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Sample records for arsenic represses transcription

  1. Disruption of Histone Modification and CARM1 Recruitment by Arsenic Represses Transcription at Glucocorticoid Receptor-Regulated Promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Fiona D.; Krohmer, Lori J.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Sheldon, Lynn A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) found in the environment is one of the most significant and widespread environmental health risks in the U.S. and throughout the world. It is associated with a broad range of health effects from cancer to diabetes as well as reproductive and developmental anomalies. This diversity of diseases can also result from disruption of metabolic and other cellular processes regulated by steroid hormone receptors via aberrant transcriptional regulation. Signi...

  2. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  3. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  4. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

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    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  5. Epigenetic mediated transcriptional activation of WNT5A participates in arsenical-associated malignant transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen with exposure associated with cancer of the lung, skin, and bladder. Many potential mechanisms have been implicated as playing a role in the process of arsenical-induced malignancy including the perturbation of signaling pathways and aberrant epigenetic regulation. We initiated studies to examine the role of a member of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway, WNT5A, in UROtsa cells and arsenite [URO-ASSC] and monomethylarsonous acid [URO-MSC] malignantly transformed variants. We present data herein that suggest that WNT5A is transcriptionally activated during arsenical-induced malignant transformation. This WNT5A transcriptional activation is correlated with the enrichment of permissive histone modifications and the reduction of repressive modifications in the WNT5A promoter region. The epigenetic activation of WNT5A expression and acetylation of its promoter remain after the removal of the arsenical, consistent with the maintenance of an anchorage independent growth phenotype in these cells. Additionally, treatment with epigenetic modifying drugs supports a functional role for these epigenetic marks in controlling gene expression. Reduction of WNT5A using lentiviral shRNA greatly attenuated the ability of these cells to grow in an anchorage independent fashion. Extension of our model into human bladder cancer cell lines indicates that each of the cell lines examined also express WNT5A. Taken together, these data suggest that the epigenetic remodeling of the WNT5A promoter is correlated with its transcriptional activation and this upregulation likely participates in arsenical-induced malignant transformation

  6. Hairy Transcriptional Repression Targets and Cofactor Recruitment in Drosophila

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    Bianchi-Frias Daniella

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the widely conserved Hairy/Enhancer of split family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix repressors are essential for proper Drosophila and vertebrate development and are misregulated in many cancers. While a major step forward in understanding the molecular mechanism(s surrounding Hairy-mediated repression was made with the identification of Groucho, Drosophila C-terminal binding protein (dCtBP, and Drosophila silent information regulator 2 (dSir2 as Hairy transcriptional cofactors, the identity of Hairy target genes and the rules governing cofactor recruitment are relatively unknown. We have used the chromatin profiling method DamID to perform a global and systematic search for direct transcriptional targets for Drosophila Hairy and the genomic recruitment sites for three of its cofactors: Groucho, dCtBP, and dSir2. Each of the proteins was tethered to Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase, permitting methylation proximal to in vivo binding sites in both Drosophila Kc cells and early embryos. This approach identified 40 novel genomic targets for Hairy in Kc cells, as well as 155 loci recruiting Groucho, 107 loci recruiting dSir2, and wide genomic binding of dCtBP to 496 loci. We also adapted DamID profiling such that we could use tightly gated collections of embryos (2-6 h and found 20 Hairy targets related to early embryogenesis. As expected of direct targets, all of the putative Hairy target genes tested show Hairy-dependent expression and have conserved consensus C-box-containing sequences that are directly bound by Hairy in vitro. The distribution of Hairy targets in both the Kc cell and embryo DamID experiments corresponds to Hairy binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. Similarly, the distributions of loci recruiting each of Hairy's cofactors are detected as cofactor binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. We have identified 59 putative transcriptional targets of Hairy. In addition to finding putative targets for

  7. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    During development, covalent modification of both, histones and DNA contribute to the specification and maintenance of cell identity. Repressive modifications are thought to stabilize cell type specific gene expression patterns, reducing the likelihood of reactivation of lineage-unrelated genes. ...

  8. Four chromo-domain proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe differentially repress transcription at various chromosomal locations.

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, G.; Verhein-Hansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription is repressed in regions of the fission yeast genome close to centromeres, telomeres, or the silent mating-type cassettes mat2-P and mat3-M. The repression involves the chromo-domain proteins Swi6 and Clr4. We report that two other chromo-domain proteins, Chp1 and Chp2, are also important for these position effects. Chp1 showed a specificity for centromeric regions. Its essentiality for the transcriptional repression of centromeric markers correlates with its importance for chrom...

  9. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

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    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  10. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

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    Gene O Bryant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose and repression (by glucose of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the

  11. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptiona...

  12. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by EWS-FLl1 in Ewing Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EWS-FLI1 chimeric oncoprotein characterizing Ewing Sarcoma (ES) is a prototypic aberrant ETS transcription factor with activating and repressive gene regulatory functions. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, especially transcriptional repression by EWS-FLI1, are poorly understood. We report that EWS-FLI1 repressed promoters are enriched in forkhead box recognition motifs, and identify FOXO1 as a EWS-FLI1 suppressed master regulator responsible for a significant subset of EWS-FLI1 repressed genes. In addition to transcriptional FOXO1 regulation by direct promoter binding of EWS-FLI1, its subcellular localization and activity is regulated by CDK2 and AKT mediated phosphorylation downstream of EWS-FLI1. Functional restoration of nuclear FOXO1 expression in ES cells impaired proliferation and significantly reduced clonogenicity. Gene-expression profiling revealed a significant overlap between EWS-FLI1 repressed and FOXO1-activated genes. Treatment of ES cell lines with Methylseleninic acid (MSA) evoked reactivation of endogenous FOXO1 in the presence of EWS-FLI1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced massive cell death which was found to be partially FOXO1-dependent. In an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, MSA increased FOXO1 expression in the tumor paralleled by a significant decrease in ES tumor growth. Together, these data suggest that a repressive sub-signature of EWS-FLI1 repressed genes precipitates suppression of FOXO1. FOXO1 re-activation by small molecules may therefore constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of ES. (author)

  13. Selenite transiently represses transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in potato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valeria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Di Sanza, Claudio; Negri, Rodolfo; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    A striking response of potato leaves to aspersion with selenite was observed at the transcriptional level by means of cDNA microarrays analysis. This response is characterized by a general transient repression of genes coding for components of photosynthetic systems and of other light-regulated genes. In particular, maximal repression was observed 8 h after selenite aspersion, while 24 h after the treatment a complete recovery of normal transcriptional levels was detected. Another general feature of the transcriptional response to selenite is represented by the transcriptional induction of genes related to amino acid metabolism, and to stress defense; interestingly, two genes coding for glutathione S-transferases were found early-induced upon selenite treatment. PMID:17846914

  14. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  15. Repression of RNA Polymerase I Transcription by the Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is frequently inactivated in tumors. It functions as a transcriptional activator as well as a repressor for a number of viral and cellular promoters transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and by RNA Pol III. Moreover, it appears that p53 also suppresses RNA Pol I transcription. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of Pol I transcriptional inhibition by p53. We show that wild-type, but not mutant, p53 can repress Pol I transcription from a huma...

  16. Transcriptional Repression of Gata3 Is Essential for Early B Cell Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anupam; Northrup, Daniel; Boukarabila, Hanane; Jacobsen, Sten Erik W.; Allman, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms underlying the silencing of alternative fate potentials in very early B cell precursors remain unclear. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches together with a synthetic Zinc-finger polypeptide (6ZFP) engineered to prevent transcription factor binding to a defined cis element, we show that the transcription factor EBF1 promotes B cell lineage commitment by directly repressing expression of the T-cell-lineage-requisite Gata3 gene. Ebf1-deficient lymphoid progenitors ...

  17. Polycomb group protein-mediated repression of transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morey, Lluís; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. They form multi-protein complexes that work as transcriptional repressors of several thousand genes controlling differentiation pathways during development. How the PcG proteins work as transcri...

  18. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  19. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  20. ASXL1 Represses Retinoic Acid Receptor-mediated Transcription through Associating with HP1 and LSD1*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Wang; Cho, Yang-Sook; Na, Jung-Min; Park, Ui-Hyun; Kang, Myengmo; Kim, Eun-Joo; Um, Soo-Jong

    2009-01-01

    We previously suggested that ASXL1 (additional sex comb-like 1) functions as either a coactivator or corepressor for the retinoid receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor in a cell type-specific manner. Here, we provide clues toward the mechanism underlying ASXL1-mediated repression. Transfection assays in HEK293 or H1299 cells indicated that ASXL1 alone possessing autonomous transcriptional repression activity significantly represses RAR- or retinoid X receptor-dependen...

  1. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

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    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  2. PTEN Represses RNA Polymerase I Transcription by Disrupting the SL1 Complex†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Cheng; Comai, Lucio; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor whose function is frequently lost in human cancer. It possesses a lipid phosphatase activity that represses the activation of PI3 kinase/Akt signaling, leading to decreased cell growth, proliferation, and survival. The potential for PTEN to regulate transcription of the large rRNAs by RNA polymerase I (RNA Pol I) was investigated. As increased synthesis of rRNAs is a hallmark of neoplastic transformation, the ability of PTEN to control the transcription of rRNAs mig...

  3. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

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    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  4. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  5. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  6. Mycobacterium leprae induces NF-κB-dependent transcription repression in human Schwann cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, invades peripheral nerve Schwann cells, resulting in deformities associated with this disease. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in the regulation of host immune antimicrobial responses. We aimed in this work to investigate NF-κB signaling pathways in the human ST88-14 Schwannoma cell line infected with M. leprae. Gel shift and supershift assays indicate that two NF-κB dimers, p65/p50 and p50/p50, translocate to the nucleus in Schwann cells treated with lethally irradiated M. leprae. Consistent with p65/p50 and p50/p50 activation, we observed IκB-α degradation and reduction of p105 levels. The nuclear translocation of p50/p50 complex due to M. leprae treatment correlated with repression of NF-κB-driven transcription induced by TNF-α. Moreover, thalidomide inhibited p50 homodimer nuclear translocation induced by M. leprae and consequently rescues Schwann cells from NF-κB-dependent transcriptional repression. Here, we report for the first time that M. leprae induces NF-κB activation in Schwann cells and thalidomide is able to modulate this activation

  7. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  8. A response regulator that represses transcription of several virulence operons in the group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, M J; McIver, K S; Scott, J R

    1999-06-01

    A search for homologs of the Bacillus subtilis PhoP response regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) genome revealed three good candidates. Inactivation of one of these, recently identified as csrR (J. C. Levin and M. R. Wessels, Mol. Microbiol. 30:209-219, 1998), caused the strain to produce mucoid colonies and to increase transcription of hasA, the first gene in the operon for capsule synthesis. We report here that a nonpolar insertion in this gene also increased transcription of ska (encoding streptokinase), sagA (streptolysin S), and speMF (mitogenic factor) but did not affect transcription of slo (streptolysin O), mga (multiple gene regulator of GAS), emm (M protein), scpA (complement C5a peptidase), or speB or speC (pyrogenic exotoxins B and C). The amounts of streptokinase, streptolysin S, and capsule paralleled the levels of transcription of their genes in all cases. Because CsrR represses genes unrelated to those for capsule synthesis, and because CsrA-CsrB is a global regulatory system in Escherichia coli whose mechanism is unrelated to that of these genes in GAS, the locus has been renamed covR, for "control of virulence genes" in GAS. Transcription of the covR operon was also increased in the nonpolar insertion mutant, indicating that CovR represses its own synthesis as well. All phenotypes of the covR nonpolar insertion mutant were complemented by the covR gene on a plasmid. CovR acts on operons expressed both in exponential and in stationary phase, demonstrating that the CovR-CovS pathway is separate from growth phase-dependent regulation in GAS. Therefore, CovR is the first multiple-gene repressor of virulence factors described for this important human pathogen. PMID:10368137

  9. The transcription factor ATF3 is upregulated during chondrocyte differentiation and represses cyclin D1 and A gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Claudine G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordinated chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are required for normal endochondral bone growth. Transcription factors binding to the cyclicAMP response element (CRE are known to regulate these processes. One member of this family, Activating Tanscription Factor 3 (ATF3, is expressed during skeletogenesis and acts as a transcriptional repressor, but the function of this protein in chondrogenesis is unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that Atf3 mRNA levels increase during mouse chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, Atf3 mRNA levels are increased in response to cytochalasin D treatment, an inducer of chondrocyte maturation. This is accompanied by increased Atf3 promoter activity in cytochalasin D-treated chondrocytes. We had shown earlier that transcription of the cell cycle genes cyclin D1 and cyclin A in chondrocytes is dependent on CREs. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of ATF3 in primary mouse chondrocytes results in reduced transcription of both genes, as well as decreased activity of a CRE reporter plasmid. Repression of cyclin A transcription by ATF3 required the CRE in the cyclin A promoter. In parallel, ATF3 overexpression reduces the activity of a SOX9-dependent promoter and increases the activity of a RUNX2-dependent promoter. Conclusion Our data suggest that transcriptional induction of the Atf3 gene in maturing chondrocytes results in down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression as well as activation of RUNX2-dependent transcription. Therefore, ATF3 induction appears to facilitate cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of mouse uterus at pre-implantation stage under VEGF repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ji

    Full Text Available Uterus development during pre-implantation stage affects implantation process and embryo growth. Aberrant uterus development is associated with many human reproductive diseases. Among the factors regulating uterus development, vascular remodeling promoters are critical for uterus function and fertility. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, as one of the major members, has been found to be important in endothelial cell growth and blood vessel development, as well as in non-endothelial cells. VEGF mediation in reproduction has been broadly studied, but VEGF-induced transcriptional machinery during implantation window has not been systematically studied. In this study, a genetically repressed VEGF mouse model was used to analyze uterus transcriptome at gestation 2.5 (G2.5 by Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE system. A number of 831 uterus-specific and 2398 VEGF-regulated genes were identified. Gene ontology (GO analysis indicated that genes actively involved in uterus development were members of collagen biosynthesis, cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Uterus-specific genes were enriched in activities of phosphatidyl inositol phosphate kinase, histone H3-K36 demethylation and protein acetylation. Among VEGF-regulated genes, up-regulated were associated with RNA polymerase III activity while down-regulated were strongly related with muscle development. Comparable numbers of antisense transcripts were identified. Expression levels of the antisense transcripts were found tightly correlated with their sense expression levels, an indication of possibly non-specific transcripts generated around the active promoters and enhancers. The antisense transcripts with exceptionally high or low expression levels and the antisense transcripts under VEGF regulation were also identified. These transcripts may be important candidates in regulation of uterus development. This study provides a global survey on genes and antisense transcripts

  11. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  12. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As2O3 affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As2O3 to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As2O3 exposure in leukemia cells.

  13. Dominant Repression by Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB44 Causes Oxidative Damage and Hypersensitivity to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Persak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In any living species, stress adaptation is closely linked with major changes of the gene expression profile. As a substrate protein of the rapidly stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3, Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 likely acts at the front line of stress-induced re-programming. We recently characterized MYB44 as phosphorylation-dependent positive regulator of salt stress signaling. Molecular events downstream of MYB44 are largely unknown. Although MYB44 binds to the MBSII element in vitro, it has no discernible effect on MBSII-driven reporter gene expression in plant co-transfection assays. This may suggest limited abundance of a synergistic co-regulator. MYB44 carries a putative transcriptional repression (Ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression, EAR motif. We employed a dominant repressor strategy to gain insights into MYB44-conferred stress resistance. Overexpression of a MYB44-REP fusion markedly compromised salt and drought stress tolerance—the opposite was seen in MYB44 overexpression lines. MYB44-mediated resistance likely results from induction of tolerance-enhancing, rather than from repression of tolerance-diminishing factors. Salt stress-induced accumulation of destructive reactive oxygen species is efficiently prevented in transgenic MYB44, but accelerated in MYB44-REP lines. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of MYB44-REP caused tissue collapse in Nicotiana. A mechanistic model of MAPK-MYB-mediated enhancement in the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance is proposed. Genetic engineering of MYB44 variants with higher trans-activating capacity may be a means to further raise stress resistance in crops.

  14. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets. PMID:26025535

  15. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  16. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  17. Dynamic competition between transcription initiation and repression: Role of nonequilibrium steps in cell-to-cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Transcriptional repression may cause transcriptional noise by a competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. Although promoter activity is often governed by a single limiting step, we argue here that the size of the noise strongly depends on whether this step is the initial equilibrium binding or one of the subsequent unidirectional steps. Overall, we show that nonequilibrium steps of transcription initiation systematically increase the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in bacterial populations. In particular, this allows also weak promoters to give substantial transcriptional noise. PMID:26382435

  18. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali;

    2012-01-01

    . Psd-95 was transcribed early in mouse embryonic brain, but most of its product transcripts were degraded. The polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 repressed Psd-95 (also known as Dlg4) exon 18 splicing, leading to premature translation termination and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay...

  19. Repression of btuB gene transcription in Escherichia coli by the GadX protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wensi S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BtuB (B twelve uptake is an outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, it serves as a receptor for cobalamines uptake or bactericidal toxin entry. A decrease in the production of the BtuB protein would cause E. coli to become resistant to colicins. The production of BtuB has been shown to be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. The secondary structure switch of 5' untranslated region of butB and the intracellular concentration of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl would affect the translation efficiency and RNA stability of btuB. The transcriptional regulation of btuB expression is still unclear. Results To determine whether the btuB gene is also transcriptionally controlled by trans-acting factors, a genomic library was screened for clones that enable E. coli to grow in the presence of colicin E7, and a plasmid carrying gadX and gadY genes was isolated. The lacZ reporter gene assay revealed that these two genes decreased the btuB promoter activity by approximately 50%, and the production of the BtuB protein was reduced by approximately 90% in the presence of a plasmid carrying both gadX and gadY genes in E. coli as determined by Western blotting. Results of electrophoretic mobility assay and DNase I footprinting indicated that the GadX protein binds to the 5' untranslated region of the btuB gene. Since gadX and gadY genes are more highly expressed under acidic conditions, the transcriptional level of btuB in cells cultured in pH 7.4 or pH 5.5 medium was examined by quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the effect of GadX. The results showed the transcription of gadX with 1.4-fold increase but the level of btuB was reduced to 57%. Conclusions Through biological and biochemical analysis, we have demonstrated the GadX can directly interact with btuB promoter and affect the expression of btuB. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that the expression of btuB gene is transcriptionally repressed by the acid

  20. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-12-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to the P105 promoter were required for full repression of its activity in HeLa and HaCaT cells. Repression by E2 at E2 BS 2 occurred through the displacement of Sp1. Second, a truncated E2 product, lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, repressed transcription more efficiently than the full-length protein. Repression was abolished when the N-terminal domain of E2 was replaced by the activation domain of VP16. The VP16-E2 chimeric protein could activate transcription from an LCR mutated in its TATA box. DNA-protein binding studies showed that E2 associates with its four binding sites in the LCR with similar affinities. However, challenge of such complexes with excess binding sites demonstrated that interaction with E2 BS 4 was the most stable while interaction with E2 BS 1 was the least stable. Furthermore, complexes with the full-length E2 were less stable than those formed with the N-terminally truncated protein. PMID:9371593

  1. Repression of Ccr9 transcription in mouse T lymphocyte progenitors by the Notch signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Veena; Carr, Tiffany; de Pooter, Renee F; Emanuelle, Akinola Olumide; Akinola, Emanuelle Olumide; Gounari, Fotini; Kee, Barbara L

    2015-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR9 controls the immigration of multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells into the thymus to sustain T cell development. Postimmigration, thymocytes downregulate CCR9 and migrate toward the subcapsular zone where they recombine their TCR β-chain and γ-chain gene loci. CCR9 is subsequently upregulated and participates in the localization of thymocytes during their selection for self-tolerant receptor specificities. Although the dynamic regulation of CCR9 is essential for early T cell development, the mechanisms controlling CCR9 expression have not been determined. In this article, we show that key regulators of T cell development, Notch1 and the E protein transcription factors E2A and HEB, coordinately control the expression of Ccr9. E2A and HEB bind at two putative enhancers upstream of Ccr9 and positively regulate CCR9 expression at multiple stages of T cell development. In contrast, the canonical Notch signaling pathway prevents the recruitment of p300 to the putative Ccr9 enhancers, resulting in decreased acetylation of histone H3 and a failure to recruit RNA polymerase II to the Ccr9 promoter. Although Notch signaling modestly modulates the binding of E proteins to one of the two Ccr9 enhancers, we found that Notch signaling represses Ccr9 in T cell lymphoma lines in which Ccr9 transcription is independent of E protein function. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of Notch1 has a dominant-negative effect on Ccr9 transcription and that Notch1 and E proteins control the dynamic expression of Ccr9 during T cell development. PMID:25710912

  2. PINCH1 is transcriptional regulator in podocytes that interacts with WT1 and represses podocalyxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PINCH1, an adaptor protein containing five LIM domains, plays an important role in regulating the integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PINCH1 is induced in the fibrotic kidney after injury, and it primarily localizes at the sites of focal adhesion. Whether it can translocate to the nucleus and directly participate in gene regulation is completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cultured glomerular podocytes as a model system, we show that PINCH1 expression was induced by TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes podocyte dysfunction. Interestingly, increased PINCH1 not only localized at the sites of focal adhesions, but also underwent nuclear translocation after TGF-β1 stimulation. This nuclear translocation of PINCH1 was apparently dependent on the putative nuclear export/localization signals (NES/NLS at its C-terminus, as deletion or site-directed mutations abolished its nuclear shuttling. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that PINCH1 interacted with Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for regulating podocyte-specific gene expression in adult kidney. Interaction of PINCH1 and WT1 was mediated by the LIM1 domain of PINCH1 and C-terminal zinc-finger domain of WT1, which led to the suppression of the WT1-mediated podocalyxin expression in podocytes. PINCH1 also repressed podocalyxin gene transcription in a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PINCH1 can shuttle into the nucleus from cytoplasm in podocytes, wherein it interacts with WT1 and suppresses podocyte-specific gene expression. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized, novel function of PINCH1, in which it acts as a transcriptional regulator through controlling specific gene expression.

  3. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C.; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to th...

  4. Estradiol repression of tumor necrosis factor-α transcription requires estrogen receptor activation function-2 and is enhanced by coactivators

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jinping; Ribeiro, Ralff C. J.; Webb, Paul; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Kushner, Peter J.; Baxter, John D.; Leitman, Dale C.

    1999-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) promoter was used to explore the molecular mechanisms of estradiol (E2)-dependent repression of gene transcription. E2 inhibited basal activity and abolished TNF-α activation of the TNF-α promoter. The E2-inhibitory element was mapped to the −125 to −82 region of the TNF-α promoter, known as the TNF-responsive element (TNF-RE). An AP-1-like site in the TNF-RE is essential for repression activity. Estrogen receptor (ER) β is more potent than ERα at repressin...

  5. Repression of the H5 histone gene by a factor from erythrocytes that binds to the region of transcription initiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Cuadrado, A; Rousseau, S.; Renaud, J.; Ruiz-Carrillo, A

    1992-01-01

    Expression of histone H5, like that of other erythrocyte specific proteins, declines during the latter stages of erythroid maturation because of a decrease in the rate of gene transcription. Here, we report the isolation of cIBR (chicken initiation binding repressor), a 75 kDa DNA binding glycoprotein from mature chicken erythrocytes that recognizes sequences spanning the transcription start sites of the H5 gene. cIBR was found to repress transcription from the H5 promoter in vitro and this e...

  6. Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of countries, including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, and the United States of America. Drinking-water, ... ingestion of inorganic arsenic include developmental effects, neurotoxicity, diabetes, pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Arsenic-induced myocardial ...

  7. Let-7b promotes alpaca hair growth via transcriptional repression of TGFβR I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shen; Yu, Zhang; Ning, Liu; Hai-Dong, Wang; Jian-Shan, Xie; Shu-Yuan, Gao; Jia-Qi, Cheng; Xiu-Ju, Yu; Ting, Wang; Chang-Sheng, Dong; Xiao-Yan, He

    2016-02-10

    The young male alpaca ear and the back skins were used to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor receptor-β I (TGFβR I) on alpaca hair follicles and hair growth. The expression level and location of TGFβR I in alpaca ear and dorsal skin were detected through real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and paraffin section immunohistochemical technique (ICC-P). The results shown TGFβR I was lower expression in back skin compared to ear skin and the mean density of the positive reaction in ear skin was significantly higher than back skin. The targeted relationship with let-7b was detected using the dual-luciferase reporter vector of TGFβR I, which showed a significant target relationship between let-7b and TGFβR I. After transfection with let-7b eukaryotic expression vector, the relative mRNA expression of TGFβR I in alpaca skin fibroblasts did not differ, while the relative protein level was significantly decreased. In summary, a higher TGFβR I expression level in the ear skin suggests that TGFβR I may inhibit coat hair elongation. Further studies showed TGFβR I protein was downregulated by let-7b through transcriptional repression. PMID:26611528

  8. Dlx transcription factors promote migration through repression of axon and dendrite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Inma; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L R

    2007-06-21

    In the mouse telencephalon, Dlx homeobox transcription factors are essential for the tangential migration of subpallial-derived GABAergic interneurons to neocortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dlx1/2 has a central role in restraining neurite growth of subpallial-derived immature interneurons at a stage when they migrate tangentially to cortex. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2-/- mutants, neurite length is increased and cells fail to migrate. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2+/- mutants, while the tangential migration of immature interneurons appears normal, they develop dendritic and axonal processes with increased length and decreased branching, and have deficits in their neocortical laminar positions. Thus, Dlx1/2 is required for coordinating programs of neurite maturation and migration. In this regard, we provide genetic evidence that in immature interneurons Dlx1/2 repression of the p21-activated serine/threonine kinase PAK3, a downstream effector of the Rho family of GTPases, is critical in restraining neurite growth and promoting tangential migration. PMID:17582329

  9. Transcriptional repression of p27 is essential for murine embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratake, Youichi; Kuga, Chisa; Hasegawa, Yuta; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kitahashi, Masayasu; Fujimura, Lisa; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Sakamoto, Akemi; Arima, Masafumi; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The Nczf gene has been identified as one of Ncx target genes and encodes a novel KRAB zinc-finger protein, which functions as a sequence specific transcriptional repressor. In order to elucidate Nczf functions, we generated Nczf knockout (Nczf-/-) mice. Nczf-/- mice died around embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) with small body size and impairment of axial rotation. Histopathological analysis revealed that the cell number decreased and pyknotic cells were occasionally observed. We examined the expression of cell cycle related genes in Nczf-/- mice. p27 expression was increased in E8.0 Nczf-/- mice compared to that of wild type mice. Nczf knockdown by siRNA resulted in increased expression of p27 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, p27 promoter luciferase reporter gene analysis confirmed the regulation of p27 mRNA expression by Nczf. Nczf-/-; p27-/- double knockout mice survived until E11.5 and the defect of axial rotation was restored. These data suggest that p27 repression by Nczf is essential in the developing embryo. PMID:27196371

  10. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower...

  11. Telomere-Mediated Plasmid Segregation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Involves Gene Products Required for Transcriptional Repression at Silencers and Telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Longtine, M. S.; Enomoto, S.; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids that contain Saccharomyces cerevisiae TG(1-3) telomere repeat sequences (TRS plasmids) segregate efficiently during mitosis. Mutations in histone H4 reduce the efficiency of TRS-mediated plasmid segregation, suggesting that chromatin structure is involved in this process. Sir2, Sir3 and Sir4 are required for the transcriptional repression of genes located at the silent mating type loci (HML and HMR) and at telomeres (telomere position effect) and are also involved in the segregation ...

  12. Suppressors of Defective Silencing in Yeast: Effects on Transcriptional Repression at the Hmr Locus, Cell Growth and Telomere Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sussel, L; Vannier, D; Shore, D

    1995-01-01

    To identify factors that affect transcriptional silencing at the HMR mating-type locus in yeast, we characterized a set of extragenic suppressor mutations that restore metastable repression in cells containing both a mutant silencer-binding protein (rap1(s)) and a mutated silencer element (hmrδA). A total of 57 suppressors comprising 21 different complementation groups was identified. This report describes a detailed genetic analysis of these suppressors of defective silencing (sds) mutants. ...

  13. The catenin p120ctn inhibits Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the β-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The POZ-zinc finger transcription factor Kaiso was first identified as a specific binding partner for the Armadillo catenin and cell adhesion cofactor, p120ctn. Kaiso is a unique POZ protein with bi-modal DNA-binding properties; it associates with a sequence-specific DNA consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS) or methylated CpG dinucleotides, and regulates transcription of artificial promoters containing either site. Interestingly, the promoter of the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin possesses two conserved copies of the KBS, which suggested that Kaiso might regulate matrilysin expression. In this study, we demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that Kaiso associates with the matrilysin promoter in vivo. Minimal promoter assays further confirmed that Kaiso specifically repressed transcription of the matrilysin promoter; mutation of the KBS element or RNAi-mediated depletion of Kaiso abrogated this effect. More importantly, Kaiso blocked β-catenin-mediated activation of the matrilysin promoter. Consistent with our previous findings, both Kaiso-DNA binding and Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the matrilysin promoter were inhibited by overexpression of wild-type p120ctn, but not by a p120ctn mutant exhibiting impaired nuclear import. Collectively, our data establish Kaiso as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of the matrilysin promoter, and suggest that p120ctn and β-catenin act in a synergistic manner, via distinct mechanisms, to activate matrilysin expression

  14. KRAB-zinc finger proteins and KAP1 can mediate long-range transcriptional repression through heterochromatin spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Groner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs are tetrapod-specific transcriptional repressors encoded in the hundreds by the human genome. In order to explore their as yet ill-defined impact on gene expression, we developed an ectopic repressor assay, allowing the study of KRAB-mediated transcriptional regulation at hundreds of different transcriptional units. By targeting a drug-controllable KRAB-containing repressor to gene-trapping lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that KRAB and its corepressor KAP1 can silence promoters located several tens of kilobases (kb away from their DNA binding sites, with an efficiency which is generally higher for promoters located within 15 kb or less. Silenced promoters exhibit a loss of histone H3-acetylation, an increase in H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3, and a drop in RNA Pol II recruitment, consistent with a block of transcriptional initiation following the establishment of silencing marks. Furthermore, we reveal that KRAB-mediated repression is established by the long-range spreading of H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1 beta (HP1beta between the repressor binding site and the promoter. We confirm the biological relevance of this phenomenon by documenting KAP1-dependent transcriptional repression at an endogenous KRAB-ZFP gene cluster, where KAP1 binds to the 3' end of genes and mediates propagation of H3K9me3 and HP1beta towards their 5' end. Together, our data support a model in which KRAB/KAP1 recruitment induces long-range repression through the spread of heterochromatin. This finding not only suggests auto-regulatory mechanisms in the control of KRAB-ZFP gene clusters, but also provides important cues for interpreting future genome-wide DNA binding data of KRAB-ZFPs and KAP1.

  15. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  16. Positive selection of mutants defective in transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis by iron in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Kapustyak, Kostyantyn Y; Fayura, Lyubov R; Stasyk, Oleh V; Stenchuk, Mykola M; Bobak, Yaroslav P; Drobot, Lyudmyla B; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2005-06-01

    It is known for many years that iron represses synthesis of riboflavin (RF) and most of RF-synthesizing enzymes in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanism of such repression is not known. We have found that iron represses transcription of RIB1 and RIB7 genes coding for the first and the last enzymes of RF biosynthesis in the model flavinogenic organism Pichia guilliermondii. To decipher molecular mechanisms of iron-dependent repression, isolation and study of the regulatory mutants defective in corresponding regulation is desirable. However, no suitable methods for isolation of such mutants were previously available. We have produced a single-point transition mutation in the RIB1 gene. The corresponding rib1-86 mutant exhibits leaky phenotype and is unable to grow in iron-sufficient minimal medium without exogenous RF. However, it can grow in minimal iron-deficient medium without RF, or in iron-sufficient medium upon introduction of the previously-isolated regulatory mutation rib81, which leads to increase in RF production. Using the rib1-86 mutant as parental strain, a collection of mutants able to grow in iron-sufficient medium without exogenous RF has been isolated. The mutants appeared to be defective in regulation of RF biosynthesis and iron homeostasis and were divided into six new complementation groups. Study of one corresponding mutant, red6, showed derepression of RIB1 mRNA synthesis in iron-sufficient medium. PMID:15925311

  17. Staphylococcus aureus RNAIII coordinately represses the synthesis of virulence factors and the transcription regulator Rot by an antisense mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisset, Sandrine; Geissmann, Thomas; Huntzinger, Eric; Fechter, Pierre; Bendridi, Nadia; Possedko, Maria; Chevalier, Clément; Helfer, Anne Catherine; Benito, Yvonne; Jacquier, Alain; Gaspin, Christine; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    RNAIII is the intracellular effector of the quorum-sensing system in Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the largest regulatory RNAs (514 nucleotides long) that are known to control the expression of a large number of virulence genes. Here, we show that the 3′ domain of RNAIII coordinately represses at the post-transcriptional level, the expression of mRNAs that encode a class of virulence factors that act early in the infection process. We demonstrate that the 3′ domain acts primarily as an antisense RNA and rapidly anneals to these mRNAs, forming long RNA duplexes. The interaction between RNAIII and the mRNAs results in repression of translation initiation and triggers endoribonuclease III hydrolysis. These processes are followed by rapid depletion of the mRNA pool. In addition, we show that RNAIII and its 3′ domain mediate translational repression of rot mRNA through a limited number of base pairings involving two loop–loop interactions. Since Rot is a transcriptional regulatory protein, we proposed that RNAIII indirectly acts on many downstream genes, resulting in the activation of the synthesis of several exoproteins. These data emphasize the multitude of regulatory steps affected by RNAIII and its 3′ domain in establishing a network of S. aureus virulence factors. PMID:17545468

  18. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower leaf blades than the wox1 prs double mutant, indicating that WUS genetically interacts with WOX1 and PRS in Arabidopsis leaf blade development. Our data points to a general requirement for AS2 repression in meristematic regions to allow cell proliferation. PMID:25807065

  19. Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter J; Powell, Thomas H Q; Walden, Kimberly K O; Schieferecke, Adam J; Feder, Jeffrey L; Hahn, Daniel A; Robertson, Hugh M; Berlocher, Stewart H; Ragland, Gregory J

    2016-09-01

    The duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an apple-infesting population and a hawthorn-infesting population where the apple population ends pupal diapause earlier than the hawthorn-infesting population. Marked differences in transcription between the two populations during winter suggests that the 'early' apple population is developmentally advanced compared with the 'late' hawthorn population prior to spring warming, with transcripts participating in growth and developmental processes relatively up-regulated in apple pupae during the winter cold period. Thus, regulatory differences during winter ultimately drive phenological differences that manifest themselves in the following summer. Expression and polymorphism analysis identify candidate genes in the Wnt and insulin signaling pathways that contribute to population differences in seasonality. Both populations remained in diapause and displayed a pattern of up- and then down-regulation (or vice versa) of growth-related transcripts following warming, consistent with transcriptional repression. The ability to repress growth stimulated by permissive temperatures is likely critical to avoid mismatched phenology and excessive metabolic demand. Compared with diapause studies in other insects, our results suggest some overlap in candidate genes/pathways, though the timing and direction of changes in transcription are likely species specific. PMID:27312473

  20. CAR-mediated repression of Foxo1 transcriptional activity regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21 in mouse livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of Foxo1 in mouse livers. • CAR activation decreased the level of p21 in mouse livers. • CAR activation inhibited Foxo1 transcriptional activity in mouse livers. - Abstract: 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), an agonist of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), is a well-known strong primary chemical mitogen for the mouse liver. Despite extensive investigation of the role of CAR in the regulation of cell proliferation, our knowledge of the intricate mediating mechanism is incomplete. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increased liver-to-body weight ratio and decreased tumour suppressor Foxo1 expression and transcriptional activity, which were correlated with reduced expression of genes regulated by Foxo1, including the cell-cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a(p21), and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on the association of Foxo1 with the target Foxo1 itself and Cdkn1a(p21) promoters. Thus, we identified CAR-mediated repression of cell cycle inhibitor p21, as mediated by repression of FOXO1 expression and transcriptional activity. CAR-FOXO1 cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments

  1. Chromatin Remodeling around Nucleosome-Free Regions Leads to Repression of Noncoding RNA Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Yadon, Adam N.; Mark, Daniel; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffrey; Whitehouse, Iestyn; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) at the 5′ and 3′ ends of genes are general sites of transcription initiation for mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA). The presence of NFRs within transcriptional regulatory regions and the conserved location of transcription start sites at NFRs strongly suggest that the regulation of NFRs profoundly affects transcription initiation. To date, multiple factors are known to facilitate transcription initiation by positively regulating the formation and/or size of NFRs in...

  2. Global transcriptional analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in root-associated Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological nitrogen fixation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level by regulatory networks that respond to the availability of fixed nitrogen. In many diazotrophs, addition of excess ammonium in the growth medium results in immediate repression of nif gene transcription. Although the regulatory cascades that control the transcription of the nif genes in proteobacteria have been well investigated, there are limited data on the kinetics of ammonium-dependent repression of nitrogen fixation. Results Here we report a global transcriptional profiling analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, a root-associated and nitrogen-fixing bacterium. A total of 166 genes, including those coding for the global nitrogen regulation (Ntr and Nif-specific regulatory proteins, were upregulated under nitrogen fixation conditions but rapidly downregulated as early as 10 min after ammonium shock. Among these nitrogen fixation-inducible genes, 95 have orthologs in each of Azoarcus sp. BH72 and Azotobacter vinelandii AvoP. In particular, a 49-kb expression island containing nif and other associated genes was markedly downregulated by ammonium shock. Further functional characterization of pnfA, a new NifA-σ54-dependent gene chromosomally linked to nifHDK, is reported. This gene encodes a protein product with an amino acid sequence similar to that of five hypothetical proteins found only in diazotrophic strains. No noticeable differences in the transcription of nifHDK were detected between the wild type strain and pnfA mutant. However, the mutant strain exhibited a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity under microaerobic conditions and lost its ability to use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for the support of nitrogen fixation under anaerobic conditions. Conclusions Based on our results, we conclude that transcriptional regulation of nif gene expression in A1501 is mediated by the nif

  3. Human THAP7 is a chromatin-associated, histone tail-binding protein that represses transcription via recruitment of HDAC3 and nuclear hormone receptor corepressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlan, Todd; Kutney, Sara; Altman, Brian; Montross, Rebecca; Yu, Jiujiu; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2005-02-25

    The identities of signal transducer proteins that integrate histone hypoacetylation and transcriptional repression are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that THAP7, an uncharacterized member of the recently identified THAP (Thanatos-associated protein) family of proteins, is ubiquitously expressed, associates with chromatin, and represses transcription. THAP7 binds preferentially to hypoacetylated (un-, mono-, and diacetylated) histone H4 tails in vitro via its C-terminal 77 amino acids. Deletion of this domain, or treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA, which leads to histone hyperacetylation, partially disrupts THAP7/chromatin association in living cells. THAP7 coimmunoprecipitates with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and the nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) and represses transcription as a Gal4 fusion protein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that these corepressors are recruited to promoters in a THAP7 dependent manner and promote histone H3 hypoacetylation. The conserved THAP domain is a key determinant for full HDAC3 association in vitro, and both the THAP domain and the histone interaction domain are important for the repressive properties of THAP7. Full repression mediated by THAP7 is also dependent on NCoR expression. We hypothesize that THAP7 is a dual function repressor protein that actively targets deacetylation of histone H3 necessary to establish transcriptional repression and functions as a signal transducer of the repressive mark of hypoacetylated histone H4. This is the first demonstration of the transcriptional regulatory properties of a human THAP domain protein, and a critical identification of a potential transducer of the repressive signal of hypoacetylated histone H4 in higher eukaryotes. PMID:15561719

  4. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M; Francí, Clara; Gutierrez, Arantxa; Dave, Natàlia; Escrivà, Maria; Hernandez-Muñoz, Inma; Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    -regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In...

