainly controlled by SO42- rather than Fe levels. Under high sulfate levels, As immobilization in soil increased by 50% and As concentrations in plant roots increased by 97%, whereas no significant changes in plant As levels were seen for varying Fe concentrations. More than 80% of As was sequestrated in soils rather than plant uptake. Pore water As speciation analyses indicate that 20% more As(V) was reduced to As(III) under high sulfate as than low sulfate levels and that low Fe was more favorable to the As dissimilatory reduction. More dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria (DARB) under high sulfate were confirmed by quantitative PCR. Arsenic distribution in plant leafs and roots after 30 days of exposure to As was analyzed via Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analyses. The uptake of As by plants was distributed

  15. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  16. Evaporative concentration of arsenic in groundwater: health and environmental implications, La Laguna Region, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    2017-10-01

    High arsenic concentrations in groundwater have been documented in La Laguna Region (LLR) in arid northern Mexico, where arsenic poisoning is both chronic and endemic. A heated debate has continued for decades on its origin. LLR consisted of a series of ancient connected lakes that developed at the end of a topographic depression under closed basin conditions. This study addresses the isotopic, chemical composition of the groundwater and geochemical modeling in the southeasternmost part of the LLR to determine the origin of arsenic. Groundwater samples were obtained from a carbonate and granular aquifers and from a clayey aquitard at terminal Viesca Lake. Results show that groundwater originated as meteoric water that reached the lakes mainly via abundant springs in the carbonate aquifer and perennial flooding of the Nazas-Aguanaval Rivers. Paleo-lake water underwent progressive evaporation as demonstrated by the enrichment of δ 18 O, δ 2 H and characteristic geochemical patterns in the granular aquifer and aquitard that resulted in highly saline (>90,000 mS/cm), arsenic-rich (up to 5000 μg/L) paleo-groundwater (>30,000 years BP). However, adsorption or co-precipitation on iron oxides, clay-mineral surfaces and organic carbon limited arsenic concentration in the groundwater. Arsenic-rich groundwater and other solutes are advancing progressively from the lacustrine margins toward the main granular aquifer, due to reversal of hydraulic gradients caused by intensive groundwater exploitation and the reduction in freshwater runoff provoked by dam construction on the main rivers. Desorption of arsenic will incorporate additional concentrations of arsenic into the groundwater and continue to have significant negative effects on human health and the environment.

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  18. Digestion of Alumina from Non-Magnetic Material Obtained from Magnetic Separation of Reduced Iron-Rich Diasporic Bauxite with Sodium Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of iron from iron-rich diasporic bauxite ore via reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation has been explored recently. However, the efficiency of alumina extraction in the non-magnetic materials is absent. In this paper, a further study on the digestion of alumina by the Bayer process from non-magnetic material obtained after magnetic separation of reduced iron-rich diasporic bauxite with sodium salts was investigated. The results indicate that the addition of sodium salts can destroy the original occurrences of iron-, aluminum- and silicon-containing minerals of bauxite ore during reductive roasting. Meanwhile, the reactions of sodium salts with complex aluminum- and silicon-bearing phases generate diaoyudaoite and sodium aluminosilicate. The separation of iron via reductive roasting of bauxite ore with sodium salts followed by magnetic separation improves alumina digestion in the Bayer process. When the alumina-bearing material in bauxite ore is converted into non-magnetic material, the digestion temperature decreases significantly from 280 °C to 240 °C with a nearly 99% relative digestion ratio of alumina.

  19. Synthesis of nanostructured mixed oxide CeO2-Mn2O3 and investigation of their sorption ability for arsenic, ammoniac, iron, manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Minh Dai; Dao Ngoc Nhiem; Duong Thi Lim

    2012-01-01

    The nanostrutured mixed oxide CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 have been synthesised at low temperature (350 o C) by the combustion of gel prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Ce (NO 3 ) 4 and Mn(No 3 ) 3 , CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 characterizations were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET (Brunauce-Emmet-Teller) measurements. The phase of CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 , with large specific surface ares 65.3 m 2 /g was obtained at 350 o C for 2 hours. The nanostructured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 has been investigated for removing iron, manganese, arsenic and ammoniac from water. The sorption characteristics of the nanostrutured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 for AS(V), NH4 + , Fe(III), Mn(II) according to the langmuir isotherm. The sorption capacities of nanostrutured CeO 2 -Mn 2 O 3 are 57.10 mg As(V)g; 154.54 mg NH4 + /g; 72.97 mg Fe(III)/g; 60.27 Mn(II) / g. (author)

  20. Enabling the high capacity of lithium-rich anti-fluorite lithium iron oxide by simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chun; Yao, Zhenpeng; Lu, Jun; Ma, Lu; Maroni, Victor A.; Li, Liang; Lee, Eungje; Alp, Esen E.; Wu, Tianpin; Wen, Jianguo; Ren, Yang; Johnson, Christopher; Thackeray, Michael M.; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Wolverton, Chris; Amine, Khalil

    2017-12-01

    Anionic redox reactions in cathodes of lithium-ion batteries are allowing opportunities to double or even triple the energy density. However, it is still challenging to develop a cathode, especially with Earth-abundant elements, that enables anionic redox activity for real-world applications, primarily due to limited strategies to intercept the oxygenates from further irreversible oxidation to O2 gas. Here we report simultaneous iron and oxygen redox activity in a Li-rich anti-fluorite Li5FeO4 electrode. During the removal of the first two Li ions, the oxidation potential of O2- is lowered to approximately 3.5 V versus Li+/Li0, at which potential the cationic oxidation occurs concurrently. These anionic and cationic redox reactions show high reversibility without any obvious O2 gas release. Moreover, this study provides an insightful guide to designing high-capacity cathodes with reversible oxygen redox activity by simply introducing oxygen ions that are exclusively coordinated by Li+.

  1. Arsenic Methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    The metalloid arsenic enters the environment by natural processes (volcanic activity, weathering of rocks) and by human activity (mining, smelting, herbicides and pesticides). Although arsenic has been exploited for homicidal and suicidal purposes since antiquity, its significan...

  2. Rapid Separation of Copper Phase and Iron-Rich Phase From Copper Slag at Low Temperature in a Super-Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xi; Gao, Jintao; Huang, Zili; Guo, Zhancheng

    2018-06-01

    A novel approach for quickly separating a metal copper phase and iron-rich phase from copper slag at low temperature is proposed based on a super-gravity method. The morphology and mineral evolution of the copper slag with increasing temperature were studied using in situ high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Fe3O4 particles dispersed among the copper slag were transformed into FeO by adding an appropriate amount of carbon as a reducing agent, forming the slag melt with SiO2 at low temperature and assisting separation of the copper phase from the slag. Consequently, in a super-gravity field, the metallic copper and copper matte were concentrated as the copper phase along the super-gravity direction, whereas the iron-rich slag migrated in the opposite direction and was quickly separated from the copper phase. Increasing the gravity coefficient (G) significantly enhanced the separation efficiency. After super-gravity separation at G = 1000 and 1473 K (1200 °C) for 3 minutes, the mass fraction of Cu in the separated copper phase reached 86.11 wt pct, while that in the separated iron-rich phase was reduced to 0.105 wt pct. The recovery ratio of Cu in the copper phase was as high as up to 97.47 pct.

  3. Effect of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction on Arsenic dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheyun; Moon, Hee Sun; Myneni, Satish; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in water soil and sediments is of worldwide concern due to its ecological toxicity and chronic effects on human health. Wetlands are at the interface between ground and surface waters and because of their unique biogeochemical dynamics could be promising location for arsenic immobilization. However, the nature of biogeochemical reactions of As in wetlands are complex and not well understood. The dynamics of As in wetland sediments are closely linked to the redox cycling of Fe and S, both of which are affected by water-table fluctuations and wetland plants activity that are typical in such environments. Little is not known about redox cycling of Fe or S and their effects on As speciation, biogeochemical dynamics, and bioaccumulation in the wetland rhizosphere and plants. To gain further insights into these processes, twelve mesocosms were set up and planted with wetland plants (Scirpus actus), six were submerged in a tray (reactor) with ~ 170 mM SO4-2 and six in a tray with ~ 350 uM SO4-2 and two levels of ferrihydrite in the soil for each SO4-2 treatment. Each mesocosm was sealed and the only contact with the solution in the reactor was via the surface of the mesocosm. The mesocosms were run for 1.5 months to establish the plants, after which 50μM Na2HAsO4·7H2O was added to the reactors. Water in the reactors was constantly recirculated to make the solution homogeneous. The reactors were run for 4 months and monitored regularly for dissolved species, and were then dismantled. Results show that the presence of plants, high Fe, and high SO42- levels enhanced As sequestration in the soil. We hypothesize that the reason for this compounding effect is that plants release easily biodegradable organic carbon, which is used by microorganism to reduce ferrihydrite and SO42- to generate FeS or FeS2. More As is then sequestrated via sorption or co-precipitation on FeS or FeS2. Analysis of As in plant tissue showed that As uptake by Scirpus actus was

  4. A methodological approach for the identification of arsenic bearing phases in polluted soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matera, V.; Le Hecho, I.; Laboudigue, A.; Thomas, P.; Tellier, S.; Astruc, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic in the three polluted soils is mainly associated with neoformed amorphous iron (hydr)oxides. - A methodological approach is used to characterize arsenic pollution in three soils and to determine arsenic speciation and association with solid phases in three polluted soils. HPLC-ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation analysis, SEM-EDS and XRD for physical characterization of arsenic pollution, and sequential chemical extractions to identify arsenic distribution. Arsenic was concentrated in the finest size fractions also enriched in iron and aluminium. Total arsenic concentrations in soils are close to 1%. Arsenic was mainly present as arsenate, representing more than 90% of total arsenic. No crystallised arsenic minerals were detected by XRD analysis. SEM-EDS observations indicated arsenic/iron associations. Modified Tessier's procedure showed that arsenic was mainly extracted from amorphous iron oxide phase. The results of this methodological approach lead to predict the formation of iron arsenates in the case of one of the studied soils while arsenic sorption on iron amorphous (hydr)oxides seemed to be the determinant in the two other soils

  5. Simultaneous alleviation of cadmium and arsenic accumulation in rice by applying zero-valent iron and biochar to contaminated paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Liu, Tong-Xu; Wang, Xiang-Qin; Li, Fang-Bai; Lv, Ya-Hui; Cui, Jiang-Hu; Zeng, Xiao-Duo; Yuan, Yu-Zhen; Liu, Chuan-Ping

    2018-03-01

    The fates of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) in paddy fields are generally opposite; thus, the inconsistent transformation of Cd and As poses large challenges for their remediation. In this study, the impacts of zero valent iron (ZVI) and/or biochar amendments on Cd and As bioavailability were examined in pot trials with rice. Comparison with the untreated soil, both Cd and As accumulation in different rice tissues decreased significantly in the ZVI-biochar amendments and the Cd and As accumulation in rice decreased with increasing ZVI contents. In particular, the concentrations of Cd (0.15 ± 0.01 mg kg -1 ) and As (0.17 ± 0.01 mg kg -1 ) in rice grains were decreased by 93% and 61% relative to the untreated soil, respectively. A sequential extraction analysis indicated that with increasing Fe ratios in the ZVI-biochar mixtures, bioavailable Cd and As decreased, and the immobilized Cd and As increased. Furthermore, high levels of Fe, Cd, and As were detected in Fe plaque of the ZVI-biochar amendments in comparison with the single biochar or single ZVI amendments. The ZVI-biochar mixture may have a synergistic effect that simultaneously reduces Cd and As bioavailability by increasing the formation of amorphous Fe and Fe plaque for Cd and As immobilization. The single ZVI amendment significantly decreased As bioavailability, while the single biochar amendment significantly reduced the bioavailability of Cd compared with the combined amendments. Hence, using a ZVI-biochar mixture as a soil amendment could be a promising strategy for safely-utilizing Cd and As co-contaminated sites in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interlaboratory comparison survey of the determination of chromium, manganese, iron, titanium in dust and arsenic, cadmium, cobalt and chromium in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Jytte Molin

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an intercomparison survey based on the Danish External Quality Assessment Scheme (DEQAS). The study was carried out in 1998 for 10 laboratories in a research project on assessment of levels and health effects of airborne particulate matter in mining, metal refining and metal working industries using nuclear and related analytical techniques. The project was co-ordinated by the IAEA. Eight laboratories measured chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and titanium (Ti) in welding fume dust loaded on filters. Six laboratories measured arsenic (As), four laboratories measured cadmium (Cd), five laboratories measured cobalt (Co) and four laboratories measured chromium (Cr) in urine. The target values of the quality control materials were traceable to certified reference materials with respect to Cr in welding fume and As, Cd, Co and Cr in urine. For Mn, Fe and Ti in welding fume the target values were established based on values from reference laboratories and consensus values from several DEQAS rounds. For evaluating the analytical performance the z-score and E n number were calculated as recommended in ISO 45. The judgement of laboratories according to the performance scores revealed that few laboratories could maintain an ideal z-score below 3 and an ideal E n number below 1. Nearly all participants had a high precision in the reported results. This is a good basis for improvements. The deviations from the target values appear to be systematic, because the deviations for Mn, Fe, Ti in welding dust as well as for As, Cd, Co and Cr in urine were a linear function of the target values (ISO 5725 evaluation). The cause for this bias is unknown at present and might not be the same for all participants. It is necessary to look further into the cause for this bias. Therefore, validation of the methodologies and regularly use of certified reference materials are highly recommended. (author)

  7. Sequestration of arsenic in ombrotrophic peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, James; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Taylor, Kevin; Polya, David; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands can be important stores of arsenic but we are lacking spectroscopic evidence of the sequestration pathways of this toxic metalloid in peatland environments. This study reports on the solid-phase speciation of anthropogenically-derived arsenic in atmospherically contaminated peat from the Peak District National Park (UK). Surface and sub-surface peat samples were analysed by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy on B18 beamline at Diamond Light Source (UK). The results suggest that there are contrasting arsenic sequestration mechanisms in the peat. The bulk arsenic speciation results, in combination with strong arsenic-iron correlations at the surface, suggest that iron (hydr)oxides are key phases for the immobilisation of arsenic at the peat surface. In contrast, the deeper peat samples are dominated by arsenic sulphides (arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment). Given that these peats receive inputs solely from the atmosphere, the presence of these sulphide phases suggests an in-situ authigenic formation. Redox oscillations in the peat due to a fluctuating water table and an abundant store of legacy sulphur from historic acid rain inputs may favour the precipitation of arsenic sequestering sulphides in sub-surface horizons. Oxidation-induced loss of these arsenic sequestering sulphur species by water table drawdown has important implications for the mobility of arsenic and the quality of waters draining peatlands.

  8. Arsenic and Fluoride Mobilization Mechanism in Groundwater of Indus Delta and Thar Desert, Sindh, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIQAR HUSAIN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Indus deltaic plain consists of medium to fine grained sediments, rich in organic matter deposited during the Holocene period. Thar desert is covered with sand dunes and loess originated from transported sediments from Rann of Kutch or the Indus plain by monsoon winds or by the reworking of local alluvial deposits. Groundwater salinity and microbial pollution are common in both types of lanforms, but arsenic (AS and fluoride (F toxicity dominate in the groundwater of Indus delta and Thar desert, respectively. Arsenic concentration in Tando Mohammad Khan and Tando Allayar varies from 10-500 ppb and exhibits near neutral slightly alkaline pH ranging from 6.8 to 8.0. Arsenic distribution is patchy and seems to be related to the prsence of small scale redox zonation in the aquifer. High arsenic affected areas are densely populated and intensively cultivated and its hot spots are those from where the Indus river passed during the Holocene period including Tando Allayar and Tando Mohammad Khan. Extensive ground water irrigation has accelerated flow of groundwater that brought dissolved degraded organic matter in contact with arsenic bearing sediments, enhancing reduction processes and triggering release of arsenic from detrital bioitite and muscovite in the groundwater. Furthermore, unlined sanitation and microbial contamination contribute to degradation of organic matter that enhances the reduction of iron oxy-hydroxide leading to release of arsenic to groundwater. Fluoride is found in all the groundwater samples of Tharparkar district, in the range of 0.96-2.74mg/l. The pH of groundwater is alkaline (7.38-8.59, which is accelerating maximum (1.24%F dissolution in the groundwater. The favourable pH of groundwater and soil composition of Holocene sediments of Indus delta and slightly older alluvium of Thar desert, respectively are responsible for mobilization of arsenic and fluoride in groundwater of Sindh province of Pakistan.

  9. Simultaneous sorption of fluoride and arsenic ions (V) in a naturally occurring material modified with iron and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez M, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, two materials, zeolite and pozzolans from the States of Oaxaca and Mexico, were used respectively, which were modified to evaluate their efficiencies to remove F and As(V) ions from solution and natural water. The materials were modified with iron and aluminum using an electrochemical cell, and with the hydroxides formed with iron and aluminum chloride solutions. The natural and modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis, specific area and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Experimental data on the sorption processes of F- ions by modified zeolite and pozzolans were adjusted to the kinetic models of pseudo-second-order (q e, 0408 mg /g K, 4.33 g / mg h) and Lagergen (q e, 0.807 mg/g K L, 1.83 1/min), respectively. Both materials showed the best fit to the Freundlich isotherm, Kf, 0.33 and 0.64 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively; suggesting a physical adsorption process on a heterogeneous material. Experimental adsorption capacities of pozzolans and modified zeolite for F ions were 0.36 and 0.83 mg/g respectively. The results of the kinetics of adsorption of As(V) were treated with the Largergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models; however the adsorption rate was high and consequently the rate constants could not be calculated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Freundlich model and the constants Kf were 6.24 and 11.15 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption processes suggest endothermic adsorption for F- ions by both materials and for As(V) by the pozzolans. The free energy values ΔG indicate spontaneous processes and not spontaneous for F- ions by pozzolans. The adsorption of As (V) by the pozzolans presented an exothermic and spontaneous behavior. Finally, a study was performed in columns with

  10. Removal of arsenic from drinking water by natural adsorbents

    OpenAIRE

    MD SHAHNOOR ALAM KHAN

    2017-01-01

    The presence of arsenic in groundwater has been reported in many countries across the world and it is a serious threat to public health. The aim of this study was to identify prospective natural materials with high arsenic adsorption capacity and durable hydraulic property to produce adequate flow of water. The comparative study identified Skye sand as the best natural adsorbent. The prototype household filter with Skye sand achieved complete removal of arsenic and iron. Arsenic removal by du...

  11. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    ). Tyrosinase generated a red compound (dopachrome) that is the target analyte of the traditional L-DOPA oxidative enzyme assay, whereas our soil slurries generated purple melanin-like compounds that were likely generated by more extensive oxidation. To investigate the importance of Fe(II) for L-DOPA oxidation, we added realistic concentrations of Fe(II) (equivalent to 10 - 500 μg Fe g-1 soil) to an L-DOPA buffer solution under oxic conditions, and found rates of L-DOPA oxidation comparable to those from soil slurries. Molecular oxygen and Fe(II) are known to generate strong oxidants via Fenton reactions. We decreased L-DOPA oxidation rates in soil slurries by adding catalase and superoxide-dismutase enzymes to scavenge reactive oxygen species, suggesting that a free-radical mechanism contributed to L-DOPA oxidation. We obtained similar results using another humic model compound, tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). Although abiotic oxidative reactions involving iron have been employed to degrade anthropogenic organic contaminants, this study is among the first to demonstrate their potential importance for oxidizing organic matter in natural ecosystems. In soils rich in Fe(II), abiotic reactions could complement, or even obviate, the role of microbial oxidative enzymes in degrading recalcitrant organic compounds.

  12. Arsenic tolerance and bioleaching from realgar based on response surface methodology by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans isolated from Wudalianchi volcanic lake, northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: From this work we were successful in isolating an acidophilic, arsenic tolerant ferrous iron-oxidizing bacterium. The BBD-RSM analysis showed that maximum arsenic bioleaching rate obtained under optimum conditions, and the most effective factor for arsenic leaching was initial ferrous ion concentration. These revealed that BYQ-12 could be used for bioleaching of arsenic from arsenical minerals.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  14. A higher proportion of Iron-Rich leafy vegatables in a typical burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cercamondi, C.I.; Icard-Verniere, C.; Egli, I.; Vernay, M.; Hama, F.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2014-01-01

    Food-to-food fortification can be a promising approach to improve the low dietary iron intake and bioavailability from monotonous diets based on a small number of staple plant foods. In Burkina Faso, the common diet consists of a thick, cereal-based paste consumed with sauces composed of mainly

  15. Arsenic removal by manganese greensand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phommavong, T. [Saskatchewan Environment, Regina (Canada); Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Some of the small communities in Saskatchewan are expected to have difficulty complying with the new maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 25 {micro}g/L for arsenic. A test column was set up in the laboratory to study the removal of arsenic from the potable water using oxidation with KMnO{sub 4}, followed by manganese greensand filtration. Tests were run using water from the tap having a background arsenic concentration of <0.5 {micro}g/L and iron concentration in the range of 0.02 to 0.77 mg/L. The test water was spiked with arsenic and iron. Results showed that 61 % to 98% of arsenic can be removed from the potable water by oxidation with KMnO{sub 4} followed by manganese greensand filtration.

  16. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  17. Legacy of the California Gold Rush: Environmental geochemistry of arsenic in the southern Mother Lode Gold District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, K.S.; Bird, D.K.; Ashley, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Gold mining activity in the Sierra Nevada foothills, both recently and during the California Gold Rush, has exposed arsenic-rich pyritic rocks to weathering and erosion. This study describes arsenic concentration and speciation in three hydrogeologic settings in the southern Mother Lode Gold District: mineralized outcrops and mine waste rock (overburden); mill tailings submerged in a water reservoir; and lake waters in this monomictic reservoir and in a monomictic lake developing within a recent open-pit mine. These environments are characterized by distinct modes of rock-water interaction that influence the local transport and fate of arsenic. Arsenic in outcrops and waste rock occurs in arsenian pyrite containing an average of 2 wt% arsenic. Arsenic is concentrated up to 1300 ppm in fine-grained, friable iron-rich weathering products of the arsenian pyrite (goethite, jarosite, copiapite), which develop as efflorescences and crusts on weathering outcrops. Arsenic is sorbed as a bidentate complex on goethite, and substitutes for sulfate in jarosite. Submerged mill tailings obtained by gravity core at Don Pedro Reservoir contain arsenic up to 300 ppm in coarse sand layers. Overlying surface muds have less arsenic in the solid fraction but higher concentrations in porewaters (up to 500 ??g/L) than the sands. Fine quartz tailings also contain up to 3.5 ppm mercury related to the ore processing. The pH values in sediment porewaters range from 3.7 in buried gypsum-bearing sands and tailings to 7 in the overlying lake sediments. Reservoir waters immediately above the cores contain up to 3.5 ??g/L arsenic; lake waters away from the submerged tailings typically contain less than 1 ??g/L arsenic. Dewatering during excavation of the Harvard open-pit mine produced a hydrologic cone of depression that has been recovering toward the pre-mining groundwater configuration since mining ended in 1994. Aqueous arsenic concentrations in the 80 m deep pit lake are up to 1000 ??g

  18. Understanding arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, Babar

    2001-01-01

    The problem of water contamination by naturally occurring arsenic confronts governments, public and private utilities, and the development community with a new challenge for implementing operational mitigation activities under difficult conditions of imperfect knowledge - especially for arsenic mitigation for the benefit of the rural poor. With more than a conservative estimate of 20 million of its 130 million people assumed to be drinking contaminated water and another 70 million potentially at risk, Bangladesh is facing what has been described as perhaps the largest mass poisoning in history. High concentrations of naturally occurring arsenic have already been found in water from tens of thousands of tube wells, the main source of potable water, in 59 out of Bangladesh's 64 districts. Arsenic contamination is highly irregular, so tube wells in neighboring locations or even different depths can be safe. Arsenic is extremely hazardous if ingested in drinking water or used in cooking in excess of the maximum permissible limit of 0.01 mg/liter over an extended period of time. Even in the early 1970s, most of Bangladesh's rural population got its drinking water from surface ponds and nearly a quarter of a million children died each year from water-borne diseases. Groundwater now constitutes the major source of drinking water in Bangladesh with 95% of the drinking water coming from underground sources. The provision of tube well water for 97 percent of the rural population has been credited with bringing down the high incidence of diarrheal diseases and contributing to a halving of the infant mortality rate. Paradoxically, the same wells that saved so many lives now pose a threat due to the unforeseen hazard of arsenic. The provenance of arsenic rich minerals in sediments of the Bengal basin as a component of geological formations is believed to be from the Himalayan mountain range. Arsenic has been found in different uncropped geological hard rock formations

  19. Method of arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-10-26

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  20. Increasing the cooking temperature of meat does not affect nonheme iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baech, S.B.; Hansen, M.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    The effect of increasing cooking temperatures of meat on nonheme iron absorption from a composite meal was investigated. Cysteine-containing peptides may have a role in the iron absorption enhancing effect of muscle proteins. Heat treatment can change the content of sulfhydryl groups produced from...... cysteine and thereby affect iron absorption. Twenty-one women (25 +/- 3 y) were served a basic meal without meat and two other meals consisting of the basic meal plus 75 g of pork meat cooked at 70, 95 or 120degreesC. The meals were extrinsically labeled with Fe-55 or Fe-59. Iron absorption was determined...... from measurements of wholebody Fe-59 retention and the activity of Fe-55 and Fe-59 in blood samples. Nonheme iron absorptions were 0.9 (0.5-4.0)% (P = 0.06), 0.7 (0.4-3.9)% (P = 0.1) and 2.0 (1.3-3.1)% (P cooked at 70, 95 or 120degreesC, respectively, was added to the basic...

  1. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  2. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroslav, S

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3 to 7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004 to 0.75 percent arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed.

  3. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3-7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004-0.75% arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed. 5 references.

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY PHYTOFILTRATION AND SILICON TREATMENT : A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR LOWERING ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS IN FOOD CROPS

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhi, Arifin

    2017-01-01

    Use of arsenic-rich groundwater for crop irrigation can increase the arsenic (As) content in food crops and act as a carcinogen, compromising human health. Using aquatic plant based phytofiltration is a potential eco-technique for removing arsenic from water. The aquatic moss species Warnstorfia fluitans grows naturally in mining areas in northern Sweden, where high concentrations of arsenic occur in lakes and rivers. This species was selected as a model for field, climate chamber and greenho...

  5. Long-term fate and transport of arsenic in an in-pit uranium mine tailings facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, B.; Hendry, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    An important environmental issue facing the uranium mining industry in Saskatchewan is the quantification of the long-term migration of arsenic from its tailings facilities to the adjacent groundwater system. Decommissioning of these arsenic-rich tailings requires that the long-term arsenic source term for the tailings to the groundwater be defined. To meet this need, arsenic-rich uranium mine tailings from one in-pit tailings facility (tailings emplaced in a mined out open pit) were studied in detail. The tailings facility selected for study was the Rabbit Lake in-pit tailings management facility (RLITMF) in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The tailings body in the RLITMF is 425 m long x 300 m wide x 100 m deep at its center and mill tailings were deposited in layers between 1985 (base) and 2004 (top). Associated with the low-level radioactive tailings is approximately 23,000 tonnes of arsenic. The in-pit design limits solute transport in these fine-grained tailings to diffusion. Because the layers of tailings have varying chemical characteristics (controlled by the ore being milled at the time), the total arsenic concentrations in the layers and their associated pore fluids range from 56 to 9,871 μ/g and 0.24 to 140 mg/l, respectively. As was the case for arsenic, the concentration of iron present in the layers was also variable (ranging from 8,967 to 30,247 μ/g). Synchrotron-based studies show that the arsenic in these tailings is strongly attenuated by adsorption to secondary 2-line ferrihydrite through inner sphere bidentate linkages. Single reservoir diffusion cell testing shows that the effective diffusion coefficient for arsenic in the tailings is 4.5 x 10 -10 m 2 s- 1 . Based on results from our field- and laboratory-based studies, the redistribution (via diffusion) and attenuation (via adsorption) of arsenic in the RLITMF was modelled using a one-dimensional geochemical reactive transport model to provide a source term for arsenic migration from the

  6. Seasonal Arsenic Accumulation in Stream Sediments at a Groundwater Discharge Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKay, Allison A.; Gan, Ping; Yu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal changes in arsenic and iron accumulation rates were examined in the sediments of a brook that receives groundwater discharges of arsenic and reduced iron. Clean glass bead columns were deployed in sediments for known periods over the annual hydrologic cycle to monitor changes in arsenic...... and iron concentrations in bead coatings. The highest accumulation rates occurred during the dry summer period (July-October) when groundwater discharges were likely greatest at the sample locations. The intermediate flow period (October-March), With higher surface water: levels, was associated with losses...... of arsenic and iron from bead column coatings at. depths below 2-6 cm. Batch incubations indicated iron releases from solids to be induced by biological reduction of iron (oxy)hydroxide solids. Congruent arsenic releases during incubation were limited by the high arsenic sorption capacity (0.536 mg...

  7. Rare mtDNA haplogroups and genetic differences in rich and poor Danish Iron-Age villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, L; Gilbert, M T P; Kivisild, T

    2008-01-01

    The Roman Iron-Age (0-400 AD) in Southern Scandinavia was a formative period, where the society changed from archaic chiefdoms to a true state formation, and the population composition has likely changed in this period due to immigrants from Middle Scandinavia. We have analyzed mtDNA from 22 indi...

  8. Both Phosphorus Fertilizers and Indigenous Bacteria Enhance Arsenic Release into Groundwater in Arsenic-Contaminated Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Chun-Han; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-03-23

    Arsenic (As) is a human carcinogen, and arsenic contamination in groundwater is a worldwide public health concern. Arsenic-affected areas are found in many places but are reported mostly in agricultural farmlands, yet the interaction of fertilizers, microorganisms, and arsenic mobilization in arsenic-contaminated aquifers remains uncharacterized. This study investigates the effects of fertilizers and bacteria on the mobilization of arsenic in two arsenic-contaminated aquifers. We performed microcosm experiments using arsenic-contaminated sediments and amended with inorganic nitrogenous or phosphorus fertilizers for 1 and 4 months under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results show that microcosms amended with 100 mg/L phosphorus fertilizers (dipotassium phosphate), but not nitrogenous fertilizers (ammonium sulfate), significantly increase aqueous As(III) release in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. We also show that concentrations of iron, manganese, potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium are increased in the aqueous phase and that the addition of dipotassium phosphate causes a further increase in aqueous iron, potassium, and sodium, suggesting that multiple metal elements may take part in the arsenic release process. Furthermore, microbial analysis indicates that the dominant microbial phylum is shifted from α-proteobacteria to β- and γ-proteobacteria when the As(III) is increased and phosphate is added in the aquifer. Our results provide evidence that both phosphorus fertilizers and microorganisms can mediate the release of arsenic to groundwater in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. Our study suggests that agricultural activity such as the use of fertilizers and monitoring phosphate concentration in groundwater should be taken into consideration for the management of arsenic in groundwater.

  9. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  10. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m2·g−1 for the goethite and 2.44 m2·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(II...

  11. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of

  12. Performance assessment of laboratory and field-scale multi-step passive treatment of iron-rich acid mine drainage for design improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonimaro, Tsiverihasina V; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Bussière, Bruno; Genty, Thomas; Zagury, Gérald J

    2018-04-17

    Multi-step passive systems for the treatment of iron-rich acid mine drainage (Fe-rich AMD) perform satisfactorily at the laboratory scale. However, their field-scale application has revealed dissimilarities in performance, particularly with respect to hydraulic parameters. In this study, the assessment of factors potentially responsible for the variations in performance of laboratory and field-scale multi-step systems was undertaken. Three laboratory multi-step treatment scenarios, involving a combination of dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) units, anoxic dolomitic drains, and passive biochemical reactors (PBRs), were set up in 10.7-L columns. The field-scale treatment consisted of two PBRs separated by a wood ash (WA) reactor. The parameters identified as possibly influencing the performances of the laboratory and field-scale experiments were the following: AMD chemistry (electrical conductivity and Fe and SO 4 2- concentrations), flow rate (Q), and saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ). Based on these findings, the design of an efficient passive multi-step treatment system is suggested to consider the following: (1) Fe pretreatment, using materials with high k sat and low HRT. If a PBR is to be used, the Fe load should be PBR/DAS filled with a mixture with at least 20% of neutralizing agent; (3) include Q and k sat (> 10 -3  cm/s) in the long-term prediction. Finally, mesocosm testing is strongly recommended prior to construction of full-scale systems for the treatment of Fe-rich AMD.

  13. The hydro- and multi-isotope geochemistry of iron-rich ground waters emerging at the southern Baltic Sea coast line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Marko; Wu, Zijun; Escher, Peter; Struck, Ulrich; Dellwig, Olaf; Schafmeister, Maria; Böttcher*, Michael E.

    2013-04-01

    Iron-rich groundwater springs emerging at the shore zone of the southern Baltic Sea (BS; Site Meschendorf) were examined on a seasonal base for a period of about two years. Besides major, minor, and trace elements, stable isotopes of water (H-2, O-18), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; C-13), and sulfate (S-34) were analyzed. The stream bed sediment was extracted for the geochemistry of the newly formed precipitates and further characterized via SEM-EDAX. Subsequently, the hydrogeochemical results were subjected to a thermodynamic analysis via the PHREEQC speciation model. The springs emerge from small pits (about 60 cm diameter; up to 15cm depth). Surrounding sediments are sandy with gravels found at depth and corresponding high permeabilities. The positions of different springs on the shore zone were stable during the investigation period while the shape of the pits and the stream beds may vary due to wind- and wave-driven forces. Selected measurements of spring yield discharges close to 10 L/min. The H-2 and O-18 contents of the spring waters indicate the ground water to originate from relatively young mixed meteoric waters. The hydrochemistry of the springs was similar and showed some variability in between which indicates that the genetic processes for the ground water before reaching the surface may slightly differ. The springs are characterized by dissolved Ca, Mg, Na, DIC and sulfate, mainly reflecting the interaction with soils and bedrocks in the recharge area that is dominated by marly till. The oxygen-free ground water is rich in Fe, P, and DIC. Iron and dissolved sulfate originate from the oxidation of pyrite, as further confirmed by the 34-S signature of sulfate. The carbon isotope signature of DIC indicates a mixture of biogenic CO2 from the soil zone with some water-rock interaction with carbonate minerals. The streams flow towards the BS and, in contact with the atmosphere, outgas carbon dioxide and takes up oxygen. Upon CO2-degassing, C-12 is

  14. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VILLAGE ON THE PONDS IN DELAVAN, WI. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds at Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kine...