  5. CDK11p58 represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11p58 as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11p58, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11p58 interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11p58 decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11p58 is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  6. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin, E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  7. WT1-mediated repression of the proapoptotic transcription factor ZNF224 is triggered by the BCR-ABL oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Giorgia; Vidovic, Karina; Palladino, Chiara; Cesaro, Elena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Quintarelli, Concetta; De Angelis, Biagio; Errichiello, Santa; Pane, Fabrizio; Izzo, Paola; Grosso, Michela; Gullberg, Urban; Costanzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The Kruppel-like protein ZNF224 is a co-factor of the Wilms’ tumor 1 protein, WT1. We have previously shown that ZNF224 exerts a specific proapoptotic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells and contributes to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, by modulating WT1-dependent transcription of apoptotic genes. Here we demonstrate that ZNF224 gene expression is down-regulated both in BCR-ABL positive cell lines and in primary CML samples and is restored after imatinib and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. We also show that WT1, whose expression is positively regulated by BCR-ABL, represses transcription of the ZNF224 gene. Finally, we report that ZNF224 is significantly down-regulated in patients with BCR-ABL positive chronic phase-CML showing poor response or resistance to imatinib treatment as compared to high-responder patients. Taken as a whole, our data disclose a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL that leads to inhibition of apoptosis through the ZNF224 repression. ZNF224 could thus represent a novel promising therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26320177

  8. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. ► SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. ► IFN-γ represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-γ in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  9. WNT signaling : activation, repression and fine-tuning of TCF transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Brantjes, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of a Wnt signal ß-catenin is phosphorylated by GSK3-ß, in a complex also containing Axin and APC. Upon phosphorylation, ß-catenin is primed for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In the nucleus, Tcf proteins bind Groucho family members and repress target genes. When a Wnt protein reaches the cell, it associates with the transmembrane receptors Frizzled and LRP. The destruction complex of GSK3-?, APC and Axin is subsequently inactivated via Dishevelled,...

  10. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30II, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30II, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30II-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30II-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30II-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30II-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  11. Cold shock domain proteins repress transcription from the GM-CSF promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Coles, L S; P. Diamond; Occhiodoro, F; Vadas, M A; Shannon, M F

    1996-01-01

    The human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene promoter binds a sequence-specific single-strand DNA binding protein termed NF-GMb. We previously demonstrated that the NF-GMb binding sites were required for repression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induction of the proximal GM-CSF promoter sequences in fibroblasts. We now describe the isolation of two different cDNA clones that encode cold shock domain (CSD) proteins with NF-GMb binding characteristics. On...

  12. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection

  13. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  14. CRISPathBrick: Modular Combinatorial Assembly of Type II-A CRISPR Arrays for dCas9-Mediated Multiplex Transcriptional Repression in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Brady F; Toparlak, Ö Duhan; Guleria, Sanjay; Lebovich, Matthew; Stieglitz, Jessica T; Englaender, Jacob A; Jones, J Andrew; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-09-18

    Programmable control over an addressable global regulator would enable simultaneous repression of multiple genes and would have tremendous impact on the field of synthetic biology. It has recently been established that CRISPR/Cas systems can be engineered to repress gene transcription at nearly any desired location in a sequence-specific manner, but there remain only a handful of applications described to date. In this work, we report development of a vector possessing a CRISPathBrick feature, enabling rapid modular assembly of natural type II-A CRISPR arrays capable of simultaneously repressing multiple target genes in Escherichia coli. Iterative incorporation of spacers into this CRISPathBrick feature facilitates the combinatorial construction of arrays, from a small number of DNA parts, which can be utilized to generate a suite of complex phenotypes corresponding to an encoded genetic program. We show that CRISPathBrick can be used to tune expression of plasmid-based genes and repress chromosomal targets in probiotic, virulent, and commonly engineered E. coli strains. Furthermore, we describe development of pCRISPReporter, a fluorescent reporter plasmid utilized to quantify dCas9-mediated repression from endogenous promoters. Finally, we demonstrate that dCas9-mediated repression can be harnessed to assess the effect of downregulating both novel and computationally predicted metabolic engineering targets, improving the yield of a heterologous phytochemical through repression of endogenous genes. These tools provide a platform for rapid evaluation of multiplex metabolic engineering interventions. PMID:25822415

  15. Dual role of Med12 in PRC1-dependent gene repression and ncRNA-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Thaleia; Kaymak, Aysegül; Sayols, Sergi; Richly, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is considered an enhancer of RNA-Polymerase II dependent transcription but its function and regulation in pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) remains unresolved. One means of controlling the function of Mediator is provided by the binding of the Cdk8 module (Med12, Cdk8, Ccnc and Med13) to the core Mediator. Here we report that Med12 operates together with PRC1 to silence key developmental genes in pluripotency. At the molecular level, while PRC1 represses genes it is also required to assemble ncRNA containing Med12-Mediator complexes. In the course of cellular differentiation the H2A ubiquitin binding protein Zrf1 abrogates PRC1-Med12 binding and facilitates the association of Cdk8 with Mediator. This remodeling of Mediator-associated protein complexes converts Mediator from a transcriptional repressor to a transcriptional enhancer, which then mediates ncRNA-dependent activation of Polycomb target genes. Altogether, our data reveal how the interplay of PRC1, ncRNA and Mediator complexes controls pluripotency and cellular differentiation. PMID:27096886

  16. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  17. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  18. The Unicellular Ancestry of Groucho-Mediated Repression and the Origins of Metazoan Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Groucho is a co-repressor that interacts with many transcription factors playing a crucial role in animal development. The evolutionary origins of Groucho are not clear. It is generally regarded as being a distinct animal-specific protein, although with similarities to the yeast Tup-like proteins. Here, it is shown that Groucho has true orthologs in unicellular relatives of animals. Based on their phylogenetic distribution, and an analysis of ligand-binding residues, these genes are unlikely to be orthologs of the fungal Tup-like genes. By identifying conserved candidate Groucho interaction motifs (GIMs) in nonmetazoan transcription factors, it is demonstrated that the details of molecular interactions between Groucho and transcription factors are likely to have been established prior to the origin of animals, but that the association of GIMs with many transcription factor types can be regarded as a metazoan innovation. PMID:27189982

  19. A gene-rich, transcriptionally active environment and the pre-deposition of repressive marks are predictive of susceptibility to KRAB/KAP1-mediated silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangger Nadine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KRAB-ZFPs (Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger proteins are vertebrate-restricted transcriptional repressors encoded in the hundreds by the mouse and human genomes. They act via an essential cofactor, KAP1, which recruits effectors responsible for the formation of facultative heterochromatin. We have recently shown that KRAB/KAP1 can mediate long-range transcriptional repression through heterochromatin spreading, but also demonstrated that this process is at times countered by endogenous influences. Method To investigate this issue further we used an ectopic KRAB-based repressor. This system allowed us to tether KRAB/KAP1 to hundreds of euchromatic sites within genes, and to record its impact on gene expression. We then correlated this KRAB/KAP1-mediated transcriptional effect to pre-existing genomic and chromatin structures to identify specific characteristics making a gene susceptible to repression. Results We found that genes that were susceptible to KRAB/KAP1-mediated silencing carried higher levels of repressive histone marks both at the promoter and over the transcribed region than genes that were insensitive. In parallel, we found a high enrichment in euchromatic marks within both the close and more distant environment of these genes. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that high levels of gene activity in the genomic environment and the pre-deposition of repressive histone marks within a gene increase its susceptibility to KRAB/KAP1-mediated repression.

  20. Brd4-Independent Transcriptional Repression Function of the Papillomavirus E2 Proteins▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Michal-Ruth; Ottinger, Matthias; You, Jianxin; Howley, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 protein is a critical viral regulatory protein with transcription, DNA replication, and genome maintenance functions. We have previously identified the cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 as a major E2-interacting protein and established that it participates in tethering bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 and viral genomes to host cell mitotic chromosomes. We have also shown that Brd4 mediates E2-dependent transcriptional activation, which is strongly inhibited by the disrupt...

  1. Role of the hinge region of glucocorticoid receptor for HEXIM1-mediated transcriptional repression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that HEXIM1 (hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1), which suppresses transcription elongation via sequestration of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) using 7SK RNA as a scaffold, directly associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to suppress glucocorticoid-inducible gene activation. Here, we revealed that the hinge region of GR is essential for its interaction with HEXIM1, and that oxosteroid receptors including GR show sequence homology in their hinge region and interact with HEXIM1, whereas the other members of nuclear receptors do not. We also showed that HEXIM1 suppresses GR-mediated transcription in two ways: sequestration of P-TEFb by HEXIM1 and direct interaction between GR and HEXIM1. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-dependent gene expression is negatively modulated by HEXIM1 solely via sequestration of P-TEFb. We, therefore, conclude that HEXIM1 may act as a gene-selective transcriptional regulator via direct interaction with certain transcriptional regulators including GR and contribute to fine-tuning of, for example, glucocorticoid-mediated biological responses

  2. Mechanisms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (mmp-2 transcriptional repression by progesterone in jar choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalev Eliezer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the MMP-2 promoter lacks a canonical progesterone response element (PRE, the hormone inhibits MMP-2 expression and is part of treatment protocols in gynecological invasive pathologies, including endometriosis and endometrial hyperplasia. This study aimed to explore the mechanism by which progesterone inhibits MMP-2 expression. Methods The effect of progesterone on MMP-2 expression in the JAR human choriocarcinoma cell line was analyzed by gelatin zymography. MMP-2 transcript expression was studied using Northern blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Rat promoter deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immuno-precipitation assays were performed in order to locate the DNA binding site and the transcription factors involved in MMP-2 regulation. Results Progesterone significantly decreased secretion of pro-MMP-2 and MMP-2 transcript expression level in a dose-dependent manner. Progesterone (1 microM significantly decreased both human and rat MMP-2 promoter activity (80.1% +/- 0.3 and 81.3% +/- 0.23, respectively. Progesterone acts through the SP1 family transcription factors-binding site, located between -1433 and -1342 bp region from the transcriptional start site of the rat MMP-2 promoter, which are present in the orthologous human MMP-2 promoter. Progesterone receptor (PR, SP2, SP3 and SP4 proteins are constitutively bound to this consensus sequence. Conclusion Progesterone reducesPR and SP4 binding to the MMP-2 promoter, thereby suppressing transcription. Progesterone also promotes SP4 degradation. These novel mechanisms of MMP-2 regulation by progesterone provide the biological rationale for the use of progesterone in clinical settings associated with increased MMP-2 expression.

  3. H-NS mediated repression of CRISPR-based immunity in Escherichia coli K12 can be relieved by the transcription activator LeuO

    OpenAIRE

    Westra, Edze Rients; Pul, Ümit; Heidrich, Nadja; Jore, Matthijs Miklas; Lundgren, Magnus; Stratmann, Thomas; Wurm, Reinhild; Raine, Amanda; Mescher, Melina; Heereveld, Luc Van; Mastop, Marieke; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Schnetz, Karin; van der Oost, John; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The recently discovered prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas defense system provides immunity against viral infections and plasmid conjugation. It has been demonstrated that in Escherichia coli transcription of the Cascade genes (casABCDE) and to some extent the CRISPR array, is repressed by heat-stable nucleoid-structuring (H-NS) protein, a global transcriptional repressor. Here we elaborate on the control of the E. coli CRISPR/Cas system, and study the effect on CRISPR-based anti-vira...

  4. CsrA Participates in a PNPase Autoregulatory Mechanism by Selectively Repressing Translation of pnp Transcripts That Have Been Previously Processed by RNase III and PNPase

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hongmarn; Yakhnin, Helen; Connolly, Michael; Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Csr is a conserved global regulatory system that represses or activates gene expression posttranscriptionally. CsrA of Escherichia coli is a homodimeric RNA binding protein that regulates transcription elongation, translation initiation, and mRNA stability by binding to the 5′ untranslated leader or initial coding sequence of target transcripts. pnp mRNA, encoding the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), was previously identified as a CsrA target by transcriptome se...

  5. Identification of a Boundary Domain Adjacent to the Potent Human Cytomegalovirus Enhancer That Represses Transcription of the Divergent UL127 Promoter†

    OpenAIRE

    Angulo, Ana; Kerry, David; Huang, Huang; Borst, Eva-Maria; Razinsky, Alison; Wu, Jun; Hobom, Urs; Messerle, Martin; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional repression within a complex modular promoter may play a key role in determining the action of enhancer elements. In human cytomegalovirus, the major immediate-early promoter (MIEP) locus contains a highly potent and complex modular enhancer. Evidence is presented suggesting that sequences of the MIEP between nucleotide positions −556 and −673 function to prevent transcription activation by enhancer elements from the UL127 open reading frame divergent promoter. Transient transf...

  6. Identification of a boundary domain adjacent to the potent human cytomegalovirus enhancer that represses transcription of the divergent UL127 promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Angulo, A; Kerry, D; Huang, H.; Borst, E M; Razinsky, A; Wu, J.; Hobom, U; Messerle, M.; Ghazal, P

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional repression within a complex modular promoter may play a key role in determining the action of enhancer elements. In human cytomegalovirus, the major immediate-early promoter (MIEP) locus contains a highly potent and complex modular enhancer. Evidence is presented suggesting that sequences of the MIEP between nucleotide positions -556 and -673 function to prevent transcription activation by enhancer elements from the UL127 open reading frame divergent promoter. Transient transf...

  7. H-NS-mediated repression of CRISPR-based immunity in Escherichia coli K12 can be relieved by the transcription activator LeuO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, E.R.; Pul, Ü.; Heidrich, N.; Jore, M.M.; Lundgren, N.M.J.; Stratmann, T.; Wurm, R.; Raine, A.; Mescher, M.; Heereveld, van L.; Mastop, M.; Wagner, E.G.H.; Schnetz, K.; Oost, van der J.; Wagner, R.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas defence system provides immunity against viral infections and plasmid conjugation. It has been demonstrated that in Escherichia coli transcription of the Cascade genes (casABCDE) and to some extent the CRISPR array is repressed by heat-stable nucleoid-s

  8. Changing a conserved amino acid in R2R3-MYB transcription repressors results in cytoplasmic accumulation and abolishes their repressive activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Sun, Zhanmin; Wang, Chenglong; Zhang, Xinquan; Tang, Yixiong; Zhu, Xuemei; Shao, Jirong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-10-01

    Sub-group 4 R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, including MYB3, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32, act as repressors in phenylpropanoid metabolism. These proteins contain the conserved MYB domain and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) repression domain. Additionally, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32 possess a putative zinc-finger domain and a conserved GY/FDFLGL motif in their C-termini. The protein 'sensitive to ABA and drought 2' (SAD2) recognizes the nuclear pore complex, which then transports the SAD2-MYB4 complex into the nucleus. Here, we show that the conserved GY/FDFLGL motif contributes to the interaction between MYB factors and SAD2. The Asp → Asn mutation in the GY/FDFLGL motif abolishes the interaction between MYB transcription factors and SAD2, and therefore they cannot be transported into the nucleus and cannot repress their target genes. We found that MYB4(D261N) loses the capacity to repress expression of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) gene and biosynthesis of sinapoyl malate. Our results indicate conservation among MYB transcription factors in terms of their interaction with SAD2. Therefore, the Asp → Asn mutation may be used to engineer transcription factors. PMID:26332741

  9. Transcriptional repression of the yeast CHA1 gene requires the chromatin-remodeling complex RSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    absence of Sth1p/Nps1p (a homolog of Swi2p/Snf2p) or of Swh3p (a homolog of Swi3p), expression of CHA1 in non-induced cells is increased to a level comparable with that of fully induced cells. Furthermore, in non-induced cells depleted for Sth1p/Nps1p or Swh3p, a nucleosome positioned over the TATA box of......In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism in...

  10. A metabolic phenotype in sarcoma? Repression of skeletal muscle transcription factor mondo A (Mlx- Interacting Protein)

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Emily; Yusuf, Alex; Stephenson, John; Airley, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    MondoA (MLX-interacting protein) is a bHLH transcription factor primarily located in skeletal muscle which drives glucose-dependent pathways such as glycolysis and the expression of TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein). A Mondo-A/TXNIP feedback pathway has been defined previously which is believed to regulate the uptake of glucose by tumours in response to increased glycolysis and production of lactate1. The aim of this study was to profile MondoA protein expression...

  11. CCAAT displacement protein/cut homolog recruits G9a histone lysine methyltransferase to repress transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Hitomi; Walsh, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    CCAAT displacement protein/cut homolog (CDP/cut) is a highly conserved homeodomain protein that contains three cut repeat sequences. CDP/cut is a transcriptional factor for many diverse cellular and viral genes that are involved in most cellular processes, including differentiation, development, and proliferation. Here, we report that CDP/cut interacts with a histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT), G9a, in vivo and in vitro. The deletion of the cut repeats within CDP/cut abrogates the intera...

  12. Transcriptional repression of the M channel subunit Kv7.2 in chronic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kirstin; Ooi, Lezanne; Dalle, Carine; Robertson, Brian; Wood, Ian C; Gamper, Nikita

    2011-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe health problem for which there is a lack of effective therapy. A frequent underlying condition of neuropathic pain is a sustained overexcitability of pain-sensing (nociceptive) sensory fibres. Therefore, the identification of mechanisms for such abnormal neuronal excitability is of utmost importance for understanding neuropathic pain. Despite much effort, an inclusive model explaining peripheral overexcitability is missing. We investigated transcriptional regulation of the Kcnq2 gene, which encodes the Kv7.2 subunit of membrane potential-stabilizing M channel, in peripheral sensory neurons in a model of neuropathic pain-partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). We show that Kcnq2 is the major Kcnq gene transcript in dorsal root ganglion (DRG); immunostaining and patch-clamp recordings from acute ganglionic slices verified functional expression of Kv7.2 in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. Neuropathic injury induced substantial downregulation of Kv7.2 expression. Levels of repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), which is known to suppress Kcnq2 expression, were upregulated in response to neuropathic injury identifying the likely mechanism of Kcnq2 regulation. Behavioural experiments demonstrated that neuropathic hyperalgesia following PSNL developed faster than the downregulation of Kcnq2 expression could be detected, suggesting that this transcriptional mechanism may contribute to the maintenance rather than the initiation of neuropathic pain. Importantly, the decrease in the peripheral M channel abundance could be functionally compensated by peripherally applied M channel opener flupirtine, which alleviated neuropathic hyperalgesia. Our work suggests a novel mechanism for neuropathic overexcitability and brings focus on M channels and REST as peripheral targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21345591

  13. Transcriptional repression of the M channel subunit Kv7.2 in chronic nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Kirstin; Ooi, Lezanne; Dalle, Carine; Robertson, Brian; Wood, Ian C.; Gamper, Nikita

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe health problem for which there is a lack of effective therapy. A frequent underlying condition of neuropathic pain is a sustained overexcitability of pain-sensing (nociceptive) sensory fibres. Therefore, the identification of mechanisms for such abnormal neuronal excitability is of utmost importance for understanding neuropathic pain. Despite much effort, an inclusive model explaining peripheral overexcitability is missing. We investigated transcriptional regulati...

  14. Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1 and recruits the LSD1/NuRD complex to epigenetically co-repress CYP7A1 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Ouyang

    Full Text Available Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1 directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative

  15. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway. PMID:25514493

  16. Analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans thaumatin-like cetA gene and evidence for transcriptional repression of pyr4 expression in the cetA-disrupted strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Shulamit; Shadkchan, Yona; Jadoun, Jeries; Sharon, Chaim; Markovich, Sarit; Osherov, Nir

    2006-01-01

    The asexual spore or conidium plays a critical role in the life cycle of many filamentous fungi. However, the process of conidial germination remains surprisingly obscure. To better understand this process at the molecular level we characterized the Aspergillus nidulans cetA gene which is uniquely transcribed in conidiating cultures and whose transcript is significantly enriched in mature conidia. CetA is a member of a novel family of fungal genes of unknown function with homology to plant thaumatin-like (PR-5) defense proteins. We demonstrate by Northern analysis that cetA is a glucose-repressible gene. Transcriptional repression is dependent on the presence of protein kinase A. Western analysis indicates that the CETA protein is absent from conidia but is highly expressed during the first 6h of germination and is secreted into the medium. Disruption of the cetA gene seemingly results in delayed germination, slow growth, abnormal hyphal branching, and cell-wall defects. However, further analysis shows that the mutant phenotype is the result of glucose-dependent transcriptional repression of the pyr4 selectable marker used to disrupt the cetA gene. This is the first time that repression of a selectable marker ("position effect") has been reported in A. nidulans, a finding that may well be of significance in the analysis and interpretation of mutant phenotypes in this organism. PMID:16376592

  17. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jiangsu Provincial Hospital of Chinese Traditional Medicine (China); Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yuhao [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Fang, Mingming [Jiangsu Jiankang Vocational Institute (China); Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxienjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwangnjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Xu, Yong [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IFN-{gamma} represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-{gamma} in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  18. A Response Regulator That Represses Transcription of Several Virulence Operons in the Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Federle, Michael J.; McIver, Kevin S.; Scott, June R.

    1999-01-01

    A search for homologs of the Bacillus subtilis PhoP response regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) genome revealed three good candidates. Inactivation of one of these, recently identified as csrR (J. C. Levin and M. R. Wessels, Mol. Microbiol. 30:209–219, 1998), caused the strain to produce mucoid colonies and to increase transcription of hasA, the first gene in the operon for capsule synthesis. We report here that a nonpolar insertion in this gene also increased ...

  19. Therapeutic fetal-globin inducers reduce transcriptional repression in hemoglobinopathy erythroid progenitors through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan; Sangerman, Jose; Luo, Hong Yuan; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chui, David H K; Faller, Douglas V; Perrine, Susan P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic augmentation of γ-globin expression sufficient to reduce anemia and clinical severity in patients with diverse hemoglobinopathies has been challenging. In studies here, representative molecules from four chemical classes, representing several distinct primary mechanisms of action, were investigated for effects on γ-globin transcriptional repressors, including components of the NuRD complex (LSD1 and HDACs 2-3), and the downstream repressor BCL11A, in erythroid progenitors from hemoglobinopathy patients. Two HDAC inhibitors (MS-275 and SB939), a short-chain fatty acid derivative (sodium dimethylbutyrate [SDMB]), and an agent identified in high-throughput screening, Benserazide, were studied. These therapeutics induced γ-globin mRNA in progenitors above same subject controls up to 20-fold, and increased F-reticulocytes up to 20%. Cellular protein levels of BCL11A, LSD-1, and KLF1 were suppressed by the compounds. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a 3.6-fold reduction in LSD1 and HDAC3 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with Benserazide exposure, 3-fold reduction in LSD-1 and HDAC2 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with SDMB exposure, while markers of gene activation (histone H3K9 acetylation and H3K4 demethylation), were enriched 5.7-fold. These findings identify clinical-stage oral therapeutics which inhibit or displace major co-repressors of γ-globin gene transcription and may suggest a rationale for combination therapy to produce enhanced efficacy. PMID:26603726

  20. Quercetin represses apolipoprotein B expression by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Shimizu

    Full Text Available Quercetin is one of the most abundant polyphenolic flavonoids found in fruits and vegetables and has anti-oxidative and anti-obesity effects. Because the small intestine is a major absorptive organ of dietary nutrients, it is likely that highly concentrated food constituents, including polyphenols, are present in the small intestinal epithelial cells, suggesting that food factors may have a profound effect in this tissue. To identify novel targets of quercetin in the intestinal enterocytes, mRNA profiling using human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was performed. We found that mRNA levels of some apolipoproteins, particularly apolipoprotein B (apoB, are downregulated in the presence of quercetin. On the exposure of Caco-2 cells to quercetin, both mRNA and protein levels of apoB were decreased. Promoter analysis of the human apoB revealed that quercetin response element is localized at the 5'-proximal promoter region, which contains a conserved CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP-response element. We found that quercetin reduces the promoter activity of apoB, driven by the enforced expression of C/EBPβ. Quercetin had no effect on either mRNA or protein levels of C/EBPβ. In contrast, we found that quercetin inhibits the transcriptional activity of C/EBPβ but not its recruitment to the apoB promoter. On the exposure of Caco-2 cells to quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, which is in a cell-impermeable form, no notable change in apoB mRNA was observed, suggesting an intracellular action of quercetin. In vitro interaction experiments using quercetin-conjugated beads revealed that quercetin binds to C/EBPβ. Our results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of transcription of apolipoprotein genes by quercetin in the intestinal enterocytes.

  1. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    Full Text Available Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  2. The transcription factor Vox represses endoderm development by interacting with Casanova and Pou2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jue; Lambert, Guillaume; Meijer, Annemarie H; Rosa, Frederic M

    2013-03-01

    Endoderm and mesoderm are both formed upon activation of Nodal signaling but how endoderm differentiates from mesoderm is still poorly explored. The sox-related gene casanova (sox32) acts downstream of the Nodal signal, is essential for endoderm development and requires the co-factor Pou2 (Pou5f1, Oct3, Oct4) in this process. Conversely, BMP signals have been shown to inhibit endoderm development by an as yet unexplained mechanism. In a search for Casanova regulators in zebrafish, we identified two of its binding partners as the transcription factors Pou2 and Vox, a member of the Vent group of proteins also involved in the patterning of the gastrula. In overexpression studies we show that vox and/or Vent group genes inhibit the capacity of Casanova to induce endoderm, even in the presence of its co-factor Pou2, and that Vox acts as a repressor in this process. We further show that vox, but not other members of the Vent group, is essential for defining the proper endodermal domain size at gastrulation. In this process, vox acts downstream of BMPs. Cell fate analysis further shows that Vox plays a key role downstream of BMP signals in regulating the capacity of Nodal to induce endoderm versus mesoderm by modulating the activity of the Casanova/Pou2 regulatory system. PMID:23364327

  3. NB-LRR signaling induces translational repression of viral transcripts and the formation of RNA processing bodies through mechanisms differing from those activated by UV stress and RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteignier, Louis-Valentin; Zhou, Ji; Cohen, Mathias; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Brosseau, Chantal; Caamal Chan, Maria Goretty; Robatzek, Silke; Moffett, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Plant NB-LRR proteins confer resistance to multiple pathogens, including viruses. Although the recognition of viruses by NB-LRR proteins is highly specific, previous studies have suggested that NB-LRR activation results in a response that targets all viruses in the infected cell. Using an inducible system to activate NB-LRR defenses, we find that NB-LRR signaling does not result in the degradation of viral transcripts, but rather prevents them from associating with ribosomes and translating their genetic material. This indicates that defense against viruses involves the repression of viral RNA translation. This repression is specific to viral transcripts and does not involve a global shutdown of host cell translation. As a consequence of the repression of viral RNA translation, NB-LRR responses induce a dramatic increase in the biogenesis of RNA processing bodies (PBs). We demonstrate that other pathways that induce translational repression, such as UV irradiation and RNAi, also induce PBs. However, by investigating the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and by using suppressors of RNAi we show that the mechanisms leading to PB induction by NB-LRR signaling are different from these stimuli, thus defining a distinct type of translational control and anti-viral mechanism in plants. PMID:26889008

  4. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huai; Li, Shuangyue; Guo, Yanjie; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yi; Guo, Jinqiu; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Cong; Shang, Lixin; Piao, Fengyuan

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that arsenic (As) impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV) in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH) may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4) levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway. PMID:26821021

  5. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that arsenic (As impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR/retinoid X receptor (RXR heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3’-triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxin (T4 levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway.

  6. Glucose Repression of Fbp1 Transcription in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Is Partially Regulated by Adenylate Cyclase Activation by a G Protein α Subunit Encoded by Gpa2 (Git8)

    OpenAIRE

    Nocero, M.; Isshiki, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Hoffman, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, genetic studies have identified genes that are required for glucose repression of fbp1 transcription. The git2 gene, also known as cyr1, encodes adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase converts ATP into the second messenger cAMP as part of many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. The git1, git3, git5, git7, git8 and git10 genes act upstream of adenylate cyclase, presumably encoding an adenylate cyclase activation pathway. In mammalian cells, a...

  7. TNIP1 reduction of HSPA6 gene expression occurs in promoter regions lacking binding sites for known TNIP1-repressed transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Vincent P.; Krueger, Winfried; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    TNFα-induced protein 3-interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) represses signaling pathways initiated by specific nuclear and transmembrane receptors. This effect results in reduced activity of distinct transcription factors such as retinoic acid receptors (RAR), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and NFκB. TNIP1-null and TNIP1-knockin defective for ubiquitin-binding mice show increased liver apoptosis, and enlarged spleen and lymph nodes, respectively. To complement current knowledge ...

  8. A human Polycomb isoform lacking the Pc box does not participate to PRC1 complexes but forms protein assemblies and represses transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völkel, Pamela; Le Faou, Perrine; Vandamme, Julien; Pira, Dorcas; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Polycomb repression controls the expression of hundreds of genes involved in development and is mediated by essentially two classes of chromatin-associated protein complexes. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) trimethylates histone H3 at lysine 27, an epigenetic mark that serves as a docking site for the PRC1 protein complex. Drosophila core PRC1 is composed of four subunits: Polycomb (Pc), Posterior sex combs (Psc), Polyhomeotic (Ph) and Sex combs extra (Sce). Each of these proteins has multiple orthologs in vertebrates, thus generating an enormous scope for potential combinatorial diversity. In particular, mammalian genomes encode five Pc family members: CBX2, CBX4, CBX6, CBX7 and CBX8. To complicate matters further, distinct isoforms might arise from single genes. Here, we address the functional role of the two human CBX2 isoforms. Owing to different polyadenylation sites and alternative splicing events, the human CBX2 locus produces two transcripts: a 5-exon transcript that encodes the 532-amino acid CBX2-1 isoform that contains the conserved chromodomain and Pc box and a 4-exon transcript encoding a shorter isoform, CBX2-2, lacking the Pc box but still possessing a chromodomain. Using biochemical approaches and a novel in vivo imaging assay, we show that the short CBX2-2 isoform lacking the Pc box, does not participate in PRC1 protein complexes, but self-associates in vivo and forms complexes of high molecular weight. Furthermore, the CBX2 short isoform is still able to repress transcription, suggesting that Polycomb repression might occur in the absence of PRC1 formation. PMID:22419124

  9. Complex regulation of the global regulatory gene csrA: CsrA-mediated translational repression, transcription from five promoters by Eσ70 and EσS, and indirect transcriptional activation by CsrA

    OpenAIRE

    Yakhnin, Helen; Yakhnin, Alexander V.; Baker, Carol S.; Sineva, Elena; Berezin, Igor; Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2011-01-01

    CsrA of Escherichia coli is an RNA binding protein that globally regulates gene expression by repressing translation and/or altering the stability of target transcripts. Here we explored mechanisms that control csrA expression. Four CsrA binding sites were predicted upstream of the csrA initiation codon, one of which overlapped its Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Results from gel shift, footprint, toeprint and in vitro translation experiments indicate that CsrA binds to these four sites and represse...

  10. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription. PMID:26483469

  11. Transient viral DNA replication and repression of viral transcription are supported by the C-terminal domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M C; McBride, A A

    1998-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein is important for viral DNA replication and transcriptional repression. It has been proposed that the full-length E1 protein consists of a small N-terminal and a larger C-terminal domain. In this study, it is shown that an E1 polypeptide containing residues 132 to 605 (which represents the C-terminal domain) is able to support transient viral DNA replication, although at a level lower than that supported by the wild-type protein. This domain can also repress E2-mediated transactivation from the P89 promoter as well as the wild-type E1 protein can. PMID:9420289

  12. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  13. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Fabiana; Vu, Ly P.; Themeli, Maria; Kriks, Sonja; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Khanin, Raya; Hricik, Todd; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Papapetrou, Eirini P.; Levine, Ross L.; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia. PMID:25754204

  14. Intracellular high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) represses HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated whether the high mobility group B 1 (HMGB1), an abundant nuclear protein in all mammalian cells, affects HIV-1 transcription. Intracellular expression of human HMGB1 repressed HIV-1 gene expression in epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect of HMGB1 was caused by repression of long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription. Other viral promoters/enhancers, including simian virus 40 or cytomegalovirus, were not inhibited by HMGB1. In addition, HMGB1 inhibition of HIV-1 subtype C expression was dependent on the number of NFκB sites in the LTR region. The inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on viral gene expression observed in HeLa cells was confirmed by an upregulation of viral replication in the presence of antisense HMGB1 in monocytic cells. In contrast to what was found in HeLa cells and monocytic cells, endogenous HMGB1 expression did not affect HIV-1 replication in unstimulated Jurkat cells. Thus, intracellular HMGB1 affects HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

  15. Recruitment of HDAC4 by transcription factor YY1 represses HOXB13 to affect cell growth in AR-negative prostate cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guoling; Zhang, Guocui; Dong, Zhixiong; Liu, Zhiwei; Li, Lin; Feng, Yunpeng; Su, Dongmei; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Baiqu; Lu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    -immunoprecipitation assays revealed that HDAC4 and YY1 formed a complex. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays verified that HDAC4 was recruited to HOXB13 promoter by YY1. Moreover, promoter truncation and point mutation studies determined that the two proximal YY1 binding sites on the HOXB13 promoter were...... essential for the recruitments of YY1 and HDAC4. Data presented in this report suggest that YY1 and HDAC4 affected cell growth by repressing transcriptional regulation of HOXB13 through an epigenetic modification of histones....

  16. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at ...

  17. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 Is required for the transcriptional repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjun Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, catalysing demethylation of mono- and di-methylated histone H3-K4 or K9, exhibits diverse transcriptional activities by mediating chromatin reconfiguration. The telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene, encoding an essential component for telomerase activity that is involved in cellular immortalization and transformation, is silent in most normal human cells while activated in up to 90% of human cancers. It remains to be defined how exactly the transcriptional activation of the hTERT gene occurs during the oncogenic process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we determined the effect of LSD1 on hTERT transcription. In normal human fibroblasts with a tight hTERT repression, a pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 led to a weak hTERT expression, and a robust induction of hTERT mRNA was observed when LSD1 and histone deacetylases (HDACs were both inhibited. Small interference RNA-mediated depletion of both LSD1 and CoREST, a co-repressor in HDAC-containing complexes, synergistically activated hTERT transcription. In cancer cells, inhibition of LSD1 activity or knocking-down of its expression led to significant increases in levels of hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that LSD1 occupied the hTERT proximal promoter, and its depletion resulted in elevated di-methylation of histone H3-K4 accompanied by increased H3 acetylation locally in cancer cells. Moreover, during the differentiation of leukemic HL60 cells, the decreased hTERT expression was accompanied by the LSD1 recruitment to the hTERT promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LSD1 represses hTERT transcription via demethylating H3-K4 in normal and cancerous cells, and together with HDACs, participates in the establishment of a stable repression state of the hTERT gene in normal or differentiated malignant cells. The findings contribute to better understandings of h

  18. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) represses transcription of the tumor suppressor Rb gene via binding competition with Sp1 and recruitment of co-repressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-11-28

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp -308 to -188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp -65 to -56) and GC-box 2 (bp -18 to -9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp -244 to -236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  19. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  20. Long-distance transport, vacuolar sequestration and transcriptional responses induced by cadmium and arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Jobe, Timothy O.; Hauser, Felix; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-01-01

    Iron, zinc, copper and manganese are essential metals for cellular enzyme functions while cadmium, mercury and the metalloid arsenic lack any biological function. Both, essential and non-essential metals and metalloids are extremely reactive and toxic. Therefore, plants have acquired specialized mechanisms to sense, transport and maintain essential metals within physiological concentrations and to detoxify non-essential metals and metalloids. This review focuses on the recent identification o...

  1. The formamidase gene of Aspergillus nidulans: regulation by nitrogen metabolite repression and transcriptional interference by an overlapping upstream gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, J A; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    2001-01-01

    The ability to utilize formamide as a sole nitrogen source has been found in numerous fungi. We have cloned the fmdS gene encoding a formamidase from Aspergillus nidulans and found that it belongs to a highly conserved family of proteins separate from the major amidase families. The expression of fmdS is primarily regulated via AreA-mediated nitrogen metabolite repression and does not require the addition of exogenous inducer. Consistent with this, deletion analysis of the 5' region of fmdS h...

  2. The transcription factor GATA3 actively represses RUNX3 protein-regulated production of interferon-gamma

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Ryoji; Junttila, Ilkka S.; Wei, Gang; Urban, Joseph F.; Zhao, Keji; Paul, William E.; Zhu, Jinfang

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is crucial for the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into T helper 2 (Th2) cells. Here we show that deletion of Gata3 allowed the appearance of interferon γ (IFNγ)-producing cells in the absence of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IFNγ. Such IFNγ production was transcription factor T-bet-independent. Another T-box-containing transcription factor Eomes, but not T-bet, was induced both in GATA3-deficient CD4+ T cells differentiated under Th2 cell conditions, and in ...