  15. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal. U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sabin, MN. Six-Month Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Sabin, MN. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Kinetico FM-248-AS ars...

  16. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sabin, MN Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from January 30, 2006 to April 29, 2007 at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration site in Sabin, MN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the eff...

  17. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of a Kinetico Macrolite® press...

  18. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of US Water Sys...

  19. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project following one year of operation at the Climax, Minnesota, site. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kin...

  20. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL AND ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT STEWART, MN. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of Siemens¿ Type II AERALA...

  1. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BIG SAUK LAKE MOBILE HOME PARK IN SAUK CENTRE, MN. SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Big Sauk Lake Mobile Home Park (BSLMHP) in Sauk Centre, MN. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the...

  2. Adsorption of Arsenic by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: A Versatile, Inquiry-Based Laboratory for a High School or College Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDorn, Daniel; Ravalli, Matthew T.; Small, Mary Margaret; Hillery, Barbara; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    There has been much interest in magnetite (Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]) due to its utility in adsorbing high concentrations of arsenic in contaminated water. The magnetic properties of the material allow for simple dispersion and removal from an aqueous system. An inquiry-based laboratory has been developed that illustrates these unique…

  3. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Transport Across The Ground-Water/Surface Water Interface: Ground-Water Discharge And Iron Oxide Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of arsenic in ground water, surface water, and sediments at a Superfund Site in the northeastern United States (see companion presentation by K. G. Scheckel et al). Ground-water discharge into the study area was cha...

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal and Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Stewart, MN, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the one-year U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  5. Arsenic Speciation and Extraction and the Significance of Biodegradable Acid on Arsenic Removal—An Approach for Remediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Van, Thinh; Osanai, Yasuhito; Do Nguyen, Hai; Kurosawa, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    A series of arsenic remediation tests were conducted using a washing method with biodegradable organic acids, including oxalic, citric and ascorbic acids. Approximately 80% of the arsenic in one sample was removed under the effect of the ascorbic and oxalic acid combination, which was roughly twice higher than the effectiveness of the ascorbic and citric acid combination under the same conditions. The soils treated using biodegradable acids had low remaining concentrations of arsenic that are primarily contained in the crystalline iron oxides and organic matter fractions. The close correlation between extracted arsenic and extracted iron/aluminum suggested that arsenic was removed via the dissolution of Fe/Al oxides in soils. The fractionation of arsenic in four contaminated soils was investigated using a modified sequential extraction method. Regarding fractionation, we found that most of the soil contained high proportions of arsenic (As) in exchangeable fractions with phosphorus, amorphous oxides, and crystalline iron oxides, while a small amount of the arsenic fraction was organic matter-bound. This study indicated that biodegradable organic acids can be considered as a means for arsenic-contaminated soil remediation.

  6. Seasonal arsenic accumulation in stream sediments at a groundwater discharge zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Allison A; Gan, Ping; Yu, Ran; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-21

    Seasonal changes in arsenic and iron accumulation rates were examined in the sediments of a brook that receives groundwater discharges of arsenic and reduced iron. Clean glass bead columns were deployed in sediments for known periods over the annual hydrologic cycle to monitor changes in arsenic and iron concentrations in bead coatings. The highest accumulation rates occurred during the dry summer period (July-October) when groundwater discharges were likely greatest at the sample locations. The intermediate flow period (October-March), with higher surface water levels, was associated with losses of arsenic and iron from bead column coatings at depths below 2-6 cm. Batch incubations indicated iron releases from solids to be induced by biological reduction of iron (oxy)hydroxide solids. Congruent arsenic releases during incubation were limited by the high arsenic sorption capacity (0.536 mg(As)/mg(Fe)) of unreacted iron oxide solids. The flooded spring (March-June) with high surface water flows showed the lowest arsenic and iron accumulation rates in the sediments. Comparisons of accumulation rates across a shoreline transect were consistent with greater rates at regions exposed above surface water levels for longer times and greater losses at locations submerged below surface water. Iron (oxy)hydroxide solids in the shallowest sediments likely serve as a passive barrier to sorb arsenic released to pore water at depth by biological iron reduction.

  7. Application of iron-rich natural clays in Camlica, Turkey for boron sorption from water and its determination by fluorimetric-azomethine-H method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyhan, Serap; Seki, Yoldas; Yurdakoc, Mueruevvet; Merdivan, Melek

    2007-01-01

    In this study, iron-rich natural Camlica Bentonites, CB1 and CB2, were used for the sorption of boron in water samples. Boron was determined by newly progressed fluorimetric azomethine-H method. The optimum conditions found using factorial designs are pH 10, 45 deg. C, 0.250 g of clay and 20 mL of sample volume. It was found that 180 min is enough time for the equilibrium state to be reached in boron adsorption. At these conditions, boron sorption percentage was 80% for CB1 and 30% for CB2. The adsorption isotherms are well described by linear Freundlich model. Various geothermal waters in our country were also studied for boron sorption

  8. Disturbances to metal partitioning during toxicity testing of iron(II)-rich estuarine pore waters and whole sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stuart L; Batley, Graeme E

    2003-02-01

    Metal partitioning is altered when suboxic estuarine sediments containing Fe(II)-rich pore waters are disturbed during collection, preparation, and toxicity testing. Experiments with model Fe(II)-rich pore waters demonstrated the rates at which adsorptive losses of Cd, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Zn occur upon exposure to air. Experiments with Zn-contaminated estuarine sediments demonstrated large and often unpredictable changes to metal partitioning during sediment storage, removal of organisms, and homogenization before testing. Small modifications to conditions, such as aeration of overlying waters, caused large changes to the metal partitioning. Disturbances caused by sediment collection required many weeks for reestablishment of equilibrium. Bioturbation by benthic organisms led to oxidation of pore-water Fe(II) and lower Zn fluxes because of the formation of Fe hydroxide precipitates that adsorb pore-water Zn. For five weeks after the addition of organisms to sediments, Zn fluxes increased slowly as the organisms established themselves in the sediments, indicating that the establishment of equilibrium was not rapid. The results are discussed in terms of the dynamic nature of suboxic, Fe(II)-rich estuarine sediments, how organisms perturb their environment, and the importance of understanding chemistry in toxicity testing with whole sediments or pore water. Recommendations are provided for the handling of sediments for toxicity testing.

  9. The influence of silicate and sulphate anions on the anodic corrosion and the transpassivity of iron and silicon-rich steel in concentrated KOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čekerevac, Milan; Simičić, Miloš; Bujanović, Ljiljana Nikolić; Popović, Negica

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Anodic behaviour of Fe and steel in 10 M KOH with sulphate and silicate is examined. ► X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of Fe 3 (Si 1.32 Fe 0.68 )O 5 (OH) 4 in anodic layer. ► X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of Ba(Fe, S)O 4 at anodic oxidation. - Abstract: The effect of sulphate and silicate addition in a 10 M KOH electrolyte on the anodic corrosion and transpassivity of iron and steel rich in silicon are explored by cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry. Formation of ferrate(VI) in the iron transpassivity region is noticed in all explored electrolytes. The electrochemical sulphato- and silico-ferrate(VI) formation is discussed as a possible result of Fe 3 III (Si 1.32 Fe 0.68 )O 5 (OH) 4 and [Fe(II) 4 Fe(III) 2 (OH) 12 ]SO 4 oxidation in the 10 M KOH electrolytes with silicate and sulphate, respectively. The presence of Fe 3 (Si 1.32 Fe 0.68 )O 5 (OH) 4 in the anodic layer of silicon steel and the crystal structure of electrochemically synthesised Ba(Fe, S)O 4 have been revealed by XRD.

  10. Effects of organic matter and ageing on the bioaccessibility of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, Louise; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic-contaminated soils may pose a risk to human health. Redevelopment of contaminated sites may involve amending soils with organic matter, which potentially increases arsenic bioaccessibility. The effects of ageing on arsenic-contaminated soils mixed with peat moss were evaluated in a simulated ageing period representing two years, during which arsenic bioaccessibility was periodically measured. Significant increases (p = 0.032) in bioaccessibility were observed for 15 of 31 samples tested, particularly in comparison with samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in soils naturally rich in organic matter (>25%). Samples where percent arsenic bioaccessibility was unchanged with age were generally poor in organic matter (average 7.7%) and contained both arsenopyrite and pentavalent arsenic forms that remained unaffected by the organic matter amendments. Results suggest that the addition of organic matter may lead to increases in arsenic bioaccessibility, which warrants caution in the evaluation of risks associated with redevelopment of arsenic-contaminated land. - Highlights: → Adding organic matter to contaminated soils may increase arsenic bioaccessibility. → Ageing soils with >25% organic matter can lead to increased arsenic bioaccessibility. → No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for soils poor in organic matter (mean 7.7%). → No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for samples containing arsenopyrite. → Organic matter in soil may favour oxidation of trivalent arsenic to pentavalent form. - Adding organic carbon may increase arsenic bioaccessibility, especially in samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in organic carbon-rich soils (>25%).

  11. Nano-structured iron(III)–cerium(IV) mixed oxide: Synthesis, characterization and arsenic sorption kinetics in the presence of co-existing ions aiming to apply for high arsenic groundwater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Tina; Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in

    2013-10-15

    Here, we aim to develop an efficient material by eco-friendly green synthetic route that was characterized to be nano-structured. The thermal stability of the sample was well established from the consistent particle size at different temperature and also, from differential thermal analysis. The bimetal mixed oxide contained agglomerated crystalline nano-particles of dimension 10-20 nm, and its empirical composition as FeCe{sub 1.1}O{sub 7.6}. The surface area ( m{sup 2}g{sup -1}), pore volume ( cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}) and maximum pore width (nm) obtained from BET analysis were found to be 104, 0.1316 and 5.68 respectively. Use of this material for estimating arsenic sorption kinetics in presence of some groundwater occurring ions revealed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model is unambiguously the best fit option to describe the nature of the reactions. Groundwater occurring ions exhibit a notable decrease of As(V)-sorption capacity (no other ion > chloride ∼ silicate > sulfate > bicarbonate > phosphate). However, As(III)-sorption capacity of the bimetal mixed oxide was nominally influenced by the presence of the above ions in the reaction system. Rate determining step of arsenic sorption reactions was confirmed to be a multistage process in the presence of the above ions at pH ∼ 7.0 and 30 °C.

  12. Nano-structured iron(III)–cerium(IV) mixed oxide: Synthesis, characterization and arsenic sorption kinetics in the presence of co-existing ions aiming to apply for high arsenic groundwater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Tina; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2013-01-01

    Here, we aim to develop an efficient material by eco-friendly green synthetic route that was characterized to be nano-structured. The thermal stability of the sample was well established from the consistent particle size at different temperature and also, from differential thermal analysis. The bimetal mixed oxide contained agglomerated crystalline nano-particles of dimension 10-20 nm, and its empirical composition as FeCe 1.1 O 7.6 . The surface area ( m 2 g -1 ), pore volume ( cm 3 g -1 ) and maximum pore width (nm) obtained from BET analysis were found to be 104, 0.1316 and 5.68 respectively. Use of this material for estimating arsenic sorption kinetics in presence of some groundwater occurring ions revealed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model is unambiguously the best fit option to describe the nature of the reactions. Groundwater occurring ions exhibit a notable decrease of As(V)-sorption capacity (no other ion > chloride ∼ silicate > sulfate > bicarbonate > phosphate). However, As(III)-sorption capacity of the bimetal mixed oxide was nominally influenced by the presence of the above ions in the reaction system. Rate determining step of arsenic sorption reactions was confirmed to be a multistage process in the presence of the above ions at pH ∼ 7.0 and 30 °C.

  13. Arsenic precipitation from metallurgical effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Araya, E.; Martin, I.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2004-01-01

    In the mining-metallurgical companies different liquid effluents are produced, which can contain a series of dissolved elements that are considered dangerous from an environmental point of view. One of these elements is the arsenic, especially in the state of oxidation +5 that can be precipitated as calcium or iron arsenate. To fulfil the environmental requests it should have in solution a content of arsenic lower than 0,5 mg/l and the obtained solid product should be very stable under the condition in which it will be stored. this work looks for the best conditions of arsenic precipitation, until achieving contents in solution lower than such mentioned concentration. Also, the stability of the precipitates was studied. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Overview of the Performance and Cost Effectiveness of Small Arsenic Removal Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation provides information on the performance and cost of primarily four arsenic removal technologies; adsorptive media, iron removal, coagulation/filtration and the combination system of iron removal followed by adsorptive media.

  15. Microbial Diversity in Surface Iron-Rich Aqueous Environments: Implications for Seeking Signs of Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Allen, C. C.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Garrison, D. H.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The success of selecting future landing sites on Mars to discover extinct and/or extant extraterrestrial life is dependent on the correct approximation of available knowledge about terrestrial paleogeochemistry and life evolution to Martian (paleo) geology and geochemistry. It is well known that both Earth and Mars are Fe rich. This widespread occurrence suggests that Fe may have played a key role in early life forms, where it probably served as a key constituent in early prosthetic moieties in many proteins of ancient microbes on Earth and likely Mars. The second critical idea is the premise that Life on Mars could most likely have developed when Mars experienced tectonic activity [1] which dramatically decreased around 1 bin years after Martian creation. After that Martian life could have gone extinct or hibernated in the deep subsurface, which would be expensive to reach in contrast to the successful work of Martian surface rovers. Here we analyze the diversity of microbes in several terrestrial Fe rich surface environments in conjunction with the phylogeny and molecular timing of emergence of those microbes on Earth. Anticipated results should help evaluate future landing sites on Mars in searches for biosignatures.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  17. Hydrology and Soil Manipulations of Iron-Rich Ditch Mesocosms Provide Little Evidence of Phosphorus Capture within the Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, David E; Needelman, Brian A; Kleinman, Peter J A; Rabenhorst, Martin C; Momen, Bahram; Wester, David B

    2017-05-01

    Agricultural drainage ditches function as first-order streams and affect nutrient management. Soil mesocosms from a ditch featuring a vertical (increasing upward) gradient in iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) were subjected to hydraulic and soil treatments. These manipulations mimicked aspects of dredging and controlled drainage and inspected the soil release and retention of P. Treatments did not remove P from simulated groundwater. Throughput water either gained in P (lack of dredging, especially under Fe-reducing conditions) or had P concentrations indistinguishable from input water (dredging). Undredged mesocosms, when Fe-reducing, released Fe and P simultaneously. Simultaneous release of P and Fe from our Fe-reducing mesocosms indicates a mechanism whereby P capture occurs by Fe precipitation upon emergence to aerated surficial waters. Upwelling and surficial phases of ditch hydrology and the lowering of the ditch surface on dredging complicate interpretation of traditional means of describing ditch P retention and release. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Geochemical fates and unusual distribution of arsenic in natural ferromanganese duricrust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Huan; Lu, Xiancai; Li, Juan; Chen, Xiaoye; Zhu, Xiangyu; Xiang, Wanli; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaolin; Lu, Jianjun; Wang, Rucheng

    2017-01-01

    Preferential enrichment of arsenic in iron oxides relative to manganese oxides has been well documented. In this study, however, a distinct arsenic enrichment is revealed in natural ferromanganese duricrusts, which are commonly found in natural weathering profiles of manganese-bearing carbonate rocks. In the studied ferromanganese duricrust covering Carboniferous carbonates at Qixia Mountain in eastern China, stromotalite-like structures composed by hematite, goethite, pyrolusite and hetaerolite have been observed. Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) mapping and synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analyses reveal that the arsenic content in manganese oxides is elevated with respect to iron oxide phases. For example, the arsenic content of pyrolusite is approximately 5 times as much as that of hematite or hetaerolite. However, the highest arsenic content (0.58 wt% As_2O_5) occurs in 2.75 (±0.96, ±σ) μm micro-bands of hematite ((Fe_xMn"I"I"I_1_-_x)_2O_3, 0.75 < x < 0.83). Although arsenic contents in the Mn-rich hematite micro-bands are extraordinarily high, the amount of hematite with a high Mn content is very low in the duricrust. Hence manganese oxides are suggested to be the major arsenic sink in the ferromanganese duricrust. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra (EXAFS) further shows that all arsenic is present as oxidized As(V) and are bound to Fe/Mn oxides in bidentate binuclear bridging complexes with As−Fe and As−Mn bond distances of 3.24 Å and 3.23 Å, respectively. In addition, it is found that zinc is also more enriched in Mn oxides (besides hetaerolite) than in Fe oxides. The fine hematite crust with low contents of heavy metals could act as a protective seal to separate Mn oxides core with high Zn and As from environmental fluids. This separation could reduce the interaction between them and decrease the release of Zn and As from this ferromanganese duricrusts, which ensures long-term sequestration of

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  3. Concentrations and chemical species of arsenic in human urine and hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, Naohisa (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan))

    1988-05-01

    Because marine products are rich in arsenic, the concentration of arsenic in the human urine varies greatly with the state of ingestion of marine products. It has been revealed that inorganic arsenic is methylated in the human body to form MAA (methylarsonic acid) and DMAA (dimethylarsinic acid). It appears therefore that the arsenic present in the human urine is a mixture of the arsenic originating from marine products and the arsenic metabolized in vivo. Recent studies have shown that inorganic arsenic and methylarsenic compounds are quite different in toxicity and effect on the living body due to their difference in chemical species. Finding the chemical species of arsenic in the urine and hair of normal subjects will therefore provide valuable basal data for the biological monitoring of arsenic exposure and for toxicological studies of arsenic.

  4. Using Systems Biology Approaches to Elucidate the Mechanisms of Arsenic Reduction in Shewanella Sp. ANA-3

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Ruth Pamela Tilus

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring ubiquitous metalloid that is usually associated with Iron, sulfur and other compounds in the earth’s crust. In some places around the world the bio-geochemical conditions can cause the mineral bound form of arsenic (arsenate) to be reduced to a more water-soluble form (arsenite). In its reduced state, arsenic can seep from the soil down into ground water aquifers and contaminate drinking water supplies. The effects of drinking arsenic tainted water are devasta...

  5. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Garrido-Hoyos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m2·g−1 for the goethite and 2.44 m2·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III. To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 23 factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C0 of As(V 0.360 mg·L−1, and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L−1, a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004 [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg−1·min−1. With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm of 0.4822 mg·g−1 for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III.

  6. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2015-12-23

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m²·g(-1) for the goethite and 2.44 m²·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III). To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 2³ factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C₀ of As(V) 0.360 mg·L(-1)), and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L(-1), a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004) [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg(-1)·min(-1). With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm) of 0.4822 mg·g(-1) for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III).

  7. Urinary arsenic speciation and its correlation with 8-OHdG in Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Pi, J.B.; Li, B.; Xu, Y.Y.; Jin, Y.P.; Sun, G.F. [China Medical University, Shenyang (China). Dept. for Occupational & Environmental Health

    2008-10-15

    In contrast to arsenicosis caused by consumption of water contaminated by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic, human exposure to this metalloid through coal burning has been rarely reported. In this study, arsenic speciation and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in urine were determined in the Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning in Guizhou, China, an epidemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning caused by coal burning. The urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and total arsenic (tAs) of high-arsenic exposed subjects were significantly higher than those of low-arsenic exposed residents. A biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, urinary 8-OHdG level was significantly higher in high-arsenic exposed subjects than that of low exposed. Significant positive correlations were found between 8-OHdG levels and concentrations of iAs, MMA, DMA and tAs, respectively. In addition, a significant negative correlation was observed between 8-OHdG levels and the secondary methylation ratio (DMA/(MMA + DMA)). The results suggest that chronic arsenic exposure through burning coal rich in arsenic is associated with oxidative DNA damages, and that secondary methylation capacity is potentially related to the susceptibility of individuals to oxidative DNA damage induced by arsenic exposure through coal burning in domestic living.

  8. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As{sup III}) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Y., E-mail: yiannisgeorgiou@hotmail.com [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Mouzourakis, E., E-mail: emouzou@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bourlinos, A.B., E-mail: bourlino@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Zboril, R., E-mail: radek.zboril@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Karakassides, M.A., E-mail: mkarakas@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Douvalis, A.P., E-mail: adouval@uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bakas, Th., E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Deligiannakis, Y., E-mail: ideligia@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Novel hybrid based on carbon nitride and iron nanoparticles (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe). • gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe superior As{sup III} sorbent(76.5 mg g{sup −1}). • Surface complexation modeling of As{sup III} adsorption. • Dual mode EPR,monitoring of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} evolution. - Abstract: A novel hybrid material (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10 nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20–100 nm). {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O{sub 2}. The as-prepared gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears Fe{sup 2+} and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O{sub 2}, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As{sup III} uptake capacity of 76.5 mg g{sup −1}, i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe is a superior As{sup III} sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11–36 mg g{sup −1}). The present results demonstrate that the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity.

  9. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share ... of the Method used to Measure Arsenic in Foods Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometric Determination of Arsenic, ...

  10. A comparison of iron oxide-rich joint coatings and rock chips as geochemical sampling media in exploration for disseminated gold deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, W.; Larson, L.T.; Carpenter, R.H.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of iron oxide-rich fracture coatings as a geochemical sampling medium for disseminated gold deposits, as compared with conventional lithogeochemical methods, for samples from the Pinson mine and Preble prospect in southeastern Humboldt County, Nevada. That disseminated gold mineralization is associated with Hg, As, and Sb is clearly demonstrated in these deposits for both fracture coatings and rock chip samples. However, the relationship is more pronounced for fracture coatings. Fracture coatings at Pinson contain an average of 3.61, 5.13, 14.37, and 3.42 times more Au, As, Sb and Hg, respectively, than adjacent rock samples. At Preble, fracture coatings contain 3.13, 9.72, 9.18, and 1.85 times more Au, As, Sb and Hg, respectively, than do adjacent rock samples. Geochemical anomalies determined from fracture coatings are thus typically more intense than those determined from rock samples for these elements. The sizes of anomalies indicated by fracture coatings are also somewhat larger, but this is less obvious. In both areas, Sb anomalies are more extensive in fracture coatings. At Preble, some Hg and Au anomalies are also more extensive in fracture coatings. In addition to halos formed by the Hg, As and Sb, high values for Au/Ag and Zn/(Fe + Mn) are closely associated with gold mineralization at the Pinson mine. The large enhancement in geochemical response afforded by fracture coatings indicates a definite potential in the search for buried disseminated gold deposits. ?? 1984.

  11. Impact of biostimulated redox processes on metal dynamics in an iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Akob, Denise M; Bischoff, Sebastian; Sitte, Jana; Kostka, Joel E; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of metals and radionuclides in soil environments is necessary for evaluating risks to pristine sites. An iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium-mining district (Ronneburg, Germany) showed high porewater concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Thus, this study aims to (i) evaluate metal dynamics during terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and (ii) characterize active microbial populations in biostimulated soil microcosms using a stable isotope probing (SIP) approach. In biostimulated soil slurries, concentrations of soluble Co, Ni, Zn, As, and unexpectedly U increased during Fe(III)-reduction. This suggests that there was a release of sorbed metals and As during reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-oxides. Subsequent sulfate-reduction was concurrent with a decrease of U, Co, Ni, and Zn concentrations. The relative contribution of U(IV) in the solid phase changed from 18.5 to 88.7% after incubation. The active Fe(III)-reducing population was dominated by delta-Proteobacteria (Geobacter) in (13)C-ethanol amended microcosms. A more diverse community was present in (13)C-lactate amended microcosms including taxa related to Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, delta-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria. Our results suggested that biostimulated Fe(III)-reducing communities facilitated the release of metals including U to groundwater which is in contrast to other studies.

  12. Interaction of iron with boron in metal-rich metallaboranes resulting in large deshielding and rapid relaxation processes of the boron-11 nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, N.P.; Fehlner, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    A first-order, parameterized model for calculating 11 B chemical shifts in metal-rich ferraboranes and a correlation of chemical shift with boron Mulliken populations from Fenske-Hall calculations are presented. These correlations are qualitatively different from those reported earlier for boranes and suggest that direct iron-boron interactions lead to large deshielding due to substantial increases in multiple-bond contributions to the shielding tensor. Relaxation rates have been measured for [Fe 4 (CO) 12 BH/sub 3-n/]/sup n-/ (n = 0-2) and correlated with electric field gradients at the boron nucleus estimated from Fenske-Hall calculations. These results demonstrate that formation of the boride, [Fe 4 (CO) 12 B] 3- , by deprotonation is accompanied by the development of large asymmetries in the electronic charge distribution around the boron nucleus. Finally, 7 Li NMR is used to probe the nature of the anions [Fe 4 (CO) 12 BH/sub 3-n/]/sup n-/ (n = 1-3), and observed line shapes suggest close association of Li + with the trianion. 28 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  13. Surface Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Hemoglobin-Derived Iron and Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nanolayers for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The great challenge of boosting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activity of non-noble-metal electrocatalysts is how to achieve effective exposure and full utilization of nitrogen-rich active sites. To realize the goals of high utilization of active sites and fast electron transport, here we report a new strategy for synthesis of an iron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanolayers-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes as ORR electrocatalyst (N-C@CNT-Fe via using partially carbonized hemoglobin as a single-source precursor. The onset and half-wave potentials for ORR of N-C@CNT-Fe are only 45 and 54 mV lower than those on a commercial Pt/C (20 wt.% Pt catalyst, respectively. Besides, this catalyst prepared in this work has been confirmed to follow a four-electron reaction mechanism in ORR process, and also displays ultra-high electrochemical cycling stability in both acidic and alkaline electrolytes. The enhancement of ORR activity can be not only attributed to full exposure and utilization of active site structures, but also can be resulted from the improvement of electrical conductivity owing to the introduction of CNT support. The analysis of X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy shows that both Fe–N and graphitic-N species may be the ORR active site structures of the prepared catalyst. Our study can provide a valuable idea for effective improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of non-noble-metal ORR catalysts.

  14. Environmental assessment of the arsenic-rich, Rodalquilar gold-(copper-lead-zinc) mining district, SE Spain: data from soils and vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzun, Roberto; Cubas, Paloma; Higueras, Pablo; Lillo, Javier; Llanos, Willians

    2009-08-01

    The Rodalquilar mineral deposits (SE Spain) were formed in Miocene time in relation to caldera volcanic episodes and dome emplacement phenomena. Two types of ore deposits are recognized: (1) the El Cinto epithermal, Au-As high sulphidation vein and breccia type; and (2) peripheral low sulphidation epithermal Pb-Zn-Cu-(Au) veins. The first metallurgical plants for gold extraction were set up in the 1920s and used amalgamation. Cyanide leaching began in the 1930s and the operations lasted until the mid 1960s. The latter left a huge pile of ~900,000-1,250,000 m3 of abandoned As-rich tailings adjacent to the town of Rodalquilar. A frustrated initiative to reactivate the El Cinto mines took place in the late 1980s and left a heap leaching pile of ~120,000 m3. Adverse mineralogical and structural conditions favoured metal and metalloid dispersion from the ore bodies into soils and sediments, whereas mining and metallurgical operations considerably aggravated contamination. We present geochemical data for soils, tailings and wild plant species. Compared to world and local baselines, both the tailings and soils of Rodalquilar are highly enriched in As (mean concentrations of 950 and 180 μg g-1, respectively). Regarding plants, only the concentrations of As, Bi and Sb in Asparagus horridus, Launaea arborescens, Salsola genistoides, and Stipa tenacissima are above the local baselines. Bioaccumulation factors in these species are generally lower in the tailings, which may be related to an exclusion strategy for metal tolerance. The statistical analysis of geochemical data from soils and plants allows recognition of two well-differentiated clusters of elements (As-Bi-Sb-Se-Sn-Te and Cd-Cu-Hg-Pb-Zn), which ultimately reflect the strong chemical influence of both El Cinto and peripheral deposits mineral assemblages.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of conditioned carbon with iron nanoparticles for the arsenic removal in aqueous phase; Sintesis y caracterizacion de carbon acondicionado con nanoparticulas de hierro para la remocion de arsenico en fase acuosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores C, D. O.

    2012-07-01

    Using pineapple husks conditioned with carboxymethylcellulose, hexamine and ferric nitrate, a carbonaceous material was obtained with nanoparticles of Fe (C Fe), which was characterized and tested for arsenic removal in the aqueous phase. The microscopic study showed spheres 4 microns and filaments 100 nm wide, so as iron particles whose diameter decreases to an average of 38.81 nm, when pyrolysis time was increased to 180 min. their distribution in the carbonaceous matrix is homogeneous. According to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, C Fe contains C (82.29%), O (7.23%), K (0.68%), Ca (3.77%) and Fe (6.25%) and its diffraction pattern shows the characteristic peak of Fe (0), which is not observed in the coal without iron. By neutron activation analysis were quantified Al, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn, they can be involved in the process of sorption of As (v) forming surface active sites. For C Fe and C B characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, groups C-H, C=O, C=C, -Nh, NH{sub 2}, isocyanate and isonitrile were found, the last two were formed by the present hexamine. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed energy states of C 1 and O 1 in pineapple shell washed, shell conditioned with iron, C Fe at different times and the pyrolysis coal without iron (C B). The material C Fe 180 presented a specific area of 167 m{sup 2}/g and 7.12 {+-} 1 sites/nm{sup 2} isoelectric point while pH{sub i} = 11.1 C B is 98.80 m{sup 2}/g specific area and 1.5 {+-} 1 sites/nm{sup 2} and pH{sub i} = 10.6, being favorable to the sorption process. The highest removal of As(v) for both materials was at ph = 2, fitting the kinetic data to pseudo-second order model. The isotherms as a function of concentration were adjusted to Freundlich model indicating multilayer chemisorption at specific sites of a heterogeneous medium. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy after the sample sorption Fe nanoparticles remain in the carbonaceous

  16. The effect of lipids, a lipid-rich ready-to-use therapeutic food, or a phytase on iron absorption from maize-based meals fortified with micronutrient powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnard, Arnaud; Moretti, Diego; Zeder, Christophe; Steingötter, Andreas; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2017-06-01

    Background: Ready-to-use-therapeutic foods (RUTFs) high in lipid, protein, and iron are used to treat malnutrition. Lipids increase gastric residence time, which could increase iron absorption, particularly from poorly soluble iron compounds and in combination with phytase. Objectives: The objectives were to 1 ) assess the effect on iron absorption of a lipid emulsion given 20 min before or together with an iron-fortified maize meal and 2 ) assess iron absorption from a micronutrient powder (MNP) given with a nutrient-dense RUTF and/or a microbial phytase. Design: A total of 41 women participated in 3 studies. They consumed a maize meal fortified with isotopically labeled ferrous sulfate (FeSO 4 ; study 1) or ferric pyrophosphate (FePP; study 2). In studies 1 and 2, a lipid emulsion was given with or 20 min before the meal. In study 3, with the use of a 2 × 2 factorial design, subjects consumed a maize meal fortified with an MNP containing labeled FeSO 4 (MNP) given with an RUTF (MNP+RUTF), with a phytase (MNP+phytase), or both (MNP+RUTF+phytase). Iron absorption was assessed by isotope incorporation in erythrocytes 14 d after the test meals. Results: The lipid emulsion given either before or with the meal significantly increased iron absorption from FePP by 2.55-fold (95% CI: 1.48-, 4.37-fold; P = 0.001) but not from FeSO 4 There was a trend to increase iron absorption with the MNP+RUTF meal, which did not reach significance (1.21-fold; 95% CI: 0.92-, 1.61-fold; P = 0.060). The addition of phytase to MNP and MNP+RUTF significantly increased iron absorption by 1.85-fold (95% CI: 1.49-, 2.29-fold; P phytase and RUTF. Conclusions: In iron-fortified maize-based meals, the addition of lipids more than doubles iron absorption from FePP. Our results suggest the possibility of an enhancing effect on iron absorption of lipid-rich RUTFs, but more research is needed to determine this. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01991626. © 2017 American Society

  17. Nuclear structure of neutron rich gallium, germanium and arsenic around N=50 and development of a laser ion source at ALTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastet, B.

    2011-01-01

    During this thesis, we have studied β decays of gallium's nuclei around N=50 and prepared a laser ionization source at ALTO.The production of exotic isotopes has brought new beam production challenges. The one addressed here relates to the elimination of isobar contaminants that create background for experiments. To address this issue a laser ionization source has been developed at ALTO. Copper has been chosen to be the first element to be ionized for physical interests and to compare the results of the laser ionization source with the ones at others facilities. A laser setup has been installed and optimized in order to ionize selectively the atoms of copper produced for experiments. After the optimization, a test of ionization of stable-copper was performed. This test has shown us that the laser system is able to successfully ionize atoms of copper.The studies of the region of the neutron-rich nuclei around N=50 are still to complete. 79,80,82,83,84,85 Ga has been produced using photo-nuclear reactions at the experimental area of the on-line PARRNe mass-separator operating with the ALTO facility. The fission fragments are produced at the interaction of the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the ALTO linear accelerator with a thick target of uranium in a standard UC x form. The oven is connected to a W ionizer heated up to 2000 C degrees that selectively ionizes alkalis but also elements with low ionization potentials such as Ga. The ions are accelerated through 30 kV and magnetically mass-separated before being implanted on a mylar tape close to the detection setup, so that this system allows us to study β and β-n decays of 79,80,82,83,84,85 Ga.The data analysis have produced new results concerning the decays of 80 Ga, 84 Ga and 84 Ge. For 80 Ga, the existence of an isomeric state has been confirmed and two different half-lives were measured for the ground state and the isomer. Furthermore, the analysis of 84 Ga decay confirmed two states and allowed us to

  18. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  19. Groundwater arsenic concentrations in Vietnam controlled by sediment age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming; Thai, Nguyen Thi

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater continues to threaten the health of millions of people in southeast Asia. The oxidation of organic carbon, coupled to the reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron oxides, is thought to control the release of sediment-bound arsenic into groundwater. However......, the cause of the high spatial variability in groundwater arsenic concentrations—which can range from 5 to 500 μg l−1 within distances of a few kilometres—has been uncertain. Here, we combine measurements of sediment age, organic-matter reactivity and water chemistry at four locations along a cross......-section of the arsenic-contaminated Red River floodplain in Vietnam to determine the origin of variations in groundwater arsenic concentrations. The burial age of the aquifer sediments, determined using optical stimulated luminescence, ranged from 460 years near the course of the present-day river to 5,900 years...