  3. GLUT1 glucose transporter gene transcription is repressed by Sp3. Evidence for a regulatory role of Sp3 during myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandos, C; Sánchez-Feutrie, M; Santalucía, T; Viñals, F; Cadefau, J; Gumà, A; Cussó, R; Kaliman, P; Canicio, J; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1999-11-19

    GLUT1 glucose transporters are highly expressed in proliferating and transformed cells as well as in tissues during fetal life. However, the mechanisms that regulate GLUT1 gene expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Sp3 proteins bind to the GLUT1 proximal promoter gene and inhibit transcriptional activity in muscle and non-muscle cells. Two different Sp3 translational products (110 and 74 kDa) derived from differential translational initiation were detected in nuclear extracts from myoblast cells, and both Sp3 protein species inhibited GLUT1 gene transcriptional activity. The inhibitory effect of Sp3 was dominant over the stimulatory effect of Sp1 on transcriptional activity of GLUT1 gene. Furthermore, abolition of Sp3 binding to the proximal promoter of GLUT1 gene completely blocked the response to Sp3. We provide evidence that the expression of Sp3 protein is subject to regulation in muscle cells and that this is likely to control GLUT1. Thus, Sp3 protein was up-regulated in the absence of changes in Sp1 early after the induction of IGF-II-dependent myogenesis. Furthermore, forced over-expression of MyoD caused an enhancement in the cellular Sp3/Sp1 ratio which was concomitant to a reduced GLUT1 expression. Later during myogenesis, Sp3 expression was substantial whereas Sp1 was markedly down-regulated. In summary, we provide direct evidence that the transcription factor Sp3 represses gene expression in non-muscle and muscle cells and this is likely to operate in fetal heart by binding to the GLUT1 gene promoter. This is the first description of a repressor of GLUT1 gene transcription. Furthermore, we propose that variations in the ratio of Sp3 versus Sp1 regulate GLUT1 promoter activity and this is crucial in the down-regulation of GLUT1 associated to myogenesis. PMID:10556032

  4. Tamoxifen represses alcohol-induced transcription of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Qingsong; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption in women has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, particular in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III-dependent (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular tRNAs and 5S rRNA production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. Our recent studies demonstrated that alcohol induces Brf1 expression and Pol III gene transcription via ER. Here, we report that Tamoxi...

  5. Progesterone receptor activation downregulates GATA3 by transcriptional repression and increased protein turnover promoting breast tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Izzo, Franco; Mercogliano, Florencia; Venturutti, Leandro; Tkach, Mercedes; Inurrigarro, Gloria; Schillaci, Roxana; Cerchietti, Leandro; Elizalde, Patricia V.; Proietti, Cecilia J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The transcription factor GATA3 is involved in mammary gland development and is crucial for the maintenance of the differentiated status of luminal epithelial cells. The role of GATA3 in breast cancer as a tumor suppressor has been established, although insights into the mechanism of GATA3 expression loss are still required. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were conducted to study progestin modulation of recruitment of transcription factors to GATA3 promoter. We perfor...

  6. Transcription from the second heavy-strand promoter of human mtDNA is repressed by transcription factor A in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lodeiro, Maria F.; Uchida, Akira; Bestwick, Megan; Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based studies support the existence of two promoters on the heavy strand of mtDNA: heavy-strand promoter 1 (HSP1) and HSP2. However, transcription from HSP2 has been reported only once in a cell-free system, and never when recombinant proteins have been used. Here, we document transcription from HSP2 using an in vitro system of defined composition. An oligonucleotide template representing positions 596–685 of mtDNA was sufficient to observe transcription by the human mtRNA polymerase (PO...

  7. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells.

  8. The transcription factor GATA3 actively represses RUNX3 protein-regulated production of interferon-gamma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transcription factor GATA3 is crucial for the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into T helper 2 (Th2) cells. Here, we show that deletion of Gata3 allowed the appearance of interferon-g (IFN-g)-producing cells in the absence of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IFN-g. Such IFN-g production was tra...

  9. ZCT1 and ZCT2 transcription factors repress the activity of a gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway in Madagascar periwinkle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebbi, Mouadh; Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas; Gaillard, Cécile; Atanassova, Rossitza; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2014-10-15

    In Catharanthus roseus, accumulating data highlighted the existence of a coordinated transcriptional regulation of structural genes that takes place within the secoiridoid biosynthetic branch, including the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and the following steps leading to secologanin. To identify transcription factors acting in these pathways, we performed a yeast one-hybrid screening using as bait a promoter region of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene involved in the responsiveness of C. roseus cells to hormonal signals inducing monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) production. We identified that ZCT2, one of the three members of the zinc finger Catharanthus protein (ZCT) family, can bind to a HDS promoter region involved in hormonal responsiveness. By trans-activation assays, we demonstrated that ZCT1 and ZCT2 but not ZCT3 repress the HDS promoter activity. Gene expression analyses in C. roseus cells exposed to methyljasmonate revealed a persistence of induction of ZCT2 gene expression suggesting the existence of feed-back regulatory events acting on HDS gene expression in correlation with the MIA production. PMID:25108262

  10. Transcription factor C/EBP-β induces tumor-suppressor phosphatase PHLPP2 through repression of the miR-17-92 cluster in differentiating AML cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y; Hanse, E A; Stedman, K; Benson, J M; Lowman, X H; Subramanian, S; Kelekar, A

    2016-07-01

    PHLPP2, a member of the PH-domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) family, which targets oncogenic kinases, has been actively investigated as a tumor suppressor in solid tumors. Little is known, however, regarding its regulation in hematological malignancies. We observed that PHLPP2 protein expression, but not its mRNA, was suppressed in late differentiation stage acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. MicroRNAs (miR or miRNAs) from the miR-17-92 cluster, oncomir-1, were shown to inhibit PHLPP2 expression and these miRNAs were highly expressed in AML cells that lacked PHLPP2 protein. Studies showed that miR-17-92 cluster regulation was, surprisingly, independent of transcription factors c-MYC and E2F in these cells; instead all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a drug used for terminally differentiating AML subtypes, markedly suppressed miR-17-92 expression and increased PHLPP2 protein levels and phosphatase activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the effect of ATRA on miR-17-92 expression is mediated through its target, transcription factor C/EBPβ, which interacts with the intronic promoter of the miR-17-92 gene to inhibit transactivation of the cluster. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for upregulation of the phosphatase activity of PHLPP2 through C/EBPβ-mediated repression of the miR-17-92 cluster in terminally differentiating myeloid cells. PMID:26868909

  11. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA. PMID:27165520

  12. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Sim; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat) encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2)O(2). In C. diphtheriae C7(β), both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2)O(2). In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β) to H(2)O(2) did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2)O(2) sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β), C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2)O(2). In the C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β) wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2)O(2) resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β) bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2). PMID:22438866

  13. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Sim Kim

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2O(2. In C. diphtheriae C7(β, both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2O(2. In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β to H(2O(2 did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2O(2 sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β, C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2O(2. In the C. diphtheriae C7(β ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2O(2 resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2O(2.

  14. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  15. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  16. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A functions to repress FoxO transcription factors to allow cell cycle progression in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huanjie; Mohamed, Esraa M; Xu, Guoyan G; Waters, Michael; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Zhang, Yan; Spiegel, Sarah; Idowu, Michael O; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-26

    Cancer cells rely on hyperactive de novo lipid synthesis for maintaining malignancy. Recent studies suggest involvement in cancer of fatty acid oxidation, a process functionally opposite to lipogenesis. A mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to oncogenic processes is yet to be established. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) that catalyzes the transfer of long-chain acyl group of the acyl-CoA ester to carnitine, thereby shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPT1A was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian serous carcinomas. Overexpression of CPT1A correlated with a poor overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. Inactivation of CPT1A decreased cellular ATP levels and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, suggesting that ovarian cancer cells depend on or are addicted to CPT1A-mediated FAO for cell cycle progression. CPT1A deficiency also suppressed anchorage-independent growth and formation of xenografts from ovarian cancer cell lines. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 (p21) was identified as most consistently and robustly induced cell cycle regulator upon inactivation of CPT1A. Furthermore, p21 was transcriptionally upregulated by the FoxO transcription factors, which were in turn phosphorylated and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK and p38. Our results established the oncogenic relevance of CPT1A and a mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to cell cycle regulation, suggesting that CPT1A could be a prognostic biomarker and rational target for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:26716645

  17. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  18. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gia-Ming [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Present address: The University of Chicago, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 900 E. 57th Street, Room 7134, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  19. The SCL/TAL1 Transcription Factor Represses the Stress Protein DDiT4/REDD1 in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Calvo, Julien; Renou, Laurent; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; van den Heuvel, Anita; Amsellem, Sophie; Mehrpour, Maryam; Larghero, Jerome; Soler, Eric; Naguibneva, Irina; Pflumio, Francoise

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are regulated through numerous molecular mechanisms that have not been interconnected. The transcription factor stem cell leukemia/T-cell acute leukemia 1 (TAL1) controls human HSPC but its mechanism of action is not clarified. In this study, we show that knockdown (KD) or short-term conditional over-expression (OE) of TAL1 in human HSPC ex vivo, respectively, blocks and maintains hematopoietic potentials, affecting proliferation of human HSPC. Comparative gene expression analyses of TAL1/KD and TAL1/OE human HSPC revealed modifications of cell cycle regulators as well as previously described TAL1 target genes. Interestingly an inverse correlation between TAL1 and DNA damage-induced transcript 4 (DDiT4/REDD1), an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, is uncovered. Low phosphorylation levels of mTOR target proteins in TAL1/KD HSPC confirmed an interplay between mTOR pathway and TAL1 in correlation with TAL1-mediated effects of HSPC proliferation. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments performed in human HSPC showed that DDiT4 is a direct TAL1 target gene. Functional analyses showed that TAL1 represses DDiT4 expression in HSPCs. These results pinpoint DDiT4/REDD1 as a novel target gene regulated by TAL1 in human HSPC and establish for the first time a link between TAL1 and the mTOR pathway in human early hematopoietic cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:2268-2279. PMID:25858676

  20. Psychiatric Risk Gene Transcription Factor 4 Regulates Intrinsic Excitability of Prefrontal Neurons via Repression of SCN10a and KCNQ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannals, Matthew D; Hamersky, Gregory R; Page, Stephanie Cerceo; Campbell, Morganne N; Briley, Aaron; Gallo, Ryan A; Phan, BaDoi N; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Shin, Joo Heon; Jaffe, Andrew E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Maher, Brady J

    2016-04-01

    Transcription Factor 4 (TCF4) is a clinically pleiotropic gene associated with schizophrenia and Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). To gain insight about the neurobiology of TCF4, we created an in vivo model of PTHS by suppressing Tcf4 expression in rat prefrontal neurons immediately prior to neurogenesis. This cell-autonomous genetic insult attenuated neuronal spiking by increasing the afterhyperpolarization. At the molecular level, using a novel technique called iTRAP that combined in utero electroporation and translating ribosome affinity purification, we identified increased translation of two ion channel genes, Kcnq1 and Scn10a. These ion channel candidates were validated by pharmacological rescue and molecular phenocopy. Remarkably, similar excitability deficits were observed in prefrontal neurons from a Tcf4(+/tr) mouse model of PTHS. Thus, we identify TCF4 as a regulator of neuronal intrinsic excitability in part by repression of Kcnq1 and Scn10a and suggest that this molecular function may underlie pathophysiology associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26971948

  1. The manganese-responsive regulator MntR represses transcription of a predicted ZIP family metal ion transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Meike; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Manganese is an important trace element required as an enzyme cofactor and for protection against oxidative stress. In this study, we characterized the DtxR-type transcriptional regulator MntR (cg0741) of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 as a manganese-dependent repressor of the predicted ZIP family metal transporter Cg1623. Comparative transcriptome analysis of a ΔmntR strain and the wild type led to the identification of cg1623 as potential target gene of MntR which was about 50-fold upregulated when cells were grown in glucose minimal medium. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, a conserved 18 bp inverted repeat (TGTTCAATGCGTTGAACA) was identified as binding motif of MntR in the cg1623 promoter and confirmed by mutational analysis. Promoter fusion of Pcg1623 to eyfp confirmed that the MntR-dependent repression is only abolished in the absence of manganese. However, neither deletion of mntR nor cg1623 resulted in a significant growth phenotype in comparison to the wild type--strongly suggesting the presence of further manganese uptake and efflux systems in C. glutamicum. The control of cg1623 by the DtxR-type regulator MntR represents the first example of a predicted ZIP family protein that is regulated in a manganese-dependent manner in bacteria. PMID:25790484

  2. E2F-Rb Complexes Assemble and Inhibit cdc25A Transcription in Cervical Carcinoma Cells following Repression of Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lingling; Goodwin, Edward C.; Naeger, Lisa Kay; Vigo, Elena; Galaktionov, Konstantin; Helin, Kristian; DiMaio, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest. To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F bin...

  3. Nerve Injury Diminishes Opioid Analgesia through Lysine Methyltransferase-mediated Transcriptional Repression of μ-Opioid Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chen, Shao-Rui; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR, encoded by Oprm1) agonists are the mainstay analgesics for treating moderate to severe pain. Nerve injury causes down-regulation of MORs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and diminishes the opioid effect on neuropathic pain. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the diminished MOR expression caused by nerve injury are not clear. G9a (encoded by Ehmt2), a histone 3 at lysine 9 methyltransferase, is a key chromatin regulator responsible for gene silencing. In this study, we determined the role of G9a in diminished MOR expression and opioid analgesic effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We found that nerve injury in rats induced a long-lasting reduction in the expression level of MORs in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Nerve injury consistently increased the enrichment of the G9a product histone 3 at lysine 9 dimethylation in the promoter of Oprm1 in the DRG. G9a inhibition or siRNA knockdown fully reversed MOR expression in the injured DRG and potentiated the morphine effect on pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In mice lacking Ehmt2 in DRG neurons, nerve injury failed to reduce the expression level of MORs and the morphine effect. In addition, G9a inhibition or Ehmt2 knockout in DRG neurons normalized nerve injury-induced reduction in the inhibitory effect of the opioid on synaptic glutamate release from primary afferent nerves. Our findings indicate that G9a contributes critically to transcriptional repression of MORs in primary sensory neurons in neuropathic pain. G9a inhibitors may be used to enhance the opioid analgesic effect in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26917724

  4. The Developmental Regulator Protein Gon4l Associates with Protein YY1, Co-repressor Sin3a, and Histone Deacetylase 1 and Mediates Transcriptional Repression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Hankel, Isaiah L.; Hostager, Bruce S.; Swartzendruber, Julie A.; Friedman, Ann D.; Brenton, Janet L.; Rothman, Paul B.; Colgan, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies involving zebrafish and mice have demonstrated that the protein Gon4l (Gon4-like) is essential for hematopoiesis. These studies also suggested that Gon4l regulates gene expression during hematopoietic development, yet the biochemical function of Gon4l has not been defined. Here, we describe the identification of factors that interact with Gon4l and may cooperate with this protein to regulate gene expression. As predicted by polypeptide sequence conservation, Gon4l interacted and co-localized with the DNA-binding protein YY1 (Yin Yang 1). Density gradient sedimentation analysis of protein lysates from mouse M12 B cells showed that Gon4l and YY1 co-sediment with the transcriptional co-repressor Sin3a and its functional partner histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1. Consistent with these results, immunoprecipitation studies showed that Gon4l associates with Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 as a part of complexes that form in M12 cells. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Gon4l, YY1, Sin3a, and HDAC1 could all associate as components of a single complex and that a conserved domain spanning the central portion of Gon4l was required for formation of this complex. When targeted to DNA, Gon4l repressed the activity of a nearby promoter, which correlated with the ability to interact with Sin3a and HDAC1. Our data suggest that Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 are co-factors for Gon4l and that Gon4l may function as a platform for the assembly of complexes that regulate gene expression. PMID:21454521

  5. The developmental regulator protein Gon4l associates with protein YY1, co-repressor Sin3a, and histone deacetylase 1 and mediates transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Hankel, Isaiah L; Hostager, Bruce S; Swartzendruber, Julie A; Friedman, Ann D; Brenton, Janet L; Rothman, Paul B; Colgan, John D

    2011-05-20

    Genetic studies involving zebrafish and mice have demonstrated that the protein Gon4l (Gon4-like) is essential for hematopoiesis. These studies also suggested that Gon4l regulates gene expression during hematopoietic development, yet the biochemical function of Gon4l has not been defined. Here, we describe the identification of factors that interact with Gon4l and may cooperate with this protein to regulate gene expression. As predicted by polypeptide sequence conservation, Gon4l interacted and co-localized with the DNA-binding protein YY1 (Yin Yang 1). Density gradient sedimentation analysis of protein lysates from mouse M12 B cells showed that Gon4l and YY1 co-sediment with the transcriptional co-repressor Sin3a and its functional partner histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1. Consistent with these results, immunoprecipitation studies showed that Gon4l associates with Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 as a part of complexes that form in M12 cells. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Gon4l, YY1, Sin3a, and HDAC1 could all associate as components of a single complex and that a conserved domain spanning the central portion of Gon4l was required for formation of this complex. When targeted to DNA, Gon4l repressed the activity of a nearby promoter, which correlated with the ability to interact with Sin3a and HDAC1. Our data suggest that Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 are co-factors for Gon4l and that Gon4l may function as a platform for the assembly of complexes that regulate gene expression. PMID:21454521

  6. TBL1 and TBLR1 Phosphorylation on Regulated Gene Promoters Overcomes Dual CtBP and NCoR/SMRT Transcriptional Repression Checkpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Perissi, Valentina; Scafoglio, Claudio; Zhang, Jie; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Rose, David W.; Glass, Christopher K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    A key strategy to achieve regulated gene expression in higher eukaryotes is to prevent illegitimate signal-independent activation by imposing robust control on the dismissal of corepressors. Here, we report that many signaling pathways, including Notch, NFkB, and nuclear receptor ligands, are subjected to a dual repression “check point” based on distinct corepressor complexes. Gene activation requires the release of both CtBP1/2- and NCoR/SMRT-dependent repression, through the coordinate acti...

  7. Eukaryotic translation initiator protein 1A isoform, CCS-3, enhances the transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yuri; Yu, Mi-young; Park, Jungeun; Lee, Choong-Eun; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    FBI-1, a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors, plays a role in differentiation, oncogenesis, and adipogenesis. eEF1A is a eukaryotic translation elongation factor involved in several cellular processes including embryogenesis, oncogenic transformation, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal organization. CCS-3, a potential cervical cancer suppressor, is an isoform of eEF1A. We found that eEF1A forms a complex with FBI-1 by co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF Mass analysis of the immunoprecipitate. GST fusion protein pull-downs showed that FBI-1 directly interacts with eEF1A and CCS-3 via the zinc finger and POZ-domain of FBI-1. FBI-1 co-localizes with either eEF1A or CCS-3 at the nuclear periplasm. CCS-3 enhances transcriptional repression of the p21CIP1 gene (hereafter referred to as p21) by FBI-1. The POZ-domain of FBI-1 interacts with the co-repressors, SMRT and BCoR. We found that CCS-3 also interacts with the co-repressors independently. The molecular interaction between the co-repressors and CCS-3 at the POZ-domain of FBI-1 appears to enhance FBI-1 mediated transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that CCS-3 may be important in cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and oncogenesis by interacting with the proto-oncogene FBI-1 and transcriptional co-repressors. PMID:19471103

  8. Transcriptional changes associated with reduced spontaneous liver tumor incidence in mice chronically exposed to high dose arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of male C3H mice in utero (from gestational days 8-18) to 85 ppm sodium arsenite via the dams' drinking water has previously been shown to increase liver tumor incidence by 2 years of age. However, in our companion study (Ahlborn et al., 2009), continuous exposure to 85 ppm sodium arsenic (from gestational day 8 to postnatal day 365) did not result in increased tumor incidence, but rather in a significant reduction (0% tumor incidence). The purpose of the present study was to examine the gene expression responses that may lead to the apparent protective effect of continuous arsenic exposure. Genes in many functional categories including cellular growth and proliferation, gene expression, cell death, oxidative stress, protein ubiquitination, and mitochondrial dysfunction were altered by continuous arsenic treatment. Many of these genes are known to be involved in liver cancer. One such gene associated with rodent hepatocarcinogenesis, Scd1, encodes stearoyl-CoA desaturase and was down-regulated by continuous arsenic treatment. An overlap between the genes in our study affected by continuous arsenic exposure and those from the literature affected by long-term caloric restriction suggests that reduction in the spontaneous tumor incidence under both conditions may involve similar gene pathways such as fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, and stress response.

  9. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...... gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...... on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression....

  10. Repetitive elements and enforced transcriptional repression co-operate to enhance DNA methylation spreading into a promoter CpG-island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repression of many tumor suppressor genes in cancer is concurrent with aberrantly increased DNA methylation levels at promoter CpG islands (CGIs). About one-fourth of empirically defined human promoters are surrounded by or contain clustered repetitive elements. It was previously observed that a sha...

  11. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K;

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest....... To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a...... in the absence of E2 expression. Expression of the E2 protein also led to posttranscriptional increase in the level of E2F4, p105(Rb), and p130 and induced the formation of nuclear E2F4-p130 and E2F4-p105(Rb) complexes. This resulted in marked rearrangement of the protein complexes that formed at the...

  12. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  13. Requirements for Vibrio cholerae HapR Binding and Transcriptional Repression at the hapR Promoter Are Distinct from Those at the aphA Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Skorupski, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Virulence gene expression in certain strains of Vibrio cholerae is regulated in response to cell density by a quorum-sensing cascade that influences the levels of the LuxR homolog HapR through small regulatory RNAs that control the stability of its message. At high cell density, HapR represses the expression of the gene encoding the virulence gene activator AphA by binding to a site between −85 and −58 in the aphA promoter. We show here that a second binding site for HapR lies within the hapR...

  14. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21WAF1/CIP1) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF mediates

  15. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bi-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Jeng [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Huei-Sheng, E-mail: huanghs@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF

  16. Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex functions in controlling polarized growth by repressing Hsf1-driven heat stress-associated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Vjestica

    Full Text Available How the molecular mechanisms of stress response are integrated at the cellular level remains obscure. Here we show that the cellular polarity machinery in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes dynamic adaptation to thermal stress resulting in a period of decreased Cdc42 activity and altered, monopolar growth. Cells where the heat stress-associated transcription was genetically upregulated exhibit similar growth patterning in the absence of temperature insults. We identify the Ssa2-Mas5/Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex as repressor of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Cells lacking this chaperone activity constitutively activate the heat-stress-associated transcriptional program. Interestingly, they also exhibit intermittent monopolar growth within a physiological temperature range and are unable to adapt to heat stress. We propose that by negatively regulating the heat stress-associated transcription, the Ssa2-Mas5 chaperone system could optimize cellular growth under different temperature regiments.

  17. Toxoplasma Effector Recruits the Mi-2/NuRD Complex to Repress STAT1 Transcription and Block IFN-γ-Dependent Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olias, Philipp; Etheridge, Ronald D; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J; Sibley, L David

    2016-07-13

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an essential mediator of host defense against intracellular pathogens, including the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. However, prior T. gondii infection blocks IFN-γ-dependent gene transcription, despite the downstream transcriptional activator STAT1 being activated and bound to cognate nuclear promoters. We identify the parasite effector that blocks STAT1-dependent transcription and show it is associated with recruitment of the Mi-2 nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, a chromatin-modifying repressor. This secreted effector, toxoplasma inhibitor of STAT1-dependent transcription (TgIST), translocates to the host cell nucleus, where it recruits Mi-2/NuRD to STAT1-dependent promoters, resulting in altered chromatin and blocked transcription. TgIST is conserved across strains, underlying their shared ability to block IFN-γ-dependent transcription. TgIST deletion results in increased parasite clearance in IFN-γ-activated cells and reduced mouse virulence, which is restored in IFN-γ-receptor-deficient mice. These findings demonstrate the importance of both IFN-γ responses and the ability of pathogens to counteract these defenses. PMID:27414498

  18. A human Polycomb isoform lacking the Pc box does not participate to PRC1 complexes but forms protein assemblies and represses transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völkel, Pamela; Le Faou, Perrine; Vandamme, Julien;

    2012-01-01

    site for the PRC1 protein complex. Drosophila core PRC1 is composed of four subunits: Polycomb (Pc), Posterior sex combs (Psc), Polyhomeotic (Ph) and Sex combs extra (Sce). Each of these proteins has multiple orthologs in vertebrates, thus generating an enormous scope for potential combinatorial...... diversity. In particular, mammalian genomes encode five Pc family members: CBX2, CBX4, CBX6, CBX7 and CBX8. To complicate matters further, distinct isoforms might arise from single genes. Here, we address the functional role of the two human CBX2 isoforms. Owing to different polyadenylation sites...... and alternative splicing events, the human CBX2 locus produces two transcripts: a 5-exon transcript that encodes the 532-amino acid CBX2-1 isoform that contains the conserved chromodomain and Pc box and a 4-exon transcript encoding a shorter isoform, CBX2-2, lacking the Pc box but still possessing a chromodomain...

  19. Phosphorylation of RelA/p65 promotes DNMT-1 recruitment to chromatin and represses transcription of the tumor metastasis suppressor gene BRMS1

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuan; Mayo, Marty W.; Nagji, Alykhan S.; Smith, Philip W.; Ramsey, Catherine S.; Li, Duo; David R Jones

    2011-01-01

    The majority of patients with lung cancer present with metastatic disease. Chronic inflammation and subsequent activation of NF-κB have been associated the development of cancers. The RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB is typically associated with transcriptional activation. In this report we show that RelA/p65 can function as an active transcriptional repressor through enhanced methylation of the BRMS1 metastasis suppressor gene promoter via direct recruitment of DNMT-1 to chromatin in response to TN...

  20. Identification of the subunit of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) that functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, K L; Kallipolitis, B H; Ebright, R H; Valentin-Hansen, P

    2000-01-01

    At promoters of the Escherichia coli CytR regulon, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) interacts with the repressor CytR to form transcriptionally inactive CRP-CytR-promoter or (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Here, using "oriented heterodimer" analysis, we show that only one subunit of the CRP dimer......, the subunit proximal to CytR, functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Our results provide information about the architecture of CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes and rule out the proposal that masking of activating region 2 of...... CRP is responsible for the transcriptional inactivity of the complexes....

  1. Beta-casein gene promoter activity is regulated by the hormone-mediated relief of transcriptional repression and a mammary-gland-specific nuclear factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt-Ney, M; Doppler, W; Ball, R K; Groner, B

    1991-01-01

    Transcription from the beta-casein milk protein gene promoter is induced by the synergistic action of glucocorticoid and prolactin hormones in the murine mammary epithelial cell line, HC11. We analyzed the binding of nuclear proteins to the promoter and determined their binding sites. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the function of nuclear factor binding. During lactogenic hormone induction of HC11 cells, the binding of two nuclear factors increased. The binding of two other n...

  2. Retinoic acid-mediated repression of human papillomavirus 18 transcription and different ligand regulation of the retinoic acid receptor beta gene in non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic HeLa hybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, D; Boye, B; Baust, C; zur Hausen, H; Schwarz, E

    1992-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) belongs to the group of genital papillomaviruses involved in the development of cervical carcinomas. Since retinoic acid (RA) is a key regulator of epithelial cell differentiation and a growth inhibitor in vitro of HPV18-positive HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we have used HeLa and HeLa hybrid cells in order to analyse the effects of RA on expression of the HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenes and of the cellular RA receptor genes RAR-beta and -gamma. We show here that RA down-regulates HPV18 mRNA levels apparently due to transcriptional repression. Transient cotransfection assays indicated that RARs negatively regulate the HPV18 upstream regulatory region and that the central enhancer can confer RA-dependent repression on a heterologous promoter. RA treatment resulted in induction of RAR-beta mRNA levels in non-tumorigenic HeLa hybrid cells, but not in tumorigenic hybrid segregants nor in HeLa cells. No alterations of the RAR-beta gene or of the HeLa RAR-beta promoter could be revealed by Southern and DNA sequence analysis, respectively. As determined by transient transfection assays, however, the RAR-beta control region was activated by RA more strongly in non-tumorigenic hybrid cells than in HeLa cells, thus indicating differences in trans-acting regulatory factors. Our data suggest that the RARs are potential negative regulators of HPV18 E6 and E7 gene expression, and that dysregulation of the RAR-beta gene either causatively contributes to or is an indicator of tumorigenicity in HeLa and HeLa hybrid cells. Images PMID:1318198

  3. CtBP1 is expressed in melanoma and represses the transcription of p16INK4a and Brca1

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Hui; Liu, Jing; Deng, Yu; Han, Gangwen; Yiqun G Shellman; Robinson, Steven; Tentler, John; Robinson, William; David A Norris; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Qinghong

    2013-01-01

    Carboxyl-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) has been shown to suppress the transcription of several tumor suppressors in vitro. Paradoxically, a previous report showed that CtBP1 mRNA was down-regulated in melanoma. Using immunostaining, we found that a large percentage of human melanomas were positive for CtBP1 protein. Further, we demonstrated that CtBP1 expression in melanoma cells contributes to cell proliferation and genome instability, two aspects promoting melanoma initiation and progr...

  4. The Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Rhesus Monkey Rhadinovirus Inhibits Viral Replication through Repression of Orf50/Rta Transcriptional Activation

    OpenAIRE

    DeWire, Scott M.; Damania, Blossom

    2005-01-01

    Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) is a gamma-2-herpesvirus that is closely related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8. We have previously reported that the transcript for RRV latency-associated nuclear antigen (R-LANA) is expressed during lytic replication in rhesus fibroblasts. In this article, we report the development of a latent culture system for RRV and show that mRNA specific for R-LANA is expressed during latency as well. We have characterized the R-LANA pro...

  5. Rice osa-miR171c Mediates Phase Change from Vegetative to Reproductive Development and Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance by Repressing Four OsHAM Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Fan

    Full Text Available Phase change from vegetative to reproductive development is one of the critical developmental steps in plants, and it is regulated by both environmental and endogenous factors. The maintenance of shoot apical meristem (SAM identity, miRNAs and flowering integrators are involved in this phase change process. Here, we report that the miRNA osa-miR171c targets four GRAS (GAI-RGA-SCR plant-specific transcription factors (OsHAM1, OsHAM2, OsHAM3, and OsHAM4 to control the floral transition and maintenance of SAM indeterminacy in rice (Oryza sativa. We characterized a rice T-DNA insertion delayed heading (dh mutant, where the expression of OsMIR171c gene is up-regulated. This mutant showed pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including especially prolonged vegetative phase, delayed heading date, and bigger shoot apex. Parallel expression analysis showed that osa-miR171c controlled the expression change of four OsHAMs in the shoot apex during floral transition, and responded to light. In the dh mutant, the expression of the juvenile-adult phase change negative regulator osa-miR156 was up-regulated, expression of the flowering integrators Hd3a and RFT1 was inhibited, and expression of FON4 negative regulators involved in the maintenance of SAM indeterminacy was also inhibited. From these data, we propose that the inhibition of osa-miR171c-mediated OsHAM transcription factors regulates the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive development by maintaining SAM indeterminacy and inhibiting flowering integrators.

  6. Optimal Financial Repression

    OpenAIRE

    Olga A. Norkina; Sergey E. Pekarski

    2014-01-01

    Modern financial repression in advanced economies does not rely on increasing seigniorage revenue, but mostly rests upon regulatory measures to enlarge the demand for public debt that delivers extremely low or negative real interest rate. In this paper we propose the extension of the overlapping generations model to question the optimality of financial repression in the form of non-market placement of the public debt in the captive pension fund. We show that financial repression and capital i...

  7. Long non-coding RNA LINC01133 represses KLF2, P21 and E-cadherin transcription through binding with EZH2, LSD1 in non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chongshuang; Nie, Feng-Qi; Wang, Qian; Sun, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Jing; Zhang, Meiling; Lu, Kai-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are emerging as crucial regulators and prognostic markers in multiple cancers including non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we screened LINCO1133 as a new candidate lncRNA which promotes NSCLC development and progression, in two independent datasets (GSE18842 and GSE19804) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). LINC01133 is previously found to be over-expressed in lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC) and knockdown its expression inhibits LSCC cells invasion. However, its' molecular mechanism and downstream targets involving in regulation of cancer cells phenotype is not known. Here, we found that LINC01133 expression is up-regulated in NSCLC tissues, and its' over-expression is associated with patients poor prognosis and short survival time. LINC01133 knockdown decreased NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion and induced cell cycle G1/S phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations showed that LINC01133 could interact with EZH2, LSD1 and recruit them to KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin promoter regions to repress their transcription. Furthermore, rescue experiments demonstrated that LINC01133 oncogenic function is partly through regulating KLF2. Lastly, we found that there was negative correlation between LINC01133 and KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin in NSCLC. Overall, our findings illuminate how LINC01133 over-expression confers an oncogenic function in NSCLC that may offer a novel therapy target in this disease. PMID:26840083

  8. Arabidopsis STO/BBX24 negatively regulates UV-B signaling by interacting with COP1 and repressing HY5 transcriptional activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jiang; Yan Wang; Qian-Feng Li; Lars Olof Bj(o)rn; Jun-Xian He; Shao-Shan Li

    2012-01-01

    UV-B (280-315 nm) is an integral part of solar radiation and can act either as a stress inducer or as a developmental signal.In recent years,increasing attention has been paid to the Iow-fluence UV-B-induced photomorphogenic response and several key players in this response have been identified,which include UVR8 (a UV-B-specific photoreceptor),COPI (a WD40-repeat-containing RING finger protein),HY5 (a basic zipper transcription factor),and RUP1/2 (two UVR8-interacting proteins).Here we report that Arabidopsis SALT TOLERANCE (STO/BBX24),a known regulator for light signaling in plants,defines a new signaling component in UV-B-mediated photomorphogenesis.The bbx24 mutant is hypersensitive to UV-B radiation and becomes extremely dwarfed under UV-B treatment.By contrast,BBX24 overexpression transgenic lines respond much more weakly to UV-B than the bbx24 and wild-type plants.BBX24 expression is UV-B-inducible and its accumulation under UV-B requires COP1.Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that BBX24 interacts with COP1 in planta upon UV-B illumination.Moreover,BBX24 interacts with HY5 and acts antagonistically with HY5 in UV-B-induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation.Furthermore,BBX24 attenuates UV-B-induced HY5 accumulation and suppresses its transcription-activation activity.Taken together,our results reveal a previously uncharacterized function of the light-regulated BBX24 in UV-B responses and demonstrate that BBX24 functions as a negative regulator of photomorphogenic UV-B responses by interacting with both COP1 and HY5.The UV-B-inducible expression pattern and its suppression of HY5 activity suggest that BBX24 could be a new component of the feedback regulatory module of UV-B signaling in plants.

  9. Isolation of a Novel Family of C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins Implicated in Transcriptional Repression Mediated by Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor (COUP-TF) Orphan Nuclear Receptors*

    OpenAIRE

    Avram, Dorina; Fields, Andrew; Top, Karen Pretty On; Nevrivy, Daniel J.; Ishmael, Jane E.; Leid, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Two novel and related C2H2 zinc finger proteins that are highly expressed in the brain, CTIP1 and CTIP2 (COUP TF-interacting proteins 1 and 2, respectively), were isolated and shown to interact with all members of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors. The interaction of CTIP1 with ARP1 was studied in detail, and CTIP1 was found to harbor two independent ARP1 interaction domains, ID1 and ID2, whereas the putative AF-2 of A...

  10. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to increase arsenic mobilization in the aqueous phase, raising concerns with this approach.

  11. RBP1 Recruits Both Histone Deacetylase-Dependent and -Independent Repression Activities to Retinoblastoma Family Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Albert; Lee, Joseph M; Yang, Wen-Ming; DeCaprio, James A.; William G Kaelin; Seto, Edward; Branton, Philip E.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family proteins block cell proliferation in part by repressing certain E2F-specific promoters. Both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent repression activities are associated with the RB “pocket.” The mechanism by which these two repression functions occupy the pocket is unknown. A known RB-binding protein, RBP1, was previously found by our group to be an active corepressor which, if overexpressed, represses E2F-mediated transcription via i...

  12. JAZF1 promotes proliferation of C2C12 cells, but retards their myogenic differentiation through transcriptional repression of MEF2C and MRF4—Implications for the role of Jazf1 variants in oncogenesis and type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Aoki, Natsumi; Hijikata, Takao, E-mail: hijikata@musashino-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified in Jazf1, which is also involved in the oncogenesis of endometrial stromal tumors. To understand how Jazf1 variants confer a risk of tumorigenesis and T2D, we explored the functional roles of JAZF1 and searched for JAZF1 target genes in myogenic C2C12 cells. Consistent with an increase of Jazf1 transcripts during myoblast proliferation and their decrease during myogenic differentiation in regenerating skeletal muscle, JAZF1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, whereas it retarded myogenic differentiation. Examination of myogenic genes revealed that JAZF1 overexpression transcriptionally repressed MEF2C and MRF4 and their downstream genes. AMP deaminase1 (AMPD1) was identified as a candidate for JAZF1 target by gene array analysis. However, promoter assays of Ampd1 demonstrated that mutation of the putative binding site for the TR4/JAZF1 complex did not alleviate the repressive effects of JAZF1 on promoter activity. Instead, JAZF1-mediated repression of Ampd1 occurred through the MEF2-binding site and E-box within the Ampd1 proximal regulatory elements. Consistently, MEF2C and MRF4 expression enhanced Ampd1 promoter activity. AMPD1 overexpression and JAZF1 downregulation impaired AMPK phosphorylation, while JAZF1 overexpression also reduced it. Collectively, these results suggest that aberrant JAZF1 expression contributes to the oncogenesis and T2D pathogenesis. - Highlights: • JAZF1 promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation of myoblasts. • JAZF1 retards myogenic differentiation and hypertrophy of myotubes. • JAZF1 transcriptionally represses Mef2C and Mrf4 expression. • JAZF1 has an impact on the phosphorylation of AMPK.

  13. Cooperative Action of Cdk1/cyclin B and SIRT1 Is Required for Mitotic Repression of rRNA Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Voit, Renate; Seiler, Jeanette; Grummt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary In metazoans, transcription is arrested during mitosis. Previous studies have established that mitotic repression of cellular transcription is mediated by Cdk1/cyclin B-dependent phosphorylation of basal transcription factors that nucleate transcription complex formation. Repression of rDNA transcription at the onset of mitosis is brought about by inactivation of the TBP-containing transcription factor SL1 by Cdk1/cyclin B-dependent phosphorylation of the TAFI110 subunit, which...

  14. Repression of the locus of the enterocyte effacement-encoded regulator of gene transcription of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by Lactobacillus reuteri culture supernatants is LuxS and strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcić, Ivan; Hüfner, Eric; Schmidt, Herbert; Hertel, Christian

    2008-05-01

    Culture supernatants of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 repressed ler expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells, but neither the strain's isogenic luxS mutant nor the L. reuteri 100-23C wild-type strain and its luxS mutant elicited a comparable effect. Furthermore, the epinephrine-mediated induction of ler expression was repressed by secreted substance(s) of L. reuteri ATCC 55730. PMID:18378666

  15. Repression of the Locus of the Enterocyte Effacement-Encoded Regulator of Gene Transcription of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by Lactobacillus reuteri Culture Supernatants Is LuxS and Strain Dependent▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jelčić, Ivan; Hüfner, Eric; Schmidt, Herbert; Hertel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Culture supernatants of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 repressed ler expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells, but neither the strain's isogenic luxS mutant nor the L. reuteri 100-23C wild-type strain and its luxS mutant elicited a comparable effect. Furthermore, the epinephrine-mediated induction of ler expression was repressed by secreted substance(s) of L. reuteri ATCC 55730.

  16. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  17. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling

  18. Financial Repression and Structural Imbalances

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Anders C.; Wang, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between financial repression and structural change. We present a simple theoretical model of structural transformation in which the impact of financial repression on unbalanced growth is studied. The model suggests that governments may choose to repress the financial sector to allow for continued development of the industry sector while inhibiting growth in the domestic service sector. We then present empirical evidence of financial repression having a sig...

  19. FOXP3 interactions with histone acetyltransferase and class II histone deacetylases are required for repression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin; Samanta, Arabinda; Song, Xiaomin; Iacono, Kathryn T.; Bembas, Kathryn; Tao, Ran; Basu, Samik; Riley, James L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Mark I. Greene

    2007-01-01

    The forkhead family protein FOXP3 acts as a repressor of transcription and is both an essential and sufficient regulator of the development and function of regulatory T cells. The molecular mechanism by which FOXP3-mediated transcriptional repression occurs remains unclear. Here, we report that transcriptional repression by FOXP3 involves a histone acetyltransferase–deacetylase complex that includes histone acetyltransferase TIP60 (Tat-interactive protein, 60 kDa) and class II histone deacety...

  20. Repression is relieved before attenuation in the trp operon of Escherichia coli as tryptophan starvation becomes increasingly severe.

    OpenAIRE

    Yanofsky, C; Kelley, R.L.; Horn, V.

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the tryptophan operon of Escherichia coli is regulated over about a 500- to 600-fold range by the combined action of repression and attenuation. Repression regulates transcription initiation in response to variation in the intracellular concentration of tryptophan. Attenuation regulates transcription termination at a site in the leader region of the operon in response to changes in the extent of charging of tRNATrp. We measured repression independently of attenuation to ascertai...

  1. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems. PMID:26729910

  2. Cell-Context Dependent TCF/LEF Expression and Function: Alternative Tales of Repression, De-Repression and Activation Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Catherine D.; Byers, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt signaling controls cell specification and fate during development and adult tissue homeostasis by converging on a small family of DNA binding factors, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) family. In response to Wnt signals, TCF/LEF members undergo a transcriptional switch from repression to activation mediated in part by nuclear β-catenin binding and recruitment of co-activator complexes. In mammals, the specificity and fine tuning of this transcriptional switch is also ac...

  3. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  4. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology ...

  5. Cryptic exposure to arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Rossy Kathleen; Janusz Christopher; Schwartz Robert

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic) and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving ne...

  6. Dominant negative autoregulation limits steady-state repression levels in gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsey, Szabolcs; Krishna, Sandeep; Erdossy, János; Horváth, Péter; Orosz, László; Sneppen, Kim; Adhya, Sankar

    2009-07-01

    Many transcription factors repress transcription of their own genes. Negative autoregulation has been shown to reduce cell-cell variation in regulatory protein levels and speed up the response time in gene networks. In this work we examined transcription regulation of the galS gene and the function of its product, the GalS protein. We observed a unique operator preference of the GalS protein characterized by dominant negative autoregulation. We show that this pattern of regulation limits the repression level of the target genes in steady states. We suggest that transcription factors with dominant negative autoregulation are designed for regulating gene expression during environmental transitions. PMID:19429616

  7. miRNA-dependent translational repression in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila ovary is a tissue rich in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Many of the regulatory factors are proteins identified via genetic screens. The more recent discovery of microRNAs, which in other animals and tissues appear to regulate translation of a large fraction of all mRNAs, raised the possibility that they too might act during oogenesis. However, there has been no direct demonstration of microRNA-dependent translational repression in the ovary. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, quantitative analyses of transcript and protein levels of transgenes with or without synthetic miR-312 binding sites show that the binding sites do confer translational repression. This effect is dependent on the ability of the cells to produce microRNAs. By comparison with microRNA-dependent translational repression in other cell types, the regulated mRNAs and the protein factors that mediate repression were expected to be enriched in sponge bodies, subcellular structures with extensive similarities to the P bodies found in other cells. However, no such enrichment was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the variety of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that operate in the Drosophila ovary, and have implications for the mechanisms of miRNA-dependent translational control used in the ovary.

  8. BSAP Can Repress Enhancer Activity by Targeting PU.1 Function

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Shanak; Atchison, Michael

    2000-01-01

    PU.1 and BSAP are transcription factors crucial for proper B-cell development. Absence of PU.1 results in loss of B, T, and myeloid cells, while absence of BSAP results in an early block in B-cell differentiation. Both of these proteins bind to the immunoglobulin κ chain 3′ enhancer, which is developmentally regulated during B-cell differentiation. We find here that BSAP can repress 3′ enhancer activity. This repression can occur in plasmacytoma lines or in a non-B-cell line in which the enha...

  9. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles of the...... polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  10. Functional domains of the human orphan receptor ARP-1/COUP-TFII involved in active repression and transrepression.

    OpenAIRE

    Achatz, G; Hölzl, B; Speckmayer, R; Hauser, C; Sandhofer, F; Paulweber, B.

    1997-01-01

    The orphan receptor ARP-1/COUP-TFII, a member of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of nuclear receptors, strongly represses transcriptional activity of numerous genes, including several apolipoprotein-encoding genes. Recently it has been demonstrated that the mechanism by which COUP-TFs reduce transcriptional activity involves active repression and transrepression. To map the domains of ARP-1/COUP-TFII required for repressor activity, a detailed ...

  11. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  12. Identification of a Portable Repression Domain and an E1A-Responsive Activation Domain in Pax4: a Possible Role of Pax4 as a Transcriptional Repressor in the Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Fujitani, Yoshio; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Umayahara, Yutaka; Fujita, Noriko; Watada, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu

    1999-01-01

    Pax4 is a paired-domain (PD)-containing transcription factor which plays a crucial role in pancreatic β/δ-cell development. In this study, we characterized the DNA-binding and transactivation properties of mouse Pax4. Repetitive rounds of PCR-based selection led to identification of the optimal DNA-binding sequences for the PD of Pax4. In agreement with the conservation of the optimal binding sequences among the Pax family transcription factors, Pax4 could bind to the potential binding sites ...

  13. Tandem DNA-bound cAMP-CRP complexes are required for transcriptional repression of the deoP2 promoter by the CytR repressor in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Møllegaard, N E; Douthwaite, S R; Valentin-Hansen, P

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the deoP2 promoter in Escherichia coli to define features important for its interaction with the CytR repressor. As is characteristic for CytR-regulated promoters, deoP2 encodes tandem binding sites for the activating complex cAMP-CRP. One of these sites, CRP-1, overlaps the -35...... region, and is sufficient for activation; the second site, CRP-2, centred around -93, is indispensable for repression. Here we demonstrate, by means of in vivo titration, that CytR interaction with deoP2 depends not only on CRP-2, but also on CRP-1 and the length and possibly the sequence separating...... these two sites. Also, point mutations in either CRP site reduce or abolish CytR titration; however, no co-operativity is observed in the interaction of CytR with the two CRP binding sites. Furthermore, the reduction in CytR titration parallels the reduction in binding of cAMP-CRP to the mutated CRP...

  14. Genome-Scale CRISPR-Mediated Control of Gene Repression and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Luke A.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Adamson, Britt; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Chen, Yuwen; Whitehead, Evan H.; Guimaraes, Carla; Panning, Barbara; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Bassik, Michael C.; Qi, Lei S.; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    While the catalog of mammalian transcripts and their expression levels in different cell types and disease states is rapidly expanding, our understanding of transcript function lags behind. We present a robust technology enabling systematic investigation of the cellular consequences of repressing or inducing individual transcripts. We identify rules for specific targeting of transcriptional repressors (CRISPRi), typically achieving 90–99% knockdown with minimal off-target effects, and activat...

  15. Earthworms produce phytochelatins in response to arsenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Liebeke

    Full Text Available Phytochelatins are small cysteine-rich non-ribosomal peptides that chelate soft metal and metalloid ions, such as cadmium and arsenic. They are widely produced by plants and microbes; phytochelatin synthase genes are also present in animal species from several different phyla, but there is still little known about whether these genes are functional in animals, and if so, whether they are metal-responsive. We analysed phytochelatin production by direct chemical analysis in Lumbricus rubellus earthworms exposed to arsenic for a 28 day period, and found that arsenic clearly induced phytochelatin production in a dose-dependent manner. It was necessary to measure the phytochelatin metabolite concentrations directly, as there was no upregulation of phytochelatin synthase gene expression after 28 days: phytochelatin synthesis appears not to be transcriptionally regulated in animals. A further untargetted metabolomic analysis also found changes in metabolites associated with the transsulfuration pathway, which channels sulfur flux from methionine for phytochelatin synthesis. There was no evidence of biological transformation of arsenic (e.g. into methylated species as a result of laboratory arsenic exposure. Finally, we compared wild populations of earthworms sampled from the field, and found that both arsenic-contaminated and cadmium-contaminated mine site worms had elevated phytochelatin concentrations.

  16. Identification of a new isoform of the human estrogen receptor-alpha (hER-α) that is encoded by distinct transcripts and that is able to repress hER-α activation function 1

    OpenAIRE

    Flouriot, Gilles; Brand, Heike; Denger, Stefanie; Metivier, Raphaël; Kos, Martin; Reid, George; Sonntag-Buck, Vera; Gannon, Frank

    2000-01-01

    A new isoform of the human estrogen receptor-alpha (hER-α) has been identified and characterized. This 46 kDa isoform (hERα46) lacks the N-terminal 173 amino acids present in the previously characterized 66 kDa isoform (hERα66). hERα46 is encoded by a new class of hER-α transcript that lacks the first coding exon (exon 1A) of the ER-α gene. We demonstrated that these Δ1A hER-α transcripts originate from the E and F hER-α promoters and are produced by the splicing of exon 1E directly to exon 2...

  17. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  18. Protein sequestration versus Hill-type repression in circadian clock models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyoung

    2016-08-01

    Circadian (∼24 h) clocks are self-sustained endogenous oscillators with which organisms keep track of daily and seasonal time. Circadian clocks frequently rely on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops to generate rhythms that are robust against intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. To investigate the dynamics and mechanisms of the intracellular feedback loops in circadian clocks, a number of mathematical models have been developed. The majority of the models use Hill functions to describe transcriptional repression in a way that is similar to the Goodwin model. Recently, a new class of models with protein sequestration-based repression has been introduced. Here, the author discusses how this new class of models differs dramatically from those based on Hill-type repression in several fundamental aspects: conditions for rhythm generation, robust network designs and the periods of coupled oscillators. Consistently, these fundamental properties of circadian clocks also differ among Neurospora, Drosophila, and mammals depending on their key transcriptional repression mechanisms (Hill-type repression or protein sequestration). Based on both theoretical and experimental studies, this review highlights the importance of careful modelling of transcriptional repression mechanisms in molecular circadian clocks. PMID:27444022

  19. Repression of p15INK4b expression by Myc through association with Miz-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, P; Peukert, K; Kiermaier, A;

    2001-01-01

    Deregulated expression of c-myc can induce cell proliferation in established cell lines and in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), through a combination of both transcriptional activation and repression by Myc. Here we show that a Myc-associated transcription factor, Miz-1, arrests cells ...... p15INK4b messenger RNA in primary cells and are, as a consequence, deficient in immortalization....

  20. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jui Tung [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  1. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  2. Arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  3. The unified theory of repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh

    2006-10-01

    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). "Repression" was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud adapted repression to the defensive inhibition of "unbearable" mental contents. Substantial experimental literatures on attentional biases, thought avoidance, interference, and intentional forgetting exist, the oldest prototype being the work of Ebbinghaus, who showed that intentional avoidance of memories results in their progressive forgetting over time. It has now become clear, as clinicians had claimed, that the inaccessible materials are often available and emerge indirectly (e.g., procedurally, implicitly). It is also now established that the Ebbinghaus retention function can be partly reversed, with resulting increases of conscious memory over time (hypermnesia). Freud's clinical experience revealed early on that exclusion from consciousness was effected not just by simple repression (inhibition) but also by a variety of distorting techniques, some deployed to degrade latent contents (denial), all eventually subsumed under the rubric of defense mechanisms ("repression in the widest sense"). Freudian and Bartlettian distortions are essentially the same, even in name, except for motive (cognitive vs. emotional), and experimentally induced false memories and other "memory illusions" are laboratory analogs of self-induced distortions. PMID:17156548

  4. Influence of Catabolite Repression and Inducer Exclusion on the Bistable Behavior of the lac Operon

    OpenAIRE

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of the lac operon which includes all of the known regulatory mechanisms, including external-glucose-dependent catabolite repression and inducer exclusion, as well as the time delays inherent to transcription and translation, is presented. With this model we investigate the influence of external glucose, by means of catabolite repression and the regulation of lactose uptake, on the bistable behavior of this system.

  5. Multiple mechanisms mediate glucose repression of the yeast GAL1 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamphier, M S; Ptashne, M

    1992-01-01

    Several mechanisms contribute to the glucose repression of the GAL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that one mechanism involves the transcriptional down-regulation of the GAL4 gene and a second requires the GAL80 gene. We also examine the contribution of cis-acting negative elements in the GAL1 promoter to glucose repression. In an otherwise wild-type strain disruption of any one of these three mechanisms alleviates repression of GAL1 only 2- to 4-fold. However, in the absence of th...

  6. Arsenic-Mediated Activation of the Nrf2-Keap1 Antioxidant Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Alexandria; Whitman, Samantha A; Jaramillo, Melba C.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is present in the environment and has become a worldwide health concern due to its toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, the specific mechanism(s) by which arsenic elicits its toxic effects has yet to be fully elucidated. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) has been recognized as the master regulator of a cellular defense mechanism against toxic insults. This review highlights studies demonstrating that arsenic activates the Nrf2-Keap1 antioxid...

  7. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO2) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC50 = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC50 = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic

  8. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. PMID:27226589

  9. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a ...

  10. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Robin B; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Maria Mercedes Meza-Montenegro; Luis Enrique Gutiérrez-Millán; Mary Kay O’Rourke; Jason Roberge

    2012-01-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and...

  11. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fenghua; Gao, Fei; Kartashov, Andrey V; Jegga, Anil G; Barski, Artem; Das, Sanjoy K

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PRC1 members are co-localized with its functional histone modifier H2AK119ub1 (mono ubiquitination of histone-H2A at lysine-119) in polyploid cell. A potent small-molecule inhibitor of Ring1A/B E3-ubiquitin ligase or siRNA-mediated suppression of Cbx4 caused inhibition of H2AK119ub1, in conjunction with perturbation of decidualization and polyploidy development, suggesting a role for Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 in these processes. Analyses of genetic signatures by RNA-seq studies showed that the inhibition of PRC1 function affects 238 genes (154 up and 84 down) during decidualization. Functional enrichment analyses identified that about 38% genes primarily involved in extracellular processes are specifically targeted by PRC1. Furthermore, ~15% of upregulated genes exhibited a significant overlap with the upregulated Bmp2 null-induced genes in mice. Overall, Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 controls decidualization via regulation of extracellular gene remodeling functions and sheds new insights into underlying molecular mechanism(s) through transcriptional repression regulation. PMID:27181215

  12. Violent repression of environmental protests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Helen M; Haddad, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As global sea levels and natural resource demands rise, people around the world are increasingly protesting environmental threats to their lives and livelihoods. What are the conditions under which these peaceful environmental protests are violently repressed? This paper uses the random forest algorithm to conduct an event analysis of grassroots environmental protests around the world. Utilizing a database of 175 grassroots environmental protests, we found that: (1) a large proportion (37 %) of the protests involved violent repression; (2) most of the violence (56 %) was directed against marginalized groups; and (3) violence was geographically concentrated the global south in Latin America and Asia. The primary predictors of violence were political empowerment, GDP per capita, industry type, the presence of marginalized groups, and geographic region. Our analysis reveals a complex relationship between governance, resource extraction, and international funding that often resulted in human rights violations against marginalized groups. PMID:27026924

  13. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about arsenic in drinking water. It includes sections about what arsenic is, where it comes from, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, how to know if there is arsenic in a water supply and how to reduce arsenic in drinking water.

  14. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... and previous or current use of arsenic-containing pesticides. Are there ... compounds in water, food, air, and soil: organic and inorganic (these together ...

  15. Mechanism and Role of SOX2 Repression in Seminoma: Relevance to Human Germline Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Ritu; Jagadish, Nirmala; Kustagi, Manjunath; Mendiratta, Geetu; Seandel, Marco; Soni, Rekha; Korkola, James E; Thodima, Venkata; Califano, Andrea; Bosl, George J; Chaganti, R S K

    2016-05-10

    Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs) are derived from primordial germ cells (PGCs). The master pluripotency regulator and neuroectodermal lineage effector transcription factor SOX2 is repressed in PGCs and the seminoma (SEM) subset of GCTs. The mechanism of SOX2 repression and its significance to GC and GCT development currently are not understood. Here, we show that SOX2 repression in SEM-derived TCam-2 cells is mediated by the Polycomb repressive complex (PcG) and the repressive H3K27me3 chromatin mark that are enriched at its promoter. Furthermore, SOX2 repression in TCam-2 cells can be abrogated by recruitment of the constitutively expressed H3K27 demethylase UTX to the SOX2 promoter through retinoid signaling, leading to expression of neuronal and other lineage genes. SOX17 has been shown to initiate human PGC specification, with its target PRDM1 suppressing mesendodermal genes. Our results are consistent with a role for SOX2 repression in normal germline development by suppressing neuroectodermal genes. PMID:27132888

  16. Mechanism and Role of SOX2 Repression in Seminoma: Relevance to Human Germline Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Kushwaha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs are derived from primordial germ cells (PGCs. The master pluripotency regulator and neuroectodermal lineage effector transcription factor SOX2 is repressed in PGCs and the seminoma (SEM subset of GCTs. The mechanism of SOX2 repression and its significance to GC and GCT development currently are not understood. Here, we show that SOX2 repression in SEM-derived TCam-2 cells is mediated by the Polycomb repressive complex (PcG and the repressive H3K27me3 chromatin mark that are enriched at its promoter. Furthermore, SOX2 repression in TCam-2 cells can be abrogated by recruitment of the constitutively expressed H3K27 demethylase UTX to the SOX2 promoter through retinoid signaling, leading to expression of neuronal and other lineage genes. SOX17 has been shown to initiate human PGC specification, with its target PRDM1 suppressing mesendodermal genes. Our results are consistent with a role for SOX2 repression in normal germline development by suppressing neuroectodermal genes.

  17. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen U Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  18. Hormone-induced repression of genes requires BRG1-mediated H1.2 deposition at target promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacht, Ana Silvina; Pohl, Andy; Zaurin, Roser; Soronellas, Daniel; Quilez, Javier; Sharma, Priyanka; Wright, Roni H; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P

    2016-08-15

    Eukaryotic gene regulation is associated with changes in chromatin compaction that modulate access to DNA regulatory sequences relevant for transcriptional activation or repression. Although much is known about the mechanism of chromatin remodeling in hormonal gene activation, how repression is accomplished is much less understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, ligand-activated progesterone receptor (PR) is directly recruited to transcriptionally repressed genes involved in cell proliferation along with the kinases ERK1/2 and MSK1. PR recruits BRG1 associated with the HP1γ-LSD1 complex repressor complex, which is further anchored via binding of HP1γ to the H3K9me3 signal deposited by SUV39H2. In contrast to what is observed during gene activation, only BRG1 and not the BAF complex is recruited to repressed promoters, likely due to local enrichment of the pioneer factor FOXA1. BRG1 participates in gene repression by interacting with H1.2, facilitating its deposition and stabilizing nucleosome positioning around the transcription start site. Our results uncover a mechanism of hormone-dependent transcriptional repression and a novel role for BRG1 in progestin regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:27390128

  19. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  20. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  1. Arsenic-induced cutaneous hyperplastic lesions are associated with the dysregulation of Yap, a Hippo signaling-related protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Elmets, Craig A.; Afaq, Farrukh; Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Arsenic activates canonical Hippo signaling pathway and up-regulates αCatenin in the skin. •Arsenic activates transcriptional activity of Yap by its nuclear translocation. •Yap is involved in the disruption of tight/adherens junctions in arsenic-exposed animals. -- Abstract: Arsenic exposure in humans causes a number of toxic manifestations in the skin including cutaneous neoplasm. However, the mechanism of these alterations remains elusive. Here, we provide novel observations that arsenic induced Hippo signaling pathway in the murine skin. This pathway plays crucial roles in determining organ size during the embryonic development and if aberrantly activated in adults, contributes to the pathogenesis of epithelial neoplasm. Arsenic treatment enhanced phosphorylation-dependent activation of LATS1 kinase and other Hippo signaling regulatory proteins Sav1 and MOB1. Phospho-LATS kinase is known to catalyze the inactivation of a transcriptional co-activator, Yap. However, in arsenic-treated epidermis, we did not observed its inactivation. Thus, as expected, unphosphorylated-Yap was translocated to the nucleus in arsenic-treated epidermis. Yap by binding to the transcription factors TEADs induces transcription of its target genes. Consistently, an up-regulation of Yap-dependent target genes Cyr61, Gli2, Ankrd1 and Ctgf was observed in the skin of arsenic-treated mice. Phosphorylated Yap is important in regulating tight and adherens junctions through its binding to αCatenin. We found disruption of these junctions in the arsenic-treated mouse skin despite an increase in αCatenin. These data provide evidence that arsenic-induced canonical Hippo signaling pathway and Yap-mediated disruption of tight and adherens junctions are independently regulated. These effects together may contribute to the carcinogenic effects of arsenic in the skin.

  2. A bifunctional O-GlcNAc transferase governs flagellar motility through anti-repression

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Aimee; Kamp, Heather D.; Gründling, Angelika; Darren E Higgins

    2006-01-01

    Flagellar motility is an essential mechanism by which bacteria adapt to and survive in diverse environments. Although flagella confer an advantage to many bacterial pathogens for colonization during infection, bacterial flagellins also stimulate host innate immune responses. Consequently, many bacterial pathogens down-regulate flagella production following initial infection. Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that represses transcription of flagellar motility genes...

  3. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego;

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  4. Gene Silencing Triggers Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Recruitment to CpG Islands Genome Wide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riising, Eva Madi; Vacher-Comet, Itys; Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier;

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required for normal differentiation and development and are frequently deregulated in cancer. PcG proteins are involved in gene silencing; however, their role in initiation and maintenance of transcriptional repression is not well defined. Here, we show that knoc...... by default to nontranscribed CGI genes to maintain their silenced state and to protect cell identity....

  5. Gibberellins repress photomorphogenesis in darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabadí, David; Gil, Joan; Blázquez, Miguel A; García-Martínez, José L

    2004-03-01

    Plants undergo two different developmental programs depending on whether they are growing in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) or in the presence of light (photomorphogenesis). It has been proposed that the latter is the default pathway followed by many plants after germination and before the seedling emerges from soil. The transition between the two pathways is tightly regulated. The conserved COP1-based complex is central in the light-dependent repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness. Besides this control, hormones such as brassinosteroids (BRs), cytokinins, auxins, or ethylene also have been shown to regulate, to different extents, this developmental switch. In the present work, we show that the hormone gibberellin (GA) widely participates in this regulation. Studies from Arabidopsis show that both chemical and genetic reductions of endogenous GA levels partially derepress photomorphogenesis in darkness. This is based both on morphological phenotypes, such as hypocotyl elongation and hook and cotyledon opening, and on molecular phenotypes, such as misregulation of the light-controlled genes CAB2 and RbcS. Genetic studies indicate that the GA signaling elements GAI and RGA participate in these responses. Our results also suggest that GA regulation of this response partially depends on BRs. This regulation seems to be conserved across species because lowering endogenous GA levels in pea (Pisum sativum) induces full de-etiolation in darkness, which is not reverted by BR application. Our results, therefore, attribute an important role for GAs in the establishment of etiolated growth and in repression of photomorphogenesis. PMID:14963246

  6. Snai1 represses Nanog to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Galvagni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained by an external signaling pathways and intrinsic regulatory networks involving ESC-specific transcriptional complexes (mainly formed by OCT3/4, Sox2 and Nanog proteins, the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 and DNA methylation [1–8]. Among these, Nanog represents the more ESC specific factor and its repression correlates with the loss of pluripotency and ESC differentiation [9–11]. During ESC early differentiation, many development-associated genes become upregulated and although, in general, much is known about the pluripotency self-renewal circuitry, the molecular events that lead ESCs to exit from pluripotency and begin differentiation are largely unknown. Snai1 is one the most early induced genes during ESC differentiation in vitro and in vivo [12,13]. Here we show that Snai1 is able to directly repress several stemness-associated genes including Nanog. We use a ESC stable-line expressing a inducible Snai1 protein. We here show microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESC expressing Snail-ER at various time points of induction with 4-OH. Data were deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO datasets under reference GSE57854 and here: http://epigenetics.hugef-research.org/data.php.

  7. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  8. Translational Repression of NhaR, a Novel Pathway for Multi-Tier Regulation of Biofilm Circuitry by CsrA

    OpenAIRE

    Pannuri, Archana; Yakhnin, Helen; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Edwards, Adrianne N.; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) represses biofilm formation in several proteobacterial species. In Escherichia coli, it represses the production of the polysaccharide adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PGA) by binding to the pgaABCD mRNA leader, inhibiting pgaA translation, and destabilizing this transcript. In addition, CsrA represses genes responsible for the synthesis of cyclic di-GMP, an activator of PGA production. Here we determined that CsrA also represses NhaR, a LysR-type...

  9. In silico finding of Putative Cis-Acting Elements for the Tethering of Polycomb Repressive Complex2 in Human Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Jahani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex2 maintains a predetermined state of transcription which constitutes a cellular memory stable over many cell divisions. Since this complex acts through the regulation of chromatin structure, it is important to understand how it is recruited to chromatin. The specific target sequences of this complex such as PRE (polycomb repressive element) have not been completely recognized in human genome. In this study, we have compared the target sequences of this complex with ...

  10. EXAFS study on arsenic species and transformation in arsenic hyperaccumulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zechun; CHEN Tongbin; LEI Mei; HU Tiandou; HUANG Qifei

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SR EXAFS) was employed to study the transformation of coordination environment and the redox speciation of arsenic in a newly discovered arsenic hyperaccumulator, Cretan brake (Pteris cretica L. var nervosa Thunb). It showed that the arsenic in the plant mainly coordinated with oxygen, except that some arsenic coordinated with S as As-GSH in root. The complexation of arsenic with GSH might not be the predominant detoxification mechanism in Cretan brake. Although some arsenic in root presented as As(V) in Na2HAsO4 treatments, most of arsenic in plant presented as As(III)-O in both treatments, indicating that As(V) tended to be reduced to As(III) after it was taken up into the root, and arsenic was kept as As(III) when it was transported to the above-ground tissues. The reduction of As(V) primarily proceeded in the root.

  11. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress. PMID:27208271

  12. Multiple Gene Repression in Cyanobacteria Using CRISPRi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lun; Cengic, Ivana; Anfelt, Josefine; Hudson, Elton P

    2016-03-18

    We describe the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) for gene repression in the model cyanobacterium Synechcocystis sp. PCC 6803. The nuclease-deficient Cas9 from the type-II CRISPR/Cas of Streptrococcus pyogenes was used to repress green fluorescent protein (GFP) to negligible levels. CRISPRi was also used to repress formation of carbon storage compounds polyhydroxybutryate (PHB) and glycogen during nitrogen starvation. As an example of the potential of CRISPRi for basic and applied cyanobacteria research, we simultaneously knocked down 4 putative aldehyde reductases and dehydrogenases at 50-95% repression. This work also demonstrates that tightly repressed promoters allow for inducible and reversible CRISPRi in cyanobacteria. PMID:26689101

  13. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  14. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tao, Shasha [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lian, Fangru [Department of Pathology, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chau, Binh T. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Fang, Deyu [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lantz, R. Clark [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Zhang, Donna D., E-mail: dzhang@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  15. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  16. Tumor FOXP3 represses the expression of long noncoding RNA 7SL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanhui; Cheng, Jingli; Ren, Huizhu; Zhao, Hui; Gong, Wei; Shan, Chunyan

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA 7SL was over-expressed in tumor cells to promote cell growth through repressing translation of P53. However, the regulatory mechanism of 7SL remains to be defined. FOXP3 was identified as a suppressor in several tumors in addition to be a marker of regulatory T cells. In this study, we detected that over-expression of FOXP3 repressed the transcription of 7SL RNA and contributed to inhibiting tumor growth. Knock down of FOXP3 in MCF-10A normal mammary breast cells up-regulated the transcription of 7SL RNA. Chromatin Immuno-precipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that FOXP3 directly bound to the Forkhead/HNF-3 domain DNA binding sites (-789 to -795) relative to the transcription start site. Meanwhile, Luciferase analysis showed that FOXP3 repressed the full-length 7SL promoter activity, but this suppressive effect was reversed after mutation of the FOXP3 binding site. Further studies showed that FOXP3 promoted the expression of P53 at translational levels through repressing 7SL RNA. In conclusion, this study suggests that 7SL RNA is a direct target of FOXP3 and may be involved in the formation of FOXP3/P53 feedback loop. PMID:26718402

  17. RUNX1 represses the erythroid gene expression program during megakaryocytic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvardina, Olga N; Herglotz, Julia; Kolodziej, Stephan; Kohrs, Nicole; Herkt, Stefanie; Wojcik, Bartosch; Oellerich, Thomas; Corso, Jasmin; Behrens, Kira; Kumar, Ashok; Hussong, Helge; Urlaub, Henning; Koch, Joachim; Serve, Hubert; Bonig, Halvard; Stocking, Carol; Rieger, Michael A; Lausen, Jörn

    2015-06-01

    The activity of antagonizing transcription factors represents a mechanistic paradigm of bidirectional lineage-fate control during hematopoiesis. At the megakaryocytic/erythroid bifurcation, the cross-antagonism of krueppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) and friend leukemia integration 1 (FLI1) has such a decisive role. However, how this antagonism is resolved during lineage specification is poorly understood. We found that runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) inhibits erythroid differentiation of murine megakaryocytic/erythroid progenitors and primary human CD34(+) progenitor cells. We show that RUNX1 represses the erythroid gene expression program during megakaryocytic differentiation by epigenetic repression of the erythroid master regulator KLF1. RUNX1 binding to the KLF1 locus is increased during megakaryocytic differentiation and counterbalances the activating role of T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL1). We found that corepressor recruitment by RUNX1 contributes to a block of the KLF1-dependent erythroid gene expression program. Our data indicate that the repressive function of RUNX1 influences the balance between erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation by shifting the balance between KLF1 and FLI1 in the direction of FLI1. Taken together, we show that RUNX1 is a key player within a network of transcription factors that represses the erythroid gene expression program. PMID:25911237

  18. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  19. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Andrea (USGS)

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  20. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris Vittata L. and its arsenic accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. (Chinese brake) was first discovered in China by means of field survey and greenhouse cultivation. Field survey showed that Chinese brake had large accumulating capacity to arsenic; the orders of arsenic content in different parts of the fern were as follows: leaves>leafstalks>roots, which is totally different from that of ordinary plants; bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts of the fern decreased as a power function of soil arsenic contents. In the control of pot trials with normal unpolluted soil containing 9 mg/kg of arsenic, the bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts and rhizoids of Chinese brake were as high as 71 and 80 respectively. Greenhouse cultivation in the contaminated soil from mining areas has shown that more than 1 times greater arsenic can be accumulated in the leaves of the fern than that of field samples with the largest content of 5070 mg/kg As on a dry matter basis. During greenhouse cultivation, arsenic content in the leaves of the fern increased linearly with time prolonging. Not only has Chinese brake extraordinary tolerance and accumulation to arsenic, but it grew rapidly with great biomass, wide distribution and easy adaptation to different environmental conditions as well. Therefore, it has great potential in future remediation of arsenic contamination. It also demonstrates important value for studies of arsenic physiology and biochemistry such as arsenic absorption, translocation and detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  1. Arsenic at very low concentrations alters glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation but not GR-mediated gene repression: complex dose-response effects are closely correlated with levels of activated GR and require a functional GR DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwell, Jack E; Kingsley, Lauren A; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2004-08-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of drinking water is considered a principal environmental health threat throughout the world. Chronic intake is associated with an increased risk of cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and recent studies suggest increased health risks at levels as low as 5-10 ppb. We report here that 0.05-1 microM (6-120 ppb) As showed stimulatory effects on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation in rat EDR3 hepatoma cells of both the endogenous tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene and the reporter genes containing TAT glucocorticoid response elements. At slightly higher concentrations (1-3 microM), the effects of As became inhibitory. Thus, over this narrow concentration range, the effects of As changed from a 2- to 4-fold stimulation to a greater than 2-fold suppression in activity. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of GR on both AP1- and NF-kappa B-mediated gene activation was not affected by As. The magnitude of GR stimulation and inhibition by As was highly dependent on the cellular level of hormone-activated GR. Mutational deletion studies indicated that the central DNA binding domain (DBD) of GR is the minimal region required for the As effect and does not require free sulfhydryls. Point mutations located within the DBD that have known structural consequences significantly altered the GR response to As. In particular, point mutations in the DBD that confer a DNA-bound GR confirmation abolished the low dose As stimulatory effect but enhanced the inhibitory response, further indicating that the DBD is important for mediating these As effects. PMID:15310238

  2. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  3. A TATA sequence-dependent transcriptional repressor activity associated with mammalian transcription factor IIA.

    OpenAIRE

    Aso, T.; Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1994-01-01

    In the process of characterizing cellular proteins that modulate basal transcription by RNA polymerase II, we identified a novel repressor activity specific for promoters containing consensus TATA boxes. This activity strongly represses TATA-binding protein (TBP)-dependent transcription initiation from core promoter elements containing a consensus TATA sequence, but activates TBP-dependent transcription from core promoter elements lacking a consensus TATA sequence. Purification of this activi...

  4. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ((Simon)); ((Royal))

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  5. ATF3 represses PPARγ expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • ATF3 decrease the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • ATF3 represses the promoter activity of PPARγ2 gene. • ATF/CRE (−1537/−1530) is critical for ATF3-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. • ATF3 binds to the promoter region containing the ATF/CRE. • ER stress inhibits adipocyte differentiation through downregulation of PPARγ by ATF3. - Abstract: Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress-adaptive transcription factor that mediates cellular stress response signaling. We previously reported that ATF3 represses CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) expression and inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored potential role of ATF3 in negatively regulating peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). ATF3 decreased the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ATF3 also repressed the activity of −2.6 Kb promoter of mouse PPARγ2. Overexpression of PPARγ significantly prevented the ATF3-mediated inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation. Transfection studies with 5′ deleted-reporters showed that ATF3 repressed the activity of −2037 bp promoter, whereas it did not affect the activity of −1458 bp promoter, suggesting that ATF3 responsive element is located between the −2037 and −1458. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that ATF3 binds to ATF/CRE site (5′-TGACGTTT-3′) between −1537 and −1530. Mutation of the ATF/CRE site abrogated ATF3-mediated transrepression of the PPARγ2 promoter. Treatment with thapsigargin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, increased ATF3 expression, whereas it decreased PPARγ expression. ATF3 knockdown significantly blocked the thapsigargin-mediated downregulation of PPARγ expression. Furthermore, overexpression of PPARγ prevented inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation by thapsigargin. Collectively, these results suggest that ATF3-mediated

  6. Repression of arterial genes in hemogenic endothelium is sufficient for haematopoietic fate acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, Carlos O; Hawkins, John S; Schmitt, Christopher E; Bos, Frank L; Zape, Joan P; Cautivo, Kelly M; Borges Pinto, Hugo; Rhyner, Alexander M; Yu, Hui; Donohoe, Mary E; Wythe, Joshua D; Zovein, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cell fate and identity are essential for endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT), an embryonic process that generates the first adult populations of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelial cells. Dissecting EHT regulation is a critical step towards the production of in vitro derived HSCs. Yet, we do not know how distinct endothelial and haematopoietic fates are parsed during the transition. Here we show that genes required for arterial identity function later to repress haematopoietic fate. Tissue-specific, temporally controlled, genetic loss of arterial genes (Sox17 and Notch1) during EHT results in increased production of haematopoietic cells due to loss of Sox17-mediated repression of haematopoietic transcription factors (Runx1 and Gata2). However, the increase in EHT can be abrogated by increased Notch signalling. These findings demonstrate that the endothelial haematopoietic fate switch is actively repressed in a population of endothelial cells, and that derepression of these programs augments haematopoietic output. PMID:26204127

  7. Pluripotency factor binding and Tsix expression act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of Xist, the master regulator of X chromosome inactivation, is extinguished in pluripotent cells, a process that has been linked to programmed X chromosome reactivation. The key pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 are implicated in Xist gene extinction, at least in part through binding to an element located in Xist intron 1. Other pathways, notably repression by the antisense RNA Tsix, may also be involved. Results Here we employ a transgene strategy to test the role of the intron 1 element and Tsix in repressing Xist in ES cells. We find that deletion of the intron 1 element causes a small increase in Xist expression and that simultaneous deletion of the antisense regulator Tsix enhances this effect. Conclusion We conclude that Tsix and pluripotency factors act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Double mutants do not exhibit maximal levels of Xist expression, indicating that other pathways also play a role.