  20. Arsenic(V) reduction in relation to Iron(III) transformation and molecular characterization of the structural and functional microbial community in sediments of a basin-fill aquifer in Northern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Babur S; Muruganandam, Subathra; Meng, Xianyu; Sorensen, Darwin L; Dupont, R Ryan; McLean, Joan E

    2014-05-01

    Basin-fill aquifers of the Southwestern United States are associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Many private domestic wells in the Cache Valley Basin, UT, have As concentrations in excess of the U.S. EPA drinking water limit. Thirteen sediment cores were collected from the center of the valley at the depth of the shallow groundwater and were sectioned into layers based on redoxmorphic features. Three of the layers, two from redox transition zones and one from a depletion zone, were used to establish microcosms. Microcosms were treated with groundwater (GW) or groundwater plus glucose (GW+G) to investigate the extent of As reduction in relation to iron (Fe) transformation and characterize the microbial community structure and function by sequencing 16S rRNA and arsenate dissimilatory reductase (arrA) genes. Under the carbon-limited conditions of the GW treatment, As reduction was independent of Fe reduction, despite the abundance of sequences related to Geobacter and Shewanella, genera that include a variety of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. The addition of glucose, an electron donor and carbon source, caused substantial shifts toward domination of the bacterial community by Clostridium-related organisms, and As reduction was correlated with Fe reduction for the sediments from the redox transition zone. The arrA gene sequencing from microcosms at day 54 of incubation showed the presence of 14 unique phylotypes, none of which were related to any previously described arrA gene sequence, suggesting a unique community of dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria in the Cache Valley Basin.

  1. Incorporation of arsenic into gypsum: Relevant to arsenic removal and immobilization process in hydrometallurgical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Danni; Yuan, Zidan [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Shaofeng, E-mail: wangshaofeng@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Jia, Yongfeng, E-mail: yongfeng.jia@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Demopoulos, George P. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Quantitatively studied the incorporation of arsenic into the structure of gypsum. • Arsenic content in the solid increased with pH and initial arsenic concentration. • Calcium arsenate phase precipitated in addition to gypsum at higher pH values. • The structure of gypsum and its morphology was altered by the incorporated arsenate. • The incorporated arsenate formed sainfeldite-like local structure in gypsum. - Abstract: Gypsum precipitates as a major secondary mineral during the iron-arsenate coprecipitation process for the removal of arsenic from hydrometallurgical effluents. However, its role in the fixation of arsenic is still unknown. This work investigated the incorporation of arsenic into gypsum quantitatively during the crystallization process at various pHs and the initial arsenic concentrations. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the coprecipitated solids. The results showed that arsenate was measurably removed from solution during gypsum crystallization and the removal increased with increasing pH. At lower pH where the system was undersaturated with respect to calcium arsenate, arsenate ions were incorporated into gypsum structure, whereas at higher pH, calcium arsenate was formed and constituted the major arsenate bearing species in the precipitated solids. The findings may have important implications for arsenic speciation and stability of the hydrometallurgical solid wastes.

  2. Multivariate analysis of the heterogeneous geochemical processes controlling arsenic enrichment in a shallow groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangbing; Liu, Changrong; Wang, Yanxin; Zhan, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various geochemical processes on arsenic enrichment in a high-arsenic aquifer at Jianghan Plain in Central China were investigated using multivariate models developed from combined adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The results indicated that the optimum variable group for the AFNIS model consisted of bicarbonate, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, fluorescence index, pH, and siderite saturation. These data suggest that reductive dissolution of iron/manganese oxides, phosphate-competitive adsorption, pH-dependent desorption, and siderite precipitation could integrally affect arsenic concentration. Analysis of the MLR models indicated that reductive dissolution of iron(III) was primarily responsible for arsenic mobilization in groundwaters with low arsenic concentration. By contrast, for groundwaters with high arsenic concentration (i.e., > 170 μg/L), reductive dissolution of iron oxides approached a dynamic equilibrium. The desorption effects from phosphate-competitive adsorption and the increase in pH exhibited arsenic enrichment superior to that caused by iron(III) reductive dissolution as the groundwater chemistry evolved. The inhibition effect of siderite precipitation on arsenic mobilization was expected to exist in groundwater that was highly saturated with siderite. The results suggest an evolutionary dominance of specific geochemical process over other factors controlling arsenic concentration, which presented a heterogeneous distribution in aquifers. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the supplemental file.

  3. Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Sorption and desorption of arsenic to ferrihydrite in a sand filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Soren; Larsen, Flemming; Koch, Christian Bender; Arvin, Erik

    2005-10-15

    Elevated arsenic concentrations in drinking water occur in many places around the world. Arsenic is deleterious to humans, and consequently, As water treatment techniques are sought. To optimize arsenic removal, sorption and desorption processes were studied at a drinking water treatment plant with aeration and sand filtration of ferrous iron rich groundwater at Elmevej Water Works, Fensmark, Denmark. Filter sand and pore water were sampled along depth profiles in the filters. The sand was coated with a 100-300 microm thick layer of porous Si-Ca-As-contaning iron oxide (As/Fe = 0.17) with locally some manganese oxide. The iron oxide was identified as a Si-stabilized abiotically formed two-line ferrihydrite with a magnetic hyperfine field of 45.8 T at 5 K. The raw water has an As concentration of 25 microg/L, predominantly as As(II). As the water passes through the filters, As(III) is oxidized to As(V) and the total concentrations drop asymptotically to a approximately 15 microg/L equilibrium concentration. Mn is released to the pore water, indicating the existence of reactive manganese oxides within the oxide coating, which probably play a role for the rapid As(III) oxidation. The As removal in the sand filters appears controlled by sorption equilibrium onto the ferrihydrite. By addition of ferrous chloride (3.65 mg of Fe(II)/L) to the water stream between two serially connected filters, a 3 microg/L As concentration is created in the water that infiltrates into the second sand filter. However, as water flow is reestablished through the second filter, As desorbs from the ferrihydrite and increases until the 15 microg/L equilibrium concentration. Sequential chemical extractions and geometrical estimates of the fraction of surface-associated As suggest that up to 40% of the total As can be remobilized in response to changes in the water chemistry in the sand filter.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  6. Arsenic Contamination in Groundwater of Bangladesh: Perspectives on Geochemical, Microbial and Anthropogenic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafi M. Tareq

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A groundwater, sediment and soil chemistry and mineralogical study has been performed to investigate the sources and mobilization process of Arsenic (As in shallow aquifers of Bangladesh. The groundwater from the shallow aquifers is characterized by high concentrations of Arsenic (47.5–216.8 µg/L, iron (0.85–5.83 mg/L, and phosphate, along with high electrical conductivity (EC. The groundwater has both very low oxidation-reduction potential (Eh and dissolved oxygen (DO values indicating reducing conditions. By contrast, the deep aquifers and surface waters (pond, canal have very low concentrations of Arsenic ( < 6 µg/L, iron (0.12–0.39 mg/L, and phosphate along with a relatively low EC. Furthermore, the values of Eh and DO are high, indicating oxic to suboxic conditions. Arsenic is inversely correlated with Eh values in the upper aquifer, whereas no relationship in the deeper aquifer is observed. These results suggest that As mobilization is clearly linked to the development of reducing conditions. The clayey silt, enriched in Fe, Mn, Al oxides and organic matter, and deposited in the middle unit of shallow aquifers, contains moderately high concentrations of As, whereas the sediments of deep aquifers and silty mud surface soils from paddy fields and ponds contain a low content of As (Daudkandi area. Arsenic is strongly correlated with the concentrations of Fe, Mn and Al oxides in the core samples from the Daudkandi and Marua areas. Arsenic is present in the oxide phase of Fe and Mn, phyllosilicate minerals and in organic matter in sediments. This study suggests that adsorption or precipitation of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxide on the surface or inner sites of biotite might be responsible for As concentrations found in altered biotite minerals by Seddique et al. Microbially or geochemically mediated reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides is the main mechanism for As release. The reducing conditions are caused by respiratory decomposition of

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  12. Arsenic evolution in fractured bedrock wells in central Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Zheng, Y.; Culbertson, C.; Schalk, C.; Nielsen, M. G.; Marvinney, R.

    2010-12-01

    Elevated arsenic concentration in fractured bedrock wells has emerged as an important and challenging health problem, especially in rural areas without public water supply and mandatory monitoring of private wells. This has posed risks of skin, bladder, prostate diseases and cancers to private well users. In central Maine, including the study site, 31% of bedrock wells in meta-sedimentary formations have been reported of elevated arsenic concentrations of > 10 µg/L. Geophysical logging and fracture specific water sampling in high arsenic wells have been conducted to understand how water flowing through the aquifers enters the boreholes and how arsenic evolves in the fracture bedrock wells. Two domestic wells in Manchester, Maine, located 50 meter apart with 38 µg/L and 73 µg/L of arsenic in unfiltered water, were investigated to characterize fractures by geophysical logging and to determine flow rates by pumping test. Water samples, representing the bore hole and the fractures, were collected and analyzed for arsenic under ambient and pumping conditions. Transmissivity of the fractures was estimated at 0.23-10.6 m2/day. Water with high dissolved arsenic was supplied primarily by high yielding fractures near the bottom of the borehole. Dissolved arsenic concentrations in borehole water increased as fracture water with high arsenic was replacing borehole water with initially low dissolved arsenic in response to pumping. The precipitation of iron particulates enriched in arsenic was common during and after pumping. Laboratory experiment on well water samples over a period of 16 days suggested that in the borehole arsenic was mainly settled with iron enriched particles, likely amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides, with possibly minor adsorption on the iron minerals. Another bedrock well in Litchfield, Maine, with 478 µg/L of arsenic in the unfiltered well water, is being investigated to quantify and reconstruct of the groundwater flow under ambient and pumping conditions

  13. Iron Isotope Variations in Reduced Groundwater and in Drinking Water Supplies: A Case Study of Hanoi, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, N.; Berg, M.; von Gunten, U.; Halliday, A.

    2004-12-01

    In reduced groundwater iron is involved in biotic and abiotic transformation processes, both of which could lead to iron isotope fractionation. The reduced groundwater aquifers in the area of the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi are the main drinking water sources for the city. These groundwaters contain arsenic, which imposes a serious health threat to millions of people. Dissolved arsenic is related to the reducing conditions prevalent in the groundwater, and iron and arsenic contents are correlated in the sediments. We are employing iron isotope composition as a tool to better understand the processes leading to the transformation of iron in the groundwater and its role in various biogeochemical processes in reduced environments. Drinking water is supplied to the city of Hanoi from several water treatment plants (WTP) which pump the raw groundwater from a lower aquifer, while the rural surroundings pump untreated groundwater from an upper aquifer by private tubewells. Surface water from the Red River delta is the main source of recharge to these two aquifers. Due to high content of particulate natural organic matter (NOM) in the sediment leading to extensive microbial activity, the groundwaters are anoxic and rich in dissolved iron(II). The iron(II) removal in the WTPs is carried by a multi-step treatment including aeration, settling, filtration, and chlorination. We have collected natural groundwater samples for isotopic analysis from two aquifers at several locations, a groundwater depth profile and its corresponding sediment phases from the upper aquifer and the underlying aquitard, raw and treated water from several WTPs, as well as the corresponding iron(III) precipitates. The iron concentrations of groundwaters analysed in this study range from 3 to 28 mg/L and δ 57Fe (57/54 deviation from IRMM 014) values vary between -1.2 and +1.5 ‰ . The sediment depth profile has a δ 57Fe around +0.3 ‰ , which implies that the high values obtained in the groundwater

  14. Chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic arsenic from Pleistocene aquifer sediments to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillispie, Elizabeth C; Andujar, Erika; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2016-08-10

    Over 150 million people in South and Southeast Asia consume unsafe drinking water from arsenic-rich Holocene aquifers. Although use of As-free water from Pleistocene aquifers is a potential mitigation strategy, such aquifers are vulnerable to geogenic As pollution, placing millions more people at potential risk. The goal of this research was to define chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic As to groundwater. Batch incubations of sediments with natural chemical variability from a Pleistocene aquifer in Cambodia were conducted to evaluate how interactions among arsenic, manganese and iron oxides, and dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon influenced As mobilization from sediments. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon produced the highest concentrations of dissolved As after >7 months, as compared to sediment samples incubated with sodium azide or without added carbon, and the extent of As release was positively correlated with the percent of initial extractable Mn released from the sediments. The mode of As release was impacted by the source of DOC supplied to the sediments, with biological processes responsible for 81% to 85% of the total As release following incubations with lactate and acetate but only up to 43% to 61% of the total As release following incubations with humic and fulvic acids. Overall, cycling of key redox-active elements and organic-carbon reactivity govern the potential for geogenic As release to groundwater, and results here may be used to formulate better predictions of the arsenic pollution potential of aquifers in South and Southeast Asia.

  15. Arsenic species and leachability in the fronds of the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu Cong; Ma, Lena Q.; Zhang Weihua; Cai Yong; Harris, Willie G

    2003-07-01

    Arsenic was predominantly present as inorganic arsenite in the fronds of the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake. - Arsenic speciation is important not only for understanding the mechanisms of arsenic accumulation and detoxification by hyperaccumulators, but also for designing disposal options of arsenic-rich biomass. The primary objective of this research was to understand the speciation and leachability of arsenic in the fronds of Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.), an arsenic hyperaccumulator, with an emphasis on the implications for arsenic-rich biomass disposal. Chinese brake was grown for 18 weeks in a soil spiked with 50 mg As kg{sup -1} as arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), arsenite (AsO{sub 3}{sup 3-}), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), or methylarsonic acid (MMA). Plant samples were extracted with methanol/water (1:1) and arsenic speciation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The impacts of air-drying on arsenic species and leachability in the fronds were examined in the laboratory. After 18 weeks, water-soluble arsenic in soil was mainly present as arsenate with little detectable organic species or arsenite regardless of arsenic species added to the soil. However, arsenic in the fronds was primarily present as inorganic arsenite with an average of 94%. Arsenite re-oxidation occurred in the old fronds and the excised dried tissues. Arsenic species in the fronds were slightly influenced by arsenic forms added to the soil. Air-drying of the fronds resulted in leaching of substantial amounts of arsenic. These findings can be of significance when looking at disposal options of arsenic-rich biomass from the point of view of secondary contamination.

  16. Microbial community in high arsenic shallow groundwater aquifers in Hetao Basin of Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Zhou; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Hongchen; Wang, Yanxin; Dong, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    A survey was carried out on the microbial community of 20 groundwater samples (4 low and 16 high arsenic groundwater) and 19 sediments from three boreholes (two high arsenic and one low arsenic boreholes) in a high arsenic groundwater system located in Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia, using the 454 pyrosequencing approach. A total of 233,704 sequence reads were obtained and classified into 12-267 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Groundwater and sediment samples were divided into low and high arsenic groups based on measured geochemical parameters and microbial communities, by hierarchical clustering and principal coordinates analysis. Richness and diversity of the microbial communities in high arsenic sediments are higher than those in high arsenic groundwater. Microbial community structure was significantly different either between low and high arsenic samples or between groundwater and sediments. Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter and Alishewanella were the top four genera in high arsenic groundwater, while Thiobacillus, Pseudomonas, Hydrogenophaga, Enterobacteriaceae, Sulfuricurvum and Arthrobacter dominated high arsenic sediments. Archaeal sequences in high arsenic groundwater were mostly related to methanogens. Biota-environment matching and co-inertia analyses showed that arsenic, total organic carbon, SO4(2-), SO4(2-)/total sulfur ratio, and Fe(2+) were important environmental factors shaping the observed microbial communities. The results of this study expand our current understanding of microbial ecology in high arsenic groundwater aquifers and emphasize the potential importance of microbes in arsenic transformation in the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia.