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  9. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Wei, E-mail: qu@niehs.nih.gov; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  10. Derangement of a factor upstream of RARalpha triggers the repression of a pleiotropic epigenetic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Corlazzoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin adapts and responds to extrinsic and intrinsic cues. We hypothesize that inheritable aberrant chromatin states in cancer and aging are caused by genetic/environmental factors. In previous studies we demonstrated that either genetic mutations, or loss, of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, can impair the integration of the retinoic acid (RA signal at the chromatin of RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha, and can lead to aberrant repressive chromatin states marked by epigenetic modifications. In this study we tested whether the mere interference with the availability of RA signal at RARalpha, in cells with an otherwise functional RARalpha, can also induce epigenetic repression at RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To hamper the availability of RA at RARalpha in untransformed human mammary epithelial cells, we targeted the cellular RA-binding protein 2 (CRABP2, which transports RA from the cytoplasm onto the nuclear RARs. Stable ectopic expression of a CRABP2 mutant unable to enter the nucleus, as well as stable knock down of endogenous CRABP2, led to the coordinated transcriptional repression of a few RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. The chromatin at these genes acquired an exacerbated repressed state, or state "of no return". This aberrant state is unresponsive to RA, and therefore differs from the physiologically repressed, yet "poised" state, which is responsive to RA. Consistent with development of homozygosis for epigenetically repressed loci, a significant proportion of cells with a defective CRABP2-mediated RA transport developed heritable phenotypes indicative of loss of function. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Derangement/lack of a critical factor necessary for RARalpha function induces epigenetic repression of a RA-regulated gene network downstream of RARalpha, with major pleiotropic biological outcomes.

  11. Repression by RB1 characterizes genes involved in the penultimate stage of erythroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Loyd, Melanie R; Randall, Mindy S; Morris, John J; Shah, Jayesh G; Ney, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma-1 (RB1), and the RB1-related proteins p107 and p130, are key regulators of the cell cycle. Although RB1 is required for normal erythroid development in vitro, it is largely dispensable for erythropoiesis in vivo. The modest phenotype caused by RB1 deficiency in mice raises questions about redundancy within the RB1 family, and the role of RB1 in erythroid differentiation. Here we show that RB1 is the major pocket protein that regulates terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid cells lacking all pocket proteins exhibit the same cell cycle defects as those deficient for RB1 alone. RB1 has broad repressive effects on gene transcription in erythroid cells. As a group, RB1-repressed genes are generally well expressed but downregulated at the final stage of erythroid development. Repression correlates with E2F binding, implicating E2Fs in the recruitment of RB1 to repressed genes. Merging differential and time-dependent changes in expression, we define a group of approximately 800 RB1-repressed genes. Bioinformatics analysis shows that this list is enriched for terms related to the cell cycle, but also for terms related to terminal differentiation. Some of these have not been previously linked to RB1. These results expand the range of processes potentially regulated by RB1, and suggest that a principal role of RB1 in development is coordinating the events required for terminal differentiation. PMID:26397180

  12. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-cateninS45F-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  13. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  14. Rural methods to mitigate arsenic contaminated water

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water is one of the burning issues in the rural world. Poor public awareness program about health effects of drinking arsenic contaminated water and the rural methods to mitigate this problem poses a great threat of arsenic poisoning many people of the rural world. In this thesis, arsenic removal efficiency and the working mechanism of four rural and economical arsenic mitigation technologies i.e. solar oxidation and reduction of arsenic (SORAS), Bucket tr...

  15. Repression: Finding Our Way in the Maze of Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Garssen, Bert

    2007-01-01

    Repression is associated in the literature with terms such as non-expression, emotional control, rationality, anti-emotionality, defensiveness and restraint. Whether these terms are synonymous with repression, indicate a variation, or are essentially different from repression is uncertain. To clarify this obscured view on repression, this paper indicates the similarities and differences between these concepts. Repression is the general term that is used to describe the tendency to inhibit the...

  16. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Zheng, Baoshan; Aposhian, H. Vasken; Zhou, Yunshu; Chen, Ming-liang; Zhang, Aihua; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here we report the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China. Coal in this region has undergone mineralization and thus produces high concentrations of arsenic. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooki...

  17. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  18. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  19. The HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein represses Ku80 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducu, Razvan I; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2011-07-20

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax interferes with DNA double strand break repair. Since non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway used to repair DNA double strand breaks we examined the effect of Tax on this pathway, with particular interest in the expression and function of Ku80, a critical component of the NHEJ pathway. Tax expression decreased Ku80 mRNA and protein levels, and repressed transcription from the Ku80 promoter. Conversely, Ku80 mRNA increased following siRNA knockdown of Tax in HTLV-I infected cells. Tax expression was associated with an elevated number of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges, hallmarks of improper DNA double strand break repair. Our studies identified Tax as a transcriptional repressor of Ku80 that correlates with decreased DNA repair function. The reduction of Ku80 transcription by Tax may deplete the cell of an essential DNA break binding protein, resulting in reduced repair of DNA double strand breaks and accumulation genomic mutations. PMID:21571351

  20. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  1. Transplacental Arsenic Carcinogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Waalkes, Michael P.; Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-01-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation,...

  2. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan Iain M; Taylor Ewan R; Kowalczyk Anna M; Brown Craig; Gaston Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell prolifera...

  3. Smad4 suppresses the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma through repressing the expression of heparanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hongxia; Zheng, Liduan; Jiao, Wanju; Mei, Hong; Li, Dan; Song, Huajie; Fang, Erhu; Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Shiwang; Huang, Kai; Tong, Qiangsong

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase (HPSE) is the only endo-β-D-glucuronidase that is correlated with the progression of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial malignancy in childhood. However, the mechanisms underlying HPSE expression in NB still remain largely unknown. Herein, through analyzing cis-regulatory elements and mining public microarray datasets, we identified SMAD family member 4 (Smad4) as a crucial transcription regulator of HPSE in NB. We demonstrated that Smad4 repressed the HPSE expression at the transcriptional levels in NB cells. Mechanistically, Smad4 suppressed the HPSE expression through directly binding to its promoter and repressing the lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1)-facilitated transcription of HPSE via physical interaction. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that Smad4 inhibited the growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis of NB cells in vitro and in vivo. Restoration of HPSE expression prevented the NB cells from changes in these biological features induced by Smad4. In clinical NB specimens, Smad4 was under-expressed and inversely correlated with HPSE levels, while LEF1 was highly expressed and positively correlated with HPSE expression. Patients with high Smad4 expression, low LEF1 or HPSE levels had greater survival probability. These results demonstrate that Smad4 suppresses the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of NB through repressing the HPSE expression. PMID:27595937

  4. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  5. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered. PMID:25417842

  6. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel la; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counter...

  7. Repression of Runx2 by Androgen Receptor (AR) in Osteoblasts and Prostate Cancer Cells: AR Binds Runx2 and Abrogates Its Recruitment to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Khalid, Omar; Sir, Donna; Buchanan, Grant; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Frenkel, Baruch

    2009-01-01

    Runx2 and androgen receptor (AR) are master transcription factors with pivotal roles in bone metabolism and prostate cancer (PCa). We dissected AR-mediated repression of Runx2 in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated osteoblastic and PCa cells using reporter assays and endogenous Runx2 target genes. Repression required DHT, but not AR’s transactivation function, and was associated with nuclear colocalization of the two proteins. Runx2 and AR coimmunoprecipitated and interacted directly in glutath...

  8. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T;

    2006-01-01

    mechanism underlying this transcriptional repression by glucose remains unclear. Here we report that glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in INS-1E cells is independent of beta-cell excitation and insulin secretion but requires activation of protein phosphatase 2A in a process involving...... AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....

  9. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  10. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26767369

  11. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo;

    2012-01-01

    PRDM family members are transcriptional regulators involved in tissue specific differentiation. PRDM5 has been reported to predominantly repress transcription, but a characterization of its molecular functions in a relevant biological context is lacking. We demonstrate here that Prdm5 is highly e...... transcriptional program necessary to the proper assembly of osteoblastic extracellular matrix....

  12. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. ► Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TRβ1. ► ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TRβ1-repressed transcription. ► ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TRβ1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TRβ1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TRβ1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TRβ1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  13. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4 ± 0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0 ± 8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary > Early Jurassic > Late Triassic > Late Jurassic > Middle Jurassic > Late Permian > Early Carboniferous > Middle Carboniferous > Late Carboniferous > Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous > Anthracite > Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal

  14. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  15. Noise in transcription negative feedback loops: simulation and experimental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dublanche, Yann; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Kümmerer, Nico; Foglierini, Mathilde; Serrano, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Negative feedback loops have been invoked as a way to control and decrease transcriptional noise. Here, we have built three circuits to test the effect of negative feedback loops on transcriptional noise of an autoregulated gene encoding a transcription factor (TF) and a downstream gene (DG), regulated by this TF. Experimental analysis shows that self-repression decreases noise compared to expression from a non-regulated promoter. Interestingly enough, we find that noise minimization by negat...

  16. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Linsheng Yang; Jianwei Gao; Jiangping Yu

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to arsenic (As) poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP) induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions), who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the ...

  17. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror; Mao, Chai-An; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-09-15

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3(+) progenitors, decreases beta and alpha cell mass by E18.5, and triggers diabetes in adulthood. Conditional inactivation of Rest in Pdx1(+) progenitors is not sufficient to trigger endocrine differentiation but up-regulates a subset of differentiation genes. Our results show that the transcriptional repressor REST is active in pancreas progenitors where it gates the activation of part of the beta cell differentiation program. PMID:26156633

  18. Conservation of uORF repressiveness and sequence features in mouse, human and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Guo-Liang; Pauli, Andrea; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are ubiquitous repressive genetic elements in vertebrate mRNAs. While much is known about the regulation of individual genes by their uORFs, the range of uORF-mediated translational repression in vertebrate genomes is largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether the repressive effects of uORFs are conserved across species. To address these questions, we analyse transcript sequences and ribosome profiling data from human, mouse and zebrafish. We find that uORFs are depleted near coding sequences (CDSes) and have initiation contexts that diminish their translation. Linear modelling reveals that sequence features at both uORFs and CDSes modulate the translation of CDSes. Moreover, the ratio of translation over 5' leaders and CDSes is conserved between human and mouse, and correlates with the number of uORFs. These observations suggest that the prevalence of vertebrate uORFs may be explained by their conserved role in repressing CDS translation. PMID:27216465

  19. The N-CoR/Histone Deacetylase 3 Complex Is Required for Repression by Thyroid Hormone Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizuka, Takahiro; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressors (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT) have both been implicated in thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated repression. Here we show that endogenous N-CoR, TBL1, and histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), but not HDAC1, -2, or -4, are recruited to a stably integrated reporter gene repressed by unliganded TR as well as the orphan receptor RevErb. Unliganded TR also recruits this complex to a transiently transfected reporter, and transcript...

  20. The Escherichia coli OxyS regulatory RNA represses fhlA translation by blocking ribosome binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Altuvia, S; Zhang, A.; Argaman, L; Tiwari, A; Storz, G.

    1998-01-01

    OxyS is a small untranslated RNA which is induced in response to oxidative stress in Escherichia coli. This novel RNA acts as a global regulator to activate or repress the expression of as many as 40 genes, including the fhlA-encoded transcriptional activator and the rpoS-encoded sigma(s) subunit of RNA polymerase. Deletion analysis of OxyS showed that different domains of the small RNA are required for the regulation of fhlA and rpoS. We examined the mechanism of OxyS repression of fhlA and ...

  1. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. -- Highlights: ► High soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth. ► A delayed flowering time was observed in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Total grain arsenic increased in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Percentage organic arsenic in the grain altered in arsenic and organic matter soil. -- The addition of high amounts of organic matter to soils led to an increase in total rice grain arsenic, as well as alteration in the percentage arsenic species in the rice grains

  2. Involvement of sigmaS accumulation in repression of the flhDC operon in acidic phospholipid-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Junji; Nobue, Yuka; Zhao, Hong; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Nagahama, Hideki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Escherichia coli pgsA mutations, which cause acidic phospholipid deficiency, repress transcription of the flagellar master operon flhDC, and thus impair flagellar formation and motility. The molecular mechanism of the strong repression of flhDC transcription in the mutant cells, however, has not yet been clarified. In order to shed light on this mechanism we isolated genes which, when supplied in multicopy, suppress the repression of flhD, and found that three genes, gadW, metE and yeaB, were capable of suppression. Taking into account a previous report that gadW represses sigma(S) production, the level of sigma(S) in the pgsA3 mutant was examined. We found that pgsA3 cells had a high level of sigma(S) and that introduction of a gadW plasmid into pgsA3 cells did reduce the sigma(S) level. The pgsA3 cells exhibited a sharp increase in sigma(S) levels that can only be partially attributed to the slight increase in rpoS transcription; the largest part of the effect is due to a post-transcriptional accumulation of sigma(S). GadW in multicopy exerts its effect by post-transcriptionally downregulating sigma(S). YeaB and MetE in multicopy also exert their effect via sigma(S). Disruption of rpoS caused an increase of the flhD mRNA level, and induction from P(trc)-rpoS repressed the flhD mRNA level. The strong repression of flhD transcription in pgsA3 mutant cells is thus suggested to be caused by the accumulated sigma(S). PMID:20185506

  3. Methylation of H2AR29 is a novel repressive PRMT6 target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldmann Tanja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent histone modifications are central to all DNA-dependent processes. Modifications of histones H3 and H4 are becoming well characterised, but knowledge of how H2A modifications regulate chromatin dynamics and gene expression is still very limited. Results To understand the function of H2A modifications, we performed a systematic analysis of the histone H2A methylation status. We identified and functionally characterised two new methylation sites in H2A: R11 (H2AR11 and R29 (H2AR29. Using an unbiased biochemical approach in combination with candidate assays we showed that protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT 1 and PRMT6 are unique in their ability to catalyse these modifications. Importantly we found that H2AR29me2 is specifically enriched at genes repressed by PRMT6, implicating H2AR29me2 in transcriptional repression. Conclusions Our data establishes R11 and R29 as new arginine methylation sites in H2A. We identified the specific modifying enzymes involved, and uncovered a novel functional role of H2AR29me2 in gene silencing in vivo. Thus this work reveals novel insights into the function of H2A methylation and in the mechanisms of PRMT6-mediated transcriptional repression.

  4. The three operators of the lac operon cooperate in repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Oehler, S; Eismann, E R; Krämer, H; Müller-Hill, B

    1990-01-01

    We tested the effect of systematic destruction of all three lac operators of the chromosomal lac operon of Escherichia coli on repression by Lac repressor. Absence of just one 'pseudo-operator' O2 or O3 decreases repression by wild-type tetrameric Lac repressor approximately 2- to 3-fold; absence of both 'pseudo-operators' decreases repression greater than 50-fold. O1 alone represses under these conditions only approximately 20-fold. Dimeric active Lac repressor (iadi) represses the wild-type...

  5. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina;

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  6. Cancer, acute stress disorder, and repressive coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between repressive coping style and Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) in a sample of cancer patients. A total of 112 cancer patients recently diagnosed with cancer participated in the study. ASD was assessed by the Stanford Acute Stress...... Reaction Questionnaire, and repressive coping was assessed by a combination of scores from the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, and the Bendig version of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. Significantly fewer patients classified as "repressors" were diagnosed with ASD compared to patients...... classified as "non-repressors". However, further investigations revealed that the lower incidence of ASD in repressors apparently was caused by a low score on anxiety and not by an interaction effect between anxiety and defensiveness. Future studies have to investigate whether different psychological...

  7. Tbx3 represses PTEN and is over-expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgucu Durmus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in diagnostic and treatment strategies, head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC constitutes one of the worst cancer types in terms of prognosis. PTEN is one of the tumour suppressors whose expression and/or activity have been found to be reduced in HNSCC, with rather low rates of mutations within the PTEN gene (6-8%. We reasoned that low expression levels of PTEN might be due to a transcriptional repression governed by an oncogene. Tbx2 and Tbx3, both of which are transcriptional repressors, have been found to be amplified or over-expressed in various cancer types. Thus, we hypothesize that Tbx3 may be over expressed in HNSCC and may repress PTEN, thus leading to cancer formation and/or progression. Methods Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR (qPCR, protein and mRNA levels of PTEN and Tbx3 were identified in samples excised from cancerous and adjacent normal tissues from 33 patients who were diagnosed with HNSCC. In addition, HeLa and HEK cell lines were transfected with a Tbx3 expressing plasmid and endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels were determined via qPCR and flow cytometry. Transcription assays were performed to demonstrate effects of Tbx3 on PTEN promoter activity. Mann–Whitney, Spearman’s Correlation and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze the data. Results We demonstrate that in HNSCC samples, Tbx3 mRNA levels are increased with respect to their normal tissue counterparts (p Conclusions We show that Tbx3 is up-regulated in tissue samples of HNSCC patients and that Tbx3 represses PTEN transcription. Thus, our data not only reveals a new mechanism that may be important in cancer formation, but also suggests that Tbx3 can be used as a potential biomarker in cancer.

  8. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress

  9. Repression and substitutive formation: the relationship between Freud's concepts reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines Freud's concept of repression and the relationship between repression and substitutive formation as it presents itself in Freud's writings. The author shows that Freud gives at least four different meanings to the term "repression": Freud uses it interchangeably with defense, as a consciously intended forgetting, as a specific unconscious mechanism of defense, and to describe the consequence of defense mechanisms leading to substitutive formations. The inconsistencies in this relationship are discussed and clarified, and Freud's economic and linguistic attempts at founding repression are subjected to critique; the need of a primal repression as a necessary condition for repression proper is pointed out. In developing Freud's linguistic foundation of repression further, the author presents defense as a semantic displacement. Ideas are excluded from the realm of the concepts that belong to them historically. These presentations become unconscious, that is, repressed, in that they can no longer be identified as "cases" of these conceptual internal contents. At the same time they are displaced into the extensions of concepts whose internal contents do not belong to them originally. It is by virtue of the internal contents of these concepts that the displaced elements as substitutive formations once again attain consciousness, albeit a false one. The author suggests dismissing repression as a specific defense mechanism of its own; to reversing Freud's thesis that repression, as a rule, creates a substitutive formation into its opposite; and recognizing that the mechanisms used to build substitutes, as a rule, create repression. PMID:22712593

  10. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Multi-Faceted Characterization of a Novel LuxR-Repressible Promoter Library for Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Zucca

    Full Text Available The genetic elements regulating the natural quorum sensing (QS networks of several microorganisms are widely used in synthetic biology to control the behaviour of single cells and engineered bacterial populations via ad-hoc constructed synthetic circuits. A number of novel engineering-inspired biological functions have been implemented and model systems have also been constructed to improve the knowledge on natural QS systems. Synthetic QS-based parts, such as promoters, have been reported in literature, to provide biological components with functions that are not present in nature, like modified induction logic or activation/repression by additional molecules. In this work, a library of promoters that can be repressed by the LuxR protein in presence of the QS autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL was reported for Escherichia coli, to expand the toolkit of genetic parts that can be used to engineer novel synthetic QS-based systems. The library was constructed via polymerase chain reaction with highly constrained degenerate oligonucleotides, designed according to the consensus -35 and -10 sequences of a previously reported constitutive promoter library of graded strength, to maximize the probability of obtaining functional clones. All the promoters have a lux box between the -35 and -10 regions, to implement a LuxR-repressible behaviour. Twelve unique library members of graded strength (about 100-fold activity range were selected to form the final library and they were characterized in several genetic contexts, such as in different plasmids, via different reporter genes, in presence of a LuxR expression cassette in different positions and in response to different AHL concentrations. The new obtained regulatory parts and corresponding data can be exploited by synthetic biologists to implement an artificial AHL-dependent repression of transcription in genetic circuits. The target transcriptional activity can be selected among the

  12. Organizer-Derived WOX5 Signal Maintains Root Columella Stem Cells through Chromatin-Mediated Repression of CDF4 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Limin; Aichinger, Ernst; van der Graaff, Eric; Llavata-Peris, Cristina I; Weijers, Dolf; Hennig, Lars; Groot, Edwin; Laux, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells in plants and animals are maintained pluripotent by signals from adjacent niche cells. In plants, WUSCHEL HOMEOBOX (WOX) transcription factors are central regulators of stem cell maintenance in different meristem types, yet their molecular mode of action has remained elusive. Here we show that in the Arabidopsis root meristem, the WOX5 protein moves from the root niche organizer, the quiescent center, into the columella stem cells, where it directly represses the transcription factor gene CDF4. This creates a gradient of CDF4 transcription, which promotes differentiation opposite to the WOX5 gradient, allowing stem cell daughter cells to exit the stem cell state. We further show that WOX5 represses CDF4 transcription by recruiting TPL/TPR co-repressors and the histone deacetylase HDA19, which consequently induces histone deacetylation at the CDF4 regulatory region. Our results show that chromatin-mediated repression of differentiation programs is a common strategy in plant and animal stem cell niches. PMID:26028217

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  14. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  15. Arsenic-resistant bacteria solubilized arsenic in the growth media and increased growth of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2011-10-01

    The role of arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in arsenic solubilization from growth media and growth enhancement of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. was examined. Seven ARB (tolerant to 10 mM arsenate) were isolated from the P. vittata rhizosphere and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Pseudomonas sp., Comamonas sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. During 7-d hydroponic experiments, these bacteria effectively solubilized arsenic from the growth media spiked with insoluble FeAsO₄ and AlAsO₄ minerals (from organic C) by P. vittata may be responsible for As solubilization. Increase in P. vittata root biomass from 1.5-2.2 to 3.4-4.2 g/plant dw by ARB and by arsenic was associated with arsenic-induced plant P uptake. Arsenic resistant bacteria may have potential to enhance phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils by P. vittata. PMID:21840210

  16. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic and cognitive problems. Recent emerging evidences suggest that arsenic exposure affects the reproductive and developmental toxicity. Prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic causes adverse pregnancy outcomes and children's health problems. Some epidemiological studies have reported that arsenic exposure induces premature delivery, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth. In animal studies, inorganic arsenic also causes fetal malformation, growth retardation, and fetal death. These toxic effects depend on dose, route and gestation periods of arsenic exposure. In males, inorganic arsenic causes reproductive dysfunctions including reductions of the testis weights, accessory sex organs weights, and epididymal sperm counts. In addition, inorganic arsenic exposure also induces alterations of spermatogenesis, reductions of testosterone and gonadotrophins, and disruptions of steroidogenesis. However, the reproductive and developmental problems following arsenic exposure are poorly understood, and the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity remains unclear. Thus, we further investigated several possible mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26973968

  17. Tbx3 represses PTEN and is over-expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite advances in diagnostic and treatment strategies, head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) constitutes one of the worst cancer types in terms of prognosis. PTEN is one of the tumour suppressors whose expression and/or activity have been found to be reduced in HNSCC, with rather low rates of mutations within the PTEN gene (6-8%). We reasoned that low expression levels of PTEN might be due to a transcriptional repression governed by an oncogene. Tbx2 and Tbx3, both of which are transcriptional repressors, have been found to be amplified or over-expressed in various cancer types. Thus, we hypothesize that Tbx3 may be over expressed in HNSCC and may repress PTEN, thus leading to cancer formation and/or progression. Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR (qPCR), protein and mRNA levels of PTEN and Tbx3 were identified in samples excised from cancerous and adjacent normal tissues from 33 patients who were diagnosed with HNSCC. In addition, HeLa and HEK cell lines were transfected with a Tbx3 expressing plasmid and endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels were determined via qPCR and flow cytometry. Transcription assays were performed to demonstrate effects of Tbx3 on PTEN promoter activity. Mann–Whitney, Spearman’s Correlation and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze the data. We demonstrate that in HNSCC samples, Tbx3 mRNA levels are increased with respect to their normal tissue counterparts (p<0.001), whereas PTEN mRNA levels are significantly reduced in cancer tissues. Moreover, Tbx3 protein is also increased in HNSCC tissue sections. Over-expression of Tbx3 in HeLa and HEK cell lines causes reduction in endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels. In addition, transcription activity assays reveal that Tbx3 is capable of repressing both the basal and induced promoter activity of PTEN. We show that Tbx3 is up-regulated in tissue samples of HNSCC patients and that Tbx3 represses PTEN transcription. Thus, our data not only reveals a new

  18. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  19. Arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in arsenic-contaminated soils: Sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a combination of sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed in order to evaluate arsenic solid-state speciation and bioaccessibility in soils highly contaminated with arsenic from mining and smelting. Combination of these techniques indicated that iron oxides and the weathering products of sulfide minerals played an important role in regulating the arsenic retention in the soils. Higher bioaccessibility of arsenic was observed in the following order; i) arsenic bound to amorphous iron oxides (smelter-2), ii) arsenic associated with crystalline iron oxides and arsenic sulfide phase (smelter-1), and iii) arsenic associated with the weathering products of arsenic sulfide minerals, such as scorodite, orpiment, jarosite, and pyrite (mine). Even though the bioaccessibility of arsenic was very low in the mine soil, its environmental impact could be significant due to its high arsenic concentration and mobility. Highlights: • Combination of sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation was employed. • Arsenic was primarily associated with iron oxides and sulfide minerals in soils. • Bioaccessibility of arsenic was affected by arsenic solid-phase speciation. -- We investigated arsenic solid-state speciation in soils, which is crucial for risk assessment and developing suitable remediation strategies in arsenic contaminated sites

  20. Genomic responses to arsenic in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Sánchez-Riego

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a ubiquitous contaminant and a toxic metalloid which presents two main redox states in nature: arsenite [As(III] and arsenate [As(V]. Arsenic resistance in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is mediated by the arsBHC operon and two additional arsenate reductases encoded by the arsI1 and arsI2 genes. Here we describe the genome-wide responses to the presence of arsenate and arsenite in wild type and mutants in the arsenic resistance system. Both forms of arsenic produced similar responses in the wild type strain, including induction of several stress related genes and repression of energy generation processes. These responses were transient in the wild type strain but maintained in time in an arsB mutant strain, which lacks the arsenite transporter. In contrast, the responses observed in a strain lacking all arsenate reductases were somewhat different and included lower induction of genes involved in metal homeostasis and Fe-S cluster biogenesis, suggesting that these two processes are targeted by arsenite in the wild type strain. Finally, analysis of the arsR mutant strain revealed that ArsR seems to only control 5 genes in the genome. Furthermore, the arsR mutant strain exhibited hypersentivity to nickel, copper and cadmium and this phenotype was suppressed by mutation in arsB but not in arsC gene suggesting that overexpression of arsB is detrimental in the presence of these metals in the media.

  1. Design and characterization of a dual-mode promoter with activation and repression capability for tuning gene expression in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Mostafizur; McMillen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Modularity in controlling gene expression artificially is becoming an essential aspect of synthetic biology. Artificial transcriptional control of gene expression is one of the most well-developed methods for the design of novel synthetic regulatory networks. Such networks are intended to help understand natural cellular phenomena and to enable new biotechnological applications. Promoter sequence manipulation with cis-regulatory elements is a key approach to control gene expression transcriptionally. Here, we have designed a promoter that can be both activated and repressed, as a contribution to the library of synthetic biological 'parts'. Starting with the minimal cytochrome C (minCYC) promoter in yeast, we incorporated five steroid hormone responsive elements (SHREs) and one lac operator site, respectively, upstream and downstream of the TATA box. This allows activation through the testosterone-responsive androgen receptor, and repression through the LacI repressor. Exposure to varying concentrations of testosterone (to vary activation) and IPTG (to vary repression) demonstrated the ability to tune the promoter's output curve over a wide range. By integrating activating and repressing signals, the promoter permits a useful form of signal integration, and we are optimistic that it will serve as a component in future regulatory networks, including feedback controllers. PMID:25056312

  2. STENOFOLIA recruits TOPLESS to repress ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 at the leaf margin and promote leaf blade outgrowth in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Wang, Yewei; Li, Guifen; Tang, Yuhong; Kramer, Elena M; Tadege, Million

    2014-02-01

    The Medicago truncatula WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), plays a key role in leaf blade outgrowth by promoting cell proliferation at the adaxial-abaxial junction. STF functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the identification of a protein interaction partner and a direct target, shedding light on the mechanism of STF function. Two highly conserved motifs in the C-terminal domain of STF, the WUSCHEL (WUS) box and the STF box, cooperatively recruit TOPLESS (Mt-TPL) family corepressors, and this recruitment is required for STF function, as deletion of these two domains (STFdel) impaired blade outgrowth whereas fusing Mt-TPL to STFdel restored function. The homeodomain motif is required for direct repression of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (Mt-AS2), silencing of which partially rescues the stf mutant phenotype. STF and LAMINALESS1 (LAM1) are functional orthologs. A single amino acid (Asn to Ile) substitution in the homeodomain abolished the repression of Mt-AS2 and STF's ability to complement the lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris. Our data together support a model in which STF recruits corepressors to transcriptionally repress its targets during leaf blade morphogenesis. We propose that recruitment of TPL/TPL-related proteins may be a common mechanism in the repressive function of modern/WUS clade WOX genes. PMID:24585835

  3. Arsenic speciation in saliva of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients undergoing arsenic trioxide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Fenglin; Yuan, Chungang; Lu, Xiufen; Shen, Shengwen; Zhou, Jin; Le, X Chris

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been successfully used as a therapeutic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Detailed monitoring of the therapeutic arsenic and its metabolites in various accessible specimens of APL patients can contribute to improving treatment efficacy and minimizing arsenic-induced side effects. This article focuses on the determination of arsenic species in saliva samples from APL patients undergoing arsenic treatment. Saliva samples were collected from nine APL pa...

  4. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@niehs.nih.gov

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  5. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  6. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states o...

  7. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, G. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Pierra, A. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Klemm, W. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As[sup 3+], As[sup 5+]) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  8. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As3+, As5+) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  9. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  10. Arsenic removal from industrial effluent through electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, N. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Dept. of Pollution Control; Madhavan, K. [Coimbatore Inst. of Technology, Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    In the present investigation, it is attempted to remove arsenic from smelter industrial wastewater through electro-coagulation. Experiments covering a wide range of operating conditions for removal of the arsenic present in the smelter wastewater are carried out in a batch electrochemical reactor. It has been observed from the present work that arsenic can be removed effectively through electrocoagulation. (orig.)

  11. Chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates. The results of studies of chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic comprising concentrates of Chore deposit of Tajikistan are considered. It is found that by application sodium chloride for gold-arsenic comprising concentrates it is possible to extract gold and silver from flotation concentrates.

  12. Repression of the DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 by Blimp-1 limits CD8+ T cell memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Pos, Zoltan; Rao, Mahadev; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Yu, Zhiya; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Reger, Robert N.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Muranski, Pawel; Wang, Ena; Schrump, David S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gattinoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Blimp-1 is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the differentiation of CD8+ T cells into short-lived KLRG-1+ effector cells (SLEC), but how it operates remains poorly defined. Here we show that Blimp-1 binds and represses the Id3 promoter in SLEC. Repression of Id3 by Blimp-1 was dispensable for SLEC development but limited their capacity to persist as memory cells. Enforced expression of Id3 was sufficient to rescue SLEC survival and enhanced recall responses. Id3 function was mediated in part through inhibition of E2a transcriptional activity and induction of genes regulating genome stability. These findings identify a Blimp-1-Id3-E2a axis as a key molecular switch that determines whether effector CD8+ T cells are programmed to die or enter the memory pool. PMID:22057288

  13. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin [/sup 32/P]cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements

  14. Angiogenesis is repressed by ethanol exposure during chick embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chen, Jian-Long; Lu, Wen-Hui; Cheng, Xin; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-05-01

    It is now known that excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome to develop. However, it is not known whether excess ethanol exposure could directly affect angiogenesis in the embryo or angiogenesis being indirectly affected because of ethanol-induced fetal alcohol syndrome. Using the chick yolk sac membrane (YSM) model, we demonstrated that ethanol exposure dramatically inhibited angiogenesis in the YSM of 9-day-old chick embryos, in a dose-dependent manner. Likewise, the anti-angiogenesis effect of ethanol could be seen in the developing vessel plexus (at the same extra-embryonic regions) during earlier stages of embryo development. The anti-angiogenic effect of ethanol was found associated with excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; as glutathione peroxidase activity increased while superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 activities decreased in the YSMs. We further validated this observation by exposing chick embryos to 2,2'-azobis-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (a ROS inducer) and obtained a similar anti-angiogenesis effect as ethanol treatment. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the experimental YSMs revealed that expression of angiogenesis-related genes, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hypoxia-inducible factor, were all repressed following ethanol and 2,2'-azobis-amidinopropane dihydrochloride treatment. In summary, our results suggest that excess ethanol exposure inhibits embryonic angiogenesis through promoting superfluous ROS production during embryo development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177723

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies chromosome 10q24.32 variants associated with arsenic metabolism and toxicity phenotypes in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Pierce

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a major public health issue in many countries, increasing risk for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. There is inter-individual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency and susceptibility to arsenic toxicity; however, the basis of this variation is not well understood. Here, we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS of arsenic-related metabolism and toxicity phenotypes to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which arsenic affects health. Using data on urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations and approximately 300,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for 1,313 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we identified genome-wide significant association signals (P<5×10(-8 for percentages of both monomethylarsonic acid (MMA and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA near the AS3MT gene (arsenite methyltransferase; 10q24.32, with five genetic variants showing independent associations. In a follow-up analysis of 1,085 individuals with arsenic-induced premalignant skin lesions (the classical sign of arsenic toxicity and 1,794 controls, we show that one of these five variants (rs9527 is also associated with skin lesion risk (P = 0.0005. Using a subset of individuals with prospectively measured arsenic (n = 769, we show that rs9527 interacts with arsenic to influence incident skin lesion risk (P = 0.01. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analyses of genome-wide expression data from 950 individual's lymphocyte RNA suggest that several of our lead SNPs represent cis-eQTLs for AS3MT (P = 10(-12 and neighboring gene C10orf32 (P = 10(-44, which are involved in C10orf32-AS3MT read-through transcription. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic investigation of arsenic metabolism and toxicity to date, the only GWAS of any arsenic-related trait, and the first study to implicate 10q24.32 variants in both arsenic metabolism and arsenical

  16. An endogenous growth model of money, banking, and financial repression

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Marco; Yip, Chong K.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an endogenous growth model with financial intermediation to examine the effects of financial repression on growth, inflation, and welfare. By limiting the liquidity provision, binding reserve requirements always suppress economic growth while their effect on inflation is a function, among other things, of the degree of repression. For example, contrary to previous claims, if financial repression is severe enough so that an informal financial sector emerges, liberaliz...

  17. Repression: finding our way in the maze of concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garssen, Bert

    2007-12-01

    Repression is associated in the literature with terms such as non-expression, emotional control, rationality, anti-emotionality, defensiveness and restraint. Whether these terms are synonymous with repression, indicate a variation, or are essentially different from repression is uncertain. To clarify this obscured view on repression, this paper indicates the similarities and differences between these concepts. Repression is the general term that is used to describe the tendency to inhibit the experience and the expression of negative feelings or unpleasant cognitions in order to prevent one's positive self-image from being threatened ('repressive coping style'). The terms self-deception versus other-deception, and socially related versus personally related repression refer to what is considered to be different aspects of repression. Defensiveness is a broader concept that includes both anxious defensiveness and repression; the essential difference is whether negative emotions are reported or not. Concepts that are sometimes associated with repression, but which are conceptually different, are also discussed in this paper: The act of suppression, 'repressed memories,' habitual suppression, concealment, type C coping pattern, type D personality, denial, alexithymia and blunting. Consequences for research: (1) When summarizing findings reported in the literature, it is essential to determine which concepts the findings represent. This is rarely made explicit, and failure to do so may lead to drawing the wrong conclusions (2) It is advisable to use scales based on different aspects of repression (3) Whether empirical findings substantiate the similarities and differences between concepts described in this paper will need to be shown. PMID:17653842

  18. Gene expression in self-repressing system with multiple gene copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miekisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-02-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies of binding and unbinding increase to infinity. PMID:23354928

  19. Gene Expression in Self-repressing System with Multiple Gene Copies

    OpenAIRE

    Miȩkisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies...

  20. Repression of a mating type cassette in the fission yeast by four DNA elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekwall, K; Nielsen, O; Ruusala, T;

    1991-01-01

    difference between the active and the silent stage of the P determinant is controlled by four repressive elements that are located at the silent locus. There are two elements to the left and two to the right of the mating type cassette. Both elements to the left and either one of the two elements to the...... right are required for an effective blockage of transcription. When they are combined, the four elements define a highly efficient silencer functionally similar to the HMRE and HMLE and HMLI silencers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the DNA surrounding the silent P locus confers symmetric...

  1. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in min...

  2. Expression of arsenic resistance genes in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482, a gut microbiome bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaojiao; Mandal, Goutam; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    The response of the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482, a common human gut microbiota, to arsenic was determined. B. vulgatus ATCC 8482 is highly resistant to pentavalent As(V) and methylarsenate (MAs(V)). It is somewhat more sensitive to trivalent inorganic As(III) but 100-fold more sensitive to methylarsenite (MAs(III)) than to As(III). B. vulgatus ATCC 8482 has eight continuous genes in its genome that we demonstrate form an arsenical-inducible transcriptional unit. The first gene of this ars operon, arsR, encodes a putative ArsR As(III)-responsive transcriptional repressor. The next three genes encode proteins of unknown function. The remaining genes, arsDABC, have well-characterized roles in detoxification of inorganic arsenic, but there are no known genes for MAs(III) resistance. Expression of each gene after exposure to trivalent and pentavalent inorganic and methylarsenicals was analyzed. MAs(III) was the most effective inducer. The arsD gene was the most highly expressed of the ars operon genes. These results demonstrate that this anaerobic microbiome bacterium has arsenic-responsive genes that confer resistance to inorganic arsenic and may be responsible for the organism's ability to maintain its prevalence in the gut following dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic. PMID:27040269

  3. NR2F1 disrupts synergistic activation of the MTTP gene transcription by HNF-4α and HNF-1α

    OpenAIRE

    DAI, KEZHI; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) expression mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. We have previously shown that MTTP gene expression was repressed in nondifferentiated intestinal cells by nuclear receptor 2 family 1 (NR2F1). However, mechanisms involved in the repression of MTP by NR2F1 were not elucidated. Here, we show that MTP expression requires hepatic nuclear factor (HNF)-4α transcription factor. Different HNF-1 proteins synergistically enhance MTP prom...

  4. Arsenic – Poison or medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine. Med Pr 2016;67(1:89–96

  5. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook, E-mail: mwhur2@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  6. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice

  7. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  8. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT. PMID:26001292

  9. Reconstruction and logical modeling of glucose repression signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the presence of high levels of glucose leads to an array of down-regulatory effects known as glucose repression. This process is complex due to the presence of feedback loops and crosstalk between different pathways, complicating the use of intuitive approaches to analyze the system. Results We established a logical model of yeast glucose repression, formalized as a hypergraph. The model was constructed based on verified regulatory interactions and it includes 50 gene transcripts, 22 proteins, 5 metabolites and 118 hyperedges. We computed the logical steady states of all nodes in the network in order to simulate wildtype and deletion mutant responses to different sugar availabilities. Evaluation of the model predictive power was achieved by comparing changes in the logical state of gene nodes with transcriptome data. Overall, we observed 71% true predictions, and analyzed sources of errors and discrepancies for the remaining. Conclusion Though the binary nature of logical (Boolean models entails inherent limitations, our model constitutes a primary tool for storing regulatory knowledge, searching for incoherencies in hypotheses and evaluating the effect of deleting regulatory elements involved in glucose repression.

  10. Whole-house arsenic water treatment provided more effective arsenic exposure reduction than point-of-use water treatment at New Jersey homes with arsenic in well water

    OpenAIRE

    Spayd, Steven E.; Robson, Mark G.; Buckley, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the effectiveness of whole house (point-of-entry) and point-of-use arsenic water treatment systems in reducing arsenic exposure from well water was conducted. The non-randomized observational study recruited 49 subjects having elevated arsenic in their residential home well water in New Jersey. The subjects obtained either point-of-entry or point-of-use arsenic water treatment. Prior ingestion exposure to arsenic in well water was calculated by measuring arsenic concentrations...

  11. Arsenic mobility in contaminated lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An arsenic contaminated lake sediment near a landfill in Maine was used to characterize the geochemistry of arsenic and assess the influence of environmental conditions on its mobility. A kinetic model was developed to simulate the leaching ability of arsenic in lake sediments under different environmental conditions. The HM1D chemical transport model was used to model the column experiments and determine the rates of arsenic mobility from the sediment. Laboratory studies provided the information to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate the mobility of arsenic in the lake sediment. The leaching ability of arsenic in lake sediments greatly depends on the flow conditions of ground water and the geochemistry of the sediments. Large amounts of arsenic were tightly bound to the sediments. The amount of arsenic leaching out of the sediment to the water column was substantially decreased due to iron/arsenic co-precipitation at the water-sediment interface. Overall, it was found that arsenic greatly accumulated at the ground water/lake interface and it formed insoluble precipitates. - Arsenic accumulates at the ground water/lake interface, where it forms insoluble precipitates

  12. Neutron activation analysis of arsenic in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is considered a toxic trace element for plant, animal, and human organisms. Arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as carcinogens by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Arsenic is emitted in appreciable quantities into the atmosphere by coal combustion and the production of cement. Arsenic enters the aquatic environment through industrial activities such as smelting of metallic ores, metallurgical glassware, and ceramics as well as insecticide production and use. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a very sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining arsenic. This paper is a review of research studies of arsenic in the Greek environment by NAA performed at our radioanalytical laboratory. The objectives of these studies were (a) to determine levels of arsenic concentrations in environmental materials, (b) to pinpoint arsenic pollution sources and estimate the extent of arsenic pollution, and (c) to find out whether edible marine organisms from the gulfs of Greece receiving domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastes have elevated concentrations of arsenic in their tissues that could render them dangerous for human consumption

  13. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems. PMID:21549410

  14. Integrative analysis of histone ChIP-seq and transcription data using Bayesian mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Schäfer, Martin; Porse, Bo T; Hasemann, Marie S; Ickstadt, Katja; Dugas, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are a key epigenetic mechanism to activate or repress the transcription of genes. Datasets of matched transcription data and histone modification data obtained by ChIP-seq exist, but methods for integrative analysis of both data types are still rare. Here, we present a novel...

  15. Identification of uniquely expressed transcription factors in highly purified B-cell lymphoma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andréasson, Ulrika; Edén, Patrik; Peterson, Carsten; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Jerkeman, Mats; Andersen, Niels Smedegaard; Berglund, Mattias; Sundström, Christer; Rosenquist, Richard; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are critical for B-cell differentiation, affecting gene expression both by repression and transcriptional activation. Still, this information is not used for classification of B-cell lymphomas (BCLs). Traditionally, BCLs are diagnosed based on a phenotypic resemblance ...

  16. Repression of the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner by steatotic drugs and in advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Marta; Guzmán, Carla; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Martínez-Chantar, M Luz; Donato, M Teresa; Castell, José Vicente; Jover, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) (NR0B2) is an atypical nuclear receptor that lacks a DNA-binding domain. It interacts with and inhibits many transcription factors, affecting key metabolic processes, including bile acid, cholesterol, fatty acid, and drug metabolism. Our aim was to determine the influence of steatotic drugs and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on SHP expression and investigate the potential mechanisms. SHP was found to be repressed by steatotic drugs (valproate, doxycycline, tetracycline, and cyclosporin A) in cultured hepatic cells and the livers of different animal models of NAFLD: iatrogenic (tetracycline-treated rats), genetic (glycine N-methyltransferase-deficient mice), and nutritional (mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet). Among the different transcription factors investigated, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) showed the strongest dominant-repressive effect on SHP expression in HepG2 and human hepatocytes. Reporter assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of C/EBPα and steatotic drugs colocalize between -340 and -509 base pair of the SHP promoter, and mutation of a predicted C/EBPα response element at -473 base pair abolished SHP repression by both C/EBPα and drugs. Moreover, inhibition of major stress signaling pathways demonstrated that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 pathway activates, while the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase pathway represses SHP in a C/EBP-dependent manner. We conclude that SHP is downregulated by several steatotic drugs and in advanced NAFLD. These conditions can activate signals that target C/EBPα and consequently repress SHP, thus favoring the progression and severity of NAFLD. PMID:25576488

  17. The CovR response regulator of group A streptococcus (GAS) acts directly to repress its own promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusa, Asiya A; Scott, June R

    2005-06-01

    The CovR/S (CsrR/S) two component system is a global regulator of virulence gene expression in the group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes). The response regulator, CovR, regulates about 15% of the genes of GAS, including its own operon. Using in vitro DNA binding assays with purified CovR protein, we found that CovR binds a DNA fragment including the covR promoter (Pcov). DNaseI footprint analyses showed that phosphorylation of CovR enhanced and extended the protected regions. The proposed CovR consensus binding sequence (ATTARA) was present at most, but not all protected regions. The effect of replacing the two thymine residues in the consensus binding sequence (CB) with guanine residues was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Most, but not all, CB mutations reduced binding of CovR in vitro. Using a transcriptional reporter introduced in single copy into the GAS chromosome, we found that mutations at each CB completely or partially relieved CovR-mediated repression in vivo. This suggests that CovR regulation of Pcov is direct. Further support for this conclusion comes from use of an in vitro GAS transcription system in which CovR was sufficient to mediate repression of Pcov. This repression was enhanced by phosphorylation of the protein. In addition, we found that the CovR binding region overlapping the promoter was essential for wild type repression of Pcov both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that promoter occlusion is a primary mechanism of Pcov repression by CovR. PMID:15882414

  18. H3K9 methyltransferase G9a negatively regulates UHRF1 transcription during leukemia cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kee-Beom; Son, Hye-Ju; Choi, Sulji; Hahm, Ja Young; Jung, Hyeonsoo; Baek, Hee Jo; Kook, Hoon; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Kook, Hyun; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Histone H3K9 methyltransferase (HMTase) G9a-mediated transcriptional repression is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism. UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1) binds to hemimethylated DNA and plays an essential role in the maintenance of DNA methylation. Here, we provide evidence that UHRF1 is transcriptionally downregulated by H3K9 HMTase G9a. We found that increased expression of G9a along with transcription factor YY1 specifically represses UHRF1 transcription during T...

  19. Induction of glutathione synthesis in human hepatocytes by acute and chronic arsenic exposure: Differential roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Arsenic exposure increased intracellular levels of glutathione. • Mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in glutathione homeostasis. • ERK contributed to glutathione synthesis during acute arsenic exposure. • Glutathione synthesis was regulated by p38 at least in part independent of NRF2 during chronic arsenic exposure. - Abstract: Glutathione (GSH) is a vital component of antioxidant defense which protects cells from toxic insults. Previously we found intracellular GSH was involved in cell resistance against arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. However, molecular mechanisms of GSH homeostasis during arsenic exposure are largely undefined. Here, we investigated roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in GSH synthesis pathway with two arsenic exposure strategies by using Chang human hepatocytes. In one strategy, acute arsenic exposure (20 μM, 24 h) was applied, as MAPK signaling is generally considered to be transient. In the other one, chronic arsenic exposure (500 nM, 20 weeks) was applied, which mimicked the general human exposure to arsenic. We found that acute arsenic exposure activated extracellular signal-regulated 1/2 kinases (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in parallel with increased transcription and nuclear translocation of factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and enhanced expression of γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), resulting in elevated intracellular GSH levels. Specific ERK inhibitor abolished arsenic-induced NRF2 nuclear translocation and GSH synthesis. During chronic arsenic exposure which induced a malignant cellular phenotype, continuous p38 activation and NRF2 nuclear translocation were observed with enhanced GSH synthesis. Specific p38 inhibitor attenuated arsenic-enhanced GSH synthesis without changing NRF2 nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results indicate MAPK pathways play an important role in cellular GSH homeostasis in response to arsenic. However, the

  20. 致病性不同的两种流感病毒NS1蛋白对人源细胞IFN-β转录抑制的比较%Comparison of Transcriptional Repression on IFN-β with Two Different Kinds of Pathogenic Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于佳; 王雨; 李宏岳; 张翠竹; 曹又佳

    2012-01-01

    The NS1 protein is a key virulence factor encoded by influenza A virus, which developed multiple ways to antagonize the host immune defense. During the viral infection, NS1 could down regulate the transcription of IFN-β to block the induced signaling pathway, by impressing the activity of NF-kB and IRF3. Using RT-PCR, reporter assay and virus titration assay, the NSl-a, which sourced from high pathogenic avian influenza virus, could more efficiently suppress the transcription of IFN-β and help VSV replication, compared with NSl-h sourced from low pathogenic human influenza virus. This difference might root from their discrepant ability of blocking the NF-kB and IRF3, but unrelated to the IFN induced transcription of ISG. The result may provide clues for investigating the relationship between NS1 and pathogenicity of influenza virus.%A型流感病毒编码的NS1蛋白是病毒关键的致病因子,可以通过多种机制拮抗宿主抗病毒反应.病毒感染过程中,NS1通过抑制NF-κB和IRF3两种转录因子的活性,下调IFN-β转录水平以阻断其诱导的信号通路.实验选取病毒母本致病性不同的两种NS1蛋白(NS1-a,NS1-h),通过RT-PCR、报告基因和VSV病毒滴度等实验证明高致病性禽流感病毒NS1-a与普通人流感病毒NS1-h相比,表现出较强的抑制IFN-β转录能力,并有效帮助VSV病毒复制.此差异源于NS1-a更加有效抑制NF-κB活性以及IRF3激活后的入核行为,与IFN诱导的ISG转录无关.所得结果为阐释流感病毒致病性与NS1的密切关系提供线索.

  1. CD44v6 expression in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with chronic arsenic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic is a well-known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various types of human skin lesions, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. To investigate whether mutant stem cells participate in arsenic-associated carcinogenesis, we repeatedly exposed the HaCaT cells line to an environmentally relevant level of arsenic (0.05 ppm in vitro for 18 weeks. Following sodium arsenic arsenite administration, cell cycle, colony-forming efficiency (CFE, cell tumorigenicity, and expression of CD44v6, NF-κB and p53, were analyzed at different time points (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 passages. We found that a chronic exposure of HaCaT cells to a low level of arsenic induced a cancer stem- like phenotype. Furthermore, arsenic-treated HaCaT cells also became tumorigenic in nude mice, their growth cycle was predominantly in G2/M and S phases. Relative to nontreated cells, they exhibited a higher growth rate and a significant increase in CFE. Western blot analysis found that arsenic was capable of increasing cell proliferation and sprouting of cancer stem-like phenotype. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that CD44v6 expression was up-regulated in HaCaT cells exposed to a low level of arsenic during early stages of induction. The expression of CD44v6 in arsenic-treated cells was positively correlated with their cloning efficiency in soft agar (r=0.949, P=0.01. Likewise, the expressions of activating transcription factor NF-κB and p53 genes in the arsenic-treated HaCaT cells were significantly higher than that in non-treated cells. Higher expressions of CD44v6, NF-κB and p53 were also observed in tumor tissues isolated from Balb/c nude mice. The present results suggest that CD44v6 may be a biomarker of arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation in human skin cells, and that arsenic promotes malignant transformation in human skin lesions through a NF-κB signaling pathway-stimulated expression of CD44v6.

  2. Difference in uptake and toxicity of trivalent and pentavalent inorganic arsenic in rat heart microvessel endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro; Cui, Xing; Kanno, Sanae; Kobayashi, Yayoi [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Li, Song [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayakawa, Toru [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, 263-8522, Chiba (Japan); Shraim, Amjad [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2003-06-01

    Intake of inorganic arsenic is known to cause vascular diseases as well as skin lesions and cancer in humans. We investigated the differences in cytotoxicity, uptake rate of arsenic, and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes between arsenite (As{sup 3+})- and arsenate (As{sup 5+})-exposed rat heart microvessel endothelial cells. As{sup 3+} was more cytotoxic than As{sup 5+}, and LC{sub 50} values were calculated to be 36 and 220 {mu}M, respectively. As{sup 3+} (1-25 {mu}M) increased mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), thioredoxin peroxidase 2, NADPH dehydrogenase, and glutathione S-transferase P subunit. HO-1 mRNA levels showed the most remarkable increase in response to As{sup 3+}. cDNA microarray analysis indicated that there was no prominent difference in arsenic-induced transcriptional changes between As{sup 3+}- and As{sup 5+}-exposed cells, when the cells were exposed to one-fourth the LC{sub 50} concentration of arsenic (9 and 55 {mu}M for As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+}, respectively). N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) reduced both the cytotoxicity of inorganic arsenic and the HO-1 mRNA level, and buthionine sulfoximine enhanced cytotoxicity of inorganic arsenic. As{sup 3+} was taken up by the endothelial cells 6-7 times faster than As{sup 5+}, and the presence of NAC in the culture medium did not change the uptake rate of As{sup 3+}.These results suggest that the effects of NAC on arsenic-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were due to the antioxidative role of non-protein thiols and not to chelation of arsenic in the culture medium. The difference in cellular uptake of arsenic between As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} appeared not to be due to the ionic charge on arsenic (at physiological pH, trivalent arsenic is neutral whereas pentavalent arsenic is negatively charged). These results suggest that the higher toxicity of As{sup 3+} compared with that of As{sup 5+} is probably due to the faster uptake of As{sup 3+} by endothelial cells

  3. Effects of plant arsenic uptake and heavy metals on arsenic distribution in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayiga, Abioye O. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States) and Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)]. E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu; Zhou Qixing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the effects of heavy metals and plant arsenic uptake on soil arsenic distribution. Chemical fractionation of an arsenic-contaminated soil spiked with 50 or 200 mg kg{sup -1} Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb was performed before and after growing the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L for 8 weeks using NH{sub 4}Cl (water-soluble plus exchangeable, WE-As), NH{sub 4}F (Al-As), NaOH (Fe-As), and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Ca-As). Arsenic in the soil was present primarily as the recalcitrant forms with Ca-As being the dominant fraction (45%). Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions though Ca-As contributed the most (51-71% reduction). After 8 weeks of plant growth, the Al-As and Fe-As fractions were significantly (p < 0.01) greater in the metal-spiked soils than the control, with changes in the WE-As fraction being significantly (p = 0.007) correlated with plant arsenic removal. The plant's ability to solubilize soil arsenic from recalcitrant fractions may have enhanced its ability to hyperaccumulate arsenic. - Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions with most from the Ca-fraction.

  4. Control of the Type 3 Secretion System in Vibrio harveyi by Quorum Sensing through Repression of ExsA ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Christopher M.; Wu, Julie T.; Ramsey, Meghan E.; Harris, Rebecca C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) genes of Vibrio harveyi are activated at low cell density and repressed at high cell density by quorum sensing (QS). Repression requires LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS-controlled genes. Here, we determine the mechanism underlying the LuxR repression of the T3SS system. Using a fluorescence-based cell sorting approach, we isolated V. harveyi mutants that are unable to express T3SS genes at low cell density and identified two mutations in the V. harveyi exsBA operon. While LuxR directly represses the expression of exsBA, complementation and epistasis analyses reveal that it is the repression of exsA expression, but not exsB expression, that is responsible for the QS-mediated repression of T3SS genes at high cell density. The present work further defines the genes in the V. harveyi QS regulon and elucidates a mechanism demonstrating how multiple regulators can be linked in series to direct the expression of QS target genes specifically at low or high cell density. PMID:20543047

  5. Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz; Paszek, Pawel; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Brasier, Allan R; Kimmel, Marek

    2006-01-21

    Due to the small number of copies of molecular species involved, such as DNA, mRNA and regulatory proteins, gene expression is a stochastic phenomenon. In eukaryotic cells, the stochastic effects primarily originate in regulation of gene activity. Transcription can be initiated by a single transcription factor binding to a specific regulatory site in the target gene. Stochasticity of transcription factor binding and dissociation is then amplified by transcription and translation, since target gene activation results in a burst of mRNA molecules, and each mRNA copy serves as a template for translating numerous protein molecules. In the present paper, we explore a mathematical approach to stochastic modeling. In this approach, the ordinary differential equations with a stochastic component for mRNA and protein levels in a single cells yield a system of first-order partial differential equations (PDEs) for two-dimensional probability density functions (pdf). We consider the following examples: Regulation of a single auto-repressing gene, and regulation of a system of two mutual repressors and of an activator-repressor system. The resulting PDEs are approximated by a system of many ordinary equations, which are then numerically solved. PMID:16039671

  6. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  7. Plant callus: mechanisms of induction and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Momoko; Sugimoto, Keiko; Iwase, Akira

    2013-09-01

    Plants develop unorganized cell masses like callus and tumors in response to various biotic and abiotic stimuli. Since the historical discovery that the combination of two growth-promoting hormones, auxin and cytokinin, induces callus from plant explants in vitro, this experimental system has been used extensively in both basic research and horticultural applications. The molecular basis of callus formation has long been obscure, but we are finally beginning to understand how unscheduled cell proliferation is suppressed during normal plant development and how genetic and environmental cues override these repressions to induce callus formation. In this review, we will first provide a brief overview of callus development in nature and in vitro and then describe our current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying callus formation. PMID:24076977

  8. EZH2 regulates neuroepithelium structure and neuroblast proliferation by repressing p21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizu, Naiara; García, María Alejandra; Estarás, Conchi; Fueyo, Raquel; Badosa, Carmen; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The function of EZH2 as a transcription repressor is well characterized. However, its role during vertebrate development is still poorly understood, particularly in neurogenesis. Here, we uncover the role of EZH2 in controlling the integrity of the neural tube and allowing proper progenitor proliferation. We demonstrate that knocking down the EZH2 in chick embryo neural tubes unexpectedly disrupts the neuroepithelium (NE) structure, correlating with alteration of the Rho pathway, and reduces neural progenitor proliferation. Moreover, we use transcriptional profiling and functional assays to show that EZH2-mediated repression of p21WAF1/CIP1 contributes to both processes. Accordingly, overexpression of cytoplasmic p21WAF1/CIP1 induces NE structural alterations and p21WAF1/CIP1 suppression rescues proliferation defects and partially compensates for the structural alterations and the Rho activity. Overall, our findings describe a new role of EZH2 in controlling the NE integrity in the neural tube to allow proper progenitor proliferation.

  9. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors. PMID:27302525

  10. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsheng Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to arsenic (As poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions, who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the south of Shaanxi Province (China, were reported. The urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic (iAs [arsenite (iAsIII and arsenate (iAsV], monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. The relative distributions of arsenic species, the primary methylation index (PMI = MMAV/iAs and the secondary methylation index (SMI = DMAV/MMAV were calculated to assess the metabolism of arsenic. Subjects with skin lesions had a higher concentration of urinary arsenic and a lower arsenic methylation capability than subjects without skin lesions. Women had a significantly higher methylation capability of arsenic than men, as defined by a higher percent DMAV and SMI in urine among women, which was the one possible interpretation of women with a higher concentration of urinary arsenic but lower susceptibility to skin lesions. The findings suggested that not only the dose of arsenic exposure but also the arsenic methylation capability have an impact on the individual susceptibility to skin lesions induced by coal arsenic exposure.

  11. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions

  12. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  13. Bimetallic nanoparticles for arsenic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Mohapatra, Mamata; Leung, Kam Tong

    2015-06-01

    Effective and sensitive monitoring of heavy metal ions, particularly arsenic, in drinking water is very important to risk management of public health. Arsenic is one of the most serious natural pollutants in soil and water in more than 70 countries in the world. The need for very sensitive sensors to detect ultralow amounts of arsenic has attracted great research interest. Here, bimetallic FePt, FeAu, FePd, and AuPt nanoparticles (NPs) are electrochemically deposited on the Si(100) substrate, and their electrochemical properties are studied for As(III) detection. We show that trace amounts of As(III) in neutral pH could be determined by using anodic stripping voltammetry. The synergistic effect of alloying with Fe leads to better performance for Fe-noble metal NPs (Au, Pt, and Pd) than pristine noble metal NPs (without Fe alloying). Limit of detection and linear range are obtained for FePt, FeAu, and FePd NPs. The best performance is found for FePt NPs with a limit of detection of 0.8 ppb and a sensitivity of 0.42 μA ppb(-1). The selectivity of the sensor has also been tested in the presence of a large amount of Cu(II), as the most detrimental interferer ion for As detection. The bimetallic NPs therefore promise to be an effective, high-performance electrochemical sensor for the detection of ultratrace quantities of arsenic. PMID:25938763

  14. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  15. A Maternal System Initiating the Zygotic Developmental Program through Combinatorial Repression in the Ascidian Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Kubo, Atsushi; Kari, Willi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Rothbächer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Maternal factors initiate the zygotic developmental program in animal embryos. In embryos of the chordate, Ciona intestinalis, three maternal factors—Gata.a, β-catenin, and Zic-r.a—are required to establish three domains of gene expression at the 16-cell stage; the animal hemisphere, vegetal hemisphere, and posterior vegetal domains. Here, we show how the maternal factors establish these domains. First, only β-catenin and its effector transcription factor, Tcf7, are required to establish the vegetal hemisphere domain. Second, genes specifically expressed in the posterior vegetal domain have additional repressive cis-elements that antagonize the activity of β-catenin/Tcf7. This antagonizing activity is suppressed by Zic-r.a, which is specifically localized in the posterior vegetal domain and binds to DNA indirectly through the interaction with Tcf7. Third, Gata.a directs specific gene expression in the animal hemisphere domain, because β-catenin/Tcf7 weakens the Gata.a-binding activity for target sites through a physical interaction in the vegetal cells. Thus, repressive regulation through protein-protein interactions among the maternal transcription factors is essential to establish the first distinct domains of gene expression in the chordate embryo. PMID:27152625

  16. YB1 binds to and represses the p16 tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Ozawa, Yuichi; Harada, Masanori; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kenji; Suda, Takafumi; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Y box binding protein 1 (YB1) has multiple functions associated with drug resistance, cell proliferation and metastasis through transcriptional and translational regulation. Increased expression of YB1 is closely related to tumor growth and aggressiveness. We showed that YB1 protein levels were decreased through replicative and premature senescence and were correlated with increased expression levels of p16(INK) (4A) tumor suppressor gene. Depletion of YB1 was associated with increased levels of p16 in human and murine primary cells. Forced expression of YB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in decreased expression of p16 and increased cell proliferation. Senescence-associated expression of β-galactosidase was repressed in YB1-over-expressing cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that YB1 directly associates with the p16 promoter. Taken together, all our findings indicate that YB1 directly binds to and represses p16 transcription, subsequently resulting in the promotion of cell growth and prevention of cellular senescence. PMID:24165022

  17. Determination of arsenic compounds in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiszinger, A.; Goessler, W.; Kuehnelt, D.; Kosmus, W. [Karl-Franzens-Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. for Analytical Chemistry; Francesconi, K. [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biology

    1998-08-01

    Earthworms and soil collected from six sites in Styria, Austria, were investigated for total arsenic concentrations by ICP-MS and for arsenic compounds by HPLC-ICP-MS. Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 17.9 mg/kg dry weight in the worms and from 5.0 to 79.7 mg/kg dry weight in the soil samples. There was no strict correlation between the total arsenic concentrations in the worms and soil. Arsenic compounds were extracted from soil and a freeze-dried earthworm sample with a methanol/water mixture (9:1, v/v). The extracts were evaporated to dryness, redissolved in water, and chromatographed on an anion- and a cation-exchange column. Arsenic compounds were identified by comparison of the retention times with known standards. Only traces of arsenic acid could be extracted from the soil with the methanol/water (9:1, v/v) mixture. The major arsenic compounds detected in the extracts of the earthworms were arsenous acid and arsenic acid. Arsenobetaine was present as a minor constituent, and traces of dimethylarsinic acid were also detected. Two dimethylarsinoyltribosides were also identified in the extracts by co-chromatography with standard compounds. This is the first report of the presence of dimethylarsinoylribosides in a terrestrial organism. Two other minor arsenic species were present in the extract, but their retention times did not match with the retention times of the available standards.

  18. Variability in human metabolism of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimating the nature and extent of human cancer risks due to arsenic (As) in drinking water is currently of great concern, since millions of persons worldwide are exposed to arsenic, primarily through natural enrichment of drinking water drawn from deep wells. Humans metabolize and eliminate As through oxidative methylation and subsequent urinary excretion. While there is debate as to the role of methylation in activation/detoxification, variations in arsenic metabolism may affect individual risks of toxicity and carcinogenesis. Using data from three populations, from Mexico, China, and Chile, we have analyzed the distribution in urine of total arsenic and arsenic species (inorganic arsenic (InAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), and dimethyl arsenic (DMA). Data were analyzed in terms of the concentration of each species and by evaluating MMA:DMA and (MMA+DMA):InAs ratios. In all persons most urinary As was present as DMA. Male:female differences were discernible in both high- and low-exposure groups from all three populations, but the gender differences varied by populations. The data also indicated bimodal distributions in the ratios of DMA to InAs and to MMA. While the gene or genes responsible for arsenic methylation are still unknown, the results of our studies among the ethnic groups in this study are consistent with the presence of functional genetic polymorphisms in arsenic methylation leading to measurable differences in toxicity. This analysis highlights the need for continuing research on the health effects of As in humans using molecular epidemiologic methods

  19. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of

  20. The Transcription Repressor REST in Adult Neurons: Physiology, Pathology, and Diseases 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Baldelli, Pietro; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract REST [RE1-silencing transcription factor (also called neuron-restrictive silencer factor)] is known to repress thousands of possible target genes, many of which are neuron specific. To date, REST repression has been investigated mostly in stem cells and differentiating neurons. Current evidence demonstrates its importance in adult neurons as well. Low levels of REST, which are acquired during differentiation, govern the expression of specific neuronal phenotypes. REST-dependent genes...

  1. CRISPR-Mediated Modular RNA-Guided Regulation of Transcription in Eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Luke A.; Larson, Matthew H.; Morsut, Leonardo; Liu, Zairan; Brar, Gloria A.; Torres, Sandra E.; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Brandman, Onn; Whitehead, Evan H.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Lim, Wendell A.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Qi, Lei S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic interrogation and reprogramming of cells requires methods for robust and precise targeting of genes for expression or repression. The CRISPR-associated catalytically inactive dCas9 protein offers a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting. Here we show that fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in human and yeast cells with the site of delivey determined solely by a co-expre...

  2. Breast-feeding Protects against Arsenic Exposure in Bangladeshi Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Fängström, Britta; Moore, Sophie; Nermell, Barbro; Kuenstl, Linda; Goessler, Walter; Grandér, Margaretha; Kabir, Iqbal; Palm, Brita; Arifeen, Shams El; Vahter, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure causes a wide range of health effects, but little is known about critical windows of exposure. Arsenic readily crosses the placenta, but the few available data on postnatal exposure to arsenic via breast milk are not conclusive. Aim Our goal was to assess the arsenic exposure through breast milk in Bangladeshi infants, living in an area with high prevalence of arsenic-rich tube-well water. Methods We analyzed metabolites of inorganic arsenic in breast milk ...

  3. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (p< 0.000001)...

  4. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; ISLAM, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from baseline to follow-up 4 to 6 months after the household received the intervention. This was assessed through a pre- and postintervention quiz concerning kn...

  5. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Effect of water hyacinth root extract on arsenic level in different organs of arsenic-treated rat

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen Lipika Quayum

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the administration of the ethanol extract of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) ameliorates arsenic from arsenic-treated rats. To induce arsenic accumulation in different organs, arsenic trioxide was administered orally by gavage at a dose of 500 µg/rat/day for 7 days. In search of an effective therapeutic agent to counteract arsenic accumulation and arsenic-induced oxidative stress, different concentrations of ethanol extract of root of water hyacint...

  7. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, Hermann M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwate...

  8. Dissolved Air Flotation of arsenic adsorbent particles

    OpenAIRE

    Santander, M.; Valderrama, L.

    2015-01-01

    The removal of arsenic from synthetic effluent was studied using the adsorbent particle flotation technique (APF) and dissolved air flotation (DAF). A sample of an iron mineral was used as adsorbent particles of arsenic, ferric chloride as coagulant, cationic polyacrylamide (NALCO 9808) as flocculants, and sodium oleate as collector. Adsorption studies to determine the pH influence, contact time, and adsorbent particles concentration on the adsorption of arsenic were carried out along with fl...

  9. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic a...

  10. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the ′denial of death′ while ′embracing one′s symbolic immortality′ would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its ...

  11. Epigenetic distortion to VDR transcriptional regulation in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Prashant K.; Doig, Craig L.; Dhiman, Vineet K; Turner, Bryan M.; Smiraglia, Dominic J; Campbell, Moray J.

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the gene specific mechanisms by which the actions of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) are distorted in prostate cancer. Transcriptional responses toward the VDR ligand, 1α,25(OH)2D3, were examined in non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and compared to the 1α,25(OH)2D3-recalcitrant prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Time resolved transcriptional studies for two VDR target genes revealed selective attenuation and repression of VDR transcriptional responses...

  12. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  13. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Melisa W; Boyer, Edward W; Kleinman, Monica E; Rodig, Nancy M; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2005-07-01

    We report a case series of acute arsenic poisoning of 2 siblings, a 4-month-old male infant and his 2-year-old sister. Each child ingested solubilized inorganic arsenic from an outdated pesticide that was misidentified as spring water. The 4-month-old child ingested a dose of arsenic that was lethal despite extraordinary attempts at arsenic removal, including chelation therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, exchange transfusion, and hemodialysis. The 2-year-old fared well with conventional therapy. PMID:15995066

  14. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples

  15. Arsenic in the soils of Zimapan, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic concentrations of 73 soil samples collected in the semi-arid Zimapan Valley range from 4 to 14 700 mg As kg-1. Soil arsenic concentrations decrease with distance from mines and tailings and slag heaps and exceed 400 mg kg-1 only within 500 m of these arsenic sources. Soil arsenic concentrations correlate positively with Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, suggesting a strong association with ore minerals known to exist in the region. Some As was associated with Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides, this association is less for contaminated than for uncontaminated samples. Very little As was found in the mobile water-soluble or exchangeable fractions. The soils are not arsenic contaminated at depths greater than 100 cm below the surface. Although much of the arsenic in the soils is associated with relatively immobile solid phases, this represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. -- Much of the arsenic is relatively immobile but presents long-term source of arsenic

  16. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  17. Repressed BMP signaling reactivates NKL homeobox gene MSX1 in a T-ALL subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-02-01

    In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), several members of the NK-like (NKL) homeobox genes are aberrantly expressed. Here, we have analyzed the activity of NKL homeobox gene MSX1 using pediatric T-ALL in silico data, detecting overexpression in 11% of patients. Quantification of MSX1 transcripts in a panel of 24 T-ALL cell lines demonstrated overexpression in two examples. Comparative expression profiling indicated inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which was shown to inhibit MSX1 transcription. In the LOUCY cell line we identified conspicuous expression of CHRDL1 encoding a BMP inhibitor which mediated activation of MSX1. Promoter analyses demonstrated activation of CHRDL1 by oncogenic PITX1. Furthermore, knockdown and overexpression studies of hematopoietic transcription factors demonstrated that GATA2 and FOXC1 mediate activation and GATA3, LEF1, TAL1 and TOX repression of MSX1 transcription. Collectively, our findings suggest that MSX1 is physiologically restricted to lymphoid progenitors. The identification of deregulated BMP signaling may provide novel therapeutic options for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:24844359

  18. Nrf2 activation ameliorates cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells through increased glutathione levels and arsenic efflux from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shoichi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Koike, Shin; Yuan, Bo; Takagi, Norio; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2016-08-15

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis, has been shown to activate nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in cytoprotective responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Recently, the Nrf2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) pathway has been associated with cancer drug resistance attributable to modulation of the expression and activation of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. However, the exact mechanisms by which Nrf2 activation results in chemoresistance are insufficiently understood to date. This study investigated the mechanisms by which the cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO), an anticancer drug, were decreased in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells treated with CA, a typical activator of Nrf2 used to stimulate the Nrf2/Keap1 system. Our findings suggest that arsenic is non-enzymatically incorporated into NB4 cells and forms complexes that are dependent on intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations. In addition, the arsenic complexes are recognized as substrates by multidrug resistance proteins and subsequently excreted from the cells. Therefore, Nrf2-associated activation of the GSH biosynthetic pathway, followed by increased levels of intracellular GSH, are key mechanisms underlying accelerated arsenic efflux and attenuation of the cytotoxic effects of ATO. PMID:27317373

  19. Signaling by Tyrosine Kinases Negatively Regulates the Interaction between Transcription Factors and SMRT (Silencing Mediator of Retinoic Acid and Thyroid Hormone Receptor) Corepressor

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Suk-Hyun; Wong, Chi-Wai; Privalsky, Martin L.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors that bind to specific sites on DNA and modulate the expression of adjacent target genes. Many nuclear hormone receptors display bimodal transcriptional properties; thyroid hormone receptors, for example, typically repress target gene expression in the absence of hormone, but activate target gene expression in the presence of hormone. The ability to repress is closely linked to the ability of the apo-receptor to physically b...

  20. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  1. Expression of the MOZ-TIF2 oncoprotein in mice represses senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largeot, Anne; Perez-Campo, Flor Maria; Marinopoulou, Elli; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The MOZ-TIF2 translocation, which fuses monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with the nuclear co-activator TIF2, is associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemia. We recently found that in the absence of MOZ HAT activity, p16(INK4a) transcriptional levels are significantly increased, triggering an early entrance into replicative senescence. Because oncogenic fusion proteins must bypass cellular safeguard mechanisms, such as senescence and apoptosis, to induce leukemia, we hypothesized that this repressive activity of MOZ over p16(INK4a) transcription could be preserved, or even reinforced, in MOZ leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as MOZ-TIF2. We describe here that, indeed, MOZ-TIF2 silences expression of the CDKN2A locus (p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF)), inhibits the triggering of senescence and enhances proliferation, providing conditions favorable to the development of leukemia. Furthermore, we describe that abolishing the MOZ HAT activity of the fusion protein leads to a significant increase in expression of the CDKN2A locus and the number of hematopoietic progenitors undergoing senescence. Finally, we report that inhibition of senescence by MOZ-TIF2 is associated with increased apoptosis, suggesting a role for the fusion protein in p53 apoptosis-versus-senescence balance. Our results underscore the importance of the HAT activity of MOZ, preserved in the fusion protein, for repression of the CDKN2A locus transcription and the subsequent block of senescence, a necessary step for the survival of leukemic cells. PMID:26854485

  2. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in minimal amino acids medium, and in minimal glucose medium. Some of the mutations, called dcs (dciA control site), were cloned and shown by sequence analysis to cluster near the start site of dciA transcription. Primer extension and in vitro transcription analysis revealed that the dcs mutations did not create a new promoter. These mutations may therefore disrupt an operator site necessary for the binding of a negative regulator responsive to the nutritional state of the cell. The dcs mutant promoters were still subject to AbrB control, suggesting that the dciA operon is regulated by at least two proteins, AbrB and a nutritionally responsive regulator. The gene(s) for the putative nutritional regulator may be defined by the cod (control of dciA) mutations, which appeared to relieve amino acid and glucose repression of dciA by altering a diffusible factor. An abrB cod double mutant exhibited high-level expression of dciA during exponential growth phase. PMID:8335620

  3. Infrared spectrum of arsenic pentafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a literature review about arsenic fluorides, we give several methods of obtaining very pure AsF5 in order to ascertain the right spectrum of this compound. Our spectra fit well with Akers's observations, and we note that AsF5 structure can be explained in terms of C3v molecular symmetry, with the As-F bond stretching lying at 786 cm-1 and 811 cm-1. (author)

  4. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  5. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Flora Aparecida [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Cvoro, Aleksandra [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Amato, Angelica A. [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan [Laboratório de Planejamento e Síntese de Fármacos – LPSF, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Webb, Paul, E-mail: pwebb@HoustonMethodist.org [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  6. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation

  7. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  8. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  9. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  10. Interactions between arsenic species and marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The arsenic concentration and speciation of marine algae varies widely, from 0.4 to 23 ng.mg/sup -1/, with significant differences in both total arsenic content and arsenic speciation occurring between algal classes. The Phaeophyceae contain more arsenic than other algal classes, and a greater proportion of the arsenic is organic. The concentration of inorganic arsenic is fairly constant in macro-algae, and may indicate a maximum level, with the excess being reduced and methylated. Phytoplankton take up As(V) readily, and incorporate a small percentage of it into the cell. The majority of the As(V) is reduced, methylated, and released to the surrounding media. The arsenic speciation in phytoplankton and Valonia also changes when As(V) is added to cultures. Arsenate and phosphate compete for uptake by algal cells. Arsenate inhibits primary production at concentrations as low as 5 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/ when the phosphate concentration is low. The inhibition is competitive. A phosphate enrichment of > 0.3 ..mu..M alleviates this inhibition; however, the As(V) stress causes an increase in the cell's phosphorus requirement. Arsenite is also toxic to phytoplankton at similar concentrations. Methylated arsenic species did not affect cell productivity, even at concentrations of 25 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/. Thus, the methylation of As(V) by the cell produces a stable, non-reactive compound which is nontoxic. The uptake and subsequent reduction and methylation of As(V) is a significant factor in determining the arsenic biogeochemistry of productive systems, and also the effect that the arsenic may have on algal productivity. Therefore, the role of marine algae in determining the arsenic speciation of marine systems cannot be ignored. (ERB)

  11. Impaired arsenic metabolism in children during weaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) via one-carbon metabolism is a susceptibility factor for a range of arsenic-related health effects, but there is no data on the importance of arsenic metabolism for effects on child development. Aim: To elucidate the development of arsenic metabolism in early childhood. Methods: We measured iAs, methylarsonic acid (MA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), the metabolites of iAs, in spot urine samples of 2400 children at 18 months of age. The children were born to women participating in a population-based longitudinal study of arsenic effects on pregnancy outcomes and child development, carried out in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh with a wide range of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. Arsenic metabolism was evaluated in relation to age, sex, anthropometry, socio-economic status and arsenic exposure. Results: Arsenic concentrations in child urine (median 34 μg/L, range 2.4-940 μg/L), adjusted to average specific gravity of 1.009 g/mL, were considerably higher than that measured at 3 months of age, but lower than that in maternal urine. Child urine contained on average 12% iAs, 9.4% MA and 78% DMA, which implies a marked change in metabolite pattern since infancy. In particular, there was a marked increase in urinary %MA, which has been associated with increased risk of health effects. Conclusion: The arsenic metabolite pattern in urine of children at 18 months of age in rural Bangladesh indicates a marked decrease in arsenic methylation efficiency during weaning.