  17. Microbial community in high arsenic shallow groundwater aquifers in Hetao Basin of Inner Mongolia, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out on the microbial community of 20 groundwater samples (4 low and 16 high arsenic groundwater and 19 sediments from three boreholes (two high arsenic and one low arsenic boreholes in a high arsenic groundwater system located in Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia, using the 454 pyrosequencing approach. A total of 233,704 sequence reads were obtained and classified into 12-267 operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Groundwater and sediment samples were divided into low and high arsenic groups based on measured geochemical parameters and microbial communities, by hierarchical clustering and principal coordinates analysis. Richness and diversity of the microbial communities in high arsenic sediments are higher than those in high arsenic groundwater. Microbial community structure was significantly different either between low and high arsenic samples or between groundwater and sediments. Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter and Alishewanella were the top four genera in high arsenic groundwater, while Thiobacillus, Pseudomonas, Hydrogenophaga, Enterobacteriaceae, Sulfuricurvum and Arthrobacter dominated high arsenic sediments. Archaeal sequences in high arsenic groundwater were mostly related to methanogens. Biota-environment matching and co-inertia analyses showed that arsenic, total organic carbon, SO4(2-, SO4(2-/total sulfur ratio, and Fe(2+ were important environmental factors shaping the observed microbial communities. The results of this study expand our current understanding of microbial ecology in high arsenic groundwater aquifers and emphasize the potential importance of microbes in arsenic transformation in the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia.

  18. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: Arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Christopher T.; Couture, Raoul-Marie; Omoregie, Enoma O.; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH) 3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. Highlights: •Oscillating redox conditions and heterotrophic metabolism are implemented in PHREEQC. •Depletion of labile organic matter limits iron reduction and arsenic release. •Amorphous FeAsO 4 ∙2H 2 O precipitation potentially limits arsenic mobility during redox cycling. •Water fluctuating zones may naturally attenuate arsenic liberation during flooding. -- We demonstrate through batch experiments, spectroscopy and modelling that repetitive cycles of oxidation and reduction decrease arsenic mobility in soils during subsequent reducing conditions

  19. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  20. Nonheme-iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal is increased by the addition of small amounts of pork meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boech, S.B.; Hansen, M.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    of small amounts of meat on nonheme-iron absorption from a meal presumed to have low iron bioavailability. Design: Forty-five healthy women with a mean (+/-SD) age of 24 +/- 3 y were randomly assigned to I of 3 groups, each of which was served (A) a basic meal (rice, tomato sauce, pea puree, and a wheat...

  1. Arsenic removal by electrocoagulation process: Recent trends and removal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidheesh, P V; Singh, T S Anantha

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a major issue in the present world. Arsenicosis is the disease caused by the regular consumption of arsenic contaminated water, even at a lesser contaminated level. The number of arsenicosis patients is increasing day-by-day. Decontamination of arsenic from the water medium is the only one way to regulate this and the arsenic removal can be fulfilled by water treatment methods based on separation techniques. Electrocoagulation (EC) process is a promising technology for the effective removal of arsenic from aqueous solution. The present review article analyzes the performance of the EC process for arsenic removal. Electrocoagulation using various sacrificial metal anodes such as aluminium, iron, magnesium, etc. is found to be very effective for arsenic decontamination. The performances of each anode are described in detail. A special focus has been made on the mechanism behind the arsenite and arsenate removal by EC process. Main trends in the disposal methods of sludge containing arsenic are also included. Comparison of arsenic decontamination efficiencies of chemical coagulation and EC is also reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adsorção de arsênio(V pela quitosana ferro - III reticulada Asorption of arsenic (V by crosslinked iron-III-chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathyane Fagundes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of As(V by a crosslinked iron(III-chitosan adsorbent was evaluated under various conditions. The adsorption capacity of CH-FeCL was around 54 mg/g of As(V. The kinetics of adsorption obeys a pseudo-first-order model with rate constants equal to 0.022, 0.028, and 0.033 min-1 at 15, 25 and 35 ºC respectively. Adsorption data were well described by the Langmuir model, although they could be modeled also by the Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The maximum adsorption capacity, calculated with the Langmuir model, was 127 mg g-1 of As(V. The inhibition by competing anions is dependant on their kind and valence.

  3. Ecotoxicology of arsenic in the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, J.M. [Battelle Ocean Sciences Lab., Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Arsenic has a complex marine biogeochemistry that has important implications for its toxicity to marine organisms and their consumers. The average concentration of total arsenic in the ocean is about 1.7 {micro}g/L, about two orders of magnitude higher than the US Environmental Protection Agency`s human health criterion value of 0.0175 {micro}g/L. The dominant form of arsenic in oxygenated marine and brackish waters in arsenate (As V). The more toxic and potentially carcinogenic arsenite (As III) rarely accounts for more than 20% of total arsenic in seawater. Uncontaminated marine sediments contain from 5 to about 40 {micro}g/g dry weight total arsenic. Arsenate dominates in oxidized sediments and is associated primarily with iron oxyhydroxides. In reducing marine sediments, arsenate is reduced to arsenite and is associated primarily with sulfide minerals. Marine algae accumulate arsenate from seawater, reduce it to arsenite, and then oxidize the arsenite to a large number of organoarsenic compounds. The algae release arsenite, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid to seawater. Dissolved arsenite and arsenate are more toxic to marine phytoplankton than to marine invertebrates and fish. This may be due to the fact that marine animals have a limited ability to bioconcentrate inorganic arsenic from seawater but can bioaccumulate organoarsenic compounds from their food. Tissues of marine invertebrates and fish contain high concentrations of arsenic, usually in the range of about 1 to 100 {micro}g/g dry weight, most of it in the form of organoarsenic compounds, particularly arsenobetaine. Organoarsenic compounds are bioaccumulated by human consumers of seafood products, but the arsenic is excreted rapidly, mostly as organoarsenic compounds. Arsenobetaine, the most abundant organoarsenic compound in seafoods, is not toxic or carcinogenic to mammals. Little of the organoarsenic accumulated by humans from seafood is converted to toxic inorganic arsenite.

  4. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  5. Land scale biogeography of arsenic biotransformation genes in estuarine wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Yu; Su, Jian-Qiang; Sun, Guo-Xin; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Yi; Ding, Junjun; Chen, Yong-Shan; Shen, Yu; Zhu, Guibing; Rensing, Christopher; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-06-01

    As an analogue of phosphorus, arsenic (As) has a biogeochemical cycle coupled closely with other key elements on the Earth, such as iron, sulfate and phosphate. It has been documented that microbial genes associated with As biotransformation are widely present in As-rich environments. Nonetheless, their presence in natural environment with low As levels remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the abundance levels and diversities of aioA, arrA, arsC and arsM genes in estuarine sediments at low As levels across Southeastern China to uncover biogeographic patterns at a large spatial scale. Unexpectedly, genes involved in As biotransformation were characterized by high abundance and diversity. The functional microbial communities showed a significant decrease in similarity along the geographic distance, with higher turnover rates than taxonomic microbial communities based on the similarities of 16S rRNA genes. Further investigation with niche-based models showed that deterministic processes played primary roles in shaping both functional and taxonomic microbial communities. Temperature, pH, total nitrogen concentration, carbon/nitrogen ratio and ferric iron concentration rather than As content in these sediments were significantly linked to functional microbial communities, while sediment temperature and pH were linked to taxonomic microbial communities. We proposed several possible mechanisms to explain these results. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Kinetic Modeling of Arsenic Cycling by a Freshwater Cyanobacterium as Influenced by N:P Ratios: A Potential Biologic Control in an Iron-Limited Drainage Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, C. T.; Herbert, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Elevated As levels are common in South Texas surface waters, where As is derived from the natural weathering of geogenic sources and a byproduct of historical uranium mining. The impacted surface waters of the Nueces River drainage basin supply Lake Corpus Christi (LCC), a major drinking water reservoir for the Corpus Christi area. The soils and sediments of the Nueces River drainage basin generally have low levels of reactive iron (average concentration of 2780 mg/kg), limiting the control of iron oxyhydroxides on As geochemistry and bioavailability. Given these conditions, biologic cycling of As may have a large influence on As fate and transport in LCC. Sediment cores from LCC show evidence for cyanobacterial blooms after reservoir formation based upon stable isotopes, total organic matter and specific elemental correlations. While algae have been shown to accumulate and reduce inorganic As(V), few studies have reported biologic cycling of As by cyanobacteria. Therefore, As(V) uptake, accumulation, reduction, and excretion in a 1.0 μ M As(V) solution by the freshwater cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120, was measured over time as a function of low, middle and high N:P ratios (1.2, 12, 120) to determine nutrient effects on As cycling by the cyanobacterium. Total As(V) reduction was observed in all three conditions upon completion of the ten-day experiment. Maximum As(V) reduction rates ranged from (0.013 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the low N:P solution to (0.398 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the high N:P solution. Increased cell biomass in the low N:P ratio solution compensated for the low maximum reduction rate to allow total As(V) reduction. Kinetic equations commonly used to model algal-nutrient interactions were utilized in modeling the current data. The Michaelis-Menten enzyme saturation equation modified with a competitive inhibition term adequately modeled As(III) excretion in the high and middle N:P ratio test conditions. The low N:P test condition further

  7. Arsenic: natural and anthropogenic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matschullat, Jörg; Deschamps, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    .... Based on state-of-the-art investigations into the global arsenic cycle, the related human toxicology and available remediation technologies, it assesses arsenic in all the environmental compartments...

  8. ARSENIC RESEARCH AT GWERD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract - The presentation will summarize the arsenic research program at the Ground Water & Ecosystems Restoration Division of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of USEPA. Topics include use of permeable reactive barriers for in situ arsenic remediation in ground...

  9. Arsenic removal by magnetic nanocrystalline barium hexaferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Hasmukh A.; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) ( 12 O 19 , BHF) is a well-known permanent magnet (i.e., fridge magnets) and attractive due to its low cost in making large quantities. BHF offers a viable alternative to magnetite nanocrystals for arsenic removal since it features surfaces similar to iron oxides but with much enhanced magnetism. Herein, we employ BHF nanocrystalline materials for the first time in arsenic removal from wastewater. Our results show better (75 %) arsenic removal than magnetite of the similar sizes. The BHF nanoparticles, 6.06 ± 0.52 nm synthesized by thermolysis method at 320 °C do not show hexagonal phase, however, subsequent annealing at 750 °C produced pure hexagonal BHF in >200 nm assemblies. By using BHF, we demonstrate that nanoparticle removal is more efficient and fixed bed type cartridge applications are more possible.

  10. Arsenic removal using natural biomaterial-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansone, Linda; Klavins, Maris; Viksna, Arturs

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of water is a major problem worldwide. A possible solution can be approached through developing new sorbents based on cost-effective and environmentally friendly natural biomaterials. We have developed new sorbents based on biomaterial impregnation with iron oxyhydroxide. In this study, raw peat material, iron-modified peat, iron-modified biomass (shingles, straw, sands, cane and moss) as well as iron humate were used for the removal of arsenate from contaminated water. The highest sorption capacity was observed in iron-modified peat, and kinetic studies indicated that the amount of arsenic sorbed on this material exceeds 90 % in 5 h. Arsenate sorption on iron-modified peat is characterised by the pseudo-second-order mechanism. The results of arsenic sorption in the presence of competing substances indicated that sulphate, nitrate, chloride and tartrate anions have practically no influence on As(V) sorption onto Fe-modified peat, whereas the presence of phosphate ions and humic acid significantly lowers the arsenic removal efficiency.

  11. Manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide-graphene magnetic nanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, and application for the arsenic(III)-sorption from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Gupta, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup Kumar [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); De, Amitabha [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Chemical Science Division (India); Banerjee, Sangam [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Surface Physics Division (India); Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2012-12-15

    High specific surface area of graphene (GR) has gained special scientific attention in developing magnetic GR nanocomposite aiming to apply for the remediation of diverse environmental problems like point-of-use water purification and simultaneous separation of contaminants applying low external magnetic field (<1.0 T) from ground water. Fabrication of magnetic manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide (Mn{sub x}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2-x}{sup 3+}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}) (IMBO)-GR nanocomposite is reported by exfoliating the GR layers. Latest microscopic, spectroscopic, powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device characterizations showed that the material is a magnetic nanocomposite with high specific surface area (280 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) and pore volume (0.3362 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}). Use of this composite for the immobilization of carcinogenic As(III) from water at 300 K and pH {approx}7.0 showed that the nanocomposite has higher binding efficiency with As(III) than the IMBO owing to its high specific surface area. The composite showed almost complete (>99.9 %) As(III) removal ({<=}10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) from water. External magnetic field of 0.3 T efficiently separated the water dispersed composite (0.01 g/10 mL) at room temperature (300 K). Thus, this composite is a promising material which can be used effectively as a potent As(III) immobilizer from the contaminated groundwater (>10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) to improve drinking water quality.

  12. Identification of arsenite-and arsenic diglutathione-binding proteins in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumura, Ayano; Watanabe, Takayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yayoi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Hirano, Seishiro [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    It is generally accepted that trivalent arsenicals are more toxic than the corresponding pentavalent arsenicals, since trivalent arsenicals bind the thiol groups of biomolecules, leading to a deterioration in cellular functions. In the present study, we prepared three different arsenic-bound sepharoses and investigated the binding of hepatic cytosolic proteins to pentavalent, trivalent, and glutathione-conjugated trivalent arsenicals. SDS-PAGE showed no proteins bound to pentavalent arsenic specifically. In contrast, we found a number of proteins that have specific and high affinity for trivalent arsenic. Two of those proteins were identified: protein disulfide isomerase-related protein 5 (PDSIRP5) and peroxiredoxin 1/enhancer protein (PRX1/EP). These proteins have vicinal cysteines, as previously reported. In contrast, one of the prominent proteins that did not bind to trivalent arsenic was identified as calreticulin precursor. Although there are 3 cysteines in calreticulin precursor, two of the cysteines are spaced more than 25 amino acids apart. Five synthetic peptides containing 2 vicinal cysteines were prepared to study whether they would inhibit the binding of PDSIRP5, PRX1/EP, and other arsenic-binding proteins to trivalent arsenicals. Only two of the five peptides effectively inhibited binding, suggesting that other amino acids besides the 2 vicinal cysteines may modulate the affinity of cysteine-rich proteins for trivalent arsenicals. We further investigated hepatic cytosolic proteins that bound specifically to glutathione-conjugated trivalent arsenic, which is the most abundant form of arsenical in bile fluid. Four proteins that bound specifically to glutathione-conjugated trivalent arsenic were identified; interestingly, these proteins were different from the trivalent arsenic-binding proteins. These results suggest that although glutathione-conjugation is an important process in the metabolism, excretion, and detoxification of arsenicals, glutathione

  13. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in

  14. Liquid-liquid extraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium by zinc diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, S.; Wyttenbach, A.

    1978-03-01

    The authors report the solvent extraction, oxidation, reduction, extraction in the presence of iron, and reextraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium. These processes were studied using radioactive tracers. (G.T.H.)

  15. Removal of arsenic from contaminated water using coagulation enhanced microfiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchek, K.; Velicogna, D.; Dumouchel, A.; Wong, W.P.; Brown, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an innovative arsenic removal process were presented. The process is based on a combination of coagulation and microfiltration processes. Coagulation-Enhanced Microfiltration (CEMF) may eventually become a full-scale commercial technology. This study focused on the process with respect to groundwater treatment because of the importance of arsenic contamination in drinking water. Most experiments were bench-scale using tap water spiked with arsenic. Ferric chloride, which is commonly used in arsenic removal processes was also added. In addition, some tests were conducted on actual arsenic-contaminated water from the effluent treatment plant of a former mining site in Ontario. Results indicate a high arsenic removal efficiency in both spiked and actual water solutions. The microfiltration significantly reduced the level of arsenic in the treatment. This paper described the characteristics of membrane separation. It also presented information regarding chemically enhanced membrane filtration and coagulation-enhanced microfiltration. Bench-scale tests were conducted with both tubular membranes and with immersed capillary membranes. The effect of iron to arsenic ratios on the effectiveness of the system was also tested. It was recommended that future research should include a field study of the process on a pilot-scale to optimize process parameters and to accurately determine the cost of the process. 16 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs

  16. Dissolved Air Flotation of arsenic adsorbent particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Enrique Santander Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of arsenic from synthetic effluent was studied using the adsorbent particle flotation technique (APF and dissolved air flotation (DAF. A sample of an iron mineral was used as adsorbent particles of arsenic, ferric chloride as coagulant, cationic poly-acrylamide (NALCO 9808 as flocculants, and sodium oleate as collector. Adsorption studies to determine the pH influence, contact time, and adsorbent particles concentration on the adsorption of arsenic were carried out along with flotation studies to determine the removal efficiency of adsorbents particles. The results achieved indicate that the adsorption kinetic of arsenic is very rapid and that in range of pH’s from 2 to 7 the adsorption percentages remain constant. The equilibrium conditions were achieved in 60 minutes and about 95% of arsenic was adsorbed when used an adsorbent concentration of 2 g/L and pH 6.3. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent particles was 4.96 mg/g. The mean free energy of adsorption (E was found to be 2.63 kJ/mol, which suggests physisorption. The results of the flotation studies demonstrated that when synthetic effluents with 8.9 mg/L of arsenic were treated under the following experimental conditions; 2 g/L of adsorbent particles, 120 mg/L of Fe(III, 2 mg/L of Nalco 9808, 20 mg/L of sodium oleate, and 40% of recycle ratio in the DAF, it was possible to reach 98% of arsenic removal and 6.3 NTU of residual turbidity in clarified synthetic effluent.