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL AND ECOLOGICALLY SAFE CONTAINMENT OF ARSENIC-WASTE: A SUSTAINABLE SOLUTION FOR ARSENIC CRISIS IN CAMBODIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    An appalling degree of arsenic contamination in groundwater has affected more than a million people in wide region of Mekong delta flood plain in Cambodia. Arsenic is by far the most toxic species of all naturally occurring groundwater contaminants and disposal of removed arse...

  13. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  14. Legitimation, Kooptation und Repression im NS-Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Bialas, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    "This essay deals with the interplay between cooptation, legitimation, and repression with a special emphasis on the Nazi attitude and the behavior towards politically indifferent Germans. It analyzes the ideological framework of justification for the repressive Nazi politics that were also used to recruit followers who had a clean conscience and felt they were doing the right thing. Nazi ideology rejected the bourgeois - Christian concepts of universal human rights and dignity as anachronist...

  15. Relaxation of glycine receptor and onconeural gene transcription control in NRSF deficient small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.B.; Seitz, R.; Gorzella, A.; Heister, A.J.; Doeberitz, M.K.; Becker, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Negative regulation of many neuronal genes is mediated by the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/repressor element-1 binding transcription factor, REST), which binds to the neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE/repressor element-1, RE-1) and thereby represses transcription of neuronal gene

  16. Bioaccumulation of Arsenic by Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola O. Adeyemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Arsenic is a known toxic element and its presence and toxicity in nature is a worldwide environmental problem. The use of microorganisms in bioremediation is a potential method to reduce as concentration in contaminated areas. Approach: In order to explore the possible bioremediation of this element, three filamentous fungi-Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor were investigated for their potential abilities to accumulate (and possibly solubilize arsenic from an agar environment consisting of non buffered mineral salts media amended with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% (w/v arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Growth rates, dry weights, arsenic accumulation and oxalate production by the fungi as well as the pH of the growth media were all assessed during this study. Results: There was no visible solubilization of FeAsS particles underneath any of the growing fungal colonies or elsewhere in the respective agar plates. No specific patterns of growth changes were observed from the growth ratios of the fungi on agar amended with different amounts of FeAsS although growth of all fungi was stimulated by the incorporation of varying amounts of FeAsS into the agar with the exception of A. niger on 0.4% (w/v amended agar and T. versicolor on 0.8% (w/v amended agar. The amounts of dry weights obtained for all three fungi also did not follow any specific patterns with different amounts of FeAsS and the quantities obtained were in the order A. niger > S. himantioides > T. versicolor. All fungi accumulated as in their biomasses with all amounts of FeAsS although to varying levels and T. versicolor was the most effective with all amounts of FeAsS while A. niger was the least effective. Conclusion: The accumulation of arsenic in the biomasses of the test fungi as shown in this study may suggested a role for fungi through their bioaccumulating capabilities as agents in the possible bioremediation of arsenic contaminated environments.

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  19. The Chemistry and Metabolism of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. IntrodctionA century of study of the process by which many organisms convert inorganic arsenic into an array of methylated metabolites has answered many questions and has posed some new ones. The capacity of microorganisms to. form volatile arsenic compounds was first recogniz...

  20. ARSENIC EFFECTS ON TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic effects on telomere and telomerase activity. T-C. Zhang, M. T. Schmitt, J. Mo, J. L. Mumford, National Research Council and U.S Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711Arsenic is a known carcinogen and also an anticancer agent for acut...

  1. Arsenic and human health effects: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Khaja Shameem Mohammed; Jayasinghe, Sudheera Sammanthi; Chandana, Ediriweera P S; Jayasumana, Channa; De Silva, P Mangala C S

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is ubiquitous in nature and humans being exposed to arsenic via atmospheric air, ground water and food sources are certain. Major sources of arsenic contamination could be either through geological or via anthropogenic activities. In physiological individuals, organ system is described as group of organs that transact collectively and associate with other systems for conventional body functions. Arsenic has been associated with persuading a variety of complications in body organ systems: integumentary, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, immune, endocrine, hepatic, renal, reproductive system and development. In this review, we outline the effects of arsenic on the human body with a main focus on assorted organ systems with respective disease conditions. Additionally, underlying mechanisms of disease development in each organ system due to arsenic have also been explored. Strikingly, arsenic has been able to induce epigenetic changes (in utero) and genetic mutations (a leading cause of cancer) in the body. Occurrence of various arsenic induced health effects involving emerging areas such as epigenetics and cancer along with their respective mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26476885

  2. Arsenic Consumption in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Denise

    2015-10-01

    Exposure limits for arsenic in drinking water and minimal risk levels (MRLs) for total dietary exposure to arsenic have long been established in the U.S. Multiple studies conducted over the last five years have detected arsenic in foods and beverages including juice, rice, milk, broth (beef and chicken), and others. Understanding whether or not each of these foods or drinks is a concern to certain groups of individuals requires examining which types of and how much arsenic is ingested. In this article, recent studies are reviewed and placed in the context of consumption patterns. When single sources of food or drink are considered in isolation, heavy rice eaters can be exposed to the most arsenic among adults while infants consuming formula containing contaminated organic brown rice syrup are the most exposed group among children. Most food and drink do not contain sufficient arsenic to exceed MRLs. For individuals consuming more than one source of contaminated water or food, however, adverse health effects are more likely. In total, recent studies on arsenic contamination in food and beverages emphasize the need for individual consumers to understand and manage their total dietary exposure to arsenic. PMID:26591332

  3. The interplay of StyR and IHF regulates substrate-dependent induction and carbon catabolite repression of styrene catabolism genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Livia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, the promoter of the styrene catabolic operon, PstyA, is induced by styrene and is subject to catabolite repression. PstyA regulation relies on the StyS/StyR two-component system and on the IHF global regulator. The phosphorylated response regulator StyR (StyR-P activates PstyA in inducing conditions when it binds to the high-affinity site STY2, located about -40 bp from the transcription start point. A cis-acting element upstream of STY2, named URE, contains a low-affinity StyR-P binding site (STY1, overlapping the IHF binding site. Deletion of the URE led to a decrease of promoter activity in inducing conditions and to a partial release of catabolite repression. This study was undertaken to assess the relative role played by IHF and StyR-P on the URE, and to clarify if PstyA catabolite repression could rely on the interplay of these regulators. Results StyR-P and IHF compete for binding to the URE region. PstyA full activity in inducing conditions is achieved when StyR-P and IHF bind to site STY2 and to the URE, respectively. Under catabolite repression conditions, StyR-P binds the STY1 site, replacing IHF at the URE region. StyR-P bound to both STY1 and STY2 sites oligomerizes, likely promoting the formation of a DNA loop that closes the promoter in a repressed conformation. We found that StyR and IHF protein levels did not change in catabolite repression conditions, implying that PstyA repression is achieved through an increase in the StyR-P/StyR ratio. Conclusion We propose a model according to which the activity of the PstyA promoter is determined by conformational changes. An open conformation is operative in inducing conditions when StyR-P is bound to STY2 site and IHF to the URE. Under catabolite repression conditions StyR-P cellular levels would increase, displacing IHF from the URE and closing the promoter in a repressed conformation. The balance between the open and the closed

  4. Inflammatory stimuli promote growth and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through NF-κB pathway dependent repression of PP2Ac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Min; Liu, Lu; Shen, Meng; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gong, Fei-Ran; Zhou, Binhua P; Wu, Yadi; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Kai; Shen, Bairong; Wu, Meng-Yao; Shou, Liu-Mei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that inflammatory stimulation represses protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a well-known tumor suppressor. However, whether PP2A repression participates in pancreatic cancer progression has not been verified. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM) to establish in vitro inflammation models, and investigated whether inflammatory stimuli affect pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac)-dependently. Via nude mouse models of orthotopic tumor xenografts and dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-induced chronic pancreatitis, we evaluated the effect of an inflammatory microenvironment on PP2Ac expression in vivo. We cloned the PP2Acα and PP2Acβ isoform promoters to investigate the PP2Ac transcriptional regulation mechanisms. MCM accelerated pancreatic cancer cell growth; MCM and LPS promoted cell invasion. DBTC promoted xenograft growth and metastasis, induced tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, promoted angiogenesis, activated the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and repressed PP2Ac expression. In vitro, LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac mRNA and protein. PP2Acα overexpression attenuated JNK, ERK, PKC, and IKK phosphorylation, and impaired LPS/MCM-stimulated cell invasion and MCM-promoted cell growth. LPS and MCM activated the NF-κB pathway in vitro. LPS and MCM induced IKK and IκB phosphorylation, leading to p65/RelA nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation. Overexpression of the dominant negative forms of IKKα attenuated LPS and MCM downregulation of PP2Ac, suggesting inflammatory stimuli repress PP2Ac expression NF-κB pathway-dependently. Luciferase reporter gene assay verified that LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac transcription through an NF-κB-dependent pathway. Our study presents a new mechanism in inflammation-driven cancer progression through NF-κB pathway-dependent PP2Ac repression. PMID:26761431

  5. Arsenic Uptake by Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) Plants from Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; Martin, Kirt; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic element that occurs naturally in the environment. High levels of arsenic are found in water in some parts of the world, including Texas. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of arsenic in muskmelon (Cucumis melo) plants accumulated from arsenic spiked water and to observe effects on plant biomass. Plants were grown and irrigated using water spiked with variable concentrations of arsenic. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify arsenic in different parts of the plant and fruit. Under all conditions tested in this study, the highest concentrations of arsenic were found in the leaves, soil, and roots. Arsenic in the water had no significant effect on plant biomass. Fruits analyzed in this study had arsenic concentrations of 101 μg/kg or less. Consuming these fruits would result in less arsenic exposure than drinking water at recommended levels. PMID:27460822

  6. Methylation of inorganic arsenic by murine fetal tissue explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (∼7% of total arsenic/48 h incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  7. Transcriptional regulation by Polycomb group proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of transcription that have key roles in stem-cell identity, differentiation and disease. Mechanistically, they function within multiprotein complexes, called Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs), which modify histones (and other proteins) and...... silence target genes. The dynamics of PRC1 and PRC2 components has been the focus of recent research. Here we discuss our current knowledge of the PRC complexes, how they are targeted to chromatin and how the high diversity of the PcG proteins allows these complexes to influence cell identity....

  8. Elucidating the pathway for arsenic methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although biomethylation of arsenic has been studied for more than a century, unequivocal demonstration of the methylation of inorganic arsenic by humans occurred only about 30 years ago. Because methylation of inorganic arsenic activates it to more reactive and toxic forms, elucidating the pathway for the methylation of this metalloid is a topic of considerable importance. Understanding arsenic metabolism is of public health concern as millions of people chronically consume drinking water that contains high concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Hence, the focus of our research has been to elucidate the molecular basis of the steps in the pathway that leads from inorganic arsenic to methylated and dimethylated arsenicals. Here we describe a new S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase from rat liver cytosol that catalyzes the conversion of arsenite to methylated and dimethylated species. This 42-kDa protein has sequence motifs common to many non-nucleic acid methyltransferases and is closely related to methyltransferases of previously unknown function that have been identified by conceptual translations of cyt19 genes of mouse and human genomes. Hence, we designate rat liver arsenic methyltransferase as cyt19 and suggest that orthologous cyt19 genes encode an arsenic methyltransferase in the mouse and human genomes. Our studies with recombinant rat cyt19 find that, in the presence of an exogenous or a physiological reductant, this protein can catalyze the entire sequence of reactions that convert arsenite to methylated metabolites. A scheme linking cyt19 and thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase in the methylation and reduction of arsenicals is proposed

  9. Arsenic burden survey among refuse incinerator workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chung-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incinerator workers are not considered to have arsenic overexposure although they have the risk of overexposure to other heavy metals. Aim: To examine the relationship between arsenic burden and risk of occupational exposure in employees working at a municipal refuse incinerator by determining the concentrations of arsenic in the blood and urine. Settings and Design: The workers were divided into three groups based on their probability of contact with combustion-generated residues, namely Group 1: indirect contact, Group 2: direct contact and Group 3: no contact. Healthy age- and sex-matched residents living in the vicinity were enrolled as the control group. Materials and Methods: Heavy metal concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Downstream rivers and drinking water of the residents were examined for environmental arsenic pollution. A questionnaire survey concerning the contact history of arsenic was simultaneously conducted. Statistical analysis: Non-parametric tests, cross-tabulation and multinomial logistic regression. Results: This study recruited 122 incinerator workers. The urine and blood arsenic concentrations as well as incidences of overexposure were significantly higher in the workers than in control subjects. The workers who had indirect or no contact with combustion-generated residues had significantly higher blood arsenic level. Arsenic contact history could not explain the difference. Airborne and waterborne arsenic pollution were not detected. Conclusion: Incinerator workers run the risk of being exposed to arsenic pollution, especially those who have incomplete protection in the workplace even though they only have indirect or no contact with combustion-generated pollutants.

  10. Arsenic Geochemistry in Source Waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct

    OpenAIRE

    Hering, Janet G; Wilkie, Jennifer A; Chiu, Van Q

    1997-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely distributed constituent of geologic materials, with an average crustal abundance of 1.8 ppm. The natural processes of weathering of arsenic-containing minerals and volcanism contribute arsenic to groundwaters, surface freshwaters, and seawater. Recently, increased attention has focused on arsenic geochemistry in natural waters. This attention has been motivated by concern over the human health effects of arsenic exposure; consumption of drinking water can be a significant,...

  11. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Responsive miR-125a Represses Mesenchymal Morphology in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen D. Cowden Dahl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT that occurs during embryonic development is recapitulated during tumor metastasis. Important regulators of this process include growth factors, transcription factors, and adhesion molecules. New evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA activity contributes to metastatic progression and EMT; however, the mechanisms leading to altered miRNA expression during cancer progression remain poorly understood. Importantly, overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ovarian cancer correlates with poor disease outcome and induces EMT in ovarian cancer cells. We report that EGFR signaling leads to transcriptional repression of the miRNA miR-125a through the ETS family transcription factor PEA3. Overexpression of miR-125a induces conversion of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells from a mesenchymal to an epithelial morphology, suggesting miR-125a is a negative regulator of EMT. We identify AT-rich interactive domain 3B (ARID3B as a target of miR-125a and demonstrate that ARID3B is overexpressed in human ovarian cancer. Repression of miR-125a through growth factor signaling represents a novel mechanism for regulating ovarian cancer invasive behavior.

  12. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1 enhances p53 function and represses tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyran eShahbazi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1 is a stress-induced p53 target gene whose expression is modulated by transcription factors such as p53, p73 and E2F1. TP53INP1 gene encodes two isoforms of TP53INP1 proteins, TP53INP1α and TP53INP1β, both of which appear to be key elements in p53 function. When associated with homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2, TP53INP1 phosphorylates p53 protein at Serine 46, enhances p53 protein stability and its transcriptional activity, leading to transcriptional activation of p53 target genes such as p21, PIG-3 and MDM2, cell growth arrest and apoptosis upon DNA damage stress. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of TP53INP1 indicate that TP53INP1 has an important role in cellular homeostasis and DNA damage response. Deficiency in TP53INP1 expression results in increased tumorigenesis; while TP53INP1 expression is repressed during early stages of cancer by factors such as miR-155. This review aims to summarize the roles of TP53INP1 in blocking tumor progression through p53-dependant and p53-independent pathways, as well as the elements which repress TP53INP1 expression, hence highlighting its potential as a therapeutic target in cancer treatment.

  13. A review on environmental factors regulating arsenic methylation in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjects exposed to arsenic show significant inter-individual variation in urinary patterns of arsenic metabolites but insignificant day-to-day intra-individual variation. The inter-individual variation in arsenic methylation can be partly responsible for the variation in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Wide inter-ethnic variation and family correlation in urinary arsenic profile suggest a genetic effect on arsenic metabolism. In this paper the environmental factors affecting arsenic metabolism are reviewed. Methylation capacity might reduce with increasing dosage of arsenic exposure. Furthermore, women, especially at pregnancy, have better methylation capacity than their men counterparts, probably due to the effect of estrogen. Children might have better methylation capacity than adults and age shows inconsistent relevance in adults. Smoking and alcohol consumption might be associated with a poorer methylation capacity. Nutritional status is important in the methylation capacity and folate may facilitate the methylation and excretion of arsenic. Besides, general health conditions and medications might influence the arsenic methylation capacity; and technical problems can cause biased estimates. The consumption of seafood, seaweed, rice and other food with high arsenic contents and the extent of cooking and arsenic-containing water used in food preparation may also interfere with the presentation of the urinary arsenic profile. Future studies are necessary to clarify the effects of the various arsenic metabolites including the trivalent methylated forms on the development of arsenic-induced human diseases with the consideration of the effects of confounding factors and the interactions with other effect modifiers

  14. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel. La; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counteracted by PADI4, which augments the active H3K4me3 mark and thus increases IL6ST expression. In contrast, at the CTCF promoter PADI4 acts as a repressor. We propose that the influence of PADI4 on IL6ST transcription plays a role in the control of IL6ST expression during lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. These results open the possibility to pharmacologically influence Tal1 in leukaemia.

  15. AP-2α suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2α is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2α binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2α-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2α interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2α is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  16. A systems biology approach to study glucose repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Steen Lund; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Bro, Christoffer;

    2007-01-01

    repression of a wide range of genes involved to utilization of alternative carbon sources. In this work, we applied a systems biology approach to study the interaction between these two pathways. Through genome-wide transcription analysis of strains with disruption of HXK2, GRR1, MIG1, the combination of MIG......1 and MIG2, and the parentel strain, we identified 393 genes to have significantly changed expression levels. To identify co-regulation patterns in the different strains we applied principal component analysis. Disruption of either GRR1 or HXK2 were both found to have profound effects on...... reporter metabolites, and found that there is a high degree of consistency between the identified reporter metabolites and the physiological effects observed in the different mutants . Our systems biology approach points to close interaction between the two pathways, and our metabolism driven analysis of...

  17. Characterization of a novel radiation-inducible transcript, uscA, and analysis of its transcriptional regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcriptional expression of the uscA promote (PuscA) only occurred under aerobic conditions and a dose of 2Gy maximally activated transcription of PuscA. However, various environmental stress including physical shocks (pH, temperature, osmotic shock), DNA damaging agents (UV and MMC) or oxidative stressagents (paraquat, menadione, and H2O2) didn't cause the transcriptional activationof PuscA. The transcription of uscA was initiated at 170 bp upstream of the cyoA start codon, and ended around the ampG stop codon. The size of uscA was determined through reverse transcription assay, approximately 250 bp. The deletion analysis of uscA promoter demonstrates that radiation inducibility of PuscA is mediated by sequences present between -20 and +111 relativeto +1 of PuscA and radiation causes PuscA activation thorough permitting the expression that is repressed under non-irradiated conditions

  18. Natural arsenic contaminated diets perturb reproduction in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, David; Brix, Kevin V; Amlund, Heidi; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Hogstrand, Christer; Bury, Nic R

    2008-07-15

    The toxicological effect of natural diets elevated in metals on reproduction in fish is poorly understood. The reproductive output of zebrafish fed the polychaete Nereis diversicolor collected from a metal-impacted estuary, Restronguet Creek, Cornwall, UK, was compared to fish fed N. diversicolor collected from a nonmetal impacted estuary, Blackwater, Essex, UK. Fish fed the metal laden N. diversicolorfor 68 days showed reduced reproductive output, characterized by reduced cumulative egg production (47%), cumulative number of spawns (30%), as well as reduced average number of eggs produced per spawn and % hatch rate. The mRNA transcript levels of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin was also reduced 1.5 fold in the livers of female fish fed metal-laden N. diversicolor. No difference was seen between the lipid, protein, or moisture content of the two diets and no difference in growth was seen between the two fish populations. The Restronguet Creek polychaetes have elevated arsenic, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, and silver body burdens, but the only element found to accumulate in the tissues of zebrafish fed this diet was As. The As in these N. diversicolor was found to be predominantly potentially toxic inorganic As species, 58% of total As content, which is unusual for aquatic organisms where arsenic is typically biotransformed into less toxic organoarsenical compounds. These results demonstrate that reproduction in fish is a sensitive target of exposure to a natural diet contaminated with As and this exposure route could be of significance to the health of fish populations. PMID:18754393

  19. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Allison J; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Southall, Tony D; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-03-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] as the major targets of this repression. In addition, we find that the bHLH transcription factor Daughterless is essential to maintain ISC identity and that bHLH binding sites promote ISC-specific enhancer activity. We propose that Daughterless-dependent bHLH activity is important for the ISC fate and that E(spl)-C factors inhibit this activity to promote differentiation. PMID:20147375

  20. A broad view of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F T

    2007-01-01

    In the mind of the general public, the words "arsenic" and "poison" have become almost synonymous. Yet, As is a natural metallic element found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment, including foods. Mining and smelting activities are closely associated with As, and the largest occurrence of As contamination in the United States is near the gold mines of northern Nevada. Inhabitants of Bangladesh and surrounding areas have been exposed to water that is naturally and heavily contaminated with As, causing what the World Health Organization has described as the worst mass poisoning in history. Although readily absorbed by humans, most inorganic As (>90%) is rapidly cleared from the blood with a half-life of 1 to 2 h, and 40 to 70% of the As intake is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted within 48 h. Arsenic does not appreciably bioaccumulate, nor does it biomagnify in the food chain. The United States has for some time purchased more As than any other country in the world, but As usage is waning, and further reductions appear likely. Arsenic is used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from computers to fireworks. All feed additives used in US poultry feeds must meet the strict requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (Rockville, MD) before use. Although some public health investigators have identified poultry products as a potentially significant source of total As exposure for Americans, studies consistently demonstrate that <1% of samples tested are above the 0.5 ppm limit established by the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated the possibility that As in poultry litter could pollute ground waters, million of tons of litter have been applied to the land, and no link has been established between litter application and As contamination of ground water. Yet, the fact that <2% of the United States population is involved in

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADR1 gene is a positive regulator of transcription of genes encoding peroxisomal proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Simon; Adam, G.; Rapatz, W; Spevak, W; Ruis, H

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CTA1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding catalase A, the peroxisomal catalase of this yeast, is sensitive to glucose repression. A DNA fragment cloned as a multicopy plasmid suppressing the glucose repression of CTA1 transcription was demonstrated to contain the ADR1 gene. Multiple copies of ADR1 increased catalase A formation not only on 10% glucose, but also on ethanol medium and in the presence of oleic acid, an inducer of peroxisome proliferation. Compared with wi...

  2. ARSENIC SPECIATION IN CARROT EXTRACTS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON THE DETECTION OF MMA(III) AND MMTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two predominant routes of arsenic exposure are dietary ingestion and drinking water consumption. Dietary arsenic, unlike drinking water arsenic, contains a variety of arsenicals with dramatically different toxicities. The list of arsenicals detected in dietary samples conti...

  3. GW4064, an Agonist of Farnesoid X Receptor, Represses CYP3A4 Expression in Human Hepatocytes by Inducing Small Heterodimer Partner Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shu; Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) functions as a regulator of bile acid and lipid homeostasis and is recognized as a promising therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. The biologic function of FXR is mediated in part by a small heterodimer partner (SHP); ligand-activated FXR enhances SHP expression, and SHP in turn represses the activity of multiple transcription factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of FXR activation on expression of the major drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4. The ef...

  4. DOF AFFECTING GERMINATION 2 is a positive regulator of light-mediated seed germination and is repressed by DOF AFFECTING GERMINATION 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Santopolo, Silvia; Boccaccini, Alessandra; Lorrai, Riccardo; Ruta, Veronica; Capauto, Davide; Minutello, Emanuele; Serino, Giovanna; Costantino, Paolo; Vittorioso, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Background The transcription factor DOF AFFECTING GERMINATION1 (DAG1) is a repressor of the light-mediated seed germination process. DAG1 acts downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE 5 (PIL5), the master repressor, and negatively regulates gibberellin biosynthesis by directly repressing the biosynthetic gene AtGA3ox1. The Dof protein DOF AFFECTING GERMINATION (DAG2) shares a high degree of aminoacidic identity with DAG1. While DAG1 inactivation considerably increases the germination c...

  5. Bach2 represses effector programmes to stabilize Treg-mediated immune homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Mousavi, Kambiz; Clever, David; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Bonelli, Michael; Sciume, Giuseppe; Zare, Hossein; Vahedi, Golnaz; Dema, Barbara; Yu, Zhiya; Liu, Hui; Takahashi, Hayato; Rao, Mahadev; Muranski, Pawel; Crompton, Joseph G.; Punkosdy, George; Bedognetti, Davide; Wang, Ena; Hoffmann, Victoria; Rivera, Juan; Marincola, Francesco M.; Nakamura, Atsushi; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; Gattinoni, Luca; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; O’Shea, John J.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Through their functional diversification, distinct lineages of CD4+ T cells play key roles in either driving or constraining immune-mediated pathology. Transcription factors are critical in the generation of cellular diversity, and negative regulators antagonistic to alternate fates often act in conjunction with positive regulators to stabilize lineage commitment1. Genetic polymorphisms within a single locus encoding the transcription factor BACH2 are associated with numerous autoimmune and allergic diseases including asthma2, Crohn’s disease3–4, coeliac disease5, vitiligo6, multiple sclerosis7 and type 1 diabetes8. While these associations point to a shared mechanism underlying susceptibility to diverse immune-mediated diseases, a function for Bach2 in the maintenance of immune homeostasis has not been established. Here, we define Bach2 as a broad regulator of immune activation that stabilizes immunoregulatory capacity while repressing the differentiation programmes of multiple effector lineages in CD4+ T cells. Bach2 was required for efficient formation of regulatory (Treg) cells and consequently for suppression of lethal inflammation in a manner that was Treg cell dependent. Assessment of the genome-wide function of Bach2, however, revealed that it represses genes associated with effector cell differentiation. Consequently, its absence during Treg polarization resulted in inappropriate diversion to effector lineages. In addition, Bach2 constrained full effector differentiation within Th1, Th2 and Th17 cell lineages. These findings identify Bach2 as a key regulator of CD4+ T-cell differentiation that prevents inflammatory disease by controlling the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:23728300

  6. Arsenic contamination and arsenicosis in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenicosis is a serious environmental chemical disease in China mainly caused by drinking water from pump wells contaminated by high levels of arsenic. Chronic exposure of humans to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, blackfoot disease, and high risk of cancers. Lead by the Ministry of Health of China, we carried out a research about arsenicosis in China recently. Areas contaminated with arsenic from drinking water are determined by 10% pump well water sample method while areas from burning coal are determined by existing data. Two epidemic areas of Shanxi Province and Inner Mongolia are investigated for the distribution of pump wells containing high arsenic. Well water in all the investigated villages of Shanxi Province showed polluted by high arsenic, and the average rate of unsafe pump well water is 52%. In Inner Mongolia, the high percentage of pump wells containing elevated arsenic is found only in a few villages. The average rate of unsafe pump well water is 11%. From our research, we find that new endemic areas are continuously emerging in China. Up to now, epidemic areas of arsenicosis mainly involve eight provinces and 37 counties in China. In the affected areas, the discovery of wells and coal with high levels of arsenic is continuing sporadically, and a similar scattered distribution pattern of patients is also being observed

  7. [Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Bai, Yao-hui; Liang, Jin-song; Huo, Yang; Wang, Ming-xing; Yuan, Lin-ijang

    2016-02-15

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3+ could be oxidized to As5+ by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5+ could be reduced to As3+ by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain (Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2+, As3+ or As5+ The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3+ in the existing system and the As3+ generated by arsenic reductase into As. PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant. PMID:27363151

  8. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  9. Involvement of a Putative Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP)-Like Binding Sequence and a CRP-Like Protein in Glucose-Mediated Catabolite Repression of thn Genes in Rhodococcus sp. Strain TFB

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2012-01-01

    Glucose catabolite repression of tetralin catabolic genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB was shown to be exerted by a protein homologous to transcriptional regulators of the cyclic AMP receptor (CRP)-FNR family. The protein was detected bound to putative CRP-like boxes localized at the promoters of the thnA1 and thnS genes.

  10. Involvement of a putative cyclic amp receptor protein (CRP)-like binding sequence and a CRP-like protein in glucose-mediated catabolite repression of thn genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2012-08-01

    Glucose catabolite repression of tetralin catabolic genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB was shown to be exerted by a protein homologous to transcriptional regulators of the cyclic AMP receptor (CRP)-FNR family. The protein was detected bound to putative CRP-like boxes localized at the promoters of the thnA1 and thnS genes. PMID:22636000

  11. Sex-specific patterns and deregulation of endocrine pathways in the gene expression profiles of Bangladeshi adults exposed to arsenic contaminated drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana [New York University School of Medicine, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Hall, Megan [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York (United States); Kluz, Thomas [New York University School of Medicine, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Gamble, Mary V., E-mail: mvg7@columbia.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York (United States); Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water occurs globally and is associated with numerous diseases including skin, lung and bladder cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research indicates that arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the nature of gene expression changes among males and females exposed to arsenic contaminated water in Bangladesh at high and low doses. Twenty-nine (55% male) Bangladeshi adults with water arsenic exposure ranging from 50 to 1000 μg/L were selected from the Folic Acid Creatinine Trial. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for gene expression profiling using Affymetrix 1.0 ST arrays. Differentially expressed genes were assessed between high and low exposure groups for males and females separately and findings were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 534 and 645 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of males and females, respectively, when high and low water arsenic exposure groups were compared. Only 43 genes overlapped between the two sexes, with 29 changing in opposite directions. Despite the difference in gene sets both males and females exhibited common biological changes including deregulation of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, deregulation of genes downstream of Sp1 (specificity protein 1) transcription factor, and prediction of estrogen receptor alpha as a key hub in cardiovascular networks. Arsenic-exposed adults exhibit sex-specific gene expression profiles that implicate involvement of the endocrine system. Due to arsenic's possible role as an endocrine disruptor, exposure thresholds for arsenic may require different parameters for males and females. - Highlights: • Males and females exhibit unique gene expression changes in response to arsenic. • Only 23 genes are common among the differentially expressed genes for the sexes. • Male and female gene lists exhibit common

  12. Sex-specific patterns and deregulation of endocrine pathways in the gene expression profiles of Bangladeshi adults exposed to arsenic contaminated drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water occurs globally and is associated with numerous diseases including skin, lung and bladder cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research indicates that arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the nature of gene expression changes among males and females exposed to arsenic contaminated water in Bangladesh at high and low doses. Twenty-nine (55% male) Bangladeshi adults with water arsenic exposure ranging from 50 to 1000 μg/L were selected from the Folic Acid Creatinine Trial. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for gene expression profiling using Affymetrix 1.0 ST arrays. Differentially expressed genes were assessed between high and low exposure groups for males and females separately and findings were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 534 and 645 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of males and females, respectively, when high and low water arsenic exposure groups were compared. Only 43 genes overlapped between the two sexes, with 29 changing in opposite directions. Despite the difference in gene sets both males and females exhibited common biological changes including deregulation of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, deregulation of genes downstream of Sp1 (specificity protein 1) transcription factor, and prediction of estrogen receptor alpha as a key hub in cardiovascular networks. Arsenic-exposed adults exhibit sex-specific gene expression profiles that implicate involvement of the endocrine system. Due to arsenic's possible role as an endocrine disruptor, exposure thresholds for arsenic may require different parameters for males and females. - Highlights: • Males and females exhibit unique gene expression changes in response to arsenic. • Only 23 genes are common among the differentially expressed genes for the sexes. • Male and female gene lists exhibit common

  13. Arsenic adsorption of lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash on arsenic-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuthiphun, L.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic adsorption efficiency of soil covering materials (lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash on arsenic-contaminated soil obtained from Ronpiboon District, Nakhon Sri Thammarat Province tosolve arsenic air pollution problem was investigated using batch experiments. The four types of the aforementioned soil covering materials were examined to determine their arsenic adsorption efficiency, equilibriumtime as well as adsorption isotherms.The results revealed that among soil covering materials mixed with arsenic-contaminated soil at 10% w/w, the efficiency of arsenic adsorption of fly ash, lateritic soil, lime and limestone powder were 84, 60,38 and 1% respectively. The equilibrium time for lateritic soil at pH 4 was achieved within 4 hrs, whereas pH 7 and 12, the equilibrium time was 6 hrs. For fly ash, 2 hrs were required to reach the equilibrium at pH 12, while the equilibrium time was attained within 6 hrs at pH 4 and 7. Furthermore, lateritic soil possessedhigh arsenic adsorption efficiency at pH 7 and 4 and best fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The fly ash showing high arsenic adsorption efficiency at pH 12 and 7 fit the Freundlich isotherm at pH 12 and Langmuirisotherm at pH 7.This indicated that lateritic soil was suitable for arsenic adsorption at low pH, whilst at high pH,arsenic was well adsorbed by fly ash. The Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm could be used to determine quantities of soil covering materials for arsenic adsorption to prevent arsenic air pollution from arseniccontaminated soils.

  14. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Bardin, Allison J.; Perdigoto, Carolina N.; Southall, Tony D.; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhan...

  15. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF BONE MARROW THROMBOPOIETIN BY PLATELET PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Bryan; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Platelet production is regulated primarily by the cytokine thrombopoietin (TPO). Although TPO is expressed in several different tissues, only in the bone marrow has the level of expression been reported to increase in response to reduced numbers of platelets. In these studies we demonstrate that platelet granule proteins are able to transcriptionally repress TPO mRNA expression in a marrow stromal cell line as well as in primary bone marrow stromal cell cultures. Like TPO mRNA, secretion of T...

  16. A novel CRE recombinase assay for quantification of GAL10-non coding RNA suppression on transcriptional leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharioudakis, Ioannis; Tzamarias, Dimitris

    2016-05-13

    Eukaryotic promoters are tightly regulated and often securely repressed. However, recent reports indicated that transcripts originating from the strictly regulated GAL1-10 promoter can be detected by single-yeast cell imaging under repressive conditions. Such leaky, noisy transcription events were suppressed by a long non-coding RNA (GAL10-ncRNA) transcribed within the GAL1-10 locus. It was further suggested that GAL10-ncRNA repression of GAL1-10 promoter leakage tunes the bimodal expression pattern of the GAL network. Independent evidence has indicated that GAL10-ncRNA transcription establishes a repressive chromatin structure through the Set2 histone methyl-transferase and the Rpd3s histone deacetylase complex. In this report we set up a novel, simple genetic Cre recombinase assay in order to readily quantify transcriptional leakage from tightly repressed promoters. By applying this method we demonstrate that GAL10-ncRNA, Set2p and Rpd3p all suppress leaky GAL1-10 driven transcription. However, GAL10-ncRNA repression is not mediated by Set2p or Rpd3p. Moreover, as opposed to GAL10-ncRNA transcription, Set2 and Rpd3 do not influence the bimodal expression of GAL genes, despite their effect on GAL1-10 promoter leakage. We suggest that GAL10-ncRNA tunes the expression of GAL genes by additional mechanisms besides suppressing leaky transcription from the GAL1-10 promoter. PMID:27073161

  17. Current Status and Prevention Strategy for Coal-arsenic Poisoning in Guizhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dasheng; An, Dong; Zhou, Yunsu; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic exposure from burning coal with high arsenic contents occurs in southwest Guizhou, China. Coal in this region contains extremely high concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Arsenic exposure from coal-burning is much higher than exposure from arsenic-contaminated water in other areas of China. The current status and prevention strategies for arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic coal in southwest Guizhou, China, is reported here. Over 3,000 arsenic-intoxicated patients were diagnos...

  18. Prdm12 specifies V1 interneurons through cross-repressive interactions with Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thélie, Aurore; Desiderio, Simon; Hanotel, Julie; Quigley, Ian; Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Borromeo, Mark D; Kricha, Sadia; Lahaye, François; Croce, Jenifer; Cerda-Moya, Gustavo; Ordoño Fernandez, Jesús; Bolle, Barbara; Lewis, Katharine E; Sander, Maike; Pierani, Alessandra; Schubert, Michael; Johnson, Jane E; Kintner, Christopher R; Pieler, Tomas; Van Lint, Carine; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Bellefroid, Eric J; Van Campenhout, Claude

    2015-10-01

    V1 interneurons are inhibitory neurons that play an essential role in vertebrate locomotion. The molecular mechanisms underlying their genesis remain, however, largely undefined. Here, we show that the transcription factor Prdm12 is selectively expressed in p1 progenitors of the hindbrain and spinal cord in the frog embryo, and that a similar restricted expression profile is observed in the nerve cord of other vertebrates as well as of the cephalochordate amphioxus. Using frog, chick and mice, we analyzed the regulation of Prdm12 and found that its expression in the caudal neural tube is dependent on retinoic acid and Pax6, and that it is restricted to p1 progenitors, due to the repressive action of Dbx1 and Nkx6-1/2 expressed in the adjacent p0 and p2 domains. Functional studies in the frog, including genome-wide identification of its targets by RNA-seq and ChIP-Seq, reveal that vertebrate Prdm12 proteins act as a general determinant of V1 cell fate, at least in part, by directly repressing Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes. This probably occurs by recruiting the methyltransferase G9a, an activity that is not displayed by the amphioxus Prdm12 protein. Together, these findings indicate that Prdm12 promotes V1 interneurons through cross-repressive interactions with Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes, and suggest that this function might have only been acquired after the split of the vertebrate and cephalochordate lineages. PMID:26443638

  19. Octamerization of lambda CI repressor is needed for effective repression of P(RM) and efficient switching from lysogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, I B; Perkins, A J; Tsemitsidis, D; Egan, J B

    2001-11-15

    The CI repressor of bacteriophage lambda is a model for the role of cooperativity in the efficient functioning of genetic switches. Pairs of CI dimers interact to cooperatively occupy adjacent operator sites at O(R) and at O(L). These CI tetramers repress the lytic promoters and activate transcription of the cI gene from P(RM). CI is also able to octamerize, forming a large DNA loop between O(R) and O(L), but the physiological role of this is unclear. Another puzzle is that, although a dimer of CI is able to repress P(RM) by binding to the third operator at O(R), O(R)3, this binding seems too weak to affect CI production in the lysogenic state. Here we show that repression of P(RM) at lysogenic CI concentrations is absolutely dependent on O(L), in this case 3.8 kb away. A mutant defective in this CI negative autoregulation forms a lysogen with elevated CI levels that cannot efficiently switch from lysogeny to lytic development. Our results invalidate previous evidence that Cro binding to O(R)3 is important in prophage induction. We propose the octameric CI:O(R)-O(L) complex increases the affinity of CI for O(R)3 by allowing a CI tetramer to link O(R)3 and the third operator at O(L), O(L)3. PMID:11711436

  20. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  1. Environmental arsenic exposure and sputum metalloproteinase concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Josyula, Arun B.; Poplin, Gerald S.; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; McClellen, Hannah E.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Stürup, Stefan; Clark Lantz, R.; Jefferey L. Burgess

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers of exposure & early effects: field studiesBiomarker: arsenic, creatinin, MMP levelsExposure/effect represented: arsenicStudy design: cross-sectionalStudy size: 73 subjectsAnalytical technique: ELISA, HPLCTissue/biological material/sample size: urine samplesRelationship with exposure or effect of interest (including dose-response): inorganic arsenic positively correlated with logMMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in sputum (Pearson's r Ό 0:351, P Ό 0:009) and negatively correlated with the log of s...