  17. Effect of Solution Properties on Arsenic Adsorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, R.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element in the environment. Higher levels of As in soils may result from various anthropogenic sources such as use of arsenical pesticides, fertilizers, wood preservatives, smelter wastes, and coal combustion. This is of great environmental and human health concern due to the high toxicity and proven carcinogenicity of several arsenical species. Thus there is a need for developing cost effective technologies capable of lowering bioavailable As concentrations in soils to environmentally acceptable levels. In-situ immobilization of metals using inexpensive amendments such as minerals (apatite, zeolite, or clay minerals) or waste by-products (steel shot, beringite, and iron-rich biosolids) to reduce bioavailability is an inexpensive alternative to the more expensive ex-situ remediation methods. One such emerging in-situ technique is the application of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs). WTRs can be classified as a byproduct of drinking water treatment plants and are generally composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. WTRs possess amorphous structure and generally have high positive charge. Because As is chemically similar to phosphorus, the oxyanions As (V) and As (III) may have the potential of being retained by the WTRs. Thus, it is hypothesized that WTRs retain As irreversibly, thereby reducing As biavailability. As mobility of arsenic is controlled by adsorption reactions, knowledge of adsorption of As by WTRs is of primary relevance. Although the overall rate of adsorption is dependent on numerous factors, review of the literature indicates that competing ions in solution play an important role in the overall retention of As; however, little work has been conducted to identify which ions provide the most competition. As arsenic adsorption appears to be influenced by the variable pH-dependent charges developed on the soil particle surfaces, the effect of pH is also of critical importance. Hence, the

  18. Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Solar Driven Inline-Electrolytic Induced Co-Precipitation and Filtration—A Long Term Field Test Conducted in West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, Philipp; Malakar, Pradyut; Jana, Bana Bihari; Grischek, Thomas; Benz, Florian; Goldmaier, Alexander; Feistel, Ulrike; Jana, Joydev; Lahiri, Susmita; Alvarez, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water resources is of major concern in the Ganga delta plains of West Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Here, several laboratory and field studies on arsenic removal from drinking water resources were conducted in the past and the application of strong-oxidant-induced co-precipitation of arsenic on iron hydroxides is still considered as the most promising mechanism. This paper suggests an autonomous, solar driven arsenic removal setting and presents the finding...

  19. The occurrence and geochemistry of arsenic in groundwaters of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Lu, H.; Liu, T.

    2008-12-01

    Blackfoot disease caused by digesting water with high concentration (>0.3 mg/L) of arsenic from deep wells affected thousands of people in Chianan of Taiwan during 1930 to 1960. Drinking water with arsenic, even in a lower concentration (0.1-0.01 mg/L) increase risk of cancer that had been demonstrated by a number of studies on Taiwan. By concerning the effects of long-term chronic exposure to arsenic, the EPA of United States had revised the regulatory limit of arsenic for drinking water from 0.05 to 0.01 mg/L in 2006. Many researches have investigated on the occurrence and chemistry of the arsenic-contained groundwater and its health effects in Chianan of Taiwan. However, there are only a few studies on the other groundwater basins of Taiwan that providing about one third of water supplies for a population of 21 million. In this study, we investigate the occurrence and redox geochemistry of arsenic in nine major groundwater basins of Taiwan. The values and concentrations of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, iron, methane, sulfide, bicarbonate and ammonium in groundwaters were determined with a total of 610 monitoring wells in 2006. More than 60% of wells in the GW6 basin with a concentration of arsenic exceed 0.05 mg/L. The groundwaters in GW6 basin also have the highest average arsenic concentration. The exceeding percent (>0.05 mg/L) of wells for GW7, GW5, GW9 and GW8 basins are 30%, 20%, 18% and 8%, respectively. All of arsenic concentrations in groundwaters of GW1 to GW4 basins are lower than 0.05 mg/L, but some samples are higher than 0.01 mg/L. The exceeding percent of samples for arsenic 0.01 mg/L in GW3, GW1, GW2 and GW4 basins are 28%, 24%, 23% and 6%, respectively. Our results suggest that the concentrations of arsenic as well as iron in groundwaters of Taiwan were elevated by the iron-reducing process in aquifers. Samples, especially those with higher concentration of bicarbonate (> 400 mg/L) and oversaturated methane, mostly in the GW6 basin

  20. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H., E-mail: sarita.ahoranta@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kokko, Marika E., E-mail: marika.kokko@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Papirio, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.papirio@unicas.it [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Özkaya, Bestamin, E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Campus 34220, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Puhakka, Jaakko A., E-mail: jaakko.puhakka@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Continuous and rapid arsenic removal with biogenic jarosite was achieved at pH 3.0. • Arsenic removal was inefficient below pH 2.4 due to reduced Fe–As co-precipitation. • As(V) had better sorption characteristics than As(III). • Biogenic jarosite adsorbed arsenic more effectively than synthetic jarosite. - Abstract: Treatment of acidic solution containing 5 g/L of Fe(II) and 10 mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7 h, 96–98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28 mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH < 2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help ... but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help ... has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  4. Arsenic-transforming microbes and their role in biomining processes

    OpenAIRE

    Drewniak, L.; Sklodowska, A.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that microorganisms can dissolve different minerals and use them as sources of nutrients and energy. The majority of rock minerals are rich in vital elements (e.g., P, Fe, S, Mg and Mo), but some may also contain toxic metals or metalloids, like arsenic. The toxicity of arsenic is disclosed after the dissolution of the mineral, which raises two important questions: (1) why do microorganisms dissolve arsenic-bearing minerals and release this metal into the environment in a tox...

  5. Arsenic pollution and fractionation in sediments and mine waste samples from different mine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios, Raquel; Fernandez-Martinez, Rodolfo [Unidad de Espectroscopia, Division de Quimica, Departamento de Tecnologia, CIEMAT. Av. Complutense, 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, Rodrigo [Dpto. de Explotacion y Prospeccion de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, ETS de Ingenieros de Minas, C/Independencia, 13, E-33004 Oviedo (Spain); Rucandio, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.rucandio@ciemat.es [Unidad de Espectroscopia, Division de Quimica, Departamento de Tecnologia, CIEMAT. Av. Complutense, 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-01

    A characterization of arsenic pollution and its associations with solid mineral phases in sediments and spoil heap samples from four different abandoned mines in Spain is performed. Three of them were mercury mines located in the same mining district, in the province of Asturias, and the other one, devoted to arsenic mining, is in the province of Leon. A sequential extraction procedure, especially developed for arsenic, was applied for the study of arsenic partitioning. Very high total arsenic concentrations ranging 300-67,000 mg{center_dot}kg{sup -1} were found. Arsenic fractionation in each mine is broadly in accordance with the mineralogy of the area and the extent of the mine workings. In almost all the studied samples, arsenic appeared predominantly associated with iron oxyhydroxides, especially in the amorphous form. Sediments from cinnabar roasted piles showed a higher arsenic mobility as a consequence of an intense ore treatment, posing an evident risk of arsenic spread to the surroundings. Samples belonging to waste piles where the mining activity was less intense presented a higher proportion of arsenic associated with structural minerals. Nevertheless, it represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic fractionation in sediments from different mining areas is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sequential extraction scheme especially designed for arsenic partitioning is applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As associations with mineral pools is in accordance to the mineralogy of each area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As distribution and mobility in each area depends on the extent of mining activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As occurs mainly associated with amorphous iron oxyhydroxides in all samples.

  6. Arsenic pollution and fractionation in sediments and mine waste samples from different mine sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larios, Raquel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Álvarez, Rodrigo; Rucandio, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of arsenic pollution and its associations with solid mineral phases in sediments and spoil heap samples from four different abandoned mines in Spain is performed. Three of them were mercury mines located in the same mining district, in the province of Asturias, and the other one, devoted to arsenic mining, is in the province of León. A sequential extraction procedure, especially developed for arsenic, was applied for the study of arsenic partitioning. Very high total arsenic concentrations ranging 300–67,000 mg·kg −1 were found. Arsenic fractionation in each mine is broadly in accordance with the mineralogy of the area and the extent of the mine workings. In almost all the studied samples, arsenic appeared predominantly associated with iron oxyhydroxides, especially in the amorphous form. Sediments from cinnabar roasted piles showed a higher arsenic mobility as a consequence of an intense ore treatment, posing an evident risk of arsenic spread to the surroundings. Samples belonging to waste piles where the mining activity was less intense presented a higher proportion of arsenic associated with structural minerals. Nevertheless, it represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. - Highlights: ► Arsenic fractionation in sediments from different mining areas is evaluated. ► A sequential extraction scheme especially designed for arsenic partitioning is applied. ► As associations with mineral pools is in accordance to the mineralogy of each area. ► As distribution and mobility in each area depends on the extent of mining activity. ► As occurs mainly associated with amorphous iron oxyhydroxides in all samples.

  7. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a ...

  8. Evaluation of sorption capacity of modified wood biomass for arsenic five-valent oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littera, P.; Antoska, R.; Cernansky, S.; Sevc, J.; Kolencik, M.; Budzakova, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work is assessed bio-sorption of arsenic oxyanions, which represent one of two most common special arsenic occurring in contaminated waters. A wood biomass was used as sorbent, which was modified by amorphous oxohydroxides of iron to increase sorption capacity, to whom arsenic has high affinity. The work estimated sorption capacity of wood biomass adjusted by oxohydroxides of iron. The Langmuir model as well as the Freundlich model were suitable for evaluation of experimental results. Maximal sorption capacity of investigated sorbent was 9.259 mg/g, what is comparable with values published by other authors.

  9. [Mixture Leaching Remediation Technology of Arsenic Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun-feng; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Can; Yang, Qi; Deng, Lin-jing; Xie, Wei-qiang; Zhong, Yui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Wei-qiang; Zhang, Zhi-bei

    2016-03-15

    Soil contamination of arsenic pollution has become a severely environmental issue, while soil leaching is an efficient method for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil. In this study, batch tests were primarily conducted to select optimal mixture leaching combination. Firstly, five conventional reagents were selected and combined with each other. Secondly, the fractions were analyzed before and after the tests. Finally, to explore the feasibility of mixed leaching, three soils with different arsenic pollution levels were used to compare the leaching effect. Comparing with one-step washing, the two-step sequential washing with different reagents increased the arsenic removal efficiency. These results showed that the mixture of 4 h 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 4 h 0.1 mol · L⁻¹ EDTA was found to be practicable, which could enhance the removal rate of arsenic from 66.67% to 91.83%, and the concentration of arsenic in soil was decreased from 186 mg · kg⁻¹ to 15.2 mg · kg⁻¹. Furthermore, the results indicated that the distribution of fractions of arsenic in soil changed apparently after mixture leaching. Leaching process could significantly reduce the available contents of arsenic in soil. Moreover, the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 0.1 mol L⁻¹ EDTA could well decrease the arsenic concentration in aluminum-type soils, while the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ OX + 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH could well decrease the arsenic concentration in iron-type soils.

  10. Occurrence and geochemical behavior of arsenic in a coastal aquifer–aquitard system of the Pearl River Delta, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ya; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Cherry, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 161 μg/L, have been identified in groundwater samples from the confined basal aquifer underlying the aquitard of the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Both aquatic arsenic in pore water and solid arsenic in the sediments in the basal aquifer and aquitard were identified. Arsenic speciation of groundwater in the basal aquifer was elucidated on a pH-Eh diagram. In the PRD, arsenic is enriched in groundwater having both low and high salinity, and arsenic enriched groundwater is devoid of dissolved oxygen, has negative Eh values, is slightly alkaline, and has abnormally high concentrations of ammonium and dissolved organic carbon, but low concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Results of geochemical and hydrochemical analyses and sequential extraction analysis suggest that reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide could be one of the important processes that mobilized solid arsenic. We speculate that mineralization of sedimentary organic matter could also contribute to aquatic arsenic. Scanning electron microscope analysis confirms that abundant authigenic pyrite is present in the sediments. Sulphate derived from paleo-seawater served as the important sulfur source for authigenic pyrite formation. Co-precipitation of arsenic with authigenic pyrite significantly controlled concentrations of aquatic arsenic in the coastal aquifer–aquitard system. - Highlights: ► Coastal aquifer and aquitard are treated as an integrate system. ► Both aquatic arsenic and solid arsenic are observed. ► Aquatic arsenic is derived from reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide. ► Aquatic arsenic can also derived from mineralization of sedimentary organic matter. ► Co-precipitation of arsenic with authigenic pyrite is significant in such a system.

  11. Occurrence and geochemical behavior of arsenic in a coastal aquifer-aquitard system of the Pearl River Delta, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ya [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Jiao, Jiu Jimmy, E-mail: jjiao@hku.hk [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Cherry, John A. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 161 {mu}g/L, have been identified in groundwater samples from the confined basal aquifer underlying the aquitard of the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Both aquatic arsenic in pore water and solid arsenic in the sediments in the basal aquifer and aquitard were identified. Arsenic speciation of groundwater in the basal aquifer was elucidated on a pH-Eh diagram. In the PRD, arsenic is enriched in groundwater having both low and high salinity, and arsenic enriched groundwater is devoid of dissolved oxygen, has negative Eh values, is slightly alkaline, and has abnormally high concentrations of ammonium and dissolved organic carbon, but low concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Results of geochemical and hydrochemical analyses and sequential extraction analysis suggest that reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide could be one of the important processes that mobilized solid arsenic. We speculate that mineralization of sedimentary organic matter could also contribute to aquatic arsenic. Scanning electron microscope analysis confirms that abundant authigenic pyrite is present in the sediments. Sulphate derived from paleo-seawater served as the important sulfur source for authigenic pyrite formation. Co-precipitation of arsenic with authigenic pyrite significantly controlled concentrations of aquatic arsenic in the coastal aquifer-aquitard system. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coastal aquifer and aquitard are treated as an integrate system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both aquatic arsenic and solid arsenic are observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aquatic arsenic is derived from reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aquatic arsenic can also derived from mineralization of sedimentary organic matter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-precipitation of arsenic with authigenic pyrite is significant in such a system.

  12. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Daniel A.; Moore, Robert Charles; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  13. Treatability of inorganic arsenic and organoarsenicals in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlmeier, P.D.; Sherwood, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    A 2-year three-phase study into methods for treatment of mixed inorganic and organic arsenic species to drinking water levels was conducted at a former pesticide facility in Houston, Tex. The species present include monomethylarsinic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenate, and arsenite. Phase One studies reported here included the evaluation of four adsorbents using bottle roll and column flow through techniques, oxidation through the application of Fenton's reagent followed by coprecipitation, coprecipitation without oxidation, and ultraviolet (UV)/ozone tests. The four adsorbents tested were activated carbon, activated alumina, ferrous sulfide, and a strongly basic ion exchange resin. All adsorbents removed some arsenic, but none except ferrous sulfide was sufficiently effective to warrant follow-up studies. Two small ferrous sulfide column tests, run under different conditions, removed arsenic but not to the levels and loading capacities needed to make this method practical. Organic compound destruction was tested using Fenton's reagent (a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron) before coprecipitation. Arsenic was reduced to 170 ppb in the treated liquor. Coprecipitation without oxidative pretreatment produced a liquor containing 260 ppb arsenic. A two-stage Fenton-type coprecipitation procedure produced a supernatant containing 110 ppb total arsenic. Preliminary tests with a second-stage oxidative process, using ozone and UV radiation, showed approximately 80% destruction of an organic-arsenic surrogate (cacodylic acid) in 1 hour

  14. Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2009-06-09

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  15. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-05

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pHremoves iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Project Update: ZVI Used for Arsenic from Lead Smelting Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is conducting long-term monitoring of a granular iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for remediation of ground water contaminated with arsenic from a former lead smelting faci...

  17. The effect of nanocrystalline magnetite size on arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mayo et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher environmental standards have made the removal of arsenic from water an important problem for environmental engineering. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting sorbent to consider for this application. Its magnetic properties allow relatively routine dispersal and recovery of the adsorbent into and from groundwater or industrial processing facilities; in addition, iron oxide has strong and specific interactions with both As(III and As(V. Finally, this material can be produced with nanoscale dimensions, which enhance both its capacity and removal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential arsenic adsorption by nanoscale iron oxides, specifically magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We focus on the effect of Fe3O4 particle size on the adsorption and desorption behavior of As(III and As(V. The results show that the nanoparticle size has a dramatic effect on the adsorption and desorption of arsenic. As particle size is decreased from 300 to 12 nm the adsorption capacities for both As(III and As(V increase nearly 200 times. Interestingly, such an increase is more than expected from simple considerations of surface area and suggests that nanoscale iron oxide materials sorb arsenic through different means than bulk systems. The desorption process, however, exhibits some hysteresis with the effect becoming more pronounced with small nanoparticles. This hysteresis most likely results from a higher arsenic affinity for Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This work suggests that Fe3O4 nanocrystals and magnetic separations offer a promising method for arsenic removal.

  18. Arsenic removal by magnetic nanocrystalline barium hexaferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Hasmukh A.; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T., E-mail: yavuz@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of EEWS, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) (<15 nm) is known to remove arsenic efficiently but is very difficult to separate or require high magnetic fields to separate out from the waste water after treatment. Anisotropic hexagonal ferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}, BHF) is a well-known permanent magnet (i.e., fridge magnets) and attractive due to its low cost in making large quantities. BHF offers a viable alternative to magnetite nanocrystals for arsenic removal since it features surfaces similar to iron oxides but with much enhanced magnetism. Herein, we employ BHF nanocrystalline materials for the first time in arsenic removal from wastewater. Our results show better (75 %) arsenic removal than magnetite of the similar sizes. The BHF nanoparticles, 6.06 {+-} 0.52 nm synthesized by thermolysis method at 320 Degree-Sign C do not show hexagonal phase, however, subsequent annealing at 750 Degree-Sign C produced pure hexagonal BHF in >200 nm assemblies. By using BHF, we demonstrate that nanoparticle removal is more efficient and fixed bed type cartridge applications are more possible.

  19. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Big Sauk Lake Mobile Home Park in Sauk Centre, MN Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the one-year arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Big Sauk Lake Mobile Home Park (BSLMHP) in Sauk Centre, MN. The objectives of the project are to evaluate (1) the effective...

  20. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Török, B; Thiele, A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well

  1. Iron-Rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502 C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (<53 microns) with varying Fe amounts (Fe(0.66)X(0.34)- to Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3, where X refers to Mg and/or Mn) were selected for T/EGA. The carbonates were heated from 25 to 715 C (35 C/min) and evolved CO2 was measured as a function of temperature. The highest Fe containing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3) yielded CO2 peak temperatures between 466-487 C, which is consistent with the high temperature RN CO2 release. The lower Fe-bearing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.66)X(0.34)CO3) did not have peak CO2 release temperatures that matched the RN peak CO2 temperatures; however, their entire CO2 releases did occur within RN temperature range of the high temperature CO2 release. Results from this laboratory analog analysis demonstrate that the high temperature RN CO2 release is consistent with Fe-rich carbonate (approx.0.7 to 1 wt.% FeCO3). The similar RN geochemistry with other materials in Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through

  2. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found at low levels in breast milk. top How can families reduce their risk for exposure to arsenic? If you use arsenic-treated wood in home projects, you should wear dust masks, gloves, and protective clothing to decrease exposure to sawdust. ...

  3. Arsenical poisoning of racehorses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.N.; Fawell, E.V.; Brown, J.K.

    1964-03-07

    A case of arsenic poisoning in a training stable of Thoroughbred racehorses is described. This was due to the accidental spilling of an arsenical rat poison into the corn bin. Nine horses were affected. The mortality rate was 100 per cent. 1 table.

  4. Influence of chelating ligands on arsenic uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.): a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mohammad A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kazumasa; Maki, Teruya [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa (Japan); Rahman, M.M. [Department of Botany, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2008-06-15

    Ferric (oxyhydro-)oxides (FeO{sub x}) precipitate in the rhizosphere at neutral or alkaline pH and are adsorbed on the plant root surfaces. Consequently, the higher binding affinity of arsenate to FeO{sub x} and the low iron phytoavailability of the precipitated FeO{sub x} make the phytoremediation of arsenic difficult. In the present study, the influence of chelating ligands on arsenic and iron uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated. When chelating ligands were not treated to the growth medium, about 63 and 71% of the total arsenic and iron were distributed in the root extract (outer root surfaces) of rice, respectively. On the other hand, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and hydroxyiminodisuccinic acid (HIDS) desorbed a significant amount of arsenic from FeO{sub x} of the outer root surfaces. Therefore, the uptake of arsenic and iron into the roots and their subsequent translocation to the shoots of the rice seedlings increased significantly. The order of increasing arsenic uptake by chelating ligands was HIDS > EDTA > EDDS. Methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA) and iminodisuccinic acid (IDS) might not be effective in arsenic solubilization from FeO{sub x}. The results suggest that EDDS and HIDS would be a good and environmentally safe choice to accelerate arsenic phytoavailability in the phytoremediation process because of their biodegradability and would be a competent alternative to the widely used non-biodegradable and environmentally persistent EDTA. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Characterization of accumulated precipitates during subsurface iron removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halem, Doris van; Vet, Weren de; Verberk, Jasper; Amy, Gary; Dijk, Hans van

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Accumulated iron was not found to clog the well or aquifer after 12 years of subsurface iron removal. → 56-100% of accumulated iron hydroxides were found to be crystalline. → Subsurface iron removal favoured certain soil layers, either due to hydraulics or mineralogy. → Other groundwater constituents, such as manganese and arsenic were found to co-accumulate with iron. - Abstract: The principle of subsurface iron removal for drinking water supply is that aerated water is periodically injected into the aquifer through a tube well. On its way into the aquifer, the injected O 2 -rich water oxidizes adsorbed Fe 2+ , creating a subsurface oxidation zone. When groundwater abstraction is resumed, the soluble Fe 2+ is adsorbed and water with reduced Fe concentrations is abstracted for multiple volumes of the injection water. In this article, Fe accumulation deposits in the aquifer near subsurface treatment wells were identified and characterized to assess the sustainability of subsurface iron removal regarding clogging of the aquifer and the potential co-accumulation of other groundwater constituents, such as As. Chemical extraction of soil samples, with Acid-Oxalate and HNO 3 , showed that Fe had accumulated at specific depths near subsurface iron removal wells after 12 years of operation. Whether it was due to preferred flow paths or geochemical mineralogy conditions; subsurface iron removal clearly favoured certain soil layers. The total Fe content increased between 11.5 and 390.8 mmol/kg ds in the affected soil layers, and the accumulated Fe was found to be 56-100% crystalline. These results suggest that precipitated amorphous Fe hydroxides have transformed to Fe hydroxides of higher crystallinity. These crystalline, compact Fe hydroxides have not noticeably clogged the investigated well and/or aquifer between 1996 and 2008. The subsurface iron removal wells even need less frequent rehabilitation, as drawdown increases more slowly than in

  6. Vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kathryn V; Webster, Tara M; Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-04-15

    The performance of a vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter was evaluated for future application as point-of-use water treatment in rural areas for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater containing common ions. Due to the importance of sulfate and iron in arsenic removal and their variable concentrations in groundwater, influent sulfate and iron concentrations were varied. Complete removal of influent nitrate (50 mg/L) and over 50% removal of influent arsenic (200 μg/L) occurred. Of all conditions tested, the lowest median effluent arsenic concentration was 88 μg/L. Iron removal occurred completely when 4 mg/L was added, and sulfate concentrations were lowered to a median concentration arsenic concentrations remained above the World Health Organization's arsenic drinking water standard. Further research is necessary to determine if anaerobic biosand filters can be improved to meet the arsenic drinking water standard and to evaluate practical implementation challenges. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Speciation And Uptake of Arsenic Accumulated By Corn Seedlings Using XAS And DRC-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, J.G.; Martinez-Martinez, A.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-05-21

    ICP-MS was used to investigate the uptake of As(III) and As(V) from hydroponics growth media by corn seedlings. It was found that arsenic uptake by the plant roots for the arsenic(V) and arsenic(III) treatments were 95 and 112 ppm, respectively. However, in the shoots of the arsenic (V) treatments had 18 ppm whereas arsenic(III) treatments had 12 ppm. XANES studies showed that As for both treatments arsenic was present as a mixture of an As(III) sulfur complex and an As(V) oxygen complex. The XANES data was corroborated by the EXAFS studies showing the presence of both oxygen and sulfur ligands coordinated to the arsenic. Iron concentrations were found to increase by 4 fold in the As(V) contaminated growth media and 7 fold in the As(III) treatment compared to the control iron concentration of 500 ppm. Whereas, the total iron concentration in the shoots was found to decrease by approximately the same amount for both treatments from 360 ppm in the control to approximately 125 ppm in both arsenic treatments. Phosphorus concentrations were found to decrease in both the roots and shoots compared to the control plants. The total sulfur in the roots was found to increase in the arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) treatments to 560 ppm and 800 ppm, respectively, compared to the control plants 358 ppm. In addition, the total sulfur in shoots of the plants was found to remain relatively constant at approximately 1080 ppm. The potassium concentrations in the plants were found to increase in the roots and decrease in the shoots.

  8. Distribution of arsenic in groundwater in the area of Chalkidiki, Northern Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouras, A.; Katsoyiannis, I.; Voutsa, D.

    2007-01-01

    An integrate study aiming at the occurrence and distribution of arsenic in groundwater in the area of Chalkidiki, Northern Greece has been carried out. Groundwater samples from public water supply wells and private wells were analysed for arsenic and other quality parameters (T, pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl, HCO 3 , NO 3 , SO 4 , B, Fe, Mn). Arsenic showed high spatial variation; ranged from 0.001 to 1.840 mg/L. Almost 65% of the examined groundwaters exhibit arsenic concentrations higher than the maximum concentration limit of 0.010 mg/L, proposed for water intended for human consumption. Correlation analysis and principal component analysis were employed to find out possible relationships among the examined parameters and groundwater samples. Arsenic is highly correlated with potassium, boron, bicarbonate, sodium, manganese and iron suggesting common geogenic origin of these elements and conditions that enhance their mobility. Three groups of groundwater with different physicochemical characteristics were found in the study area: (a) groundwater with extremely high arsenic concentrations (1.6-1.9 mg/L) and high temperature (33-42 deg. C) from geothermal wells, (b) groundwater with relatively high arsenic concentrations (>0.050 mg/L), lower temperatures and relatively high concentrations of major ions, iron and manganese and, (c) groundwater with low arsenic concentrations that fulfil the proposed limits for dinking water

  9. Arsenic Mobility and Availability in Sediments by Application of BCR Sequential Extractions Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larios, R.; Fernandez, R.; Rucandio, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid found in nature, both naturally and due to anthropogenic activities. Among them, mining works are an important source of arsenic release to the environment. Asturias is a region where important mercury mines were exploited, and in them arsenic occurs in para genesis with mercury minerals. The toxicity and mobility of this element depends on the chemical species it is found. Fractionation studies are required to analyze the mobility of this metalloid in soils and sediments. Among them, the proposed by the Bureau Community of Reference (BCR) is one of the most employed. This method attempts to divide up, by operationally defined stages, the amount of this element associated with carbonates (fraction 1), iron and manganese oxy hydroxides (fraction 2), organic matter and sulphides (fraction 3), and finally as the amount associated residual fraction to primary and secondary minerals, that is, from the most labile fractions to the most refractory ones. Fractionation of arsenic in sediments from two mines in Asturias were studied, La Soterrana and Los Rueldos. Sediments from La Soterrana showed high levels of arsenic in the non-residual phases, indicating that the majority of arsenic has an anthropogenic origin. By contrast, in sediments from Los Rueldos most of the arsenic is concentrated in the residual phase, indicating that this element remains bound to very refractory primary minerals, as is also demonstrated by the strong correlation of arsenic fractionation and the fractionation of elements present in refractory minerals, such as iron, aluminum and titanium. (Author) 51 refs.

  10. Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a multi-element contaminated soil profile assessed by in-situ soil pore water sampling, column leaching and sequential extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Luke; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Clemente, Rafael; Lepp, Nicholas; Dickinson, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Three methods for predicting element mobility in soils have been applied to an iron-rich soil, contaminated with arsenic, cadmium and zinc. Soils were collected from 0 to 30 cm, 30 to 70 cm and 70 to 100 cm depths in the field and soil pore water was collected at different depths from an adjacent 100 cm deep trench. Sequential extraction and a column leaching test in the laboratory were compared to element concentrations in pore water sampled directly from the field. Arsenic showed low extractability, low leachability and occurred at low concentrations in pore water samples. Cadmium and zinc were more labile and present in higher concentrations in pore water, increasing with soil depth. Pore water sampling gave the best indication of short term element mobility when field conditions were taken into account, but further extraction and leaching procedures produced a fuller picture of element dynamics, revealing highly labile Cd deep in the soil profile. - Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a polluted soil can be realistically interpreted by in-situ soil pore water sampling.

  11. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  12. Environmental biochemistry of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, S.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr. (Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in the redistribution and global cycling of arsenic. Arsenic can accumulate and can be subject to various biotransformations including reduction, oxidation, and methylation. Bacterial methylation of inorganic arsenic is coupled to the methane biosynthetic pathway in methanogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions and may be a mechanism for arsenic detoxification. The pathway proceeds by reduction of arsenate to arsenite followed by methylation to dimethylarsine. Fungi are also able to transform inorganic and organic arsenic compounds into volatile methylarsines. The pathway proceeds aerobically by arsenate reduction to arsenite followed by several methylation steps producing trimethylarsine. Volatile arsine gases are very toxic to mammals because they destroy red blood cells (LD50 in rats; 3.0 mg kg-1). Further studies are needed on dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine toxicity tests through inhalation of target animals. Marine algae transform arsenate into non-volatile methylated arsenic compounds (methanearsonic and dimethylarsinic acids) in seawater. This is considered to be a beneficial step not only to the primary producers, but also to the higher trophic levels, since non-volatile methylated arsenic is much less toxic to marine invertebrates. Freshwater algae like marine algae synthesize lipid-soluble arsenic compounds and do not produce volatile methylarsines. Aquatic plants also synthesize similar lipid-soluble arsenic compounds. In terrestrial plants, arsenate is preferentially taken up 3 to 4 times the rate of arsenite. In the presence of phosphate, arsenate uptake is inhibited while in the presence of arsenate, phosphate uptake is only slightly inhibited. There is a competitive interaction between arsenate and phosphate for the same uptake system in terrestrial plants.

  13. Microbial community of high arsenic groundwater in agricultural irrigation area of Hetao Plain, Inner Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities can play important role in arsenic release in groundwater aquifers. To investigate the microbial communities in high arsenic groundwater aquifers in agricultural irrigation area, 17 groundwater samples with different arsenic concentrations were collected along the agricultural drainage channels of Hangjinhouqi County, Inner Mongolia and examined by illumina Miseq sequencing approach targeting the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Both principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering results indicated that these samples were divided into two groups (high and low arsenic groups according to the variation of geochemical characteristics. Arsenic concentrations showed strongly positive correlations with NH4+ and TOC. Sequencing results revealed that a total of 329-2823 OTUs were observed at the 97% OTU level. Microbial richness and diversity of high arsenic groundwater samples along the drainage channels were lower than those of low arsenic groundwater samples but higher than those of high arsenic groundwaters from strongly reducing areas. The microbial community structure in groundwater along the drainage channels was different from those in strongly reducing As-rich aquifers of Hetao Plain and other high As groundwater aquifers including Bangladesh, West Bengal and Vietnam. Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas dominated with high percentages in both high and low arsenic groundwaters. Alishewanella, Psychrobacter, Methylotenera and Crenothrix showed relatively high abundances in high arsenic groundwater, while Rheinheimera and the unidentified OP3 were predominant populations in low arsenic groundwater. Archaeal populations displayed a low occurrence and mainly dominated by methanogens such as Methanocorpusculum and Methanospirillum. Microbial community compositions were different between high and low arsenic groundwater samples based on the results of principal coordinate analysis and co-inertia analysis. Other geochemical

  14. Arsenic and drinking water. Part 1. A review of the source, distribution and behaviour of arsenic in the environment; Arsen und Trinkwasser. Teil 1. Ein Ueberblick ueber Vorkommen, Verteilung und Verhalten von Arsen in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberacker, F.; Maier, D. [Heinrich-Sontheimer-Lab., DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, M. [Stadtwerke Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Arsenic is ubiquituously distributed in our environment and is subject to continuous bio-geochemical cycling. Besides the acute toxicity of arsenic its chronic effects are of special importance. The permanent uptake with drinking water for example might cause cancer. Today, arsenic compounds hardly serve as pesticides anymore, although chromated copper arsenate is still used to preserve wood. Furthermore, arsenic is used in the alloy, glass and semiconductor industry. The main part of the earths' arsenic resources are bound to sulfur in the lithosphere. By means of rock weathering and volcanism it is transferred into pedo-, hydro- and atmosphere, where it is mainly bound to oxygen. Microorganisms are able to methylate the arsenic, whereby gaseous arsenic compounds are carried into the atmosphere. Also, it is released from the lithosphere through anthropogenic mining activities, although only for a small part of the released amount useful applications exist. The arsenic behaviour in natural waters is closely related to sulfur on the one hand and to iron oxides on the other. Under strongly reducing conditions the arsenic is precipitated as sulfide, while under oxidising conditions it is adsorbed to the surfaces of iron oxides. Therefore, under aerobic conditions the arsenic concentrations of aqueous solutions are controlled by these adsorption processes rather than by the solubility of solid arsenic phases. Manganese oxides also play an important role as they are able to rapidly oxidise As(III) to As(V). These processes of release and fixation of arsenic in the nature must be studied carefully, because they are applied for arsenic elimination during drinking water production as well. (orig.)

  15. Arsenic speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting results of synchrotron data to determine arsenic speciation in soil samples. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  16. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have not been helped by other types of chemotherapy or whose condition has improved but then worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications ...

  17. Paper on Arsenic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hiren

    The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of arsenic on ... concentration caused reduction in plant growth along with induction of few antioxidants. ... esc