  2. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 μg=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 μg=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100

  3. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 mu g=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 mu g=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100 - 500 mu g=L) in real Bangladesh tube well water

  4. Arsenic in rice: A cause for concern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojsak, Iva; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri;

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic intake is likely to affect long-term health. High concentrations are found in some rice-based foods and drinks widely used in infants and young children. In order to reduce exposure we recommend avoidance of rice drinks for infants and young children. For all rice products, strict...... regulation should be enforced regarding arsenic content. Moreover, infants and young children should consume a balanced diet including a variety of grains as carbohydrate sources. While rice protein based infant formulas are an option for infants with cows' milk protein allergy, the inorganic arsenic content...

  5. Arsenic(III) Immobilization on Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Malay Chaudhuri; Mohammed Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A number of large aquifers in various parts of the world have been identified with contamination by arsenic. Long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer of the skin, lungs, urinary bladder and kidney, as well as skin pigmentation and hyperkeratosis. Arsenic occurs in groundwater in two valence states, as trivalent arsenite [As(III)] and pentavalent arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is more toxic and more difficult to remove from water by adsorption on activated alumina. In this stud...

  6. Reduced specificity of negative autobiographical memories in repressive coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraerts, Elke; Dritschel, Barbara; Kreplin, Ute; Miyagawa, Liv; Waddington, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The current study examined memory specificity of autobiographical memories in individuals with and without a repressive coping style. It seems conceivable that reduced memory specificity may be a way to reduce accessibility of negative experiences, one of the hallmark features of a repressive coping style. It was therefore hypothesized that repressors would show reduced specificity when retrieving negative memories. In order to study memory specificity, participants (N = 103) performed the autobiographical memory test. Results showed that individuals with a repressive coping style were significantly less specific in retrieving negative experiences, relative to control groups of low anxious, high anxious, and defensive high anxious individuals. This result was restricted to negative memory retrieval, as participants did not differ in memory specificity for positive experiences. These results show that repressors retrieve negative autobiographical memories in an overgeneral way, possibly in order to avoid negative affect. PMID:23200428

  7. Transcript analysis of nrrF, a Fur repressed sRNA of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like most microorganisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae alters gene expression in response to iron availability. The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been shown to be involved in controlling this response, but the extent of this involvement remains unknown. It is known that in addition to working directly to...

  8. The TR2 and TR4 orphan nuclear receptors repress Gata1 transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Osamu; Shen, Yannan; Liu, Qinghui; Campbell, Andrew D.; Kuroha, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Engel, James Douglas

    2007-01-01

    When the orphan nuclear receptors TR2 and TR4, the DNA-binding subunits of the DRED repressor complex, are forcibly expressed in erythroid cells of transgenic mice, embryos exhibit a transient mid-gestational anemia as a consequence of a reduction in the number of primitive erythroid cells. GATA-1 mRNA is specifically diminished in the erythroid cells of these TR2/TR4 transgenic embryos as it is in human CD34+ progenitor cells transfected with forcibly expressed TR2/TR4. In contrast, in loss-...

  9. Multiple Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Transcription Factors Repress Premature Seedling Photomorphogenesis in Darkness

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important contributing factor to the success of terrestrial flowering plants in colonizing the land was the evolution of a developmental strategy, termed skotomorphogenesis, whereby postgerminative seedlings emerging from buried seed grow vigorously upward in the subterranean darkness toward the ...

  10. FOXP3 Regulates Sensitivity of Cancer Cells to Irradiation by Transcriptional Repression of BRCA1

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiquan; Katoh, Hiroto; Wang, Lizhong; Yu, Xiaochun; Du, Zhanwen; Yan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    FOXP3 is an X-linked tumor suppressor gene and a master regulator in T regulatory cell function. This gene has been found to be mutated frequently in breast and prostate cancers and to inhibit tumor cell growth, but its functional significance in DNA repair has not been studied. We found that FOXP3 silencing stimulates homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair and also repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage. Expression profiling and chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ...

  11. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Promotes Transcriptional Repression of Integrated Retroviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, Murilo T. D.; Reyes, Daniel; Valdes, Luis; Saheba, Adarsh; Urias, Eduardo; Mendoza, Crystal; Fregoso, Oliver I.; de Llano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) is a cellular enzyme with a fundamental role in DNA repair and the regulation of chromatin structure, processes involved in the cellular response to retroviral DNA integration. However, the function of PARP-1 in retroviral DNA integration is controversial, probably due to the functional redundancy of the PARP family in mammalian cells. We evaluated the function of PARP-1 in retroviral infection using the chicken B lymphoblastoid cell line DT40. These cel...

  12. Functionality of unliganded VDR in breast cancer cells: repressive action on CYP24 basal transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Vaishnav, Avani; McCormick, Michael; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Chatterjee, Bandana; Mehta, Rajendra G.; Peng, Xinjian

    2010-01-01

    It is well-established that CYP24, an immediate target gene of VDR is upregulated by VDR ligands. This study is focused on the functional role of unliganded VDR by investigating the correlation between the expression of VDR protein and basal mRNA levels of CYP24 in breast cancer cell lines. Analyses of multiple breast cancer cell lines demonstrated an inverse correlation between VDR protein expression and CYP24 mRNA expression levels; while in the presence of ligand, VDR protein level was pos...

  13. Cooperative activation of transcription by bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 can occur over a large distance.

    OpenAIRE

    Thierry, F; Dostatni, N; Arnos, F; Yaniv, M

    1990-01-01

    The viral transcriptional factors encoded by the E2 open reading frame bind to the specific DNA sequence elements ACCGNNNNCGGT, allowing activation or repression of transcription. We have analyzed bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivation using recombinant genes containing E2-binding sites inserted at either 3' or 5' positions relative to the heterologous transcriptional initiation site of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. In these hybrid plasmids, strong transactivation r...

  14. The JNKs differentially regulate RNA polymerase III transcription by coordinately modulating the expression of all TFIIIB subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong and, Shuping; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III-dependent transcription is subject to stringent regulation by tumor suppressors and oncogenic proteins and enhanced RNA pol III transcription is essential for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Since the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) display both oncogenic and tumor suppressor properties, the roles of these proteins in regulating RNA pol III transcription were examined. In both mouse and human cells, loss or reduction in JNK1 expression represses RNA pol III...

  15. [Advance on oxidative stress mechanism of arsenic toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; An, Yan

    2009-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic is one of proven human carcinogens, which there are so far no sound laboratory-based evidences and there are very few reports in the literature regarding arsenic carcinogenic effects in in vivo animal experiment. Because of this lack of adequate evidences, the mechanism for understanding arsenic toxicology remains vague. Recently, many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, oxidative stress is one of the stronger theories of arsenic action modes which have a substantial mass of supporting data. Further more, many researchers have pointed out that induction of oxidative stress by methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics plays an important role in the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenics. The role of oxidative stress induced by arsenic in arsenic toxicology was reviewed. PMID:19877531

  16. Global Atmospheric Transport and Source-Receptor Relationships for Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Ka-Ming; Wu, Shiliang; Li, Xueling; Jaffe, Daniel A; Perry, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic and many of its compounds are toxic pollutants in the global environment. They can be transported long distances in the atmosphere before depositing to the surface, but the global source-receptor relationships between various regions have not yet been assessed. We develop the first global model for atmospheric arsenic to better understand and quantify its intercontinental transport. Our model reproduces the observed arsenic concentrations in surface air over various sites around the world. Arsenic emissions from Asia and South America are found to be the dominant sources for atmospheric arsenic in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively. Asian emissions are found to contribute 39% and 38% of the total arsenic deposition over the Arctic and Northern America, respectively. Another 14% of the arsenic deposition to the Arctic region is attributed to European emissions. Our results indicate that the reduction of anthropogenic arsenic emissions in Asia and South America can significantly reduce arsenic pollution not only locally but also globally. PMID:26906891

  17. Mathematical model insights into arsenic detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijhout H Frederik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic in drinking water, a major health hazard to millions of people in South and East Asia and in other parts of the world, is ingested primarily as trivalent inorganic arsenic (iAs, which then undergoes hepatic methylation to methylarsonic acid (MMAs and a second methylation to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs. Although MMAs and DMAs are also known to be toxic, DMAs is more easily excreted in the urine and therefore methylation has generally been considered a detoxification pathway. A collaborative modeling project between epidemiologists, biologists, and mathematicians has the purpose of explaining existing data on methylation in human studies in Bangladesh and also testing, by mathematical modeling, effects of nutritional supplements that could increase As methylation. Methods We develop a whole body mathematical model of arsenic metabolism including arsenic absorption, storage, methylation, and excretion. The parameters for arsenic methylation in the liver were taken from the biochemical literature. The transport parameters between compartments are largely unknown, so we adjust them so that the model accurately predicts the urine excretion rates of time for the iAs, MMAs, and DMAs in single dose experiments on human subjects. Results We test the model by showing that, with no changes in parameters, it predicts accurately the time courses of urinary excretion in mutiple dose experiments conducted on human subjects. Our main purpose is to use the model to study and interpret the data on the effects of folate supplementation on arsenic methylation and excretion in clinical trials in Bangladesh. Folate supplementation of folate-deficient individuals resulted in a 14% decrease in arsenicals in the blood. This is confirmed by the model and the model predicts that arsenicals in the liver will decrease by 19% and arsenicals in other body stores by 26% in these same individuals. In addition, the model predicts that arsenic

  18. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 μM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  19. ICP0 antagonizes Stat 1-dependent repression of herpes simplex virus: implications for the regulation of viral latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balliet John W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is encoded within the HSV-1 latency-associated locus. When ICP0 is not synthesized, the HSV-1 genome is acutely susceptible to cellular repression. Reciprocally, when ICP0 is synthesized, viral replication is efficiently initiated from virions or latent HSV-1 genomes. The current study was initiated to determine if ICP0's putative role as a viral interferon (IFN antagonist may be relevant to the process by which ICP0 influences the balance between productive replication versus cellular repression of HSV-1. Results Wild-type (ICP0+ strains of HSV-1 produced lethal infections in scid or rag2-/- mice. The replication of ICP0- null viruses was rapidly repressed by the innate host response of scid or rag2-/- mice, and the infected animals remained healthy for months. In contrast, rag2-/- mice that lacked the IFN-α/β receptor (rag2-/- ifnar-/- or Stat 1 (rag2-/- stat1-/- failed to repress ICP0- viral replication, resulting in uncontrolled viral spread and death. Thus, the replication of ICP0- viruses is potently repressed in vivo by an innate immune response that is dependent on the IFN-α/β receptor and the downstream transcription factor, Stat 1. Conclusion ICP0's function as a viral IFN antagonist is necessary in vivo to prevent an innate, Stat 1-dependent host response from rapidly repressing productive HSV-1 replication. This antagonistic relationship between ICP0 and the host IFN response may be relevant in regulating whether the HSV-1 genome is expressed, or silenced, in virus-infected cells in vivo. These results may also be clinically relevant. IFN-sensitive ICP0- viruses are avirulent, establish long-term latent infections, and induce an adaptive immune response that is highly protective against lethal challenge with HSV-1. Therefore, ICP0- viruses appear to possess the desired safety and efficacy profile of a live vaccine against

  20. Analysis of the upstream activating sequence and site of carbon and nitrogen source repression in the promoter of an early-induced sporulation gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Frisby, D; Zuber, P

    1991-01-01

    The transcription from the spoVG promoter of Bacillus subtilis is induced at the start of the stationary phase of growth and is dependent on the expression of the spoOA, spoOB, and spoOH genes. It is repressed in cells grown in the presence of excess glucose and glutamine and is under the negative control of the abrB gene. The spoOA and spoOB gene products function to suppress the negative control exerted by abrB. Transcription initiation requires the form of RNA polymerase holoenzyme that co...

  1. Comparative genomic analyses identify common molecular pathways modulated upon exposure to low doses of arsenic and cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Rebecca C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the toxic metals arsenic and cadmium is associated with detrimental health effects including cancers of various organs. While arsenic and cadmium are well known to cause adverse health effects at high doses, the molecular impact resulting from exposure to environmentally relevant doses of these metals remains largely unexplored. Results In this study, we examined the effects of in vitro exposure to either arsenic or cadmium in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells using genomics and systems level pathway mapping approaches. A total of 167 genes with differential expression were identified following exposure to either metal with surprisingly no overlap between the two. Real-time PCR was used to confirm target gene expression changes. The gene sets were overlaid onto protein-protein interaction maps to identify metal-induced transcriptional networks. Interestingly, both metal-induced networks were significantly enriched for proteins involved in common biological processes such as tumorigenesis, inflammation, and cell signaling. These findings were further supported by gene set enrichment analysis. Conclusions This study is the first to compare the transcriptional responses induced by low dose exposure to cadmium and arsenic in human lymphoblastoid cells. These results highlight that even at low levels of exposure both metals can dramatically influence the expression of important cellular pathways.

  2. Targeted regulation of imprinted genes by synthetic zinc-finger transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvenot, Y; Ginjala, V; Zhang, L; Liu, P-Q; Oshimura, M; Feinberg, A P; Wolffe, A P; Ohlsson, Rolf; Gregory, P D

    2003-03-01

    Epigenetic control of transcription is essential for mammalian development and its deregulation causes human disease. For example, loss of proper imprinting control at the IGF2-H19 domain is a hallmark of cancer and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, with no targeted therapeutic approaches available. To address this deficiency, we engineered zinc-finger transcription proteins (ZFPs) that specifically activate or repress the IGF2 and H19 genes in a domain-dependent manner. Importantly, we used these ZFPs successfully to reactivate the transcriptionally silent IGF2 and H19 alleles, thus overriding the natural mechanism of imprinting and validating an entirely novel avenue for 'transcription therapy' of human disease. PMID:12621455

  3. Roles of histones and nucleosomes in gene transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the latest research developments in the field of eukaryotic gene regulation by the structural alterations of chromatin and nucleosomes. The following issues are briefly addressed: (ⅰ) nucleosome and histone modifications by both the ATP-dependent remodel- ing com-plexes and the histone acetyltransferases and their roles in gene activation; (ⅱ) competitive binding of histones and transcription factors on gene promoters, and transcription repression by nucleosomes; and (ⅲ) influences of linker histone H1 on gene regulation. Meanwhile, the significance and impact of these new research progresses, as well as issues worthwhile for further study are commented.

  4. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 10 (COP10 Contributes to Floral Repression under Non-Inductive Short Days in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Young Kang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS genes act in repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness, and recent reports revealed that some of these genes, such as COP1 and DET1, also have important roles in controlling flowering time and circadian rhythm. The COP/DET/FUS protein COP10 interacts with DET1 and DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1 to form a CDD complex and represses photomorphogenesis in darkness. The cop10-4 mutants flower normally in inductive long days (LD but early in non-inductive short days (SD compared with wild type (WT; however, the role of COP10 remains unknown. Here, we investigate the role of COP10 in SD-dependent floral repression. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that in SD, expression of the LD-dependent floral inducers GI, FKF1, and FT significantly increased in cop10-4 mutants, compared with WT. This suggests that COP10 mainly regulates FT expression in a CO-independent manner. We also show that COP10 interacts with GI in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that COP10 could also affect GI function at the posttranslational level. Moreover, FLC expression was repressed drastically in cop10-4 mutants and COP10 interacts with MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 4 (MSI4/FVE (MSI4/FVE, which epigenetically inhibits FLC expression. These data suggest that COP10 contributes to delaying flowering in the photoperiod and autonomous pathways by downregulating FT expression under SD.

  5. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  6. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  7. Arsenic stress after the Proterozoic glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Arvestål, Emma; Callac, Nolwenn; El Albani, Abderrazak; Kilias, Stephanos; Argyraki, Ariadne; Jakobsson, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Protection against arsenic damage in organisms positioned deep in the tree of life points to early evolutionary sensitization. Here, marine sedimentary records reveal a Proterozoic arsenic concentration patterned to glacial-interglacial ages. The low glacial and high interglacial sedimentary arsenic concentrations, suggest deteriorating habitable marine conditions may have coincided with atmospheric oxygen decline after ~2.1 billion years ago. A similar intensification of near continental margin sedimentary arsenic levels after the Cryogenian glaciations is also associated with amplified continental weathering. However, interpreted atmospheric oxygen increase at this time, suggests that the marine biosphere had widely adapted to the reorganization of global marine elemental cycles by glaciations. Such a glacially induced biogeochemical bridge would have produced physiologically robust communities that enabled increased oxygenation of the ocean-atmosphere system and the radiation of the complex Ediacaran-Cambrian life.

  8. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  9. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY SOFTENING AND COAGULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water regulations for arsenic (As) and disinfection by-product precursor materials (measured as TOC) are becoming increasingly stringent. Among the modifications to conventional treatment that can improve removal of As and TOC, precipitative softening and coagulation are...

  11. Speciation of arsenic in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are presented in this report for the determination of inorganic species of arsenic. For both methods, the parameters influencing the separations have been investigated using radiotracers. Following optimization of the methods; the applicability was tested by determining As(III) and As(V) in real water samples. The detection limit of these arsenic species in both fresh and sea water was about 0.02 μg/L. (author). 2 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Arsenic Induced Decreases in the Vascular Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Allison M.; Lantz, R. Clark; Rodgers, Laurel S.; Sollome, James J.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.; Andrew, Angeline S; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of arsenic is associated with increased incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the role of arsenic in early events in vascular pathology, C57BL/6 mice ingested drinking water with or without 50 ppb sodium arsenite (AsIII) for four, five or eight weeks. At five and eight weeks, RNA from the lungs of control and AsIII exposed animals was processed for microarray. Sixty-five genes were significantly and differentially expressed. Differential expres...

  13. Arsenic biotransformation and volatilization in transgenic rice

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiang-yan; Qin, Jie; Wang, Li-Hong; Duan, Gui-Lan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Wu, Hui-Lan; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Ling, Hong-Qing; Rosen, Barry P.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-01-01

    Biotransformation of arsenic includes oxidation, reduction, methylation and conversion to more complex organic arsenicals. Members of the class of arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethyltransferase enzymes catalyze As(III) methylation to a variety of mono-, di- and trimethylated species, some of which are less toxic than As(III) itself. However, no methyltransferase gene has been identified in plants.Here, an arsM gene from the soil bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was expressed in Japonica r...

  14. Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykknes, Annette; Kvittingen, Lise

    2003-05-01

    This article presents parts of the history of the element arsenic in order to illustrate processes behind development of knowledge in chemistry. The particular aspects presented here are the use of arsenic as a stimulant by Styrian peasants, in Fowler's solution, in drugs of the 19th century (e.g., salvarsan), and in current medical treatment, all of which challenge the myth of this element as exclusively poisonous.

  15. Arsenic accumulation in some higher fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Stijve, T.; Vellinga, Else C.; Herrmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    The high arsenic concentrations reported in literature for Laccaria amethystina were amply confirmed. In addition, it was demonstrated that Laccaria fraterna also accumulates the element, whereas in other species of Laccaria the phenomenon was far less outspoken. Few other basidiomycetes proved to have an affinity for the toxic element. The arsenic concentrations in the principal edible mushrooms of commerce were found to be very low, i.e. on the average 0.5 mg/kg on dry matter. Among the asc...

  16. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes

    OpenAIRE

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displac...

  17. HISTONE H3 LYSINE 9 METHYLTRANSFERASE G9a IS A TRANSCRIPTIONAL COACTIVATOR FOR NUCLEAR RECEPTORS*

    OpenAIRE

    David Y. Lee; Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Kuo, Min-Hao; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of Lys-9 of histone H3 has been associated with repression of transcription. G9a is a histone H3 Lys-9 methyltransferase localized in euchromatin and acts as a corepressor for specific transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that G9a also functions as a coactivator for nuclear receptors, cooperating synergistically with nuclear receptor coactivators GRIP1, CARM1, and p300 in transient transfection assays. This synergy depends strongly on the arginine-specific protein methyltran...

  18. Alk Is a Transcriptional Target of LMO4 and ERα that Promotes Cocaine Sensitization and Reward

    OpenAIRE

    Lasek, Amy W.; Gesch, Julie; Giorgetti, Francesco; Kharazia, Viktor; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the mouse LIM-domain only 4 (Lmo4) gene, which encodes a protein containing two zinc-finger LIM domains that interact with various DNA-binding transcription factors, attenuates behavioral sensitivity to repeated cocaine administration. Here we show that transcription of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is repressed by LMO4 in the striatum and that Alk promotes the development of cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference, a measure of cocaine reward. Sin...

  19. Transcripts of Vp-1 homeologues are misspliced in modern wheat and ancestral species

    OpenAIRE

    McKibbin, Rowan S.; Wilkinson, Mark D; Bailey, Paul C.; Flintham, John E.; Andrew, Lucy M.; Lazzeri, Paul A.; Gale, Mike D.; Lenton, John R.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) Viviparous 1 (Vp1) transcription factor has been shown previously to be a major regulator of seed development, simultaneously activating embryo maturation and repressing germination. Hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) caryopses are characterized by relatively weak embryo dormancy and are susceptible to preharvest sprouting (PHS), a phenomenon that is phenotypically similar to the maize vp1 mutation. Analysis of Vp-1 transcript structure in wheat embryos during grai...

  20. Repression of Fgf signaling by sprouty1-2 regulates cortical patterning in two distinct regions and times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Andrea; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L R

    2010-03-17

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how signaling pathways establish a transcription factor code that controls cell proliferation, regional fate and cell fate. Morphogenesis of the rostral telencephalon is controlled in part by Fgf signaling from the rostral patterning center. How Fgf signaling is regulated in the telencephalon is critical for understanding cerebral cortex formation. Here we show that mouse Sprouty1 and Sprouty2 (Spry1-2), which encode negative feedback regulators of Fgf signaling, are affecting cortical proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of genes regulating progenitor identity in the ventricular zone. In addition, Spry2 has a later function in regulating the MAPK pathway, proliferation, and gene expression in the cortex at mid-neurogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that Coup-TFI, a transcription factor that promotes caudal fate, does so through repressing Fgf signaling, in part by promoting Spry expression. PMID:20237272

  1. Repression of Fgf-Signaling by Sprouty1-2 Regulates Cortical Patterning in Two Distinct Regions and Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Andrea; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how signaling pathways establish a transcription factor code that controls cell proliferation, regional fate and cell fate. Morphogenesis of the rostral telencephalon is controlled in part by Fgf-signaling from the rostral patterning center (RPC). How Fgf signaling is regulated in the telencephalon is critical for understanding cerebral cortex formation. Here we show that mouse Sprouty1 and Sprouty2 (Spry1-2), which encode negative feedback regulators of Fgf signaling, are affecting cortical proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of genes regulating progenitor identity in the ventricular zone. In addition, Spry2 has a later function in regulating the MAPK pathway, proliferation and gene expression in the cortex at mid-neurogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that Coup-TFI, a transcription factor that promotes caudal fate, does so through repressing Fgf-signaling, in part by promoting Spry expression. PMID:20237272

  2. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large

  3. Aquatic arsenic: phytoremediation using floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-04-01

    Phytoremediation, a plant based green technology, has received increasing attention after the discovery of hyperaccumulating plants which are able to accumulate, translocate, and concentrate high amount of certain toxic elements in their above-ground/harvestable parts. Phytoremediation includes several processes namely, phytoextraction, phytodegradation, rhizofiltration, phytostabilization and phytovolatilization. Both terrestrial and aquatic plants have been tested to remediate contaminated soils and waters, respectively. A number of aquatic plant species have been investigated for the remediation of toxic contaminants such as As, Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, Hg, etc. Arsenic, one of the deadly toxic elements, is widely distributed in the aquatic systems as a result of mineral dissolution from volcanic or sedimentary rocks as well as from the dilution of geothermal waters. In addition, the agricultural and industrial effluent discharges are also considered for arsenic contamination in natural waters. Some aquatic plants have been reported to accumulate high level of arsenic from contaminated water. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), duckweeds (Lemna gibba, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza), water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), water ferns (Azolla caroliniana, Azolla filiculoides, and Azolla pinnata), water cabbage (Pistia stratiotes), hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and watercress (Lepidium sativum) have been studied to investigate their arsenic uptake ability and mechanisms, and to evaluate their potential in phytoremediation technology. It has been suggested that the aquatic macrophytes would be potential for arsenic phytoremediation, and this paper reviews up to date knowledge on arsenic phytoremediation by common aquatic macrophytes. PMID:21435676

  4. Determination of leachable arsenic from glass ampoules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appreciable amounts of different arsenic compounds are used in the manufacture of glass and glass ampoules (injection vials and bottles) used to store drugs. Exposure/intake of arsenic to human beings may result in skin ulceration, injury to mucous membranes, perforation of nasal septum, skin cancer and keratoses, especially of the palms and soles and may cause detrimental effects. Considering the toxicity of arsenic, even if traces of arsenic from such glass containers/ampoules are leached out, it can impart damage to human beings. To check the possibility of leaching of arsenic from glass ampoules, a simple methodology has been developed. Different makes and varieties of glass ampoules filled with de-ionized water were subjected to high pressure and temperature leaching for varying amount of time using autoclave to create extreme conditions for the maximum leaching out of the analyte. Subsequently, the determination of the arsenic contents in leached water using neutron activation analysis is reported in detail with observations. (author)

  5. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  6. A novel arsenic methyltransferase gene of Westerdykella aurantiaca isolated from arsenic contaminated soil: phylogenetic, physiological, and biochemical studies and its role in arsenic bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shikha; Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Meher, Alok Kumar; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-03-01

    Elevated arsenic concentration in the environment and agricultural soil is a serious concern to crop production and human health. Among different detoxification mechanisms, the methylation of arsenic is a widespread phenomenon in nature. A number of microorganisms are able to methylate arsenic, but less is known about the arsenic metabolism in fungi. We identified a novel arsenic methyltransferase (WaarsM) gene from a soil fungus, Westerdykella aurantiaca. WaarsM showed sequence homology with all known arsenic methyltransferases having three conserved SAM binding motifs. The expression of WaarsM enhanced arsenic resistance in E. coli (Δars) and S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) strains by biomethylation and required endogenous reductants, preferably GSH, for methyltransferase activity. The purified WaarsM catalyzes the production of methylated arsenicals from both AsIII and AsV, and also displays AsV reductase activity. It displayed higher methyltransferase activity and lower KM 0.1945 ± 0.021 mM and KM 0.4034 ± 0.078 mM for AsIII and AsV, respectively. S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) cells expressing WaarsM produced 2.2 ppm volatile arsenic and 0.64 ppm DMA(v) with 0.58 ppm volatile arsenicals when exposed to 20 ppm AsV and 2 ppm AsIII, respectively. Arsenic tolerance in rice after co-culture with genetically engineered yeast suggested its potential role in arsenic bioremediation. Thus, characterization of WaarsM provides a potential strategy to reduce arsenic concentration in soil with reduced arsenic accumulation in crops grown in arsenic contaminated areas, and thereby alleviating human health risks. PMID:26776948

  7. Polyvinyl chloride catheters with repressed migration of plasticizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Kašpárková, V.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Larnaca : Polymer Processing Society, 2009, s. 243. [Polymer Processing Society Europe/Africa Regional Meeting. Larnaca (GR), 18.10.2009-21.10.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Polyvinyl chloride * catheter * repressed migration of plasticizers Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Repressive Policy of the Soviet Government During World War II

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin N. Maksimov; Irina V. Lidzhieva

    2014-01-01

    The article features wide range of sources dealing with deportation of a number of Nations in the years of the great Patriotic war. The authors note that the repressive policy of the Soviet state, as well as the reason for the deportation of the peoples in the first half of XX century are rooted in the nature of the totalitarian mode.

  9. Addressing the repressed needs of the Arabic client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, M

    1997-01-01

    In comparison to families in Western society, the traditional Arabic family plays a relatively greater role in providing support for adult progeny. This serves to condition adult offspring to continue to comply with the will and values of the family. Therefore, in exchange for familial support, Arabic individuals learn to repress authentic needs and emotions, and within that process they relinquish the need for self-actualization. Arabic society discourages individualism and opposes self-actualization by means of simultaneous punishment and moralization. Thus, there is a relatively greater development of the social value system (or superego) and comparatively less development of the self (or ego). In comparison to Western society, Arabic individuals continue to experience greater oppression during adulthood. Given these cultural differences, the processes of reliving and activating repressed needs and emotions, which ultimately serves to promote self-actualization, will transform intrapsychic conflicts into interpersonal and social ones. Thus, personal actions typically encouraged during Western psychotherapy are likely to produce significant social oppression. Indeed, promoting awareness of repressed needs and emotions often leads the Arabic client to become more helpless, because such wishes will rarely be socially sanctioned or satisfactorily fulfilled. Therefore, when addressing repressed needs and emotions in psychotherapy, ego strength, cultural identity, and degree of strictness of the client's family of origin must be considered. PMID:9231529

  10. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this...

  11. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this hypothesis by using radioactive 73As labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the binding affinity and capacity of 73As arsenite to calf thymus DNA and Type 2A unfractionated histones, histone H3, H4 and horse spleen ferritin. Arsenicals are known to release redox active Fe from ferritin. At concentrations up to about 1 mM, neither DNA nor any of the three proteins studied, Type II-A histones, histone H3, H4 or ferritin, bound radioactive arsenite in a specific manner. Therefore, it appears highly unlikely that initial in situ binding of trivalent arsenicals, followed by in situ oxidative DNA damage, can account for arsenic's carcinogenicity. This experimental evidence (lack of arsenite binding to DNA, histone Type II-A and histone H3, H4) does not rule out other possible oxidative stress modes of action for arsenic such as (a) diffusion of longer lived oxidative stress molecules, such as H2O2 into the nucleus and ensuing oxidative damage, (b) redox chemistry by unbound arsenicals in the nucleus, or (c) arsenical-induced perturbations in Fe, Cu or other metals which are already known to oxidize DNA in vitro and in vivo

  12. DETERMINATION OF URINARY TRIVALENT ARSENICALS (MMASIII AND DMASIII) IN INDIVIDUALS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO ARSENIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    DETERMINATION OF URINARY TRIVALENT ARSENICALS (MMAsIII and DMAsIII) IN INDIVIDUALS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO ARSENIC. L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo2, W. R. Cullen3, and D.J. Thomas4. 1Toxicology Section, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F., 2Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 3Uni...

  13. Arsenic speciation in Chinese Herbal Medicines and human health implication for inorganic arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice and drinking water are recognized as the dominant sources of arsenic (As) for human intake, while little is known about As accumulation and speciation in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHMs), which have been available for many hundreds of years for the treatment of diseases in both eastern and western cultures. Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in all of CHMs samples. The levels of inorganic arsenic in CHMs from fields and markets or pharmacies ranged from 63 to 550 ng/g with a mean of 208 ng/g and 94 to 8683 ng/g with a mean of 1092 ng/g, respectively. The highest concentration was found in the Chrysanthemum from pharmacies. It indicates that the risk of inorganic As in CHMs to human health is higher in medicines from markets or pharmacies than that collected directly from fields. Some CHMs may make a considerable contribution to the human intake of inorganic arsenic. - Highlights: ► Arsenic speciation was extracted using 1% HNO3 in microwave. ► Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in all of CHMs samples. ► The highest concentration of inorganic arsenic was found in the Chrysanthemum. - Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in all of CHMs samples.

  14. Soil arsenic in Armadale, Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.H.; Lloyd, O.L.; Hubbard, F.H.

    1986-03-01

    As part of an investigation into the high mortality from lung cancer and the high sex ratios of births in Armadale, central Scotland, concentrations of arsenic were measured in soil cores from 48 sites in Armadale and 6 sites in a comparison town. Concentrations in Armadale were substantially higher than those in the comparison town, and many of the highest range of values were in that part of the town where the epidemiological abnormalities of lung cancer and of birth sex ratios were most pronounced. The study indicated that clues to the etiology of high rates of disease in small areas could be sought most profitably if close links were maintained between epidemiological and environmental investigations.

  15. Arsenic induces NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase I by disrupting the Nrf2 x Keap1 x Cul3 complex and recruiting Nrf2 x Maf to the antioxidant response element enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoqing; Chen, Michael G; Lin, Gary X; Ma, Qiang

    2006-08-18

    The ubiquitous toxic metalloid arsenic elicits pleiotropic adverse and adaptive responses in mammalian species. The biological targets of arsenic are largely unknown at present. We analyzed the signaling pathway for induction of detoxification gene NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1) by arsenic. Genetic and biochemical evidence revealed that induction required cap 'n' collar basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nrf2 and the antioxidant response element (ARE) of Nqo1. Arsenic stabilized Nrf2 protein, extending the t(1/2) of Nrf2 from 21 to 200 min by inhibiting the Keap1 x Cul3-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal turnover of Nrf2. Arsenic markedly inhibited the ubiquitination of Nrf2 but did not disrupt the Nrf2 x Keap1 x Cul3 association in the cytoplasm. In the nucleus, arsenic, but not phenolic antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone, dissociated Nrf2 from Keap1 and Cul3 followed by dimerization of Nrf2 with a Maf protein (Maf G/Maf K). Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf2 and Maf associated with the endogenous Nqo1 ARE enhancer constitutively. Arsenic substantially increased the ARE occupancy by Nrf2 and Maf. In addition, Keap1 was shown to be ubiquitinated in the cytoplasm and deubiquitinated in the nucleus in the presence of arsenic without changing the protein level, implicating nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of Keap1. Our data reveal that arsenic activates the Nrf2/Keap1 signaling pathway through a distinct mechanism from that by antioxidants and suggest an "on-switch" model of Nqo1 transcription in which the binding of Nrf2 x Maf to ARE controls both the basal and inducible expression of Nqo1. PMID:16785233

  16. MiR144/451 Expression Is Repressed by RUNX1 During Megakaryopoiesis and Disturbed by RUNX1/ETO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kohrs

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A network of lineage-specific transcription factors and microRNAs tightly regulates differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells along the distinct lineages. Deregulation of this regulatory network contributes to impaired lineage fidelity and leukemogenesis. We found that the hematopoietic master regulator RUNX1 controls the expression of certain microRNAs, of importance during erythroid/megakaryocytic differentiation. In particular, we show that the erythorid miR144/451 cluster is epigenetically repressed by RUNX1 during megakaryopoiesis. Furthermore, the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion protein transcriptionally represses the miR144/451 pre-microRNA. Thus RUNX1/ETO contributes to increased expression of miR451 target genes and interferes with normal gene expression during differentiation. Furthermore, we observed that inhibition of RUNX1/ETO in Kasumi1 cells and in RUNX1/ETO positive primary acute myeloid leukemia patient samples leads to up-regulation of miR144/451. RUNX1 thus emerges as a key regulator of a microRNA network, driving differentiation at the megakaryocytic/erythroid branching point. The network is disturbed by the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion product.

  17. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. PMID:27114303

  18. Arsenic emission during combustion of high arsenic coals from Southwestern Guizhou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of better understanding the distribution of arsenic, 144 coal samples were collected from southwestern Guizhou, and the concentrations of arsenic were determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The content of arsenic varies from 0.3 ppm to 3.2 wt.%. In most coal samples, the arsenic content was lower than 30 ppm, which was close to a representative value of arsenic concentration of coal in China. Arsenic contents in 37 samples, which were from several small coal mines, were more than 30 ppm, among which only 16 samples were more than 100 ppm, and only a few samples contained more than 1000 ppm, which were very restricted and the coal seams were generally unworkable. Combustion of two kinds of high arsenic coal with and without CaO additive was studied in a bench scale drop tube furnace (DTF) to understand the partition and emission of arsenic in the process. The PM was size segregated by low pressure impactor (LPI) into 13 size stages ranging from 9.8 to 0.0281 μm. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) was used to determine the chemical composition of the PM, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the arsenic content. A bimodal mode distribution of the PM was formed during coal combustion; the large mode (coarse particle) was formed at 4.0 μm, and the other mode (fine particles) was at about 0.1 μm. A middle mode was gradually obvious in high temperature for both of the two coal combustions, which may have been derived from coagulation and agglomeration of metal elements vapors. More gaseous arsenic was formed in 50% oxygen content than 20% oxygen content. Arsenic in sulfide is easier to vaporize than as arsenate. Along with the increasing temperature from 1100 oC to 1400 oC, the arsenic concentration in PM1 increased from 0.07 mg/N m3 to 0.25 mg/N m3. With the addition of the calcium based sorbent, the arsenic concentration in

  19. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying;

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  20. Evidence That the Transcriptional Regulators Sin3 and Rpd3, and a Novel Gene (Sds3) with Similar Functions, Are Involved in Transcriptional Silencing in S. Cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Vannier, D; Balderes, D; Shore, D

    1996-01-01

    In a screen for extragenic suppressors of a silencing defective rap1(s) hmrΔA strain, recessive mutations in 21 different genes were found that restored repression to HMR. We describe the characterization of three of these SDS (suppressors of defective silencing) genes. SDS16 and SDS6 are known transcriptional modifiers, SIN3(RPD1/UME4/SDI1/GAM2) and RPD3(SDI2), respectively, while the third is a novel gene, SDS3. SDS3 shares the meiotic functions of SIN3 and RPD3 in that it represses IME2 in...